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Sample records for access chest pain

  1. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability. PMID:25533261

  2. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Having a pain in your chest can be scary. It does not always mean that you are having a heart attack. There can be many other causes, ... embolism Costochondritis - an inflammation of joints in your chest Some of these problems can be serious. Get ...

  3. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pain, including your heart, lungs, esophagus, muscles, ribs, tendons, or nerves. Pain may also spread to ... often occurs with fast breathing Inflammation where the ribs join the breast bone or sternum ( costochondritis ) Shingles , ...

  4. Chest pain in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, A. K.; Robson, W. L.; Cho, H.

    1996-01-01

    Chest pain is usually a benign symptom in children. The most common identifiable causes are musculoskeletal. Often, no cause can be identified. Cardiac disorders are uncommon causes of chest pain children. Most causes can be diagnosed from history and physical examination. Treatment should be directed at the underlying cause. For idiopathic chest pain, reassurance and regular follow-up examinations are important. PMID:8704491

  5. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  6. Chest Pain (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... coronary arteries. Heart attack — A heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), occurs when the surface covering of a ... chest pain Criteria for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction Outpatient evaluation of the adult with chest pain ...

  7. [Acute Chest Pain].

    PubMed

    Gmür, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Acute chest pain is a frequent consultation reason in general practice as well as in emergency departments. With the help of history, physical examination, ECG, laboratory and newly developed risk scores, potentially life-threatening diseases and high-risk patients may be detected and treated early, quickly and cost-effectively. New biomarkers and their combination with risk scores can increase the negative predictive value to exclude certain diseases. PMID:26886697

  8. Is access to specialist assessment of chest pain equitable by age, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status? An enhanced ecological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Neha; Hemingway, Harry; Walsh, Niamh; Eldridge, Sandra; Junghans, Cornelia; Feder, Gene

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether access to rapid access chest pain clinics of people with recent onset symptoms is equitable by age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity and gender, according to need. Design Retrospective cohort study with ecological analysis. Setting Patients referred from primary care to five rapid access chest pain clinics in secondary care, across England. Participants Of 8647 patients aged ≥35 years referred to chest pain clinics with new-onset stable chest pain but no known cardiac history, 7570 with documented census ward codes, age, gender and ethnicity comprised the study group. Patients excluded were those with missing date of birth, gender or ethnicity (n=782) and those with missing census ward codes (n=295). Outcome measures Effects of age, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status on clinic attendance were calculated as attendance rate ratios, with number of attendances as the outcome and resident population-years as the exposure in each stratum, using Poisson regression. Attendance rate ratios were then compared with coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality ratios to determine whether attendance was equitable according to need. Results Adjusted attendance rate ratios for patients aged >65 years were similar to younger patients (1.1, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.16), despite population CHD mortality rate ratios nearly 15 times higher in the older age group. Women had lower attendance rate ratios (0.81, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.84) and also lower population CHD mortality rate ratios compared with men. South Asians had higher attendance rates (1.67, 95% CI 1.57 to 1.77) compared with whites and had a higher standardised CHD mortality ratio of 1.46 (95% CI 1.41 to 1.51). Although univariable analysis showed that the most deprived patients (quintile 5) had an attendance rate twice that of less deprived quintiles, the adjusted analysis showed their attendance to be 13% lower (0.87, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.94) despite a higher population CHD mortality rate. Conclusion

  9. Chest pain syndromes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Gagan

    2012-08-01

    Chest pain syndromes in pregnancy include numerous catastrophic cardiovascular events. Acute myocardial infarction, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and amniotic fluid embolism are the most important causes of nonobstetric mortality and morbidity in pregnancy. Each of these could result in poor maternal and fetal outcomes if not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. However, their diagnosis and management is limited by fetal risks of diagnostic procedures, dangers of pharmacotherapy and interventions that have neither been widely studied nor validated. This article reviews the current literature on epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of 4 potentially lethal chest pain syndromes in pregnancy. PMID:22813362

  10. Angina (Chest Pain)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of High Blood Pressure ... The discomfort also can occur in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back. Angina pain may even feel like indigestion. But, ...

  11. Chest pain in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Tonino, S H; Nur, E; Otten, H M; Wykrzykowska, J J; Hoekstra, J B L; Biemond, B J

    2013-06-01

    The differential diagnosis of chest pain in a patient with sickle cell disease is difficult and may encompass several serious conditions, including chest syndrome, pulmonary embolism and infectious complications. In this manuscript we provide an overview on the various underlying diseases that may cause chest pain in patients with sickle cell disease and provide clues for a proper diagnostic workup. PMID:23799317

  12. Implementation of NICE Clinical Guideline 95 for assessment of stable chest pain in a rapid access chest pain clinic reduces the mean number of investigations and cost per patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alvin J X; Michail, Michael; Quaderi, Shumonta A; Richardson, James A; Aggarwal, Suneil K; Speechly-Dick, M Elsya

    2015-01-01

    Objective In 2010, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the UK published Clinical Guideline 95 (CG95) advocating risk stratification of patients using ‘CADScore’ to guide appropriate cardiac investigations for chest pain of recent onset. Implementation of the guideline in the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust was evaluated to see if it led to a reduction in the average cost of the diagnostic journey per patient and fewer investigations per patient in order to confirm a diagnosis. Methods This was a single centre study at a Tertiary Centre in Central London. The investigative journey for each patient presenting to the Rapid Access Chest Pain Clinic (RACPC) at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust was recorded. Retrospective analysis on this data was performed. Results Data for 4968 patients presenting to the RACPC from 2004 to 2012 was analysed and a size-matched cohort of 1503 patients preimplementation and postimplementation of the guidelines was compared. The mean cost of investigations postimplementation was £291.83 as compared to £319.54 preimplementation of the guidelines despite higher costs associated with some of the recommended initial investigations. The mean number of tests per patient postguidelines was 0.78 compared to 0.97 for preguidelines. An approximate twofold increase in patients not requiring tests was seen post-CG95 implementation (245 pre-CG95 vs 476 post-CG95). Conclusions The implementation of the NICE guidelines in our trust has reduced the average cost of the investigative journey and the number of investigations required per patient. PMID:25722859

  13. Chest pain evaluation in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Foy, Andrew J; Filippone, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Chest pain is a common complaint in the emergency department. Recognition of chest pain symptoms and electrocardiographic changes consistent with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) can lead to prompt initiation of goal-directed therapy. Cardiac troponin testing confirms the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, but does not reveal the mechanism of injury. When patients with chest pain rule out for ACS the use of advanced, noninvasive testing has not been found to be associated with better patient outcomes. PMID:26042885

  14. [Differential diagnosis "non-cardiac chest pain"].

    PubMed

    Frieling, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) are recurrent angina pectoris like pain without evidence of coronary heart diesease in conventional diagnostic evaluation. The prevalence of NCCP is up to 70% and may be detected in this order at all levels of the medical health care system (general practitioner, emergency department, chest pain unit, coronary care). Reduction of quality of life in NCCP is comparable, partially even higher compared to cardiac chest pain. Reasons for psychological strain are symptom recurrence in app. 50%, nonspecific diagnosis with resulting uncertainty and insufficient integration of other medical disciplines in diagnostic work-up. Managing of patients with NCCP has to be interdisciplinary because non cardiac causes of chest pain may be found frequently. This are musculosceletal in app. 40%, gastrointestinal in app. 20%, psychiatric in app. 10% and pulmonary and mediastinal diseases in app. 5% of cases. Also gastroenterological expertise is required because here gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in app. 60%, hypercontractile esophageal motility disorders with nutcracker, jackhammer esophagus or distal esophageal spasmus or achalasia in app. 20% and other esophageal alterations (e. g. infectious esophageal inflammation, drug-induced ulcer, rings, webs, eosinophilic esophagits) in app. 30% of cases may be detected as cause of chest pain may. This implicates that regular interdisciplinary round wards and interdisciplinary management of chest pain units are mandatory. PMID:26230070

  15. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-03-01

    The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice. PMID:20380955

  16. [A rare case of chest pain].

    PubMed

    Bodócsi, Beáta; Koncz, István; Hum, Zsigmond; Serfőző, Orsolya; Pap-Szekeres, József; Szabó, István

    2016-09-01

    Chest pain is a common symptom in patients who visit Emergency Departments. The main task is to exclude life-threatening diseases such as acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolization and dissection of thoracic aorta. The authors present the history of a patient, who had an intense chest pain for 7 hours. In accordance with the diagnostic algorithm of chest pain, ECG, blood collection, chest X-ray and chest computed tomography angiography were performed. Acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolization and dissection of the thoracic aorta were excluded, however, chest computed tomography CT revealed a huge hiatal hernia as an incidental finding. An emergency surgical repair was performed and the patient recovered without any complications. The authors emphasize that the diagnostic algorithms focus on the confirmation or rejection of possible life threatening diseases in case of chest pain. However, it should be kept in mind that rarer causes may occur, which may require involvement of the relevant disciplines and multidisciplinary thinking. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(36), 1445-1448. PMID:27596512

  17. Painful Chest Wall Swellings: Tietze Syndrome or Chest Wall Tumor?

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Gunal, Nesimi; Gulbahar, Gultekin; Kocer, Bulent; Han, Serdar; Eryazgan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsoy, Arzu; Naldoken, Seniha; Alhan, Aslıhan; Sakinci, Unal

    2016-04-01

    Background Tietze syndrome (TS) is an inflammatory condition characterized by chest pain and swelling of costochondral junction. Primary chest wall tumors may mimic TS. In this article, we report our experience of approximately 121 patients initially diagnosed as TS and determined chest wall tumor in some cases at the follow-up. Methods This is a retrospective review of patients diagnosed as TS by clinical examination, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, routine laboratory tests, and computed tomography (CT) of chest: all treated and followed up between March 2001 and July 2012. There were 121 cases (41 males and 80 females; mean age, 39.6 ± 3.2 years) of TS. Results In 27 patients with initial normal radiological findings, the size of swellings had doubled during the follow-up period (mean, 8.51 ± 2.15 months). These patients were reevaluated with chest CT and bone scintigraphy and then early diagnostic biopsy was performed. Pathologic examination revealed primary chest wall tumor in 13 patients (5 malignant, 8 benign). CT had a sensitivity of 92.3% and a specificity of 64.2% in detection of tumors (kappa: 0.56, p = 0.002), whereas the sensitivity and the specificity of bone scan were 84.6 and 35.7%, respectively (kappa: 0.199, p = 0.385). Conclusion Primary chest wall tumors could mimic TS. Bone scintigraphy or CT is not specific enough to determine malignant and other benign disorders of costochondral junction. Therefore, clinicians should follow TS patients more closely, and in case of increasing size of swelling, early diagnostic biopsy should be considered. PMID:25742551

  18. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  19. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Coss-Adame, Enrique; Rao, Satish S C

    2015-11-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  20. Thymic carcinoma presenting as atypical chest pain.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Sadiq; Connelly, Tara; Keita, Luther; Blazkova, Sylvie; Veerasingam, Dave

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a 2-month history of atypical chest pain was referred to the chest pain clinic by the general practitioner. Exercise stress test was positive and subsequent coronary angiogram revealed significant triple vessel disease with left ventricular impairment requiring a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). The patient had a chest X-ray as part of the preoperative work up. Chest X-ray revealed a large anterior mediastinal mass. Subsequent thorax CT revealed a 7.2 cm anterior mediastinal mass. CT-guided biopsy of the mass revealed the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated thymic basaloid carcinoma. The patient was successfully treated with concomitant surgery involving complete resection of the mass and a CABG procedure. PMID:26607199

  1. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours. PMID:27122690

  2. Non-Cardiac Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... been termed “Esophageal or visceral hypersensitivity” (enhanced esophageal perception or sensitivity to balloon distension). Although the cause ... can be used to improve this exaggerated pain perception. Non-esophageal Causes of NCCP NCCP is a ...

  3. Noncardiac chest pain: epidemiology, natural course and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fass, Ronnie; Achem, Sami R

    2011-04-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is defined as recurrent chest pain that is indistinguishable from ischemic heart pain after a reasonable workup has excluded a cardiac cause. Noncardiac chest pain is a prevalent disorder resulting in high healthcare utilization and significant work absenteeism. However, despite its chronic nature, noncardiac chest pain has no impact on patients' mortality. The main underlying mechanisms include gastroesophageal reflux, esophageal dysmotility and esophageal hypersensitivity. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is likely the most common cause of noncardiac chest pain. Esophageal dysmotility affects only the minority of noncardiac chest pain patients. Esophageal hypersensitivity may be present in non-GERD-related noncardiac chest pain patients regardless if esophageal dysmotility is present or absent. Psychological co-morbidities such as panic disorder, anxiety, and depression are also common in noncardiac chest pain patients and often modulate patients' perception of disease severity. PMID:21602987

  4. Treatment of Morbidity with Atypical Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cott, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    The appropriate management of atypical chest pain requires an integration of medical and behavioural treatments. Unnecessary medicalization can increase morbidity. A sensitivity to the behavioural factors contributing to symptoms and disability may reduce both. The purpose of this paper is to provide physicians with a cognitive-behavioural perspective of the nature of morbidity and disability associated with chronic chest discomfort; some strategies for detecting heretofore unsuspected disability associated with chronic chest pain and related discomfort in patients with organic findings (both cardiac and non-cardiac), as well those with no identifiable disease process or organic cause; and some simple behavioural and cognitive-behavioural therapeutic techniques for treating and preventing such problems. PMID:21263912

  5. Chest pain: coronary CT in the ER.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Erica; Seitun, Sara; Guaricci, Andrea I; Cademartiri, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac CT has developed into a robust clinical tool during the past 15 years. Of the fields in which the potential of cardiac CT has raised more interest is chest pain in acute settings. In fact, the possibility to exclude with high reliability obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients at low-to-intermediate risk is of great interest both from the clinical standpoint and from the management standpoint. Several other modalities, with or without imaging, have been used during the past decades in the settings of new onset chest pain or in acute chest pain for both diagnostic and prognostic assessment of CAD. Each one has advantages and disadvantages. Most imaging modalities also focus on inducible ischaemia to guide referral to invasive coronary angiography. The advent of cardiac CT has introduced a new practice diagnostic paradigm, being the most accurate non-invasive method for identification and exclusion of CAD. Furthermore, the detection of subclinical CAD and plaque imaging offer the opportunity to improve risk stratification. Moreover, recent advances of the latest generation CT scanners allow combining both anatomical and functional imaging by stress myocardial perfusion. The role of cardiac CT in acute settings is already important and will become progressively more important in the coming years. PMID:26866681

  6. Recurrent Chest Pain, as a Presenting Sign of Ovarian Endometrioma

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Mehmet; Oztekin, Ozgur; Oztekin, Deniz

    2011-01-01

    Chest pain is a rare sign of thoracal endometriosis associated with endometrioma of the tubo-ovarian endometrioma. We report the case periodic episodes of chest pain concurrent with menstruation in a 35-year-old female, in which ovarian endometrioma was diagnosed and left-sided oophorectomy was performed. After surgery, patient underwent medical treatment which included a Gn-RH agonist and a combined oral contraceptive. In the follow-up period, there was no evidence of chest pain. PMID:22084779

  7. Painful palpitations: chest pain associated with postextrasystolic ST depression.

    PubMed

    Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Kleyn, Emile; Omar, Bassam

    2014-01-01

    Postextrasystolic T-wave changes have been described as early as 1915. The significance and mechanism of such changes remain controversial. Because postextrasystolic ST changes are rare, much of the ensuing discussion concentrates on the closely related and more commonly reported phenomenon of postextrasystolic T-wave inversion. This report documents the case of a 67-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease who was admitted to the hospital with chest pain. PMID:25662929

  8. Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Quell, Robin; Sørlie, Venke

    2008-10-01

    The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation. PMID:18929341

  9. Catastrophic chest pain: blinded by cardiopulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Timothy John; Asiimwe, Denis D; Gemmel, David; Brine, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with a history of diabetic foot ulcer, osteomyelitis, coronary artery disease, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia, presented with chest pain of 3 weeks duration. Eleven days earlier, the patient had had a drug-eluting stent (DES) placed in a branch of the right coronary artery (RCA) after similar chest pain, leading to the findings of a positive nuclear stress test. Since discharge, he was not compliant with taking clopidegrel (Plavix), a concern for in-stent thrombosis with recurrent myocardial ischaemia; but work up was negative and medications were restarted. Within 24 h of admission, he developed bilateral flaccid leg weakness, urine retention and loss of sensation from the umbilicus level down. MRI revealed a T4-T6 epidural abscess. Emergent decompression laminectomy and abscess drainage was completed. Neurological symptoms improved hours after surgery with complete resolution of sensory deficits. Cultures grew Streptococcus sp., treated with intravenous nafcillin for 8 weeks. He regained leg strength with continued improvement seen in rehabilitation. PMID:26135489

  10. Coping in Chest Pain Patients with and without Psychiatric Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined relations between psychiatric disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) in 77 patients with chest pain, and compared coping profiles of chest pain patients with and without psychiatric disorders and CHD. Psychiatric patients with no medical disease were also studied. Results are discussed in the context of illness behavior and…

  11. Sexual, Physical, Verbal/Emotional Abuse and Unexplained Chest Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslick, Guy D.; Koloski, Natasha A.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one third of patients with non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) report a history of abuse, however no data exists on the prevalence of abuse among people with unexplained chest pain in the general population. We aimed to determine if there is a relationship between childhood sexual, physical, emotional abuse and unexplained…

  12. Peripartum cardiac chest pain and troponin rise.

    PubMed

    Tatham, K; Hughes-Roberts, Y; Davies, S; Johnson, M; Ashpole, K; Cox, M

    2010-10-01

    The incidence of myocardial ischaemia is increasing in the obstetric population. This has been attributed to several factors including greater maternal age, the increasing incidence of obesity and diabetes, and the growing population of patients with grown-up congenital heart disease who now reach adulthood and become pregnant. A number of cases of myocardial ischaemia in pregnant women have been documented, during and after delivery, for which no cause has been established. We present a case of a nulliparous woman who developed cardiac chest pain, bradycardia, hypertension and a raised troponin I after vaginal delivery of twin boys at 36 weeks of gestation. Ischaemic electrocardiogram changes were noted. Detailed investigations demonstrated a normal coronary circulation. A patent foramen ovale was found on bubble echocardiography. PMID:20833026

  13. Pleuritic Chest Pain; Where Should We Search for?

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Behdad; Ziaee, Vahid; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Esmaeili, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Pleuritic pain is not an unusual problem in children. Other concomitant symptoms should be considered for diagnostic approach in a child with pleuritic chest pain. In this report we discuss chest pain in a 6-year-old child with regard to other signs and symptoms. Finally, we found a rare life-threatening complication of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) in our patient. PMID:23056851

  14. An uncommon cause of chest pain - penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Htoo; Sadiq, Sanah; Chowdhury, Arnab; Gholamrezaee, Rashin; Yoe, Linus

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is a very common symptom and can be of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. It accounts for approximately 5.5 million annual emergency room visits in the United States, according to 2011 CDC data. Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer (PAU), an uncommon condition, is also a potential cause of chest pain. We here report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with atypical chest and back pain. The pain persisted for 4 weeks necessitating two emergency room visits. Initial tests were non-significant including cardiac troponins, an electrocardiogram (EKG), and a chest X-ray on her first visit. Upon her second visit, she underwent a computed tomography angiogram of chest with contrast which revealed a PAU with an intramural hematoma in descending aorta. The PAU was finally diagnosed with an exclusion of other chest pain causes. She was treated non-surgically with a blood pressure control strategy and pain management. After a 2-month period of smoking cessation and following the achievement of a controlled blood pressure, she felt well without chest pain. PMID:27406453

  15. Chest Pain in Adolescent Japanese Male Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin K.; Naheed, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Acute chest pain with very elevated troponin level and abnormal EKG in adult population is considered sine qua non to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) unless proved otherwise. Similar presentation in adolescent population is seen less often but raises suspicion for ACS. Most common etiology for chest pain with cardiac enzyme elevation in adolescent population is usually viral myopericarditis. The adolescent population presenting with chest pain and elevated cardiac enzymes should be carefully evaluated for ACS and other etiologies including myocarditis, myopericarditis, pulmonary embolism, acute rheumatic fever, and trauma. We report one Japanese adolescent male with mycoplasma pneumoniae myocarditis who presented to the ER with chest pain, elevated cardiac enzymes, and abnormal EKG. PMID:25202456

  16. The chest pain center in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Grzybowski, M

    2001-05-01

    Despite the improvement of medical treatment for acute coronary syndromes throughout the 20th century, the authors believe that many cases of life-threatening coronary events could be avoided through early detection of CAD and the use of preventive strategies. Establishing chest pain units that are linked to the ED is one excellent strategy to risk-stratify patients with symptoms who are at risk for sustaining an AMI or having lethal arrhythmias. There is a need for more research on chest pain units to determine the value for cost and to further optimize strategies for ACI detection and screening. In EDs with high volumes of chest pain patients, or high pressures to avoid hospital admissions, a planned, systematic, and rapid approach to the treatment of AMI and the diagnosis of chest pain is a rewarding necessity. PMID:11373990

  17. Psychiatric Characteristics of the Cardiac Outpatients with Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jea-Geun; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Ki-Seok; Joo, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives A cardiologist's evaluation of psychiatric symptoms in patients with chest pain is rare. This study aimed to determine the psychiatric characteristics of patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) and explore their relationship with the intensity of chest pain. Subjects and Methods Out of 139 consecutive patients referred to the cardiology outpatient department, 31 with atypical chest pain (heartburn, acid regurgitation, dyspnea, and palpitation) were excluded and 108 were enrolled for the present study. The enrolled patients underwent complete numerical rating scale of chest pain and the symptom checklist for minor psychiatric disorders at the time of first outpatient visit. The non-CAD group consisted of patients with a normal stress test, coronary computed tomography angiogram, or coronary angiogram, and the CAD group included those with an abnormal coronary angiogram. Results Nineteen patients (17.6%) were diagnosed with CAD. No differences in the psychiatric characteristics were observed between the groups. "Feeling tense", "self-reproach", and "trouble falling asleep" were more frequently observed in the non-CAD (p=0.007; p=0.046; p=0.044) group. In a multiple linear regression analysis with a stepwise selection, somatization without chest pain in the non-CAD group and hypochondriasis in the CAD group were linearly associated with the intensity of chest pain (β=0.108, R2=0.092, p=0.004; β= -0.525, R2=0.290, p=0.010). Conclusion No differences in psychiatric characteristics were observed between the groups. The intensity of chest pain was linearly associated with somatization without chest pain in the non-CAD group and inversely linearly associated with hypochondriasis in the CAD group. PMID:27014347

  18. Quick identification of acute chest pain patients study (QICS)

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Hendrik M; de Jong, Gonda; Tio, René A; Nieuwland, Wybe; Kema, Ido P; van der Horst, Iwan CC; Oudkerk, Mattijs; Zijlstra, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with acute chest pain are often referred to the emergency ward and extensively investigated. Investigations are costly and could induce unnecessary complications, especially with invasive diagnostics. Nevertheless, chest pain patients have high mortalities. Fast identification of high-risk patients is crucial. Therefore several strategies have been developed including specific symptoms, signs, laboratory measurements, and imaging. Methods/Design The Quick Identification of acute Chest pain Study (QICS) will investigate whether a combined use of specific symptoms and signs, electrocardiography, routine and new laboratory measures, adjunctive imaging including electron beam (EBT) computed tomography (CT) and contrast multislice CT (MSCT) will have a high diagnostic yield for patients with acute chest pain. All patients will be investigated according a standardized protocol in the Emergency Department. Serum and plasma will be frozen for future analysis for a wide range of biomarkers at a later time point. The primary endpoint is the safe recognition of low-risk chest pain patients directly at presentation. Secondary endpoint is the identification of a wide range of sensitive predictive clinical markers, chemical biomarkers and radiological markers in acute chest pain patients. Chemical biomarkers will be compared to quantitative CT measurements of coronary atherosclerosis as a surrogate endpoint. Chemical biomarkers will also be compared in head to head comparison and for their additional value. Discussion This will be a very extensive investigation of a wide range of risk predictors in acute chest pain patients. New reliable fast and cheap diagnostic algorithm resulting from the test results might improve chest pain patients' prognosis, and reduce unnecessary costs and diagnostic complications. PMID:19527487

  19. Role of multidetector computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of patients attending the rapid access chest pain clinic, The Scottish computed tomography of the heart (SCOT-HEART) trial: study protocol for randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid access chest pain clinics have facilitated the early diagnosis and treatment of patients with coronary heart disease and angina. Despite this important service provision, coronary heart disease continues to be under-diagnosed and many patients are left untreated and at risk. Recent advances in imaging technology have now led to the widespread use of noninvasive computed tomography, which can be used to measure coronary artery calcium scores and perform coronary angiography in one examination. However, this technology has not been robustly evaluated in its application to the clinic. Methods/design The SCOT-HEART study is an open parallel group prospective multicentre randomized controlled trial of 4,138 patients attending the rapid access chest pain clinic for evaluation of suspected cardiac chest pain. Following clinical consultation, participants will be approached and randomized 1:1 to receive standard care or standard care plus ≥64-multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography and coronary calcium score. Randomization will be conducted using a web-based system to ensure allocation concealment and will incorporate minimization. The primary endpoint of the study will be the proportion of patients diagnosed with angina pectoris secondary to coronary heart disease at 6 weeks. Secondary endpoints will include the assessment of subsequent symptoms, diagnosis, investigation and treatment. In addition, long-term health outcomes, safety endpoints, such as radiation dose, and health economic endpoints will be assessed. Assuming a clinic rate of 27.0% for the diagnosis of angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease, we will need to recruit 2,069 patients per group to detect an absolute increase of 4.0% in the rate of diagnosis at 80% power and a two-sided P value of 0.05. The SCOT-HEART study is currently recruiting participants and expects to report in 2014. Discussion This is the first study to look at the implementation of computed

  20. [Chest pain - not always the heart! Clinical impact of gastrointestinal diseases in non-cardiac chest pain].

    PubMed

    Frieling, T; Bergdoldt, G; Allescher, H D; Riemann, J F

    2015-02-01

    Non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) are recurrent angina pectoris like pain without evidence of coronary heart disease in conventional diagnostic evaluation. The prevalence of NCCP is up to 70 % and may be detected in this order at all levels of the medical health care system (general practitioner, emergency department, chest pain unit, coronary care). Reduction of quality of life in NCCP is comparable, partially even higher compared to cardiac chest pain. Reasons for psychological strain are symptom recurrence in app. 50 %, nonspecific diagnosis with resulting uncertainty and insufficient integration of other medical disciplines in diagnostic work-up. Managing of patients with NCCP has to be interdisciplinary because non cardiac causes of chest pain may be found frequently. Especially gastroenterological expertise is required because in 50 - 60 % of cases gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in 15 - 18 % hypercontractile esophageal motility disorders with nutcracker, jackhammer esophagus or distal esophageal spasmus or achalasia and in 32 - 35 % other esophageal alterations (e. g. infectious esophageal inflammation, drug-induced ulcer, rings, webs, eosinophilic esophagitis) as cause of chest pain may be detected. This implicates that regular interdisciplinary round wards and management of chest pain units are mandatory. PMID:25668714

  1. Noncardiac Chest Pain in Children and Adolescents: A Biopsychosocial Conceptualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Cassandra J.; White, Kamila S.; Grady, R. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric NCCP may be characterized by recurrent pain accompanied by emotional distress and functional impairment. This paper reviews and critiques literature on pediatric noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) and introduces a theoretical conceptualization to guide future study of NCCP in children and adolescents. A developmentally informed biopsychosocial…

  2. Spinal dural AV fistula: an unusual cause of chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Bioh, Gabriel; Bogle, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A 22 -year-old man presented with 6 months of sudden onset, incapacitating, left-sided chest pain occurring 1–2 times a week. The severity of the pain caused loss of consciousness several times leading to multiple fractures. Investigation with echocardiogram, exercise tolerance test, Holter monitor, chest X-ray and V/Q scan revealed no abnormality as did EEG and 48 h video telemetry. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine showed a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) at the level of T6, confirmed on angiogram. The patient underwent division of the left T6 AV fistula. Following the operation, the patient has been completely pain free. Our patient, presenting in his early 20s does not fit the usual age demographic for SDAVF. A second atypical feature is his presentation with chest pain alone and no neurological symptoms. This case represents a rare presentation of SDAVF. PMID:24532234

  3. Evaluation and Management of Chest Pain in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rohit; Munoz, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Geriatric patients are at increased risk for serious morbidity and mortality from life-threatening causes of chest pain. This article covers 5 life-threatening causes of chest pain in the elderly: acute coronary syndrome, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax, and esophageal rupture. Atypical presentations, frailty, and significant comorbidities that characterize the elderly make the diagnosis and treatment of these already complicated conditions even more complicated. The emergency provider must be vigilant and maintain a low threshold to test. When a diagnosis is made, treatment must be aggressive. The elderly benefit from optimal care. PMID:27475013

  4. Recurrent inflight chest pain due to a solitary bulla

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, Carlos; Harrison, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Ms L is a 47-year-old lady who was referred with severe, left-sided pleuritic chest pain and painful left arm weakness that occurred predictably during consecutive commercial flights. Subsequent investigations diagnosed a large left-sided, isolated bulla. A VATS bullectomy was performed with no complications, and a symptomless flight followed. We discuss here the physiological explanation for her symptoms and the treatment of bulla in this unusual case. PMID:26057108

  5. An unusual cause of chest pain in a young woman

    PubMed Central

    Fryearson, John; Adamson, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    A 25-year-old-woman presented to health-care services recurrently due to pleuritic chest pain. This increased during the first trimester of her first pregnancy. She was subsequently referred to a tertiary cardiology centre where she was seen by a cardiologist with a special interest in obstetric cardiology. After further investigations, an unusual cause of her pain was identified. Her investigations, management and her clinical course are presented here.

  6. Slipping Rib Syndrome as Persistent Abdominal and Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Vergaray, Juan Javier; de la Gala García, Francisco; Obaya Rebollar, Juan Carlos; Bové Alvarez, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Slipping rib syndrome is an overlooked cause of persistent abdominal or chest pain. The etiology of this syndrome is not well understood, but the characteristic pain is from hypermobility of the false ribs. Although it is a diagnosis of exclusion, misdiagnosis may lead to an excessive workup. A simple clinical examination via the hooking maneuver is the most significant feature of its diagnosis. We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman with slipping rib syndrome. PMID:26528703

  7. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum: an important differential in acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Francesca; McCullough, Chris; Rahman, Asif

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with pleuritic chest pain that was present on waking and localised to the left costal margin with no radiation. He was otherwise asymptomatic and denied preceding trauma, heavy lifting, coughing or recent vomiting. Observations and examination were unremarkable; however, a chest radiograph showed a pneumomediastinum. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a rare condition that tends to follow a benign clinical course. A CT of the chest is generally only indicated if the chest X-ray fails to show an SPM in patients for whom there is a high index of clinical suspicion. A contrast-enhanced swallow study is only indicated if there is suspicion of an oesophageal tear or rupture. Evidence suggests that patients with SPM can be managed conservatively and observed for 24 h. PMID:25432910

  8. Lyme Myocarditis Presenting as Chest Pain in an Adolescent Girl.

    PubMed

    Fishe, Jennifer N; Marchese, Ronald F; Callahan, James M

    2016-07-01

    A previously healthy adolescent girl presented to the emergency department with new onset chest and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Laboratory studies and imaging were consistent with myocarditis. She developed heart block after admission and required stabilization in the cardiac intensive care unit. Lyme serology returned positive, and her condition was diagnosed as Lyme disease-associated myocarditis. PMID:26945194

  9. Diagnosis of chest pain with foregut symptoms in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bo; Wang, Ru-Wen; Jiang, Yao-Guang; Tan, Qun-You; Liao, Xiang-Li; Zhou, Jing-Hai; Zhao, Yun-Ping; Gong, Tai-Qian; Ma, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnosis of chest pain with foregut symptoms in Chinese patients. METHODS: Esophageal manometric studies, 24-h introesophageal pH monitoring and 24-h electrocardiograms (Holter electrocardiography) were performed in 61 patients with chest pain. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients were diagnosed with non-specific esophageal motility disorders (29 patients with abnormal gastroesophageal reflux and eight patients with myocardial ischemia). Five patients had diffuse spasm of the esophagus plus abnormal gastroesophageal reflux (two patients had concomitant myocardial ischemia), and one patient was diagnosed with nutcracker esophagus. CONCLUSION: The esophageal manometric studies, 24-h intra-esophageal pH monitoring and Holter electrocardiography are significant for the differential diagnosis of chest pain, particularly in patients with foregut symptoms. In cases of esophageal motility disorders, pathological gastroesophageal reflux may be a major cause of chest pain with non-specific esophageal motility disorders. Spasm of the esophageal smooth muscle might affect the heart-coronary smooth muscle, leading to myocardial ischemia. PMID:19222101

  10. Picture quiz: a case of sudden severe chest pain.

    PubMed

    Rabia, Mustafa Abu; Sullivan, P; Stivaros, Stavros M

    2007-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with no previous medical history presented to hospital with sudden onset of acute epigastric pain radiating to the anterior chest wall and both shoulders. There was no history of recent trauma and he had not been vomiting. PMID:21611610

  11. Sudden chest pain and cardiac emergencies in the obstetric patient.

    PubMed

    Mabie, W C; Freire, C M

    1995-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and work-up of a patient with chest pain during pregnancy is presented in this article. This is followed by discussions of cardiac emergencies including hypertensive crisis, pulmonary edema, arrhythmias, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, myocardial infarction, and aortic dissection. PMID:7784039

  12. Rethinking Cocaine-Associated Chest Pain and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan B.; Marhefka, Gregary D.

    2011-01-01

    Every year more than 500,000 patients present to the emergency department with cocaine-associated complications, most commonly chest pain. Many of these patients undergo extensive work-up and treatment. Much of the evidence regarding cocaine’s cardiovascular effects, as well as the current management of cocaine-associated chest pain and acute coronary syndromes, is anecdotally derived and based on studies written more than 2 decades ago that involved only a few patients. Newer studies have brought into question many of the commonly held theories and practices regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this common clinical scenario. However, there continues to be a paucity of prospective, randomized trials addressing this topic as it relates to clinical outcomes. We searched PubMed for English-language articles from 1960 to 2011 using the keywords cocaine, chest pain, coronary arteries, myocardial infarction, emergency department, cardiac biomarkers, electrocardiogram, coronary computed tomography, observation unit, β-blockers, benzodiazepines, nitroglycerin, calcium channel blockers, phentolamine, and cardiomyopathy; including various combinations of these terms. We reviewed the abstracts to confirm relevance, and then full articles were extracted. References from extracted articles were also reviewed for relevant articles. In this review, we critically evaluate the limited historical evidence underlying the current teachings on cocaine’s cardiovascular effects and management of cocaine-associated chest pain. We aim to update the reader on more recent, albeit small, studies on the emergency department evaluation and clinical and pharmacologic management of cocaine-associated chest pain. Finally, we summarize recent guidelines and review an algorithm based on the current best evidence. PMID:22134939

  13. [Psychosomatic medicine for non-cardiac chest pain].

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Seiko; Hosoi, Masako; Tsuchida, Osamu

    2009-09-01

    Recently, it has become problematic that the number of noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) patients are increasing among those who come to the emergency room with chest pain as a chief complaint. They tend to come to hospitals often and over many years, even after cardiac-chest pain has been excluded from their diagnosis. Moreover, studies have shown that NCCP patients have a high prevalence of anxiety, depression and disability. However, most NCCP patients are usually treated by cardiologists or primary physicians. Ordinary biomedical approaches often fail to treat NCCP. NCCP is one of the most important functional somatic syndromes from the view of medical economics. The cause of NCCP includes gastroesophageal reflux disease, panic disorder and esophageal dysmotility. In this review article, we summarize the definition, epidemiology, pathology, and process of diagnosis of NCCP. Finally, we propose a pathological hypothesis from a psychosomatic view. We discuss the effects of anxiety, fear and hyperactive behavior induced by affective stressors on the dysmotility and the lowering of the pain threshold. PMID:19768919

  14. Severe limb pain suppresses chest pain in a patient with anterior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Canpolat, U; Kaya, E B; Aytemir, K; Kabakçı, G

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac complications of chest trauma range from arrhythmias and valvular avulsions to myocardial contusion, rupture, and--rarely--myocardial infarction. Herein, we described a 44-year-old male patient who presented to the hospital after receiving a blow from a fist directly to the chest and fingertip amputation during a fight; anterior myocardial infarction without any chest pain was coincidentally detected. Our case illustrates the importance of electrocardiography in the initial evaluation of patients with chest trauma and suspected injury to the coronary arteries. PMID:22407423

  15. Pain in the chest in a user of cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Wiener, M.D.; Putnam, C.E.

    1987-10-16

    A 21-year-old man presented with pleuritic substernal chest pain of one hour's duration. The pain was exacerbated in a supine position and did not radiate. Questioning revealed that he was a recreational user of cocaine and had inhaled free-based cocaine via a pipe the previous evening and as recently as two hours before admission to the hospital. Physical examination demonstrated an anxious young man with a respiratory rate of 26 breaths per minute and shallow. He was afebrile with normal heart rate and blood pressure. His sternum was tender to palpation, and auscultation revealed precordial crepitus synchronous with systole. His electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm at a rate of 62 beats per minute. Posteroanterior and lateral roentgenograms of the chest were obtained. A diagnosis of spontaneous pneumomediastinum was made.

  16. Approach to chest pain and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Pandie, S; Hellenberg, D; Hellig, F; Ntsekhe, M

    2016-03-01

    Patient history, physical examination, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac biomarkers are key components of an effective chest pain assessment. The first priority is excluding serious chest pain syndromes, namely acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, cardiac tamponade and tension pneumothorax. On history, the mnemonic SOCRATES (Site Onset Character Radiation Association Time Exacerbating/relieving factor and Severity) helps differentiate cardiac from non-cardiac pain. On examination, evaluation of vital signs, evidence of murmurs, rubs, heart failure, tension pneumothoraces and chest infections are important. A 12-lead ECG should be interpreted within 10 minutes of first medical contact, specifically to identify ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). High-sensitivity troponins improve the rapid rule-out of myocardial infarction (MI) and confirmation of non-ST elevation MI (NSTEMI). ACS (STEMI and NSTEMI/unstable anginapectoris (UAP)) result from acute destabilisation of coronary atheroma with resultant complete (STEMI) or subtotal (NSTEMI/UAP) thrombotic coronary occlusion. The management of STEMI patients includes providing urgent reperfusion: primary percutaneous coronary intervention(PPCI) if available, deliverable within 60 - 120 minutes, and fibrinolysis if PPCI is not available. Essential adjunctive therapies include antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, P2Y12 inhibitors), anticoagulation (heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin) and cardiac monitoring. PMID:27303759

  17. Air pollution and ED visits for chest pain.

    PubMed

    Szyszkowicz, Mieczyslaw

    2009-02-01

    This was a study of 157,028 emergency department (ED)-diagnosed visits for chest pain (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9]: 786) in 6 cities in Canada. The generalized linear mixed methods technique was applied to analyze the relations between daily counts of ED visits for chest pain on the levels of ambient air pollutants after adjusting for meteorological variables. The daily counts of visits were analyzed separately for the whole period (January-December), warm (April-September), and cold (October-March). The results are presented in the form of the excess risks associated with an increase in the mean values of the pollutant concentrations. The highest increase was obtained for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure in the warm period as follows: 5.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.3-5.8) for mean value equals to 20.1 ppb. The associations of ED visits for chest pain with air pollution are very similar to the associations of ED visits related to cardiac problems. PMID:19371523

  18. Cardiac computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Koen; Hoffmann, Udo

    2015-04-14

    The efficient and reliable evaluation of patients with acute chest pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department. Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography may play a major role, since it permits ruling out coronary artery disease with high accuracy if performed with expertise in properly selected and prepared patients. Several randomized trials have established early cardiac CT as a viable safe and potentially more efficient alternative to functional testing in the evaluation of acute chest pain. Ongoing investigations explore whether advanced anatomic and functional assessments such as high-risk coronary plaque, resting myocardial perfusion, and left ventricular function, or the simulation of the fractional coronary flow reserve will add information to the anatomic assessment for stenosis, which would allow expanding the benefits of cardiac CT from triage to treatment decisions. Especially, the combination of high-sensitive troponins and coronary computed tomography angiography may play a valuable role in future strategies for the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain. PMID:25687351

  19. Chest Pain: The Need to Consider Less Frequent Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Anabela; Carvalho, Sofia; Cunha, Joana; Lima, Ana R.; Moreira, J. Ilídio; Faria, Trigo

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most frequent patient's complaints. The commonest underlying causes are well known, but, sometimes, in some clinical scenarios, it is necessary to consider other diagnoses. We report a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male, chronically hypertensive, who complained of recurrent episodes of chest pain and fever with elevated acute phase reactants. The first investigation was negative for some of the most likely diagnosis and he quickly improved with anti-inflammatory drugs. Over a few months, his symptoms continued to recur periodically, his hypertension was aggravated, and he developed headaches and lower limbs claudication. After a temporal artery biopsy that was negative for vasculitis, he underwent a positron emission tomography suggestive of Takayasu Arteritis. Takayasu Arteritis is a rare chronic granulomatous vasculitis of the aorta and its first-order branches affecting mostly females up to 50 years old. Chest pain is experienced by >40% of the patients and results from the inflammation of the aorta, pulmonary artery, or coronaries. PMID:27034853

  20. It's Not Your Heart: Group Treatment for Non-Cardiac Chest Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Sherry M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief group psychoeducational treatment for non-cardiac chest pain, supplemented with a composite case study. Patients present to emergency rooms for chest pain they believe is a heart attack symptom. When cardiac testing is negative, this pain is usually a panic symptom, often occurring with a cluster of other panic…

  1. Chest pain prevalence, causes, and disposition in the emergency department of a regional hospital in Pretoria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest pain is a common clinical syndrome. However, there is a paucity of African studies describing the causes, prevalence, aetiology, and disposition of patients with chest pain presenting in the emergency department (ED). Aim The aim of this retrospective descriptive study was to determine the prevalence, causes, demographics, and disposition of all adult patients with the main complaint of chest pain presenting at the ED of a regional hospital in South Africa. Methods Records of all patients 18 years and older presenting with the complaint of chest pain from 1 December 2011 through 10 April 2012 were assessed. A data collection sheet capturing patient demographics and disposition from the ED was used. The diagnosis was subdivided into groups: cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, psychiatric/psychogenic, other, and unknown. Results Of the 312 patients presenting with chest pain, 210 patient files were retrieved. The prevalence of non-traumatic chest pain was 1.66%. Respiratory disease was the most common cause (36.19%), with pneumonia the most common diagnosis (24.40%). Logistic regression showed diagnoses of acute cardiovascular disease or respiratory disease, older age, and transport by ambulance as being associated with admission. Conclusion The main cause of acute chest pain was found to be respiratory disease, followed by musculoskeletal disorders. In the African context, the aetiology of acute chest pain differs from that in first world countries. Health workers should therefore pay special attention to respiratory conditions during diagnosis and management in African patients with acute chest pain. PMID:27380782

  2. Prognosis with chest pain and normal thallium-201 exercise scintigrams

    SciTech Connect

    Pamelia, F.X.; Gibson, R.S.; Watson, D.D.; Craddock, G.B.; Sirowatka, J.; Beller, G.A.

    1985-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prognostic value of a normal exercise thallium-201 (TI-201) scintigram by quantitative criteria in a consecutive series of 349 patients with chest pain. Follow- up was obtained in 345 patients (99%) from 8 to 45 months (mean 34 +/- 7). Of these, 60% were men, 26% had typical angina, 21% had chest pain during exercise testing, 29% were unable to achieve 85% or more of maximal predicted heart rate, and in 9% ischemic ST depression (1.0 mm or greater) developed during exercise. At the time of exercise testing, 45% of patients were taking nitrates and 38% were receiving a beta- blocking drug. During the follow-up period, there were 5 cardiac deaths (0.51%/year), of which 2 were sudden, 6 patients had a nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) (0.61%/year). Two of the 5 patients who died and 1 who had MI had angiographically normal coronary arteries. The event rate was significantly higher (p less than 0.01) in patients referred for early catheterization (5 of 53; 9%) compared with the rate for those not undergoing early angiography (6 of 298; 2%). However, the event rate was similar in those who underwent catheterization with angiographically normal coronary arteries and in those who had significant coronary artery disease.

  3. Exercise radionuclide ventriculographic responses in hypertensive patients with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, A.G.; Katz, R.J.; Varghese, P.J.; Leiboff, R.H.; Bren, G.G.; Schlesselman, S.; Varma, V.M.; Reba, R.C.; Ross, A.M.

    1984-11-15

    The effectiveness of exercise-treadmill testing in diagnosing coronary-artery disease in hypertensive patients is limited by a high rate of false positivity. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography, however, relies on different criteria (ejection fraction and wall motion), and we have evaluated this procedure in 37 hypertensive and 109 normotensive patients with chest pain, using coronary arteriography as an indicator of coronary disease. In the hypertensive cohort there was no difference in the ejection fraction at rest between the 17 patients with coronary disease and the 20 without it. Neither group had a significant mean (+/- S.E.M.) change in ejection fraction from rest to exercise (-1.9 +/- 2 and 1.4 +/- 1%, respectively). A wall-motion abnormality developed during exercise in 5 of the 17 hypertensive patients with coronary disease (29%) and in 4 of the 20 without it (20%) (P = not significant). In the normotensive cohort, however, the peak-exercise ejection fractions were significantly different. The 71 patients with coronary disease had a mean decrease of 3.6 +/- 1%, in contrast to the patients without coronary disease, who had an increase of +/- 1% (P < 0.001). An exercise-induced wall-motion abnormality was seen in 35 of the 71 patients with coronary disease (48%), as compared with 3 of the 38 without it (8%) (P < 0.001). We conclude that exercise radionuclide ventriculography is inadequate as a screening test for coronary atherosclerosis in hypertensive patients with chest pain. 28 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Screening and Identifying Erosive Esophagitis in Children with Non-cardiac Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Won; Choi, You Jin; Jeong, Su Jin

    2016-02-01

    Non-cardiac chest pain is a common disorder that leads to costly evaluations to distinguish it from cardiac pain. The present study aimed to clarify the clinical characteristics of erosive esophagitis in children with non-cardiac chest pain. Ninety nine patients (mean age, 9.55 ± 2.95 years, 49 girls) with non-cardiac chest pain were enrolled. Patients were classified into two groups: erosive esophagitis and non-erosive esophagitis-related non-cardiac chest pain by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Children in the erosive esophagitis-related non-cardiac chest pain group were significantly older (10.95 ± 2.54 years vs. 8.52 ± 2.83 years). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the following predictors of gastroesophageal reflux: chest pain related to sleep (odds ratio = 18.05, 95% confidence interval: 3.18-102.49); unfavorable dietary habits (odds ratio = 7.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.53-32.87); chest pain related to food (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.37-18.86); epigastric pain (odds ratio = 3.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.12-12.33); and nausea, vomiting, and/or regurgitation (odds ratio = 4.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.22-15.54). Gastroesophageal reflux disease should be considered first in children with non-cardiac chest pain. Children with gastroesophageal reflux disease should receive medical treatment and lifestyle modifications. PMID:26839482

  5. Screening and Identifying Erosive Esophagitis in Children with Non-cardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Non-cardiac chest pain is a common disorder that leads to costly evaluations to distinguish it from cardiac pain. The present study aimed to clarify the clinical characteristics of erosive esophagitis in children with non-cardiac chest pain. Ninety nine patients (mean age, 9.55 ± 2.95 years, 49 girls) with non-cardiac chest pain were enrolled. Patients were classified into two groups: erosive esophagitis and non-erosive esophagitis-related non-cardiac chest pain by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Children in the erosive esophagitis-related non-cardiac chest pain group were significantly older (10.95 ± 2.54 years vs. 8.52 ± 2.83 years). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the following predictors of gastroesophageal reflux: chest pain related to sleep (odds ratio = 18.05, 95% confidence interval: 3.18–102.49); unfavorable dietary habits (odds ratio = 7.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.53–32.87); chest pain related to food (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.37–18.86); epigastric pain (odds ratio = 3.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.12–12.33); and nausea, vomiting, and/or regurgitation (odds ratio = 4.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.22–15.54). Gastroesophageal reflux disease should be considered first in children with non-cardiac chest pain. Children with gastroesophageal reflux disease should receive medical treatment and lifestyle modifications. PMID:26839482

  6. Experimental human pain models in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and unexplained chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Methods related to experimental human pain research aim at activating different nociceptors, evoke pain from different organs and activate specific pathways and mechanisms. The different possibilities for using mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical methods in visceral pain research are discussed with emphasis of combinations (e.g., the multimodal approach). The methods have been used widely in assessment of pain mechanisms in the esophagus and have contributed to our understanding of the symptoms reported in these patients. Hence abnormal activation and plastic changes of central pain pathways seem to play a major role in the symptoms in some patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in patients with functional chest pain of esophageal origin. These findings may lead to an alternative approach for treatment in patients that does not respond to conventional medical or surgical therapy. PMID:16718803

  7. Predicting Chest Wall Pain From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Different Fractionation Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, Neil M.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Djemil, Toufik; Kim, Yongbok; Xia Ping

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recent studies with two fractionation schemes predicted that the volume of chest wall receiving >30 Gy (V30) correlated with chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. This study developed a predictive model of chest wall pain incorporating radiobiologic effects, using clinical data from four distinct SBRT fractionation schemes. Methods and Materials: 102 SBRT patients were treated with four different fractionations: 60 Gy in three fractions, 50 Gy in five fractions, 48 Gy in four fractions, and 50 Gy in 10 fractions. To account for radiobiologic effects, a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) model calculated the dose to the chest wall with volume weighting. For comparison, V30 and maximum point dose were also reported. Using univariable logistic regression, the association of radiation dose and clinical variables with chest wall pain was assessed by uncertainty coefficient (U) and C statistic (C) of receiver operator curve. The significant associations from the univariable model were verified with a multivariable model. Results: 106 lesions in 102 patients with a mean age of 72 were included, with a mean of 25.5 (range, 12-55) months of follow-up. Twenty patients reported chest wall pain at a mean time of 8.1 (95% confidence interval, 6.3-9.8) months after treatment. The mEUD models, V30, and maximum point dose were significant predictors of chest wall pain (p < 0.0005). mEUD improved prediction of chest wall pain compared with V30 (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.11). The mEUD with moderate weighting (a = 5) better predicted chest wall pain than did mEUD without weighting (a = 1) (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.14). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with chest wall pain (p = 0.008). On multivariable analysis, mEUD and BMI remained significant predictors of chest wall pain (p = 0.0003 and 0.03, respectively). Conclusion: mEUD with moderate weighting better predicted chest wall pain than

  8. A rare cause of chest pain in a cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Welaya, Karim; Yousuf, Kabir; del Pilar Morales, Maria

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that cancer and hypercoagulability go hand in hand. Most thromboembolism is venous in nature although arterial thrombosis can occur. Arterial thrombosis secondary to malignancy is usually seen in the lower extremities; however, it can also be seen elsewhere. This is a case of bronchogenic carcinoma with no history of typical atherosclerotic risk factors including smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia presented with chest pain and was found to have an acute ST segment elevation myocardial infection. Coronary angiography showed a large thrombus in the left anterior descending artery in the absence of any atherosclerotic lesions. Malignancy is considered to be the major contributing factor for this myocardial infarction in the absence of both atherosclerotic risk factors and atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary angiography. We will focus on the relationship between cancer and thrombosis with special emphasis on arterial thromboembolism with subsequent development of myocardial infarction. PMID:27124166

  9. Handling of Uncertainty in Analysis of Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, D. L.; Cohen, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, a large research effort has been devoted to the development of rule-based expert systems for medical decision making. While many of these systems provide competent medical advice in their domains of expertise, few are employed in actual clinical use for a variety of reasons. One of the challenges confronting these systems is the task of dealing with uncertain information. Although much attention has been devoted to this problem, no completely satisfactory solution has been found. A strategy for coping with uncertainty based on a modified production rule format as well as an automated technique for extracting relative degrees of importance of contributing factors is discussed as applied to an existing medical expert system for the analysis of chest pain.

  10. Chest pain in lupus patients: the emergency department experience.

    PubMed

    Modi, Masoom; Ishimori, Mariko L; Sandhu, Vaneet K; Wallace, Daniel J; Weisman, Michael H

    2015-11-01

    Heart disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in SLE patients, often manifests as chest pain (CP). Our goal was to understand the prevalence and outcome of CP presentations for SLE patients in the emergency department (ED). Billing records of patients who presented to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center ED with ICD-9 codes for SLE and secondary ICD-9 codes for CP (786.50-786.59) between March 2009 and October 2013 were reviewed. Two study groups were formed: discharge from ED versus hospital admission. Visits were evaluated for basic cardiac work-up with an electrocardiogram (EKG) and cardiac enzymes; hospital admissions were evaluated for CP etiology and discharge diagnoses. Of 2675 ED visits with ICD-9 codes for SLE, 397 visits had secondary codes for CP (15%); 173 were discharged and 224 became hospital admissions. While 92% of admissions had basic cardiac work-up, over 50% had chest pain attributed to non-cardiac causes. Only 7.2% had a discharge diagnosis related to cardiovascular disease. Fifteen percent of all SLE coded patients had complaints of CP, a figure higher than the national average for non-SLE CP (10%). There is a majority of non-cardiac diagnoses given to SLE patients at discharge. CP is likely to be a window of opportunity to address the known cardiac morbidity and mortality in SLE patients perhaps at an early stage of development of this complication. Our study strengthens the need for more investigations to assess the etiology of CP in this population. PMID:25912215

  11. An uncommon cause of chest pain – penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Kyaw, Htoo; Sadiq, Sanah; Chowdhury, Arnab; Gholamrezaee, Rashin; Yoe, Linus

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is a very common symptom and can be of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. It accounts for approximately 5.5 million annual emergency room visits in the United States, according to 2011 CDC data. Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer (PAU), an uncommon condition, is also a potential cause of chest pain. We here report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with atypical chest and back pain. The pain persisted for 4 weeks necessitating two emergency room visits. Initial tests were non-significant including cardiac troponins, an electrocardiogram (EKG), and a chest X-ray on her first visit. Upon her second visit, she underwent a computed tomography angiogram of chest with contrast which revealed a PAU with an intramural hematoma in descending aorta. The PAU was finally diagnosed with an exclusion of other chest pain causes. She was treated non-surgically with a blood pressure control strategy and pain management. After a 2-month period of smoking cessation and following the achievement of a controlled blood pressure, she felt well without chest pain. PMID:27406453

  12. Lower threshold for adenosine-induced chest pain in patients with angina and normal coronary angiograms

    PubMed Central

    Lagerqvist, Bo; Sylvén, Christer; Waldenström, Anders

    1992-01-01

    Objective—To investigate whether patients with angina-like chest pain and normal coronary angiograms are more sensitive to adenosine as an inducer of chest pain. Design—Increasing doses of adenosine were given in a single blind study as intravenous bolus injections. Chest pain and the electrocardioǵraphic findings were noted. Patients—Eight patients with anginalike chest pain but no coronary stenoses (group A), nine patients with angina and coronary stenoses (group B), and 16 healthy volunteers (group C). Results—In the absence of ischaemic signs on the electrocardiogram adenosine provoked angina-like pain in all patients in groups A and B. The pain was located in the chest, and its quality and location were described as being no different from the patient's habitual angina. In group C, 14 of 16 subjects reported chest pain. The lowest dose resulting in chest pain was lower in group A (0·9 (0·6) mg) than in group B (3·1 (1·5) mg) (p < 0·005) and in group C (6·2 (3·7) mg) (p < 0·005). The maximum tolerable dose was lower in group A (4·7 (2·1) mg) than in group B (9·2 (3·8) mg) (p < 0·05) and in group C (12·0 (4·1) mg) (p < 0·005). Conclusions—Patients with anginalike chest pain and normal coronary angiograms have a low pain threshold and low tolerance to pain induced by adenosine. PMID:1389759

  13. Exercise-Triggered Chest Pain as an Isolated Symptom of Myocarditis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Tshimanga, Prisca; Daron, Benoît; Farhat, Nesrine; Desprechins, Brigitte; Gewillig, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In childhood, chest pain occurring at exercise is a common complaint. A cardiac etiology for it is exceptionally found, explaining that most children do not undergo systematic cardiological investigation. However, chest pain at exercise may manifest as the unique symptom of a viral myocarditis. Recognizing this form of myocardial injury, however, might help to avoid clinical deterioration by providing adequate care. In this paper, we report on two children presenting with the unique clinical symptom of chest pain related to physical activity and in whom laboratory and cardiac investigations suggested transient myocardial damage related to myocarditis. PMID:27478581

  14. Editor's Choice-Chest pain relief in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Chest pain is the prevalent symptom at presentation in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Despite the complete absence of rigorous studies designed to assess the impact of morphine administration in patients with AMI, clinical practice guidelines strongly recommend morphine for analgesia. However, when using morphine to relieve chest pain in AMI patients, physicians must be aware that hypotension, respiratory depression, vomiting, and delayed onset of action of antiplatelet agents are potential unwanted side effects of the drug. The purpose of this report is to review morphine's clinical and side effects and to propose strategies able to reduce chest pain in AMI patients. PMID:25904757

  15. Investigation of Esophageal Sensation and Biomechanical Properties in Functional Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Issam; Attaluri, Ashok; Hashmi, Syed; Gregersen, Hans; Rao, Satish S.C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES There is limited and conflicting data regarding the role of esophageal hypersensitivity in the pathogenesis of functional chest pain (FCP). We examined esophageal sensori-motor properties, mechanics and symptoms in subjects with FCP. METHODS Esophageal balloon distension test (EBDT) was performed using impedance planimetry in 189 (m/f = 57/132) consecutive subjects with noncardiac, non-reflux chest pain, and 36 (m/f = 16/20) healthy controls. The biomechanical and sensory properties of subjects with and without esophageal hypersensitivity were compared to controls. The frequency, intensity and duration of chest pain were assessed. RESULTS: 143 (75 %) subjects had esophageal hypersensitivity and 46 (25%) had normal sensitivity. Typical chest pain was reproduced in 105/143 (74%) subjects. Subjects with hypersensitivity demonstrated larger cross-sectional area (CSA) (p<0.001), decreased esophageal wall strain (p<0.001) and distensibility (p<0.001), and lower thresholds for perception (p<0.01), discomfort (p<0.01) and pain (p<0.01) compared to those without hypersensitivity or healthy controls. Chest pain scores (mean ± SD) for frequency, intensity and duration were 2.5 ± 0.3, 2.2 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.2 respectively, and were similar between the two patient groups. CONCLUSIONS 75% of subjects with FCP demonstrate esophageal hypersensitivity. Visceral hyperalgesia and sensori-motor dysfunction of the esophagus play a key role in the pathogenesis of chest pain. PMID:20067548

  16. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Thomas, Jimmy; Shah, Deep; Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong; Mitchell, Kevin; Gao, Song; Balter, Peter; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within <2.5 cm of the chest wall; 104 (39%) developed skin toxicity (any grade); 14 (5%) developed acute pain (any grade), and 45 (17%) developed chronic pain (Grade 1 in 22 cases [49%] and Grade 2 or 3 in 23 cases [51%]). Both skin toxicity and chest wall pain were associated with the V{sub 30}, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI {>=}29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  17. The Importance of Esophageal and Gastric Diseases as Causes of Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Jung; Kim, Nam Su; Lee, Young Ho; Nam, Eun Woo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pediatric chest pain is considered to be idiopathic or caused by benign diseases. This study was to find out how much upper gastrointestinal (UGI) diseases are major causes of chest pain in pediatric patients. Methods The records of 75 children (42 boys and 33 girls, aged 3-17 years old) who have presented with mainly chest pain from January 1995 to March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Chest X-ray and electrocardiography (ECG) were performed in all aptients. Further cardiologic and gastrointestinal (GI) evaluations were performed in indicated patients. Results Chest pain was most common in the children of 6 and 9 to 14 years old. Esopha-gogastric diseases were unexpectedly the most common direct causes of the chest pain, the next are idiopathic, cardiac diseases, chest trauma, respiratory disease, and psychosomatic disease. Even though 21 showed abnormal ECG findings and 7 showed abnormalities on echocardiography, cardiac diseases were determined to be the direct causes only in 9. UGI endoscopy was performed in 57 cases, and esophago-gastric diseases which thereafter were thought to be causative diseases were 48 cases. The mean age of the children with esophago-gastric diseases were different with marginal significance from that of the other children with chest pain not related with esophago-gastric diseases. All the 48 children diagnosed with treated with GI medicines based on the diagnosis, and 37 cases (77.1%) subsequently showed clinical improvement. Conclusion Diagnostic approaches to find out esophageal and gastric diseases in children with chest pain are important as well as cardiac and respiratory investigations. PMID:26770901

  18. Quality of Life After Bypass Surgery in Patients with Chest Pain and Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bypass Surgery in Patients With Chest Pain and Heart Failure The full report is titled “Quality-of-Life ... in patients who have coronary artery disease plus heart failure, which can cause additional symptoms, such as shortness ...

  19. Diagnostic Strategies for the Evaluation of Chest Pain: Clinical Implications From SCOT-HEART and PROMISE.

    PubMed

    Fordyce, Christopher B; Newby, David E; Douglas, Pamela S

    2016-02-23

    SCOT-HEART (Scottish COmputed Tomography of the HEART) and PROMISE (PROspective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of chest pain) represent the 2 largest and most comprehensive cardiovascular imaging outcome trials in patients with stable chest pain and provide significant insights into patient diagnosis, management, and outcomes. These trials are particularly timely, given the well-recognized knowledge gaps and widespread use of noninvasive imaging. The overall goal of this review is to distill the data generated from these 2 pivotal trials to better inform the practicing clinician in the selection of noninvasive testing for stable chest pain. Similarities and differences between SCOT-HEART and PROMISE are highlighted, and clinical and practical implications are discussed. Both trials show that coronary computed tomography angiography should have a greater role in the diagnostic pathway of patients with stable chest pain. PMID:26892420

  20. Unexplained Chest Pain and Physical Activity: Balancing Between Existential Uncertainty and Certainty.

    PubMed

    Røysland, Ingrid Ølfarnes; Friberg, Febe

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common complaints in medical settings, but the majority of cases have no detectable cause. Physical activity is recommended, but is one of the major avoidance behaviors in patients with coronary heart disease. The article aims at achieving an understanding of the meaning of physical activity for people with unexplained chest pain. Fifteen people were interviewed using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach, with the results revealing four themes: "awareness of the influence of previous life experiences on the decision to be physically active," "unanswered questions related to physical activity and unexplained chest pain," "intertwinement of body and mind," and "physical activity as a source of personal growth." Comprehensive understanding was formulated as "Being physically active while living with unexplained chest pain means balancing between existential uncertainty and certainty." The results are discussed in relation to capability. It is suggested that health professionals adopt a person-centered approach. PMID:25662944

  1. Just 6 Percent of Chest Pain Cases in ER Are Life-Threatening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Percent of Chest Pain Cases in ER Are Life-Threatening: Study Muscle strains, anxiety, gastrointestinal issues often ... than 6 percent of these patients suffer from life-threatening conditions such as a heart attack. Most ...

  2. Clinical Distinct Features of Noncardiac Chest Pain in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Ho; Lee, Jung Hyeon; Ko, Soon Young; Hong, Sung Noh; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sub

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is a very common disorder world-wide and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is known to be the most common cause. The prevalence of NCCP may tend to decrease with increasing age. However, there is little report about young aged NCCP. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of GERD and to evaluate the efficacy of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) test in the young NCCP patients. Methods Thirty patients with at least weekly NCCP less than 40 years were enrolled. The baseline symptoms were assessed using a daily symptom diary for 14 days. Esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) and 24 hr esophageal pH monitoring were performed for the diagnosis of GERD and esophageal manometry was done. Then, patients were tried with lansoprazole 30 mg twice daily for 14 days, considering positive if a symptom score improved ≥ 50% compared to the baseline. Results Nine (30%) of the patients were diagnosed with GERD at EGD and/or 24 hr esophageal pH monitoring, also, 3 (10%) were diagnosed with GERD-associated esophageal motility disorder and 3 (10%) were non GERD-associated. Concerning PPI test, GERD-related NCCP had a higher positive PPI test (n = 8, 89%) than non GERD-related NCCP (n = 5, 24%) (p = 0.002). Conclusions In young patients with NCCP, a prevalence of GERD diagnosed using EGD and/or 24 hr esophageal pH monitoring was 30%. PPI test was very predictable on diagnosis of GERD-related NCCP, thus, PPI test in young NCCP patients may assist to the physician's clinical judgment of NCCP. PMID:20535347

  3. ACR Appropriateness Criteria chronic chest pain-low to intermediate probability of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Pamela K; White, Richard D; Abbara, Suhny; Araoz, Philip A; Cury, Ricardo C; Dorbala, Sharmila; Earls, James P; Hoffmann, Udo; Hsu, Joe Y; Jacobs, Jill E; Javidan-Nejad, Cylen; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Mammen, Leena; Martin, Edward T; Ryan, Thomas; Shah, Amar B; Steiner, Robert M; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; White, Charles S

    2013-05-01

    Chronic chest pain can arise from a variety of etiologies. However, of those potential causes, the most life-threatening include cardiac disease. Chronic cardiac chest pain may be caused either by ischemia or atherosclerotic coronary artery disease or by other cardiac-related etiologies, such as pericardial disease. To consider in patients, especially those who are at low risk for coronary artery disease, are etiologies of chronic noncardiac chest pain. Noncardiac chest pain is most commonly related to gastroesophageal reflux disease or other esophageal diseases. Alternatively, it may be related to costochondritis, arthritic or degenerative diseases, old trauma, primary or metastatic tumors, or pleural disease. Rarely, noncardiac chest pain may be referred pain from organ systems below the diaphragm, such as the gallbladder. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:23542027

  4. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Alley, William; Mahler, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT); Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT); North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR); and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART) score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. PMID:27147894

  5. Atypical Chest Pain: An Unusual Presentation of Spinal Metastasis due to Penile Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pywell, Sarah; Dott, Cameron; Khan, Mohammad Taimur; Sivanadarajah, Naveethan

    2016-01-01

    Spinal metastases may present in a myriad of ways, most commonly back pain with or without neurology. We report an unusual presentation of isolated atypical chest pain preceding metastatic cord compression, secondary to penile carcinoma. Spinal metastasis from penile carcinoma is rare with few cases reported. This unusual presentation highlights the need for a heightened level of clinical suspicion for spinal metastases as a possible cause for chest pain in any patients with a history of carcinoma. The case is discussed with reference to the literature. PMID:27429829

  6. Morbidity of "DSM-IV" Axis I Disorders in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain: Psychiatric Morbidity Linked with Increased Pain and Health Care Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kamila S.; Raffa, Susan D.; Jakle, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.; Covino, Nicholas A.; Ullman, Edward; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined current and lifetime psychiatric morbidity, chest pain, and health care utilization in 229 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), angina-like pain in the absence of cardiac etiology. Diagnostic interview findings based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV"; American…

  7. A national survey of emergency department chest pain centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Rydman, R J; Ting, S; Kampe, L; Selker, H P

    1998-06-01

    Although chest pain centers are promoted as improving emergency cardiac care, no data exist on their structure and processes. This national study determines the 1995 prevalence rate for emergency department (ED)-based chest pain centers in the United States and compares organizational differences of EDs with and without such centers. A mail survey was directed to 476 EDs randomly selected from the American Hospital Association's database of metropolitan hospitals (n = 2,309); the response rate was 63%. The prevalence of chest pain centers was 22.5% (95% confidence interval 18% to 27%), which yielded a projection of 520 centers in the United States in 1995. EDs with centers had higher overall patient volumes, greater use of high-technology testing, lower treatment times for thrombolytic therapy, and more advertising (all p <0.05). Hospitals with centers had greater market competition and more beds per annual admissions, cardiac catheterization, and open heart surgery capability (all p <0.05). Logistic regression identified open heart surgery, high-admission volumes, and nonprofit status as independent predictors of hospitals having chest pain centers. Thus, chest pain centers have a moderate prevalence, offer more services and marketing efforts than standard EDs, and tend to be hosted by large nonprofit hospitals. PMID:9631967

  8. Chest pain units: A necessity or only a name to encourage patients

    PubMed Central

    Reza Assareh, Ahmad; Azadi, Nasim; Tahmasebi, Safar Ali; Sahraei, Tooba; Dabbagh, Razieh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Mahdavi, Kamran; Heydari, Ali; Alasti, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute chest pain is a common symptom among patients presenting to emergency wards. Identification and admission of patients with real acute coronary syndrome and preventing the hospitalization of people with false diagnosis of coronary syndrome are the most important tasks in emergency wards. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of designing a special chest pain unit in emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital (Ahvaz, Iran). METHODS The patients with markers of ongoing cardiac ischemia underwent selective coronary angiography. The chest pain unit protocol was applied to selected patients with no definite evidence of acute coronary syndrome or alternative pathology. The protocol consisted of twelve hours of observation and serial 12-lead electrocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, and biochemical testing followed by an exercise treadmill test. We compared the number of patients who were discharged after work up, discharged themselves against medical advice, admitted at coronary care unit (CCU), underwent invasive procedures or died between 2007 and 2010. RESULTS During 2010, 43% of patients were discharged after evaluation in the chest pain unit. In 2007 however, 26% were discharged following traditional assessments. The admission rate increased from 23% in 2007 to 36% in 2010. The percentage of patients who discharged themselves against medical advice decreased from 37% in 2007 to 14% in 2010. There was not a statistically significant difference between mortality rates in 2007 and 2010. CONCLUSION Providing a special chest pain unit in emergency ward in our condition is helpful. It reduces unnecessary admissions and improves patient satisfaction. PMID:23359791

  9. Pleuritic chest pain and fluid levels on imaging in a heavy cannabis smoker.

    PubMed

    Cary, Rachel Margaret; Bragg, Craig; Mukherjee, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 48-year-old man with an extensive cannabis smoking history who presented with pleuritic chest pain. A chest X-ray revealed multiple large, apical lung bullae with fluid levels, an appearance consistent with infection. Lung function tests showed moderate airflow obstruction and decreased gas transfer. The infection was treated with a prolonged course of antimicrobials, and the patient followed up by respiratory physicians. PMID:25650062

  10. Distress correlates with the degree of chest pain: a description of patients awaiting revascularisation.

    PubMed Central

    Bengtson, A.; Herlitz, J.; Karlsson, T.; Hjalmarson, A.

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To describe various symptoms other than pain among consecutive patients on the waiting list for possible coronary revascularisation in relation to estimated severity of chest pain. DESIGN: All patients were sent a postal questionnaire for symptom evaluation. SUBJECTS: All patients in western Sweden on the waiting list in September 1990 who had been referred for coronary angiography or coronary revascularisation (n = 904). RESULTS: 88% of the patients reported chest pain symptoms that limited their daily activities to a greater or lesser degree. Various psychological symptoms including anxiety and depression were strongly associated with the severity of pain (P < 0.001), as were sleep disturbances (P < 0.001), and dyspnoea and various psychosomatic symptoms (P < 0.001). Nevertheless only 44% of the patients reported chest pain as the major disruptive symptom, whereas the remaining 56% reported uncertainty about the future, fear, or unspecified symptoms as being the most disturbing. CONCLUSIONS: In a consecutive series of patients on the waiting list for possible coronary revascularisation, half the participants reported that uncertainty and fear were more disturbing than chest pain. PMID:8800988

  11. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum: A Rare Disease Associated with Chest Pain in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Song, Jinyoung; Kang, I-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a rare entity, with only a few cases reported, especially in adolescents. We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of SPM in adolescents and the diagnostic implications of computed tomography (CT) and esophagography therein. Materials and Methods This retrospective descriptive study was conducted as a review of medical records of 416 adolescents (10-18 years of age) with chest pain from March 2005 to June 2013. Information on clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, hospital stay, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. Results Among adolescents complaining of chest pain, 11 patients had SPM (11/416, 2.64%). All patients presented with pleuritic chest pain, and 54.5% reported neck pain as the most common associated complaint. Clinical findings were nonspecific, and initial chest X-ray assessment was diagnostic only in three of 11 patients. However, reassessment of chest X-ray revealed diagnostic findings of SPM in five of the remaining eight patients. CT was diagnostic in all patients, while esophagography and echocardiogram were uninformative. Symptomatic improvement was noted within 2.45±1.2 hours (range, 0.5 to 4) after supportive care; mean hospital stay was 4.54±0.99 days (range, 2 to 6). No recurrence was observed. Conclusion SPM is a rare disease that should be considered in adolescent patients with pleuritic chest pain. Careful reading of initial chest X-rays is important to avoiding further unnecessary investigations. SPM is self-limited and treatment is supportive; nevertheless, if there are no indications of esophageal rupture, urgent esophagography is not recommended. PMID:26256992

  12. Investigation and management of patients with pleuritic chest pain presenting to the accident and emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K; Raghuram, A

    1999-01-01

    The assessment of a patient with pleuritic chest pain calls for a high degree of clinical acumen and a high degree of suspicion that the diagnosis might be pulmonary embolism. This area is one of the most difficult in A&E medicine (and indeed chest medicine). One error is to "think the best" when considering the diagnosis in such patients but experience soon teaches to "think PE" and diagnose less serious conditions only when pulmonary embolism has been excluded. A key consideration is the presence of risk factors. Because the diagnosis is difficult, there should be no hesitation in requesting a senior opinion or referring to the inpatient medical team. We have produced an algorithm (fig 1) for the investigation and management of pleuritic chest pain as discussed in this article. Three questions relating to this article are: (1) Can pulmonary embolism be the diagnosis in a patient with pleuritic chest pain but a normal chest radiograph, ECG, and arterial blood gases? (2) What is the chest radiograph abnormality which is most likely to alert you to the possibility of pulmonary embolism? (3) What percentage of patients with a low clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism but a high probability V/Q scan will have pulmonary embolism demonstrated on pulmonary angiography? The three key references are The PIOPED Investigators, Dalen, and Fennerty. PMID:9918289

  13. Syncope caused by coronary artery spasm without chest pain leading to ventricular fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Yusuke; Kato, Takao; Minamino, Eri; Inoko, Moriaki

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of syncope caused by coronary artery spasm without chest pain leading to ventricular fibrillation despite of vasodilator therapy with a calcium channel blocker (CCB). A 68-year-old man presented with two episodes of syncope without chest pain. Ergonovine provocation test induced a diffuse spasm in the right coronary artery (RCA) and subsequently, ventricular fibrillation. Under the therapy with multiple vasodilators including two CCBs, a second ergonovine provocation induced a spasm of the proximal RCA resulting in complete obstruction. Owing to drug-resistant coronary spasm complicated by ventricular fibrillation, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) was implanted. This case report highlights the occurrence of syncope caused by coronary artery spasm without chest pain that was refractory to single CCB therapy and needed ICD implantation. Therapy with multiple vasodilators, including two or more CCBs, along with ICD implantation may be required to treat such refractory coronary artery spasms leading to lethal arrhythmia. PMID:23749837

  14. Chest pain, panic disorder and coronary artery disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Soares-Filho, Gastão L F; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Santulli, Gaetano; Silva, Adriana C; Machado, Sergio; Valenca, Alexandre M; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    Chest pain may be due benign diseases but often suggests an association with coronary artery disease, which justifies a quick search for medical care. However, some people have anxiety disorder with symptoms that resemble clearly an acute coronary syndrome. More specifically, during a panic attack an abrupt feeling of fear accompanied by symptoms such as breathlessness, palpitations and chest pain, makes patients believe they have a heart attack and confuse physicians about the diagnosis. The association between panic disorder and coronary artery disease has been extensively studied in recent years and, although some studies have shown anxiety disorders coexisting or increasing the risk of heart disease, one causal hypothesis is still missing. The aim of this systematic review is to present the various ways in which the scientific community has been investigating the relation between chest pain, panic disorder and coronary artery disease. PMID:24923348

  15. Thallium myocardial scanning in the emergency department evaluation of chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, S.E.

    1989-05-01

    Chest pain is a common complaint of patients seen in the emergency department. The causes are legion, and range from the non-life threatening to the potentially catastrophic. Thallium heart scanning was done prospectively in 20 patients with a ''classic'' history for myocardial infarction (eight patients) or atypical chest pain and/or associated symptoms plus an abnormal ECG (12 patients) to discern a subset of patients from whom thallium scintography may be indicated in the emergency department. Although further investigation is needed, our preliminary study suggests that myocardial scanning with thallium can be a safe, fairly rapid, and useful objective parameter in the emergency department detection of suspected myocardial infarction, and in differential diagnosis of chest pain when other data such as the history, physical examination, ECG, or enzymes are inconclusive.

  16. Undisclosed cocaine use and chest pain in emergency departments of Spain

    PubMed Central

    Burillo-Putze, Guillermo; López, Beatriz; León, Juan María Borreguero; Sánchez, Miquel Sánchez; González, Martin García; Rodriguez, Alberto Domínguez; Afonso, Eva Vallbona; Sosa, Alejandro Jiménez; Mirò, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Aims Illicit cocaine consumption in Spain is one of the highest in Europe. Our objective was to study the incidence of undisclosed cocaine consumption in patients attending in two Spanish Emergency Departments for chest pain. Methods We analysed urine samples from consenting consecutive patients attending ED for chest pain to determine the presence of cocaine, and other drugs, by semiquantative tests with fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). Results Of 140 cases, 15.7 presented positive test for drugs, and cocaine was present in 6.4%. All cocaine-positive patients were younger (p < 0.001); none was admitted to Hospital (p = 0.08). No significant differences in ED stay or need for hospitalization were found between cocaine-positive and negative patients. Conclusion This finding in chest pain patients who consented to urine analysis suggests that the true incidence of cocaine use leading to such ED visits may be higher. PMID:19254377

  17. New guidance on imaging tests for a range of chest pain scenarios.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    New recommendations from the American College of Cardiology and the American College of Radiology offer guidance to emergency providers on which imaging tests to use in 20 different clinical scenarios involving chest pain. For each clinical scenario, an expert panel rated the appropriateness of a range of imaging modalities as rarely appropriate (R), may be appropriate (M), or appropriate (A). The guidelines are constructed to flow from the clinician's judgment as to the probable cause of the chest pain. The recommendations for each clinical scenario are condensed into tables that can be fashioned into notecards or a smartphone app for quick reference. Developers note that the guidelines will need to be revisited when high-sensitivity troponin tests are approved for use in the United States, as these newer-generation blood tests may negate the need for many imaging tests when patients present with chest pain. PMID:27093767

  18. Chest pain in family practice. Diagnosis and long-term outcome in a community setting.

    PubMed Central

    Svavarsdóttir, A. E.; Jónasson, M. R.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Fjeldsted, K.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe diagnostic distribution and outcome of chest pain among patients attending an urban family practice. DESIGN: Retrospective, descriptive chart review. SETTING: Primary care practice. PARTICIPANTS: All patients contacts for chest pain at Fossvogur Health Centre in the years 1989 and 1990 (193 contacts with 189 patients) were examined. One patient died before follow up and two could not be reached for follow up; they were excluded from the study. Of the 190 contacts and 186 patients studied, one patient who had two contacts with the clinic died during the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age and sex distribution, physical examination, investigations, diagnosis, and treatment; well-being of every patient was checked 3 to 4 years after initial contact. We asked about evolution of symptoms and looked for possible misdiagnosis. RESULTS: Musculoskeletal pain was diagnosed in 48.9% of contacts, heart diseases in 17.9% and 9.5% had undiagnosed chest pain. The history was the main diagnostic tool for patients with musculoskeletal diseases, while patients with heart diseases were examined more carefully and underwent more diagnostic procedures. Follow up showed that no serious disease had been missed in spite of restrictive use of laboratory investigations. CONCLUSIONS: The working methods of family doctors who examined patients with chest pain in this health centre can differentiate between patients with serious diseases and those with benign conditions. PMID:8704488

  19. Stress Tests for Chest Pain: When You Need an Imaging Test -- and When You Don't

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Resources Stress Tests for Chest Pain Stress Tests for Chest Pain When you need an imaging test—and when you don’t DOWNLOAD PDF If ... that suggests you might have heart disease, a test that stresses the heart can help you and ...

  20. One Year Medical Outcomes and ED Recidivism Following ED Observation for Cocaine-Associated Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Rebecca; Walton, Maureen A.; Weber, Jim Edward; O'Broin, Samantha; Tripathi, Shanti P; Maio, Ronald F.; Booth, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Chest pain is the most common complaint among cocaine users who present to the ED seeking care and many hospital resources are applied to stratify cocaine users in regard to future cardiac morbidity and mortality. Little is known about the longitudinal cardiac and non cardiac medical outcomes of cocaine users who have been stratified to an ED observation period following their ED visit. Objectives to examine one-year cardiac outcomes in a low-intermediate risk sample of patients with cocaine- associated chest pain in an urban ED, as well as to examine ED recidivism one year for cardiac and non-cardiac complaints. Methods Prospective consecutive cohort study of patients (18–60 years) who presented to an urban Level 1 ED with cocaine-associated chest pain and were risk stratified to low-intermediate cardiac risk. Exclusion criteria: EKG suggestive of AMI, elevated serum cardiac markers, history of AMI or CABG, hemodynamic instability, unstable angina. Baseline interviews using validated measures of health functioning, and substance use were conducted during CPOU stay, and 3, 6, and 12 months. ED utilization during the study year was abstracted from medical chart. Zero-Inflated Poisson regression analyses were conducted to predict recurrent ED visits. Results 219 participants (73% participation) were enrolled, 65% returned to the ED post index visit; 23% returned for chest pain, of these 66% had a positive cocaine urine screen. No patient had an AMI within the one year follow up period. Patients with continued cocaine use were more likely to have a recurrent ED visit (p<0.001) but these repeat visits were most often related to musculoskeletal pain (21%), and injury (30%) rather than potential cardiac complaints. Conclusions Patients with cocaine-associated chest pain who are low to intermediate cardiac risk and complete a CPOU protocol have less then 1% rate of MI in the subsequent 12-months. PMID:18824277

  1. Pleuritic chest pain from portal hypertensive gastropathy in ESRD patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease misdiagnosed as pericarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma; Achebe, Jennifer; Odenigbo, Charles; Oguejiofor, Fidelis

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) is a gastric mucosal lesion complicating portal hypertension, with higher prevalence in decompensated cirrhosis. PHG can sometimes complicate autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) due to the presence of multiple liver cysts. Besides, PHG is known to present as chest pain, with or without hematemesis. Other causes of chest pain in ADPKD include referred chest pain from progressively enlarging kidney cysts, and rare pericardial cysts. Chest pain, especially if pleuritic, in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, is often ascribed to uremic pericarditis. We present recurrent pleuritic chest pain in a 24-year old ESRD patient with ADPKD that was initially misdiagnosed as uremic pericarditis. It was ultimately shown to represent symptomatic PHG with excellent therapeutic response to proton pump inhibitors. PMID:27069969

  2. A 34-Year-Old Woman With Recurrent Right-Sided Chest Pain and Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Albores, Jeffrey; Fishbein, Gregory; Bando, Joanne

    2015-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented with her third episode of acute-onset right-sided chest pain and dyspnea. She had two prior similar occurrences of right-sided sharp, pleuritic chest pain with radiation to the back and dyspnea. Chest radiographs during these presentations revealed a small apical right-sided pneumothorax that was managed conservatively with high-flow oxygen. All three presentations were associated with vigorous exercise and the first day of her menses. She denied cough, hemoptysis, fever, smoking history, airplane travel, scuba diving, or trauma during these presentations. The patient has been trying to conceive for the past year but has been unsuccessful because of uterine fibroids but no history of endometriosis. PMID:26527442

  3. Chest pain caused by tracheostomy tube malposition: the importance of choosing the right tube.

    PubMed

    Inchingolo, R; Smargiassi, A; Bello, G; Pennisi, M A; Chiappini, F; Pirronti, T; Valente, S

    2011-02-01

    We describe a case of chest pain caused by tracheostomy tube malposition in a 65-year old woman with chronic respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This report highlights the importance of the correct choice of tracheostomy tube devices for mechanically ventilated and/or spontaneously breathing patients. PMID:21283068

  4. Women and Chest Pain: Recognizing the Different Faces of Angina in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Basmah; D’Onofrio, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) in the United States see over eight million cases of chest pain annually. While a cardinal symptom of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), multiple emergent and non-emergent causes can attribute to chest pain. This case-based perspective describes the different sex-specific causes of angina seen in ED patients. Once coronary artery disease (CAD) is ruled out with standard protocols, microvascular dysfunction is perhaps the most prevalent but under-diagnosed cause of non-CAD related angina in ED patients. Additional causes include coronary artery spasm, coronary artery dissection, coronary artery endothelial dysfunction and myocardial bridging. Non-CAD related angina is associated with persistent chest pain causing poor function, quality of life, and recidivism. Clinicians should consider additional diagnostics to routinely screen for non-CAD related causes of angina in patients with recurrent chest pain. Future work is needed to better define the epidemiological, clinical, biological, and genetic correlates of microvascular dysfunction in these patients. PMID:27354848

  5. A 57-Year-Old Man With Insidious Dyspnea and Nonpleuritic Chest and Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenta; Alba, George A; Scheske, Jonathan A; Meyersohn, Nandini M; Stone, James R; Vlahakes, Gus J; Wright, Cameron D; Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Dudzinski, David M

    2016-08-01

    A 57-year-old man with a history of DVT and pulmonary embolism, transient ischemic attacks, prior 60 pack-year smoking history, and oxygen-dependent COPD presented with insidiously worsening dyspnea associated with new pleuritic chest and back pain. PMID:27502992

  6. Women and Chest Pain: Recognizing the Different Faces of Angina in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Basmah; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2016-06-01

    Emergency departments (ED) in the United States see over eight million cases of chest pain annually. While a cardinal symptom of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), multiple emergent and non-emergent causes can attribute to chest pain. This case-based perspective describes the different sex-specific causes of angina seen in ED patients. Once coronary artery disease (CAD) is ruled out with standard protocols, microvascular dysfunction is perhaps the most prevalent but under-diagnosed cause of non-CAD related angina in ED patients. Additional causes include coronary artery spasm, coronary artery dissection, coronary artery endothelial dysfunction and myocardial bridging. Non-CAD related angina is associated with persistent chest pain causing poor function, quality of life, and recidivism. Clinicians should consider additional diagnostics to routinely screen for non-CAD related causes of angina in patients with recurrent chest pain. Future work is needed to better define the epidemiological, clinical, biological, and genetic correlates of microvascular dysfunction in these patients. PMID:27354848

  7. Chest Pain in Children With Suspected Type I Fibrillinopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Moisés; Matamala-Morillo, Miguel Ángel; Segado-Arenas, Antonio; Marín-Iglesias, M del Rosario; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso M

    2015-10-01

    Chest pain is the second most common reason for referral to a pediatric cardiologist, because cardiovascular-related disorders are a major concern for children and their families when seeking medical attention. On the rare occasions when pediatric chest pain is a result of severe heart disease, it is usually associated with well-known cardiovascular risk factors such as fibrillinopathies. Type 1 fibrillinopathies are heritable disorders caused by mutations in the fibrillin genes that lead to a broad spectrum of connective tissue phenotypes ranging from Marfan syndrome, at the most severe end, to patients displaying mild marfanoid features, or milder Marfan (MM). We report the case of an adolescent patient with MM and suspected acute coronary syndrome, with chest pain and electrocardiographic changes suggestive of myocardial ischemia. Despite the low risk of coronary or aortic dissection/aneurysm in MM, these possibilities should be tested. Once they are ruled out, mitral valve prolapse should be considered as the main cause of chest pain with ischemic-like changes in the inferior electrocardiogram leads. We emphasize that clinical and echocardiographic follow-up over years is warranted in the pediatric population to ensure that the aortic root does not show progressive dilatation or a tendency to dissect. Finally, genotyping is clinically indicated for early and complete diagnosis in patients with MM as well as de novo Marfan syndrome to take advantage of educational and clinical programs for young carriers of the mutation. PMID:26391944

  8. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. Methods and results 115 adults aged 18–75 years with acute, non-specific chest pain of musculoskeletal origin were recruited from a cardiology department in Denmark. After ruling out acute coronary syndrome and receiving usual care, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain were randomised to 4 weeks of community-based chiropractic care (n=59) or to a single information session aimed at encouraging self-management as complementary to usual care (n=56). Data on resource use were obtained from Danish national registries and valued from a societal perspective. Patient cost and health-related quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; based on EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36)) were compared in cost-effectiveness analyses over 12 months from baseline. Mean costs were €2183 lower for the group with chiropractic care, but not statistically significant (95% CI −4410.5 to 43.0). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio suggested that chiropractic care was cost-effective with a probability of 97%, given a threshold value of €30 000 per QALY gained. In both groups, there was an increase in the health-related quality of life, and the mean increases were similar over the 12-month evaluation period. The mean differences in QALYs between the groups were negligible. Conclusions Chiropractic care was more cost-effective than self-management. Therefore, chiropractic care can be seen as a good example of a targeted primary care approach for a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. Trial registration number NCT00462241. PMID:27175285

  9. Investigation in patients with previous myocardial infarction who present with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, A.P.; Fox, K.; Forse, G.; Pratt, T.; Steiner, R.

    1981-12-01

    Thirty-five patients who presented with chest pain underwent mapping of the ECG with exercise and angiocardiography. Krypton-81m was used to assess regional myocardial perfusion before, during and after atrial pacing. Twelve of the 35 patients had negative exercise tests. Eight of these 12 had normal coronary arteries and four had less than or equal to 50% stenosis of at least one major coronary artery. All 12 patients had uniform increases in regional myocardial perfusion (98 plus/minus 14.0%) during atrial pacing. Thirteen of the 35 patients had a history of myocardial infarction and precordial areas of Q waves. During exercise, all 13 patients complained of chest pain and showed precordial areas of both ST-segment elevation and depression. These 13 patients had greater than or equal to 70% stenosis of at least one major coronary artery. Myocardial blood flow studies showed fixed defects of perfusion corresponding to the Q waves and ST-segment elevation. In addition, there were separate transient decreases of regional myocardial perfusion (70 plus/minus 9.0%) during atrial pacing corresponding to ST-segment depression and chest pain. Ten of the 35 patients had a history of myocardial infarction and precordial areas of Q waves. These areas showed no changes during atrial pacing. All the patients showed at least one remote region of myocardium that increased perfusion (74 plus/minus 170%) throughout pacing. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction may present with chest pain. In this study, ST-segment elevation during an exercise ECG was not associated with chest pain or detectable myocardial ischemia. Regional perfusion in infarcted segments of myocardium did not change with atrial pacing.

  10. Osteoarthritis of the Manubriosternal Joint: An Uncommon Cause of Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Rai, Bibek K

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the manubriosternal joint is a rare cause of chest pain. The diagnosis is difficult, and other serious causes of chest pain have to be ruled out first. We report one case that was treated with fusion of the manubriosternal joint using an iliac crest bone graft with a cervical locking plate and screws with excellent results. Preoperative CT scan images were used to measure the screw length and the drill stop depth. In this case report, we have shown that arthrodesis can be an effective way of treating osteoarthritis of the manubriosternal joint when other measures fail. Furthermore, the use of a cervical locking plate with appropriate and careful preoperative planning affords a safe surgical technique, rapid pain relief, and ultimately, sound and asymptomatic union of the joint. PMID:26677420

  11. Osteoarthritis of the Manubriosternal Joint: An Uncommon Cause of Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Rai, Bibek K

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the manubriosternal joint is a rare cause of chest pain. The diagnosis is difficult, and other serious causes of chest pain have to be ruled out first. We report one case that was treated with fusion of the manubriosternal joint using an iliac crest bone graft with a cervical locking plate and screws with excellent results. Preoperative CT scan images were used to measure the screw length and the drill stop depth. In this case report, we have shown that arthrodesis can be an effective way of treating osteoarthritis of the manubriosternal joint when other measures fail. Furthermore, the use of a cervical locking plate with appropriate and careful preoperative planning affords a safe surgical technique, rapid pain relief, and ultimately, sound and asymptomatic union of the joint. PMID:26677420

  12. Another cause of chest pain: Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis in an otherwise healthy adult

    PubMed Central

    Vacek, Thomas P; Rehman, Shahnaz; Yu, Shipeng; Moza, Ankush; Assaly, Ragheb

    2014-01-01

    Chest pain requires a detailed differential diagnosis with good history-taking skills to differentiate between cardiogenic and noncardiogenic causes. Moreover, when other symptoms such as fever and elevated white blood cell count are involved, it may be necessary to consider causes that include infectious sources. A 53-year-old female with no significant past medical history returned to the hospital with recurrent complaints of chest pain that was constant, substernal, reproducible, and exacerbated with inspiration and expiration. The chest pain was thought to be noncardiogenic, as electrocardiography did not demonstrate changes, and cardiac enzymes were found to be negative for signs of ischemia. The patient’s blood cultures were analyzed from a previous admission and were shown to be positive for Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was started empirically on vancomycin, which was later switched to ceftriaxone as the bacteria were more sensitive to this antibiotic. A transthoracic echocardiogram did not demonstrate any vegetation or signs of endocarditis. There was a small right pleural effusion discovered on X-ray. Therefore, computed tomography as well as magnetic resonance imaging of the chest were performed, and showed osteomyelitis of the chest. The patient was continued on intravenous ceftriaxone for a total of 6 weeks. Tests for HIV, hepatitis A, B, and C were all found to be negative. The patient had no history of childhood illness, recurrent infections, or previous trauma to the chest, and had had no recent respiratory infections, pneumonia, or any underlying lung condition. Hence, her condition was thought to be a case of primary sternal osteomyelitis without known cause. PMID:25246811

  13. Effectiveness of the Chest Pain Choice decision aid in emergency department patients with low-risk chest pain: study protocol for a multicenter randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chest pain is the second most common reason patients visit emergency departments (EDs) and often results in very low-risk patients being admitted for prolonged observation and advanced cardiac testing. Shared decision-making, including educating patients regarding their 45-day risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and management options, might safely decrease healthcare utilization. Methods/Design This is a protocol for a multicenter practical patient-level randomized trial to compare an intervention group receiving a decision aid, Chest Pain Choice (CPC), to a control group receiving usual care. Adults presenting to five geographically and ethnically diverse EDs who are being considered for admission for observation and advanced cardiac testing will be eligible for enrollment. We will measure the effect of CPC on (1) patient knowledge regarding their 45-day risk for ACS and the available management options (primary outcome); (2) patient engagement in the decision-making process; (3) the degree of conflict patients experience related to feeling uninformed (decisional conflict); (4) patient and clinician satisfaction with the decision made; (5) the rate of major adverse cardiac events at 30 days; (6) the proportion of patients admitted for advanced cardiac testing; and (7) healthcare utilization. To assess these outcomes, we will administer patient and clinician surveys immediately after each clinical encounter, obtain video recordings of the patient-clinician discussion, administer a patient healthcare utilization diary, analyze hospital billing records, review the electronic medical record, and conduct telephone follow-up. Discussion This multicenter trial will robustly assess the effectiveness of a decision aid on patient-centered outcomes, safety, and healthcare utilization in low-risk chest pain patients from a variety of geographically and ethnically diverse EDs. Trial registration NCT01969240. PMID:24884807

  14. Unusual chest wall pain caused by thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kinshi; Yabuki, Shoji; Otani, Koji; Nikaido, Takuya; Otoshi, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is clinically rare. There are few cases of disc herniation of the thoracic spine in top athletes described in the literature. We herein present a rare case of chest wall pain due to thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher. A 30-year-old, left-handed pitcher complained of left-sided chest wall pain in the region of his lower ribs during a game. Neurological examination revealed hypoesthesia of the left side of the chest at the level of the lower thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed a left-sided paramedian disc herniation at the T9-T10 level. The player was initially prescribed rest, administration of pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), and subsequent physical rehabilitation. He was able to resume full training and pitching without medication 6 months after the onset. A follow-up MRI of the thoracic spine showed a reduction in the size of the herniated disc compared to the initial findings. Though relatively rare, thoracic disc herniation should be considered in cases of chest wall pain in athletes. PMID:26983590

  15. Exertional esophageal pH-metry and manometry in recurrent chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Budzyński, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of 24-h and exertional esophageal pH-metry and manometry in patients with recurrent chest pain. METHODS: The study included 111 patients (54% male) with recurrent angina-like chest pain, non-responsive to therapy with proton pump inhibitors. Sixty-five (59%) had non-obstructive lesions in coronary artery angiography, and in 46 (41%) significant coronary artery narrowing was found. In all patients, 24-h esophageal pH-metry and manometry, and treadmill stress tests with simultaneous esophageal pH-metry and manometry monitoring were performed. During a 24-h examination the percentage of spontaneous chest pain (sCP) episodes associated with acid reflux or dysmotility (symptom index, SI) was calculated. Patients with SI > 50% for acid gastroesophageal reflux (GER) were classified as having GER-related sCP. The remaining symptomatic individuals were determined as having non-GER-related sCP. During the stress test, the occurrence of chest pain, episodes of esophageal acidification (pH < 4 for 10 s) and esophageal spasm with more than 55% of simultaneous contractions (exercise-provoked esophageal spasm or EPES) were noted. RESULTS: Sixty-eight (61%) individuals reported sCP during 24-h esophageal function monitoring. Eleven of these (16%) were classified as having GER-related sCP and 53/68 (84%) as having non-GER-related sCP. The exercise-provoked chest pain during a stress test occurred in 13/111 (12%) subjects. In order to compare the clinical usefulness of 24-h esophageal function monitoring and its examination limited only to the treadmill stress test, the standard parameters of diagnostic test evaluation were determined. The occurrence of GER-related or non-GER-related sCP was assumed as a “gold standard”. Afterwards, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were calculated. These parameters expressed a prediction of GER-related or non-GER-related sCP occurrence by the presence of chest pain, esophageal acidification and

  16. Pre-test probability risk scores and their use in contemporary management of patients with chest pain: One year stress echo cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, Daniela Cassar; Papachristidis, Alexandros; Roper, Damian; Tsironis, Ioannis; Byrne, Jonathan; Monaghan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare how patients with chest pain would be investigated, based on the two guidelines available for UK cardiologists, on the management of patients with stable chest pain. The UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guideline which was published in 2010 and the European society of cardiology (ESC) guideline published in 2013. Both guidelines utilise pre-test probability risk scores, to guide the choice of investigation. Design We undertook a large retrospective study to investigate the outcomes of stress echocardiography. Setting A large tertiary centre in the UK in a contemporary clinical practice. Participants Two thirds of the patients in the cohort were referred from our rapid access chest pain clinics. Results We found that the NICE risk score overestimates risk by 20% compared to the ESC Risk score. We also found that based on the NICE guidelines, 44% of the patients presenting with chest pain, in this cohort, would have been investigated invasively, with diagnostic coronary angiography. Using the ESC guidelines, only 0.3% of the patients would be investigated invasively. Conclusion The large discrepancy between the two guidelines can be easily reduced if NICE adopted the ESC risk score. PMID:26673458

  17. First Clinical Judgment by Primary Care Physicians Distinguishes Well Between Nonorganic and Organic Causes of Abdominal or Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Martina, Benedict; Bucheli, Bruno; Stotz, Martin; Battegay, Edouard; Gyr, Niklaus

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the accuracy of a preliminary diagnosis based solely on patient history and physical examination in medical outpatients with abdominal or chest pain. DESIGN Prospective observational study. setting General medical outpatient clinic in a university teaching hospital. participants One hundred ninety new, consecutive patients with a mean age of 44 years (SD = 14 years, range 30–58 years) with a main complaint of abdominal or chest pain. measurements and main results The preliminary diagnosis, established on the basis of patient history and physical examination, was compared with a final diagnosis, obtained after workup at completion of the chart. A nonorganic cause was established in 66 (59%) of 112 patients with abdominal pain and in 65 (83%) of 78 with chest pain. The preliminary diagnosis of “nonorganic” versus “organic” causes was correct in 79% of patients with abdominal pain and in 88% of patients with chest pain. An “undoubted” preliminary diagnosis predicted a correct assessment in all patients with abdominal pain and in all but one patient with chest pain. Overall, only 4 patients (3%) were initially incorrectly diagnosed as having a nonorganic cause of pain rather than an organic cause. In addition, final nonorganic diagnosis (n = 131) was compared with long-term follow-up by obtaining information from patients and, if necessary, from treating physicians. Follow-up information, obtained for 71% of these patients after a mean of 29 months (range 18–56 months) identified three other patients that had been misdiagnosed as having abdominal pain of nonorganic causes. Compared with follow-up, the diagnostic accuracy for nonorganic abdominal and chest pain at chart completion was 93% and 98%, respectively. conclusions A preliminary diagnosis of nonorganic versus organic abdominal or chest pain based on patient history and physical examination proved remarkably reliable. Accuracy was almost complete in patients with an

  18. Chest pain and angina pectoris - or the ugly swan and the beautiful duckling

    PubMed Central

    van Tellingen, C.

    2010-01-01

    The original description of Heberden’s angina pectoris is put forward to stress the importance of proper history-taking in identifying patients. In a market-driven approach to improve cost-effectiveness in healthcare, angina pectoris as an entity seems stripped to its bare minimum: chest and pain. The diagnostic yield of exercise testing, however, depends on the pre-test likelihood of disease and therefore knowledge of its clinical utility and pitfalls is essential to refine an initial and subjective diagnosis based on anamnesis. Nowadays chest pain units attempt to improve diagnostic accuracy by submitting all sorts of patients to the (stress) test. In the end protocol-driven policies like these may very well prove to be contraproductive when fundamentals are ignored. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:561–4.) PMID:21113382

  19. An unusual cause of chest pain: Acute coronary syndrome following administration of ergotamine tartrate.

    PubMed

    Okutucu, Sercan; Karakulak, Ugur Nadir; Kabakcı, Giray; Aytemir, Kudret

    2012-01-01

    For many years, ergotamine has been used for the acute treatment of migraine. Ergotamine may produce coronary vasospasm, which is often associated with ischemic electrocardiography changes and angina pectoris. A 62-year-old woman who was admitted to the emergency department because of chest pain is described. She had a history of severe migraine attacks and started to use ergotamine tartrate 0.75 mg daily the day before. Electrocardiography revealed sinus tachycardia with left anterior hemiblock and T wave inversion in the precordial leads. Cardiac biomarker levels were elevated. After discontinuation of the drug and initiation of vasodilator treatment, her chest pain resolved. Patients with migraine may have an underlying vasospastic disorder predisposing them to coronary artery spasm. Physicians should be alerted to potential cardiac vasospastic effects of low-dose ergotamine in the treatment of migraine. PMID:23204901

  20. Coronary computed tomography angiography for the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Rajani, R; Brum, R L; Preston, R; Carr-White, G; Berman, D S

    2011-12-01

    Acute chest pain is a common presenting complaint of patients attending emergency room departments. Despite this, it can often be challenging to completely exclude a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome following an initial standard clinical and biochemical evaluation. As a result of this, patients are often admitted to hospital until the treating clinician is satisfied that this diagnosis can be excluded. This process imparts a significant health economic burden by not only increasing hospital bed occupancy rates but also by the unnecessary layering of diagnostic investigations. With the rapid advances in coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), there has been considerable interest in whether coronary CTA may be a viable alternative to this current standard care. We review the current literature and supporting evidence for utilising coronary CTA in the evaluation of patients presenting with acute chest pain in terms of its diagnostic accuracy, safety, cost-effectiveness and prognostic implications. PMID:22093533

  1. Significance of an isolated new right bundle branch block in a patient with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Gilliot, Geraldine; Monney, Pierre; Muller, Olivier; Hugli, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is a common presenting symptom in emergency departments, and a typical manifestation of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Recognition of ECG changes in AMI is essential for timely diagnosis and treatment. Right bundle branch block (RBBB) may be an isolated sign of AMI, and was previously considered as a criterion for fibrinolytic therapy. Since the most recent European Society of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines in 2013, RBBB alone is no longer considered a diagnostic criterion of AMI, even if it occurs in the context of acute chest pain, as RBBB does not usually interfere with the interpretation of ST-segment alteration. Our case illustrates an acute septal myocardial infarction with an isolated RBBB, and thus the importance of recognising this pattern in order to permit timely diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26055601

  2. Diagnostic testing of the emergency department patient with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Shamsa, F H

    1998-07-01

    In evaluating patients with nondiagnostic initial clinical or electrocardiogram (ECG) findings for acute cardiac ischemia, continuous 12-lead ECG monitoring increases the detection of diagnostic ECG findings, including ST-segment elevation, in patients awaiting hospital admission. Rest scanning with technitium-99m sestamibi is able to risk stratify low-moderate risk patients into lower and higher risk groups for cardiac events. Caveats include the reduced sensitivity of scanning of patients who are pain free and the need for follow-up exercise scans for patients free of perfusion defects at rest. Cardiac markers, particularly the troponins, show great promise for the detection of a larger part of the spectrum of acute coronary syndromes in the emergency department, including patients with minimal myocardial damage and higher risk for short-term death and nonfatal acute myocardial infarction. Accelerated diagnostic protocols using serial testing with cardiac markers, ECGs and then provocative testing over a 14-hour period, are feasible, safe, and cost-effective. PMID:10091020

  3. Clinicopathological conference: A 71-year-old female with neurological deficits, chest pain, and electrocardiographic changes.

    PubMed

    Narang, Aneesh T; Alian, Andrus

    2010-10-01

    The authors present a case of a 71-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with slurred speech, left sided facial droop, and right arm and leg weakness. During her ED stay, she developed left sided chest pain and right arm numbness in the setting of EKG changes. The patient's clinical course is outlined and a discussion of the potential etiologies as well as the clinical management is provided. PMID:21040102

  4. Testing of Low-Risk Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Amsterdam, Ezra A.; Kirk, J. Douglas; Bluemke, David A.; Diercks, Deborah; Farkouh, Michael E.; Garvey, J. Lee; Kontos, Michael C.; McCord, James; Miller, Todd D.; Morise, Anthony; Newby, L. Kristin; Ruberg, Frederick L.; Scordo, Kristine Anne; Thompson, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    The management of low-risk patients presenting to emergency departments is a common and challenging clinical problem entailing 8 million emergency department visits annually. Although a majority of these patients do not have a life-threatening condition, the clinician must distinguish between those who require urgent treatment of a serious problem and those with more benign entities who do not require admission. Inadvertent discharge of patients with acute coronary syndrome from the emergency department is associated with increased mortality and liability, whereas inappropriate admission of patients without serious disease is neither indicated nor cost-effective. Clinical judgment and basic clinical tools (history, physical examination, and electrocardiogram) remain primary in meeting this challenge and affording early identification of low-risk patients with chest pain. Additionally, established and newer diagnostic methods have extended clinicians' diagnostic capacity in this setting. Low-risk patients presenting with chest pain are increasingly managed in chest pain units in which accelerated diagnostic protocols are performed, comprising serial electrocardiograms and cardiac injury markers to exclude acute coronary syndrome. Patients with negative findings usually complete the accelerated diagnostic protocol with a confirmatory test to exclude ischemia. This is typically an exercise treadmill test or a cardiac imaging study if the exercise treadmill test is not applicable. Rest myocardial perfusion imaging has assumed an important role in this setting. Computed tomography coronary angiography has also shown promise in this setting. A negative accelerated diagnostic protocol evaluation allows discharge, whereas patients with positive findings are admitted. This approach has been found to be safe, accurate, and cost-effective in low-risk patients presenting with chest pain. PMID:20660809

  5. Outcome analysis of chest pain patients discharged from the ED--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Glover, C L; Benink, E; Tudor, G; Aldag, J; Smith, M

    2000-11-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to determine clinical predictors of adverse outcome, defined as myocardial infarction, angioplasy or stent placement, coronary artery bypass graft, or death, within 60 days for patients discharged from the emergency department with a presenting complaint of chest pain. All patients presenting to the emergency department with a chief complaint of chest pain were eligible for the study. A chest pain risk analysis sheet was completed as part of the patient evaluation. Patients discharged from the emergency department, in whom a risk analysis sheet was completed, were contacted to determine their clinical course within 60 days of their discharge from the emergency department. During the 6-month study period, 129 eligible patients were enrolled. Of these 129 patients, four had an adverse outcome within 60 days of their discharge. All four patients had either a balloon angioplasty procedure, coronary artery bypass graft, or both. None of the study patients had a myocardial infarction or died. Statistically significant predictors of adverse outcome in our study population were an abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG), a history of myocardial infarction, and a history of hypertension. In conclusion, patients discharged from the emergency department with a presenting complaint of chest pain were at a low risk for having a myocardial infarction or dying within 60 days of their discharge. Several patients, however, did have significant coronary artery disease requiring angioplasty or bypass. These patients were more likely to have an abnormal ECG, a history of myocardial infarction, or have a history of hypertension. A prospective study with larger numbers of patients is needed to validate these findings. PMID:11103728

  6. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Savino, P. Brian; Sporer, Karl A.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either), as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine). Prehospital 12-Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26759642

  7. A woman with recurrent chest pain and ST-segment elevation.

    PubMed

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2016-05-01

    A 32-year-old female presents with recurrent episodes of unprovoked chest pain associated with inferior ST-segment elevation and reciprocal ST-segment depression. Coronary angiography during one of these episodes revealed coronary artery spasm that spontaneously resolved followed by resolution of these electrocardiographic changes. There was no atherosclerotic occlusive disease. Her cardiac markers were normal and echocardiogram showed no regional wall motion abnormalities. Electrocariogram and angiography findings are shown in Fig. 1. PMID:26597343

  8. Pustulotic arthro-osteitis: a cause of atypical chest pain and a new arthritic syndrome.

    PubMed

    McGee, T C; Field, R S; Loebl, D H; Bailey, J P; Sizemore, K R

    1993-04-01

    We have described a 38-year-old white American woman who had a 7-year history of pain in the left anterior chest, neck, right wrist, and buttocks. The pain fluctuated in severity and appeared to coincide with worsening of her skin condition, palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP). She manifested the typical skeletal features of an arthritic condition referred to as pustulotic arthro-osteitis, which is frequently associated with the characteristic rash of PPP. This is an infrequently described disorder in the United States, possibly reflecting lack of familiarity or confusion with related disorders. PMID:8465230

  9. The Esophagus as a Source of Non-Cardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Craven, M.A.; Waterfall, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Many patients present with chest pain and are subsequently found to have normal coronary angiography; investigation of these patients frequently stops once coronary artery disease has been ruled out. It is now clear that considerable morbidity may be associated with failure to make a definite diagnosis in these patients, and that efforts to identify a cause for the pain should continue within appropriate limits. This paper presents the evidence in support of an esophageal cause of non-cardiac angina. The authors emphasize the difficulty in distinguishing between cardiac and esophageal angina on the basis of clinical history and suggest an approach to investigation. PMID:21253154

  10. The esophagus as a source of non-cardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Craven, M A; Waterfall, W E

    1988-03-01

    Many patients present with chest pain and are subsequently found to have normal coronary angiography; investigation of these patients frequently stops once coronary artery disease has been ruled out. It is now clear that considerable morbidity may be associated with failure to make a definite diagnosis in these patients, and that efforts to identify a cause for the pain should continue within appropriate limits. This paper presents the evidence in support of an esophageal cause of non-cardiac angina. The authors emphasize the difficulty in distinguishing between cardiac and esophageal angina on the basis of clinical history and suggest an approach to investigation. PMID:21253154

  11. Coordinated Digital-Assisted Program Improved Door-to-Balloon Time for Acute Chest Pain Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Dingcheng; Qin, Weiyi; Zhou, Minwei; Tian, Yan; Wang, Mingyu; Yang, Jijiang; Gao, Qiang

    2016-05-25

    Emergency care for patients with chest pain can be a challenge in remote areas. Digital communication technology has the potential to improve outcomes by allowing early diagnosis and faster treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether implementation of a coordinated digital-assisted program (CDAP) for Chinese hospitals can reduce the door-to-balloon (D2B) time for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in acute chest pain patients in China. From March to December 2011, 609 patients (CDAP group) requiring an emergency response for acute chest pain were evaluated using this CDAP. The results were compared in terms of time interval reduction (including D2B) and economic indices with those of 528 patients (non-CDAP group) previously treated by conventional protocols after admission. We screened 154 and 127 eligible patients under PCI in the CDAP and non-CDAP groups, respectively. PCI patients achieved a D2B time < 90 minutes using CDAP (82.5 versus 26.0%, P < 0.001). CDAP reduced D2B time under PCI and reduced hospitalization lengths and costs (all P < 0.001). PMID:27150005

  12. Syncope and Atypical Chest Pain in an Intercollegiate Wrestler: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Joseph B.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Riemann, Bryan L.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To present the case of a 20-year-old collegiate wrestler who suffered from atypical chest pains and syncope after rigorous exercise, dehydration, and ingestion of a metabolic stimulant. Background: As a result of pressure to obtain a lower body weight for competition, wrestlers often pursue practices to lose a substantial amount of weight in a short period of time. These practices include rigorous exercise, starvation, dehydration, laxatives, diuretics, and over-the-counter stimulants. Our case involves an athlete who ingested a metabolic stimulant containing ma huang (ephedrine) and suffered from syncope and atypical chest pains during a bout of rigorous exercise and dehydration to lose weight for competition. Differential Diagnosis: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, electrolyte imbalance, drug overdose, traumatic head injury, myocardial infarction, syncope. Treatment: The emergency medical services transported the athlete to the emergency room, and he was hospitalized for 2 days. After discharge, the team physician counseled the athlete in the dangers of metabolic stimulants and excessive weight-loss techniques. Uniqueness: This case is unique because it presents an athlete who ingested an over-the-counter stimulant to lose weight and suffered from syncope and atypical chest pains during a bout of rigorous exercise and dehydration. Conclusions: Athletic trainers must understand not only the dangers of excessive weight loss, but also the dangers of using unregulated ephedrine-containing stimulants to aid in weight loss. PMID:16558574

  13. Prognosis of Low-Risk Young Women Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Stacey M; Teleten, Aleksander; Li, Zhongmin; Venugopal, Sandhya; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2016-01-01

    Identification of patients at low risk presenting to the emergency department with chest pain is a continuing challenge. We examined a cohort of low-risk women with negative cardiac injury markers, electrocardiogram with normal results, and clinical stability. We hypothesized that these patients can be safely and accurately managed in a chest pain unit (CPU), may not require predischarge cardiac testing, and have an excellent short-term prognosis. The primary end point was major cardiovascular events during index admission or follow-up. Mean age of the 403 women was 42 ± 4.3 years (30 to 50 years). No patient had a cardiovascular event in the CPU, and none of the 321 patients followed for 6 months had a late cardiovascular event. Most (211, 52%) did not receive predischarge cardiac testing. The remaining 192 patients (48%) had predischarge exercise treadmill test, stress imaging, or cardiac catheterization. Of those patients who underwent treadmill testing, almost 90% had no exercise-induced chest pain and approximately 50% had functional capacity 8 to 14 METs. In addition, 166 patients (41%) were discharged from the CPU after <2 hours and 21% (n = 86) within 2 to 8 hours. In conclusion, this group of low-risk women was safely and accurately managed in the CPU and discharged promptly. There were no cardiac events on index admission or 6-month follow-up, and in most patients, predischarge cardiac testing was unnecessary. PMID:26552512

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of Diagnostic Testing Strategies in Emergency Department Patients With Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Andrew J.; Liu, Guodong; Davidson, William R.; Sciamanna, Christopher; Leslie, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain whose evaluation for ischemia demonstrates no abnormalities receive further functional or anatomical studies for coronary artery disease; however, comparative evidence for the various strategies is lacking and multiple testing options exist. OBJECTIVE To compare chest pain evaluation pathways based on their association with downstream testing, interventions, and outcomes for patients in EDs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective analysis of health insurance claims data for a national sample of privately insured patients from January 1 to December 31, 2011. Individuals with a primary or secondary diagnosis of chest pain in the ED were selected and classified into 1 of 5 testing strategies: no noninvasive testing, exercise electrocardiography, stress echocardiography, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, or coronary computed tomography angiography. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The proportion of patients in each group who received a cardiac catheterization, coronary revascularization procedure, or future noninvasive test as well as those who were hospitalized for an acute myocardial infarction (MI) during 7 and 190 days of follow-up. RESULTS In 2011, there were 693 212 ED visits with a primary or secondary diagnosis of chest pain, accounting for 9.2% of all ED encounters. After application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 421 774 patients were included in the final analysis; 293 788 individuals did not receive an initial noninvasive test and 127 986 did, representing 1.7% of all ED encounters. Overall, the percentage of patients hospitalized with an MI was very low during both 7 and 190 days of follow-up (0.11% and 0.33%, respectively). Patients who did not undergo initial noninvasive testing were no more likely to experience an MI than were those who did receive testing. Compared with no testing, exercise electrocardiography, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, and coronary

  15. Association of chest pain versus dyspnea as presenting symptom for coronary angiography with demographics, coronary anatomy, and 2-year mortality

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Rajiv; Beridze, Natalia; Ahn, Chul; Sanaani, Abdallah; Agarwal, Pallak; Farell, Kim; Jain, Diwakar; Timmermans, Robert; Cooper, Howard A.; Panza, Julio A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The association of chest pain versus dyspnea with demographics, coronary angiographic findings, and outcomes of patients undergoing coronary angiography is unknown. Material and methods We studied 1,053 patients who had coronary angiography to investigate the association of chest pain versus dyspnea with demographics, coronary angiographic findings, and outcomes. Results Of 1,053 patients, 654 (62%) had chest pain, 229 (22%) had dyspnea, and 117 (11%) had chest pain and dyspnea. Patients with dyspnea were older (p < 0.0001) and had higher serum creatinine (p = 0.0011), lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (p < 0.0001), more cardiogenic shock (p = 0.0004), less obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) (p < 0.0001), less percutaneous coronary intervention (p < 0.0001), and similar 2-year mortality. Stepwise Cox regression analysis showed no significant difference in mortality between chest pain and dyspnea. Significant risk factors for time to death were age (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.07, p < 0.0001), serum creatinine (HR = 1.5, p < 0.0001), body mass index (HR = 0.93, p = 0.005), and obstructive CAD graft (HR = 3.2, p = 0.011). Conclusions Patients undergoing coronary angiography presenting with dyspnea were older and had higher serum creatinine, lower LVEF, more frequent cardiogenic shock, less obstructive CAD, and less percutaneous coronary intervention compared to patients presenting with chest pain but similar 2-year mortality. PMID:27478454

  16. Causes of chest pain in primary care – a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haasenritter, Jörg; Biroga, Tobias; Keunecke, Christian; Becker, Annette; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Dornieden, Katharina; Stadje, Rebekka; Viniol, Annika; Bösner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the frequencies of different and relevant underlying etiologies of chest pain in general practice. Methods We systematically searched PubMed and EMBASE. Two reviewers independently rated the eligibility of publications and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. We extracted data to calculate the relative frequencies of different underlying conditions and investigated the variation across studies using forest plots, I2, tau2, and prediction intervals. With respect to unexplained heterogeneity, we provided qualitative syntheses instead of pooled estimates. Results We identified 11 eligible studies comprising about 6500 patients. The overall risk of bias was rated as low in 6 studies comprising about 3900 patients. The relative frequencies of different conditions as the underlying etiologies of chest pain reported by these studies ranged from 24.5 to 49.8% (chest wall syndrome), 13.8 to 16.1% (cardiovascular diseases), 6.6 to 11.2% (stable coronary heart disease), 1.5 to 3.6% (acute coronary syndrome/myocardial infarction), 10.3 to 18.2% (respiratory diseases), 9.5 to 18.2% (psychogenic etiologies), 5.6 to 9.7% (gastrointestinal disorders), and 6.0 to 7.1% (esophageal disorders). Conclusion This information may be of practical value for general practitioners as it provides the pre-test probabilities for a range of underlying diseases and may be suitable to guide the diagnostic process. PMID:26526879

  17. Treatment of acute, severe epigastric/chest pain in a patient with stomach cancer following gastrectomy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZAPOROWSKA-STACHOWIAK, IWONA; GORZELIŃSKA, LIDIA; SOPATA, MACIEJ; ŁUCZAK, JACEK

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of acute chest pain can be a challenge in palliative care. Firstly, because acute chest pain is a symptom of a paucity of diseases, which makes diagnosis difficult and time consuming, while there is also a time constraint, due to the extreme suffering of the patient. Secondly, the condition of a patient with advanced cancer disease and co-morbidities does not always allow for required diagnostic procedures. The present report describes a case of acute, severe epigastric/chest pain in a patient with dynamic disease progression, who was receiving palliative care. This study also demonstrates that the pathophysiology of pain in a terminal patient may determine the treatment strategy. The patient in the present case was a 41-year-old male, who had previously undergone gastrectomy for stomach cancer, followed by postoperative chemotherapy. The patient was treated with palliative chemotherapy for metastases to the lungs, liver and lymph nodes, which led to the development of iatrogenic peripheral neuropathy. The patient was subsequently admitted to the Palliative Medicine In-patient Unit of the University Hospital of Lord’s Transfiguration (Poznan, Poland) with the complaint of acute epigastric and chest pain. An electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, chest and abdomen computerized tomography scan, esophagoduodenoscopy and laboratory analyses were performed to determine the source of the pain. The patient was treated with morphine sulfate, metoclopramide, midazolam, diazepam, acetaminophen, ketamine, hyoscine butylbromide, propofol, dexamethasone and amoxycillin, and received parenteral nutrition. As the source of pain remained unclear, a second esophagoduodenoscopy was performed to determine a diagnosis, resulting in pain relief. Thus, in the present case, esophagoduodenoscopy was diagnostic and therapeutic. Furthermore, although the treatment of acute chest pain may be a challenge in palliative care, the present study indicates that pain treatment should be

  18. ECG of the Month: Subtle ECG Change in a 31 Year-Old Man with Recent Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Glancy, D Luke

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old man had an hour of pain across the upper portion of his chest anteriorly, and it radiated down the inner aspects of both arms. The pain came while he was walking and gradually disappeared as he sat quietly. Six Rolaid tablets did not seem to alter the pain. The pain was unaccompanied by dyspnea, sweating, nausea or vomiting. The night before the patient had had similar pain relieved by Rolaids and belching. After the second episode of pain, he went to the emergency department of a local hospital where an ECG was recorded. PMID:27598900

  19. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  20. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Unstable Angina and Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/ ... of Patients With Unstable Angina/Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (Updating the 2007 Guidelines and Replacing the 2011 ...

  1. Acute non-traumatic gastrothorax: presentation of a case with chest pain and atypical radiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepwant; Mackeith, Pieter; Gopal, Dipesh Pravin

    2016-01-01

    A previously well 71-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Department with acute-onset left-sided chest pain. She was haemodynamically stable with unremarkable systemic examination. Her electrocardiogram and troponin were within normal limits and her chest radiograph showed a raised left hemi-diaphragm. Two hours after admission, this woman became acutely breathless, and suffered a pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there was a return of spontaneous circulation and regained consciousness. A repeat clinical assessment revealed a new left-sided dullness to percussion with contralateral percussive resonance on respiratory examination. CXR revealed a left pan-hemi-thoracic opacity whilst better definition using CT-pulmonary angiography (CTPA) indicated an acute tension gastrothorax secondary to a large left-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Nasogastric (NG) tube insertion was used to decompress the stomach and the patient underwent uncomplicated emergency laparoscopic hernia reduction. She remained well at 1-year follow-up. PMID:27027934

  2. Occult sternal metastasis identified by laminography in patients with chest pain.

    PubMed

    LaBan, M M; Newman, J M

    1984-04-01

    Six patients with occult sternal metastasis presenting with chest pain, and four with sternal deformity associated with "arthritis" had undergone routine roentgenographic examinations, reported as "normal." Subsequent laminography of the sternum demonstrated lytic lesions confirmed by needle biopsy. Adenocarcinoma of the lung and breast were identified in two each of four patients; myeloma and kidney neoplasms were the primary source of malignancy in the remaining two patients. In widespread malignancy, metastasis to the skeletal chest wall is a well-recognized occurrence. Infrequently, it can be an isolated manifestation of an occult or recurrent malignancy, initially overlooked when routine roentgenograms are read as normal. Although sternal x-rays remain the most important means of diagnosis, in suspected cases of sternal metastasis laminography alone may initially reveal lytic lesions. PMID:6712441

  3. Chest pain in rubber chemical workers exposed to carbon disulphide and methaemoglobin formers.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, L C; Weber, R P

    1984-01-01

    A cross sectional prevalence study of chest pain in 94 rubber chemical workers exposed to carbon disulphide (CS2) and methaemoglobin forming aromatic amines was carried out. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the prevalence of chest pain or coronary heart disease (CHD), or both, in exposed individuals exceeded that of a group of non-exposed individuals from the same plant. Cardiovascular, smoking, and occupational histories were obtained. Blood pressure, height, weight, serum cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose were measured. Resting electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained on all study participants, as were exercise stress tests on selected exposed individuals. Matching eliminated important known risk factors for coronary artery disease. Both chest pain and angina were significantly related to exposure, controlling for age and cigarette smoking. This association was not dependent on duration of exposure as defined by 10 or more years of employment in the department of interest. CHD as defined by angina, a history of myocardial infarction, or a coronary ECG or a combination of these occurred more frequently among exposed workers. The number of abnormal ECGs in the exposed group was twice that in the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Age rather than exposure appeared to be the important variable associated with raised blood pressure. Neither biological measures of exposure nor ECGs showed an acute effect of workplace exposures on the myocardium. Possible additive or multiplicative effects of individual chemical agents could not be evaluated. Appropriate modification of medical surveillance of rubber chemical workers with exposure to CS2 and aromatic amines is warranted. PMID:6611171

  4. Exercise-provoked esophageal motility disorder in patients with recurrent chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Budzyński, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between exercise-provoked esophageal motility disorders and the prognosis for patients with chest pain. METHODS: The study involved 63 subjects with recurrent angina-like chest pain non-responsive to empirical therapy with proton pump inhibitor (PPI). In all, a coronary artery angiography, panendoscopy, 24-h esophageal pH-metry and manometry, as well as a treadmill stress test with simultaneous esophageal pH-metry and manometry monitoring, were performed. Thirty-five subjects had no significant coronary artery lesions, and 28 had more than 50% coronary artery narrowing. In patients with hypertensive esophageal motility disorders, a calcium antagonist was recommended. The average follow-up period was 977 ± 249 d. RESULTS: The prevalence of esophageal disorders, such as gastroesophageal reflux or diffuse esophageal spasm, was similar in patients both with and without significant coronary artery narrowing. Exercise prompted esophageal motility disorders, such as a decrease in the percentage of peristaltic and effective contractions and their amplitude, as well as an increase in the percentage of simultaneous and non-effective contractions. In 14 (22%) patients the percentage of simultaneous contractions during the treadmill stress test exceeded the value of 55%. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the proportional hazard Cox regression model, it was shown that the administration of a calcium channel antagonist in patients with such an esophageal motility disorder significantly decreased the risk of hospitalization as a result of a suspicion of acute coronary syndrome after the 2.7-year follow-up period. CONCLUSION: In patients with chest pain non-responsive to PPIs, a diagnosis of exercise-provoked esophageal spasm may have the effect of lowering the risk of the next hospitalization. PMID:20845510

  5. Bedside echo for chest pain: an algorithm for education and assessment

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Richard; Stolz, Lori A; Kartchner, Jeffrey Z; Thompson, Matthew; Stea, Nicholas; Hawbaker, Nicolaus; Joshi, Raj; Adhikari, Srikar

    2016-01-01

    Background Goal-directed ultrasound protocols have been developed to facilitate efficiency, throughput, and patient care. Hands-on instruction and training workshops have been shown to positively impact ultrasound training. Objectives We describe a novel undifferentiated chest pain goal-directed ultrasound algorithm-focused education workshop for the purpose of enhancing emergency medicine resident training in ultrasound milestones competencies. Methods This was a cross-sectional study performed at an academic medical center. A novel goal-directed ultrasound algorithm was developed and implemented as a model for teaching and learning the sonographic approach to a patient with undifferentiated chest pain. This algorithm was incorporated into all components of the 1-day workshop: asynchronous learning, didactic lecture, case-based learning, and hands-on stations. Performance comparisons were made between postgraduate year (PGY) levels. Results A total of 38 of the 40 (95%) residents who attended the event participated in the chest pain objective standardized clinical exam, and 26 of the 40 (65%) completed the entire questionnaire. The average number of ultrasounds performed by resident class year at the time of our study was as follows: 19 (standard deviation [SD]=19) PGY-1, 238 (SD=37) PGY-2, and 289 (SD=73) PGY-3. Performance on the knowledge-based questions improved between PGY-1 and PGY-3. The application of the novel algorithm was noted to be more prevalent among the PGY-1 class. Conclusion The 1-day algorithm-based ultrasound educational workshop was an engaging learning technique at our institution. PMID:27284269

  6. How important is a history of chest pain in determining the degree of ischaemia in patients with angina pectoris?

    PubMed

    Quyyumi, A A; Wright, C M; Mockus, L J; Fox, K M

    1985-07-01

    Since therapeutic decisions in patients with angina pectoris are usually based on the reported frequency of exertional and rest pain the relations between the historical frequency of chest pain and objective evidence of myocardial ischaemia during normal daily activity were investigated in 100 patients by 48 hour ambulatory ST segment monitoring. Of these 100 consecutive patients with chest pain, 91 had typical pain and nine some atypical features. Twenty six patients had normal coronary arteries and 52 of the 74 with significant coronary disease had ambulatory ST segment changes. There was no relation between the frequency of reported exertional or rest pain and (a) the severity of coronary artery disease or (b) the frequency of daytime or nocturnal ST segment changes. Twelve patients had nocturnal ST segment changes but only four complained of nocturnal angina. Most patients had both painful and painless episodes of ST segment changes, but a substantial number had either painless or painful episodes only. These differences were not related to the severity of coronary artery disease. Chest pain after the onset of ST segment change was perceived with wide interpatient and intrapatient variability. Thus the frequency of pain is a poor indicator of the frequency of significant cardiac ischaemia. Individual differences in the perception of pain may be more important. PMID:4015912

  7. Dual Prosthetic Heart Valve Presented with Chest Pain: A Case Report of Coronary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Siwamogsatham, Sarawut

    2015-01-01

    Coronary embolism from a prosthetic heart valve is a rare but remarkable cause of acute coronary syndrome. There is no definite management of an entity like this. Here we report a case of 54-year-old male with a history of rheumatic heart disease with dual prosthetic heart valve and atrial fibrillation who developed chest pain from acute myocardial infarction. The laboratory values showed inadequate anticoagulation. Cardiac catheterization and thrombectomy with the aspiration catheter were chosen to be the treatment for this patient, and it showed satisfactory outcome. PMID:25785203

  8. Ventricular Tachycardia Associated Syncope in a Patient of Variant Angina without Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Juong, Ji Young

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was admitted for a syncope workup. After routine evaluation, he was diagnosed with syncope of an unknown cause and was discharged from the hospital. He was readmitted due to dizziness. On repeated Holter monitoring, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia was detected during syncope. We performed intracoronary ergonovine provocation test; severe coronary spasm was induced at 70% stenosis of the proximal left anterior descending artery. The patient was treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. We present a rare case of syncope induced by ventricular arrhythmia in a patient with variant angina without chest pain. PMID:26798392

  9. Discharge Communication in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain: Defining the Ideal Content.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Selina; Heierle, Anette; Bingisser, Martina-Barbara; Hertwig, Ralph; Padiyath, Rakesh; Nickel, Christian Hans; Langewitz, Wolf; Bingisser, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In an emergency department (ED), discharge communication represents a crucial step in medical care. In theory, it fosters patient satisfaction and adherence to medication, reduces anxiety, and ultimately promotes better outcomes. In practice, little is known about the extent to which patients receiving discharge information understand their medical condition and are able to memorize and retrieve instructions. Even less is known about the ideal content of these instructions. Focusing on patients with chest pain, we systematically assessed physicians' and patients' informational preferences and created a memory aid to support both the provision of information (physicians) and its retrieval (patients). In an iterative process, physicians of different specialties (N = 47) first chose which of 81 items to include in an ED discharge communication for patients with acute chest pain. A condensed list of 34 items was then presented to 51 such patients to gauge patients' preferences. Patients' and physicians' ratings of importance converged in 32 of the 34 items. Finally, three experts grouped the 34 items into five categories: (1) information on diagnosis; (2) follow-up suggestions; (3) advice on self-care; (4) red flags; and (5) complete treatment, from which we generated the mnemonic acronym "InFARcT." Defining and structuring the content of discharge information seems especially important for ED physicians and patients, as stress and time constraints jeopardize effective communication in this context. Chest pain accounts for up to 10% of all patient presentations in emergency departments (EDs) (Konkelberg & Esterman, 2003). The majority of these patients will usually be discharged within hours, after exclusion of serious conditions such as myocardial infarction (Goodacre et al., 2011). A comprehensive workup of low- to intermediate-risk patients is not feasible in the ED (Reichlin et al., 2009). Yet many of these patients go on to suffer from repeated episodes of chest

  10. Value of noninvasive assessment of patients with atypical chest pain and suspected coronary spasm using ergonovine infusion and thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    DiCarlo, L.A. Jr.; Botvinick, E.H.; Canhasi, B.S.; Schwartz, A.S.; Chatterjee, K.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-six patients with known benign coronary anatomic characteristics and atypical chest pain syndromes were evaluated for the possibility of coronary spasm. Incremental intravenous ergonovine maleate infusions were administered, and thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed at the peak dosage and during recovery in the coronary care unit. With ergonovine therapy, 4 patients (16%) had chest pain associated with electrocardiographic (ECG) or scintigraphic changes. Nine patients (35%) had chest pain without associated ECG or scintigraphic changes, and 13 patients did not have chest pain in response to ergonovine administration, although 2 (8%) had ergonovine-induced scintigraphic defects. All 4 patients with ergonovine-induced chest pain and associated ECG or scintigraphic abnormalities had resolution or reduction of chest pain after medical treatment. However, 7 of the 9 patients with ergonovine-induced chest pain in the absence of ECG or scintigraphic abnormalities continued to have symptoms despite medical treatment a mean of 18 months later. In this limited study of a select group, bedside ergonovine provocation appeared safe. Many patients had chest pain, but few showed ECG or scintigraphic evidence of ischemia. Perfusion scintigraphy appears to have potential complementary value for the identification of an ischemic cardiac cause of atypical chest pain and provides a rationale for appropriate therapy.

  11. Tender Endothelium Syndrome: Combination of Hypotension, Bradycardia, Contrast Induced Chest Pain, and Microvascular Angina

    PubMed Central

    Chiew, Soon Kwang; Syed, Jaffer

    2016-01-01

    Hypotension, bradycardia, and contrast induced chest pain are potential complications of cardiac catheterization and coronary angiography. Catheter-induced coronary spasm has been occasionally demonstrated, but its relationship to spontaneous coronary spasm is unclear. We describe a 64-year-old female who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery in 1998 on the basis of an angiographic diagnosis of severe left main disease, who recently presented with increasingly frequent typical angina. Repeat coronary angiography was immediately complicated by severe chest pain, hypotension, and bradycardia but demonstrated only mild disease of the left main artery and entire coronary tree with complete occlusion of her prior grafts. This reaction was almost identical to that observed during her original coronary angiogram. We now believe her original angiogram was complicated by severe catheter-induced left main spasm, with the accompanying contrast reaction attributed to left main disease, and the occlusion of coronary grafts explained by the absence of significant left main disease. The combination of these symptoms has not been documented in the literature. In this instance, these manifestations erroneously led to coronary bypass surgery. It is unknown whether routine, systematic injection of intracoronary nitroglycerin prior to angiography might blunt the severity of such reactions. PMID:26981290

  12. Evaluation of patients with chest pain by radionuclide ventriculography: Comparison of phase and 2-harmonic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, G.A.; Miller, T.R.; Biello, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Fourier-series analysis (FSA) of time activity curves has been used to enhance the detection of regional abnormalities in function of the left ventricle (LV) on radionuclide ventriculograms (RVGs). Phase, or first harmonic analysis, does not permit separate determination of systolic and diastolic function. The retention of 2 harmonics (2-H) in the FSA allows definition of both systolic and diastolic parameters, including time to peak ejection rate (TPER) and time to peak filling rate (TPFR). The authors compared regional phase and 2-H analysis in 42 patients with normal LV function by conventional analysis of resting RVGs. All patients had ejection fraction greater than 50% and normal regional wall motion. Diagnoses, established by cardiac characterization, included coronary artery disease (CAD) and chest pain but normal coronary arteries (NCA). Normal homogeneity of LV function was established in 12 normal volunteers by computing the standard deviation of the distribution of LV pixels for TPER, TPFR and phase angle on the 35/sup 0/ LAO views. Thus, in patients with CAD but normal conventional analysis of RVGs, 2-H analysis detected abnormal diastolic filling in 70% whereas phase analysis was abnormal in only 15%. In patients with NCA, abnormalities by either phase or 2-H analysis were infrequent. These data suggest that 2-H analysis may be of value in the investigation of patients with chest pain but normal LV function.

  13. Cardiointegram: detection of coronary artery disease in males with chest pain and a normal resting electrocardiogram

    SciTech Connect

    Teichholz, L.E.; Steinmetz, M.Y.; Escher, D.; Herman, M.V.; Naimi, S.; Mahony, D.V.; Ellestad, M.H.

    1986-07-01

    The cardiointegram is a non-invasive technique for the analysis of the electrical signals of the heart obtained by a transformation of the voltage vs. time format by a series of integrations. This multicenter study compares the results of the cardiointegram with coronary arteriography in 140 male patients with chest pain and a normal resting electrocardiogram. The cardiointegram was determined on two resting complexes of Leads I, II, V4, V5 and V6 and called abnormal if greater than or equal to four of ten complexes were abnormal, i.e., fell outside of a previously determined template of normality. The sensitivity was 73% and specificity was 78% for the diagnosis of occlusive coronary artery disease. When greater than or equal to five of ten abnormal complexes were used as the cut-off for an abnormal test and ''equivocal'' results (four of ten abnormal, n = 18) were excluded from analysis there was a sensitivity of 69% and specificity of 88%. Thirty-seven of 38 patients (97%) with an abnormal cardiointegram and a positive exercise stress test had coronary artery disease. Thus, the cardiointegram appears to be a useful non-invasive test for the detection of coronary artery disease in males with chest pain and a normal resting electrocardiogram in whom the diagnosis of coronary artery disease is being considered.

  14. Value of tomographic thallium-201 imaging in patients with chest pain following coronary artery bypass grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Starling, M.R.; Walsh, R.A.; Dehmer, G.J.; Lasher, J.C.; Blumhardt, R.

    1987-02-01

    To determine whether thallium-201 washout profile analysis can detect regional myocardial ischemia caused by coronary artery bypass graft occlusion or progression of disease in nonbypassed coronary arteries, 19 consecutive patients with chest pain following bypass grafting were evaluated with coronary arteriography and thallium-201 scintigraphy. Twenty of the 55 coronary artery regions were perfused by an occluded bypass graft or a significantly stenosed (greater than or equal to 70% diameter narrowing) nonbypassed coronary artery, while 35 coronary regions were perfused by patent bypass grafts or insignificantly diseased coronary arteries. The tomographic thallium-201 washout profile results correlated with the bypass graft and coronary arteriographic findings. The sensitivity of tomographic thallium-201 washout profile abnormalities for arteriographic abnormalities was 75%, while the specificity was 86%. The authors conclude that tomographic thallium-201 washout profile analysis may be very useful in the evaluation of patients with chest pain following coronary artery bypass grafting by detecting regional myocardial ischemia caused by occlusion of specific bypass grafts or progression of disease in nonbypassed coronary arteries.

  15. Prognostic significance of normal quantitative planar thallium-201 stress scintigraphy in patients with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.; Russo, D.J.; Russo, D.; Clements, J.P.

    1985-07-01

    The prognostic significance of normal quantitative planar thallium-201 stress scintigraphy was evaluated in patients with a chest pain syndrome. The prevalence of cardiac events during follow-up was related to the pretest (that is, before stress scintigraphy) likelihood of coronary artery disease determined on the basis of symptoms, age, sex and stress electrocardiography. In a consecutive series of 344 patients who had adequate thallium-201 stress scintigrams, 95 had unequivocally normal studies by quantitative analysis. The pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease in the 95 patients had a bimodal distribution. During a mean follow-up period of 22 +/- 3 months, no patient died. Three patients (3%) had a cardiac event: two of these patients (pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease 54 and 94%) had a nonfatal myocardial infarction 8 and 22 months, respectively, after stress scintigraphy, and one patient (pretest likelihood 98%) underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty 16 months after stress scintigraphy for persisting anginal complaints. Three patients were lost to follow-up; all three had a low pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease. It is concluded that patients with chest pain and normal findings on quantitative thallium-201 scintigraphy have an excellent prognosis. Cardiac events are rare (infarction rate 1% per year) and occur in patients with a moderate to high pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease.

  16. Intramural oesophageal dissection as an unusual presentation of chest pain: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Ryo; Van Rooyen, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intramural oesophageal dissection (IOD) is a rare clinical condition and there is a paucity of information regarding the appropriate diagnosis and management. It is described as bleeding in the submucosal plane of the oesophagus, and has various documented causes. Presentation of case We report a case of a 73 year old female who developed IOD. She presented with severe chest pain. Subsequent imaging revealed IOD and haematoma formation. This was confirmed on oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD). She was on a bisphosphonate for her osteoporosis, as well as having age-related dysmotility of her oesophagus on manometric studies. She was also taking fish oil. Treatment was conservative and the patient was discharged with proton pump inhibitors and follow up. Discussion Spontaneous haematoma formation and IOD resulted likely from a combination of the anticoagulant effect of fish oil and oesophageal dysmotility. Bisphosphonates also have some well documented gastrointestinal side effects involving mucosal damage. The possibility that the concurrent use of bisphosphonate led to a pre-existing ulcer which could have contributed to the development of IOD in this patient should be considered. Conclusion spontaneous IOD can occur in elderly patients who are anticoagulated. Fish oil has not been previously reported as having an association with IOD. This is the first known reported case of spontaneous IOD occurring in association with concurrent use of a bisphosphonate and fish oil. IOD is a rare disorder, and any anticoagulated patients presenting with severe chest pain may need careful investigation prior to definitive management. PMID:26904189

  17. Diagnostic indicators of non-cardiovascular chest pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) has a high healthcare cost, but insufficient guidelines exist for its diagnostic investigation. The objective of the present work was to identify important diagnostic indicators and their accuracy for specific and non-specific conditions underlying NCCP. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. In May 2012, six databases were searched. Hand and bibliography searches were also conducted. Studies evaluating a diagnostic test against a reference test in patients with NCCP were included. Exclusion criteria were having <30 patients per group, and evaluating diagnostic tests for acute cardiovascular disease. Diagnostic accuracy is given in likelihood ratios (LR): very good (LR+ >10, LR- <0.1); good (LR + 5 to 10, LR- 0.1 to 0.2); fair (LR + 2 to 5, LR- 0.2 to 0.5); or poor (LR + 1 to 2, LR- 0.5 to 1). Joined meta-analysis of the diagnostic test sensitivity and specificity was performed by applying a hierarchical Bayesian model. Results Out of 6,316 records, 260 were reviewed in full text, and 28 were included: 20 investigating gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD), 3 musculoskeletal chest pain, and 5 psychiatric conditions. Study quality was good in 15 studies and moderate in 13. GERD diagnosis was more likely with typical GERD symptoms (LR + 2.70 and 2.75, LR- 0.42 and 0.78) than atypical GERD symptoms (LR + 0.49, LR- 2.71). GERD was also more likely with a positive response to a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) test (LR + 5.48, 7.13, and 8.56; LR- 0.24, 0.25, and 0.28); the posterior mean sensitivity and specificity of six studies were 0.89 (95% credible interval, 0.28 to 1) and 0.88 (95% credible interval, 0.26 to 1), respectively. Panic and anxiety screening scores can identify individuals requiring further testing for anxiety or panic disorders. Clinical findings in musculoskeletal pain either had a fair to moderate LR + and a poor LR- or vice versa. Conclusions In

  18. Cardiac autonomic function and oesophageal acid sensitivity in patients with non-cardiac chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, G; Spaziani, R; Hollerbach, S; Djuric, V; Pang, C; Upton, A; Fallen, E; Kamath, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Acid reflux can elicit non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP), possibly through altered visceral sensory or autonomic function. The interactions between symptoms, autonomic function, and acid exposure are poorly understood.
AIM—To examine autonomic function in NCCP patients during exposure to oesophageal acid infusion.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—Autonomic activity was assessed using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (PSHRV), before and during oesophageal acidification (0.1 N HCl), in 28 NCCP patients (40.5 (10) years; 13 females) and in 10 matched healthy controls. Measured PSHRV indices included high frequency (HF) (0.15-0.5 Hz) and low frequency (LF) (0.06-0.15 Hz) power to assess vagal and sympathetic activity, respectively.
RESULTS—A total of 19/28 patients had angina-like symptoms elicited by acid. There were no significant manometric changes observed in either acid sensitive or insensitive patients. Acid sensitive patients had a higher baseline heart rate (82.9 (3.1) v 66.7 (3.5) beats/min; p<0.005) and lower baseline vagal activity (HF normalised area: 31.1 (1.9)% v 38.9 (2.3)%; p< 0.03) than acid insensitive patients. During acid infusion, vagal cardiac outflow increased (p<0.03) in acid sensitive but not in acid insensitive patients.
CONCLUSIONS—Patients with angina-like pain during acid infusion have decreased resting vagal activity. The symptoms elicited by perception of acid are further associated with a simultaneous increase in vagal activity in keeping with a vagally mediated pseudoaffective response.


Keywords: reflux disease; non-cardiac chest pain; acid reflux; autonomic nervous system; vagal response; sympathetic activity; heart rate variability; power spectrum analysis PMID:11600476

  19. National Heart Attack Alert Program position paper: chest pain centers and programs for the evaluation of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Selker, H P; Cannon, C P; Farin, H M; Gibler, W B; Goldberg, R J; Lambrew, C T; Ornato, J P; Rydman, R J; Steele, P

    2000-05-01

    The National Heart Attack Alert Program (NHAAP), which is coordinated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), promotes the early detection and optimal treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction and other acute coronary ischemic syndromes. The NHAAP, having observed the development and growth of chest pain centers in emergency departments with special interest, created a task force to evaluate such centers and make recommendations pertaining to the management of patients with acute cardiac ischemia. This position paper offers recommendations to assist emergency physicians in EDs, including those with chest pain centers, in providing comprehensive care for patients with acute cardiac ischemia. PMID:10783408

  20. Evaluation of the outcomes of ice application for the control of pain associated with chest tube irritation.

    PubMed

    Kol, Emine; Erdogan, Abdullah; Karslı, Bilge; Erbil, Nazmiye

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of ice for the control of pain associated with chest tube irritation. The randomized and single-blinded study consisted of 40 patients (20 in the control and 20 in the study group) who underwent thoracotomy with chest tube placement. The same general anesthesia protocol was used for all patients, and the procedure was performed by the same surgery team. Procedures such as decortication and thoracic wall resection were not included in the study. Standard postoperative analgesic methods were applied to all patients. Additionally, ice (in flexible and bendable cold gel packs wrapped in fine cloth sheaths) was applied to the chest tube insertion site at the 24th, 28th, 36th, and 40th postoperative hours for 20 minutes. To assess the effectiveness of ice application, Verbal Category Scale and Behavioral Pain Scale methods were used to measure the severity of pain. Average pain severity scores during the mobilization activities, including coughing and walking, were compared and found to be significantly lower in the study group patients who received cold therapy than in the control group patients (p < .05). Additionally, analgesic consumption was lower in the study group than in the control group patients (p < .05). As a result, the application of ice to the chest tube insertion site reduced pain associated with irritation along with the need for analgesics. PMID:23452524

  1. Compliance with stress testing in patients discharged from the emergency department following a diagnosis of low-risk chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Kent; Prabhala, Shreyas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine rates of compliance with outpatient stress testing in patients with a diagnosis of low-risk chest pain, reasons for non-compliance and incidence of adverse cardiac events (ACE). Methods This was a prospective study of 79 patients who were discharged from the emergency department with low-risk chest pain. Patients were followed-up by phone interview. Results 36.7% of patients completed EST within 30 days, 2.5% of patients completed their EST within the recommended 72 h. A lack of time was the most common reason for non-compliance and was seen in 32.0% of patients. 20% of ESTs were cancelled by the primary care physician (PCP). 12% of patients were non-compliant, as they believed the pain to be non-cardiac. There were no documented ACEs in the study. Conclusions Compliance with EST is poor in patients with low-risk chest pain. Non-compliance is related to a number of factors including work commitments, cancellation of studies by the PCP and patients beliefs about the nature of their chest pain. PMID:27326183

  2. Predictors of violence following Emergency Department visit for cocaine-related chest pain.

    PubMed

    Walton, Maureen A; Cunningham, Rebecca; Chermack, Stephen T; Tripathi, Shanti; Weber, James; Maio, Ronald F; Booth, Brenda M

    2009-01-01

    This study examined 1-year violence outcomes among non-injured patients treated in the Emergency Department (ED) for cocaine-related chest pain. An urban Level I ED required patients with chest pain (age 60 and younger) provide a urine sample for cocaine testing. Cocaine-positive consenting patients (n=219) were interviewed in the ED; 80% completed follow-up interviews over 12-months (n=174; 59% male, 79% African-American, mean age=38.8, standard deviation 9.06; range=19-60). Baseline rates of past year violent victimization and perpetration history were: 38% and 30%, respectively. During the 12-month follow-up, rates of victimization and perpetration outcomes were 35% and 30%, respectively. Predictors of violence outcomes (either victimization or perpetration) in the year post-ED visit based on characteristics were measured at baseline or during the follow-up period (i.e., gender, age, psychological distress, binge drinking days, cocaine use days, marijuana use days, substance abuse/dependence diagnosis, victimization/perpetration history). Victimization during the follow-up was related to younger age, more frequent binge drinking and marijuana use at baseline, and victimization history, and to substance abuse/dependence, more frequent binge drinking, and psychiatric distress at follow-up. Specifically, participants who reported victimization at baseline were approximately 3 times more likely to report victimization at 12-month follow-up. Perpetration during the follow-up was related to younger age and more frequent binge drinking at baseline, and to substance abuse/dependence, more frequent binge drinking, and psychiatric distress at follow-up. Overall, no significant gender differences were observed in violence; however, women were more likely than men to report injury during the most severe partner violence incident. Violence is a common problem among patients presenting to an inner-city ED for cocaine-related chest pain, with younger age and frequency of binge

  3. Treatment Efficacy for Non-Cardiovascular Chest Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Jakob M.; Jenni, Boris F.; Steurer, Johann; Held, Ulrike; Wertli, Maria M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) leads to impaired quality of life and is associated with a high disease burden. Upon ruling out cardiovascular disease, only vague recommendations exist for further treatment. Objectives To summarize treatment efficacy for patients presenting with NCCP. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis. In July 2013, Medline, Web of Knowledge, Embase, EBSCOhost, Cochrane Reviews and Trials, and Scopus were searched. Hand and bibliography searches were also conducted. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating non-surgical treatments in patients with NCCP were included. Exclusion criteria were poor study quality and small sample size (<10 patients per group). Results Thirty eligible RCT’s were included. Most studies assessed PPI efficacy for gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD, n = 10). Two RCTs included musculoskeletal chest pain, seven psychotropic drugs, and eleven various psychological interventions. Study quality was high in five RCTs and acceptable in 25. PPI treatment in patients with GERD (5 RCTs, 192 patients) was more effective than placebo [pooled OR 11.7 (95% CI 5.5 to 25.0, heterogeneity I2 = 6.1%)]. The pooled OR in GERD negative patients (4 RCTs, 156 patients) was 0.8 (95% CI 0.2 to 2.8, heterogeneity I2 = 50.4%). In musculoskeletal NCCP (2 RCTs, 229 patients) manual therapy was more effective than usual care but not than home exercise [pooled mean difference 0.5 (95% CI −0.3 to 1.3, heterogeneity I2 = 46.2%)]. The findings for cognitive behavioral treatment, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants were mixed. Most evidence was available for cognitive behavioral treatment interventions. Limitations Only a small number of studies were available. Conclusions Timely diagnostic evaluation and treatment of the disease underlying NCCP is important. For patients with suspected GERD, high-dose treatment with PPI is effective. Only limited evidence was available for most

  4. Predictors of Violence Following Emergency Department Visit for Cocaine-Related Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Maureen A.; Cunningham, Rebecca; Chermack, Stephen T.; Tripathi, Shanti; Weber, James; Maio, Ronald F.; Booth, Brenda M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined one-year violence outcomes among non-injured patients treated in the Emergency Department (ED) for cocaine-related chest pain. An urban Level I ED required patients with chest pain (age 60 and younger) provide a urine sample for cocaine testing. Cocaine-positive consenting patients (n=219) were interviewed in the ED; 80% completed follow-up interviews over 12-months (n=174; 59% male, 79% African-American, mean age = 38.8, standard deviation 9.06; range = 19 to 60). Baseline rates of past year violent victimization and perpetration history were: 38% and 30%, respectively. During the12-month follow-up, rates of victimization and perpetration outcomes were 35% and 30%, respectively. Predictors of violence outcomes (either victimization or perpetration) in the year post-ED visit based on characteristics measured at baseline or during the follow-up period (i.e., gender, age, psychological distress, binge drinking days, cocaine use days, marijuana use days, substance abuse/dependence diagnosis, victimization/perpetration history). Victimization during the follow-up was related to younger age, more frequent binge drinking and marijuana use at baseline, and victimization history, and to substance abuse/dependence, more frequent binge drinking, and psychiatric distress at follow-up. Specifically, participants who reported victimization at baseline were approximately 3 times more likely to report victimization at 12-month follow-up. Perpetration during the follow-up was related to younger age and more frequent binge drinking at baseline, and to substance abuse/dependence, more frequent binge drinking, and psychiatric distress at follow-up. Overall, no significant gender differences were observed in violence; however, women were more likely than men to report injury during the most severe partner violence incident. Violence is a common problem among patients presenting to an inner city ED for cocaine-related chest pain, with younger age and frequency of

  5. Emergency department overcrowding and ambulance transport delays for patients with chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Schull, Michael J.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Vermeulen, Marian; Redelmeier, Donald A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective Emergency department overcrowding sometimes results in diversion of ambulances to other locations. We sought to determine the resulting prehospital delays for cardiac patients. Methods Data on consecutive patients with chest pain who were transported to Toronto hospitals by ambulance were obtained for a 4-month period in 1997 and a 4-month period in 1999, which represented periods of low and high emergency department overcrowding respectively. Multivariate analyses were used to model 90th percentile system response (initiation of 9-1-1 call to arrival on scene), on-scene (arrival on scene to departure from scene) and transport (departure from scene to arrival at hospital) intervals. Predictor variables were study period (1997 or 1999), day of the week, time of day, geographic location of the patient, dispatch priority, case severity, return priority and number of other patients with chest pain transported within 2 hours of the index transport. Results A total of 3609 patients (mean age 66.3 years, 50.3% female) who met the study criteria were transported by ambulance during the 2 study periods. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics between the 2 periods, despite the fact that more patients were transported during the second period (p < 0.001). The 90th percentile system response interval increased by 11.3% from the first to the second period (9.7 v. 10.8 min, p < 0.001), whereas the on-scene interval decreased by 8.2% (28.0 v. 25.7 min, p < 0.001). The longest delay was in the transport interval, which increased by 28.4% from 1997 to 1999 (13.4 v. 17.2 min, p < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, the study period (1997 v. 1999) remained a significant predictor of longer transport interval (p < 0.001) and total prehospital interval (p = 0.004). Interpretation An increase in overcrowding in emergency departments was associated with a substantial increase in the system response interval and the ambulance transport interval for

  6. An Autopsied Case of Malignant Sarcomatoid Pleural Mesothelioma in Which Chest Pain Developed Several Months Earlier without Abnormality on Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yaguchi, Daizo; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Inoue, Noriko; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Matsuura, Akinobu; Shizu, Masato; Imai, Naoyuki; Watanabe, Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    The patient experienced chest pain for about 7 months, but a diagnosis could not be made until after death. He was diagnosed with malignant sarcomatoid pleural mesothelioma on autopsy. In this case report, difficult aspects of the diagnosis are discussed. The 70-year-old Japanese man was a driver who transported ceramic-related products. Right chest pain developed in July 2013, but no abnormality was detected on a chest computed tomography (CT) performed in September 2013, and the pain was managed as right intercostal neuralgia. A chest CT performed in late October 2013 revealed a right pleural effusion, and the patient was referred to our hospital in early November 2013. Thoracentesis was performed, but the cytology was negative, and no diagnosis could be made. Close examination was postponed because the patient developed a subarachnoid hemorrhage. He underwent 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) after discharge from the neurosurgery department, and extensive right pleural thickening and 18F-FDG accumulation in this region were observed. Based on these findings, malignant pleural mesothelioma was suspected, and a thoracoscopy was performed under local anesthesia in early December 2013, but no definite diagnosis could be made. The patient selected best supportive care and died about 7 months after the initial development of right chest pain. The disease was definitively diagnosed as malignant sarcomatoid pleural mesothelioma by a pathological autopsy. When chronic chest pain of unknown cause is observed and past exposure to asbestos is suspected, actions to prevent delay in diagnosis should be taken, including testing for suspicion of malignant pleural mesothelioma. PMID:26600776

  7. An Autopsied Case of Malignant Sarcomatoid Pleural Mesothelioma in Which Chest Pain Developed Several Months Earlier without Abnormality on Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Daizo; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Inoue, Noriko; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Matsuura, Akinobu; Shizu, Masato; Imai, Naoyuki; Watanabe, Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    The patient experienced chest pain for about 7 months, but a diagnosis could not be made until after death. He was diagnosed with malignant sarcomatoid pleural mesothelioma on autopsy. In this case report, difficult aspects of the diagnosis are discussed. The 70-year-old Japanese man was a driver who transported ceramic-related products. Right chest pain developed in July 2013, but no abnormality was detected on a chest computed tomography (CT) performed in September 2013, and the pain was managed as right intercostal neuralgia. A chest CT performed in late October 2013 revealed a right pleural effusion, and the patient was referred to our hospital in early November 2013. Thoracentesis was performed, but the cytology was negative, and no diagnosis could be made. Close examination was postponed because the patient developed a subarachnoid hemorrhage. He underwent (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) after discharge from the neurosurgery department, and extensive right pleural thickening and (18)F-FDG accumulation in this region were observed. Based on these findings, malignant pleural mesothelioma was suspected, and a thoracoscopy was performed under local anesthesia in early December 2013, but no definite diagnosis could be made. The patient selected best supportive care and died about 7 months after the initial development of right chest pain. The disease was definitively diagnosed as malignant sarcomatoid pleural mesothelioma by a pathological autopsy. When chronic chest pain of unknown cause is observed and past exposure to asbestos is suspected, actions to prevent delay in diagnosis should be taken, including testing for suspicion of malignant pleural mesothelioma. PMID:26600776

  8. Chest pain due to Pinch-off syndrome: radiological findings and endovascular rescue.

    PubMed

    Viviani, E; Giribono, A M; Ferrara, D; Santagata, A; Narese, D; Midiri, F; Albano, D; Porcellini, M

    2016-01-01

    Port-a-cath is widely used as a route for administration of drugs in hematology and oncology patients and, recently, has been adapted also for hemodialysis patients. Major complications include infection, thrombosis, arrhythmia, and embolization. The Pinch-off-syndrome (POS) means the clavicle and the first rib compress the long-term central venous catheter. The reported incidence rate ranges from 1.4% to 4.1%. This syndrome can be recognized on chest radiography by observing a thinning of the catheter lumen through the passage between the clavicle and the first rib. Catheter fracture is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication that must be recognized and treated promptly. Management of dislodged ports includes percutaneous transcatheter retrieval, open thoracotomy retrieval and oral anticoagulant therapy. Among these techniques, percutaneous transcatheter retrieval is an easy, safe and efficient method. We report the successful percutaneous endovascular retrieval of dislodged intracardiac catheter, separated from its port, in a 58 year-old male patient who presented with chest pain. PMID:26980633

  9. Meteorological factors and the time of onset of chest pain in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, David R.; Pohl, Jurgen E.; Tse, Yiu-Yu S.; Hiorns, Robert W.

    1996-09-01

    Analysis of the time of onset of chest pain in 2254 patients with a myocardial infarction admitted to a coronary care unit in Leicester during a 10-year period shows an association with temperature and humidity. During both the most cold and humid times of the year, the relationship is a strong one. A generalized linear model with a log link was used to fit the data and the backward elimination selection procedure suggested a humid, cold day might help to trigger the occurrence of myocardial infarction. In addition, cold weather was found to have a stronger effect on the male population while those men aged between 50 and 70 years were more sensitive to the effect of high humidity.

  10. Chronic Lipoid Pneumonia in a 9-Year-Old Child Revealed by Recurrent Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Hochart, A; Thumerelle, C; Petyt, L; Mordacq, C; Deschildre, A

    2015-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia in children is a rare disorder due to accumulation of fatty oily material in the alveoli and usually associated with an underlying condition. In absence of obvious context, diagnosis remains difficult with nonspecific clinical and radiological features. We report the first case of voluntary chronic aspiration of olive oil responsible for exogenous lipoid pneumonia, in a previously healthy 9-year-old boy. Clinical presentation was atypical; LP was revealed by isolated chest pain. We discuss radiological and bronchial alveolar lavage characteristics suggestive of lipoid pneumonia. Conclusion. Lipoid pneumonia is a disease to be reminded of in children, which can occur with original findings in terms of etiology and clinical presentation. PMID:26078902

  11. Chronic Lipoid Pneumonia in a 9-Year-Old Child Revealed by Recurrent Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hochart, A.; Thumerelle, C.; Petyt, L.; Mordacq, C.; Deschildre, A.

    2015-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia in children is a rare disorder due to accumulation of fatty oily material in the alveoli and usually associated with an underlying condition. In absence of obvious context, diagnosis remains difficult with nonspecific clinical and radiological features. We report the first case of voluntary chronic aspiration of olive oil responsible for exogenous lipoid pneumonia, in a previously healthy 9-year-old boy. Clinical presentation was atypical; LP was revealed by isolated chest pain. We discuss radiological and bronchial alveolar lavage characteristics suggestive of lipoid pneumonia. Conclusion. Lipoid pneumonia is a disease to be reminded of in children, which can occur with original findings in terms of etiology and clinical presentation. PMID:26078902

  12. Pretest probability assessment for selective rest sestamibi scans in stable chest pain patients.

    PubMed

    Welch, R D; Zalenski, R J; Shamsa, F; Waselewsky, D R; Kosnik, J W; Compton, S

    2000-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether pretest probability assessments permit more selective testing of chest pain patients with technetium-99m sestamibi scanning. Pretest probabilities of cardiac ischemia were measured both objectively (Acute Cardiac Ischemia Time-Insensitive Predictive Instrument [ACI-TIPI]) and subjectively (physician's estimate of the probability of unstable angina). Two groups were defined: patients whose postsestamibi scan led to a "downgrade" of the intensity of monitoring and those that resulted in no change in monitoring intensity. Sixty-five patients met study criteria; 25 had a disposition downgrade and 40 had no change. Pretest ACI-TIPI scores were similar in the two groups (29% +/- 18% versus 27% +/- 11%, mean +/- standard deviation; P = .95) as were the physician's assessment of unstable angina (39% +/- 22% versus 40% +/- 24%; P = .75). Objective or subjective pretest probabilities are not significantly different in patients who are likely to have their disposition altered by sestamibi scanning. PMID:11103730

  13. Esophageal Mast Cell Infiltration in a 32-Year-Old Woman with Noncardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keol; Kwon, Hee Jin; Kim, In Young; Yoo, Kwai Han; Lee, Seulkee; Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-01-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is one of the most common esophageal symptoms and lacks a clearly defined mechanism. The most common cause of NCCP is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). One of the accepted mechanisms of NCCP in a patient without GERD has been altered visceral sensitivity. Mast cells may play a role in visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome. In this case, a patient with NCCP and dysphagia who was unresponsive to proton pump inhibitor treatment had an increased esophageal mast cell infiltration and responded to 14 days of antihistamine and antileukotriene treatment. We suggest that there may be a relationship between esophageal symptoms such as NCCP and esophageal mast cell infiltration. PMID:26087786

  14. Chest Pain with Normal Thallium-201 Myocardial Perfusion Image – Is It Really Normal?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pang-Yen; Lin, Wen-Yu; Lin, Li-Fan; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Yang, Shih-Ping; Liou, Jun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion image (MPI) is commonly used to detect coronary artery disease in patients with chest pain. Although a normal thallium-201 MPI result is generally considered to be a good prognosis and further coronary angiogram is not recommended, there are still a few patients who suffer from unexpected acute coronary events. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical prognosis in patients with normal thallium-201 MPI. Methods From January 2006 to August 2012, a total 22,003 patients undergoing thallium-201 MPI in one tertiary center were screened. Of these, 8092 patients had normal results and were investigated retrospectively. During follow-up, 54 patients underwent coronary angiogram because of refractory typical angina pectoris or unexpected acute coronary events. These 54 patients were divided into 2 groups: group I consisted of 26 (48.1%) patients with angiography-proven significant coronary artery stenosis, and group II consisted of 28 (51.9%) patients without significant stenosis. Results Patients in group I had a higher prevalence of prior coronary stenting and electrocardiographic features of ST depression compared with patients in group II. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that both prior coronary stenting and ST depression were risk predictors of unexpected acute coronary events in the patients with normal thallium-201 MPI [odds ratio (OR), 5.93; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-34.06, p = 0.05 and OR, 7.10; 95% CI: 1.28-39.51, p = 0.03,respectively]. Conclusions Although there is a low incidence of unexpected acute coronary events in patients with chest pain and normal thallium-201 MPI, physicians should be aware of the potentials risk in certain patients in this specific population. PMID:27274174

  15. Impact of thallium-201 imaging on clinical assessment and management of patients with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Schmoliner, R.; Dudczak, R.; Kronik, G.; Moesslacher, H.; Zangeneh, M.; Pollak, C.; Schurz, B.; Schoberwalter, A.

    1984-12-01

    The histories, rest, and exercise ECG results of 60 patients without myocardial infarction complaining of chest pain were submitted to 6 physicians (3 cardiologists and 3 noncardiologists) who were unaware of the angiographic findings. The physicians were requested to estimate the probability of coronary artery disease present in percentages and to assess the need for coronary angiography on a five-point scale (1 . definitely not indicated, 5 . definitely indicated). After obtaining the results of thallium-201 imaging following dipyridamole (0.50 mg/kg intravenously) administration, the physicians were again requested to estimate probability and need for angiography. In the 43 patients with coronary artery disease the judgment of probability was increased significantly after /sup 201/Tl from 75.6 +/- 20.2% to 82.9 +/- 23.2% (p less than 0.001) and the need for angiography from 4.3 +/- 0.9% to 4.5 +/- 0.9% (p less than 0.001). In the subgroup of patients with atypical angina the relative change in probability was higher than in other subgroups of patients with coronary artery disease. In the 17 patients with normal coronary arteries the probability estimation fell after /sup 201/Tl from 36.7 +/- 22.0% to 24.8 +/- 21.0% (p less than 0.001), the need for angiography was decreased from 2.7 +/- 1.1% to 2.2 +/- 1.2% (p less than 0.001). With the /sup 201/Tl information, cardiologists performed a better diagnostic differentiation of patients with and without coronary artery disease than noncardiologists. The study demonstrates the improvement of clinical diagnosis in patients with chest pain by thallium-201 imaging and confirms the favorable influence of the method on the management of the patients in terms of indications for coronary angiography.

  16. Limitations of Chest Pain Categorization Models to Predict Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Rovai, Daniele; Neglia, Danilo; Lorenzoni, Valentina; Caselli, Chiara; Knuuti, Juhani; Underwood, S Richard

    2015-08-15

    We aimed to evaluate how chest pain categorization, currently used to assess the pretest probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), predicts the actual presence of CAD in a population of patients with stable symptoms. We studied 475 consecutive patients enrolled in the Evaluation of Integrated Cardiac Imaging for the Detection and Characterization of Ischemic Heart Disease study based on possible symptoms of CAD. Chest pain or discomfort was categorized as typical angina, atypical angina, or as nonanginal according to the guidelines. Exertional dyspnea and fatigue suspected to be angina equivalents were classified as atypical angina. Patients with a probability of CAD <20 or >90% based on age, gender, and symptoms were excluded. The end points of this substudy were significant CAD (defined by invasive coronary angiography as >50% reduction in lumen diameter in the left main stem or >70% stenosis in a major coronary vessel or 30% to 70% stenosis with fractional flow reserve ≤0.8), inducible myocardial ischemia at noninvasive stress imaging, and their association. Patients' symptoms had limited ability to predict the presence of significant CAD, global chi-square being 5.0. The inclusion of age increased global chi-square to 18.7 and gender increased it further to 51.1. Using inducible myocardial ischemia or the association of CAD with inducible ischemia as end points, the ability to predict these end points was again better for patient demographics than for patient symptoms. Thus, the ability of current models based on symptoms, age, and gender to predict the presence of CAD is mainly based on patient demographics as opposed to symptoms. PMID:26081064

  17. A Bridge to a Woman's Heart as the Cause of Recurrent Chest Pain: A Case on Myocardial Bridge.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Ashwad; Korniyenko, Aleksandr; Haq, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial bridge is a congenital structural variant of the coronary arteries where a segment of the epicardial vessel is surrounded by the myocardium. It is an uncommon entity that may go unnoticed in patients with recurrent chest pain. We present a case on a 36-year-old woman with recurrent chest pain. Initial workup revealed normal routine laboratory test results, cardiac biomarkers, electrocardiogram, and an echocardiogram showing preserved ejection fraction with no valvulopathies. A dobutamine myocardial perfusion stress test was performed; this induced chest pain in the patient with electrocardiogram changes evident for 1-mm ST segment elevation in lead V5 and V6 consistent with myocardial ischemia. Perfusion imaging revealed a small fixed myocardial perfusion defect of the apical inferior wall. A cardiac catheterization revealed moderate-to-severe myocardial bridging involving the middle left anterior descending artery. Treatment with metoprolol and ranolazine resolved her symptoms. This case portrays the importance of recognizing myocardial bridge as the potential cause of recurrent chest pain and its ability to cause myocardial ischemia under stress. PMID:25723365

  18. Point-of-Care Testing and Cardiac Biomarkers: The Standard of Care and Vision for Chest Pain Centers.

    PubMed

    Kost, Gerald J; Tran, Nam K

    2005-11-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is defined as testing at or near the site of patient care. POCTdecreases therapeutic turnaround time (TTAT), increases clinical efficiency, and improves medical and economic outcomes. TTAT represents the time from test ordering to patient treatment. POC technologies have become ubiquitous in the United States, and, therefore,so has the potential for speed, convenience, and satisfaction, strong advantages for physicians, nurses, and patients in chest pain centers. POCT is applied most beneficially through the collaborative teamwork of clinicians and laboratorians who use integrative strategies, performance maps, clinical algorithms, and care paths (critical pathways). For example, clinical investigators have shown that on-site integration of testing for cardiac injury markers (myoglobin, creatinine kinase myocardial band [CKMB],and cardiac troponin I [cTnI]) in accelerated diagnostic algorithms produces effective screening, less hospitalization, and substantial savings. Chest pain centers, which now total over 150 accredited in the United States, incorporate similar types of protocol-driven performance enhancements. This optimization allows chest pain centers to improve patient evaluation, treatment, survival, and discharge. This article focuses on cardiac biomarker POCT for chest pain centers and emergency medicine. PMID:16278118

  19. Evaluation and risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency department. Predictors of life-threatening events.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Shamsa, F; Pede, K J

    1998-08-01

    While assessing chest pain in the emergency department, physicians must first estimate the probability of acute ischemic states in the patient. This first estimate is based on the patient's history, physical examination, and electrocardiogram. Patients who meet the threshold for acute cardiac ischemia are further evaluated to confirm or exclude this diagnosis, while other life-threatening factors are excluded. PMID:9739772

  20. Triple Rule Out versus CT Angiogram Plus Stress Test for Evaluation of Chest Pain in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Kelly N.; Shah, Payal; Qu, Lihua; Kurz, Michael C.; Clark, Carol L.; Swor, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Undifferentiated chest pain in the emergency department (ED) is a diagnostic challenge. One approach includes a dedicated chest computed tomography (CT) for pulmonary embolism or dissection followed by a cardiac stress test (TRAD). An alternative strategy is a coronary CT angiogram with concurrent chest CT (Triple Rule Out, TRO). The objective of this study was to describe the ED patient course and short-term safety for these evaluation methods. Methods This was a retrospective observational study of adult patients presenting to a large, community ED for acute chest pain who had non-diagnostic electrocardiograms (ECGs) and normal biomarkers. We collected demographics, ED length of stay, hospital costs, and estimated radiation exposures. We evaluated 30-day return visits for major adverse cardiac events. Results A total of 829 patients underwent TRAD, and 642 patients had TRO. Patients undergoing TRO tended to be younger (mean 52.3 vs 56.5 years) and were more likely to be male (42.4% vs. 30.4%). TRO patients tended to have a shorter ED length of stay (mean 14.45 vs. 21.86 hours), to incur less cost (median $449.83 vs. $1147.70), and to be exposed to less radiation (median 7.18 vs. 16.6mSv). No patient in either group had a related 30-day revisit. Conclusion Use of TRO is feasible for assessment of chest pain in the ED. Both TRAD and TRO safely evaluated patients. Prospective studies investigating this diagnostic strategy are needed to further assess this approach to ED chest pain evaluation. PMID:26587090

  1. Reduce chest pain using modified silicone fluted drain tube for chest drainage after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Hu, Bin; Miao, Jinbai

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, efficacy and safety of a modified silicone fluted drain tube after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection. Methods The prospective randomized study included 50 patients who underwent VATS lung resection between March 2015 and June 2015. Eligible patients were randomized into two groups: experimental group (using the silicone fluted drain tubes for chest drainage) and control group (using standard drain tubes for chest drainage). The volume and characteristics of drainage, postoperative (PO) pain scores and hospital stay were recorded. All patients received standard care during hospital admission. Results In accordance with the exit criteria, three patients were excluded from study. The remaining 47 patients included in the final analysis were divided into two groups: experiment group (N=24) and control group (N=23). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, sex, height, weight, clinical diagnosis and type of surgical procedure. There was a trend toward less PO pain in experimental group on postoperative day (POD) 1, with a statistically significant difference. Patients in experimental group had a reduced occurrence of fever [temperature (T) >37.4 °C] compared to the control group. Conclusions The silicone fluted drain tube is feasible and safe and may relieve patient PO pain and reduce occurrence of fever without the added risk of PO complications. PMID:26941976

  2. Physical therapy intervention in patients with non-cardiac chest pain following a recent cardiac event: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stafne, Signe N; Hiller, Aud; Slørdahl, Stig A; Aamot, Inger-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of two different physical therapy interventions in patients with stable coronary heart disease and non-cardiac chest pain. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out at a university hospital in Norway. A total of 30 patients with known and stable coronary heart disease and self-reported persistent chest pain reproduced by palpation of intercostal trigger points were participating in the study. The intervention was deep friction massage and heat pack versus heat pack only. The primary outcome was pain intensity after the intervention period and 3 months after the last treatment session, measured by Visual Analogue Scale, 0 to 100. Secondary outcome was health-related quality of life. Results: Treatment with deep friction massage and heat pack gave significant pain reduction compared to heat pack only (–17.6, 95% confidence interval: –30.5, –4.7; p < 0.01), and the reduction was persistent at 3 months’ follow-up (–15.2, 95% confidence interval: –28.5, –1.8; p = 0.03). Health-related quality of life improved in all three domains in patients with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: Deep friction massage combined with heat pack is an efficient treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain in patients with stable coronary heart disease. PMID:26770781

  3. Anxiety and Hypervigilance to Cardiopulmonary Sensations in Non-Cardiac Chest Pain Patients With and Without Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    White, Kamila S.; Craft, Jennifer M.; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated body vigilance, cardiac anxiety, and the mediating role of interoceptive fear on pain in patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP; a syndrome of chest pain in the absence of identifiable organic etiology). Patients were more attentive to cardiac-congruent sensations than cardiac-incongruent sensations (e.g., gastrointestinal, cognitive dyscontrol; p's < .001). Patients with a DSM-IV Axis I anxiety or mood disorder were more body vigilant compared to patients who did not have a disorder (p's < .05). Patients with anxiety disorders were particularly vigilant to and fearful of cardiac sensations relative to patients without anxiety disorders. Latent variable path models examined the extent that interoceptive fear mediated the association between body vigilance and cardiac anxiety on chest pain. Within each model, diagnostic status, body vigilance, and cardiac anxiety were exogenous and predicted interoceptive fear that in turn predicted pain. Separate models examined body vigilance and cardiac anxiety, and both models fit the data well. Findings showed partial mediation for the body vigilance factor, and full mediation for the cardiac anxiety factor. Interoceptive fear played a mediating role in both models. The syndrome of NCCP may persist partly due to conscious hypervigilance to and fear of cardiac-congruent body sensations, particularly among anxious patients. PMID:20110083

  4. Characteristics of chest pain and its acute management in a low-middle income country: analysis of emergency department surveillance data from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Chest pain is one of the most frequent causes of emergency department (ED) visits in high-income countries. Little is known about chest pain patients presenting to EDs of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of chest pain patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) of Pakistan and to determine the utilization of ED resources in the management of chest pain patients and their outcomes. Methods This study used pilot active surveillance data from seven major EDs in Pakistan. Data were collected on all patients presenting to the EDs of the participating sites to seek emergency care for chest pain. Results A total of 20,435 patients were admitted to the EDs with chest pain. The majority were males (M 60%, F 40%) and the mean age was 42 years (SD+/- 14). The great majority (97%, n = 19,164) of patients were admitted to the EDs of public hospitals compared to private hospitals and only 3% arrived by ambulance. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were used in more than half of all chest pain patients (55%, n = 10,890) while cardiac enzymes were performed in less than 5% of cases. Chest X-rays were the most frequently performed radiological procedure (21%, n = 4,135); more than half of the admitted chest pain patients were discharged from the EDs and less than 1% died in the ED. Conclusion Chest pain is a common presenting complaint in EDs in Pakistan. The majority received an ECG and the use of diagnostic testing, such as cardiac enzymes, is quite uncommon. PMID:26691439

  5. Think twice - Diagnostic delay in a patient with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Bang, Cæcilie Larsen; Porsbjerg, Celeste Michala

    2016-01-01

    Heart involvement is the most critical and potentially lethal systemic manifestation in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). We present a case of acute chest pain in a 58-year-old male with severe asthma, which regressed after sublingual administration of nitroglycerine. At the time of hospital admission, there were non-specific ST-changes on the ecg, coronary enzymes were increased, and the patient was concluded to have a non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, and treated as such. A subacute cardiac catheterization showed no signs of significant coronary stenosis. During the next days, there was increasing pain and reduced strength in both feet. Paraclinical imaging and neurological examinations could not explain the symptoms, and physiotherapy was initiated. At the time, no connection to patient's diagnosis of severe asthma was made. The patient was seen in the respiratory outpatient clinic for a routine check-up, three weeks after the initial hospital admission. At this point, there was increasing pain in both legs and the patient had difficulty walking and experienced increasing dyspnea. Blood eosinophils were elevated (12.7 × 10(9)/L), and an acute HRCT scan showed bilateral peribronchial infiltrates with ground glass opacification and small noduli. A diagnosis of EGPA was established, and administration of systemic glucocorticoids was initiated. A year and a half later, there is still reduced strength and sensory loss. This case illustrates that it is important to consider alternative diagnoses in patients with atypical symptoms and a low risk profile. Heart involvement is the most critical and potentially lethal systemic manifestation in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, formerly known as Churg-Strauss syndrome), which makes a quick diagnosis and prompt initiation of correct treatment imperative. PMID:27625985

  6. Clinical presentation and chiropractic treatment of Tietze syndrome: A 34-year-old female with left-sided chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Gijsbers, Eefje; Knaap, Simone F.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical presentation and chiropractic management of Tietze syndrome. Clinical Features A 34-year-old woman presented with unexplained left-sided chest pain. Electrocardiogram and radiographs were taken at a medical emergency department to rule out cardiovascular and pulmonary causes, and pain medication did not relieve her pain. Physical examination showed tenderness on palpation and swelling of the second and third chondrosternal joints, as well as thoracic joint dysfunction. Heart and lung pathology was ruled out, and chondrosternal joint swelling was present, Tietze syndrome was diagnosed. Intervention and Outcome A treatment plan aimed at restoring normal thoracic and rib joint movement and decreasing inflammation of the chondrosternal joints resulted in lower pain levels. Treatment consisted of diversified high-velocity, low-amplitude chiropractic manipulation; activator technique; and cryotherapy. Conclusion Chiropractic management of Tietze syndrome was successful in reducing pain levels in this patient's case. PMID:22027210

  7. The independent association of anxiety with non-cardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Smeijers, Loes; van de Pas, Harm; Nyklicek, Ivan; Notten, Peter J; Pedersen, Susanne S; Kop, Willem J

    2014-01-01

    Non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) is common in clinical cardiology. Anxiety is an important factor in NCCP because of its role in the neurobehavioural processes of pain regulation. It is not well established that which specific anxiety symptoms are disproportionately elevated in NCCP and whether the association between anxiety and NCCP is independent of personality factors. Participants with NCCP (N = 46; mean age 44.9 ± 14.7; 67% women) were evaluated for anxiety (Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory[STAI]), clinical measures and personality factors (negative affectivity and social inhibition measured by the Type D inventory). Item analysis was conducted for each of the anxiety symptoms. A healthy reference group was used for comparison purposes (N = 1233; mean age 55.2 ± 14.3; 50% women). Results showed that NCCP was associated with elevated anxiety levels (STAI ≥ 45) compared to the reference group (OR = 3.27, 95% CI = 1.68-6.36; p < .001). Item analyses revealed that all anxiety symptoms were associated with NCCP (median rho = .125, range .08-.18), particularly worry, tension and feeling frightened. Associations between anxiety and NCCP remained significant when adjusting for demographic, clinical and personality factors (OR = 2.52; 95% CI = 1.17-5.40). It is concluded that anxiety is strongly associated with NCCP. This association is not limited to physical anxiety symptoms and is independent of personality factors. PMID:24160441

  8. Atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy in patients with chest pain: correlation with coronary anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Walter, K.E.; Williams, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    Atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy were performed in 72 patients referred for evaluation of chest pain. Coronary artery disease (CAD) was present in 63 patients, as documented by cardiac catheterization performed at the same time or within 2 months of atrial pacing. Nine patients had no or insignificant (less than 50% stenosis) CAD. The sensitivity of pacing-induced angina for CAD was 51%, and was 49% for ST depression. Specificities were 89% and 78%, respectively. A reversible perfusion defect was seen in 54% of patients with CAD (specificity 89%), and a fixed defect in 29% (specificity 100%). The sensitivity of an abnormal thallium-201 scan (one or more reversible or fixed defects) was 79% (p less than 0.05 compared to angina or ST depression). Combined sensitivity of ST depression and/or an abnormal thallium-201 scan was 87%. There were no significant changes in any of these sensitivities as the number of vessels with CAD increased. Thallium-201 scintigraphy correctly identified 11 of 19 (58%) patients with single-vessel disease as having CAD in only one vessel, but underestimated the extent of disease in all but a few patients with multivessel disease. The sensitivity of perfusion imaging to identify lesions in specific vessels ranged from 27% (circumflex) to 57% (right coronary artery). Specificities were 100% for circumflex, 78% for anterior descending, and 83% for right coronary artery lesions.

  9. Prediction of death, myocardial infarction, and worsening chest pain using thallium scintigraphy and exercise electrocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Staniloff, H.M.; Forrester, J.S.; Berman, D.S.; Swan, H.J.

    1986-12-01

    Although used extensively, there is little published information on the prognostic ability of exercise /sup 201/Tl scintigraphy. Accordingly, 1 yr after testing we contacted 819 patients without previous MI or CABG seen in our laboratory during a 2-yr period. Events were defined as death from a cardiovascular cause, nonfatal MI, or worsening clinical state requiring CABG. The event rate was 3.9 events per 100 patients per year. There was univariate prognostic information when comparing the highest and lowest categories as risk ratios for chest pain characteristics (2.7), sex (2.3), exercise duration (3.1), ST slope (2.5), and thallium pattern (11.6), intensity of perfusion defect (17.2), and number of abnormal regions (8.7). However, the strongest predictors were also the least common. Prognostic ability was improved by combining the results categorically, as the number of abnormal tests (13.9). The highest risk ratio, 20.5:1, was obtained by combining results through discriminant function analysis. We conclude that exercise thallium scintigraphy provides prognostic information, although the most predictive patterns are uncommon. Combining the results of multiple test results improves the prognostic ability.

  10. Chest pain in a patient with a tall R wave in V1

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Kenneth; Condos, Gregory; Lin, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An 83-year-old man 2 days postoperative from L3 to L5 laminectomy developed sudden onset of chest pain. Initial ECGs demonstrated a tall R wave in V1 and ST-segment depression in leads V2–V5. A posterior ECG was performed, but failed to demonstrate ST elevations. The patient was initially treated as an non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction with weight-based enoxaparin. On further review, the patient's ECG was identified as a STEMI equivalent, and he underwent cardiac catheterisation. He was noted to have a near complete occlusion of the posterior descending branch of the right coronary artery (RCA). Bare-metal stents were placed in the proximal and distal RCA, with restored flow distal to the lesions. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit for observation, and was noted to develop atrial fibrillation. Rate control was achieved with diltiazem, and the patient was started on dabigatran. Medical therapy including aspirin and clopidogrel was initiated, and the patient was discharged home. PMID:25150241

  11. Prognostic value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Guiney, T.E.; Newell, J.B.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Accurate prognostic information is important in determining optimal management of patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain. In this study, the ability of exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging to predict future cardiac events (cardiovascular death or nonfatal myocardial infarction) was correlated with clinical, coronary and left ventricular angiographic and exercise electrocardiographic data in 139 consecutive, nonsurgically managed patients followed-up over a 3 to 5 year period (mean follow-up, 3.7 +/- 0.9), using a logistic regression analysis. Among patients without prior myocardial infarction (100 of 139), the number of myocardial segments with transient thallium-201 defects was the only statistically significant predictor of future cardiac events when all patient variables were evaluated. Among patients with myocardial infarction before evaluation (39 of 139), angiographic ejection fraction was the only significant predictor of future cardiac events when all variables were considered. This study suggests an approach to evaluate the risk of future cardiac events in patients with possible ischemic heart disease.

  12. Noncardiac chest pain--an Asia-Pacific survey on the views of primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ting Kin; Lim, Paul Wah Yonn; Wong, Benjamin C Y

    2007-11-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is common and has a significant impact on health care. Primary care physicians (PCPs)' attitudes, clinical approach, preference of diagnostic tests, referral patterns, and comfort in managing patients with NCCP in the Asia-Pacific region are not known. Consequently, we performed this survey in the Asia-Pacific region. The self-completed questionnaire was sent to PCPs in the Asia-Pacific region. A 28-item questionnaire contained questions on demographic information, characteristics of practice, preferences of diagnostic tests, referral patterns, treatment plans, and opinion on Helicobacter pylori and NCCP. A total of 108 (74%) PCPs returned the questionnaire. A mean of 18% of the patients were diagnosed with NCCP by PCPs in the past 6 months. Ninety-four percent of PCPs had treated NCCP patients in the last 6 months. Only 38% of the PCPs were comfortable in diagnosing NCCP but 85.2% believed that they should manage NCCP patients. PCPs in Malaysia and Philippines were more likely to refer patients to subspecialists. Fifty-seven and four-tenths percent of PCPs believed that H. pylori infection plays a role in the development of NCCP. The study demonstrates clearly that the understanding, diagnostic strategies, and treatment strategies of NCCP in the Asia-Pacific region are suboptimal and thus highlights the importance of educational and training programs tailored for PCPs in NCCP. PMID:17436083

  13. Ejection fraction response to exercise in patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, R.L.; Lee, K.L.; Cobb, F.; Jones, R.H.

    1981-11-01

    In this study we describe the ejection fraction response to upright exercise using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in a group of 60 patients with chest pain, normal coronary ateriograms and normal resting ventricular function. A wide range of resting function (heart rate and ejection fraction) and exercise function (heart rate, ejection fraction, peak work load and estimated peak oxygen uptake) were measured. The ejection fraction response to exercise demonstrated wide variation, ranging from a decrease of 23% to an increase of 24%. Six of 22 clinical and radionuclide angiocardiographic variables (resting ejection fraction, peak work load, age, sex, body surface area and the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise) were significant univariate predictors of the ejection fraction response to exercise. Multivariable analysis identified resting ejection fraction, the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise and either sex or peak work load as variables that provided significant independent predictive information. These observations indicate that the ejection fraction response to exercise is a complex response that is influenced by multiple physiologic variables. The wide variation in this population suggests that the ejection fraction response to exercise is not a reliable test for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease because of its low specificity.

  14. Exercise left ventricular performance in patients with chest pain, ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiograms, and angiographically normal coronary arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.J.; Sands, M.J.; Davies, R.A.; Wackers, F.J.; Alexander, J.; Lachman, A.S.; Williams, B.W.; Zaret, B.L.

    1981-02-01

    Left ventricular performance was evaluated using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in 31 patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and angiographically normal coronary arteries at rest and during maximal upright bicycle exercise. /sup 201/Tl imaging was done in all patients after treadmill exercise and in selected patients after ergonovine provocation. Resting left ventricular performance was normal in all patients. An abnormal ejection fraction response to exercise was detected in 12 of 31 patients. Regional dysfunction was present during exercise in four patients, all of whom also had abnormal global responses. Three of these 12 patients and two additional patients had exercise-induced /sup 201/Tl perfusion defects. In all nine patients who underwent ergonovine testing, there was no suggestion of coronary arterial spasm. Thus, left ventricular dysfunction during exercise, in the presence of normal resting performance, was found in a substantial number of patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and normal coronary arteries.

  15. The Emerging Roles of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography: Acute Chest Pain Evaluation and Screening for Asymptomatic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ning; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Lin, Po-Chih; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Lee, Yee-Fan; Ko, Wei-Chun; Lee, Bai-Chin; Lee, Wen-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) has been widely available since 2004. After that, the diagnostic accuracy of CCTA has been extensively validated with invasive coronary angiography for detection of coronary arterial stenosis. In this paper, we reviewed the updated evidence of the role of CCTA in both scenarios including acute chest pain and screening in asymptomatic adults. Several large-scale studies have been conducted to evaluate the diagnostic value of CCTA in the context of acute chest pain patients. CCTA could play a role in delivering more efficient care. For risk stratification of asymptomatic patients using CCTA, latest studies have revealed incremental benefits. Future studies evaluating the totality of plaque characteristics may be useful for determining the role of noncalcified plaque for risk stratification in asymptomatic individuals. PMID:27122947

  16. The Incidence of Gastro-Esophageal Disease for the Patients with Typical Chest Pain and a Normal Coronary Angiogram

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Chang-Wook; Lee, Young-Soo; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Han, Seong-Wook; Hur, Seung-Ho; Kim, Yoon-Nyun; Kim, Kwon-Bae; Jang, Byoung-Kuk

    2006-01-01

    Background Although patients may present with typical chest pain and exhibit ischemic changes on the cardiac stress test, they are frequently found to have a normal coronary angiogram. Thus, we wanted to determine which procedures should be performed in order to make an adequate diagnosis of the cause of chest pain. Methods 121 patients (males: 42, 34.7%) who had a normal coronary angiogram with typical chest pain were included in this study. All the patients underwent upper endoscopy, Bernstein's test and esophageal manometry. Results Among the 121 patients, clinically stable angina was noted in 107 (88.4%). Stress testing was done in 82 (67.8%); it was positive in 52 (63.4%). Endoscopic findings were erosive gastritis in 18 (14.8%), gastric ulcer in 4 (3.3%), duodenal ulcer in 5 (4.1%), and reflux esophagitis in 16 (13.2%). Positive results were observed on Berstein's test for 68 patients (56.2%); 59 (86.8%) of them had non-erosive reflux disease. On the esophageal manometry, 35 (28.9%) of these patients had motility disorders. Nutcracker esophagus was observed in 27 patients (22.3%), nonspecific esophageal motility disorder was observed in 5 (4.1%), and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter was observed in 3 (2.5%). Among the 52 patients with positive cardiac stress testing and a negative coronary angiogram (this clinically corresponded to microvascular angina), 46 patients (85.1%) showed abnormal findings on the gastro-esophageal studies. Conclusions In our study, 85.1% of the patients with microvascular angina revealed positive results of gastric or esophageal disease. In spite of any existing evidence of microvascular angina or cardiac syndrome X, it would be more advisable to perform gastro-esophageal studies to adequately manage chest pain. PMID:16913437

  17. An example of extreme cardiology: chest pain on the high seas and helicoptered medical evacuations: the French Navy experience.

    PubMed

    Vinsonneau, Ulric; Cavel, Christiane; Bombert, Christophe; Lely, Laurent; Paleiron, Nicolas; Vergez-Larrouget, Claude; Cornily, Jean-Christophe; Castellant, Philippe; Gilard, Martine; Paule, Paule; Bronstein, Jean-Ariel

    2012-10-01

    Medicalized high sea rescue is very different from prehospital medical evacuation. It requires specifically trained medical teams because the difficulties are marine, aerial, and medically related. The French Navy provides medical evacuations by helicopter on the Atlantic coast, up to 320 km offshore and under all weather conditions. The epidemiology of acute chest pain in the high seas has been poorly described. Therefore, in this retrospective study, we aimed to assess the prevalence and constraints found in the management of these emergencies. From January 1, 2000, to April 30, 2009, 286 medical evacuations by helicopter were performed, 132 of which were due to traumatological emergencies, and 154 to medical emergencies. Acute chest pain, with 36 missions, was the leading cause of medical evacuation. All evacuated patients were men who were either professional sailors or ferry passengers. The median age was 48 years (range, 26-79). The most common prehospital diagnosis was coronary chest pain in 23 patients (64%), including 11 patients with acute coronary syndrome with ST-segment elevation. Thirty-two patients were airlifted by helicopter. All patients benefited from monitoring, electrocardiogram, peripheral venous catheter, and medical management as soon as the technical conditions allowed it. PMID:22205005

  18. Derivation and validation of a sensitive IMA cutpoint to predict cardiac events in patients with chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Manini, A F; Ilgen, J; Noble, V E; Bamberg, F; Koenig, W; Bohan, J S; Hoffmann, U

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In patients with acute chest pain, we derived a cutpoint for ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA) and prospectively validated this cutpoint to predict 30-day major adverse cardiac events (MACEs). Methods We prospectively recruited a derivation cohort (18-month period) to establish a serum IMA cutpoint targeting 80% sensitivity. This was followed by a prospective validation cohort study of emergency department patients with acute chest pain at two university hospitals over a 3-month period. A MACE was defined as myocardial infarction, revascularisation or death at 30-day follow-up. Results In the derivation cohort of 151 patients, the IMA cutpoint that achieved 80% sensitivity for MACEs was 75 KU/litre. The sensitivity was prospectively validated in 171 patients consecutively enrolled, of whom 106 underwent multiple-biomarker analysis (19.8% MACE rate, 81% sensitivity of IMA). Furthermore, IMA by itself (81%, p<0.01) and in combination with initial highly sensitive cardiac troponin T (hsTnT) (90%, p<0.001) had significantly higher sensitivity than initial hsTnT (29%) for prediction of MACEs. Conclusions We prospectively validated the sensitive IMA cutpoint of 75 KU/litre with 80% sensitivity for MACEs in patients with acute chest pain. Our data suggest that IMA alone and in combination with initial hsTnT are more sensitive than the initial hsTnT for MACEs. PMID:19850803

  19. Cardiac MR enables diagnosis in 90% of patients with acute chest pain, elevated biomarkers and unobstructed coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Emrich, K; Abegunewardene, N; Oberholzer, K; Dueber, C; Muenzel, T; Kreitner, K-F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of cardiac MRI (CMR) in patients with acute chest pain, elevated cardiac enzymes and a negative coronary angiogram. Methods: This study included a total of 125 patients treated in the chest pain unit during a 39-month period. Each included patient underwent MRI within a median of 3 days after cardiac catheterization. The MRI protocol comprised cine, oedema-sensitive and late gadolinium-enhancement imaging. The standard of reference was a consensus diagnosis based on clinical follow-up and the synopsis of all clinical, laboratory and imaging data. Results: MRI revealed a multitude of diagnoses, including ischaemic cardiomyopathy (CM), dilated CM, myocarditis, Takotsubo CM, hypertensive heart disease, hypertrophic CM, cardiac amyloidosis and non-compaction CM. MRI-based diagnoses were the same as the final reference diagnoses in 113/125 patients (90%), with the two diagnoses differing in only 12/125 patients. In two patients, no final diagnosis could be established. Conclusion: CMR performed early after the onset of symptoms revealed a broad spectrum of diseases. CMR delivered a correct final diagnosis in 90% of patients with acute chest pain, elevated cardiac enzymes and a negative coronary angiogram. Advances in knowledge: Diagnosing patients with acute coronary syndrome but unobstructed coronary arteries remains a challenge for cardiologists. CMR performed early after catheterization reveals a broad spectrum of diseases with only a simple and quick examination protocol, and there is a high concordance between MRI-based diagnoses and final reference diagnoses. PMID:25782462

  20. Diagnostic importance of admission platelet volume indices in patients with acute chest pain suggesting acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Taghipour-Sani, Leila; Rezaei, Yousef; Rostami, Rahim

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a challenging issue in cardiovascular medicine. Given platelet role in atherothrombosis, we sought to determine whether platelet indices can be used as diagnostic tests for patients who suffered from an acute chest discomfort. Methods We prospectively enrolled 862 patients with an acute chest pain and 184 healthy matched controls. They were divided into four groups: 184 controls, 249 of non-ACS, 421 of unstable angina (UA), and 192 of myocardial infarction (MI) cases. Blood samples were collected at admission to the emergency department for routine hematologic tests. Results The mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR) were significantly greater in patients with MI compared with those of non-ACS or control subjects. Negative and significant correlations existed between MPV, PDW, and P-LCR values and platelet count (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that the MPV, PDW, and P-LCR with cut-off values of 9.15 fL, 11.35 fL, and 20.25% and with area under the curves of 0.563, 0.557, and 0.560, respectively, detected MI patients among those who had chest discomfort. The sensitivities and specificities were found to be 72% and 40%, 73% and 37%, and 68% and 44% for MPV, PDW, and P-LCR, respectively. Conclusion An elevated admission MPV, PDW, and P-LCR may be of benefit to detect chest pain resulting in MI from that of non-cardiac one, and also for risk stratification of patients who suffered from an acute chest discomfort. PMID:25634396

  1. Chest pain after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with stable angina

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chao-Chien; Chen, Yueh-Chung; Ong, Eng-Thiam; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Hsiu; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Chiang, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been widely used to treat acute coronary syndrome but is only recommended as an additional treatment to medical therapy and risk modification in patients with refractory or progressing angina. The number of PCI in this patient population is still increasing. Post-PCI chest pain (PPCP) is one of the common problems of PCI. Its presentation and causes in patients with stable angina are poorly understood. Patients and methods This study retrospectively collected clinical information of 167 patients who had stable angina and underwent elective PCI, including 70 patients with PPCP 24 hours after procedure and 97 patients without PPCP. The incidence and predictors of PPCP were analyzed. Results The incidence of PPCP was 41.9% (70/167). Compared with non-PPCP patients, PPCP patients had more abnormal post-PCI electrocardiogram (ECG) changes (new Q-waves, ST-segment shifts, or T-waves inversion) and serum cardiac troponin I (cTnI) elevation, more PCI vessels, and stent placement (all P<0.05). More PPCP patients required repeat revascularization than non-PPCP patients after PCI (P=0.043). PPCP was correlated with abnormal post-PCI ECG changes (P<0.0001), cTnI elevation (P<0.0001), post-PCI serum level of cTnI (P<0.0001), number of stents placed (P=0.009), and pre-PCI cTnI level (P=0.049). The strongest predictors of PPCP were abnormal post-PCI ECG changes (P<0.0001), post-PCI cTnI level (P<0.0001), and cTnI elevation (P<0.0001), followed by the number of stents placed (P=0.048). Conclusion PPCP is common in patients with stable angina in our cohort. It is associated with abnormal ECG changes, cTnI elevation, and number of stents placed. PMID:27574412

  2. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Acute Nonspecific Chest Pain-Low Probability of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Udo; Akers, Scott R; Brown, Richard K J; Cummings, Kristopher W; Cury, Ricardo C; Greenberg, S Bruce; Ho, Vincent B; Hsu, Joe Y; Min, James K; Panchal, Kalpesh K; Stillman, Arthur E; Woodard, Pamela K; Jacobs, Jill E

    2015-12-01

    Primary imaging options in patients at low risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) who present with undifferentiated chest pain and without signs of ischemia are functional testing with exercise or pharmacologic stress-based electrocardiography, echocardiography, or myocardial perfusion imaging to exclude myocardial ischemia after rule-out of myocardial infarction and early cardiac CT because of its high negative predictive value to exclude CAD. Although possible, is not conclusive whether triple-rule-out CT (CAD, pulmonary embolism, and aortic dissection) might improve the efficiency of patient management. More advanced noninvasive tests such as cardiac MRI and invasive imaging with transesophageal echocardiography or coronary angiography are rarely indicated. With increased likelihood of noncardiac causes, a number of diagnostic tests, among them ultrasound of the abdomen, MR angiography of the aorta with or without contrast, x-ray rib views, x-ray barium swallow, and upper gastrointestinal series, can also be appropriate. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. This recommendation is based on excellent evidence, including several randomized comparative effectiveness trials and blinded observational cohort studies. PMID:26653833

  3. Prognostic value of atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy in patients with stable chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Walter, K.E.; Williams, G.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The value of atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy for assessing risk of subsequent cardiac events was examined in 210 patients with stable chest pain. Follow-up information was complete in 195 patients (mean age 61 years). Over an average follow-up of 19 months, cardiac events occurred in 38 patients--unstable angina in 20, nonfatal acute myocardial infarction in 6 and death from cardiac causes in 12. A history of previous myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension or peripheral vascular disease at the time of pacing was not associated with an increased frequency of subsequent cardiac events. Six of 38 patients with later cardiac events had a history of congestive heart failure, compared with 8 of 157 without cardiac events (p less than 0.05). Neither pacing-induced angina, ST depression, nor the presence of a fixed perfusion defect was significantly more frequent in patients with cardiac events as a whole compared with patients without such events. Reversible defects and abnormal scans (reversible or fixed defects) were present, respectively, in 19 and 31 of 38 patients with cardiac events, compared with 42 and 79 patients, respectively, of the 157 patients without cardiac events (both p less than 0.01). In patients who developed unstable angina, a reversible defect was seen in 13 and an abnormal scan in 16 (both p less than 0.01 compared with patients without cardiac events). In 12 patients who died from a primary cardiac event, fixed defects were present in 8 and an abnormal scan in 11 (p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.01, respectively, compared with patients without cardiac events).

  4. Unexplained chest pain in patients with normal coronary arteriograms: a follow-up study of functional status.

    PubMed

    Ockene, I S; Shay, M J; Alpert, J S; Weiner, B H; Dalen, J E

    1980-11-27

    Approximately 10 per cent of patients referred for coronary arteriography because of chest pain have angiographically normal coronary arteries and no other heart disease. We examined the functional status of 57 patients who had undergone catheterization (23 men and 34 women), all of whom were told that their hearts were normal, that their pain was noncardiac, and that no limitation on activity was necessary. At a mean follow-up time of 16 +/- 7.7 months, 27 of the 57 patients (47 per cent) still described their activity as limited by chest pain (before catheterization, 42 of 57 or 74 per cent); 29 of 57 (51 per cent) were unable to work (before catheterization, 36 of 57 or 63 per cent); and 25 of 57 (44 per cent) still believed that they had heart disease (before catheterization, 45 of 57 or 79 per cent). Use of medical facilities was significantly reduced after catheterization (P < 0.001). At follow-up the physician was more likely than the patient to believe that the symptoms had improved. We conclude that many of these patients remain limited in activity and may benefit from further efforts at comunication and rehabilitation. PMID:7421961

  5. A 34-Year-Old Pregnant Woman With Cough, Chest Pain, and a Left Upper Lobe Mass.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Sujith V; Akasapu, Karunakar; Kumar, Anupam; Mauzo, Shakuntala H; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B

    2016-09-01

    A 34-year-old white woman who was 30 weeks' pregnant initially presented to her primary care physician with a cough for which she was given antibiotics, but she had persistent symptoms. These were followed by chest pain, as a result of which she was referred to our department. She had a past medical history of hypertension, and currently was in her sixth pregnancy, with no reported complications in the previous pregnancies. Review of systems was otherwise negative. She had a three-pack-year smoking history, but denied smoking during her current pregnancy. PMID:27613995

  6. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. PMID:26068436

  7. Uncommon cause of chest pain in a renal transplantation patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L; Neves, M; Machado, S; Sá, H; Macário, F; Alves, R; Mota, A; Campos, M

    2012-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and, because of its intrinsic systemic involvement, its treatment can be a medical and surgical challenge. This condition is often associated with the presence of hepatic cysts and their prevalence generally increases with age. Most patients remain asymptomatic, but some of these will develop complications associated with enlargement and infection of their cysts. Chest pain is a rare manifestation of these complications and, after exclusion of more common cardiovascular and pulmonary causes, should raise the suspicion of an infected hepatic cyst in these patients. We report the case of a 62-year-old male who underwent a kidney transplantation from a cadaveric donor in 1997 (etiology of the ESRD was ADPKD), and was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of chest pain radiating to both shoulders and the interscapular region. An echocardiogram was showed compression of the right atrium by a large liver cyst without associated ventricular dysfunction. Computer tomography-guided drainage of the cyst was performed and an Enterobacter aerogenes sensitive to carbamapenemes was isolated from respective cultures. The patient presented a favorable clinical outcome with prolonged administration of antibiotic therapy according to the antibiotic susceptibility testing. There was no need for surgical intervention. PMID:23026633

  8. Radiographic evaluation of the patient with chest pain of suspected myocardial origin

    SciTech Connect

    Green, C.E.; Satler, L.F.; Elliott, L.P.

    1984-11-01

    The evaluation of the patient with suspected angina pectoris is discussed and an approach presented which makes use of radiologic tests in conjunction with exercise testing to quickly and efficiently determine the likelihood and severity of coronary artery disease. The relative merits and limitations of chest radiography, cardiac fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, and coronary arteriography are discussed.

  9. The occurrences of chest pains and frequent coughing among residents living within the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu mine area, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Ekosse, Georges; de Jager, Linda; van den Heever, Dawid J

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at establishing occurrences of chest pains and frequent coughing among different classes of residents within Selebi Phikwe, Botswana where there are on going nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) mining and smelting activities. Through the administration of questionnaires and structured questions to 600 individuals, 7 health service providers, 200 business enterprises, and 30 educational institutions, attempts were made to establish and verify the existing human health status at Selebi Phikwe by focusing on chest pains and frequent coughing which are considered to be some of the respiratory tract related symptoms of sicknesses and diseases. With the aid of statistical package for social sciences (SPSS), interpreted results from respondents indicated that 33 % of the individuals complained of persistent chest pains; and 27 % of educational institutions, 45 % business enterprises, and all health service providers had learners, workers, and patients who complained of chest pains. Furthermore, 49 % of the individuals complained of persistent frequent coughing; and 70 % of educational institutions, 45 % business enterprises, and all health service providers had learners, workers, and patients who complained of frequent coughing. According to study sites, respondents living in sites closest to the mine and smelter / concentrator plant reported a higher incidence of chest pains and frequent coughing, compared to those living in other parts of the study area. Residents associate fumes and dust from mining activities to the frequent coughing and persistent chest pains, which could be symptoms of respiratory tract diseases. This baseline investigation calls for further studies to establish relations of mining activities to human health at Selebi Phikwe. PMID:17298138

  10. The Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (MACS) decision rule for suspected cardiac chest pain: derivation and external validation

    PubMed Central

    Body, Richard; Carley, Simon; McDowell, Garry; Pemberton, Philip; Burrows, Gillian; Cook, Gary; Lewis, Philip S; Smith, Alexander; Mackway-Jones, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to derive and validate a clinical decision rule (CDR) for suspected cardiac chest pain in the emergency department (ED). Incorporating information available at the time of first presentation, this CDR would effectively risk-stratify patients and immediately identify: (A) patients for whom hospitalisation may be safely avoided; and (B) high-risk patients, facilitating judicious use of resources. Methods In two sequential prospective observational cohort studies at heterogeneous centres, we included ED patients with suspected cardiac chest pain. We recorded clinical features and drew blood on arrival. The primary outcome was major adverse cardiac events (MACE) (death, prevalent or incident acute myocardial infarction, coronary revascularisation or new coronary stenosis >50%) within 30 days. The CDR was derived by logistic regression, considering reliable (κ>0.6) univariate predictors (p<0.05) for inclusion. Results In the derivation study (n=698) we derived a CDR including eight variables (high sensitivity troponin T; heart-type fatty acid binding protein; ECG ischaemia; diaphoresis observed; vomiting; pain radiation to right arm/shoulder; worsening angina; hypotension), which had a C-statistic of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93 to 0.97) implying near perfect diagnostic performance. On external validation (n=463) the CDR identified 27.0% of patients as ‘very low risk’ and potentially suitable for discharge from the ED. 0.0% of these patients had prevalent acute myocardial infarction and 1.6% developed MACE (n=2; both coronary stenoses without revascularisation). 9.9% of patients were classified as ‘high-risk’, 95.7% of whom developed MACE. Conclusions The Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (MACS) rule has the potential to safely reduce unnecessary hospital admissions and facilitate judicious use of high dependency resources. PMID:24780911

  11. Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Observation Unit Care Reduces Cost for Patients With Emergent Chest Pain: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Hoekstra, James W.; Case, Doug; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hiestand, Brian; Diercks, Deborah B.; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Study objective We determine whether imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an observation unit would reduce medical costs among patients with emergent non-low-risk chest pain who otherwise would be managed with an inpatient care strategy. Methods Emergency department patients (n=110) at intermediate or high probability for acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographic or biomarker evidence of a myocardial infarction provided consent and were randomized to stress cardiac MRI in an observation unit versus standard inpatient care. The primary outcome was direct hospital cost calculated as the sum of hospital and provider costs. Estimated median cost differences (Hodges-Lehmann) and distribution-free 95% confidence intervals (Moses) were used to compare groups. Results There were 110 participants with 53 randomized to cardiac MRI and 57 to inpatient care; 8 of 110 (7%) experienced acute coronary syndrome. In the MRI pathway, 49 of 53 underwent stress cardiac MRI, 11 of 53 were admitted, 1 left against medical advice, 41 were discharged, and 2 had acute coronary syndrome. In the inpatient care pathway, 39 of 57 patients initially received stress testing, 54 of 57 were admitted, 3 left against medical advice, and 6 had acute coronary syndrome. At 30 days, no subjects in either group experienced acute coronary syndrome after discharge. The cardiac MRI group had a reduced median hospitalization cost (Hodges-Lehmann estimate $588; 95% confidence interval $336 to $811); 79% were managed without hospital admission. Conclusion Compared with inpatient care, an observation unit strategy involving stress cardiac MRI reduced incident cost without any cases of missed acute coronary syndrome in patients with emergent chest pain. PMID:20554078

  12. Dose-Volume Parameters Predict for the Development of Chest Wall Pain After Stereotactic Body Radiation for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mutter, Robert W.; Liu Fan; Abreu, Andres; Yorke, Ellen; Jackson, Andrew; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Chest wall (CW) pain has recently been recognized as an important adverse effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We developed a dose-volume model to predict the development of this toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with primary, clinically node-negative NSCLC received three to five fractions of SBRT to doses of 40-60 Gy and were prospectively followed. The dose-absolute volume histograms of two different definitions of the CW as an organ at risk (CW3cm and CW2cm) were examined for all 126 patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year estimated actuarial incidence of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain was 39%. The median time to onset of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0) was 9 months. There was no predictive advantage for biologically corrected dose over physical dose. Neither fraction number (p = 0.07) nor prescription dose (p = 0.07) were significantly correlated with the development of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain. Cox Proportional Hazards analysis identified significant correlation with a broad range of dose-volume combinations, with the CW volume receiving 30 Gy (V30) as one of the strongest predictors (p < 0.001). CW2cm consistently enabled better prediction of CW toxicity. When a physical dose of 30 Gy was received by more than 70 cm{sup 3} of CW2cm, there was a significant correlation with Grade {>=} 2 CW pain (p = 0.004). Conclusions: CW toxicity after SBRT is common and long-term follow-up is needed to identify affected patients. A volume of CW {>=} 70 cm{sup 3} receiving 30 Gy is significantly correlated with Grade {>=} 2 CW pain. We are currently applying this constraint at our institution for patients receiving thoracic SBRT. An actuarial atlas of our data is provided as an electronic supplement to facilitate data-sharing and meta-analysis relating to CW pain.

  13. DOSE–VOLUME PARAMETERS PREDICT FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF CHEST WALL PAIN AFTER STEREOTACTIC BODY RADIATION FOR LUNG CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, Robert W.; Liu, Fan; Abreu, Andres; Yorke, Ellen; Jackson, Andrew; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chest wall (CW) pain has recently been recognized as an important adverse effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We developed a dose–volume model to predict the development of this toxicity. Methods and Materials A total of 126 patients with primary, clinically node-negative NSCLC received three to five fractions of SBRT to doses of 40–60 Gy and were prospectively followed. The dose–absolute volume histograms of two different definitions of the CW as an organ at risk (CW3cm and CW2cm) were examined for all 126 patients. Results With a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year estimated actuarial incidence of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain was 39%. The median time to onset of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0) was 9 months. There was no predictive advantage for biologically corrected dose over physical dose. Neither fraction number (p = 0.07) nor prescription dose (p = 0.07) were significantly correlated with the development of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain. Cox Proportional Hazards analysis identified significant correlation with a broad range of dose-volume combinations, with the CW volume receiving 30 Gy (V30) as one of the strongest predictors (p < 0.001). CW2cm consistently enabled better prediction of CW toxicity. When a physical dose of 30 Gy was received by more than 70 cm3 of CW2cm, there was a significant correlation with Grade ≥ 2 CW pain (p = 0.004). Conclusions CW toxicity after SBRT is common and long-term follow-up is needed to identify affected patients. A volume of CW ≥ 70 cm3 receiving 30 Gy is significantly correlated with Grade ≥ 2 CW pain. We are currently applying this constraint at our institution for patients receiving thoracic SBRT. An actuarial atlas of our data is provided as an electronic supplement to facilitate data-sharing and meta-analysis relating to CW pain. PMID:21868173

  14. Provider-Directed Imaging Stress Testing Reduces Health-Care Expenditures in Lower-Risk Chest Pain Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hoekstra, James W.; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Mahler, Simon; Diercks, Deborah B.; Neiberg, Rebecca; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Background Among intermediate to high-risk patients with chest pain, we have shown that a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) stress-test strategy implemented in an observation unit (OU) reduces 1-year healthcare costs compared to inpatient care. In this study, we compare two OU strategies to determine among lower-risk patients if a mandatory CMR stress test strategy was more effective than a physicians’ ability to select a stress test modality. Methods and Results Upon ED arrival and referral to the OU for management of low to intermediate-risk chest pain, 120 individuals were randomized to receive an a) CMR stress imaging test (n=60), or b) a provider selected stress test (n=60: stress echo [62%], CMR (32%), cardiac catheterization (3%), nuclear (2%), and coronary CT [2%]). No differences were detected in length of stay (median CMR = 24.2 hours vs 23.8 hours, p=0.75), catheterization without revascularization (CMR=0% vs 3%), appropriateness of admission decisions (CMR 87% vs 93%, p=0.36), or 30-day ACS (both 3%). Median cost was higher among those randomized to the CMR mandated group ($2005 vs $1686, p<0.001). Conclusions In patients with lower-risk chest pain receiving ED-directed OU care, the ability of a physician to select a cardiac stress imaging modality (including echocardiography, CMR, or radionuclide testing) was more cost effective than a pathway that mandates a CMR stress test. Contrary to prior observations in individuals with intermediate to high-risk chest pain, in those with lower risk chest pain, these results highlight the importance of physician-related choices during ACS diagnostic protocols. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00869245. PMID:22128195

  15. Incremental value of clinical assessment, supine exercise electrocardiography, and biplane exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the prediction of coronary artery disease in men with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, P.J.; Kelly, M.J.; Harper, R.W.; Federman, J.; Kalff, V.; Anderson, S.T.; Pitt, A.

    1983-11-01

    The incremental value of clinical assessment, exercise electrocardiography (ECG) and biplane radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) in the prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) was assessed in 105 men without myocardial infarction who were undergoing coronary angiography for investigation of chest pain. Independent clinical assessment of chest pain was made prospectively by 2 physicians. Graded supine bicycle exercise testing was symptom-limited. Right anterior oblique ECG-gated first-pass RVG and left anterior oblique ECG-gated equilibrium RVG were performed at rest and exercise. Regional wall motion abnormalities were defined by agreement of 2 of 3 blinded observers. A combined strongly positive exercise ECG response was defined as greater than or equal to 2 mm ST depression or 1.0 to 1.9 mm ST depression with exercise-induced chest pain. A multivariate logistic regression model for the preexercise prediction of CAD was derived from the clinical data and selected 2 variables: chest pain class and cholesterol level. A second model assessed the incremental value of the exercise test in prediction of CAD and found 2 exercise variables that improved prediction: RVG wall motion abnormalities, and a combined strongly positive ECG response. Applying the derived predictive models, 37 of the 58 patients (64%) with preexercise probabilities of 10 to 90% crossed either below the 10% probability threshold or above the 90% threshold and 28 (48%) also moved across the 5 and 95% thresholds. Supine exercise testing with ECG and biplane RVG together, but neither test alone, effectively adds to clinical prediction of CAD. It is most useful in men with atypical chest pain and when the ECG and RVG results are concordant.

  16. Hamman's Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Chest Pain in a Postpartum Patient

    PubMed Central

    Khurram, Daniyeh; Patel, Brijesh; Farra, M. Waseem

    2015-01-01

    Hamman's syndrome is a rare condition represented by spontaneous pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema. Excessive Valsalva maneuver during vaginal delivery and excessive retching, coughing, and straining are frequently reported causes. The incidence of Hamman's syndrome is believed to be 1 in 100,000 deliveries. The pathophysiology of this condition is rupture of alveoli and seepage of air through bronchovascular connective tissue. Diffusion of air to subcutaneous tissues results in subcutaneous emphysema. In most cases, it is a benign condition and resolves spontaneously. In life-threatening cases, a cardiac tamponade can ensue. Chest X-ray is a useful early diagnostic technique. We report a case of a twenty-four-year-old female who was diagnosed with Hamman's syndrome after prolonged, exhaustive labor. PMID:25688319

  17. Access to public healthcare services and waiting times for patients with chronic nonmalignant pain: feedback from a tertiary pain clinic.

    PubMed

    Triva, Petra; Jukić, Marko; Puljak, Livia

    2013-03-01

    Evaluation of healthcare services by patients is an essential component of quality improvement. We studied association between patient satisfaction and accessibility of healthcare services to patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. A hundred patients from the Pain Clinic, Split University Hospital Center, Split, Croatia, completed a 27-item questionnaire about their condition, duration of chronic pain treatment, access to healthcare, waiting times for various healthcare services, and their satisfaction with the pain clinic and health system. Patients were referred to the pain clinic after median of 4.5 years of chronic nonmalignant pain duration. Median waiting time for pain clinic appointment, seeing a specialist and performing diagnostic procedures was 10, 30 and 90 days, respectively. However, some patients waited for an appointment to a specialist and diagnosis for up to one year. Negative association was found between waiting time for pain clinic appointment and healthcare system grade (r = -0.34, P = 0.02). Patient suggestions for improving pain clinic were more staff, better approach to each patient, and better organization. In conclusion, access to public healthcare for patients with chronic nonmalignant pain should be better to improve patient satisfaction and provide better care. PMID:23837276

  18. Computed Tomography-Derived Parameters of Myocardial Morphology and Function in Black and White Patients With Acute Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Takx, Richard A P; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schoepf, U Joseph; Abro, Joseph A; Nance, John W; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Bamberg, Fabian; Carr, Christine M; Apfaltrer, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Blacks have higher mortality and hospitalization rates because of congestive heart failure compared with white counterparts. Differences in cardiac structure and function may contribute to the racial disparity in cardiovascular outcomes. Our aim was to compare computed tomography (CT)-derived cardiac measurements between black patients with acute chest pain and age- and gender-matched white patients. We performed a retrospective analysis under an institutional review board waiver and in Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliance. We investigated patients who underwent cardiac dual-source CT for acute chest pain. Myocardial mass, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV end-systolic volume, and LV end-diastolic volume were quantified using an automated analysis algorithm. Septal wall thickness and cardiac chamber diameters were manually measured. Measurements were compared by independent t test and linear regression. The study population consisted of 300 patients (150 black-mean age 54 ± 12 years; 46% men; 150 white-mean age 55 ± 11 years; 46% men). Myocardial mass was larger for blacks compared with white (176.1 ± 58.4 vs 155.9 ± 51.7 g, p = 0.002), which remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, and hypertension. Septal wall thickness was slightly greater (11.9 ± 2.7 vs 11.2 ± 3.1 mm, p = 0.036). The LV inner diameter was moderately larger in black patients in systole (32.3 ± 9.0 vs 30.1 ± 5.4 ml, p = 0.010) and in diastole (50.1 ± 7.8 vs 48.9 ± 5.2 ml, p = 0.137), as well as LV end-diastolic volume (134.5 ± 42.7 vs 128.2 ± 30.6 ml, p = 0.143). Ejection fraction was nonsignificantly lower in blacks (67.1 ± 13.5% vs 69.0 ± 9.6%, p = 0.169). In conclusion, CT-derived myocardial mass was larger in blacks compared with whites, whereas LV functional parameters were generally not statistically different, suggesting that LV mass might be a possible contributing factor to the higher rate of cardiac events

  19. Coronary artery disease in patients with atypical chest pain with and without diabetes mellitus assessed with coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Krul, Marije M G; Bogaard, Kjell; Knol, Remco J J; van Rossum, Albert C; Knaapen, Paul; Cornel, Jan H; van der Zant, Friso M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetes mellitus (DM) is often widespread when diagnosed. Non-invasive coronary calcium scoring and coronary CT angiography (CAC-score/CCTA) are accurate in the detection of CAD. This study compared CAD characteristics as identified by CCTA between patients with and without DM with atypical chest pain. Methods CAD was defined as CAC-score >0 and/or presence of coronary plaque. Several CAD characteristics (number of affected segments, obstructive (>50% stenosis) CAD and CAD distribution) were compared on a per patient and segment basis. Subanalysis of duration of DM (<5 or >5 years) and gender was performed. Results A total of 1148 patients (63.3% men, mean age 57.7±10.7), of whom 99 (8.6%) suffered from DM, were referred for CCTA. There was no difference in the prevalence of CAD between patients with and without DM (53.5% vs 50.9%, p=0.674). However patients with DM showed more affected coronary segments compared with patients without DM (2.5±3.4 vs 1.7±2.4, p=0.003). Multivariate analysis indicated that DM was an independent predictor of obstructive CAD (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.23 to 3.78), as were age, women, and Diamond-Forrester score. In our study, obstructive CAD was more prevalent in women than in men (DM 40.0% vs 14.1%, p=0.003; non-DM 16.8% vs 8.4%, p<0.001). Patients suffering from DM >5 years showed more distal plaques (11.2% vs 7.7%, p=0.030). Conclusions Patients with atypical chest pain and DM showed more extensive CAD, as well as more obstructive CAD, particularly in women. Diabetes duration (>5 years) was not associated with more obstructive coronary disease or different plaque morphology, although more distal disease was present. PMID:25452855

  20. Evaluating Diagnostic and Prognostic Value of Plasma miRNA133a in Acute Chest Pain Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ke-Gang, Jia; Zhi-Wei, Li; Xin, Zhang; Jing, Wang; Ping, Shi; Xue-Jing, Han; Hong-Xia, Tang; Xin, Tang; Xiao-Cheng, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Circulating microRNA has recently emerged as a promising biomarker for cardiovascular disease. This study sought to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of circulating miR-133a as a marker of acute myocardial infarction in acute chest pain patients undergoing coronary angiography. Plasma was collected from 312 patients with chest pain on admission in the emergency department and 67 healthy controls. MiR-133a was detected using real-time quantitative PCR and enhanced accu-TnI, creatinine kinase-MB mass, and myoglobin were measured by immunoassay. End-point events (serious adverse cardiovascular events which require hospitalization or cardiovascular death) were examined in the AMI (acute myocardical infarction) group within 1, 6, 12, and 24 months. The miR-133a level was higher in AMI patients than in non-AMI patients (P < 0.001). In the ROC analysis, the sensitivity of miR-133a in diagnosis of AMI is 0.61 and the specificity is 0.68. In the prognostic analysis, only 1 endpoint event was observed in the non-AMI group; the amount of cases with end-point events in the AMI group at 1,6,12, and 24 months were 8, 19, 28, and 35, respectively. The cutoff value of miR-133a was determined using the median value of the AMI group and separated the patients into a positive group and a negative group. The Kaplan–Meier survival curve showed no significant difference in survival was detected in AMI patients between the miR-133a positive group and negative group after follow-up (12-month: x2 = 1.353, P = 0.245; 24-month: x2 = 3.722, P = 0.054). After adjusting for age, gender, Killip classes, prior myocardiac infarction history, myoglobin, LVEF (left ventricular ejection fraction), diabetes, hypertension, smoking and systolic blood pressure, miR133a had a significant association with the risk of events at 12 months (HR = 2.869, P = 0.024) and 24 months (HR = 3.936, P = 0.001). In patients undergoing coronary angiography

  1. On your toes: Detecting mediastinal air on the chest radiograph in ecstasy abusers.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Mergan; Govind, Mayuri

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal mediastinal air may be caused by inhalational illicit drug use subsequent to barotrauma resulting from coughing after deep inhalation and breath holding. It may also arise from oesophageal rupture due to retching after ingestion of the illicit drug. The history can alert the practitioner to this cause of chest pain. As chest radiographs are widely accessible and mediastinal air is easily recognisable, the chest radiograph should be included and carefully scrutinised in the diagnostic workup of chest pain in the recreational drug abuser. It is prudent to exclude oesophageal rupture, particularly in the setting of retching, before deciding on conservative and expectant management. PMID:27138662

  2. Candida albicans osteomyelitis as a cause of chest pain and visual loss.

    PubMed

    Magano, Rita; Cortez, Joana; Ramos, Evelise; Trindade, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans osteomyelitis is a rare disease that occurs in immunocompromised individuals, sometimes with a late diagnosis related to the mismatch between symptoms and candidemia. This case refers to a 36-year-old male patient with a history of oesophageal surgery for achalasia with multiple subsequent surgeries and hospitalisation in the intensive care unit for oesophageal fistula complication. Four months after discharge, the patient was admitted to the infectious diseases department with pain in the 10th-12th left ribs, swelling of the 4th-6th costal cartilage and decreased visual acuity. An MRI study showed thickening and diffuse enhancement, with no defined borders in the cartilage and ribs, compatible with infection. After performing a CT-guided bone biopsy, isolated C. albicans sensitive to antifungal agents was detected. The patient started therapy with liposomal amphotericin B and maintenance fluconazole for 6 months and showed clinical and radiological improvement within this time. PMID:26475877

  3. Impact of d-Dimers on the Differential Diagnosis of Acute Chest Pain: Current Aspects Besides the Widely Known.

    PubMed

    Hahne, Kathrin; Lebiedz, Pia; Breuckmann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    d-dimers are cleavage products of fibrin that occur during plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis of blood clots. In the emergency department, d-dimer measurement represents a valuable and cost-effective tool in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain including the main life-threatening entities: acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome. Whereas the diagnostic and prognostic values of d-dimer testing in acute coronary syndrome is of less priority, increases of d-dimers are frequently found in venous thromboembolism and acute aortic syndromes, especially acute aortic dissection. As to the high negative predictive value of d-dimer in those disorders, patients with low to intermediate pretest probability may profit in terms of less necessity of further non-invasive or even invasive imaging, simultaneously reducing potential complications and healthcare-related costs. However, because of the low specificity of the different d-dimer tests in contrast to its frequent usage, adequate interpretation is required. Age-related adjustment of d-dimer levels may be used to increase its diagnostic power. PMID:25392700

  4. Diagnostic value of atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy for the assessment of patients with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Walter, K.E.; Williams, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    Atrial pacing was performed either alone (n = 23) or in combination with thallium-201 scintigraphy (n = 113) in 136 patients referred for evaluation of chest pain. The presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) was excluded by cardiac catheterization in 12 patients and confirmed in 124. Both pacing-induced ST depression and angina had sensitivities of 48% for CAD; specificities were 75% and 83%, respectively. An abnormal thallium-201 scan (one or more reversible and/or fixed perfusion defects) was seen in 72% of patients with CAD (specificity 83%). Reversible perfusion defects were present in 47% of patients with CAD (specificity 83%), and fixed defects in 36% (specificity 100%). Pacing was associated with either ST depression or an abnormal perfusion scan in 81% of patients (specificity 67%). There were no significant differences in the results of atria pacing or thallium-201 scintigraphy in patients with or without a history of myocardial infarction, or in those with or without previous coronary artery bypass surgery. Pacing-induced ST depression, or both ST depression and a reversible perfusion defect occurred significantly less frequently in patients with peripheral vascular disease than in those without this diagnosis (p less than .05). With only one exception, there were no significant differences in the sensitivities of any indicators of ischemia (ST depression, angina, or perfusion scans), either individually or in combination, as the peak pacing rate or double product achieved increased.

  5. Acute chest pain in the high-sensitivity cardiac troponin era: A changing role for noninvasive imaging?

    PubMed

    Smulders, Martijn W; Kietselaer, Bas L J H; Schalla, Simon; Bucerius, Jan; Jaarsma, Caroline; van Dieijen-Visser, Marja P; Mingels, Alma M A; Rocca, Hans-Peter Brunner-La; Post, Mark; Das, Marco; Crijns, Harry J G M; Wildberger, Joachim E; Bekkers, Sebastiaan C A M

    2016-07-01

    Management of patients with acute chest pain remains challenging. Cardiac biomarker testing reduces the likelihood of erroneously discharging patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Despite normal contemporary troponins, physicians have still been reluctant to discharge patients without additional testing. Nowadays, the extremely high negative predictive value of current high-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays challenges this need. However, the decreased specificity of hs-cTn assays to diagnose AMI poses a new problem as noncoronary diseases (eg, pulmonary embolism, myocarditis, cardiomyopathies, hypertension, renal failure, etc) may also cause elevated hs-cTn levels. Subjecting patients with noncoronary diseases to unnecessary pharmacological therapy or invasive procedures must be prevented. Attempts to improve the positive predictive value to diagnose AMI by defining higher initial cutoff values or dynamic changes over time inherently lower the sensitivity of troponin assays. In this review, we anticipate a potential changing role of noninvasive imaging from ruling out myocardial disease when troponin values are normal toward characterizing myocardial disease when hs-cTn values are (mildly) abnormal. PMID:27297855

  6. Variability in coronary hemodynamics in response to ergonovine in patients with normal coronary arteries and atypical chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A.B.; Donmichael, T.A.; Botvinick, E.H.; Ishimori, T.; Parmley, W.W.; Chatterjee, K.

    1983-03-01

    Because an increase in coronary vascular resistance in response to ergonovine maleate has been suggested as a possible diagnostic aid for variant angina, changes were evaluated in coronary hemodynamics and serial myocardial thallium-201 perfusion scans in 15 patients without angina and with normal coronary arteries in response to ergonovine (0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 mg intravenously). For the group, heart rate-blood pressure product increased significantly (p less than 0.001) without any change in coronary sinus flow, coronary vascular resistance, myocardial oxygen extraction, arterial-coronary sinus oxygen difference and lactate extraction. In 7 of 15 patients, however, coronary vascular resistance increased (mean 39%, range 11 to 75%, probability (p) less than 0.001), and coronary sinus flow decreased (14%, p less than 0.001), despite an increase in heart rate-blood pressure product (36%, p less than 0.02). No electrocardiographic, metabolic or thallium-201 scan abnormalities occurred. Therefore, significant increases in coronary vascular resistance in response to ergonovine may occur in patients with normal coronary arteries and atypical chest pain.

  7. Long-term mortality of chest pain patients managed according to a decision scheme that aims to avoid inappropriate hospitalisations

    PubMed Central

    de Torbal, A.; Grijseels, E.W.M.; van Domburg, R.T.; Hartman, J.A.M.; Simoons, M.L.; Boersma, E.

    2003-01-01

    Objective A triage decision scheme was developed to avoid unnecessary hospitalisations for suspected acute coronary syndromes. The current investigation aimed at evaluating the long-term survival of patients who were managed according to this scheme. Subjects Patients (n=964) with symptoms suggestive of acute cardiac pathology, who were seen by a general practitioner, and for whom a pre-hospital ECG was recorded by the ambulance service in 1993-1994. Methods During the year 2000 a follow-up of the entire cohort was performed, and the vital status of patients was determined via the civil registry office. Cox's multivariable regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relation between final (hospital discharge) diagnosis and long-term outcome. Results The median follow-up was 6.0 years (4.6-6.6). Six-year mortality of the entire cohort was 30%. Long-term mortality was significantly lower in patients identified to be at low risk, who are not hospitalised, than in hospitalised patients (six-year mortality 7.5% versus 33.1%; p<0.0001). Longterm outcome was strongly associated with the final hospital discharge diagnosis. Conclusion Our data support the usefulness and appropriateness of the applied diagnostic scheme that aims to avoid unjustified hospital and CCU admissions in patients with acute chest pain. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:25696234

  8. Impact of d-Dimers on the Differential Diagnosis of Acute Chest Pain: Current Aspects Besides the Widely Known

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Kathrin; Lebiedz, Pia; Breuckmann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    d-dimers are cleavage products of fibrin that occur during plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis of blood clots. In the emergency department, d-dimer measurement represents a valuable and cost-effective tool in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain including the main life-threatening entities: acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome. Whereas the diagnostic and prognostic values of d-dimer testing in acute coronary syndrome is of less priority, increases of d-dimers are frequently found in venous thromboembolism and acute aortic syndromes, especially acute aortic dissection. As to the high negative predictive value of d-dimer in those disorders, patients with low to intermediate pretest probability may profit in terms of less necessity of further non-invasive or even invasive imaging, simultaneously reducing potential complications and healthcare-related costs. However, because of the low specificity of the different d-dimer tests in contrast to its frequent usage, adequate interpretation is required. Age-related adjustment of d-dimer levels may be used to increase its diagnostic power. PMID:25392700

  9. Nuclear Scan Strategy and Outcomes in Chest Pain Patients Value of Stress Testing with Dipyridamole or Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Alberto; Mariannini, Yuri; Canuti, Erica; Petrova, Tetyana; Innocenti, Francesca; Zanobetti, Maurizio; Gallini, Chiara; Costanzo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To update the prognostic value of scan strategy with pharmacological stress agent in chest pain (CP) patients presenting with normal electrocardiography (ECG) and troponin. Methods: Two consecutive nonrandomized series of patients with CP and negative first-line workup inclusive of serial ECG, serial troponin, and echocardiography underwent myocardial perfusion imaging single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the emergency department. Of 170 patients enrolled, 52 patients underwent dipyridamole-SPECT and 118 adenosine-SPECT. Patients with perfusion defects underwent angiography, whereas the remaining patients were discharged and followed-up. Primary endpoint was the composite of nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, revascularization, and cardiovascular death at follow-up or the presence of coronary stenosis > 50% at angiography. Results: At multivariate analysis, the presence of perfusion defects or hypertension was independent predictor of the primary endpoint. Sensitivity and negative predictive value were higher in patients subjected to adenosine-SPECT (95% and 99%, respectively) versus dipyridamole-SPECT (56% and 89%; yield 70% and 11%, respectively; P < 0.03). Of note, sensitivity, negative, and positive predictive values were high in patients with hypertension (100%, 93%, and 60%, respectively) or nonischemic echocardiography alterations (100%, 100%, and 100%, respectively). Conclusions: In CP patients, presenting with normal ECG and troponin, adenosine-SPECT adds incremental prognostic values to dipyridamole-SPECT. Costly scan strategy is more appropriate and avoids unnecessary angiograms in patients with hypertension or nonischemic echocardiography alterations. PMID:25191123

  10. Efficiency and safety of coronary CT angiography compared to standard care in the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain: a Canadian study.

    PubMed

    Peña, Elena; Rubens, Fraser; Stiell, Ian; Peterson, Rebecca; Inacio, Joao; Dennie, Carole

    2016-08-01

    The optimal assessment of patients with chest pain and possible acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a diagnostic dilemma for emergency physicians. Cardiac computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) may identify patients who can be safely discharged home from the emergency department (ED). The objective of the study was to compare the efficiency and safety of CCTA to standard care in patients presenting to the ED with low- to intermediate-risk chest pain. This was a single-center before-after study enrolling ED patients with chest pain and low to intermediate risk of ACS, before and after implementing a cardiac CT-based management protocol. The primary outcome was efficiency (time to diagnosis). Secondary outcomes included safety (30-day incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE)) and length of stay in the ED. We enrolled 258 patients: 130 in the standard care group and 128 in the cardiac CT-based management group. The cardiac CT group had a shorter time to diagnosis of 7.1 h (IQR 5.8-14.0) compared to 532.9 h (IQR 312.8-960.5) for the standard care group (p < 0.0001) but had a longer length of stay in the ED of 7.9 h (IQR 6.5-10.8) versus 5.5 h (IQR 3.9-7.7) (p < 0.0001). The MACE rate was 1.6 % in the standard care group and 0 % in the cardiac CT group. In conclusion, a cardiac CT-based management strategy to rule out ACS in ED patients with low- to intermediate-risk chest pain was safe and led to a shorter time to diagnosis but increased length of stay in the ED. PMID:27220653

  11. Who gets admitted to the Chest Pain Unit (CPU) and how do we manage them? Improving the use of the CPU in Waikato DHB, New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Jade, Judith; Huggan, Paul; Stephenson, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is a commonly encountered presentation in the emergency department (ED). The chest pain unit at Waikato DHB is designed for patients with likely stable angina, who are at low risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), with a normal ECG and Troponin T, who have a history which is highly suggestive of coronary artery disease (CAD). Two issues were identified with patient care on the unit (1) the number of inappropriate admissions and (2) the number of inappropriate exercise tolerance tests. A baseline study showed that 73% of admissions did not fulfil the criteria and the majority of patients (72%) had an exercise tolerance test (ETT) irrespective of clinical picture. We delivered educational presentations to key stakeholders and the implementation of a new fast track chest pain pathway for discharging patients directly from the ED. There was an improvement in the number of patients inappropriately admitted, which fell to 61%. However, the number of inappropriate ETTs did not decrease, and were still performed on 76.9% of patients. PMID:26734314

  12. Impact of Fractionation and Dose in a Multivariate Model for Radiation-Induced Chest Wall Pain

    SciTech Connect

    Din, Shaun U.; Williams, Eric L.; Jackson, Andrew; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Wu, Abraham J.; Foster, Amanda; Yorke, Ellen D.; Rimner, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of patient/tumor characteristics, radiation dose, and fractionation using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to predict stereotactic body radiation therapy–induced grade ≥2 chest wall pain (CWP2) in a larger series and develop clinically useful constraints for patients treated with different fraction numbers. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 lung tumors in 295 patients were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy in 3 to 5 fractions to 39 to 60 Gy. Absolute dose–absolute volume chest wall (CW) histograms were acquired. The raw dose-volume histograms (α/β = ∞ Gy) were converted via the LQ model to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (normalized total dose, NTD) with α/β from 0 to 25 Gy in 0.1-Gy steps. The Cox proportional hazards (CPH) model was used in univariate and multivariate models to identify and assess CWP2 exposed to a given physical and NTD. Results: The median follow-up was 15.4 months, and the median time to development of CWP2 was 7.4 months. On a univariate CPH model, prescription dose, prescription dose per fraction, number of fractions, D83cc, distance of tumor to CW, and body mass index were all statistically significant for the development of CWP2. Linear-quadratic correction improved the CPH model significance over the physical dose. The best-fit α/β was 2.1 Gy, and the physical dose (α/β = ∞ Gy) was outside the upper 95% confidence limit. With α/β = 2.1 Gy, V{sub NTD99Gy} was most significant, with median V{sub NTD99Gy} = 31.5 cm{sup 3} (hazard ratio 3.87, P<.001). Conclusion: There were several predictive factors for the development of CWP2. The LQ-adjusted doses using the best-fit α/β = 2.1 Gy is a better predictor of CWP2 than the physical dose. To aid dosimetrists, we have calculated the physical dose equivalent corresponding to V{sub NTD99Gy} = 31.5 cm{sup 3} for the 3- to 5-fraction groups.

  13. Severe coronary tortuosity or myocardial bridging in patients with chest pain, normal coronary arteries, and reversible myocardial perfusion defects.

    PubMed

    Gaibazzi, Nicola; Rigo, Fausto; Reverberi, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    We reviewed patients with normal or near-normal coronary angiograms enrolled in the SPAM contrast stress echocardiographic diagnostic study in which 400 patients with chest pain syndrome of suspected cardiac origin with a clinical indication to coronary angiography were enrolled. Patients underwent dipyridamole contrast stress echocardiography (cSE) with sequential analysis of wall motion, myocardial perfusion, and Doppler coronary flow reserve before elective coronary angiography. Ninety-six patients with normal or near-normal epicardial coronary arteries were screened for the presence of 2 prespecified findings: severely tortuous coronary arteries and myocardial bridging. Patients were divided in 2 groups based on the presence (false-positive results, n = 37) or absence (true-negative results, n = 59) of reversible myocardial perfusion defects during cSE and compared for history and clinical and angiographic characteristics. Prevalence of severely tortuous coronary arteries (35% vs 5%, p <0.001) or myocardial bridging (13% vs 2%, p <0.05) was 7 times higher in patients who demonstrated reversible perfusion defects at cSE compared to those without reversible perfusion defects. No significant differences were found between the 2 groups for the main demographic variables and risk factors. Patients in the false-positive group more frequently had a history of effort angina (p <0.001) and ST-segment depression at treadmill electrocardiography (p <0.001). In conclusion, we hypothesize that patients with a positive myocardial perfusion finding at cSE but without obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease have a decreased myocardial blood flow reserve, which may be caused by a spectrum of causes other than obstructive coronary artery disease, among which severely tortuous coronary arteries/myocardial bridging may play a significant role. PMID:21784382

  14. Impaired Esophageal Mucosal Integrity May Play a Causative Role in Patients With Nongastroesophageal Reflux Disease–Related Noncardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Choi, Kyu; Pyo, Jeung Hui; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Baseline impedance (BI) measurement can be used to evaluate the status of the esophageal mucosa integrity. We hypothesized that impaired esophageal mucosal integrity may play a causative role in patients with nongastroesophageal reflux disease (non-GERD)–related noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). This retrospective study analyzed 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH testing data from 77 patients with NCCP and 5 healthy volunteers. BI was calculated at 3 cm (distal esophagus) and 17 cm (proximal esophagus) above the lower esophageal sphincter. GERD was defined by the presence of pathologic acid exposure or reflux esophagitis. Among the 77 patients with NCCP, 16 (20.8%) were classified into the GERD-related NCCP group and 61 (79.2%) into the non-GERD-related NCCP group. BI (median, interquartile range) of the non-GERD-related NCCP group was lower than the control group at the proximal esophagus (2507 Ω, 2156–3217 vs 3855 Ω, 3238–4182, P = 0.001) but was similar at the distal esophagus. The GERD-related NCCP group showed lower BI than the control group at both the distal and proximal esophagus (2024 Ω, 1619–2308 vs 3203 Ω, 2366–3774, P = 0.007 and 2272 Ω, 1896–2908 vs 3855 Ω, 3238–4182, P = 0.003, respectively). At the distal esophagus, BI was lower in the GERD-related NCCP group than the non-GERD-related NCCP group (P = 0.002), whereas it did not differ between the 2 groups at the proximal esophagus. In conclusion, the mucosal integrity is impaired at the proximal esophagus in patients with non-GERD-related NCCP, which might be the pathogenic mechanism of NCCP. PMID:26705212

  15. Use of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography Findings to Modify Statin and Aspirin Prescription in Patients With Acute Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Pursnani, Amit; Celeng, Csilla; Schlett, Christopher L; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Zakroysky, Pearl; Lee, Hang; Ferencik, Maros; Fleg, Jerome L; Bamberg, Fabian; Wiviott, Stephen D; Truong, Quynh A; Udelson, James E; Nagurney, John T; Hoffmann, Udo

    2016-02-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is used in patients with low-intermediate chest pain presenting to the emergency department for its reliability in excluding acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, its influence on medication modification in this setting is unclear. We sought to determine whether knowledge of CCTA-based coronary artery disease (CAD) was associated with change in statin and aspirin prescription. We used the CCTA arm of the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction using Computed Angiographic Tomography II multicenter, randomized control trial (R-II) and comparison cohort from the observational Rule Out Myocardial Infarction using Computed Angiographic Tomography I cohort (R-I). In R-II, subjects were randomly assigned to CCTA to guide decision making, whereas in R-I patients underwent CCTA with results blinded to caregivers and managed according to standard care. Our final cohort consisted of 277 subjects from R-I and 370 from R-II. ACS rate was similar (6.9% vs 6.2% respectively, p = 0.75). For subjects with CCTA-detected obstructive CAD without ACS, initiation of statin was significantly greater after disclosure of CCTA results (0% in R-I vs 20% in R-II, p = 0.009). Conversely, for subjects without CCTA-detected CAD, aspirin prescription was lower with disclosure of CCTA results (16% in R-I vs 4.8% in R-II, p = 0.001). However, only 68% of subjects in R-II with obstructive CAD were discharged on statin and 65% on aspirin. In conclusion, physician knowledge of CCTA results leads to improved alignment of aspirin and statin with the presence and severity of CAD although still many patients with CCTA-detected CAD are not discharged on aspirin or statin. Our findings suggest opportunity for practice improvement when CCTA is performed in the emergency department. PMID:26762723

  16. Prognostic utility of the exercise thallium-201 test in ambulatory patients with chest pain: comparison with cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.; Lilly, D.R.; Gascho, J.A.; Watson, D.D.; Gibson, R.S.; Oliner, C.A.; Ryan, J.M.; Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of the exercise thallium-201 stress test in ambulatory patients with chest pain who were also referred for cardiac catheterization. Accordingly, 4 to 8 year (mean +/- 1SD, 4.6 +/- 2.6 years) follow-up data were obtained for all but one of 383 patients who underwent both exercise thallium-201 stress testing and cardiac catheterization from 1978 to 1981. Eighty-three patients had a revascularization procedure performed within 3 months of testing and were excluded from analysis. Of the remaining 299 patients, 210 had no events and 89 had events (41 deaths, nine nonfatal myocardial infarctions, and 39 revascularization procedures greater than or equal to 3 months after testing). When all clinical, exercise, thallium-201, and catheterization variables were analyzed by Cox regression analysis, the number of diseased vessels (when defined as greater than or equal to 50% luminal diameter narrowing) was the single most important predictor of future cardiac events (chi 2 = 38.1) followed by the number of segments demonstrating redistribution on delayed thallium-201 images (chi 2 = 16.3), except in the case of nonfatal myocardial infarction, for which redistribution was the most important predictor of future events. When coronary artery disease was defined as 70% or greater luminal diameter narrowing, the number of diseased vessels significantly (p less than .01) lost its power to predict events (chi 2 = 14.5). Other variables found to independently predict future events included change in heart rate from rest to exercise (chi 2 = 13.0), ST segment depression on exercise (chi 2 = 13.0), occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias on exercise (chi 2 = 5.9), and beta-blocker therapy (chi 2 = 4.3).

  17. Impaired Esophageal Mucosal Integrity May Play a Causative Role in Patients With Nongastroesophageal Reflux Disease-Related Noncardiac Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Choi, Kyu; Pyo, Jeung Hui; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-12-01

    Baseline impedance (BI) measurement can be used to evaluate the status of the esophageal mucosa integrity. We hypothesized that impaired esophageal mucosal integrity may play a causative role in patients with nongastroesophageal reflux disease (non-GERD)-related noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). This retrospective study analyzed 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH testing data from 77 patients with NCCP and 5 healthy volunteers. BI was calculated at 3 cm (distal esophagus) and 17 cm (proximal esophagus) above the lower esophageal sphincter. GERD was defined by the presence of pathologic acid exposure or reflux esophagitis. Among the 77 patients with NCCP, 16 (20.8%) were classified into the GERD-related NCCP group and 61 (79.2%) into the non-GERD-related NCCP group. BI (median, interquartile range) of the non-GERD-related NCCP group was lower than the control group at the proximal esophagus (2507 Ω, 2156-3217 vs 3855 Ω, 3238-4182, P = 0.001) but was similar at the distal esophagus. The GERD-related NCCP group showed lower BI than the control group at both the distal and proximal esophagus (2024 Ω, 1619-2308 vs 3203 Ω, 2366-3774, P = 0.007 and 2272 Ω, 1896-2908 vs 3855 Ω, 3238-4182, P = 0.003, respectively). At the distal esophagus, BI was lower in the GERD-related NCCP group than the non-GERD-related NCCP group (P = 0.002), whereas it did not differ between the 2 groups at the proximal esophagus. In conclusion, the mucosal integrity is impaired at the proximal esophagus in patients with non-GERD-related NCCP, which might be the pathogenic mechanism of NCCP. PMID:26705212

  18. Chest Pain, Acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... HYPERVENTILATION, an episode of overbreathing often caused by stress of anxiety. IF YOU HAVE A HEART PROBLEM, LUNG CONDITION, ... HOSPITAL. If you have hyperventilated before due to stress or anxiety, your doctor may have given you information about ...

  19. Medical consumption compared for TIMI and HEART score in chest pain patients at the emergency department: a retrospective cost analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwets, A; Poldervaart, J M; Reitsma, J B; Buitendijk, S; Six, A J; Backus, B E; Hoes, A W; Doevendans, P A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate which risk score (TIMI score or HEART score) identifies the largest population of low-risk patients at the emergency department (ED). Furthermore, we retrospectively calculated the corresponding expected decrease in medical consumption if these patients would have been discharged from the ED. Methods We performed analyses in two hospitals of the multicentre prospective validation study of the HEART score, executed in 2008 and 2009. Patients with chest pain presenting to the ED were included and information was collected on major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) and on hospital admissions and diagnostic procedures within 6 weeks. The TIMI and HEART score were calculated for each patient. Results We analysed 640 patients (59% male, mean age of 60, cumulative incidence of MACE 17%). An estimated total of €763 468 was spent during follow-up on hospital admission and diagnostic procedures. In total, 256 (40%) patients had a HEART score of 0–3 and were considered low risk (miss rate 1.6%), a total of €64 107 was spent on diagnostic procedures and hospital admission after initial presentation in this group. In comparison, 105 (16%) patients with TIMI score of 0 were considered low risk (miss rate 0%), with a total of €14 670 spent on diagnostic procedures and initial hospital admission costs. With different cut-offs for low risk, HEART 0–2 (miss rate 0.7%), would have resulted in a total of €25 365 in savings, compared with €71 905 when an alternative low risk cut-off for TIMI of TIMI≤1 would be used (miss rate 3.0%). Conclusions The HEART score identifies more patients as low risk compared with the TIMI score, which may lead to a larger reduction in diagnostic procedures and costs in this low-risk group. Future studies should prospectively investigate whether adhering to the HEART score in clinical practice and early discharge of low-risk patients is safe and leads to a reduction in medical consumption. PMID:27311905

  20. Coronary Computed Tomography Versus Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Chest Pain Patients Admitted to Telemetry: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Levsky, Jeffrey M.; Spevack, Daniel M.; Travin, Mark I.; Menegus, Mark A.; Huang, Paul W.; Clark, Elana T.; Kim, Choo-won; Hirschhorn, Esther; Freeman, Katherine D.; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Haramati, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coronary computed tomography angiography plays an expanding role managing symptomatic patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Prospective intermediate-term outcomes are lacking. OBJECTIVE To compare coronary CT angiography with conventional non-invasive testing. DESIGN Randomized, controlled comparative effectiveness trial. SETTING Telemetry-monitored wards of one inner-city medical center. PATIENTS 400 acute chest pain patients (mean age 57); 63% women; 54% Hispanic, 37% African-American; low socioeconomic status. INTERVENTION Coronary CT angiography (CT) or radionuclide stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). MEASUREMENTS The primary outcome was cardiac catheterization not leading to revascularization within one year. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, resource utilization and patient experience. Safety outcomes included death, major cardiovascular events and radiation exposure. RESULTS 30(15%) CT patients and 32(16%) MPI patients underwent cardiac catheterization within one year, of which 15(7.5%) and 20(10%), respectively, were not revascularized (-2.5% difference, 95%CI −8.6%–+3.5%; hazard ratio 0.77, 95%CI 0.40–1.49, p=0.44). Median length of stay was 28.9 hours for CT and 30.4 hours for MPI (p=0.057). Median follow-up was 40.4 months. For CT and MPI, the incidences of death (0.5% vs 3%, p=0.12), non-fatal cardiovascular events (4.5% vs 4.5%), re-hospitalization (43% vs 49%), emergency visit (63% vs 58%) and outpatient cardiology visit (23% vs 21%) were not different. Long-term, all-cause radiation was lower for CT (24 vs 29 milliSieverts, p<0.001). More CT patients graded their experience favorably (p=0.001) and would undergo the exam again (p=0.003). LIMITATIONS Single site study; primary outcome dependent on clinical management decisions. CONCLUSIONS There were no significant differences between CT and MPI in outcomes or resource utilization over 40 months. CT had lower associated radiation and was more positively

  1. The UPBEAT Nurse-Delivered Personalized Care Intervention for People with Coronary Heart Disease Who Report Current Chest Pain and Depression: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Barley, Elizabeth A.; Walters, Paul; Haddad, Mark; Phillips, Rachel; Achilla, Evanthia; McCrone, Paul; Van Marwijk, Harm; Mann, Anthony; Tylee, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is common in people with coronary heart disease (CHD) and associated with worse outcome. This study explored the acceptability and feasibility of procedures for a trial and for an intervention, including its potential costs, to inform a definitive randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a nurse-led personalised care intervention for primary care CHD patients with current chest pain and probable depression. Methods Multi-centre, outcome assessor-blinded, randomized parallel group study. CHD patients reporting chest pain and scoring 8 or more on the HADS were randomized to personalized care (PC) or treatment as usual (TAU) for 6 months and followed for 1 year. Primary outcome was acceptability and feasibility of procedures; secondary outcomes included mood, chest pain, functional status, well being and psychological process variables. Result 1001 people from 17 General Practice CHD registers in South London consented to be contacted; out of 126 who were potentially eligible, 81 (35% female, mean age = 65 SD11 years) were randomized. PC participants (n = 41) identified wide ranging problems to work on with nurse-case managers. Good acceptability and feasibility was indicated by low attrition (9%), high engagement and minimal nurse time used (mean/SD = 78/19 mins assessment, 125/91 mins telephone follow up). Both groups improved on all outcomes. The largest between group difference was in the proportion no longer reporting chest pain (PC 37% vs TAU 18%; mixed effects model OR 2.21 95% CI 0.69, 7.03). Some evidence was seen that self efficacy (mean scale increase of 2.5 vs 0.9) and illness perceptions (mean scale increase of 7.8 vs 2.5) had improved in PC vs TAU participants at 1 year. PC appeared to be more cost effective up to a QALY threshold of approximately £3,000. Conclusions Trial and intervention procedures appeared to be feasible and acceptable. PC allowed patients to work on unaddressed problems and appears cheaper than TAU

  2. Chest Wall Volume Receiving >30 Gy Predicts Risk of Severe Pain and/or Rib Fracture After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, Neal E.; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B.; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng Ke; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Larner, James M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving >=20, >=30, >=40, >=50, and >=60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Results: Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R{sup 2} = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm{sup 3} was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm{sup 3} receiving 30 Gy. Conclusion: The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to <30 cm{sup 3}, if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage.

  3. Access to rehabilitation: patient perceptions of inequalities in access to specialty pain rehabilitation from a gender and intersectional perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wiklund, Maria; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie; Hammarström, Anne; Lehti, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term musculoskeletal pain is common, particularly among women. Pain conditions are a concern in primary health care, and people with severe and complex pain are referred to specialty health care. There is gender bias in access, counselling, assessment, and treatment of long-term pain. Objective This study explores patient accounts and perceptions about important (social) factors for accessing specialised pain rehabilitation from gender and intersectional equality perspectives. We aimed to identify potential biases and inequalities in accessing rehabilitation resources at a specialised rehabilitation clinic. Design Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 adults after an assessment or completion of a specialised rehabilitation programme in northern Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was used to explore patients’ perceptions of important factors for accessing rehabilitation. Results One main theme was formulated as Access to rehab – not a given. Three categories of perceived inequality were demonstrated: power of gender, power of social status, and power of diagnosis. Participants perceived rehabilitation as a resource that is not equally available, but dependent on factors such as gender, socio-economic status, ability to work, ethnicity, or age, and more subtle aspects of social status and habitus (e.g. appearance, fitness, and weight). The character of diagnosis received (medical versus psychiatric or social) was also noted. Conclusions It is crucial that professionals are aware of how potential inequalities related to gender, social status, and diagnosis, and their intersections, can be created, perceived, and have influence on the processes of assessment and treatment. Reduction of social determinants of health and biases remain important within global, national, and local contexts. PMID:27569592

  4. In Emergency Department Patients with Acute Chest Pain, Stress Cardiac MRI Observation Unit Care Reduces 1- year Cardiac-Related Health Care Expenditures: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Case, Doug; Hoekstra, James W.; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the direct cost of medical care and clinical events during the first year after patients with intermediate risk acute chest pain were randomized to stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) observation unit (OU) testing, versus inpatient care. Background In a recent study, randomization to OU-CMR reduced median index hospitalization cost compared to inpatient care in patients presenting to the emergency department with intermediate risk acute chest pain. Methods Emergency department patients with intermediate risk chest pain were randomized to OU-CMR (OU care, cardiac markers, stress CMR) or inpatient care (admission, care per admitting provider). This analysis reports the direct cost of cardiac-related care and clinical outcomes (MI, revascularization, cardiovascular death) during the first year of follow-up subsequent to discharge. Consistent with health economics literature, provider cost was calculated from work-related relative value units using the Medicare conversion factor; facility charges were converted to cost using departmental specific cost-to-charge ratios. Linear models were used to compare cost accumulation among study groups. Results One-hundred nine (109) randomized subjects were included in this analysis (52 OU-CMR, 57 inpatient care). The median age was 56 years; baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. At 1 year, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72) with 1 patient in each group experiencing a cardiac event after discharge. First-year cardiac-related costs were significantly lower for participants randomized to OU-CMR compared to participants receiving inpatient care (geometric mean = $3101 vs $4742 including the index visit (p = .004) and $29 vs $152 following discharge (p = .012)). During the year following randomization, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72). Conclusions An OU-CMR strategy

  5. [Rabeprazole test and comparison of the effectiveness of course treatment with rabeprazole in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and non-coronary chest pain].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Iurenev, G L; Burkov, S G; V'iuchnova, E S

    2007-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are efficient for ex juvantibus diagnostics of non-coronary chest pain (NCCP) of gastroesophageal reflux origin as well as for its course treatment. The aim of this randomized cross-over study was to compare the efficiency of rabeprasol and omeprasol as means of both diagnostics and long-term treatment. In rabeprasol group the symptoms disappeared more quickly, and the maximum effect was achieved by day three, while in omeprasol group the best results were achieved only by day six (p < or = 0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of rabeprasol test was 81.6% and 80.6%, respectively, while those of omeprasol test were 73.5% and 77.4%, respectively. By the end of the 12th week of treatment pain syndrome had been completely or partly coped with in 92% of rabeprasol patients, and 76% of omeprazol patients (p < 0.05). Thus, response to rabeprasol takes place twice as quick as response to omeprasol, which makes it possible to shorten the time of NCCP diagnostics. Furthermore, rabeprasol test is more sensitive and specific. Course treatment with high doses of PPI increase the number of patients with eliminated pain syndrome, and rabeprasol here is more efficient than omeprasol. PMID:17520889

  6. How common are ventricular arrhythmias in patients admitted to CCU with chest pain and a non-ischaemic ECG? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Anne-Maree; Klim, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of serious ventricular arrhythmias in a cohort of patients admitted to coronary care units for investigation and treatment of possible acute coronary syndrome. Design Secondary analysis of prospective cohort study. Setting Community teaching hospital. Patients Adults (>18 years) admitted to coronary care unit with chest pain and non-ischaemic ECG. Interventions None. Main outcome measures Rate of serious ventricular arrhythmia during hospital stay. Results 397 patients were studied; median age 64 years, 65% male; median Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction score 3; troponin elevation 43%, final diagnosis myocardial infarction 32%. No patient in the study suffered a serious ventricular arrhythmia (0%, 95% CI 0 to 1.0%). Conclusion Patients admitted to coronary care units for investigation and treatment of possible acute coronary syndrome with a non-ischaemic ECG have a very low rate of serious ventricular arrhythmia.

  7. A Young Man Presenting with Pleuritic Chest Pain and Fever after Electrophysiological Study and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement: Diagnostic Difficulties and Value of Bedside Thoracic Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Faraone, Antonio; Fortini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 23-year-old man presenting with recurrent pleuritic chest pain and prolonged fever after electrophysiology testing and placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator because of a suspected arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. The clinical suspicion was initially directed toward pneumonia with pleural effusion and later toward an infection of the cardiac device complicated by septic pulmonary embolism. The definitive diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and infarction was suggested by a point-of-care thoracic sonography, performed at the bedside by a clinician caring for the patient, and then confirmed by contrast enhanced computed tomography, which also showed thrombosis of the left iliofemoral vein, site of percutaneous puncture for cardiac catheterization. Prolonged fever was attributable to a concomitant Epstein-Barr virus primary infection that acted as confounding factor. The present report confirms the value of bedside thoracic sonography in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with nonspecific respiratory symptoms. PMID:26576159

  8. Value of normal electrocardiographic findings in predicting resting left ventricular function in patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, J.H. Jr.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Gibbons, R.J.

    1989-06-01

    Characterization of left ventricular function is important in managing patients with coronary artery disease. Although many methods are available to assess left ventricular function, most are either expensive, invasive, or both. In this study, we examined the ability of normal or near-normal resting electrocardiographic findings to predict resting left ventricular ejection fraction, measured by resting radionuclide angiography, in 874 patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease. A retrospective review was undertaken of 4,410 Mayo Clinic patients who underwent rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography for the evaluation of chest pain and known or suspected coronary artery disease; of these, 874 patients met the inclusion criteria for the current study. A 15-lead electrocardiogram, which was interpreted by the cardiologist or cardiology trainee working in the laboratory, was obtained at the same evaluation as the radionuclide study. In 590 patients with no previous history of a myocardial infarction and entirely normal resting electrocardiographic results without nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.63 +/- 0.004, and 559 patients (95%) had a normal resting ejection fraction (defined as 0.50 or more). Both nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities (p less than 0.001) and, to a lesser degree, a history of myocardial infarction (p = 0.06) were independent predictors of an abnormal resting ejection fraction. In 185 patients with nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities and no history of myocardial infarction, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.61 +/- 0.009, and 85% had a normal resting ejection fraction.

  9. Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in the assessment of patients presenting with chest pain suspected for acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Filippo, Massimo; Capasso, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Acute chest pain is an important clinical challenge and a major reason for presentation to the emergency department. Although multiple imaging techniques are available to assess patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS), considerable interest has been focused on the use of non-invasive imaging options as coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). According to several recent evidences, CCTA has been shown to represent a useful tool to rapidly and accurately diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with low to intermediate cardiovascular risk. CCTA examination has the unique ability to non-invasively depict the coronary anatomy, not only allowing visualization of the lumen of the arteries in order to detect severe stenosis or occlusion responsible of myocardial ischemia, but also allows the assessment of coronary artery wall by demonstrating the presence or absence of CAD. However, routine CCTA is not able to differentiate ischemic from non-ischemic chest pain in patients with known CAD and it does not provide any functional assessment of the heart. Conversely, CMR is considered the gold standard in the evaluation of morphology, function, viability and tissue characterization of the heart. CMR offers a wide range of tools for diagnosing myocardial infarction (MI) at least at the same time of the elevation of cardiac troponin values, differentiating infarct tissue and ischemic myocardium from normal myocardium or mimicking conditions, and distinguishing between new and old ischemic events. In high-risk patients, with acute and chronic manifestations of CAD, CMR may be preferable to CCTA, since it would allow detection, differential diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and management of MI. PMID:27500156

  10. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain ... Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain ...

  11. Ranolazine versus placebo in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and persistent chest pain or dyspnea despite optimal medical and revascularization therapy: randomized, double-blind crossover pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, Nicolas W; Shammas, Gail A; Keyes, Kathleen; Duske, Shawna; Kelly, Ryan; Jerin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) may continue to experience persistent chest pain and/or dyspnea despite pharmacologic therapy and revascularization. We hypothesized that ranolazine would reduce anginal symptoms or dyspnea in optimally treated ICM patients. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, crossover-design pilot study, 28 patients with ICM (ejection fraction less or equal 40%) were included after providing informed consent. A total of 24 patients completed both placebo and ranolazine treatments and were analyzed. All patients were on treatment with a beta blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (or angiotensin receptor blocker), and at least one additional antianginal drug. After randomization, patients received up to 1,000 mg ranolazine orally twice a day, as tolerated, versus placebo. The primary end point was change in angina as assessed by the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ), or in dyspnea as assessed by the Rose Dyspnea Scale (RDS). Change in the RDS and SAQ score from baseline was compared, for ranolazine and placebo, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test or paired t-test. Results Patients had the following demographic and clinical variables: mean age of 71.5 years; male (82.1%); prior coronary bypass surgery (67.9%); prior coronary percutaneous intervention (85.7%); prior myocardial infarction (82.1%); diabetes (67.9%); and mean ejection fraction of 33.1%. No statistical difference was seen between baseline RDS score and that after placebo or ranolazine (n=20) (P≥0.05). There was however, an improvement in anginal frequency (8/10 patients) (P=0.058), quality of life (8/10 patients) (P=0.048), and mean score of all components of the SAQ questionnaire (n=10) (P=0.047) with ranolazine compared with placebo. Conclusion In optimally treated ICM patients with continued chest pain or dyspnea, ranolazine possibly had a positive impact on quality of life, a reduction in anginal frequency, and an overall improvement in the

  12. Intractable chest pain in cardiomyopathy: treatment by a novel technique of cardiac cryodenervation with quantitative immunohistochemical assessment of success.

    PubMed Central

    Gaer, J A; Gordon, L; Wharton, J; Polak, J M; Taylor, K M; McKenna, W; Parker, D J

    1993-01-01

    A novel method of cardiac denervation by cryoablation has been developed experimentally. The technique uses liquid nitrogen delivered under pressure to ablate the principal sources of cardiac innervation--namely, the adventitia surrounding the aorta, pulmonary arteries, and veins. The technique has been verified experimentally both in vivo by physiological means and in vitro by quantitative immunohistochemistry and the measurement of myocardial noradrenaline concentrations. A 35 year old woman presented with intractable precordial pain, normal epicardial coronary arteries, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Her symptoms were refractory to maximal medical treatment and she was thought to be unsuitable for either conventional myocardial revascularisation, autotransplantation, or allografting with the concomitant risk of transplant coronary artery disease. She therefore underwent cardiac denervation by the method developed in the laboratory. There was quantitative immunohistochemical evidence of extrinsic cardiac denervation associated with a considerable improvement in her symptoms. This improvement persisted during a follow up period of over 16 months. Images PMID:8280529

  13. The 'chest pain kit' study: A 'pill in the pocket' concept to improve the pre-hospital therapy of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kralev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The 'pill in the pocket' concept is an established therapy for atrial fibrillation. The current guidelines for the management of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction endorse the concept that faster time to reperfusion is associated with important reductions in morbidity and mortality. The mechanical reperfusion and outcome of these patients is significantly supported by dual antiplatelet therapy. There is no data comparing the effect of early self-application by the patient ('pill in the pocket') versus application by the emergency doctor of dual antiplatelet therapy and a factor Xa inhibitor in case of severe chest pain. In patients with a high risk of developing an acute coronary syndrome and previously selected by a cardiologist, early self-application of dual antiplatelet therapy and a factor Xa inhibitor (e.g. fondaparinux) immediately after calling the emergency doctor might be of significance in cases of acute coronary syndrome or pulmonary embolism. In particular, in less developed areas where it might take a long time for the emergency doctor to arrive, this 'pill in the pocket' concept may be significant. PMID:20865688

  14. Comparative diagnostic value of a new computerized vectorcardiographic method (cardiogoniometry) and other noninvasive tests in medically treated patients with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, A.; Hoeflin, F.H.; Herrmann, H.J.; Wolf, C.; Gurtner, H.P.; Roesler, H.

    1987-05-01

    The diagnostic value of cardiogoniometry (CGM), a new computerized vectorcardiographic method, for the identification of coronary artery disease was compared with other noninvasive tests in 48 medically treated patients with chest pain. Coronary angiography revealed one-vessel disease in 18, two- or three-vessel disease in 21, and normal coronary arteries in 9 patients. Cardiogoniometry was less sensitive (63%) than thallium-/sup 201/ (201T1) scanning (82%), but slightly more sensitive than the exercise ECG (50%) or a recently proposed parameter of exercise performance (50%). On the other hand, specificity was comparable among these tests (exercise ECG 78%, thallium-201 scanning 72%, CGM 67%, new parameter of exercise performance 66%). Moreover, the false negative rate of noninvasive testing was reduced from 8 to 3% when CGM was added to thallium-201 scanning and exercise ECG. Our findings indicate that in view of the easier feasibility with computerized technology, the future role of vectorcardiographic methods such as CGM in the noninvasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease should be redefined.

  15. Chest drain care bundle: Improving documentation and safety.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Joe; Graham, Selina

    2015-01-01

    Chest drain insertion is a common advanced procedure with a significant associated risk of pain, distress, and complications. Nationally, audit and recommendations from leading bodies have highlighted a number of safety concerns around chest drain insertion. Audit work has demonstrated poor levels of documentation; particularly around use of premedication, use of ultrasound guidance and consent. This has obvious potential consequences for patient safety and thus is an important target for improvement work. This project quantifies current standards of documentation and aims to improve this through a combination of accessible and easy to read guidelines, education, and the introduction of a chest drain insertion bundle. National best practice standards were identified through review of national guidance. Drain insertion was prospectively analysed over a three month period to establish baseline standards of documentation. This initial work was presented and a bundle and clinical guidelines produced. Chest drain insertion was then reaudited and assessed for improvement. Results demonstrated an improvement in many areas of documentation, pushing local results above the national average. However, only 40% of cases used the new bundle due to a mixture of staff rotation and an unexpectedly high proportion of drains inserted in non targeted areas including the emergency department, theatre, and intensive care. Despite this, the introduction of accessible guidance and bundle has significantly improved chest drain insertion documentation to the benefit of all. PMID:26734423

  16. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging test that uses powerful magnetic fields and radio waves to create pictures of the chest (thoracic area). ... no side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of ...

  17. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy Superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction Thoracic aortic aneurysm Thymus tumor Tumors of the chest Consult your ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy SVC obstruction Swollen lymph nodes Thoracic aortic aneurysm Patient Instructions Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge ...

  18. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case.

  19. Chest drainage.

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris

    2014-07-15

    As an intensive care nurse with experience of caring for critically ill patients in the UK and on deployed operations overseas, I found the CPD article useful in reviewing the pathophysiology of a pneumothorax, use of intrapleural chest drains, observations that should be recorded, and nursing care and management of a patient with an intrapleural chest drain. Reflecting on the time out activities in the CPD article was valuable. PMID:25005418

  20. Sex Differences in the Effectiveness of Early Coronary CT Angiography Compared to Standard Emergency Department Evaluation for Acute Chest Pain: The ROMICAT II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Hayden, Douglas; Woodard, Pamela K.; Kirby, Ruth; Chou, Eric T.; Nagurney, John T.; Wiviott, Stephen D.; Fleg, Jerome L.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Udelson, James E.; Hoffmann, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluate sex-based differences in the effectiveness of early cardiac computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) versus standard emergency department (ED) evaluation in patients with acute chest pain. Methods and Results In the ROMICAT II multicenter controlled trial, we randomized 1000 patients (47% women) 40-74 years old with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) to an early CCTA or standard ED evaluation. In this pre-specified analysis, women in the CCTA arm had greater reduction in length of stay (LOS), lower hospital admission rates, and lesser increased cumulative radiation dose than men when comparing ED strategies (p-interactions≤0.02). While women had lower ACS rates than men (3% vs 12%, p<0.0001), sex differences in LOS persisted after adjustment for baseline differences including ACS rate (p-interaction<0.03). LOS was similar between sexes with normal CCTA findings (p=0.11). There was no missed ACS for either sex. No difference was observed in major adverse cardiac events between sex and ED strategies (p-interaction=0.39). Women had more normal CCTA examinations than men (58% vs 37%, p<0.0001), less obstructive coronary disease by CCTA (5% vs 17%, p=0.0001), but similar normalcy rates for functional testing (p=1.0). Men in the CCTA arm had the highest rate of invasive coronary angiography (18%), while women had comparable low 5% rates irrespective of ED strategies. Conclusions This trial provides data supporting an early CCTA strategy as an attractive option in women presenting to the ED with symptoms suggestive of ACS. The findings may be explained by lower CAD prevalence and severity in women than men. PMID:23685743

  1. Superiority of quantitative exercise thallium-201 variables in determining long-term prognosis in ambulatory patients with chest pain: a comparison with cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.; Finkelstein, D.M.; Homma, S.; Leavitt, M.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of quantitative exercise thallium-201 imaging and compare it with that of cardiac catheterization in ambulatory patients. Accordingly, long-term (4 to 9 years) follow-up was obtained in 293 patients who underwent both tests for the evaluation of chest pain: 89 had undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery within 3 months of testing and were excluded from analysis, 119 experienced no cardiac events and 91 had an event (death in 20, nonfatal myocardial infarction in 21 and coronary artery bypass operations performed greater than 3 months after cardiac catheterization in 50). When all variables were analyzed using Cox regression analysis, the quantitatively assessed lung/heart ratio of thallium-201 activity was the most important predictor of a future cardiac event (chi 2 = 40.21). Other significant predictors were the number of diseased vessels (chi 2 = 17.11), patient gender (chi 2 = 9.43) and change in heart rate from rest to exercise (chi 2 = 4.19). Whereas the number of diseased vessels was an important independent predictor of cardiac events, it did not add significantly to the overall ability of the exercise thallium-201 test to predict events. Furthermore, information obtained from thallium-201 imaging alone was marginally superior to that obtained from cardiac catheterization alone (p = 0.04) and significantly superior to that obtained from exercise testing alone (p = 0.02) in determining the occurrence of events. In addition, unlike the exercise thallium-201 test, which could predict the occurrence of all categories of events, catheterization data were not able to predict the occurrence of nonfatal myocardial infarction. The exclusion of bypass surgery and previous myocardial infarction did not alter the results.

  2. Utility of Coronary Artery Calcium Scanning Beyond Coronary CT Angiography in the Emergency Department Evaluation for Acute Chest Pain: The ROMICAT II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pursnani, Amit; Chou, Eric; Zakroysky, Pearl; Deaño, Roderick C.; Mamuya, Wilfred S.; Woodard, Pamela K.; Nagurney, John T.; Fleg, Jerome L.; Lee, Hang; Schoenfeld, David; Udelson, James E.; Hoffmann, Udo; Truong, Quynh A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether a coronary artery calcium (CAC) scan provides added value to coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in emergency department (ED) patients with acute chest pain (ACP) remains unsettled. We sought to determine the value of CAC scan in ACP patients undergoing CCTA. Methods and Results In the multicenter ROMICAT II trial, we enrolled low-intermediate risk ED patients with symptoms suggesting acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In this pre-specified sub-analysis of 473 patients (54±8years, 53%male) who underwent both CAC scanning and CCTA, the ACS rate was 8%. Overall, 53% of patients had CAC=0 of whom 2 (0.8%) developed ACS, while 7% had CAC>400 with 49% whom developed ACS. C-statistic of CAC>0 was 0.76, while that using the optimal cutpoint of CAC≥22 was 0.81. Continuous CAC score had lower discriminatory capacity than CCTA (c-statistic 0.86 vs. 0.92, p=0.03). Compared to CCTA alone, there was no benefit combining CAC score with CCTA (c-statistic 0.93, p=0.88) or with selective CCTA strategies after initial CAC>0 or optimal cutpoint CAC≥22 (p≥0.09). Mean radiation dose from CAC acquisition was 1.4±0.7mSv. Higher CAC scores resulted in more non-diagnostic CCTA studies though the majority remained interpretable. Conclusions In ED patients with ACP, CAC score does not provide incremental value beyond CCTA for ACS diagnosis. CAC=0 does not exclude ACS, nor a high CAC score preclude interpretation of CCTA in most patients. Thus, CAC results should not influence the decision to proceed with CCTA, and the decision to perform a CAC scan should be balanced with the additional radiation exposure required. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01084239. PMID:25710925

  3. [Chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. PMID:21640287

  4. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  5. Creating widely accessible spatial interfaces: mobile VR for managing persistent pain.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, David; Korsakov, Fedor; Jolton, Joseph; Keefe, Francis J; Haley, Alex; Keefe, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    Using widely accessible VR technologies, researchers have implemented a series of multimodal spatial interfaces and virtual environments. The results demonstrate the degree to which we can now use low-cost (for example, mobile-phone based) VR environments to create rich virtual experiences involving motion sensing, physiological inputs, stereoscopic imagery, sound, and haptic feedback. Adapting spatial interfaces to these new platforms can open up exciting application areas for VR. In this case, the application area was in-home VR therapy for patients suffering from persistent pain (for example, arthritis and cancer pain). For such therapy to be successful, a rich spatial interface and rich visual aesthetic are particularly important. So, an interdisciplinary team with expertise in technology, design, meditation, and the psychology of pain collaborated to iteratively develop and evaluate several prototype systems. The video at http://youtu.be/mMPE7itReds demonstrates how the sine wave fitting responds to walking motions, for a walking-in-place application. PMID:24807994

  6. Comparison of Rates of Coronary Angiography and Combined Testing Procedures in Patients Seen in the Emergency Room With Chest Pain (But No Objective Acute Coronary Syndrome Findings) Having Coronary Computed Tomography Versus Exercise Stress Testing.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Brian; Leipsic, Jonathon; Purssell, Elizabeth; Kasteel, Naomi; Nguyen, Kimchi; Kazem, Mikameh; Naoum, Christopher; Raju, Rekha; Blanke, Philipp; Heilbron, Brett; Taylor, Carolyn; Scheuermeyer, Frank X

    2016-07-15

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) appears comparable to standard care, including exercise stress testing (EST), in diagnosing acute coronary syndrome in emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain but may increase downstream testing. The objective of this study was to investigate rates of post-CCTA versus post-EST testing for (1) invasive angiography and (2) all combined cardiac testing. This was a retrospective cohort study performed at 2 urban Canadian EDs involving patients aged up to 65 years with chest pain but no objective ACS findings that were evaluated with CCTA or EST at the physician's discretion. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had 30-day invasive angiography in each group; secondary outcomes included all subsequent 30-day cardiac testing, including nuclear medicine scanning. From July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2014, we collected 1,700 patients: 521 CCTA and 1,179 EST. Demographics and risk factors were similar in both cohorts. In the following 30 days, 30 CCTA (5.8%) and 297 EST (25.2%) patients underwent any type of additional cardiac testing (difference 19.4%, 95% CI 16.0 to 22.6), whereas 12 CCTA (2.3%) and 20 EST patients (1.7%) underwent angiography (difference 0.6%, 95% CI -0.8% to 2.6%). No patients in either group died or had a myocardial infarction within 30 days. For ED patients with chest pain who underwent brief observation, CCTA and EST had similar 30-day angiography rates, but CCTA patients underwent significantly less overall cardiac investigations. PMID:27236251

  7. What Is Chest MRI?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive ... creates detailed pictures of the structures in your chest, such as your chest wall, heart, and blood ...

  8. Point-of-care echocardiography for aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients with killer chest pain: EASY screening focused on the assessment of effusion, aorta, ventricular size and shape and ventricular asynergy.

    PubMed

    Nishigami, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography and focused cardiac ultrasound are point-of-care echo protocols for the evaluation of cardiac disease in the emergency room; however, these protocols may not adequately assess aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and acute coronary syndrome in patients with killer chest pain. Here, I present an echocardiography protocol focused on screening for these critical cardiovascular diseases. This protocol (termed EASY screening) consists of the assessment of effusion in the pericardial space, aortic abnormalities, the size and shape of the ventricles and asynergy of the left ventricle. Aortic dissection is suggested by positive findings for effusion and/or abnormal aortic findings. Pulmonary embolism is suggested by a dilated right ventricle and a D-shaped left ventricle in the short-axis view. Acute coronary syndrome is suggested by asynergy of left ventricular wall motion. EASY screening may facilitate the assessment of aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting to the emergency room with killer chest pain. PMID:26497152

  9. Toward a Next Generation of Widely Accessible Spatial Interfaces: Mobile VR Environments for Patients with Persistent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, David; Korsakov, Fedor; Jolton, Joseph; Keefe, Francis J.; Haley, Alex; Keefe, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a series of multi-modal spatial interfaces and virtual environments that can be implemented with widely accessible virtual reality (VR) technologies. The results demonstrate and evaluate the new degree to which rich virtual experiences involving motion sensing, physiological inputs, stereoscopic imagery, sound, and haptic feedback can now be created using low-cost (e.g., mobile phone based) VR environments. Adapting spatial interfaces to these new platforms can open up exciting new application areas for VR. This is demonstrated through a series of prototype systems aimed at delivering in-home VR therapies to patients suffering from persistent pain conditions (e.g. arthritis pain, cancer pain). A rich spatial interface and visual aesthetic is particularly important for the success of these applications; thus an interdisciplinary team with expertise in technology, design, meditation, and the psychology of pain worked together to iteratively develop and evaluate the current prototypes. PMID:24807994

  10. Clinical utility of far-infrared therapy for improvement of vascular access blood flow and pain control in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo Jeong; Cho, Eun Hee; Jo, Hye Min; Min, Changwook; Ji, Young Sok; Park, Moo Yong; Kim, Jin Kuk; Hwang, Seung Duk

    2015-01-01

    Background Maintenance of a well-functioning vascular access and minimal needling pain are important goals for achieving adequate dialysis and improving the quality of life in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Far-infrared (FIR) therapy may improve endothelial function and increase access blood flow (Qa) and patency in HD patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of FIR therapy on Qa and patency, and needling pain in HD patients. Methods This prospective clinical trial enrolled 25 outpatients who maintained HD with arteriovenous fistula. The other 25 patients were matched as control with age, sex, and diabetes. FIR therapy was administered for 40 minutes during HD 3 times/wk and continued for 12 months. The Qa was measured by the ultrasound dilution method, whereas pain was measured by a numeric rating scale at baseline, then once per month. Results One patient was transferred to another facility, and 7 patients stopped FIR therapy because of an increased body temperature and discomfort. FIR therapy improved the needling pain score from 4 to 2 after 1 year. FIR therapy increased the Qa by 3 months and maintained this change until 1 year, whereas control patients showed the decrease in Qa. The 1-year unassisted patency with FIR therapy was not significantly different from control. Conclusion FIR therapy improved needling pain. Although FIR therapy improved Qa, the unassisted patency was not different compared with the control. A larger and multicenter study is needed to evaluate the effect of FIR therapy. PMID:27069856

  11. Chest wall resection for extrapulmonary tumor.

    PubMed

    Long, W P; Kline, R; Levine, E A

    1997-09-01

    Despite progress in early detection of breast cancer, a minority of women continue to present with extensive disease which may necessitate chest wall resection. Between 1992 and 1996, 14 patients were treated by surgical resection of the chest wall and reconstruction by the LSU Sections of Surgical Oncology and Plastic Surgery. Indications included resection of primary tumor, resection of recurrent tumor, and resection of radiation therapy induced damage to the chest wall. We report chest wall excision and reconstruction with no operative mortality and minor surgical morbidity in 21% of cases. Local control was achieved in 13 of 14 cases. Additionally we report uniform success in the palliation of ulcerating, painful, or infected chest wall lesions. Approximately 25% of patients treated for breast cancer and followed up for more than 6 months have remained free of disease. Chest wall resection is a useful modality in selected patients with extensive disease. PMID:9316348

  12. Lower limb gigantism, lymphedema, and painful varicosities following a thigh vascular access graft.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael; Mathuram Thiyagarajan, Umasankar; Akoh, Jacob A

    2014-07-01

    Prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are associated with greater morbidity than autogenous arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), but their use is indicated when AVF formation is not possible. This report adds to the literature a case of lower limb gigantism, painful varicosities, and lymphedema following long-term use of AVG in the upper thigh. The patient's past medical history included renal transplantation on the same side well before the AVG was inserted and right leg deep vein thrombosis. Suspicion of AVG thrombosis was excluded by Doppler ultrasound, which demonstrated an access flow of 1700 mL/min. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis did not identify the cause of her symptoms. Whereas functional incompetence of the iliac vein valve might be responsible for the varicosities, the extent of hypertrophy in this case raises the suspicion of lymphatic blockage possibly secondary to groin dissection undertaken at the time of graft insertion, in addition to the previous dissection at the time of transplantation. This case highlights the need for minimal groin dissection during AVG insertion, particularly in patients with a history of previous abdominopelvic surgery. PMID:24467313

  13. Postoperative Pain Management in Children, Parental English Proficiency, and Access to Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Nathalia; Jackson, Douglass L.; Zhou, Chuan; Ayala, Nelly C.; Ebel, Beth E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) are at risk for undertreated pain. The goal of this study was to examine the association between parental language proficiency, interpreted care, and postsurgical pediatric pain management. METHODS This was a retrospective matched cohort study among children <18 years of age. Children of LEP and English-proficient (EP) parents were matched according to age group, surgical procedure, and admission date. Mean number of daily pain assessments and mean daily pain scores were compared between language groups. We also compared the association between pain scores and type of medication given (opioid versus nonopioid). Within the LEP group, similar analyses compared pain assessment and treatment of children whose families received ≥2 professional interpretations per day versus those who received lower rates of interpretation. RESULTS A total of 474 children (237 LEP and 237 EP) were included in the study. Children of LEP parents had fewer pain assessments (mean: 7 [95% confidence interval: 2–13] vs 9 [95% confidence interval: 4–15]; P = .012), and higher levels of pain recorded before receiving opioid analgesics, compared with children of EP parents (P = .003). Within the LEP group, children with ≥2 interpretations per day had lower pain scores after medication administration (P < .05) and were more likely to receive opioids at pain levels similar to those of EP families. CONCLUSIONS Children of LEP parents received fewer pain assessments and were less likely to receive opioid analgesics for similar levels of pain compared with children of EP parents. More frequent use of professional interpreters when assessing pain may aid in reducing the gap in pain management between LEP and EP pediatric patients. PMID:24435597

  14. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your ...

  15. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... leaks from inside the lung into the chest ( pneumothorax ) Fluid buildup in the chest (called a pleural ... on the reason a chest tube is inserted. Pneumothorax usually improves, but sometimes needs minimally invasive surgery. ...

  16. Additive prognostic value of coronary artery calcium score and renal function in patients with acute chest pain without known coronary artery disease: up to 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Nabi, Faisal; Mahmarian, John J; Chang, Su Min

    2015-12-01

    Long-term incremental prognostic value of renal function over coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in symptomatic patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine additive prognostic value of renal function over CACS in patients with acute chest pain suspected of CAD. Renal function and CACS were assessed in patients without known CAD who presented to the emergency department with chest pain from 2005 to 2008. Renal function was assessed using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was defined as eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). A total of 949 patients (804 non-CKD and 145 CKD, age 54 ± 13 years) were included. During the follow-up period of up to 5.3 years, major adverse cardiac events (MACE) occurred in 5.7% of patients (19 cardiac deaths, 6 myocardial infarction and 29 late coronary revascularization). Annualized MACE rate was higher in patients in higher CACS categories with and without CKD (p = 0.011 and p < 0.001 respectively). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, CACS categories (CACS 1-100: HR 3.17, p = 0.005; CACS 101-400: HR 7.68, p < 0.001; CACS > 400: HR 8.88, p < 0.001) and CKD (HR 10.18, p < 0.001) were independent predictors for MACE. Both adding renal function and CACS significantly improved the overall predictive performance (p < 0.001 for global Chi square increase) from Framingham risk categories or thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score. Both CACS and renal function were independent predictors for future cardiac events and provided additive prognostic value to each other and over either Framingham risk categories or TIMI risk score. PMID:26243534

  17. Findings from an evaluation of PlanAlyzer's double cross-over trials of computer-based, self-paced, case-based programs in anemia and chest pain diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, H. C.; Healy, J. C.; Bell, J. R.; O'Donnell, J. F.; Shultz, E. K.; Wigton, R. S.; Hirai, F.; Beck, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    We report on three years of research trials of the PlanAlyzer I Project--a carefully controlled research study using a microcomputer-based, self-paced, case-based, event-driven system for medical education. PlanAlyzer presents cases, elicits and critiques a second year student's approach to the diagnosis of anemias and chest pain. PlanAlyzer uses text, hypertext, images and critiquing theory. Students were randomized, one half becoming the experimental group who received the interactive PlanAlyzer cases in anemia, the other half becoming the controls who received the exact same content material in a text format. Later in each year there was a crossover, the controls becoming the experimentals for a similar intervention with the cardiology PlanAlyzer cases. Results at the end of the first two years of trials show that the programs have achieved some significant efficiency and economy gains. 96 faculty hours of classroom time were saved by using PlanAlyzer in their place, with no loss in student achievement. In terms of student proficiency and efficiency, combining the anemia and cardiology trials, the 328 students in the two years of full scale trials were able to accomplish the project's instructional objectives. The experimentals accomplished this in 43% less time than the controls. On the average, for both the anemia and chest pain programs, this amounted to students spending 7.5 hours longer on the 30 text cases than on the same 30 computer cases to achieve the same level of mastery. There have been no significant proficiency differences (as measured by current post-tests) between the experimental and control groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1807738

  18. Effects of distraction on pain, fear, and distress during venous port access and venipuncture in children and adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Windich-Biermeier, Andrea; Sjoberg, Isabelle; Dale, Juanita Conkin; Eshelman, Debra; Guzzetta, Cathie E

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of self-selected distracters (ie, bubbles, I Spy: Super Challenger book, music table, virtual reality glasses, or handheld video games) on pain, fear, and distress in 50 children and adolescents with cancer, ages 5 to 18, with port access or venipuncture. Using an intervention-comparison group design, participants were randomized to the comparison group (n = 28) to receive standard care or intervention group (n = 22) to receive distraction plus standard care. All participants rated their pain and fear, parents rated participant fear, and the nurse rated participant fear and distress at 3 points in time: before, during, and after port access or venipuncture. Results show that self-reported pain and fear were significantly correlated (P = .01) within treatment groups but not significantly different between groups. Intervention participants demonstrated significantly less fear (P <.001) and distress (P = .03) as rated by the nurse and approached significantly less fear (P = .07) as rated by the parent. All intervention parents said the needlestick was better because of the distracter. The authors conclude that distraction has the potential to reduce fear and distress during port access and venipuncture. PMID:17185397

  19. Intercostal hemangioma of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Hamzík, Julian

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a case of a 36-year-old patient who had six months’ pain of the thoracic spine and left chest. A soft slowly growing resistance was present on the dorso-lateral side of the left chest wall, in the range of the seventh to ninth rib. According to the medical history, the patient did not have any prior trauma and malignancy. A well-defined tumor of the left chest wall with calcifications, which grew to the seventh and eighth intercostal space, was present on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) scans. The patient underwent resection of the tumor with the chest wall and reconstruction with polypropylene mesh. Histologically, it was a venous hemangioma, one of very rare tumors of the chest wall. PMID:27212983

  20. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is sudden and sharp You also have pain in your chest, neck or shoulder You're vomiting blood or have blood in your stool Your abdomen is stiff, hard and tender to touch You can't move your bowels, especially if you're also vomiting

  1. Toward safe accessibility of opioid pain medicines in Vietnam and other developing countries: a balanced policy method.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, Eric L; Nguyen, Thi Phuong Cham; Husain, Syeda Asra; Nguyen, Thi Hai Yen; Joranson, David E; Luong, Ngoc Khue; Maurer, Martha A

    2015-05-01

    Moderate or severe pain is common among people with advanced cancer and other life-threatening illnesses. Yet despite agreement that pain relief is a human right, the poorest 80% of the world's population rarely have access to strong opioid analgesics. Excessively restrictive opioid policies, especially in developing countries, both stem from and propagate misguided fears about opioids, so-called opiophobia. Because opiophobia, like any norm, is historically, socially, and culturally situated, efforts to change opiophobic policies will be most effective if guided by awareness of their historical, social, and cultural determinants. We describe some of these determinants in Vietnam and report on results of an ongoing project there to allay opiophobia and improve safe access to opioids for medical uses. We used a method that entails working with committed local partners, including a high-level official from the Ministry of Health, to review all Vietnamese policies governing opioid accessibility to identify the barriers; devising an action plan to safely reduce or circumnavigate the barriers; obtaining buy-in for the plan from all stakeholders, including drug regulators and the police; and assisting the Ministry of Health to implement the plan. Since the start of the project, morphine consumption has increased each year and as of 2010 was ninefold greater than in 2003, and the number of hospitals offering palliative care has increased from three to 15. We conclude that this balanced policy method appears to be helping to reduce barriers to opioid access in Vietnam and should be used in other developing countries. PMID:25523889

  2. [A case of esophageal cancer with a funnel chest].

    PubMed

    Takemura, Manabu; Matsuyama, Takeshi; Nishibeppu, Keiji; Matsumura, Atsushi; Ogino, Shiro; Mugitani, Tatsuro; Akami, Toshikazu; Shimode, Yoshikazu

    2013-11-01

    Esophageal cancer is a disease that is difficult to manage before and after surgery and is associated with a high in-hospital mortality rate despite there being reports of improved outcomes after multidisciplinary treatment. Meanwhile, although funnel chest is generally a subclinical condition, patients with this deformity may sometimes present with cardiac failure and chest pain. We report a case of advanced esophageal cancer with a funnel chest deformity that was very difficult to reconstruct after thoracoscopy-assisted resection. PMID:24394024

  3. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Prostate Ultrasound Video: IMRT Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Pediatric MRI Radiology and You About ... Prostate Ultrasound Video: IMRT Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Pediatric MRI Radiology and You About ...

  4. Computed tomography of the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    In this reference book readers have access to information pertaining to the role of thoracic CT, its limitations, normal anatomy and variations, scanning techniques, confusing artifacts, and pathologic anatomy. Major sections provide detailed, explicit data on lung cancer staging, the thoracic inlet, the heart, the esophagus, CT-guided invasive techniques, and the pediatric chest CT. Controversies are explored fully and presented fairly. This book is profusely illustrated with almost 500 CT scans for greater recognition and comprehension of the material presented.

  5. Atypical chest discomfort in a 36-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Lisa Mustone; Robie, Stephen; Baute, Scott

    2016-07-01

    This article focuses on aortic aneurysms and the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain. A complete and accurate family history is essential. Clinicians should pay close attention to persistence of symptoms and age in patients with atypical chest discomfort who do not have routine confirmatory cardiac findings. PMID:27351640

  6. Ventricular premature beats on Holter monitoring in patients admitted with chest pain, in whom acute myocardial infarction is not confirmed. The prognostic value and relationship to scars or ischemia on thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, J.K.; Sorensen, J.N.; Kromann-Andersen, B.; Kjeldgaard, K.M.; Christoffersen, K.; van Duijvendijk, K.; Reiber, J.H.

    1987-05-01

    Ambulatory 24-h Holter monitoring was carried out in 198 patients who had been admitted because of suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI) due to chest pain, but in whom AMI was not confirmed. During a follow-up period of 12-24 months (median 14 months) 16 cardiac events (i.e., nonfatal AMI or cardiac death) occurred. Ventricular premature beats (VPBs) were found in 65.2% of the patients, complex VPBs in 28.8%. Pairs of VPBs which were seen in 10.0% of the patients were the only important type of VPBs significantly related to an impaired prognosis. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed in 144 of the patients. VPBs were significantly related to scar formation (i.e., to permanent defects, but not to ischemia, specifically, to transient defects). It is concluded that ventricular arrhythmias in this patient category indicate presence of chronic ischemic heart disease, and that pairs of VPBs seem to identify patients at risk for cardiac events.

  7. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  8. Accessibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/accessibility.html MedlinePlus Accessibility To use the sharing features on this page, ... Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs ...

  9. [Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Chest Wall].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Genkichi; Yoneshima, Yasuto; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kitagawa, Dai; Kinjo, Nao; Ohgaki, Kippei; Maehara, Shinichiro; Teramoto, Seiichi; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi; Mine, Mari

    2016-08-01

    A 79-year-old man complaining of an anterior chest mass with pain had an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. A mass, 7 cm in size, with destruction of the right 4th rib was found on chest computed tomography. A F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) corresponding to the lesion showed an abnormal accumulation of FDG with the standardized uptake value(SUV) max=16.19. A malignant tumor of the chest wall origin was suspected and the tumor was resected with the 3th, 4th, and 5th ribs. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. He died of local recurrence about 5 months after the operation. PMID:27476566

  10. American College of Chest Physicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Certification (MOC) CHEST GAIN NSCLC CHEST SEEK Innovation, Simulation, and Training Center Professional Representative Education Program ( ... of Certification (MOC) CHEST GAIN NSCLC CHEST SEEK Innovation, Simulation, and Training Center Professional Representative Education Program ( ...

  11. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Verdon, François; Burnand, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli; Junod, Michel; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS). Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6%) patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration. PMID:17850647

  12. A Multifaceted Approach to Improve the Availability and Accessibility of Opioids for the Treatment of Cancer Pain in Serbia: Results From the International Pain Policy Fellowship (2006-2012) and Recommendations for Action.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, Snezana M; Maurer, Martha A; Ryan, Karen M; Popovic, Ivana; Husain, S Asra; Cleary, James F; Scholten, Willem

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in Serbia, and at least 14,000-16,000 patients experience moderate-to-severe cancer pain every year. Cancer pain relief has been impeded by inadequate availability of opioid analgesics and barriers to their accessibility. In 2006, a Serbian oncologist was selected as an International Pain Policy Fellow. The fellow identified barriers to opioid availability in Serbia and implemented an action plan to address the unavailability of oral morphine, attitudinal and knowledge barriers about opioids, and barriers in the national opioid control policy, in collaboration with the government, local partners, and international experts, including those from the World Health Organization. Collaborative efforts resulted in availability of immediate-release oral morphine, registration of controlled-release hydromorphone, and reimbursement of oral methadone for cancer pain; numerous educational activities aimed at changing inadequate knowledge and negative attitudes toward opioids; recognition of opioids as essential medicines for palliative care in a new National Palliative Care Strategy; and recognition of the medical use of opioids as psychoactive-controlled substances for the relief of pain included in a new national law on psychoactive-controlled substances, and the development of recommendations for updating regulations on prescribing and dispensing opioids. An increase in opioid consumption at the institutional and national levels also was observed. This article outlines a multifaceted approach to improving access to strong opioids for cancer pain management and palliative care in a middle-income country and offers a potential road map to success. PMID:26988849

  13. Value of the Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire (GerdQ) in predicting the proton pump inhibitor response in coronary artery disease patients with gastroesophageal reflux-related chest pain.

    PubMed

    He, S; Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Tang, Y; Xu, J; Tang, C

    2016-05-01

    Chest pain experienced by patients with coronary artery disease can be partly due to gastroesophageal reflux-induced chest pain (GERP). Empirical proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy has been recommended as an initial clinical approach for treating GERP. However, PPI use may lead to some health problems. The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire (GerdQ) may represent a noninvasive and cost-effective approach for avoiding PPI misuse and for identifying the appropriate patients for the PPI trial test. The aim of this pilot study was to prospectively evaluate the association between GerdQ scores and PPI response in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and GERP to determine whether the GerdQ predicts the PPI response in patients with CAD and GERP and to further validate the clinical application value of the GerdQ. A total of 154 consecutive patients with potential GERP were recruited to complete a GerdQ with subsequent PPI therapy. Based on the PPI trial result, patients were divided into a PPI-positive response group and a PPI-negative response group. The difference in the GerdQ scores between the two groups was assessed. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of GerdQ score was drawn according to the PPI response as the gold standard. The ability of GerdQ to predict the PPI response was assessed. A total of 96 patients completed the entire study; 62 patients (64.6%) were assigned to the PPI-positive response group, and 34 patients (35.4%) to the PPI-negative response group. The GerdQ score of the PPI-positive response group (8.11 ± 3.315) was significantly higher than that of the PPI-negative response group (4.41 ± 2.743), and the difference was statistically significant (t = 5.863, P = 0.000). The ROC curve was drawn according to a PPI response assessment result with a score above 2 as the gold standard. The area under curve was 0.806. When the critical value of GerdQ score was 7.5, Youden index was up to 0.514, the diagnostic sensitivity

  14. [Coronary artery dissection following blunt chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Seven, Ekim; Henningsen, Kristoffer; Abildgaard, Ulrik

    2015-03-16

    A previously healthy 38-year-old man was admitted to hospital with chest pain. The day before the patient had been to a karate session and had received multiple punches and kicks to the chest region. An ECG showed Q-waves in V1 and V2 and flattening of the T-waves in V1-V6. Levels of cardiac enzyme markers were elevated. The patient subsequently underwent coronary angiography with supplemental optical coherence tomography that revealed a bifurcate dissection involving the proximal parts of left ramus interventricularis anterior and circumflex coronary artery. Two drug-eluting stents were implanted with good angiographic result. PMID:25786846

  15. Clinical demand for and access to images and interpretations of chest radiographs in a medical intensive care unit serviced by an integrated PACS-radiology information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shile, Peter E.; Kundel, Harold L.; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Carey, Bruce; Kishore, Sheel; Brikman, Inna; Feingold, Eric R.; Lanken, Paul N.

    1994-05-01

    Digital communication systems have been proposed as a means of improving the flow of information between radiologists and other physicians. In the intensive care unit (ICU), physicians require more rapid access to images and interpretations than physicians in most other hospital settings. Thus these systems must be designed to ensure that rapid exchange of radiological information can be achieved. To better define system design for the electronic communication of radiological information to ICUs, this study examined bottlenecks in information flow through an integrated PACS-Radiology Information System.

  16. Chest Pain in Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... breath? Yes These symptoms may be caused by PLEURISY, an inflammation of the lining around the lung. ... or she can determine what is causing the pleurisy. Often, an anti-inflammatory drug will help relieve ...

  17. Angina - when you have chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-Elevation myocardial infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ... of Patients With Unstable Angina/Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction) developed in collaboration with the American College of ...

  18. Unrecognized stent embolization causing recurrent chest pain.

    PubMed

    Levisay, Justin P; Vaitkus, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Numerous methods have been described for retrieving or addressing stents that have embolized in the coronary arteries. Almost all of these prior reports address the "freshly" embolized stent with retrieval or deployment occurring during the same index procedure during which the embolization occurred. We describe a case of a thrombosed, chronically embolized coronary stent. PMID:16404788

  19. Angina - when you have chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines ( ... Infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines: ...

  20. [Functional Outcome after Chest Wall Stabilisation].

    PubMed

    Kyriss, T; Lenz, U; Friedel, G

    2016-09-01

    This overview reviews the current literature to compare the functional results after surgical and conservative treatment of patients with flail chest and multiple rib fractures. Regarding functional aspects, patients in the early phase after a thoracic trauma are those that benefit most from the stabilisation of the chest wall by internal fixation of the ribs. Patients recover faster from restrictive respiratory disorders, have less pain and return to the workplace earlier after an operation compared with those that receive conservative treatment. In the medium term, however, patients that are treated conservatively also achieve normal pulmonary function values and become free of pain. The period of convalescence after blunt thoracic trauma is generally underestimated. Future studies of the functional outcome after severe chest injuries should take this into account and the development of functional parameters should be monitored for at least 24 months. A prospective data collection of early and long-term surgical results in registries would be suitable to evaluate benefits and indications of chest wall stabilisation. PMID:27607891

  1. [Isolated chest trauma in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Yersin, Bertrand; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Pasquier, Mathieu; Zingg, Tobias

    2015-08-12

    In elderly patients, a blunt trauma of the chest is associated with a significant risk of complications and mortality. The number of ribs fractures (≥ 4), the presence of bilateral rib fractures, of a pulmonary contusion, of existent comorbidities or acute extra-thoracic traumatic lesions, and lastly the severity of thoracic pain, are indeed important risk factors of complications and mortality. Their presence may require hospitalization of the patient. When complications do occur, they are represented by alveolar hypoventilation, pulmonary atelectasia and broncho-pulmonary infections. When hospitalization is required, it may allow for the specific treatment of thoracic pain, including locoregional anesthesia techniques. PMID:26449103

  2. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni; Maadani, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  3. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni

    2016-01-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  4. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... pictures to create a very detailed, three-dimensional (3D) model of organs. Sometimes, a substance called contrast dye is injected into a vein in your arm for the CT scan. This substance highlights areas in your chest, which ...

  5. Chest Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... your neck and your abdomen. It includes the ribs and breastbone. Inside your chest are several organs, ... and collapsed lung Pleural disorders Esophagus disorders Broken ribs Thoracic aortic aneurysms Disorders of the mediastinum, the ...

  6. [Chest wall reconstruction after resection of malignant chest wall tumors].

    PubMed

    Ayabe, H; Oka, T; Akamine, S; Takahashi, T; Nagayasu, T

    1998-05-01

    Full-thickness chest wall resection is performed for complete removal of primary and secondary malignant chest wall tumors. Large defects of the chest wall after resection must be repaired to maintain adequate ventilation, to protect important intrathoracic structures, and to preserve cosmetic integrity. Various materials have been utilized over the years to replace the rigid chest wall. At present, Marlex mesh and a composite of Marlex mesh and methylmethacrylate are frequently used to reconstruct rigid chest wall defects. On the other hand, to replace the soft part of the chest wall and cover the rigid materials, pedicled muscle flaps, myocutaneous flaps, or omentum are used. Major pedicled flaps include the pectoralis major, rectus abdominis and latissimus dorsi muscular, and musculocutaneous flaps. Techniques are now available to repair any chest wall site, and to restore chest continuity in patients whose tumors are curatively resected. PMID:9656244

  7. Evaluating a Human Rights-Based Advocacy Approach to Expanding Access to Pain Medicines and Palliative Care: Global Advocacy and Case Studies from India, Kenya, and Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Diederik; Amon, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care has been defined as care that is person-centered and attentive to physical symptoms and psychological, social, and existential distress in patients with severe or life-threatening illness. The identification of access to palliative care and pain treatment as a human rights issue first emerged among palliative care advocates, physicians, and lawyers in the 1990s, with a basis in the right to health and the right to be free from cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment. Using a case study approach, we evaluate the results of a human rights-based advocacy approach on access to pain medicine and palliative care in India, Kenya, and Ukraine. In each country, human rights advocacy helped raise awareness of the issue, identify structural barriers to care, define government obligations, and contribute to the reform of laws, policies, and practices impeding the availability of palliative care services. In addition, advocacy efforts stimulated civil society engagement and high-level political leadership that fostered the implementation of human rights-based palliative care programs. Globally, access to palliative care was increasingly recognized by human rights bodies and within global health and drug policy organizations as a government obligation central to the right to health. PMID:26766856

  8. Usability testing of a Smartphone for accessing a web-based e-diary for self-monitoring of pain and symptoms in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Stinson, Jennifer; Duran, Joana; Gupta, Ankur; Gerla, Mario; Ann Lewis, Mary; Zeltzer, Lonnie

    2012-07-01

    We examined the usability of smartphones for accessing a web-based e-Diary for self-monitoring symptoms in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). One group of participants (n = 10; mean age, 13.1 ± 2.4 y; 5 M; 5 F) responded to questions using precompleted paper-based measures. A second group (n = 21; mean age, 13.4 ± 2.4 y; 10 M; 11 F) responded based on pain and symptoms they experienced over the previous 12 hours. The e-Diary was completed with at least 80% accuracy when compared to paper-based measures. Symptoms experienced over the previous 12 hours included feeling tired (33.3%), headache (28.6%), coughing (23.8%), lack of energy/fatigue (19.0%), yellowing of the eyes (19.0%), pallor (19.0%), irritability (19.0%), stiffness in joints (19.0%), general weakness (14.3%), and pain (14.3%), rating on average as 2.0 ± 1.7 (on 0 to 10 scale). Overall, sleep was good (8.1 ± 1.4 on the 0 to 10 scale). In conclusion, children with SCD were able to use smartphones to access a web-based e-Diary for reporting pain and symptoms. Smartphones may improve self-reporting of symptoms and communication between patients and their health care providers, who may consequently be able to improve pain and symptom management in children and adolescents with SCD in a timely manner. PMID:22627570

  9. Usability Testing of a Smartphone for Accessing a Web-Based e-Diary for Self-Monitoring of Pain and Symptoms in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Eufemia; Stinson, Jennifer; Duran, Joana; Gupta, Ankur; Gerla, Mario; Lewis, Mary Ann; Zeltzer, Lonnie

    2012-01-01

    We examined the usability of smartphones for accessing a web-based e-Diary for self-monitoring symptoms in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). One group of participants (n=10; mean age 13.1 ± 2.4 years; 5M; 5F) responded to questions using pre-completed paper-based measures. A second group (n=21; mean age 13.4 ± 2.4 years; 10M;11F) responded based on pain and symptoms they experienced over the previous 12 hours. The e-Diary was completed with at least 80% accuracy when compared to paper-based measures. Symptoms experienced over the previous 12 hours included feeling tired (33.3%), headache (28.6%), coughing (23.8%), lack of energy/fatigue (19.0%), yellowing of the eyes (19.0%), pallor (19.0%), irritability (19.0%), stiffness in joints (19.0%), general weakness (14.3%), and pain (14.3%), rating on average as 2.0 ± 1.7 (on 0 to 10 scale). Overall, sleep was good (8.1 ± 1.4 on the 0 to 10 scale). In conclusion, children with SCD were able to use smartphones to access a web-based e-Diary for reporting pain and symptoms. Smartphones may improve self-reporting of symptoms and communication between patients and their health care providers, who may consequently be able to improve pain and symptom management in children and adolescents with SCD in a timely manner. PMID:22627570

  10. [The medicine chest of Roald Amundsen in 1914].

    PubMed

    Gjelsvik, A M; Engelskjøn, T

    1990-12-10

    This historical medicine chest evidently has not been used, and its contents are nearly complete. Practically all medicines for internal use were dispensed in tablet form, which was very advanced for that time. The chest also contains a manual with short descriptions of illnesses and injuries and how to treat them, accompanied by an inventory. The medicine chest and accompanying booklet were compiled in a systematic way for easy access, and provide an interesting review of medical and pharmaceutical knowledge at that time. Many of the compounds are in surprisingly good condition after 75 years. Some of them have been analysed for active ingredients, and were shown to contain from 0 to 79% of the declared content. The composition of the medicine chest is based on 19th century traditions for ships' equipment, but compared with a 20 years older specimen it seems advanced. The medicine chest is located in Roald Amundsen's Home at Svartskog near Oslo. PMID:2281451

  11. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%). PMID:24704648

  12. Sonography of the Pediatric Chest.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yonggeng; Kapur, Jeevesh

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, pediatric chest diseases are evaluated with chest radiography. Due to advancements in technology, the use of sonography has broadened. It has now become an established radiation-free imaging tool that may supplement plain-film findings and, in certain cases, the first-line modality for evaluation of the pediatric chest. This pictorial essay will demonstrate the diagnostic potential of sonography, review a spectrum of pediatric chest conditions, and discuss their imaging features and clinical importance. PMID:27009313

  13. Approach to Pediatric Chest Radiograph.

    PubMed

    Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Chest radiograph remains the first line imaging modality even today, especially in ICU settings. Hence proper interpretation of chest radiographs is crucial, which can be achieved by adopting a systematic approach and proper description and identification of abnormalities. In this review, the authors describe a short and comprehensive way of interpreting the pediatric chest radiograph. PMID:26983619

  14. Chest radiography in acute aortic syndrome: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Rajendran, Surendran; Yung, Wai Heng; Babu, Suresh Balasubramanian; Peh, Wilfred C

    2016-08-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is a group of life-threatening diseases of the thoracic aorta that usually present to the emergency department. It includes aortic dissection, aortic intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Rare aortic pathologies of aorto-esophageal fistula and mycotic aneurysm may also be included in this list. All these conditions require urgent treatment with complex clinical care and management. Most patients who present with chest pain are evaluated with a chest radiograph in the emergency department. It is important that maximum diagnostic information is extracted from the chest radiograph as certain signs on the chest radiograph are extremely useful in pointing towards the diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome. PMID:27282377

  15. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  16. Filters For Chest Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, N.; Paron, J.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of low dose radiography is achieved by a judicious combination of proper kV selection, fast film-screen systems and beam filtration. A systematic study of filters was undertaken to evaluate the improvements that can be realized in terms of patient Entrance Skin Exposures (ESE) for chest radiographs. The Picker CD 135 Generator and the Automatic Chest Filmer with dynamic phototiming were used for the study. The kV dependence of ESE with various amounts of zinc and aluminum filtration is presented. The effect of filtration on image contrast is discussed. The variations of ESE with phantom thickness under different filtration conditions are also considered. It was found that the ESE can be reduced by as much as a factor of 1.8 ± .1 with no significant increase in tube loading.

  17. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Impact of a Regional Rapid Access Clinic on Access to Care

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jackson S.Y.; Kerba, Marc; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Mckimmon, Erin; Eigl, Bernhard; Hagen, Neil A.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (RT) is commonly indicated for the palliation of symptomatic bone metastases, but there is evidence of underutilization of this treatment modality in palliative care for cancer populations. This study was conducted to investigate factors that influenced the use of palliative RT services at a regional comprehensive cancer center. Methods and Materials: A cohort of patients with radiographically confirmed bone metastases and first-time users of palliative RT between 2003 and 2005 was retrospectively reviewed from the time of initial diagnosis of bone metastases to death or last follow-up. Type of radiation treatment service provider used (rapid access or routine access) and patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their influences on the number of treatment courses given over the duration of disease. Results: A total of 887 patients received 1,354 courses of palliative RT for bone metastases at a median interval of 4.0 months between courses. Thirty-three percent of patients required more than one RT course. Increased age and travel distance reduced the likelihood and number of treatment courses, while service through a rapid access clinic was independently associated with an increase in subsequent use of palliative RT. Conclusions: A rapid access service model for palliative RT facilitated access to RT. Travel distance and other factors remained substantial barriers to use of palliative RT services. The pattern of practice suggests an unmet need for symptom control in patients with bone metastases.

  18. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  19. Cost-effectiveness of initial stress cardiovascular MR, stress SPECT or stress echocardiography as a gate-keeper test, compared with upfront invasive coronary angiography in the investigation and management of patients with stable chest pain: mid-term outcomes from the CECaT randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Howard; West, Nicholas E J; Hughes, Vikki; Dyer, Matthew; Buxton, Martin; Sharples, Linda D; Jackson, Christopher H; Crean, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare outcomes and cost-effectiveness of various initial imaging strategies in the management of stable chest pain in a long-term prospective randomised trial. Setting Regional cardiothoracic referral centre in the east of England. Participants 898 patients (69% man) entered the study with 869 alive at 2 years of follow-up. Patients were included if they presented for assessment of stable chest pain with a positive exercise test and no prior history of ischaemic heart disease. Exclusion criteria were recent infarction, unstable symptoms or any contraindication to stress MRI. Primary outcome measures The primary outcomes of this follow-up study were survival up to a minimum of 2 years post-treatment, quality-adjusted survival and cost-utility of each strategy. Results 898 patients were randomised. Compared with angiography, mortality was marginally higher in the groups randomised to cardiac MR (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1 to 6.2), but similar in the single photon emission CT-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (SPECT-MIBI; HR 1.0, 95% CI 0.4 to 2.9) and ECHO groups (HR 1.6, 95% CI 0.6 to 4.0). Although SPECT-MIBI was marginally superior to other non-invasive tests there were no other significant differences between the groups in mortality, quality-adjusted survival or costs. Conclusions Non-invasive cardiac imaging can be used safely as the initial diagnostic test to diagnose coronary artery disease without adverse effects on patient outcomes or increased costs, relative to angiography. These results should be interpreted in the context of recent advances in imaging technology. Trial registration ISRCTN 47108462, UKCRN 3696. PMID:24508847

  20. Chest wall tumour following iodized talc pleurodesis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, John W.; Bennett, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Jackson, J. W., and Bennett, M. H. (1973).Thorax, 28, 788-793. Chest wall tumour following iodized talc pleurodesis. A man of 37 had an iodized talc pleurodesis carried out for recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax. There was no history of industrial exposure to asbestos. Two years later he presented with pain in the right chest and radiographs at that time showed some localized pleural thickening at the site of the thoracoscopy cannulation for introduction of talc. A provisional diagnosis of talc granuloma, chemical abscess or tumour was made and exploratory thoracotomy revealed a tumour involving the chest wall, lung, and pleura which, on histological examination, showed adenocarcinoma of varying degrees of differentiation and in some parts also presenting a more squamoid appearance. Numerous doubly refractile talc particles were intimately associated with the tumour and fibrous tissue. Shortly after excision the patient developed evidence of systemic dissemination of the disease and died four months later. The possibility of this tumour being induced by the talc is discussed. A brief review is made of the various forms of talc used in surgery over the past 40 years and attention is drawn to the significance of the proportion of asbestos mineral which is present in talc as mined in various parts of the world. We do not consider that this is a case of mesothelioma of the pleura. Images PMID:4787992

  1. The intersection between asthma and acute chest syndrome in children with sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-06-18

    Acute chest syndrome is a frequent cause of acute lung disease in children with sickle-cell disease. Asthma is common in children with sickle-cell disease and is associated with increased incidence of vaso-occlusive pain events, acute chest syndrome episodes, and earlier death. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation and an acute chest syndrome episode are similar, and both can present with shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and wheezing. Despite overlapping risk factors and symptoms, an acute exacerbation of asthma or an episode of acute chest syndrome are two distinct entities that need disease-specific management strategies. Although understanding has increased about asthma as a comorbidity in sickle-cell disease and its effects on morbidity, substantial gaps remain in knowledge about best management. PMID:27353685

  2. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries. PMID:17676376

  3. Right coronary artery dissection following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Ander; Alvarez-Contreras, Luis; Martín-Yuste, Victoria; Kasa, Gizem; Sabaté, Manel

    2012-04-01

    Chest trauma is a major health problem with a high mortality. Myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection following blunt chest trauma is a rare entity. We describe the case of an inferior MI following blunt chest trauma. A 61-year-old male without any relevant medical history was transported to a hospital after a low-velocity motorcycle accident. The patient was asymptomatic before the accident. The patient developed severe chest pain and an ECG revealed inferior ST segment elevation. After ruling out aortic dissection with angio-CT, a coronary angiograph depicted a proximal occlusion of the right coronary artery. After thrombectomy, a typical image of coronary artery dissection was observed; the image persisted after several runs of thrombectomy and for that reason a bare metal stent was implanted with a good final angiographic result. Five days after admission the patient was discharged home. Cardiac contusion is not uncommon; however acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma. Thorough evaluation with clinical suspicion can lead to optimal medical care. PMID:24062888

  4. Chest drainage systems in use.

    PubMed

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  5. Chest drainage systems in use

    PubMed Central

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  6. A 44-year-old man with abdominal pain, lung nodules, and hemoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Mariam; Kamangar, Nader

    2015-05-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a 1-day history of sudden-onset abdominal pain. The pain was characterized as severe, diffuse, sharp, and nonradiating. Associated symptoms included nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and subjective fevers. He was originally from El Salvador, but had not traveled in > 10 years. Review of systems was positive for 2 weeks of dry cough with associated mild, bilateral, pleuritic chest pain and subjective weight loss. His medical history was notable for gout and end-stage renal disease secondary to chronic nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use, for which he attended hemodialysis sessions three times weekly. Surgical history consisted of a currently nonfunctioning left upper extremity fistula, a longstanding right internal jugular PermCath IV access for chronic hemodialysis that had been removed 2 weeks prior to presentation, and a left brachiocephalic fistula. He did not smoke, consume alcohol, or have a history of illicit drug use. PMID:25940261

  7. Factors Associated With Chest Wall Toxicity After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sheree; Vicini, Frank; Vanapalli, Jyotsna R.; Whitaker, Thomas J.; Pope, D. Keith; Lyden, Maureen; Bruggeman, Lisa; Haile, Kenneth L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate dose-volume relationships associated with a higher probability for developing chest wall toxicity (pain) after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by using both single-lumen and multilumen brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Rib dose data were available for 89 patients treated with APBI and were correlated with the development of chest wall/rib pain at any point after treatment. Ribs were contoured on computed tomography planning scans, and rib dose-volume histograms (DVH) along with histograms for other structures were constructed. Rib DVH data for all patients were sampled at all volumes {>=}0.008 cubic centimeter (cc) (for maximum dose related to pain) and at volumes of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cc for analysis. Rib pain was evaluated at each follow-up visit. Patient responses were marked as yes or no. No attempt was made to grade responses. Eighty-nine responses were available for this analysis. Results: Nineteen patients (21.3%) complained of transient chest wall/rib pain at any point in follow-up. Analysis showed a direct correlation between total dose received and volume of rib irradiated with the probability of developing rib/chest wall pain at any point after follow-up. The median maximum dose at volumes {>=}0.008 cc of rib in patients who experienced chest wall pain was 132% of the prescribed dose versus 95% of the prescribed dose in those patients who did not experience pain (p = 0.0035). Conclusions: Although the incidence of chest wall/rib pain is quite low with APBI brachytherapy, attempts should be made to keep the volume of rib irradiated at a minimum and the maximum dose received by the chest wall as low as reasonably achievable.

  8. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  9. Mastalgia. Tailoring treatment to type of breast pain.

    PubMed

    Steinbrunn, B S; Zera, R T; Rodriguez, J L

    1997-11-01

    Breast pain is a common, often distressing problem among women. After significant disease is ruled out, most patients respond to simple reassurance. Others, however, require treatment because symptoms interfere with their lifestyle. The authors offer practical suggestions for tailoring treatment for these patients according to type of pain--cyclical mastalgia, non-cyclical mastalgia, or chest wall pain. PMID:9385340

  10. Pain and mortality risk among elderly persons in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Kåreholt, I; Brattberg, G

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse how the mortality risk varies with mild or severe pain in different locations: chest, back and hips, shoulders, the extremities, abdomen, rectum and head. A Swedish nationally representative sample of 1930 persons born 1892-1915 were interviewed in 1968 (ages 53-76). Survivors were also interviewed in 1974 and 1981 if they had not passed the age of 75 years. Proportional hazard regression was used to analyze mortality risk among persons ages 53-98 years for the period 1968-1991. Relationships were found between mortality risk and headache, chest pain, abdominal pain, pain in the extremities and rectal pain. No relationships were found between mortality and pain in back and hips or in shoulders. There was a correlation between chest pain and increased mortality among both men and women, but the association was significantly stronger among men. There was a significant association between severe rectal pain and mortality among men but no similar association among women. Significant associations between mortality and chest pain and abdominal pain were found among persons younger than 80 years, but not among those older than 80 years. Pain is an indicator of the quality of life and a symptom of underlying medical conditions. The finding that there are relationships between mortality risk and pain in the chest, abdomen, rectum, the extremities and head may be of clinical relevance. These results, however, must be further investigated since the relationships between reported pain and mortality do not imply that pain in these locations is necessarily symptomatic of lethal diseases. Abdominal pain, rectal pain and headache may be indicators of diseases but can also be side effects of treatments for other diseases correlated with higher mortality. PMID:9808352

  11. [Chest ultrasonography in pleurapulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gallego Gómez, M P; García Benedito, P; Pereira Boo, D; Sánchez Pérez, M

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial diagnosis and follow-up of pleuropulmonary disease are normally done with plain chest films and the gold standard for chest disease is computed tomography, diverse studies have established the usefulness of chest ultrasonography in the diagnosis of different pleuropulmonary diseases like pleural effusion and lung consolidation, among others. In this article, we show the different ultrasonographic patterns for pleuropulmonary disease. The availability of ultrasonography in different areas (ICU, recovery areas) makes this technique especially important for critical patients because it obviates the need to transfer the patient. Moreover, ultrasonography is noninvasive and easy to repeat. On the other hand, it enables the direct visualization of pleuropulmonary disease that is necessary for interventional procedures. PMID:22819690

  12. [Imaging signs in chest diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Krombach, G A

    2016-08-01

    Signs in chest imaging are defined as typical findings which can be easily recognized on x‑ray photographs or computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. They are caused by different typical pathophysiological processes. Due to the association of a certain pathophysiological cause with a given sign, knowledge and use of these signs can allow the possible differential diagnoses to be narrowed down. If other imaging findings and clinical data are additionally taken into account, the diagnosis can be made with a high degree of confidence in many cases. PMID:27369549

  13. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management. PMID:24887787

  14. Chest tomosynthesis: technical and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Ase Allansdotter; Vikgren, Jenny; Bath, Magnus

    2014-02-01

    The recent implementation of chest tomosynthesis is built on the availability of large, dose-efficient, high-resolution flat panel detectors, which enable the acquisition of the necessary number of projection radiographs to allow reconstruction of section images of the chest within one breath hold. A chest tomosynthesis examination obtains the increased diagnostic information provided by volumetric imaging at a radiation dose comparable to that of conventional chest radiography. There is evidence that the sensitivity of chest tomosynthesis may be at least three times higher than for conventional chest radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. The sensitivity increases with increasing nodule size and attenuation and decreases for nodules with subpleural location. Differentiation between pleural and subpleural lesions is a known pitfall due to the limited depth resolution in chest tomosynthesis. Studies on different types of pathology report increased detectability in favor of chest tomosynthesis in comparison to chest radiography. The technique provides improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography and facilitates the exclusion of pulmonary lesions in a majority of patients, avoiding the need for computed tomography (CT). However, motion artifacts can be a cumbersome limitation and breathing during the tomosynthesis image acquisition may result in severe artifacts significantly affecting the detectability of pathology. In summary, chest tomosynthesis has been shown to be superior to chest conventional radiography for many tasks and to be able to replace CT in selected cases. In our experience chest tomosynthesis is an efficient problem solver in daily clinical work. PMID:24481756

  15. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  16. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... your pain. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ... If your doctor recommends an over-the-counter pain reliever, read and follow the instructions on the box. ...

  17. Crush injuries of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, I. A.; Bargh, W.; Cruickshank, A. N.; Duthie, W. H.

    1969-01-01

    Fifty-four patients previously treated for a severe chest injury in an artificial ventilation unit have been followed up. An attempt has been made to determine their state of health and activity. Particular attention has been paid to their respiratory function. The significance of the findings has been discussed. Images PMID:4899979

  18. Chest physiotherapy in acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, M S; Martin, J A; Cartlidge, P H; Ng, Y K; Wright, N A

    1985-01-01

    Forty four children with acute bronchiolitis were given twice daily chest physiotherapy in addition to standard supportive measures and were compared with 46 controls who were not given physiotherapy. There was no clinically discernable benefit on the course of their illness. PMID:3907510

  19. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  20. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound, weather-resistant, equipped...

  1. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  2. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  3. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound, weather-resistant, equipped...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound, weather-resistant, equipped...

  6. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  7. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  8. Durations of service until first and recurrent episodes of clinically significant back pain, active component military members: changes among new accessions to service since calendar year 2000.

    PubMed

    Brundage, John F; Hu, Zheng; Clark, Leslie L

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes frequencies and timing of first and recurrent episodes of back pain treated in the U.S. Military Health System among more than 2 million military members who began active service between July 2000 and June 2012. In the population overall, at least 5% were affected by clinically significant back pain within 6 months and 10% within 13 months of beginning active service; and 34% had at least one episode of back pain while in active service during the surveillance period. After initial episodes of back pain, more than half (54%) of those affected had at least one recurrent episode; and after first recurrences, 65% had second recurrences while still in active service. In general, back pain episode-free periods preceding initial and between successive episodes markedly decreased during the period. Frequencies and timing of back pain episodes varied in relation to service branch, gender, and occupation. Acute back pain is a common disorder that is unpredictable in onset and often debilitating. Its prevention should be a military medical research objective of high priority. PMID:26836203

  9. Acute myocardial infarction due to coronary thrombosis caused by blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Treuth, Gregory M; Baibars, Motaz; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Alraies, M Chadi

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man presented to the emergency department following an anterior chest trauma. He had significant chest pain and chest X-ray was significant for revealed multiple rib fractures and negative. CT scan of the chest ruled out pulmonary embolism or aortic dissection. However, few hours later he developed hypotension requiring admission to medical intensive care unit and intravenous vasopressors. Further workup showed ST elevation myocardial infarction involving the anterior ECG leads. Emergent coronary angiography was performed with intervention to the mid-left anterior descending occlusion. Cardiogenic shock resolved and patient was discharged few days later. One-year follow-up with echocardiogram showed stable ischaemic cardiomyopathy with improved left ventricular ejection fraction to 50%. PMID:24769662

  10. Picture quiz: a case of sudden severe chest pain: answers.

    PubMed

    Rabia, M Abu; Sullivan, P; Stivaros, S M

    2007-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum is a condition in which air presents in the mediastinum. It was first described by Laennec in 1819 as a consequence of trauma. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) was reported in 1939 by Hamman. PMID:21611614

  11. Acute chest pain in a patient treated with capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Camaro, C; Danse, P W; Bosker, H A

    2009-08-01

    A 61-year-old male with a history of metastatic colorectal cancer was referred to our hospital for primary coronary intervention because of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography, however, revealed no significant stenoses. When asked, the patient revealed that capecitabine (Xeloda(R)) was started by his oncologist one day before admission. It is known that this oral 5-FU analogue drug, used in metastatic colorectal cancer, can cause coronary artery spasms. The main treatment of capecitabine-induced vasospasm is discontinuation of the drug. Indeed, after cessation of the drug the patient remained free of symptoms and the ECG abnormalities normalised. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:288-91.). PMID:19789697

  12. Systemic Air Embolism Associated with Pleural Pigtail Chest Tube Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Alkhankan, Emad; Nusair, Ahmad; Mazagri, Rida

    2016-01-01

    Pleural pigtail catheter placement is associated with many complications including pneumothorax, hemorrhage, and chest pain. Air embolism is a known but rare complication of pleural pigtail catheter insertion and has a high risk of occurrence with positive pressure ventilation. In this case report, we present a 50-year-old male with bilateral pneumonia who developed a pneumothorax while on mechanical ventilation with continuous positive airway pressure mode. During the placement of the pleural pigtail catheter to correct the pneumothorax, the patient developed a sudden left sided body weakness and became unresponsive. An air embolism was identified in the right main cerebral artery, which was fatal.

  13. Radiology of occupational chest disease

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. ); Kreel, L.

    1989-01-01

    Radiologic manifestations of occupational lung disease are summarized and classified in this book according to the ILO system. The interpretation of chest roentgenograms outlines the progression of each disease and is accompanied with clinically-oriented explanations. Some of the specific diseases covered include asbestosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, silicosis, non-mining inhalation of silica and silicates, beryllium induced disease, inhalation of organics and metallics, and occupationally induced asthma.

  14. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain March 2015 Handout on Health: Back Pain This publication is for people who have back ... to discuss them with your doctor. What Is Back Pain? Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem ...

  15. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  16. Cryoanalgesia in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Trescot, Andrea M

    2003-07-01

    Cryoneuroablation, also known as cryoanalgesia or cryoneurolysis, is a specialized technique for providing long-term pain relief in interventional pain management settings. Modern cryoanalgesia traces its roots to Cooper et al who developed in 1961, a device that used liquid nitrogen in a hollow tube that was insulated at the tip and achieved a temperature of - 190 degrees C. Lloyd et al proposed that cryoanalgesia was superior to other methods of peripheral nerve destruction, including alcohol neurolysis, phenol neurolysis, or surgical lesions. The application of cold to tissues creates a conduction block, similar to the effect of local anesthetics. Long-term pain relief from nerve freezing occurs because ice crystals create vascular damage to the vasonervorum, which produces severe endoneural edema. Cryoanalgesia disrupts the nerve structure and creates wallerian degeneration, but leaves the myelin sheath and endoneurium intact. Clinical applications of cryoanalgesia extend from its use in craniofacial pain secondary to trigeminal neuralgia, posterior auricular neuralgia, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia; chest wall pain with multiple conditions including post-thoracotomy neuromas, persistent pain after rib fractures, and post herpetic neuralgia in thoracic distribution; abdominal and pelvic pain secondary to ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, genitofemoral, subgastric neuralgia; pudendal neuralgia; low back pain and lower extremity pain secondary to lumbar facet joint pathology, pseudosciatica, pain involving intraspinous ligament or supragluteal nerve, sacroiliac joint pain, cluneal neuralgia, obturator neuritis, and various types of peripheral neuropathy; and upper extremity pain secondary to suprascapular neuritis and other conditions of peripheral neuritis. This review describes historical concepts, physics and equipment, various clinical aspects, along with technical features, indications and contraindications, with clinical description of multiple conditions

  17. Non-lethal? Penetrating chest injury due to beanbag bullet

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Sanjay; Teloken, Patrick Ely; Gilfillan, Ian; Sharma, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of serious lung injury from beanbag bullet. A 46-year-old gentleman, shot with beanbag bullets was brought to the emergency department. Upon arrival he was in obvious respiratory distress and complained of severe pain in the right chest. A 3.0×3.5 cm entry wound on the right parasternal area was identified. Chest x-ray revealed a right haemopneumothorax, parenchymal changes at the right lung base and a radiopaque foreign body. A right-sided intercostal chest tube was inserted, draining air and 750 ml of blood. After stabilisation patient underwent a right thoracotomy. A beanbag bullet was found in the oblique fissure of the right lung, with extensive haematoma of the middle lobe. The bullet and skin fragments overlying the lung and along the bullet track were extracted. The pleural cavity was washed with normal saline and haemostasis was confirmed. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:23513018

  18. Left anterior descending coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Sadr-Ameli, Mohammad Ali; Amiri, Elaheh; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Heidarali, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery dissection is a well-known albeit unusual complication of blunt chest trauma. It is also an uncommon cause of myocardial infarction. Only a few such cases have been reported, probably due to the high rate of sudden death. We report a case of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery dissection in a healthy 38-year-old female caused by blunt chest trauma. The patient was referred to our hospital with a complaint of chest pain. Electrocardiography showed T-wave inversion, echocardiography a revealed circumferential pericardial effusion, and the coronary angiogram demonstrated a thrombotic dissection of the LAD.  Troponin I was the only biomarker with elevated level. CT coronary angiography was performed using the subtotal occlusion of the LAD and illustrated a relatively good LAD run-off, and thallium scintigraphy displayed viable myocardium in this territory. Despite the total occlusion of the LAD in our case, myocardial injury was not significant due to the relatively good LAD run-off. She underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery with an excellent result. PMID:24444069

  19. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... BACK PAIN? There are many possible causes of low back pain, including stretched (strained) muscles, torn or stretched (sprained) ... appear to be at an increased risk for low back pain in comparison to the general population (estimates range ...

  20. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Pain - neck; Neck stiffness; Cervicalgia; Whiplash Images Neck pain Whiplash Location of whiplash pain References ... pubmed/19272509 . Read More Diskectomy Foraminotomy Laminectomy Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 3/ ...

  1. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePlus

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  2. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  3. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  4. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  5. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  6. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study1

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira; da Costa, José Madson Vidal; Cascudo, Marcelo Matos; Pinheiro, Ênio de Oliveira; Fernandes, Maria Angela Ferreira; de Araujo, Ivonete Batista

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47). The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious. PMID:26625989

  7. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  8. Construction of a multimodal CT-video chest model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Patrick D.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    Bronchoscopy enables a number of minimally invasive chest procedures for diseases such as lung cancer and asthma. For example, using the bronchoscope's continuous video stream as a guide, a physician can navigate through the lung airways to examine general airway health, collect tissue samples, or administer a disease treatment. In addition, physicians can now use new image-guided intervention (IGI) systems, which draw upon both three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) chest scans and bronchoscopic video, to assist with bronchoscope navigation. Unfortunately, little use is made of the acquired video stream, a potentially invaluable source of information. In addition, little effort has been made to link the bronchoscopic video stream to the detailed anatomical information given by a patient's 3D MDCT chest scan. We propose a method for constructing a multimodal CT-video model of the chest. After automatically computing a patient's 3D MDCT-based airway-tree model, the method next parses the available video data to generate a positional linkage between a sparse set of key video frames and airway path locations. Next, a fusion/mapping of the video's color mucosal information and MDCT-based endoluminal surfaces is performed. This results in the final multimodal CT-video chest model. The data structure constituting the model provides a history of those airway locations visited during bronchoscopy. It also provides for quick visual access to relevant sections of the airway wall by condensing large portions of endoscopic video into representative frames containing important structural and textural information. When examined with a set of interactive visualization tools, the resulting fused data structure provides a rich multimodal data source. We demonstrate the potential of the multimodal model with both phantom and human data.

  9. Pain after laparoscopic antireflux surgery

    PubMed Central

    Szczebiot, L; Peyser, PM

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The benefits of antireflux surgery are well established. Laparoscopic techniques have been shown to be generally safe and effective. The aim of this paper was to review the subject of pain following laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the PubMed database to identify all studies reporting pain after laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Publications were included for the main analysis if they contained at least 30 patients. Operations in children, Collis gastroplasty procedures, endoluminal fundoplication and surgery for paraoesophageal hernias were excluded. The frequency of postoperative pain was calculated and the causes/management were reviewed. An algorithm for the investigation of patients with pain following laparoscopic fundoplication was constructed. Results A total of 17 studies were included in the main analysis. Abdominal pain and chest pain following laparoscopic fundoplication were reported in 24.0% and 19.5% of patients respectively. Pain was mild or moderate in the majority and severe in 4%. Frequency of pain was not associated with operation type. The authors include their experience in managing patients with persistent, severe epigastric pain following laparoscopic anterior fundoplication. Conclusions Pain following laparoscopic antireflux surgery occurs in over 20% of patients. Some have an obvious complication or a diagnosis made through routine investigation. Most have mild to moderate pain with minimal effect on quality of life. In a smaller proportion of patients, pain is severe, persistent and can be disabling. In this group, diagnosis is more difficult but systematic investigation can be rewarding, and can enable appropriate and successful treatment. PMID:24780664

  10. Technique for chest compressions in adult CPR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chest compressions have saved the lives of countless patients in cardiac arrest as they generate a small but critical amount of blood flow to the heart and brain. This is achieved by direct cardiac massage as well as a thoracic pump mechanism. In order to optimize blood flow excellent chest compression technique is critical. Thus, the quality of the delivered chest compressions is a pivotal determinant of successful resuscitation. If a patient is found unresponsive without a definite pulse or normal breathing then the responder should assume that this patient is in cardiac arrest, activate the emergency response system and immediately start chest compressions. Contra-indications to starting chest compressions include a valid Do Not Attempt Resuscitation Order. Optimal technique for adult chest compressions includes positioning the patient supine, and pushing hard and fast over the center of the chest with the outstretched arms perpendicular to the patient's chest. The rate should be at least 100 compressions per minute and any interruptions should be minimized to achieve a minimum of 60 actually delivered compressions per minute. Aggressive rotation of compressors prevents decline of chest compression quality due to fatigue. Chest compressions are terminated following return of spontaneous circulation. Unconscious patients with normal breathing are placed in the recovery position. If there is no return of spontaneous circulation, then the decision to terminate chest compressions is based on the clinical judgment that the patient's cardiac arrest is unresponsive to treatment. Finally, it is important that family and patients' loved ones who witness chest compressions be treated with consideration and sensitivity. PMID:22152601

  11. Hydatid disease of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Xanthakis, D.; Efthimiadis, M.; Papadakis, G.; Primikirios, N.; Chassapakis, G.; Roussaki, A.; Veranis, N.; Akrivakis, A.; Aligizakis, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Ninety-one cases of hydatid disease of the chest are reported. Eighty-eight were involving the lung, two the chest wall, and one the mediastinum. All the patients were treated surgically. Conservative operations (simple removal of the parasite and closure of the remaining cavity) were performed in 78 patients, 37 unruptured and 41 ruptured cysts. Late postoperative complications occurred in eleven. In 10 patients, recurrent haemoptysis was the main symptom due to residual cavity in four, bronchiectatic changes in two, and unknown aetiology in four. In one patient, recurrence of multiple cysts occurred in the affected lobe. Radical operations were carried out in 10 patients, including segmental resection in four and lobectomy in six. Conservative operations were performed in all cases of unruptured cysts, with the exception of a giant cyst in which resection was the operation of choice. For ruptured cysts with mild infection conservative operation was also performed. Resection was necessary only in patients with ruptured cysts with suppuration, bronchiectatic changes, and giant cysts replacing a whole lobe. There was no mortality. We believe that conservative operation is the treatment of choice for hydatid disease of the lung. Indications for resection are very limited. Images

  12. Pulmonary complications of crack cocaine use: high-resolution computed tomography of the chest.

    PubMed

    Mançano, Alexandre; Marchiori, Edson; Zanetti, Gláucia; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Duarte, Beatriz Cunha; Apolinário, Lourenço de Araujo

    2008-05-01

    Here, we report high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in a patient who developed sudden hemoptysis, dyspnea and chest pain after smoking crack cocaine. Chest X-rays showed consolidations, primarily in the upper lobes, and HRCT scans showed ground glass attenuation opacities, consolidations and air-space nodules. A follow-up CT, after drug use discontinuation and administration of corticosteroids, showed partial resolution of pulmonary lesions and the appearance of cavitations. Clinical, imaging and laboratory findings led to a diagnosis of 'crack lung'. PMID:18545829

  13. Transaction Cost Analysis of In-Clinic Versus Telehealth Consultations for Chronic Pain: Preliminary Evidence for Rapid and Affordable Access to Interdisciplinary Collaborative Consultation

    PubMed Central

    Theodore, Brian R.; Whittington, Jan; Towle, Cara; Tauben, David J.; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara; Cahana, Alex; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives With ever increasing mandates to reduce costs and increase the quality of pain management, health care institutions are faced with the challenge of adopting innovative technologies and shifting workflows to provide value-based care. Transaction cost economic analysis can provide comparative evaluation of the consequences of these changes in the delivery of care. The aim of this study was to establish proof-of-concept using transaction cost analysis to examine chronic pain management in-clinic and through telehealth. Methods Participating health care providers were asked to identify and describe two comparable completed transactions for patients with chronic pain: one consultation between patient and specialist in-clinic and the other a telehealth presentation of a patient’s case by the primary care provider to a team of pain medicine specialists. Each provider completed two on-site interviews. Focus was on the time, value of time, and labor costs per transaction. Number of steps, time, and costs for providers and patients were identified. Results Forty-six discrete steps were taken for the in-clinic transaction, and 27 steps were taken for the telehealth transaction. Although similar in costs per patient ($332.89 in-clinic vs. $376.48 telehealth), the costs accrued over 153 business days in-clinic and 4 business days for telehealth. Time elapsed between referral and completion of initial consultation was 72 days in-clinic, 4 days for telehealth. Conclusions U.S. health care is moving toward the use of more technologies and practices, and the information provided by transaction cost analyses of care delivery for pain management will be important to determine actual cost savings and benefits. PMID:25616057

  14. Common errors in evaluating chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Mann, H

    1990-01-01

    Chest radiographs that are correctly obtained and interpreted provide valuable diagnostic information. However, some radiographs are not taken at total lung capacity, and the appearance of the lungs on film may mimic certain lung disorders. Most common interpretive pitfalls in chest radiography can be avoided by physicians who are familiar with the film appearance of varying degrees of lung inflation, technical limitations of portable radiography, and common chest abnormalities. When further definition is necessary, additional projections should be obtained. Chest fluoroscopy and computed tomography can offer further clarification, if needed. PMID:2296566

  15. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Back Pain Information Page Condensed from Low Back Pain Fact ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Back Pain? Acute or short-term low back pain generally ...

  16. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  17. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi’s sarcoma, Castleman’s disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist. PMID:22224176

  18. Bronchial cancer - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a chest x-ray of a person with bronchial cancer. This is a front view. The lungs are the two dark ... white areas visible in the middle of the chest. The light areas that appear as subtle branches ...

  19. [Wooden chests for the midwife's equipment].

    PubMed

    Carlén-Nilsson, C

    1993-01-01

    In the museum of medical history in Lund there are several wooden chests containing partly identical instruments apparently belonging to a midwife. The instruments dated from before 1900, e.g. lancets and horn cups for blood-letting, a pewter enema syringe, a wooden stethoscope, a "tobacco pipe" and glass bottles. The use of the tobacco pipe was first puzzling, but it appeared to be a breast reliver. What do we know about the date of the chests? One chest has belonged to Kjersti Nilsdotter, a midwife educated in Lund 1872-1873. Her certificate was in the chest. From Ronnie Hunt, Minnesota we have got information about another chest of the same type. That belonged to Nelly Gustafsson, a midwife educated in Lund probably about 1870. She emigrated to USA and was a practising midwife in Lindstrom, Minnesota from about 1900. PMID:11639439

  20. [How to do - the chest tube drainage].

    PubMed

    Klopp, Michael; Hoffmann, Hans; Dienemann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is used to drain the contents of the pleural space to reconstitute the physiologic pressures within the pleural space and to allow the lungs to fully expand. Indications for chest tube placement include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pleural effusion, pleural empyema, and major thoracic surgery. The most appropriate site for chest tube placement is the 4th or 5th intercostal space in the mid- or anterior- axillary line. Attention to technique in placing the chest tube is vital to avoid complications from the procedure. Applying the step-by-step technique presented, placement of a chest tube is a quick and safe procedure. Complications - frequently occurring when the tube is inserted with a steel trocar - include hemothorax, dislocation, lung lacerations, and injury to organs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity." PMID:25734676

  1. Respiratory symptoms and acute painful episodes in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Sockrider, Marianna M; Dinu, Marlen; Acosta, Monica; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and determined whether respiratory symptoms were associated with prevalence of chest pain and number of acute painful episodes in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Participants (N = 93; 44 females, 49 males; mean age 9.8 +/- 4.3 years) reported coughing in the morning (21.5%), at night (31.2%), and during exercise (30.1%). Wheezing occurred both when they had a cold or infection (29.0%) and when they did not have (23.7%) a cold or infection. Sleep was disturbed by wheezing in 20.4%. Among the 76 patients who were school-age (>5 years), 19.7% of patients missed more than 4 days of school because of respiratory symptoms. The majority of patients reported having acute painful episodes (82.8%), and most (66.7%) reported having chest pain during acute painful episodes in the previous 12 months. Participants with acute pain episodes greater than 3 during the previous 12 months had significantly higher reports of breathing difficulties (P = .01) and chest pain (P = .002). The high number of respiratory symptoms (cough and wheeze) among patients with sickle cell disease may trigger acute painful episodes. Early screening and recognition, ongoing monitoring, and proactive management of respiratory symptoms may minimize the number of acute painful episodes. PMID:20038672

  2. Operability assessment in CTEPH: Lessons from the CHEST-1 study.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David P; Biederman, Andrzej; D'Armini, Andrea M; Dartevelle, Philippe G; Gan, Hui-Li; Klepetko, Walter; Lindner, Jaroslav; Mayer, Eckhard; Madani, Michael M

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy is the gold standard treatment for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and is potentially curative, although some patients are unsuitable for pulmonary endarterectomy and require alternative management. Lack of standardized assessment of pulmonary endarterectomy eligibility risks suboptimal treatment in some patients. We discuss the implications for future clinical trials and practice of a unique operability assessment in patients who have chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and were initially screened for inclusion in the CHEST-1 (Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator Trial-1) study. The CHEST-1 study evaluated riociguat for the treatment of inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) or persistent/recurrent pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary endarterectomy. Screened patients who were initially considered "inoperable" underwent central independent adjudication by a committee of experienced surgeons, or local adjudication in collaboration with an experienced surgeon. Operability decisions were based on accessibility of thrombi and the association between pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and the extent of obstruction, using pulmonary angiography/computed tomography with ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy as the minimum diagnostic tests. Of 446 patients screened for CHEST-1, a total of 188 and 124 underwent central and local adjudication, respectively, after being initially considered to be "inoperable." After a second assessment by an experienced surgeon, 69 of these 312 "inoperable" patients were deemed operable. Rigorous measures in CHEST-1 guaranteed that only technically inoperable patients, or patients who had persistent/recurrent pulmonary hypertension, were enrolled, thus ensuring that only patients for whom surgery was not an option were enrolled. This study design sets new standards for future clinical trials and practice in CTEPH, helping

  3. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  4. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or early appendicitis , may only cause mild pain or no pain. ... Food poisoning Stomach flu Other possible causes include: Appendicitis Abdominal aortic aneurysm (bulging and weakening of the ...

  5. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain played a role in producing the perception of pain. In the 19th century, physician-scientists ... they are experiencing. Discoveries of differences in pain perceptions and responses to treatment by gender has have ...

  6. Penis pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain. If penis pain is caused by a sexually transmitted disease, it is important for your sexual partner to ... Are you at risk for exposure to any sexually transmitted diseases? What other symptoms do you have? The physical ...

  7. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  8. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 muscles and their tendons, called the rotator cuff, give the shoulder its wide range of motion. Swelling, damage, or bone changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain ...

  9. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is ... injure the tendons on the outside of the elbow. This condition is commonly called tennis elbow . Golfers ...

  10. Ribcage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply)

  11. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... water or other clear fluids. You may have sports drinks in small amounts. People with diabetes must ... pain occur? For example, after meals or during menstruation? What makes the pain worse? For example, eating, ...

  12. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  13. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of the pain, and the nature of other medical and psychiatric problems, should be ... information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of ...

  14. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  15. Investigation of the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Zachrisson, Sara; Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Båth, Magnus

    2009-02-01

    Chest tomosynthesis has recently been introduced to healthcare as a low-dose alternative to CT or as a tool for improved diagnostics in chest radiography with only a modest increase in radiation dose to the patient. However, no detailed description of the dosimetry for this type of examination has been presented. The aim of this work was therefore to investigate the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis. The chest tomosynthesis examination was assumed to be performed using a stationary detector and a vertically moving x-ray tube, exposing the patient from different angles. The Monte Carlo based computer software PCXMC was used to determine the effective dose delivered to a standard-sized patient from various angles using different assumptions of the distribution of the effective dose over the different projections. The obtained conversion factors between input dose measures and effective dose for chest tomosynthesis for different angular intervals were then compared with the horizontal projection. The results indicate that the error introduced by using conversion factors for the PA projection in chest radiography for estimating the effective dose of chest tomosynthesis is small for normally sized patients, especially if a conversion factor between KAP and effective dose is used.

  16. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176

  17. An 81-year-old man with an abnormal right-sided heart shadow on chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rahman; Khan, M Rehan; Fan, Tai-Hwang M; Ruff, Genina; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B

    2015-02-01

    An 81-year-old man presented with a 1-week history of dry cough. He also complained of mild dyspnea, wheezing, and low-grade fever. He denied hemoptysis, fever, rashes, or chest pain. The patient's medical history included coronary artery bypass surgery, hypertension, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and COPD. The patient was a retired welder and an ex-smoker. PMID:25644917

  18. An algorithm used for ventricular fibrillation detection without interrupting chest compression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqin; Bisera, Joe; Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the primary arrhythmic event in the majority of patients suffering from sudden cardiac arrest. Attention has been focused on this particular rhythm since it is recognized that prompt therapy, especially electrical defibrillation, may lead to a successful outcome. However, current versions of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) mandate repetitive interruptions of chest compression for rhythm analyses since artifacts produced by chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) preclude reliable electrocardiographic (ECG) rhythm analysis. Yet, repetitive interruptions in chest compression are detrimental to the success of defibrillation. The capability for rhythm analysis without requiring "hands-off" intervals will allow for more effective resuscitation. In this paper, a novel continuous-wavelet-transformation-based morphology consistency evaluation algorithm was developed for the detection of disorganized VF from organized sinus rhythm (SR) without interrupting the ongoing chest compression. The performance of this method was evaluated on both uncorrupted and corrupted ECG signals recorded from AEDs obtained from out-of-hospital victims of cardiac arrest. A total of 232 patients and 31,092 episodes of either VF or SR were accessed, in which 8195 episodes were corrupted by artifacts produced by chest compressions. We also compared the performance of this method with three other established algorithms, including VF filter, spectrum analysis, and complexity measurement. Even though there was a modest decrease in specificity and accuracy when chest compression artifact was present, the performance of this method was still superior to other reported methods for VF detection during uninterrupted CPR. PMID:21342836

  19. Impacts to the chest of PMHSs - Influence of impact location and load distribution on chest response.

    PubMed

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Svensson, Mats Y; Davidsson, Johan; Gutsche, Andreas; Tomasch, Ernst; Darok, Mario; Ravnik, Dean

    2016-02-01

    The chest response of the human body has been studied for several load conditions, but is not well known in the case of steering wheel rim-to-chest impact in heavy goods vehicle frontal collisions. The aim of this study was to determine the response of the human chest in a set of simulated steering wheel impacts. PMHS tests were carried out and analysed. The steering wheel load pattern was represented by a rigid pendulum with a straight bar-shaped front. A crash test dummy chest calibration pendulum was utilised for comparison. In this study, a set of rigid bar impacts were directed at various heights of the chest, spanning approximately 120mm around the fourth intercostal space. The impact energy was set below a level estimated to cause rib fracture. The analysed results consist of responses, evaluated with respect to differences in the impacting shape and impact heights on compression and viscous criteria chest injury responses. The results showed that the bar impacts consistently produced lesser scaled chest compressions than the hub; the Middle bar responses were around 90% of the hub responses. A superior bar impact provided lesser chest compression; the average response was 86% of the Middle bar response. For inferior bar impacts, the chest compression response was 116% of the chest compression in the middle. The damping properties of the chest caused the compression to decrease in the high speed bar impacts to 88% of that in low speed impacts. From the analysis it could be concluded that the bar impact shape provides lower chest criteria responses compared to the hub. Further, the bar responses are dependent on the impact location of the chest. Inertial and viscous effects of the upper body affect the responses. The results can be used to assess the responses of human substitutes such as anthropomorphic test devices and finite element human body models, which will benefit the development process of heavy goods vehicle safety systems. PMID:26687541

  20. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    Face pain may be dull and throbbing or an intense, stabbing discomfort in the face or forehead. It can occur in one or ... Pain that starts in the face may be caused by a nerve problem, injury, or infection. Face pain may also begin in other places in the body. ...

  1. Compression of digital chest x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Michael; Trefler, Martin; Young, Tzay S.

    1990-07-01

    The application of digital technologies to chest radiography holds the promise of routine application of intage processing techniques to effect image enhancement. However, due to their inherent spatial resolution, digital chest images impose severe constraints on data storage devices. Compression of these images will relax such constraints and facilitate image transmission on a digital network. We have evaluated image processing algorithms aimed at compression of digital chest images while improving the diagnostic quality of the image. The image quality has been measured with respect to the task of tumor detection. Compression ratios of as high as 2:1 have been achieved. This compression can then be supplemented by irreversible methods.

  2. Technique for chest radiography for pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Routine radiographic chest examinations have been performed using a variety of techniques. Although chest radiography is one of the most commonly performed radiographic examinations, it is often difficult to obtain consistently good quality roentgenograms. This publication provides a simple guide and relatively easy solution to the many problems that radiologic technologists might encounter. The language is purposely relatively simple and care has been taken to avoid difficult mathematical and physical explanations. The intent is to provide an easily referrable text for those who may encounter difficulties in producing acceptable chest radiographs.

  3. Classification of chest wall diseases.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, E; Gulotta, C

    1993-01-01

    Several disorders of the thoracic cage are known to cause respiratory failure, by means of relatively simple mechanisms, such as the increased work of breathing, which results in alveolar hypoventilation. A variety of pathogenic mechanisms may be considered, as functions of the types of thoracic disorders present. As causes of these additional potential mechanisms, we considered the following: 1) ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) inhomogeneity; 2) inability to cough; 3) malformation or acquired defect of the respiratory centres; and 4) excess blood volume and fluid retention, which aggravate work of breathing and V/Q inhomogeneity. All of these disorders can be grouped into two major categories (which nevertheless have some of the pathophysiology in common): the mechanical syndrome and the neuromuscular or paralytic syndrome. In this paper we discuss chest wall diseases falling into the first category; namely, kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, ankylosing spondylitis and obesity-hypoventilation. Congenital deformities of the thoracic cage, which do not have important effects on ventilatory apparatus (e.g. pectus excavatum and pectus carinatum), were also considered. PMID:8472068

  4. Severe Chest Wall Toxicity From Cryoablation in the Setting of Prior Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Aggarwal, Sonya; Qian, Yushen; Carter, Justin N; Shah, Rajesh; Loo, Billy W

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with metastatic synovial sarcoma of parotid origin, treated definitively with chemoradiation, who subsequently developed oligometastatic disease limited to the lungs. She underwent multiple left and right lung wedge resections and left lower lobectomy, followed by right lower lobe stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), 54 Gy in three fractions to a right lower lobe lesion abutting the chest wall. Two years later, she was treated with cryoablation for a separate right upper lobe nodule abutting the chest wall. Two months later, she presented with acute shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain, decreased peripheral blood O2 saturation, and productive cough. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated severe chest wall necrosis in the area of recent cryoablation that, in retrospect, also received a significant radiation dose from her prior SABR. This case demonstrates that clinicians should exercise caution in using cryoablation when treating lung tumors abutting a previously irradiated chest wall. Note: Drs. Loo and Shah contributed equally as co-senior authors. PMID:27004154

  5. Severe Chest Wall Toxicity From Cryoablation in the Setting of Prior Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Aggarwal, Sonya; Qian, Yushen; Carter, Justin N; Shah, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with metastatic synovial sarcoma of parotid origin, treated definitively with chemoradiation, who subsequently developed oligometastatic disease limited to the lungs. She underwent multiple left and right lung wedge resections and left lower lobectomy, followed by right lower lobe stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), 54 Gy in three fractions to a right lower lobe lesion abutting the chest wall. Two years later, she was treated with cryoablation for a separate right upper lobe nodule abutting the chest wall. Two months later, she presented with acute shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain, decreased peripheral blood O2 saturation, and productive cough. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated severe chest wall necrosis in the area of recent cryoablation that, in retrospect, also received a significant radiation dose from her prior SABR. This case demonstrates that clinicians should exercise caution in using cryoablation when treating lung tumors abutting a previously irradiated chest wall. Note: Drs. Loo and Shah contributed equally as co-senior authors. PMID:27004154

  6. Dose-Response Model for Chest Wall Tolerance of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kimsey, Frank; McKay, Jesse; Gefter, Jeffrey; Milano, Michael T; Moiseenko, Vitali; Grimm, Jimm; Berg, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Many recent studies have described rib fractures and chest wall pain following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Although these toxicities generally are not life-threatening, the chest wall and ribs are considered dose-limiting tissues because of the potential effect on patients׳ quality of life. Few studies have reported dose-response models that can provide quantitative estimates of risk as a function of dose and volume. Notably, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (Mutter et al(8)) analyzed grade 2 or higher chest wall toxicity in a cohort of 126 patients treated with linear accelerator-based SBRT; the authors provided detailed dose-volume histogram (DVH) data to allow for pooled analyses. We pooled these 126 patients with an additional 44 patients treated with CyberKnife at the Erlanger Medical Center to create an updated dose-response model for chest wall tolerance. In the aggregate analysis, the 10% risk level for grade 2 or higher complications for D70cc was 16.2Gy in 4 fractions, and the 50% risk level was D70cc = 65.1Gy in 4 fractions. For D2cc, the 10% and 50% risk levels in 4 fractions were 43.0Gy and 87.9Gy, respectively. These dose-tolerance limits may help quantify chest wall toxicity risks. Further research continues to determine more accurate estimates of grade 3 risk levels. PMID:27000509

  7. Temporomandibular pain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, H R; Kalavathi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  8. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  9. Chest wall reconstruction using iliac bone allografts and muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Yeste, Luis; Murillo, Julio; Aubá, Cristina; Sanjulian, Mikel; Torre, Wenceslao

    2004-01-01

    Technically we can divide full-thickness thoracic reconstruction into 2 parts: providing a rigid support and ensuring well-vascularized coverage. Since 1986, the authors' center has had ample experience with bone banks and the use of cryopreserved bone grafts, which led them to consider the possibility of using these grafts for full-thickness chest wall reconstruction. They describe 3 patients in whom resection of the tumor and reconstruction of the thorax were carried out using iliac bone allografts covered with muscle flaps (1 pectoralis major and 2 rectus abdominis). None of the patients experienced breathing difficulties, pain, or instability after 14 months, 18 months, and 11 years of follow-up. The result of the reconstruction was excellent in all 3 patients in terms of function and aesthetics. The advantage of allografts compared with synthetic materials is their potential integration; they can become part of the host patient's living tissue. PMID:14676700

  10. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  11. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  12. Imaging of diseases of the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.; Dee, P.; Wilson, A.

    1988-01-01

    This book promises to be the first intermediate length chest imaging book that successfully integrates material on the newer modalities (MRI, Nuclear Medicine) with that on conventional techniques (plain film radiography).

  13. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Trigger Point Injection for Serratus Anterior Muscle Pain Syndrome: Description of Technique and Case Series.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Schaffer, Grisell; Nowakowsky, Michal; Eghtesadi, Marzieh; Cogan, Jennifer

    2015-09-15

    Chronic chest pain is a challenge, and serratus anterior muscle pain syndrome (SAMPS) is often overlooked. We have developed an ultrasound-guided technique for infiltrating local anesthetics and steroids in patients with SAMPS. In 8 patients, the duration of chronic pain was approximately 19 months. Three months after treatment, all patients had experienced a significant reduction in pain. Infiltration for SAMPS confirms the diagnosis and provides adequate pain relief. PMID:26361386

  15. Fluoroscopic chest tube insertion and patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Disher, A. C.; Miller, T. Q.

    1992-01-01

    Catheters and chest tubes may be placed under fluoroscopic control to reduce pleural effusions. This procedure has been adopted as a routine procedure at the UCLA School of Medicine in Los Angeles, California to improve patient care. This technique was modified for the placement of large chest tubes, which can be placed by a radiologist without multiple attempts or complications. Our experience with 2234 patients who underwent this procedure between 1977 and 1990 is described. PMID:1404463

  16. Management of chest trauma: a review.

    PubMed

    Adebonojo, S A

    1993-01-01

    The incidence of chest trauma has increased significantly since the turn of the century especially in developed countries where rapid means of transportation has become part of daily life. Although gunshot wounds (GSWs) were the commonest causes of chest trauma in wartime, road traffic accidents (RTAs) have become the scourge of peacetime and modern civilization. Chest trauma is more common in males during the 2nd to the 5th decades of life with an average age of 40 years reducing their life expectancy by another 40 years at the most productive and active period of their lives. Despite improvement in ambulance service and rapid mobilization of victims from the scene of accident, about 10% of chest injured patients will die on the spot and another 5% die within an hour of reaching the hospital. Of the remaining 85%, five percent will require emergency thoracotomy for various reasons while 80% will respond to resuscitative measures and tube thoracostomy drainage alone. The primary aims in the management of chest trauma are prompt restoration of normal cardiorespiratory functions, control of haemorrhage, treatment of associated injuries and prevention of sepsis. Although the overall survival rate of trauma has improved in recent years, deaths are often due to airway obstruction, exsanguinating haemorrhage, flail chest, tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade and associated intracranial, intraabdominal and skeletal injuries. PMID:8398932

  17. How to remove a chest drain.

    PubMed

    Allibone, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of a chest drain in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner. This procedure requires two practitioners. The chest drain will have been inserted aseptically to remove air, blood, fluid or pus from the pleural cavity. ▶ Chest drains may be small or wide bore depending on the underlying condition and clinical setting. They may be secured with a mattress suture and/or an anchor suture. ▶ Chest drains are usually removed under medical instructions when the patient's lung has inflated, the underlying condition has resolved, there is no evidence of respiratory compromise or failure, and their anticoagulation status has been assessed as satisfactory. ▶ Chest drains secured with a mattress suture should be removed by two practitioners. One practitioner is required to remove the tube and the other to tie the mattress suture (if present) and secure the site. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. How this article could be used to educate patients with chest drains. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26443174

  18. Surgical stabilization of traumatic flail chest.

    PubMed Central

    París, F; Tarazona, V; Blasco, E; Cantó, A; Casillas, M; Pastor, J; París, M; Montero, R

    1975-01-01

    Since 1970 we have stabilized the ribs to correct paradoxical movement of the chest wall in chest injuries, using an original technique, in order to avoid as far as possible the need for long-term chest wall stabilization by intermittent positive pressure respiration (IPPR). The technical details of surgical stabilization are described, and the different types of stainless steel struts are shown. Type I was originally used either as an intramedullary nail or as an external brace. Types II and III were designed for external fixation of the strut to the rib. Treatment of 29 patients with severe flail chest, classified into four groups is shown: group I was treated by IPPR, group II by IPPR plus surgical stabilization, group III by surgical stabilization only, and group IV by surgical stabilization after exploratory thoracotomy. The clinical results are discussed. We conclude that surgical stabilization of the paradoxial movement of the chest wall can avoid the use of the respirator or at least reduce the interval of IPPR to a short period during the initial recovery from trauma. Using type III struts, we have obtained stabilization of the flail chest in all cases even in patients with severe anterior paradoxical movement. The patients' tolerance of surgical stainless steel struts was good. Images PMID:1105874

  19. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  20. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  1. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  2. 42 CFR 37.4 - Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. 37.4... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.4 Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. (a) Every plan for chest...

  3. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  4. 42 CFR 37.4 - Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. 37.4... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.4 Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. (a) Every plan for chest...

  5. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  6. Development and validation of a clinical prediction rule for chest wall syndrome in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chest wall syndrome (CWS), the main cause of chest pain in primary care practice, is most often an exclusion diagnosis. We developed and evaluated a clinical prediction rule for CWS. Methods Data from a multicenter clinical cohort of consecutive primary care patients with chest pain were used (59 general practitioners, 672 patients). A final diagnosis was determined after 12 months of follow-up. We used the literature and bivariate analyses to identify candidate predictors, and multivariate logistic regression was used to develop a clinical prediction rule for CWS. We used data from a German cohort (n = 1212) for external validation. Results From bivariate analyses, we identified six variables characterizing CWS: thoracic pain (neither retrosternal nor oppressive), stabbing, well localized pain, no history of coronary heart disease, absence of general practitioner’s concern, and pain reproducible by palpation. This last variable accounted for 2 points in the clinical prediction rule, the others for 1 point each; the total score ranged from 0 to 7 points. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.83) in the derivation cohort (specificity: 89%; sensitivity: 45%; cut-off set at 6 points). Among all patients presenting CWS (n = 284), 71% (n = 201) had a pain reproducible by palpation and 45% (n = 127) were correctly diagnosed. For a subset (n = 43) of these correctly classified CWS patients, 65 additional investigations (30 electrocardiograms, 16 thoracic radiographies, 10 laboratory tests, eight specialist referrals, one thoracic computed tomography) had been performed to achieve diagnosis. False positives (n = 41) included three patients with stable angina (1.8% of all positives). External validation revealed the ROC curve to be 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.73-0.79) with a sensitivity of 22% and a specificity of 93%. Conclusions This CWS score offers a useful

  7. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain, bone pain from spread of cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome Neurologic: "Phantom limb" pain after amputation, nerve pain from diabetes Read More "Chronic Pain" Articles Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and ...

  8. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  9. Autoantibody pain.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    As autoantibodies bind to target tissues, Fc-region dependent inflammation can induce pain via mediators exciting nociceptors. But recently another possibility has emerged, where autoantibody binding to nociceptors can directly cause pain, without inflammation. This is thought to occur as a result of Fab-region mediated modification of nerve transduction, transmission, or neuropeptide release. In three conditions, complex regional pain syndrome, anti-voltage gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity, and chronic fatigue syndrome, all associated with no or only little inflammation, initial laboratory-, and clinical trial-results have suggested a potential role for autoantibody-mediated mechanisms. More research assessing the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies in these and other chronic pain conditions is required. The concept of autoantibody-mediated pain offers hope for the development of novel therapies for currently intractable pains. PMID:26883460

  10. Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, Michael; Scholz, Joachim; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is triggered by lesions to the somatosensory nervous system that alter its structure and function so that pain occurs spontaneously and responses to noxious and innocuous stimuli are pathologically amplified. The pain is an expression of maladaptive plasticity within the nociceptive system, a series of changes that constitute a neural disease state. Multiple alterations distributed widely across the nervous system contribute to complex pain phenotypes. These alterations include ectopic generation of action potentials, facilitation and disinhibition of synaptic transmission, loss of synaptic connectivity and formation of new synaptic circuits, and neuroimmune interactions. Although neural lesions are necessary, they are not sufficient to generate neuropathic pain; genetic polymorphisms, gender, and age all influence the risk of developing persistent pain. Treatment needs to move from merely suppressing symptoms to a disease-modifying strategy aimed at both preventing maladaptive plasticity and reducing intrinsic risk. PMID:19400724

  11. Facial pain.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B

    2009-07-01

    Facial pain is a debilitating disorder if left untreated. Too often, patients are labeled as having psychopathology when face pain etiology is unclear. These patients are categorized as "atypical," "idiopathic," or "psychogenic." Cases of facial pain involving neuropathic, neurovascular, musculoskeletal, as well as intracranial and extracranial systems will be reviewed. Peripheral and central mechanisms associated with these disorders are used to provide an update of these frequently seen clinical issues. PMID:19590376

  12. Imaging Pain.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Katherine T; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    The challenges and understanding of acute and chronic pain have been illuminated through the advancement of central neuroimaging. Through neuroimaging research, new technology and findings have allowed us to identify and understand the neural mechanisms contributing to chronic pain. Several regions of the brain are known to be of particular importance for the maintenance and amplification of chronic pain, and this knowledge provides novel targets for future research and treatment. This article reviews neuroimaging for the study of chronic pain, and in particular, the rapidly advancing and popular research tools of structural and functional MRI. PMID:27208709

  13. Use of a titanium alloy (Chest Way) in the surgical stabilization of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoki; Matsuzaki, Tomohiko; Aruga, Naohiro; Imamura, Naoko; Hamanaka, Rurika; Ikoma, Yoichiro; Masuda, Ryota; Iwazaki, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    To avoid the complications of internal pneumatic stabilization for flail chest, we performed stabilization of the chest wall with a metal bar using the Nuss procedure. Here, we used a highly elastic lightweight biocompatible titanium alloy Chest Way (Solve Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan), enabling magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was a 37-year-old man who sustained injuries in a car crash. Gradually increasing subcutaneous emphysema was present. Bilateral pleural drainage and tracheal intubation were conducted on the scene, and a peripheral venous line was established. The patient was then transferred to our hospital by helicopter. A titanium alloy Chest Way was inserted to manage his flail chest accompanied by multiple rib fractures on the left side. Two days later, artificial respiration was no longer required. PMID:26096325

  14. The usefulness of Wi-Fi based digital chest drainage system in the post-operative care of pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Min; Hong, Yoon Joo; Byun, Chun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest drainage systems are usually composed of chest tube and underwater-seal bottle. But this conventional system may restrict patients doing exercise and give clinicians obscure data about when to remove tubes because there is no objective indicator. Recently developed digital chest drainage systems may facilitate interpretation of the grade of air leak and make it easy for clinicians to decide when to remove chest tubes. In addition, with combination of wireless internet devices, monitoring and managing of drainage system distant from the patient is possible. Methods Sixty patients of primary pneumothorax were included in a prospective randomized study and divided into two groups. Group I (study) consisted of digital chest drainage system while in group II (control), conventional underwater-seal chest bottle system was used. Data was collected from January, 2012 to September, 2013 in Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. Results There was no difference in age, sex, smoking history and postoperative pain between two groups. But the average length of drainage was 2.2 days in group I and 3.1 days in group II (P<0.006). And more, about 90% of the patients in group I was satisfied with using new device for convenience. Conclusions Digital system was beneficial on reducing the length of tube drainage by real time monitoring. It also had advantage in portability, loudness and gave more satisfaction than conventional system. Moreover, internet based digital drainage system will be a good method in thoracic telemedicine area in the near future. PMID:27076934

  15. Pain channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Cregg, Roman; Momin, Aliakmal; Rugiero, Francois; Wood, John N; Zhao, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Pain remains a major clinical challenge, severely afflicting around 6% of the population at any one time. Channelopathies that underlie monogenic human pain syndromes are of great clinical relevance, as cell surface ion channels are tractable drug targets. The recent discovery that loss-of-function mutations in the sodium channel Nav1.7 underlie a recessive pain-free state in otherwise normal people is particularly significant. Deletion of channel-encoding genes in mice has also provided insights into mammalian pain mechanisms. Ion channels expressed by immune system cells (e.g. P2X7) have been shown to play a pivotal role in changing pain thresholds, whilst channels involved in sensory transduction (e.g. TRPV1), the regulation of neuronal excitability (potassium channels), action potential propagation (sodium channels) and neurotransmitter release (calcium channels) have all been shown to be potentially selective analgesic drug targets in some animal pain models. Migraine and visceral pain have also been associated with voltage-gated ion channel mutations. Insights into such channelopathies thus provide us with a number of potential targets to control pain. PMID:20142270

  16. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better. No 7. Did you have a whiplash-type injury in the past, or do you have pain and/or stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  17. Diabetic thoracic radiculopathy: an unusual cause of post-thoracotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Brewer, R; Bedlack, R; Massey, E

    2003-05-01

    Persistent pain is common following thoracotomy. A 64-year-old retired electrician with Type 2 diabetes presented with chest wall and abdominal pain 3 months following video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Postoperatively the patient had suffered pain despite a functioning thoracic epidural catheter. Following investigation, his persistent pain was due to diabetic thoracic radiculopathy (DTR). The disorder is characterized by pain, sensory loss, abdominal and thoracic muscle weakness in patients with diabetes. As in this patient, the pain and sensory loss usually resolve within one year after onset. The disorder may be distinguished from intercostal neuralgia based upon clinical and electromyographic features. PMID:12749978

  18. Pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain

    PubMed Central

    Kjøgx, Heidi; Zachariae, Robert; Pfeiffer-Jensen, Mogens; Kasch, Helge; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S.; Vase, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain frequency has been shown to influence sensitization, psychological distress, and pain modulation. The present study examined if pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain. Method: A non-clinical (247 students) and a clinical (223 pain patients) sample completed the Danish versions of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Beck Depression Inventory, and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and rated pain intensity, unpleasantness and frequency. Results: In both samples, high pain frequency was found to moderate the association between pain catastrophizing and pain intensity, whereas low pain frequency did not. The psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Danish version of the PCS were confirmed. Conclusions: This is the first study to validate the Danish version of the PCS and to show that pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and reported pain in both non-clinical and clinical populations. PMID:25646089

  19. Managing Pediatric Pain in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Benoit; Trottier, Evelyne D

    2016-08-01

    Far more attention is now given to pain management in children in the emergency department (ED). When a child arrives, pain must be recognized and evaluated using a pain scale that is appropriate to the child's development and regularly assessed to determine whether the pain intervention was effective. At triage, both analgesics and non-pharmacological strategies, such as distraction, immobilization, and dressing should be started. For mild pain, oral ibuprofen can be administered if the child has not received it at home, whereas ibuprofen and paracetamol are suitable for moderate pain. For patients who still require pain relief, oral opioids could be considered; however, many EDs have now replaced this with intranasal fentanyl, which allows faster onset of pain relief and can be administered on arrival pending either intravenous access or definitive care. Intravenous opioids are often required for severe pain, and paracetamol or ibuprofen can still be considered for their likely opioid-sparing effects. Specific treatment should be used for patients with migraine. In children requiring intravenous access or venipuncture, non-pharmacological and pharmacological strategies to decrease pain and anxiety associated with needle punctures are mandatory. These strategies can also be used for laceration repairs and other painful procedures. Despite the gaps in knowledge, pain should be treated with the most up-to-date evidence in children seen in EDs. PMID:27260499

  20. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    PubMed Central

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O.; Albret, Rikke; Krag, Christen

    2012-01-01

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC®) resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient's need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation. PMID:24765464

  1. Enhancement of chest radiographs using eigenimage processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, Philip J.; Butler, Anthony P. H.; Hurrell, Michael

    2006-08-01

    Frontal chest radiographs ("chest X-rays") are routinely used by medical personnel to assess patients for a wide range of suspected disorders. Often large numbers of images need to be analyzed. Furthermore, at times the images need to analyzed ("reported") when no radiological expert is available. A system which enhances the images in such a way that abnormalities are more obvious is likely to reduce the chance that an abnormality goes unnoticed. The authors previously reported the use of principal components analysis to derive a basis set of eigenimages from a training set made up of images from normal subjects. The work is here extended to investigate how best to emphasize the abnormalities in chest radiographs. Results are also reported for various forms of image normalizing transformations used in performing the eigenimage processing.

  2. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O; Albret, Rikke; Krag, Christen

    2012-05-29

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC®) resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient's need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation. PMID:24765464

  3. Enhancement and compression of digital chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Cohn, M; Trefler, M; Young, T Y

    1990-01-01

    The application of digital technologies to chest radiography holds the promise of routine application of image processing techniques to effect image enhancement. Because of their inherent spatial resolution, however, digital chest images impose severe constraints on data storage devices. Compression of these images will relax such constraints and facilitate image transmission on a digital network. We evaluated an algorithm for enhancing digital chest images that has allowed significant data compression while improving the diagnostic quality of the image. This algorithm is based on the photographic technique of unsharp masking. Image quality was measured with respect to the task of tumor detection and compression ratios as high as 2:1 were achieved. This compression can be supplemented by irreversible methods. PMID:2299708

  4. Pain assessment in cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Peter; Cunningham, Emma

    2014-09-01

    Pain may adversely affect cognition through its effects on mood and sleep, and chronic pain has been associated with brain atrophy. Studies suggest that chronic pain is undertreated in cognitively impaired people. Pain assessment should involve direct enquiry with the patient; where this is not possible, a proxy history from a caregiver or nurse should be obtained, and observational scales may also be useful. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 1, Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, Ltd., and is distributed free of charge to health care professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the Web site: http://www.paineurope.com, at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication. PMID:25166774

  5. Noninvasive ventilation in large postoperative flail chest.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco; De Luca, Daniele; Zorzi, Giulia; Ruggiero, Antonio; Antonelli, Massimo; Conti, Giorgio; Pietrini, Domenico

    2008-12-01

    An 11-year-old male developed a severe respiratory failure due to a iatrogenic flail chest following a surgery for removing a large chest wall area. A rare Ewing sarcoma was histologically diagnosed and intensive chemotherapy was administered. Postoperatively, because of the failure in ventilation weaning, the patient was electively extubated and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation through face-mask was provided. Respiratory support avoided asynchronous paradoxical movements and achieved pneumatic stabilization. Clinical and respiratory improvement allowed a successful weaning from ventilator. PMID:18798557

  6. Homicidal tandem bullet wound of the chest.

    PubMed

    Bentley, A J; Busuttil, A; Clifton, B; Sibbald, P

    1997-03-01

    An unusual case of a homicidal gunshot wound to the chest is reported in which two bullets were fired in unison as tandem bullets from a handgun. At autopsy, two intact bullets were retrieved from the body of the victim, yet there was only one entrance wound and a single bullet track across the chest wall and thoracic organs. An examination of the weapon and ammunition supported the likelihood of tandem bullets and suggested the probable mechanism for this event. Very few similar cases have been documented. PMID:9095302

  7. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Casandra A; Palmer, Cassandra A; Ney, Arthur L; Becker, Brian; Schaffel, Steven D; Quickel, Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequently have chest tubes, drains, catheters, etc. which could become dislodged during HFCWO. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine if HFCWO treatment, as provided by The Vest™ Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Saint Paul, MN), was safe and well tolerated by these patients. Methods Twenty-five blunt thoracic trauma patients were entered into the study. These patients were consented. Each patient was prescribed 2, 15 minute HFCWO treatments per day using The Vest® Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Inc., St Paul, MN). The Vest® system was set to a frequency of 10–12 Hz and a pressure of 2–3 (arbitrary unit). Physiological parameters were measured before, during, and after treatment. Patients were free to refuse or terminate a treatment early for any reason. Results No chest tubes, lines, drains or catheters were dislodged as a result of treatment. One patient with flail chest had a chest tube placed after one treatment due to increasing serous effusion. No treatments were missed and continued without further incident. Post treatment survey showed 76% experienced mild or no pain and more productive cough. Thirty days after discharge there were no deaths or hospital re-admissions. Conclusion This study suggests that HFCWO treatment is safe for trauma patients with lung and chest wall injuries. These findings support further work to demonstrate the airway clearance benefits of HFCWO treatment. PMID:18837992

  8. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. PMID:27108085

  9. Chest wall reconstruction after resection using hernia repair piece

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yimin; Zhang, Guofei; Zhu, Zhouyu

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of chest wall tumor is very important link of chest wall tumor resection. Many implants have been reported to be used to reconstruct the chest wall, such as steelwire, titanium mesh and polypropylene mesh. It is really hard for clinicians to decide which implant is the best one to replace the chest wall. We herein report a 68-year-old man who had underwent a chest wall reconstruction with a hernia repair piece and a Dacron hernia repair piece. The patient has maintained an excellent cosmetic and functional outcome since surgery, which proves that the hernia piece still has its place in reconstruction of chest wall. PMID:27293859

  10. [Spiritual pain].

    PubMed

    Sato, Satoru

    2011-09-01

    We defined a spiritual pain as feelings of failure and regret at end-of-life, followed by hopelessness and worthlessness in patient's own life. In Japanese, spiritual pain should be assessed in patient's dignity, psycho-social factor, and prognostic stage, not only in religious context. And patient's spirituality should be supported with providing pain and symptom relief based on human relationships. "Sterbebegleitung" is a German proverb, introduced by Alfons Deeken, and seemed to be a suggestive word for such hope-recovering relationships. PMID:21950035

  11. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  12. Prevent Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Print This Topic En español Prevent Back Pain Browse Sections The Basics Overview Am I at ... Health: Back Pain . There are different types of back pain. Back pain can be acute or chronic. It ...

  13. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  14. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  15. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  16. Effect of gravity on chest wall mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bettinelli, D; Kays, C; Bailliart, O; Capderou, A; Techoueyres, P; Lachaud, J L; Vaïda, P; Miserocchi, G

    2002-02-01

    Chest wall mechanics was studied in four subjects on changing gravity in the craniocaudal direction (G(z)) during parabolic flights. The thorax appears very compliant at 0 G(z): its recoil changes only from -2 to 2 cmH(2)O in the volume range of 30-70% vital capacity (VC). Increasing G(z) from 0 to 1 and 1.8 G(z) progressively shifted the volume-pressure curve of the chest wall to the left and also caused a fivefold exponential decrease in compliance. For lung volume <30% VC, gravity has an inspiratory effect, but this effect is much larger going from 0 to 1 G(z) than from 1 to 1.8 G(z). For a volume from 30 to 70% VC, the effect is inspiratory going from 0 to 1 G(z) but expiratory from 1 to 1.8 G(z). For a volume greater than approximately 70% VC, gravity always has an expiratory effect. The data suggest that the chest wall does not behave as a linear system when exposed to changing gravity, as the effect depends on both chest wall volume and magnitude of G(z). PMID:11796685

  17. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be involved as well. Case Report: We describe a case of invasive salmonellosis caused by Salmonella typhimurium involving the chest wall in a 73-year-old man. The patient had suffered from gastroenteritis followed by left basal pneumonia with pleural effusion 7 weeks before. The CT scan of the chest wall showed a pericostal abscess with shirt-stud morphology near the left last cartilaginous arch. The abscess was surgically drained and patient was cured after a 40-day ciprofloxacin treatment. Conclusions: A review of the literature on extra-intestinal non-typhoid salmonellosis shows that pleuropulmonary and soft-tissue infections are uncommon. We argue that non-typhoid Salmonella might be considered as a possible cause of chest wall abscess in individuals with recent history of gastroenteritis complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. PMID:24298305

  18. [Optimal beam quality for chest digital radiography].

    PubMed

    Oda, Nobuhiro; Tabata, Yoshito; Nakano, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the optimal beam quality for chest computed radiography (CR), we measured the radiographic contrast and evaluated the image quality of chest CR using various X-ray tube voltages. The contrast between lung and rib or heart increased on CR images obtained by lowering the tube voltage from 140 to 60 kV, but the degree of increase was less. Scattered radiation was reduced on CR images with a lower tube voltage. The Wiener spectrum of CR images with a low tube voltage showed a low value under identical conditions of amount of light stimulated emission. The quality of chest CR images obtained using a lower tube voltage (80 kV and 100 kV) was evaluated as being superior to those obtained with a higher tube voltage (120 kV and 140 kV). Considering the problem of tube loading and exposure in clinical applications, a tube voltage of 90 to 100 kV (0.1 mm copper filter backed by 0.5 mm aluminum) is recommended for chest CR. PMID:25410333

  19. Unsupervised segmentation of lungs from chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Payel; Antani, Sameer K.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes our preliminary investigations for deriving and characterizing coarse-level textural regions present in the lung field on chest radiographs using unsupervised grow-cut (UGC), a cellular automaton based unsupervised segmentation technique. The segmentation has been performed on a publicly available data set of chest radiographs. The algorithm is useful for this application because it automatically converges to a natural segmentation of the image from random seed points using low-level image features such as pixel intensity values and texture features. Our goal is to develop a portable screening system for early detection of lung diseases for use in remote areas in developing countries. This involves developing automated algorithms for screening x-rays as normal/abnormal with a high degree of sensitivity, and identifying lung disease patterns on chest x-rays. Automatically deriving and quantitatively characterizing abnormal regions present in the lung field is the first step toward this goal. Therefore, region-based features such as geometrical and pixel-value measurements were derived from the segmented lung fields. In the future, feature selection and classification will be performed to identify pathological conditions such as pulmonary tuberculosis on chest radiographs. Shape-based features will also be incorporated to account for occlusions of the lung field and by other anatomical structures such as the heart and diaphragm.

  20. Uncommon Flaps for Chest Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    The omentum, external oblique musculocutaneous, and thoracoepigastric flaps are uncommonly used for chest wall reconstruction. Nevertheless, awareness and knowledge of these flaps is essential for reconstructive surgeons because they fill specific niche indications or serve as lifeboats when workhorse flaps are unavailable. The current report describes the anatomic basis, technical aspects of flap elevation, and indications for these unusual flaps. PMID:22294943

  1. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6133...

  2. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6133...

  3. Pain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... have tried to find relief from cancer pain. ■■ Physical Therapy. Exercises or methods used to help restore strength, ... that you see a licensed expert when trying physical therapy, massage, hypnosis, or acupuncture. 25 To learn more ...

  4. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. Signs that may indicate a headache of dental origin include: ; Pain behind the eyes Sore jaw muscles or "tired" ... t Sleep? Check Your Bite What Causes a Toothache? Your Posture May Be the Cause of Jaw ...

  5. Penis pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - penis ... Bites, either human or insect Cancer of the penis Erection that does not go away (priapism) Genital herpes Infected hair follicles Infected prosthesis of the penis Infection under the foreskin of uncircumcised men ( balanitis ) ...

  6. Feeling pain

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... protective mechanism, alerting it to potential or actual damage to the body’s tissues. In the example of ... the pain receptors in the skin detect tissue damage from the bee sting. Then, the peripheral nerves ...

  7. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the front of your knee around the kneecap Torn ligament. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, or ... into your knee, swelling, or an unstable knee. Torn cartilage (a meniscus tear ). Pain felt on the ...

  8. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Update Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  9. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bones or cartilage of your hip, including: Hip fractures – can cause sudden hip pain. These injuries can be serious and lead to major problems. Hip fractures are more common as people get older because ...

  10. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... 37.7°C), and recent illness. Other Causes Gout : This occurs when your body produces too much ...

  11. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... The shoulder is the most movable joint in the human body. A group of 4 muscles and their tendons, called the rotator cuff, give the shoulder its wide range of motion. Swelling, damage, or ...

  12. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: gout (especially ...

  13. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  14. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gets worse when you bend forward) Tic douloureux Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome Sometimes the reason for the face pain ... is persistent, unexplained, or accompanied by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider. What to Expect at ...

  15. Chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula and gallstone empyema due to retained gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Gaster, Richard S; Berger, Aaron J; Ahmadi-Kashani, Mastaneh; Shrager, Joseph B; Lee, Gordon K

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 72-year-old man who presented with a persistent pleural effusion and painful abscess in the right lower chest wall 6 months following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patient subsequently developed a chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula requiring a large resection and complex closure. The complication was likely secondary to intraoperative spillage of gallstones. While previous reports describe gallstone spillage in the abdominal cavity as benign, this case illustrates that stones left in the abdominal cavity can potentially lead to significant morbidity. Therefore, stones should be diligently removed from the abdominal cavity when spillage occurs. In addition, it is important that operative notes reflect the occurrence of stone spillage so stones may be suspected when a patient presents with an abdominal or thoracic infection following a cholecystectomy. PMID:25123567

  16. Chest wall hernia induced by high intensity focused ultrasound treatment of unresectable massive hepatocellular carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, QI-WEN; TENG, WEN-JING; CHEN, QIAN

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a case of unresectable massive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) alone is reported. Although the treatment induced chest wall hernia, its efficacy in treating the HCC was demonstrated. The medical records of a patient with an unresectable massive tumor that was effectively treated with serial HIFU ablation were retrospectively studied. Chest wall hernia was detected as a complication of the HIFU treatment, which has not been reported thus far in the literature. The patient has survived for 44 months since the first diagnosis in September 2010. Treatment resulted in partial remission of the tumor, pain relief, decreased levels of alpha-fetoprotein and chest wall hernia, as a complication. Therefore, HIFU may be an effective approach for the treatment of unresectable HCC, although it may occasionally cause complications. PMID:27347191

  17. Acute, proximal aortic dissection with negative D-Dimer assay and normal portable chest radiograph: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thota, Darshan; Zanoni, Steve; Mells, Cary; Auten, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is one of the most devastating and time-sensitive diagnosis to consider in young adults with chest pain. Military medicine is represented by a larger proportion of 18- to 50-year-old individuals than is seen in the general medical population. Although uncommon in frequency, younger patients are more likely to suffer from proximal, aortic dissections. Chest radiographs and D-Dimer assays are used frequently as risk stratification tools, but have significant limitations in these more proximal dissections. Because of the frequency and lethality of nonspecific presentations, there exists a need for a sensitive screening tool. This case report presents a 43-year-old male with a concerning history and physical examination for aortic dissection, but a normal portable chest radiograph and a normal D-Dimer assay. It highlights the importance of clinical acumen in developing and maintaining a high clinical index of suspicion based on a Bayesian pretest probability model. PMID:25562879

  18. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids.A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6-18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors.Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P < 0.001) between the before-surgery score and the after-surgery score from both doctors and patients, indicating that both doctors and patients were satisfied with the treatment effect.Our preliminary clinical result indicates that good clinical results could be achieved by choosing the proper method in this algorithm for Chinese patients with chest wall keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  19. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  20. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids. A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6–18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors. Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P < 0.001) between the before-surgery score and the after-surgery score from both doctors and patients, indicating that both doctors and patients were satisfied with the treatment effect. Our preliminary clinical result indicates that good clinical results could be achieved by choosing the proper method in this algorithm for Chinese patients with chest wall keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  1. [Chest Wall Reconstruction Using Titanium Plates Sandwiched Between Sheets after Resection of Chest Wall Chondrosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Endoh, Makoto; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Jun; Watarai, Hikaru; Hamada, Akira; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Ai; Nakahashi, Kenta; Sugawara, Masato; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2016-07-01

    Extensive chest wall resection carries the risk of difficult reconstruction and surgical complications. We report our experience on chest wall reconstruction using titanium plates for a wide thoracic defect after tumor resection. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma of the 6th rib on the right. He needed extensive chest wall resection because of skip lesions on 4th rib noted on operative inspection, leaving a defect measuring 33 × 20 cm. Reconstruction using 5 transverse titanium plates sandwiched between an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene patch and a polypropylene mesh sheet stabilized the chest wall. This reconstruction allowed successful separation from ventilatory support after operation. The postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day 20. The advantages of this form of reconstruction over conventional prostheses are rigidity, and stability and usability. PMID:27365062

  2. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  3. Psoriasis, guttate on the arms and chest (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... guttate (drop-shaped) psoriasis on the arms and chest. Guttate psoriasis is a rare form of psoriasis. ... streptococcal infection, appears rapidly and affects the face, chest, and nearest limbs. The patches are small and ...

  4. Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... short of breath or feel tightness in your chest, you might have asthma. If you do, you ...

  5. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  6. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  7. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  8. Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... you cough a lot, wheeze, are short of breath or feel tightness in your chest, you might ...

  9. Tube thoracostomy; chest tube implantation and follow up

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an urgent medical situation that requires urgent treatment. We can divide this entity based on the etiology to primary and secondary. Chest tube implantation can be performed either in the upper chest wall or lower. Both thoracic surgeons and pulmonary physicians can place a chest tube with minimal invasive techniques. In our current work, we will demonstrate chest tube implantation to locations, methodology and tools. PMID:25337405

  10. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  11. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  12. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  13. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  14. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  15. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  16. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest radiographs required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chest radiographs required for miners. 37.3 Section... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest radiographs required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator must provide to...

  17. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  18. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  19. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  20. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...