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Sample records for access community hospitals

  1. Evaluating Michigan's community hospital access: spatial methods for decision support

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Joseph P; Shortridge, Ashton M; Groop, Richard E; Varnakovida, Pariwate; Finn, Mark J

    2006-01-01

    Background Community hospital placement is dictated by a diverse set of geographical factors and historical contingency. In the summer of 2004, a multi-organizational committee headed by the State of Michigan's Department of Community Health approached the authors of this paper with questions about how spatial analyses might be employed to develop a revised community hospital approval procedure. Three objectives were set. First, the committee needed visualizations of both the spatial pattern of Michigan's population and its 139 community hospitals. Second, the committee required a clear, defensible assessment methodology to quantify access to existing hospitals statewide, taking into account factors such as distance to nearest hospital and road network density to estimate travel time. Third, the committee wanted to contrast the spatial distribution of existing community hospitals with a theoretical configuration that best met statewide demand. This paper presents our efforts to first describe the distribution of Michigan's current community hospital pattern and its people, and second, develop two models, access-based and demand-based, to identify areas with inadequate access to existing hospitals. Results Using the product from the access-based model and contiguity and population criteria, two areas were identified as being "under-served." The lower area, located north/northeast of Detroit, contained the greater total land area and population of the two areas. The upper area was centered north of Grand Rapids. A demand-based model was applied to evaluate the existing facility arrangement by allocating daily bed demand in each ZIP code to the closest facility. We found 1,887 beds per day were demanded by ZIP centroids more than 16.1 kilometers from the nearest existing hospital. This represented 12.7% of the average statewide daily bed demand. If a 32.3 kilometer radius was employed, unmet demand dropped to 160 beds per day (1.1%). Conclusion Both modeling

  2. Economic Impact of the Critical Access Hospital Program on Kentucky's Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ona, Lucia; Davis, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Context: In 1997, the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Grant Program created the Critical Access Hospital (CAH) Program as a response to the financial distress of rural hospitals. It was believed that this program would reduce the rate of rural hospital closures and improve access to health care services in rural communities. Objective: The…

  3. 42 CFR 412.109 - Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitals (EACHs). 412.109 Section 412.109 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL... Operating Costs § 412.109 Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs). (a) General...

  4. 42 CFR 412.109 - Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs). 412.109 Section 412.109 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Special Treatment of Certain...

  5. 42 CFR 412.109 - Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL.... For payment purposes, CMS treats as a sole community hospital any hospital that is located in a rural... 1820(i)(1) of the Act as in effect on September 30, 1997, for as long as the hospital continues...

  6. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  7. Critical Care in Critical Access Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Seright, Teresa J; Winters, Charlene A

    2015-10-01

    What began as a grant-funded demonstration project, as a means of bridging the gap in rural health care, has developed into a critical access hospital system comprising 1328 facilities across 45 states. A critical access hospital is not just a safety net for health care in a rural community. Such hospitals may also provide specialized services such as same-day surgery, infusion therapy, and intensive care. For hospitals located near the required minimum of 35 miles from a tertiary care center, management of critically ill patients may be a matter of stabilization and transfer. Critical access hospitals in more rural areas are often much farther from tertiary care; some of these hospitals are situated within frontier areas of the United States. This article describes the development of critical access hospitals, provision of care and services, challenges to critical care in critical access hospitals, and suggestions to address gaps in research and collaborative care.

  8. 42 CFR 412.109 - Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... following material to CMS within 60 days of receipt from the hospital: (i) The hospital's documentation and... hospitals (EACHs). 412.109 Section 412.109 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT...

  9. Impact of Critical Access Hospital Conversion on Beneficiary Liability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Boyd H.

    2008-01-01

    Context: While the Medicare Critical Access Hospital (CAH) program has improved the financial viability of small rural hospitals and enhanced access to care in rural communities, the program puts beneficiaries at risk for paying a larger share of the cost of services covered under the Medicare part B benefit. Purpose: This paper examines the…

  10. Financial Indicators for Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pink, George H.; Holmes, G. Mark; D'Alpe, Cameron; Strunk, Lindsay A.; McGee, Patrick; Slifkin, Rebecca T.

    2006-01-01

    Context: There is a growing recognition of the need to measure and report hospital financial performance. However, there exists little comparative financial indicator data specifically for critical access hospitals (CAHs). CAHs differ from other hospitals on a number of dimensions that might affect appropriate indicators of performance, including…

  11. Community Factors and Hospital Readmission Rates

    PubMed Central

    Herrin, Jeph; St Andre, Justin; Kenward, Kevin; Joshi, Maulik S; Audet, Anne-Marie J; Hines, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between community factors and hospital readmission rates. Data Sources/Study Setting We examined all hospitals with publicly reported 30-day readmission rates for patients discharged during July 1, 2007, to June 30, 2010, with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), or pneumonia (PN). We linked these to publicly available county data from the Area Resource File, the Census, Nursing Home Compare, and the Neilsen PopFacts datasets. Study Design We used hierarchical linear models to assess the effect of county demographic, access to care, and nursing home quality characteristics on the pooled 30-day risk-standardized readmission rate. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Not applicable. Principal Findings The study sample included 4,073 hospitals. Fifty-eight percent of national variation in hospital readmission rates was explained by the county in which the hospital was located. In multivariable analysis, a number of county characteristics were found to be independently associated with higher readmission rates, the strongest associations being for measures of access to care. These county characteristics explained almost half of the total variation across counties. Conclusions Community factors, as measured by county characteristics, explain a substantial amount of variation in hospital readmission rates. PMID:24712374

  12. Financing the future of independent community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Richman, Alan P

    2011-11-01

    Effingham Hospital, a critical access hospital, undertook a modernization initiative to expand the limited scope of its inpatient services to improve financial performance and ability to build liquidity reserves. FHA Section 242 mortgage insurance was the only means for Effingham to credit enhance its debt and obtain a low-interest rate loan. Effingham needed to convince residents and county commissioners to pledge 27 years of additional tax support to offset its annual uncompensated care. The hospital won support from the community and the commissioners, in part because of the educational outreach of the CEO, CFO, and board in articulating the imperative for maintaining local hospital care and the present and future economic benefits for Effingham County.

  13. Choosing to convert to critical access hospital status.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Kathleen; Slifkin, Rebecca; Poley, Stephanie; Fruhbeis, Melissa

    2003-01-01

    The authors profile facilities converting to critical access hospitals (CAHs) from 1998-2000, comparing characteristics of their communities, operations, and finances to those of other small rural providers. Counties where CAHs are located are more sparsely populated, but do not have substantially different sociodemographic profiles than other rural counties. Converting hospitals' acute daily census averaged well below the statutory limit of 15, but over one-half reduced unused bed capacity to meet CAH size limitations. The average case-mix adjusted Medicare cost per case was 16-percent higher for CAH converters than for other small hospitals and their financial ratios were substantially worse, although many other operating characteristics were similar.

  14. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  15. The presence of ethics programs in critical access hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nelson, William A; Rosenberg, Marie-Claire; Mackenzie, Todd; Weeks, William B

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of ethics committees in rural critical access hospitals across the United States. Several studies have investigated the presence of ethics committees in rural health care facilities. The limitation of these studies is in the definition of 'rural hospital' and a regional or state focus. These limitations have created large variations in the study findings. In this nation-wide study we used the criteria of a critical access hospital (CAH), as defined by the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program (Flex Program, 2007), to bring consistency and clarity to the assessment of the presence of ethics committees in rural hospitals. The Flex Monitoring Team conducted a national telephone survey of 381 CAH administrators throughout the United States. The survey covered a wide variety of questions concerning hospitals' community benefit, impact activities, and whether the hospital had a formally established an ethics committee. About 230 (60%) of the respondents indicated they had a formally established ethics committee or ethics consultation program at their CAH. The prevalence of ethics committees declined as the CAH location became increasingly rural along a rural-urban continuum. Unlike CAHs, all rural Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers have ethics committees. The results of this study provide an understanding of the limited presence of ethics committee in rural America and the need to consider new approaches for providing ethics assistance. A virtual ethics committee network may be the most efficient and effective way of providing rural hospitals access to a knowledgeable ethics committee or consultant. PMID:20714785

  16. Choosing to Convert to Critical Access Hospital Status

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Kathleen; Slifkin, Rebecca; Poley, Stephanie; Fruhbeis, Melissa

    2003-01-01

    The authors profile facilities converting to critical access hospitals (CAHs) from 1998-2000, comparing characteristics of their communities, operations, and finances to those of other small rural providers. Counties where CAHs are located are more sparsely populated, but do not have substantially different sociodemographic profiles than other rural counties. Converting hospitals' acute daily census averaged well below the statutory limit of 15, but over one-half reduced unused bed capacity to meet CAH size limitations. The average case-mix adjusted Medicare cost per case was 16-percent higher for CAH converters than for other small hospitals and their financial ratios were substantially worse, although many other operating characteristics were similar. PMID:14997697

  17. 76 FR 25550 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Changes Affecting Hospital and Critical Access Hospital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... May 26, 2010 (75 FR 29479). In that rule, we proposed to revise both the hospital and CAH... and Medicaid Programs: Changes Affecting Hospital and Critical Access Hospital Conditions of...) for both hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs). The final rule will implement a...

  18. Community hospitals and the Internet: lessons from pilot connections.

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, S; Holt, M C; Horner, M; Rambo, N

    1994-01-01

    Community hospitals in rural and isolated areas have had little access to the Internet. In 1992, the National Library of Medicine funded a pilot project to be conducted by the University of Washington and seven community hospitals in the northwestern United States. The goals of the project were to connect the hospitals to the Internet and study the uses made of this resource. A number of administrative, technical, financial, and organizational problems were dealt with in the attempt to establish the Internet connections and introduce this resource to these health care settings. This paper examines these issues and presents conclusions drawn from the experiences of the project team. PMID:7841910

  19. 75 FR 29479 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Proposed Changes Affecting Hospital and Critical Access Hospital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... and Medicaid Programs: Proposed Changes Affecting Hospital and Critical Access Hospital (CAH... proposed rule would revise the conditions of participation (CoPs) for both hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs). These revisions would allow for a new credentialing and privileging process for...

  20. 42 CFR 486.322 - Condition: Relationships with hospitals, critical access hospitals, and tissue banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Relationships with hospitals, critical access hospitals, and tissue banks. 486.322 Section 486.322 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Measures § 486.322 Condition: Relationships with hospitals, critical access hospitals, and tissue banks....

  1. Can community hospitals survive without large scale health reform?

    PubMed

    Unland, James J

    2004-01-01

    This nation's not-for-profit community hospitals, numbering over 4000 and providing the largest percentage of all hospital services to the US population, are threatened as never before by erratic reimbursement, reduced capital access and, more recently, by physicians who now compete both by virtue of outpatient/ambulatory services and by starting "specialty hospitals." This article examines some of these trends and their implications, raising the issue of whether it is time for major restructuring of our reimbursement systems and other significant health reforms. PMID:15151196

  2. Hospital management contracts: institutional and community perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, J R; Zuckerman, H S

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that external management by contract can improve the performance of managed hospitals. This article presents a conceptual framework which develops specific hypotheses concerning improved hospital operating efficiency, increased ability to meet hospital objectives, and increased ability to meet community objectives. Next, changes in the process and structure of management under contractual arrangements, based on observations from two not-for-profit hospital systems, are described. Finally, the effects of these management changes over time on hospital and community objectives are presented. These effects suggest progressive stages in the development of management contracts. The first stage focuses on stabilizing hospital financial performance. Stage two involves recruitment and retention efforts to secure necessary personnel. In the third stage, attention shifts to strategic planning and marketing. PMID:6490378

  3. [What should general hospital psychiatry do in a community?].

    PubMed

    Takehisa, Takahashi

    2003-01-01

    medical care of GHP on same level as a part of general hospital of course. For community psychiatric care and short-term hospitalization it is necessary for GHP to cooperate with various types of social resources. As for users of rehabilitation facilities in Nagano prefecture, GHP outpatients occupy 27.2%, and as for day care users, these occupy 19.6%, thus GHPs are able to cooperate with facilities. Above-mentioned facts indicate there is high necessity as a GHP, not a psychiatric hospital or a clinic. Cooperation between GHP and other social resources including welfare services will enrich community psychiatric services. GHP is a wide entrance for psychiatric care from a viewpoints of whole psychiatric care. When GHP accepted all patients on demands from acute cases to chronic, manpower will be diffused, and safety of medical care will be undermined. Therefore, psychiatric triage mainly functioning to treat early stage in severe cases with combined medical and psychiatric illness above all is necessary for GHP in order to offer proper treatment to a community. Accessibility in early stage of disease, priority of seriously ill patients and rehabilitation programs at a community as daily life space are essential for community mental health. We believe the first role of GHP in a community is to seek for psychiatric treatment on same level as general medicine. The second role is the psychiatric triage in order to function as GHP in a community. The third role is to cooperate with other social resources in a community. In order to promote the above it is necessary to self-evaluate GHP concerning the difference with specialized psychiatric hospitals or clinics. From these viewpoints GHP will become a core of community psychiatry. Currently, however, preparation concerned with GHP is poor compared with other advanced countries, so an aggressive improvement in medical policy is expected. PMID:12875227

  4. Remote Antimicrobial Stewardship in Community Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wood, Zachary H; Nicolsen, Nicole C; Allen, Nichole; Cook, Paul P

    2015-11-13

    Antimicrobial stewardship has become standard practice at university medical centers, but the practice is more difficult to implement in remote community hospitals that lack infectious diseases trained practitioners. Starting in 2011, six community hospitals within the Vidant Health system began an antimicrobial stewardship program utilizing pharmacists who reviewed charts remotely from Vidant Medical Center. Pharmacists made recommendations within the electronic medical record (EMR) to streamline, discontinue, or switch antimicrobial agents. Totals of charts reviewed, recommendations made, recommendations accepted, and categories of intervention were recorded. Linear regression was utilized to measure changes in antimicrobial use over time. For the four larger hospitals, recommendations for changes were made in an average of 45 charts per month per hospital and physician acceptance of the pharmacists' recommendations varied between 83% and 88%. There was no significant decrease in total antimicrobial use, but much of the use was outside of the stewardship program's review. Quinolone use decreased by more than 50% in two of the four larger hospitals. Remote antimicrobial stewardship utilizing an EMR is feasible in community hospitals and is generally received favorably by physicians. As more community hospitals adopt EMRs, there is an opportunity to expand antimicrobial stewardship beyond the academic medical center.

  5. Community benefit activities of private, nonprofit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bazzoli, Gloria J; Clement, Jan P; Hsieh, Hui-Min

    2010-12-01

    The definition of hospital community benefits has been intensely debated for many years. Recently, consensus has developed about one group of activities being central to community benefits because of its focus on care for the poor and on needed community services for which any payments received are low relative to costs. Disagreements continue, however, about the treatment of bad debt expense and Medicare shortfalls. A recent revision of the Internal Revenue Service's Form 990 Schedule H, which is required of all nonprofit hospitals, highlights the agreed-on set of activities but does not dismiss the disputed items. Our study is the first to apply definitions used in the new IRS form to assess how conclusions about the adequacy of nonprofit hospital community benefits could be affected if bad debt expenses and Medicare shortfalls are included or excluded. Specifically, we examine 2005 financial data for California and Florida hospitals. Overall, we find that conclusions about community benefit adequacy are very different depending on which definition of community benefits is used. We provide thoughts on new directions for the current policy debate about the treatment of bad debts and Medicare shortfalls in light of these findings. PMID:21451160

  6. Contract management in USA hospitals: service duplication and access within local markets.

    PubMed

    Carey, Kathleen; Dor, Avi

    2008-08-01

    This paper examines the extent to which hospitals that are under external contract management engage in service duplication, as well as the degree to which the various services they offer contribute to or detract from community access. The study incorporates all USA hospitals using data from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database, supplemented by county level measures obtained from the area resource file (ARF). Using data on the 3794 hospitals classified as acute care facilities in 2002, we performed a set of logistic regressions that analyzed whether a hospital offered each of 74 distinct services. For each service (regression), key independent variables measured the number of other hospitals in the local market area that also offered the service. Local area market definitions are the areas circumscribed by the hospital within distances of 10 and 20 miles. Results suggest that contract-managed (CM) hospitals display a more competitive pattern (service duplication) than hospitals in general, but CM hospitals that are the sole provider of services locally are less likely to offer services than traditionally managed sole hospital providers. Contract management does not appear to offer any particular advantages in improving access to hospital services.

  7. Creating a Shared Formulary in 7 Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Douglas S.; Ward, Marcia M.; Loes, Jean L.; O'Brien, John; Abbas, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports a case study of 7 Critical Access Hospitals' (CAH) and 1 rural referral hospital's successful collaboration to develop a shared formulary. Methods: Study methods included document reviews, interviews with key informants, and use of descriptive statistics. Findings: Through a systematic review and decision process, CAH…

  8. Quality Improvement Strategies and Best Practices in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Michelle M.; Moscovice, Ira

    2004-01-01

    Critical access hospitals (CAHs) face many challenges in implementing quality improvement (QI) initiatives, which include limited resources, low volume of patients, small staffs, and inadequate information technology. A primary goal of the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program is to improve the quality of care provided by CAHs. This article…

  9. Comparative Performance Data for Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pink, George H.; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Coburn, Andrew F.; Gale, John A.

    2004-01-01

    Context: Among small rural hospitals, there is a growing recognition of the need to measure and report on the use of resources and the safety and quality of the services provided. Dashboards, clinical value compasses, and balanced scorecards are approaches to performance measurement that have been adopted by many health care organizations.…

  10. Improving Access Using Simulations of Community Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germann, Clark; Broida, Jane Kaufman; Broida, Jeffrey M.; Thompson, Kimberly

    The Community Access Through Technology Project (CATT) is developing and implementing virtual reality software that persons with disabilities can use to experience a physical location prior to visiting it in person. A virtual scenario of one physical location has been developed, implemented, and tested, and work is underway on two others. Using a…

  11. Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Rose, Andresse; Hill, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges open the door to opportunity for millions of Americans who want to pursue higher education and secure their economic futures. As an organization founded on the basic principle of making college accessible to women, the American Association of University Women (AAUW) has been a leading voice for women in education and the…

  12. Green 'heart' for new community hospital.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    Replacing a healthcare facility first opened in 1908 as a 20-bed cottage hospital, the recently opened 'new' Finchley Memorial Hospital in north-west London was designed by architects, Murphy Philipps, 'to be at the heart of a health campus', surrounded by green space for use by both the hospital itself, and the local community. The 28 million pounds hospital, which has achieved a BREAAM Excellent rating - with an annual energy target of just 35 GJ/100 m3 set by SHINE, the Department of Health-backed learning network for sustainable healthcare buildings - has also featured as one of only 20 projects in the RIBA Health Buildings Exhibition. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, met with lead architect, Marc Levinson, to find out more about the key elements, and the thinking, that went into the design.

  13. Revitalized commitment to community. A community benefit plan helps a hospital be a good neighbor.

    PubMed

    Brown, S

    1994-01-01

    Three years ago St. John Hospital and Medical Center, Detroit, made a commitment to strengthen its community relationships and reaffirm its mission of serving those in need by following the Catholic Health Association's Social Accountability Budget. While implementing the program, administrators were surprised to learn the hospital was already participating in many community programs for which it received little or no reimbursement. They also discovered that the hospital had no formal, written charity care policy even though St. John provided more than $14 million in uncompensated care annually. To learn what the needs of the surrounding community were, the hospital went to the clergy, who overwhelmingly identified the needs of the elderly as the number-one priority. A close second was supporting the basic family unit. Other concerns included basic family needs, safe neighborhoods and schools, and teen pregnancy. Although the hospital realized it could not do all that was needed, it felt obliged to be a leader in seeing that the needs were met and drew up a community benefit plan that documented the problems and the solutions. The hospital did what it could and worked with other organizations to address needs such as housing for the elderly, affordable and accessible healthcare, neighborhood improvement and safety, and family services. PMID:10131088

  14. Analysis of the Community Benefit Standard in Texas Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Worthy, James Corbett; Anderson, Cheryl L

    2016-01-01

    The federal government provides special tax-exemption status, known as the community benefit standard, to some nonprofit hospitals. It is not known if hospitals that claim the community benefit standard provide more or different services from those provided by hospitals that do not claim the community benefit status. Guided by the socioecological model, this quantitative study investigated 95 hospitals serving 52 counties in South Texas--43 that claimed a community benefit and 52 that did not. The independent variables were hospitals that claimed the community benefit standard versus hospitals that did not. The dependent variables were the three essential criteria and the 13 reported services used to meet the community benefit standard. The study results show that all hospitals that claimed the community benefit standard met two of the three required criteria. However, only 22 of 43 hospitals had a full-time emergency department (ED), the third criterion. Χ² analysis showed statistically significant differences for only two of the five common services: having an ED and community education for community benefit hospitals versus noncommunity benefit hospitals. On average, hospitals that claimed the community benefit spent 100 times more money on community services than hospitals that did not claim the community benefit. Further investigation is needed to determine the reasons for the gap in services pertaining to EDs, trauma care, neonatal intensive care, free-standing clinics, collaborative efforts, other medical services, education of patients, community health education, and other education services. PMID:27111928

  15. Analysis of the Community Benefit Standard in Texas Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Worthy, James Corbett; Anderson, Cheryl L

    2016-01-01

    The federal government provides special tax-exemption status, known as the community benefit standard, to some nonprofit hospitals. It is not known if hospitals that claim the community benefit standard provide more or different services from those provided by hospitals that do not claim the community benefit status. Guided by the socioecological model, this quantitative study investigated 95 hospitals serving 52 counties in South Texas--43 that claimed a community benefit and 52 that did not. The independent variables were hospitals that claimed the community benefit standard versus hospitals that did not. The dependent variables were the three essential criteria and the 13 reported services used to meet the community benefit standard. The study results show that all hospitals that claimed the community benefit standard met two of the three required criteria. However, only 22 of 43 hospitals had a full-time emergency department (ED), the third criterion. Χ² analysis showed statistically significant differences for only two of the five common services: having an ED and community education for community benefit hospitals versus noncommunity benefit hospitals. On average, hospitals that claimed the community benefit spent 100 times more money on community services than hospitals that did not claim the community benefit. Further investigation is needed to determine the reasons for the gap in services pertaining to EDs, trauma care, neonatal intensive care, free-standing clinics, collaborative efforts, other medical services, education of patients, community health education, and other education services.

  16. 78 FR 51061 - TRICARE; Reimbursement of Sole Community Hospitals and Adjustment to Reimbursement of Critical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... Part 199 RIN 0720-AB41 TRICARE; Reimbursement of Sole Community Hospitals and Adjustment to Reimbursement of Critical Access Hospitals; Correction AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: On Thursday, August 8, 2013 (78 FR 48303-48311),...

  17. 76 FR 39043 - TRICARE; Reimbursement of Sole Community Hospitals and Adjustment to Reimbursement of Critical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... Military Contingency Payment Adjustment On August 31, 2009, we published a final rule (74 FR 44752), which... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 TRICARE; Reimbursement of Sole Community Hospitals and Adjustment to Reimbursement of Critical Access Hospitals AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Defense (DoD)....

  18. Improved Maternal and Child Health Care Access in a Rural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carcillo, Joseph A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an underserved rural community in which health care initiatives increased access to comprehensive care. Over a 3-year period, increased accessibility to maternal and child health care also increased use of preventive services, thus decreasing emergency room visits and hospitalizations as well as low birth weight, risk of congenital…

  19. 75 FR 70831 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Changes to the Hospital and Critical Access Hospital Conditions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... proposed rule in the Federal Register on May 26, 2010 (75 FR 29479). In that rule, we proposed to revise..., 2003, 68 FR 47311) applies to those entities that receive Federal financial assistance from HHS... and Medicaid Programs: Changes to the Hospital and Critical Access Hospital Conditions...

  20. Factors Associated with Iowa Rural Hospitals' Decision to Convert to Critical Access Hospital Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Pengxiang; Ward, Marcia M.; Schneider, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 allowed some rural hospitals meeting certain requirements to convert to Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) and changed their Medicare reimbursement from prospective to cost-based. Some subsequent CAH-related laws reduced restrictions and increased payments, and the number of CAHs grew rapidly. Purpose:…

  1. Rural-Urban Differences in Preventable Hospitalizations among Community-Dwelling Veterans with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorpe, Joshua M.; Van Houtven, Courtney H.; Sleath, Betsy L.; Thorpe, Carolyn T.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Alzheimer's patients living in rural communities may face significant barriers to effective outpatient medical care. Purpose: We sought to examine rural-urban differences in risk for ambulatory care sensitive hospitalizations (ACSH), an indicator of access to outpatient care, in community-dwelling veterans with dementia. Methods: Medicare…

  2. Community orientation in hospitals: an institutional and resource dependence perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Proenca, E J; Rosko, M D; Zinn, J S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conceptualize community orientation-defined as the generation, dissemination, and use of community health-need intelligence-as a strategic response to environmental pressures, and to test a theoretically justified model of the predictors of community orientation in hospitals. DATA SOURCES: The analysis used data for 4,578 hospitals obtained from the 1994 and 1995 American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey and the 1994 Medicare Hospital Cost Report data sets. Market-level data came from the Area Resource File. STUDY DESIGN: Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the effects of hospital size, dependence on managed care, ownership, network, system and alliance memberships, and level of diffusion of community-orientation practices in the area on the degree of community orientation in hospitals. The model, based on Oliver's (1991) framework of organizational responsiveness to environmental pressures, controlled for the effects of industry concentration and lagged profitability. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Degree of community orientation is significantly related to hospital size; ownership; dependence on managed care; and membership in a network, system, or alliance. It is also significantly related to the diffusion of community-orientation practices among other area hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Degree of community orientation is influenced by the nature of environmental pressures and by hospital interests. It is higher in hospitals that are large, nonprofit, or members of a network, system, or alliance; in hospitals that are more dependent on managed care; and in hospitals that operate in areas with higher diffusion of community-orientation activities. PMID:11130801

  3. Treatment of hyperthyroidism in community hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Gossain, V.V.; Heath, R.C.; Rovner, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The preferred treatment of hyperthyroidism remains controversial. Most of this data is derived from large, university-based medical centers. We report here our experience with treatment of hyperthyroidism in a community setting. This involves 144 patients with hyperthyroidism who were seen over a 10 year period at Michigan State University Clinical Center and were treated in the community hospitals and private physicians' offices, and by community surgeons. Follow-up data were available on 119 of these patients; 105 of them were hyperthyroid because of Graves' disease and multinodular goiter. Patients were encouraged to make their own decisions regarding choice of therapy, as independently as possible. Sixty-five percent of these patients were treated by 131I, 18% by antithyroid drugs, and 17% by surgery. The mean follow-up period was 2.5 years (range 2 months to 19 years). Hyperthyroidism was controlled in 84% of the patients treated by 131I and 83% of the patients treated by surgery. Forty percent of the patients treated by 131I and 33% treated by surgery became hypothyroid. Fifty percent of the patients achieved remission when treated by antithyroid drugs alone. Our results indicate that when patients are encouraged to make their own decisions regarding the treatment of hyperthyroidism, their choices are similar to those of the thyroidologists. Secondly, the results obtained with different modalities of treatment for hyperthyroidism in a community setting are similar to those obtained in university medical centers.

  4. Processing Community Model Output: An Approach to Community Accessibility (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, D.; Haley, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is a fully-coupled, global climate model that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate states. The major components are models of the atmosphere, land, ocean and sea-ice. In both the development and production phases, the model output must be analyzed by developers and a diverse community of climate researchers. To facilitate community accessibility to the data, two decisions were made: (a) each component model would archive results in netCDF format (b) a supported and portable software analysis tool would be made available. NetCDF (network Common Data Format) is a set of software libraries and machine-independent data formats that support the creation, access, and sharing of array-oriented scientific data. It is available for a large variety of programming languages and many software tools can be used to manipulate and display data in netCDF files. After a 'competition' which included commercial and public domain software products, the NCAR Command Language (NCL) was selected as the 'official' analysis tool for CCSM analysis. NCL is a portable, supported software product for file handling, computations and high-quality graphics. Subsequently, a development team consisting of software engineers and scientists was created to collaborate to develop a tool capable of addressing the evolving and diverse needs of the climate modeling and observational research communities. The process of educating the user community about netCDF and NCL includes hundreds of online examples and numerous 'hands-on' workshops. The latter are held 3-to-5 times per year at NCAR and external locations.

  5. Health and Taxes: Hospitals, Community Health and the IRS.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act created new conditions of federal tax exemption for nonprofit hospitals, including a requirement that hospitals conduct a community health needs assessment (CHNA) every three years to identify significant health needs in their communities and then develop and implement a strategy responding to those needs. As a result, hospitals must now do more than provide charity care to their patients in exchange for the benefits of tax exemption. The CHNA requirement has the potential both to prompt a radical change in hospitals' relationship to their communities and to enlist hospitals as meaningful contributors to community health improvement initiatives. Final regulations issued in December 2014 clarify hospitals' obligations under the CHNA requirement, but could do more to facilitate hospitals' engagement in collaborative community health projects. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has a rich opportunity, while hospitals are still learning to conduct CHNAs, to develop guidance establishing clear but flexible expectations for how providers should assess and address community needs. This Article urges the IRS to seize that opportunity by refining its regulatory framework for the CHNA requirement. Specifically, the IRS should more robustly promote transparency, accountability, community engagement, and collaboration while simultaneously leaving hospitals a good degree of flexibility. By promoting alignment between hospitals' regulatory compliance activities and broader community health improvement initiatives, the IRS could play a meaningful role in efforts to reorient our system towards promoting health and not simply treating illness. PMID:27363258

  6. Health and Taxes: Hospitals, Community Health and the IRS.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act created new conditions of federal tax exemption for nonprofit hospitals, including a requirement that hospitals conduct a community health needs assessment (CHNA) every three years to identify significant health needs in their communities and then develop and implement a strategy responding to those needs. As a result, hospitals must now do more than provide charity care to their patients in exchange for the benefits of tax exemption. The CHNA requirement has the potential both to prompt a radical change in hospitals' relationship to their communities and to enlist hospitals as meaningful contributors to community health improvement initiatives. Final regulations issued in December 2014 clarify hospitals' obligations under the CHNA requirement, but could do more to facilitate hospitals' engagement in collaborative community health projects. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has a rich opportunity, while hospitals are still learning to conduct CHNAs, to develop guidance establishing clear but flexible expectations for how providers should assess and address community needs. This Article urges the IRS to seize that opportunity by refining its regulatory framework for the CHNA requirement. Specifically, the IRS should more robustly promote transparency, accountability, community engagement, and collaboration while simultaneously leaving hospitals a good degree of flexibility. By promoting alignment between hospitals' regulatory compliance activities and broader community health improvement initiatives, the IRS could play a meaningful role in efforts to reorient our system towards promoting health and not simply treating illness.

  7. From cottage to community hospitals: Watlington Cottage Hospital and its regional context, 1874-2000.

    PubMed

    Hall, John

    2012-01-01

    The appearance in England from the 1850s of 'cottage hospitals' in considerable numbers constituted a new and distinctive form of hospital provision. The historiography of hospital care has emphasised the role of the large teaching hospitals, to the neglect of the smaller and general practitioner hospitals. This article inverts that attention, by examining their history and shift in function to 'community hospitals'within their regional setting in the period up to 2000. As the planning of hospitals on a regional basis began from the 1920s, the impact of NHS organisational and planning mechanisms on smaller hospitals is explored through case studies at two levels. The strategy for community hospitals of the Oxford NHS Region--one of the first Regions to formulate such a strategy--and the impact of that strategy on one hospital, Watlington Cottage Hospital, is critically examined through its existence from 1874 to 2000. PMID:23057181

  8. Should psychiatric patients be granted access to their hospital records?

    PubMed

    Sergeant, H

    1986-12-01

    Beginning in September 1987, the British public will have the right to consult their computerized medical records and by extension, it is expected, noncomputerized ones as well. The author analyzed the case notes of 100 consecutive patients admitted under his care to a psychiatric day hospital. He classified material likely to affect patients adversely as puzzling or unintelligible, alarming, apparently insulting or objectionable, or sensitive information from or about others. Sergeant rejects proposals to omit sensitive material, to keep secret notes, or to grant access only to some psychiatric patients or to deny access to psychiatric patients as a class. Maintaining that there is no dividing line between somatic and psychological medicine, he concludes that access to personal health data for all patients should be limited to the disclosure of bare administrative details. Further information should be supplied within the traditional medical consultation.

  9. Six medical students in a community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Michael C. P.; Bass, Sydney; Emery, Arnold W.; Thomson, Thomas A.; Vaughan, Gerrard A.; Wong, Wilfred T. Y.; Youngash, Ronald N.; Zack, Phillip S.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes part of an education experiment at the University of British Columbia at Vancouver. Six final-year medical students spent approximately 12 weeks in a community. Their time was divided between the hospital and various doctors' offices. They answered a simple questionnaire to describe their experiences and commented favourably upon the opportunities for direct patient contact, learning basic skills, informal teaching by both family physicians and consultants, and the variety of work available. They had the opportunity to follow up the progress of the patient and learn the natural history of common illnesses. They achieved their basic objectives. We conclude from their reports and informal conversation that the experiment was successful and recommend other institutions to try similar programs. PMID:4758859

  10. Illinois Community College Board: Baccalaureate Access Task Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community College Board, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the background and history of community college role in baccalaureate access in Illinois from 1901 to the present and describes the role of the Baccalaureate Access Task Force, which commenced its work in December 2004. The Baccalaureate Access Task Force was charged with examining the extent of the baccalaureate access issues…

  11. 42 CFR 424.106 - Criteria for determining whether the hospital was the most accessible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... factors in determining whether a nonparticipating hospital in a rural area meets the accessibility... transportation facilities available to these hospitals. (3) The quality of the roads to each hospital. (4)...

  12. 42 CFR 424.106 - Criteria for determining whether the hospital was the most accessible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... factors in determining whether a nonparticipating hospital in a rural area meets the accessibility... transportation facilities available to these hospitals. (3) The quality of the roads to each hospital. (4)...

  13. 42 CFR 424.106 - Criteria for determining whether the hospital was the most accessible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... whether a nonparticipating hospital in a rural area meets the accessibility requirements: (1) The relative... available to these hospitals. (3) The quality of the roads to each hospital. (4) The availability of beds...

  14. 42 CFR 424.106 - Criteria for determining whether the hospital was the most accessible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... factors in determining whether a nonparticipating hospital in a rural area meets the accessibility... transportation facilities available to these hospitals. (3) The quality of the roads to each hospital. (4)...

  15. Community-, Healthcare- and Hospital-Acquired Severe Sepsis Hospitalizations in the University HealthSystem Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Page, David B.; Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Severe sepsis poses a major burden on the U.S. healthcare system. Previous epidemiologic studies have not differentiated community-acquired severe sepsis from healthcare-associated severe sepsis or hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations. We sought to compare and contrast community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations in a national hospital sample. Setting United States Interventions None Measurements & Main Results Prevalence of community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis, adjusted hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, length of stay in an ICU, and hospital costs. Among 3,355,753 hospital discharges, there were 307,491 with severe sepsis, including 193,081 (62.8%) community-acquired severe sepsis, 79,581 (25.9%) healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and 34,829 (11.3%) hospital-acquired severe sepsis. Hospital-acquired severe sepsis and healthcare-associated severe sepsis exhibited higher in-hospital mortality than community-acquired severe sepsis (hospital-acquired [19.2%] vs healthcare-associated [12.8%] vs community-acquired [8.6%]). Hospital-acquired severe sepsis had greater resource utilization than both healthcare-associated severe sepsis and community-acquired severe sepsis, with higher median length of hospital stay (hospital acquired [17 d] vs healthcare associated [7 d] vs community-acquired [6 d]), median length of ICU stay (hospital-acquired [8 d] vs healthcare-associated [3 d] vs community-acquired [3 d]), and median hospital costs (hospital-acquired [$38,369] vs healthcare-associated [$8,796] vs community-acquired [$7,024]). Conclusions In this series, severe sepsis hospitalizations included CA-SS (62.8%), HCA-SS (25.9%) and HA-SS (11.3%) cases. HA-SS was associated with both higher mortality and resource utilization than CA-SS and HCA-SS. PMID:26110490

  16. Finding your first job in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Aaron G

    2011-12-01

    Community hospitals offer excellent opportunities for graduating orthopaedic trauma fellows. To successfully compete for these jobs, applicants today must be better prepared than their predecessors. Organizing your practice aspirations and researching job opportunities before the interview are necessary for an effective job search. Often, a collaborative effort with hospital administrators is required to establish a viable practice that fulfills the unique needs of the hospital and surrounding community while concurrently satisfying your practice goals. Issues to consider in defining your desired practice, guidelines on how to prepare for an interview with a community hospital, and suggestions on how to justify the expense of establishing your practice are presented.

  17. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inaccessible for at least 30 days in each 2 out of 3 years. (2) The hospital is located between 15 and 25 miles... conditions, the other like hospitals are inaccessible for at least 30 days in each 2 out of 3 years. (3.... (i) Sole community hospital status is effective 30 days after the date of CMS's written...

  18. Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Polypharmacy Clinic.

    PubMed

    Ridderhoff, Kevin J; Hull, Jessica R; Sandberg, Sheila K

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of central nervous system depressants (CNSD) and psychotropics are one of the many factors that contribute to suicidal behavior in soldiers. U.S. Army policy requires medication screening for any soldier prescribed 4 or more medications when at least 1 of the medications is a CNSD or psychotropic. Constant deployments challenged health care provider ability to comply with required screenings, and senior leaders sought proactive intervention to reduce medication risks upon return of the 101 st Airborne Division (Air Assault) from deployment in 2011. A pharmacy-led team established the Polypharmacy Clinic (PC) at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital. Of the 3,999 soldiers assigned, 540 (13.5%) met the initial screening criteria. Success of the pilot program led to the mandatory screening of all other Fort Campbell, Kentucky, brigades. During the first 12 months, 895 soldiers were seen by a clinical pharmacist, and 1,574 interventions were documented. Significant interventions included medication added (121), medication changed (258), medication stopped (164), lab monitoring recommended (172), adverse reaction mitigated (41), therapeutic duplication prevented (61), and drug-drug interaction identified (93). Additionally, 55 soldiers were recommended for temporary duty profiles based on their adverse drug effects. Ten soldiers were recommended for enhanced controlled substance monitoring. Placing soldiers on clinically appropriate medications and removing potentially harmful medications from their possession are examples of how the PC positively impacted the Commanding General's ability to deploy a fully medically ready force. Soldiers consistently remarked favorably on the thorough medication counseling provided at their PC appointments. Innovative notes within the electronic health record summarized relevant findings regarding soldiers' medications, which allowed providers to quickly pinpoint and adjust medication regimens. With each identified high

  19. Enhancing the Care Continuum in Rural Areas: Survey of Community Health Center-Rural Hospital Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Michael E.; Xirasagar, Sudha; Elder, Keith T.; Probst, Janice C.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Community Health Centers (CHCs) and Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) play a significant role in providing health services for rural residents across the United States. Purpose: The overall goal of this study was to identify the CAHs that have collaborations with CHCs, as well as to recognize the content of the collaborations and the…

  20. When Hospitals Join the Community: Practical Considerations and Ethical Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Daniel; Gardner, William; Kelleher, Kelly J

    2016-01-01

    Written from the perspective of hospitals, this article examines, in theory and in practice, challenges associated with hospitals' efforts to engage in neighborhood development more fully with the communities that neighbor them. Increasingly, these efforts include significant investments in housing, safety, and educational initiatives. These investments stretch the traditional expertise of medical practitioners and administrators and raise ethical and political questions about how best to engage and work with communities. After first describing the contexts within which hospital-community relationships arise, we examine ethical and political considerations likely to bear on the success of these projects. We conclude with recommendations to hospitals for operating within communities in a way that is consistent with hospitals' ethical commitments. PMID:27524759

  1. When Hospitals Join the Community: Practical Considerations and Ethical Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Daniel; Gardner, William; Kelleher, Kelly J

    2016-01-01

    Written from the perspective of hospitals, this article examines, in theory and in practice, challenges associated with hospitals' efforts to engage in neighborhood development more fully with the communities that neighbor them. Increasingly, these efforts include significant investments in housing, safety, and educational initiatives. These investments stretch the traditional expertise of medical practitioners and administrators and raise ethical and political questions about how best to engage and work with communities. After first describing the contexts within which hospital-community relationships arise, we examine ethical and political considerations likely to bear on the success of these projects. We conclude with recommendations to hospitals for operating within communities in a way that is consistent with hospitals' ethical commitments.

  2. The Effect of Rural Hospital Closures on Community Economic Health

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, George M; Slifkin, Rebecca T; Randolph, Randy K; Poley, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of rural hospital closures on the local economy. Data Sources U.S. Census Bureau, OSCAR, Medicare Cost Reports, and surveys of individuals knowledgeable about local hospital closures. Study Design Economic data at the county level for 1990–2000 were combined with information on hospital closures. The study sample was restricted to rural counties experiencing a closure during the sample period. Longitudinal regression methods were used to estimate the effect of hospital closure on per-capita income, unemployment rate, and other community economic measures. Models included both leading and lagged closure terms allowing a preclosure economic downturn as well as time for the closure to be fully realized by the community. Data Collection Information on closures was collected by contacting every state hospital association, reconciling information gathered with that contained in the American Hospital Association file and OIG reports. Principal Findings Results indicate that the closure of the sole hospital in the community reduces per-capita income by $703 (p<0.05) or 4 percent (p<0.05) and increases the unemployment rate by 1.6 percentage points (p<0.01). Closures in communities with alternative sources of hospital care had no long-term economic impact, although income decreased for 2 years following the closure. Conclusions The local economic effects of a hospital closure should be considered when regulations that affect hospitals' financial well-being are designed or changed. PMID:16584460

  3. Audit of surgical practice in a community hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D B

    1984-01-01

    The results of a prospective analysis of one year's surgery on inpatients in a busy community hospital showed that a high quality of surgery may be achieved with safety and low rates of complications. The results of a retrospective analysis of certain aspects of surgery was just as encouraging. Surgery that is performed in a community hospital is convenient for the patient, provides continuity of care by the general practitioner, and waiting list times are short. Surgical facilities can form an integral part of the comprehensive service provided by a community hospital and can lighten the caseload for minor surgery at the district general hospital. Close liaison between the two hospitals is essential. PMID:6424831

  4. 42 CFR 424.106 - Criteria for determining whether the hospital was the most accessible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criteria for determining whether the hospital was... Conditions: Emergency Services Furnished by a Nonparticipating Hospital § 424.106 Criteria for determining whether the hospital was the most accessible. (a) Basic requirement. (1) The hospital must be the...

  5. EXPLORING THE IMPACT OF A COMMUNITY HOSPITAL CLOSURE ON OLDER ADULTS: A FOCUS GROUP STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Countouris, Malamo; Gilmore, Sandra; Yonas, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The closing of hospitals has exacerbated challenges for older adults in accessing healthcare, especially those living in economically underserved settings. Through focus groups and a community-engaged approach, our study examined and documented the emergent health needs of older adults following the closing of a local hospital in an economically disadvantaged community. Focus groups were reconvened to assess progress and health needs over time. Analyses of the focus groups (n=37, mean age 77, 84% female) illustrated the impact of the closure and the emergence of the following dominant themes: perceptions of the hospital system, including feelings of abandonment and social isolation; transportation challenges in accessing health care resources; and lack of knowledge and literacy regarding available health care and obtaining health services. Discussion sessions with hospital administrators and participants afforded an opportunity for sharing data and additional assessment. The data and relationships developed with community participants and health system representatives resulted in the production of an information resource about access to health services, tailored for older adults. PMID:24448403

  6. Residential Broadband Access for Students at Walters State Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of internet access for students attending Walters State Community College during the spring semester 2010. In particular, it is unknown to what degree broadband internet access is available in the counties that Walters State considers the service area of the college. The research was…

  7. From bench to bedside: research and testing of Internet resources and connections in community hospital libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Rambo, N.; Fuller, S.

    1993-01-01

    Access to information becomes more valuable with the continuing proliferation of medical knowledge and the increasing economic pressure being experienced by health care organizations. This is particularly so for community hospitals in rural or isolated areas, where the economic pressures are at least as great as in urban areas and where access to information is often inadequate. These conditions have implications for the quality of patient care and for economic viability. In response to this, the National Library of Medicine, the University of Washington, and seven community hospitals in five Pacific Northwest states have joined forces in a broad-scale technology diffusion project to facilitate the application of research work to clinical care. There are three components to the project: 1) a pilot connections component to extend Internet access to the community hospitals, 2) a research component to test the performance of a client/server model for network access to anatomical text and images, and 3) a clinical component to develop a registry of DNA diagnostic laboratories facilitating the provision of genetic information to clinicians. The pilot connections component is described and preliminary findings are reported. PMID:8130534

  8. Community variation in adolescent access to indoor tanning facilities.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ardis L; Carlos, Heather A; Sarnoff, Rachel A

    2013-04-01

    Melanoma rates among younger women in New Hampshire (NH) are rising. In urban studies, youth proximity to tanning facilities has been linked to indoor tanning, a proven cause of melanoma. Youth access has not been examined in rural settings. To determine on a statewide basis the influence of rurality and community income level on female students' ease of access to tanning facilities, all NH tanning facilities (N = 261) and high schools (N = 77) in 2011 were spatially and statistically analyzed to determine schools with more facilities within 2 miles of the school and greater capacity (fewer female students per facility), for indoor tanning. Schools above the state-wide average for both measures were classified as "Easy Access" to indoor tanning. Among NH high schools, 74 % have 1 or more tanning facility within two miles and 22 % have "Easy Access" to tanning facilities. Ease of access did not differ by rurality. Lower-income school status was an independent predictor of both greater capacity and "Easy Access". While urban and rural teens have similar access to indoor tanning, female students in lower-income communities have easier access. Variations in access by community size and income must be considered in planning interventions to address youth indoor tanning.

  9. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and, Community Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, M. Moss

    1973-01-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients. PMID:4725343

  10. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and community involvement.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, M M

    1973-07-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients.

  11. Community College Selective Enrollment and the Challenge to Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, David Brian

    2012-01-01

    The open access mission is central to the community college role and mission in higher education. Although initially implemented by four-year colleges and universities, adoption of formal enrollment management initiatives in community colleges is on the increase. Admission, matriculation, retention, and persistence are affected by enrollment…

  12. Identifying Key Hospital Service Quality Factors in Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain

    2015-01-01

    Background The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. Objective As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. Methods We defined social media–based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea’s two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media–based key quality factors for hospitals. Results To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is

  13. Hospitality: transformative service to children, families, and communities.

    PubMed

    Melton, Gary B

    2014-11-01

    Hospitality is an ancient moral practice that was deeply embedded in early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Hospitality requires acceptance of, service to, and respect for people who lack a place in the community. The contemporary importance of this practice reflects the social disconnection and economic disadvantage of many young parents and the high frequency of separation of young people, including many young parents, from their communities. Such social deterioration substantially increases the risk of child maltreatment. Building on the proposals of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, Strong Communities for Children demonstrated the effectiveness of community building in reducing such risk. It further suggested the importance of both relying on and learning from hospitable people in strengthening support for children and their parents.

  14. Hospitality: transformative service to children, families, and communities.

    PubMed

    Melton, Gary B

    2014-11-01

    Hospitality is an ancient moral practice that was deeply embedded in early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Hospitality requires acceptance of, service to, and respect for people who lack a place in the community. The contemporary importance of this practice reflects the social disconnection and economic disadvantage of many young parents and the high frequency of separation of young people, including many young parents, from their communities. Such social deterioration substantially increases the risk of child maltreatment. Building on the proposals of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, Strong Communities for Children demonstrated the effectiveness of community building in reducing such risk. It further suggested the importance of both relying on and learning from hospitable people in strengthening support for children and their parents. PMID:25486150

  15. Accessibility & Inclusivity in the Astronomical Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Lauren; Shanahan, J.; Monkiewicz, Jacqueline A.; Noel-Storr, Jacob; Murphy, Nicholas Arnold

    2016-06-01

    Nearly one in five Americans have a disability. However, in a 2013 survey, fewer than 2% of AAS members identified as having a disability. Persons with disabilities are dramatically underrepresented in STEM fields and astronomy in particular. Though the Americans with Disabilities Act has been law for 25 years, few astronomy departments have implemented full universal design and structures for accessibility for students. Our field which often sees itself as pushing the limits can offer an environment for enhanced stigmatization and discrimination based on disability. Indeed, many current structures place undue burden to those who are excluded. Instead, we aspire to a way of working together that does not require disclosure of disability, and where diverse needs are being met with each of our interactions and activities. A mindset of diverse access makes the experience of learning, working, and collaborating stronger for all.

  16. Internationally educated nurse hiring: geographic distribution, community, and hospital characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hyun; Masselink, Leah E; Jones, Cheryl B; Mark, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    As the largest importer of internationally educated nurses (IENs), the United States is considered to be the epicenter of global nurse migration. The purposes of this study were to examine the geographic distribution of IEN hiring and determine associations between community and hospital characteristics and IEN hiring. More community characteristics than hospital characteristics were strongly associated with IEN hiring which suggest perceived community needs and receptivity to lENs could be an important consideration in hospital administrators' decisions to hire IENs. These findings suggest that as the U.S. population ages and becomes increasingly diverse, the demand for IENs is likely to grow. Nurse leaders and faculty may face challenges with regard to the ethical recruitment of IENs from low-income countries, incorporation of IENs into U.S. health care organizations, and continued development of a diverse U.S.-educated nursing workforce. This study expands understanding of the demand side of IEN employment in U.S. hospitals by providing the first in-depth examination of the community and hospital factors related to hospitals' IEN hiring.

  17. Geographical access to community pharmacies in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Norris, Pauline; Horsburgh, Simon; Sides, Gerald; Ram, Sanya; Fraser, John

    2014-09-01

    Geographic access to community pharmacies is an important aspect of access to appropriate medicines. This study aimed to explore changes in the number and location of pharmacies in New Zealand and determine whether some populations have poor geographical access to pharmacies. Pharmacy numbers in New Zealand have been declining since the mid-1980s, and, adjusted for population growth, there are now only half the number there was in 1965. While the urbanisation of pharmacies has been matched by loss of population in rural areas, the loss of pharmacies from smaller rural towns leaves many people with poor access to pharmacy services.

  18. Myths versus facts in emergency department overcrowding and hospital access block.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Drew B; Mountain, David

    2009-04-01

    Overcrowding occurs when emergency department (ED) function is impeded, primarily by overwhelming of ED staff resources and physical capacity by excessive numbers of patients needing or receiving care. Access block occurs when there is excessive delay in access to appropriate inpatient beds (> 8 hours total time in the ED). Access block for admitted patients is the principal cause of overcrowding, and is mainly the result of a systemic lack of capacity throughout health systems, and not of inappropriate presentations by patients who should have attended a general practitioner. Overcrowding is most strongly associated with excessive numbers of admitted patients being kept in the ED. Excessive numbers of admitted patients in the ED are associated with diminished quality of care and poor patient outcomes. These include (but are not limited to) adverse events, errors, delayed time-critical care, increased morbidity and excess deaths (estimated as at least 1500 per annum in Australia). There is no evidence that telephone advice lines or collocated after-hours GP services assist in reducing ED workloads. Changes to ED structure and function do not address the underlying causes or major adverse effects of overcrowding. They are also rapidly overwhelmed by increasing access block. The causes of overcrowding, and hence the solutions, lie outside the ED. Solutions will mainly be found in managing hospital bedstock and systemic capacity (including the use of step-down and community resources) so that appropriate inpatient beds remain available for acutely sick patients. PMID:19351311

  19. Community hospital successfully implements eRecord and CPOE.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Debra M; Greenhouse, Pamela K; Diamond, Joel N; Fera, William; McCormick, Donna L

    2006-01-01

    Despite media attention on converting the nation's paper-based medical record systems to electronic systems, few hospitals, and even fewer community hospitals, have done so. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center St. Margaret has converted to a comprehensive electronic health record system, known as eRecord, in a short time. The authors describe key factors that were critical to the success of the conversion, along with positive results on quality of care.

  20. Outpatient vaginal hysterectomy in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M A; Lalich, R A; Meyer, M M; Widener, J

    1994-08-01

    From Sept 1, 1992 to Dec 31, 1993, 38 outpatient vaginal hysterectomy patients were evaluated for identification of complications after discharge, adequacy of pain relief at home, return to baseline lifestyle, and costs. No complications that would have necessitated an overnight or longer stay were identified. All patients reported adequate pain relief and a more rapid return to activity than they had expected. The hospital cost of outpatient vaginal hysterectomy was about half that of inpatient, and additional significant savings were realized in the cost of postoperative medication. Patients were positive about returning home the day of surgery and would recommend the protocol to others who qualified.

  1. Hispanic access to hospice services in a predominantly Hispanic community.

    PubMed

    Adams, Carolyn E; Horn, Kathryn; Bader, Julia

    2006-01-01

    Although the largest minority population in the United States, Hispanics are under-represented in hospice at the national level. The study purpose was to document Hispanic access to hospice services in an environment where Hispanics are a majority population. The framework for the study was Aday and Anderson's model for access to medical care. In this framework, access is not defined as availability of services and resources, but whether services are actually used by the people who need them. We completed retrospective chart reviews of 500 Medicare beneficiaries who died in four hospices. Study variables were decedent characteristics and access to hospice and hospice disciplines. Results showed that Hispanics and whites differed on characteristics known to influence access to health services, e.g., preferred language and type of caregiver Although the proportion of Hispanic elders dying in hospice was less than the proportion living in the community, the proportions of Hispanic elders who died in the community or died in their homes were not differentfrom the proportion that died in hospice. When access to hospice disciplines was compared between Hispanic and white decendents, the results showed one difference-more whites than Hispanics had access to volunteer services. Overall, the study showed that Hispanics were not underrepresented in hospice, and they had equal access to hospice disciplines. These findings differ from national data and may be associated with Hispanics being the majority population in the community. To learn how population dominance influences minority access to services, Hispanic access to hospice could be studied in locales with varying proportions of Hispanics in the population.

  2. Focus on: Watsonville Community Hospital Biomedical Engineering Department.

    PubMed

    Shugart, B L

    1986-01-01

    The Journal of Clinical Engineering is pleased to present this FOCUS on the Biomedical Engineering Department of Watsonville Community Hospital (Watsonville, CA). Since the Department's inception in 1983, the growth of the hospital and the surrounding area has resulted in the expansion of the Department and its duties. This paper describes the responsibilities of the two-man Biomedical Engineering Department, which serves this 130-bed hospital and oversees the preventive maintenance and repair of approximately 800 pieces of equipment. In addition, the Department is involved with staff education, equipment inventory control, new equipment purchases, technical consultations, and special projects. PMID:10275912

  3. Reimbursement of sole community hospitals under Medicare's prospective payment System

    PubMed Central

    Freiman, Marc P.; Cromwell, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Under the prospective payment system (PPS), designated sole community hospitals (SCH's), usually smaller than other rural hospitals but offering comparable services, have had higher average cost levels, in part because of underutilization of plant and equipment. This has resulted in negative operating margins on patient revenues, although local financial support and other revenue sources bring margins on total revenues into the positive range. The PPS legislation has also provided SCH's temporary protection from volume declines. SCH's are more likely than other rural hospitals to experience large volume swings, but only for declines greater than the threshold specified under PPS. PMID:10312392

  4. Access to Democracy Project: Community Report on Attitudes Regarding Educational Attainment. Grand Rapids (Michigan) Surrounding Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daun-Barnett, Nathan J.; Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2005-01-01

    The "Access to Democracy" project has two broad goals. It is an effort to understand community beliefs, attitudes and conditions that shape educational outcomes for community youth, and it is a way to focus community discussions on efforts that support higher educational attainment for residents. This report focuses on the lessons learned in the…

  5. Accountability for Community Benefit: A Reasonable Expectation for Canadian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Graham, J Ross

    2016-05-01

    North American hospitals have historically struggled to engage in prevention and health promotion activities because they have not been incentivized or held accountable for doing so. However, in order to be exempt from federal taxes, 3,000 non-profit hospitals in the US must now regularly assess the health status of the communities they serve, and take action to address identified health needs. This is called "accountability for community benefit," and it is required under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly known as Obamacare). A modified version of accountability for community benefit warrants exploration in the Canadian context, as it may support Canadian hospitals to direct resources towards prevention and health promotion activities - something many Canadian hospitals want to do, but struggle with in the current accountability environment. This is an important health policy topic because even a small shift in focus by hospitals towards prevention and health promotion has the potential to improve population health and reduce healthcare demand. PMID:27232233

  6. Accountability for Community Benefit: A Reasonable Expectation for Canadian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Graham, J Ross

    2016-05-01

    North American hospitals have historically struggled to engage in prevention and health promotion activities because they have not been incentivized or held accountable for doing so. However, in order to be exempt from federal taxes, 3,000 non-profit hospitals in the US must now regularly assess the health status of the communities they serve, and take action to address identified health needs. This is called "accountability for community benefit," and it is required under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly known as Obamacare). A modified version of accountability for community benefit warrants exploration in the Canadian context, as it may support Canadian hospitals to direct resources towards prevention and health promotion activities - something many Canadian hospitals want to do, but struggle with in the current accountability environment. This is an important health policy topic because even a small shift in focus by hospitals towards prevention and health promotion has the potential to improve population health and reduce healthcare demand.

  7. Internet Point of Care Learning at a Community Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinusas, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Internet point of care (PoC) learning is a relatively new method for obtaining continuing medical education credits. Few data are available to describe physician utilization of this CME activity. Methods: We describe the Internet point of care system we developed at a medium-sized community hospital and report on its first year of…

  8. Accessing the Food Systems in Urban and Rural Minnesotan Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Chery; Miller, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Explore how urban and rural Minnesotans access the food system and to investigate whether community infrastructure supports a healthful food system. Design: Eight (4 urban and 4 rural) focus groups were conducted. Setting and Participants: Eight counties with urban influence codes of 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, and 10. Fifty-nine (urban, n = 27;…

  9. Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia requiring admission to hospital.

    PubMed

    Klimek, J J; Ajemian, E; Fontecchio, S; Gracewski, J; Klemas, B; Jimenez, L

    1983-06-01

    Patients who develop bacterial pneumonia in the community often require admission to acute-care hospitals. Knowledge of the incidence of pneumonia due to different pathogens that are brought into an institution from the community may play a role in determining the patterns of infecting organisms responsible for hospital-acquired pneumonia. For 1 year, we prospectively reviewed the records of patients admitted to our 1000-bed community hospital with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Patients had clinical signs and symptoms, positive radiologic findings, and pure cultures of potential pathogens from sputum, blood, pleural fluid, lung aspirate, lung biopsy, or transtracheal aspirate. Pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila was diagnosed by serum indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) titer greater than or equal to 1:256 and clinical signs and symptoms along with response to erythromycin. Of 204 patients with bacterial pneumonia, the following pathogens were implicated: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus species, L. pneumophila, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, oral anaerobic bacteria, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and others. Most patients were more than 50 years of age and many had evidence of underlying pulmonary disease. The etiology of CABP may not be as predictable as in the past. Empiric antimicrobial therapy for CABP should include agents with activity against the pathogens prevalent in the community.

  10. Sole Community Hospitals: Are They Different? A Statistical Analysis of the Hospitals and Their Treatment under TEFRA and PPS. Hospital Studies Program. Hospital Cost and Utilization Project. Research Note 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Dean E.

    A study examined the treatment of sole community hospitals under the Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982 (TEFRA) and the Prospective Payment System (PPS) for Medicare as compared to the treatment of hospitals not designated as sole community hospitals under these same two policy guidelines. (A sole community hospital is defined as a…

  11. PAHO'S Strategy for Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage: implications for health services and hospitals in LAC.

    PubMed

    Holder, Reynaldo; Fabrega, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Moving towards Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage (UAH/UHC) is an imperative task on the health agenda for the Americas. The Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) recently approved resolution CD53.R14, titled Strategy for Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage. From the perspective of the Region of the Americas, UAH/UHC "imply that all people and communities have access, without any kind of discrimination, to comprehensive, appropriate and timely, quality health services determined at the national level according to needs, as well as access to safe, affordable, effective, quality medicines, while ensuring that the use of these services does not expose users to financial hardship, especially groups in conditions of vulnerability". PAHO's strategic approach to UAH/UHC sets out four specific lines of action toward effective universal health systems. The first strategic line proposes: a) implementation of integrated health services delivery networks (IHDSNs) based on primary health care as the key strategy for reorganizing, redefining and improving healthcare services in general and the role of hospitals in particular; and b) increasing the response capacity of the first level of care. An important debate initiated in 2011 among hospital and healthcare managers in the region tried to redefine the role of hospitals in the context of IHSDNs and the emerging UAH/UHC movement. The debates resulted in agreements around three main propositions: 1) IHSDNs cannot be envisioned without hospitals; 2) The status-quo and current hospital organizational culture makes IHSDNs inviable; and 3) Without IHSDNs, hospitals will not be sustainable. This process, that predates the approval of PAHO's UAH/UHC resolution, now becomes more relevant with the recognition that UAH/UHC cannot be attained without a profound change in healthcare service and particularly in hospitals. In this context, a set of challenges both for

  12. The business case for a diabetes self-management intervention in a community general hospital.

    PubMed

    Micklethwaite, Ashley; Brownson, Carol A; O'Toole, Mary L; Kilpatrick, Kerry E

    2012-08-01

    There is a growing and increasingly compelling body of evidence that self-management interventions for persons with type 2 diabetes can be both effective and cost-effective from a societal perspective. Yet, the evidence is elusive that these interventions can produce a positive business case for a sponsoring provider organization in the short term. The lack of a business case limits the enthusiasm for provider organizations to implement these proven quality-enhancing interventions more widely. This article provides a case example of a self-management intervention in a community general hospital targeting an underserved population who have significant barriers to receiving regular health care. The 3-component program sought to improve meaningful access to care, increase health literacy related to type 2 diabetes, and partner with the enrollees to make long-term lifestyle changes. The intervention not only resulted in significant improvements in HbA1c levels (-0.77%) but saved the hospital an average of $551 per active patient per year, primarily by reducing hospital visits. With only 255 actively enrolled patients, the hospital can recover fully its total direct annual personnel and operating costs for the program. Because the program serves patients who would have been seen at other hospitals, it also enhanced care quality and reduced costs for the broader community in which the program is embedded.

  13. Variations in Financial Performance among Peer Groups of Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pink, George H.; Holmes, George M.; Thompson, Roger E.; Slifkin, Rebecca T.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Among the large number of hospitals with critical access hospital (CAH) designation, there is substantial variation in facility revenue as well as the number and types of services provided. If these variations have material effects on financial indicators, then performance comparisons among all CAHs are problematic. Purpose: To…

  14. Critical Access Hospitals and Retail Activity: An Empirical Analysis in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Lara; Whitacre, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper takes an empirical approach to determining the effect that a critical access hospital (CAH) has on local retail activity. Previous research on the relationship between hospitals and economic development has primarily focused on single-case, multiplier-oriented analysis. However, as the efficacy of federal and state-level rural…

  15. Assessing the spatial accessibility of hospital care in Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jay; Liu, Huiran; Wang, Xiuli; Xie, Hongmei; Delamater, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Regional disparities in geographical access to hospital care are found throughout China. Understanding variations in the spatial accessibility of hospital care has the potential to provide decision support in healthcare planning. This study examines the hospital system in the Sichuan Province in China, which provides healthcare for more than 80 million people. We examine the impacts of accessibility characterisation via the conventional measurement approach by comparing the results to those derived using a floating catchment area approach. Employing a geographical information system based on population and hospital administrative data, we conducted a province-wide study of the spatial accessibility of hospital care in Sichuan Province, China. A shortest-path analysis and the enhanced two-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method were implemented. Substantial differences between these two approaches were found, including a roughly 15% difference in the total number of under-served areas. Generally, spatial accessibility was higher in the eastern regions of Sichuan. More than 5.5 million people were found to have limited access, with large variations across the province. These results indicate that the official method used by policy makers in China may not capture the true nature of spatial accessibility throughout the region. We recommend that the E2SFCA method be implemented for health services research in China, providing decision makers with more accurate information when setting healthcare policies.

  16. Discounted drug prices for hospitals: result in prescriptions for expensive drugs in the community.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Hospital prescribing has a major influence on community prescribing. In France, pharmaceutical companies can sell drugs to hospitals at dramatically reduced prices in the expectation of increasing sales in community pharmacies. PMID:26417639

  17. Value of laser-assisted angioplasty in the community hospital.

    PubMed

    Levy, J M; Hessel, S J; Horsley, W W; Cook, G C; Dickey, J E

    1989-03-01

    The experience with laser-assisted angioplasty at a community hospital was reviewed. One hundred twenty patients required angioplasty during a 7-month period, and in only 17-13 of whom had superficial femoral artery occlusions--was the use of lasers deemed appropriate. The success rate was 65% for laser-assisted angioplasty and 98% for balloon angioplasty. Laser-assisted angioplasty was the initial intervention in eight of the 13 superficial femoral artery occlusions. In two cases, a wire had been first advanced across the lesion, and in three cases, attempts to cross the lesion with a wire had been unsuccessful. The availability of the laser did not significantly increase the number of cases amenable to angioplasty, and at present laser angioplasty, does not seem to be cost-effective for community hospitals.

  18. A community hospital's journey into Lean Six Sigma.

    PubMed

    Stuenkel, Kurt; Faulkner, Taunya

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of Lean Six Sigma and 100-day workouts throughout the 304-bed Floyd Medical Center community hospital organization has led to sustainable results and a marked change in culture. The organization-wide learning of such an effort is deep and intehse, and to remain focused and successful it must be a priority of top management. The workout methodology can assist the organization to carry projects to completion and to achieve rapid implementation of desired improvements.

  19. First 101 Robotic General Surgery Cases in a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Jarrod C.; Alrajhi, Sharifah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The general surgeon's robotic learning curve may improve if the experience is classified into categories based on the complexity of the procedures in a small community hospital. The intraoperative time should decrease and the incidence of complications should be comparable to conventional laparoscopy. The learning curve of a single robotic general surgeon in a small community hospital using the da Vinci S platform was analyzed. Methods: Measured parameters were operative time, console time, conversion rates, complications, surgical site infections (SSIs), surgical site occurrences (SSOs), length of stay, and patient demographics. Results: Between March 2014 and August 2015, 101 robotic general surgery cases were performed by a single surgeon in a 266-bed community hospital, including laparoscopic cholecystectomies, inguinal hernia repairs; ventral, incisional, and umbilical hernia repairs; and colorectal, foregut, bariatric, and miscellaneous procedures. Ninety-nine of the cases were completed robotically. Seven patients were readmitted within 30 days. There were 8 complications (7.92%). There were no mortalities and all complications were resolved with good outcomes. The mean operative time was 233.0 minutes. The mean console operative time was 117.6 minutes. Conclusion: A robotic general surgery program can be safely implemented in a small community hospital with extensive training of the surgical team through basic robotic skills courses as well as supplemental educational experiences. Although the use of the robotic platform in general surgery could be limited to complex procedures such as foregut and colorectal surgery, it can also be safely used in a large variety of operations with results similar to those of conventional laparoscopy. PMID:27667913

  20. Hospital to community transitions for adults: discharge planners and community service providers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Rosemary Kennedy; Chandran, Devyani; Sergeant, Julie F; Koenig, Terry L

    2014-01-01

    Discharges from the hospital to community-based settings are more difficult for older adults when there is lack of communication, resource sharing, and viable partnerships among service providers in these settings. The researchers captured the perspectives of three different groups of participants from hospitals, independent living centers, and Area Agencies on Aging, which has rarely been done in studies on discharge planning. Findings include identification of barriers in the assessment and referral process (e.g., timing of discharge, inattention to client goals, lack of communication and partnerships between hospital discharge planners and community providers), and strategies for overcoming these barriers. Implications are discussed including potential for Medicaid and Medicare cost reductions due to fewer re-hospitalizations.

  1. 76 FR 65891 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Reform of Hospital and Critical Access Hospital Conditions of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ...) and Rural Primary Care Hospitals (RPCHs)'' (58 FR 30630) that implemented sections 6003(g) and 6116 of... Participation: Patients' Rights'' (71 FR 71378). In that final rule we revised the hospital standards for the... their professional staff (51 FR 22010). These changes were introduced to reflect the trend of...

  2. Developing accessible cyberinfrastructure-enabled knowledge communities in the national disability community: theory, practice, and policy.

    PubMed

    Myhill, William N; Cogburn, Derrick L; Samant, Deepti; Addom, Benjamin Kwasi; Blanck, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Since publication of the Atkins Commission report in 2003, the national scientific community has placed significant emphasis on developing cyberinfrastructure-enabled knowledge communities, which are designed to facilitate enhanced efficiency and collaboration in geographically distributed networks of researchers. This article suggests that the new cyberinfrastructure movement may not fully benefit those participants with disabilities, unless closer attention is paid to legal mandates and universal design principles. Many technology-enhanced learning communities provide geographically distributed collaboration opportunities that expand the inclusion of diverse peoples and help close the digital divide. However, to date, most collaboratory efforts have not emphasized the need for access among people with disabilities nor meeting minimum standards for technological accessibility. To address these concerns, this article reports on two pilot collaboratory studies that explore the role advanced information, communication, and collaboration technologies play in enhancing geographically distributed collaboration among specific research and applied networks within the national disability community. Universal design principles inform the design of the collaboratory and its use and our efforts to ensure access for all. Data for this article come from Web-based surveys, interviews, observations, computer logs, and detailed, mixed-methods accessibility testing. Emerging results suggest that with deliberate and systematic efforts, cyberinfrastructure can be more accessible and generate benefits among persons with disabilities. The authors provide lessons learned and recommendations for future research, policy, law, and practice. PMID:18939656

  3. Developing accessible cyberinfrastructure-enabled knowledge communities in the national disability community: theory, practice, and policy.

    PubMed

    Myhill, William N; Cogburn, Derrick L; Samant, Deepti; Addom, Benjamin Kwasi; Blanck, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Since publication of the Atkins Commission report in 2003, the national scientific community has placed significant emphasis on developing cyberinfrastructure-enabled knowledge communities, which are designed to facilitate enhanced efficiency and collaboration in geographically distributed networks of researchers. This article suggests that the new cyberinfrastructure movement may not fully benefit those participants with disabilities, unless closer attention is paid to legal mandates and universal design principles. Many technology-enhanced learning communities provide geographically distributed collaboration opportunities that expand the inclusion of diverse peoples and help close the digital divide. However, to date, most collaboratory efforts have not emphasized the need for access among people with disabilities nor meeting minimum standards for technological accessibility. To address these concerns, this article reports on two pilot collaboratory studies that explore the role advanced information, communication, and collaboration technologies play in enhancing geographically distributed collaboration among specific research and applied networks within the national disability community. Universal design principles inform the design of the collaboratory and its use and our efforts to ensure access for all. Data for this article come from Web-based surveys, interviews, observations, computer logs, and detailed, mixed-methods accessibility testing. Emerging results suggest that with deliberate and systematic efforts, cyberinfrastructure can be more accessible and generate benefits among persons with disabilities. The authors provide lessons learned and recommendations for future research, policy, law, and practice.

  4. Uncompensated hospital care payment and access for the uninsured: evidence from New Jersey.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, D L; Chen, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We assess the impacts of New Jersey's payment for hospital uncompensated care on access for the uninsured. DATA SOURCES. Uncompensated care charges and other data were obtained from audited reports maintained by the New Jersey State Department of Health. Other data sources include the AHA Annual Survey and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The sample includes 80 of 88 acute care hospitals in the state for 1979 to 1987. STUDY DESIGN. This study used a pre- and postdesign to assess the impacts of the introduction of uncompensated care payment. Both descriptive and multivariate analyses were used. Key variables include hospital ownership and teaching characteristics; the labor force composition; and the level of government funding for public health insurance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The overall level of uncompensated hospital care increased markedly in New Jersey during the period 1979 through 1987. However, this trend can be attributed to variables other than the new payment system, including increased demand for uncompensated care. The program did result in a more even distribution of uncompensated care across hospitals. The financial condition of hospitals providing the largest share of this care also improved, ensuring continued access. CONCLUSIONS. Funding of uncompensated care via hospital payment regulation did not increase its overall provision. However, improved access was achieved as opportunities for the uninsured to receive care were made more widely available. PMID:8163377

  5. [Healthcare access in Benin: poverty and community aid networks].

    PubMed

    Ouendo, Edgard-Marius; Makoutodé, Michel; Wilmet-Dramaix, Michèle; Paraiso, Moussiliou; Dujardin, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of poor and non-poor households to pay for health care and to show how existing community assistance (or solidarity) networks (CAN) may compensate for this inability. Sixteen (16) study sites were randomly selected after stratification of Benin into four groups. All 1,312 households in our sample (668 poor and 664 non-poor) were interviewed, and 48 focus group were held with opinion leaders, women, healthcare workers, social workers, and persons responsible for these networks. The survey showed that only 27% of the heads of households have permanent financial access to health care and health services. This financial access is lower for the poor (9%) than for others (46%). However, the capacity of heads of households to pay reached 84% (87% for the non-poor and 81% for the poor, with P<0.01). Capacity to pay differs between strata (P<0.001) and is higher in the urban strata. For 25% of the families, intervention of the CAN made payment possible, preferentially for the poor. In 90% of cases, this community support came from the family network. Health centre management committees contributed in only 0.8% of cases. In general, help covered only a small percentage of those in need. The health policy of African countries must ensure that health care is accessible to the population, especially the poor.

  6. The influence of Community Access to Child Health (CATCH) program on community pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Soares, Neelkamal S; Hobson, Wendy L; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Finneran, Maureen; Varrasso, Denia A; Keller, David

    2014-01-01

    The CATCH (Community Access to Child Health) Program, which supports pediatricians who engage with the community to improve child health, increase access to health care, and promote advocacy through small seed grants, was last evaluated in 1998. The objective was to describe the characteristics of CATCH grant recipients and projects and assess the community impact of funded projects. Prospective data was collected from CATCH applications (grantee characteristics, topic area and target population for projects funded from 2006-2012) and post-project 2-year follow-up survey (project outcomes, sustainability, and impact for projects funded from 2008 through 2010). From 2006 through 2012, the CATCH Program awarded 401 projects to grantees working mostly in general pediatrics. Eighty-five percent of projects targeted children covered by Medicaid, 33% targeted uninsured children, and 75% involved a Latino population. Main topic areas addressed were nutrition, access to health care, and medical home. Sixty-nine percent of grantees from 2008 to 2010 responded to the follow-up survey. Ninety percent reported completing their projects, and 86% of those projects continued to exist in some form. Grantees reported the development of community partnerships (77%) and enhanced recognition of child health issues in the community (73%) as the most frequent changes due to the projects. The CATCH Program funds community-based projects led by pediatricians that address the medical home and access to care. A majority of these projects and community partnerships are sustained beyond their original CATCH funding and, in many cases, are leveraged into additional financial or other community support.

  7. Hospital study of adult community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, J T; Finch, R G; Ward, M J; Macrae, A D

    1982-07-31

    The cause of primary pneumonia was diagnosed in 124 of 127 consecutive adult patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired illness. Pneumococcal infection was found in 96 (76%) patients and legionnaries' disease was the second commonest infection identified (15%). Other bacterial infections were uncommon. 11 patients had atypical pneumonia, including 7 with psittacosis. There were several mixed infections and most of the 11 patients with viral infections also had bacterial pneumonia. 19 patients died (15%) and mortality was associated with increasing age, the presence of coexisting disease, and the cause of the pneumonia. Recognition of the most likely causes of severe pneumonia allows logical initial antibiotic treatment for such patients admitted to hospital. PMID:6124681

  8. Progress and challenges: implementation and use of health information technology among critical-access hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Meghan Hufstader; Jones, Emily B; Samy, Leila; King, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    Despite major national investments to support the adoption of health information technology (IT), concerns persist that barriers are inhibiting that adoption and the use of advanced health IT capabilities in rural areas in particular. Using a survey of Medicare-certified critical-access hospitals, we examined electronic health record (EHR) adoption, key EHR functionalities, telehealth, and teleradiology, as well as challenges to EHR adoption. In 2013, 89 percent of critical-access hospitals had implemented a full or partial EHR. Adoption of key EHR capabilities varied. Critical-access hospitals that had certain types of technical assistance and resources available to support health IT were more likely to have adopted health IT capabilities and less likely to report significant challenges to EHR implementation and use, compared to other hospitals in the survey. It is important to ensure that the necessary resources and support are available to critical-access hospitals, especially those that operate independently, to assist them in adopting health IT and becoming able to electronically link to the broader health care system.

  9. Electronic medical record systems in critical access hospitals: leadership perspectives on anticipated and realized benefits.

    PubMed

    Mills, Troy R; Vavroch, Jared; Bahensky, James A; Ward, Marcia M

    2010-04-01

    The growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) is driven by the belief that EMRs will significantly improve healthcare providers' performance and reduce healthcare costs. Evidence supporting these beliefs is limited, especially for small rural hospitals. A survey that focused on health information technology (HIT) capacity was administered to all hospitals in Iowa. Structured interviews were conducted with the leadership at 15 critical access hospitals (CAHs) that had implemented EMRs in order to assess the perceived benefits of operational EMRs. The results indicate that most of the hospitals implemented EMRs to improve efficiency, timely access, and quality. Many CAH leaders also viewed EMR implementation as a necessary business strategy to remain viable and improve financial performance. While some reasons reflect external influences, such as perceived future federal mandates, other reasons suggest that the decision was driven by internal forces, including the hospital's culture and the desires of key leaders to embrace HIT. Anticipated benefits were consistent with goals; however, realized benefits were rarely obvious in terms of quantifiable results. These findings expand the limited research on the rationale for implementing EMRs in critical access hospitals.

  10. 75 FR 52960 - Medicare Program; Rural Community Hospital Demonstration Program: Solicitation of Additional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... the June 2, 2010 Federal Register (75 FR 30918)). B. Participation in the Demonstration To participate... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Rural Community Hospital... hospitals to participate in the Rural Community Hospital Demonstration program for a 5-year period....

  11. Access to primary care and the route of emergency admission to hospital: retrospective analysis of national hospital administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Thomas E; Harris, Matthew; Watt, Hilary; Soljak, Michael; Richards, Emma; Gunning, Elinor; Bottle, Alex; Macinko, James; Majeed, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    Background The UK government is pursuing policies to improve primary care access, as many patients visit accident and emergency (A and E) departments after being unable to get suitable general practice appointments. Direct admission to hospital via a general practitioner (GP) averts A and E use, and may reduce total hospital costs. It could also enhance the continuity of information between GPs and hospital doctors, possibly improving healthcare outcomes. Objective To determine whether primary care access is associated with the route of emergency admission—via a GP versus via an A and E department. Methods Retrospective analysis of national administrative data from English hospitals for 2011–2012. Adults admitted in an emergency (unscheduled) for ≥1 night via a GP or an A and E department formed the study population. The measure of primary care access—the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt—was derived from a large, nationally representative patient survey. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate associations, adjusting for patient and admission characteristics. Results The analysis included 2 322 112 emergency admissions (81.9% via an A and E department). With a 5 unit increase in the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt, the adjusted odds of GP admission (vs A and E admission) was estimated to increase by 15% (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.17). The probability of GP admission if ≥95% of appointment attempts were successful in each general practice was estimated to be 19.6%. This probability reduced to 13.6% when <80% of appointment attempts were successful. This equates to 139 673 fewer GP admissions (456 232 vs 316 559) assuming no change in the total number of admissions. Associations were consistent in direction across geographical regions of England. Conclusions Among hospital inpatients admitted as an emergency, patients

  12. [Intraosseous access for in-hospital emergencies. Intensive medical care case study].

    PubMed

    Werner, M; Daniel, H-P; Hoitz, J

    2010-07-01

    Since the release of the 2005 resuscitation guidelines intraosseous infusion has been recognized as the favorite alternative vascular access in emergency patients. It is no longer restricted to paediatric emergencies but is also considered the vascular access of choice for adult patients with difficult venous access. Intraosseous access has been used in an increasing proportion of patients especially in an out-of-hospital emergency care setting while only limited experience exists for in-hospital usage of this technique. This article reports on a case of intraosseous access performed in a critically ill patient directly after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to difficult peripheral venous access. Despite the extensive medical resources available in the ICU (i.e. central venous catheterization) less invasive means were used to render appropriate care. Based on this case different strategies of critical care and possible improvements will be discussed. Intraosseous infusion should be regarded as an infrequently needed but potentially life-saving procedure that is still too often considered as an option at later stages during in-hospital emergency care. PMID:20628712

  13. The role of critical access hospital status in mitigating the effects of new prospective payment systems under Medicare.

    PubMed

    Dalton, K; Slifkin, R T; Howard, H A

    2000-01-01

    This article examines rural hospitals that potentially qualify as critical access hospitals (CAH) and identifies facilities at substantial financial risk as a result of Medicare's expansion of prospective payment systems (PPS) to nonacute settings. Using Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) cost reports from the federal year ending Sept. 30, 1996, combined with county-level sociodemographic data from the Area Resource File (ARF), characteristics of potential CAHs were identified and their finances analyzed to determine whether they could benefit from the cost-based reimbursement rules applicable to CAH status. Rural hospitals were identified as potential CAHs if they met a combination of federal and state criteria for necessary providers. Rural facilities were classified as "at risk" if they had poor financial ratios in conjunction with high levels of dependence on outpatient, home-care or skilled nursing services. Almost 30 percent of all rural hospitals were identified as potential CAHs. Ninety percent of potential CAH facilities were identified as "at risk" by at least one of five possible risk criteria, and one-third were identified by at least three. Of those classified "at risk," 48 percent might not benefit from conversion to CAH because their inpatient Medicare reimbursement would likely be less under CAH payment rules than under their current PPS payment rules. Many potential CAHs were doing well under inpatient PPS because they were sole community hospitals (SCH) and were therefore eligible for special adjustments to the PPS rates. The Rural Hospital Flexibility Act would be more beneficial to the population of isolated rural hospitals if those eligible for both CAH and SCH status were given the option of retaining their SCH inpatient payment arrangements while still qualifying for outpatient cost-based reimbursement.

  14. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-06-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital admission and 48 hours since hospital admission (Katz ADL Index 6→5). The intervention group was those receiving physical therapy for ≥ 0.5 hour/day. Outcomes were Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge and all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate. The intervention and control groups did not differ in the Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge (p = 0.11). All-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in control groups (OR = 0.65, p = 0.02). Hospital-based physical therapy has the benefits toward reducing 30-day hospital readmission rate of acutely ill older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. PMID:26029475

  15. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital admission and 48 hours since hospital admission (Katz ADL Index 6→5). The intervention group was those receiving physical therapy for ≥ 0.5 hour/day. Outcomes were Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge and all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate. The intervention and control groups did not differ in the Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge (p = 0.11). All-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in control groups (OR = 0.65, p = 0.02). Hospital-based physical therapy has the benefits toward reducing 30-day hospital readmission rate of acutely ill older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. PMID:26029475

  16. 77 FR 29033 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Reform of Hospital and Critical Access Hospital Conditions of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... coordination activities to internal hospital management (51 FR 22010, 22017, June 17, 1986). Because we are now...)'' (58 FR 30630) that implemented sections 6003(g) and 6116 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act... Participation'' (76 FR 65891). The proposed rule identified several priority areas in the CoPs for...

  17. Intravenous access during pre-hospital emergency care of non-injured patients: a population-based outcome study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Cooke, Colin R.; Hebert, Paul L.; Rea, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective Advanced, pre-hospital procedures such as intravenous access are commonly performed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, yet little evidence supports their use among non-injured patients. We evaluated the association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients. Methods We analyzed a population-based cohort of adult (aged ≥18 years) non-injured, non-arrest patients transported by four advanced life support agencies to one of 16 hospitals from January 1, 2002 until December 31, 2006. We linked eligible EMS records to hospital administrative data, and used multivariable logistic regression to determine the risk-adjusted association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and hospital mortality. We also tested whether this association differed by patient acuity using a previously published, out-of-hospital triage score. Results Among 56,332 eligible patients, one half (N=28,978, 50%) received pre-hospital intravenous access from EMS personnel. Overall hospital mortality in patients who did and did not receive intravenous access was 3%. However, in multivariable analyses, the placement of pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with an overall reduction in odds of hospital mortality (OR=0.68, 95%CI: 0.56, 0.81). The beneficial association of intravenous access appeared to depend on patient acuity (p=0.13 for interaction). For example, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 1.38 (95%CI: 0.28, 7.0) among those with lowest acuity (score = 0). In contrast, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 0.38 (95%CI: 0.17, 0.9) among patients with highest acuity (score ≥ 6). Conclusions In this population-based cohort, pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with a reduction in hospital mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients with the highest acuity. PMID:21872970

  18. Network unites payers, physicians, hospitals. System participants work together to improve access to care and to design cost-saving incentives.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, J

    1993-05-01

    Through Sacred Heart Health System (SHHS), Eugene, OR, physicians, payers, and hospitals are designing a network that will integrate care and improve access by reducing healthcare costs. Together, system members design cost-saving incentives and the products the system offers the community. They promote managed care as the most efficient means to coordinate care and reduce costs. All participants share in the risks of a capitated payment system. Since the system pulled together the payers, physician groups, and hospitals, many of these entities' management functions were consolidated at the system level to avoid duplication and reduce administrative costs. Bringing in physicians was the most difficult yet important aspect of forming a successful network. Working with two physician groups in the community, the system's sponsor-the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace, Health and Hospital Services-developed the Physician Practice Board. The board, representing 300 physicians, meets weekly and makes recommendations on issues that affect physicians. SHHS also added innovative new functions such as an integrated medical cost management and continuous quality improvement program. Another key to success is a clinically oriented information system, which will allow the system to track patients once they leave the hospital. It also will provide a better understanding of what things have an impact on outcomes and will reduce paperwork. A portion of the system's revenue is designated for initiatives to improve access. And the system recently appointed a tack force on access to explore what they can do in cooperation with others in the community. PMID:10125358

  19. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalization among Children with Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Millman, Alexander J.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Peacock, Georgina; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and etiology of pneumonia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with neurologic disorders, non-neurologic underlying conditions, and no underlying conditions. Study design Children <18 years old hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled at 3 US children’s hospitals. Neurologic disorders included cerebral palsy, developmental delay, Down syndrome, epilepsy, non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities, and spinal cord abnormalities. We compared the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical outcomes of CAP in children with neurologic disorders with those with non-neurologic underlying conditions, and those with no underlying conditions using bivariate, age-stratified, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results From January 2010–June 2012, 2358 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were enrolled; 280 (11.9%) had a neurologic disorder (52.1% of these individuals also had non-neurologic underlying conditions), 934 (39.6%) had non-neurologic underlying conditions only, and 1144 (48.5%) had no underlying conditions. Children with neurologic disorders were older and more likely to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions and children with no underlying conditions; similar proportions were mechanically ventilated. In age-stratified analysis, children with neurologic disorders were less likely to have a pathogen detected than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions. In multivariate analysis, having a neurologic disorder was associated with ICU admission for children ≥2 years of age. Conclusions Children with neurologic disorders hospitalized with CAP were less likely to have a pathogen detected and more likely to be admitted to the ICU than children without neurologic disorders. PMID:27017483

  20. Community services' involvement in the discharge of older adults from hospital into the community

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Michelle; Grimmer, Karen; Kumar, Saravana

    2013-01-01

    Background Community services are playing an increasing role in supporting older adults who are discharged from hospital with ongoing non-acute care needs. However, there is a paucity of information regarding how community services are involved in the discharge process of older individuals from hospital into the community. Methods Twenty-nine databases were searched from 1980 to 2012 (inclusive) for relevant primary published research, of any study design, as well as relevant unpublished work (e.g. clinical guidelines) which investigated community services' involvement in the discharge of older individuals from hospital into the community. Data analysis and quality appraisal (using McMaster critical appraisal tools) were undertaken predominately by the lead author. Data was synthesised qualitatively. Results Twelve papers were eligible for inclusion (five randomised controlled trials, four before and after studies and three controlled trials), involving a total of 8440 older adults (>65 years). These papers reported on a range of interventions. During data synthesis, descriptors were assigned to four emergent discharge methods: Virtual Interface Model, In-reach Interface Model, Out-reach Interface Model and Independent Interface Model. In each model, the findings were mixed in terms of health care and patient and carer outcomes. Conclusions It is plausible that each model identified in this systematic review has a role to play in successfully discharging different cohorts of older adults from hospital. Further research is required to identify appropriate population groups for various discharge models and to select suitable outcome measures to determine the effectiveness of these models, considering all stakeholders' involved. PMID:24179455

  1. Patient Bypass Behavior and Critical Access Hospitals: Implications for Patient Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jiexin (Jason); Bellamy, Gail R.; McCormick, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the extent of bypass for inpatient care among patients living in Critical Access Hospital (CAH) service areas, and to determine factors associated with bypass, the reasons for bypass, and what CAHs can do to retain patients locally. Methods: Six hundred and forty-seven subjects, aged 18 years and older, who had been admitted to…

  2. The Role of International Medical Graduates in America?s Small Rural Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagopian, Amy; Thompson, Matthew J.; Kaltenbach, Emily; Hart, L. Gary

    2004-01-01

    Critical access hospitals (CAHs) are a federal Medicare category for isolated rural facilities with 15 or fewer acute care beds that receive cost-based reimbursement from Medicare. Purpose: This study examines the role of foreign-born international medical graduates (IMGs) in the staffing of CAHs. Methods: Chief executive officers (CEOs) of CAH…

  3. Use of Critical Access Hospital Emergency Rooms by Patients with Mental Health Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, David; Ziller, Erika C.; Loux, Stephenie L.; Gale, John A.; Lambert, David; Yousefian, Anush E.

    2007-01-01

    Context: National data demonstrate that mental health (MH) visits to the emergency room (ER) comprise a small, but not inconsequential, proportion of all visits; however, we lack a rural picture of this issue. Purpose: This study investigates the use of critical access hospital (CAH) ERs by patients with MH problems to understand the role these…

  4. A Correlational Analysis: Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Quality of Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Arshia A.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the compulsion to improve the evident paucity in quality of care, especially in critical access hospitals in the United States, policy makers, healthcare providers, and administrators have taken the advise of researchers suggesting the integration of technology in healthcare. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) System composed of multiple…

  5. A Study of the Access to the Scholarly Record From a Hospital Health Science Core Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James F., II; Pings, Vern M.

    This study is an effort to determine possible service performance levels in hospital libraries, based on access to the scholarly record of medicine through selected lists of clinical journals and indexing and abstracting journals. Specific emphasis is placed on (1) the citation verification through the use of the index and abstract journals, (2)…

  6. Adoption and Perceived Effectiveness of Financial Improvement Strategies in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, George M.; Pink, George H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the use and perceived success of strategies to improve the financial performance of Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs). Methods: Information about the use and perceived effectiveness of 44 specific strategies to improve financial performance was collected from an online survey of 291 CAH Chief Executive Officers and Chief…

  7. Perceptions of emergency care in Kenyan communities lacking access to formalised emergency medical systems: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Broccoli, Morgan C; Calvello, Emilie J B; Skog, Alexander P; Wachira, Benjamin; Wallis, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We undertook this study in Kenya to understand the community's emergency care needs and barriers they face when trying to access care, and to seek community members’ thoughts regarding high impact solutions to expand access to essential emergency services. Design We used a qualitative research methodology to conduct 59 focus groups with 528 total Kenyan community member participants. Data were coded, aggregated and analysed using the content analysis approach. Setting Participants were uniformly selected from all eight of the historical Kenyan provinces (Central, Coast, Eastern, Nairobi, North Eastern, Nyanza, Rift Valley and Western), with equal rural and urban community representation. Results Socioeconomic and cultural factors play a major role both in seeking and reaching emergency care. Community members in Kenya experience a wide range of medical emergencies, and seem to understand their time-critical nature. They rely on one another for assistance in the face of substantial barriers to care—a lack of: system structure, resources, transportation, trained healthcare providers and initial care at the scene. Conclusions Access to emergency care in Kenya can be improved by encouraging recognition and initial treatment of emergent illness in the community, strengthening the pre-hospital care system, improving emergency care delivery at health facilities and creating new policies at a national level. These community-generated solutions likely have a wider applicability in the region. PMID:26586324

  8. Evaluating hospitals' provision of community benefit: an argument for an outcome-based approach to nonprofit hospital tax exemption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniel B; Singh, Simone Rauscher; Jacobson, Peter D

    2013-04-01

    Nonprofit hospitals are exempt from federal income taxation if they pass organizational and operational tests, including satisfying the community-benefit standard. Policymakers, however, have questioned the adequacy of the community benefits that nonprofit hospitals provide in exchange for these exemptions. The Internal Revenue Service recently responded to these concerns by redesigning its tax forms for nonprofit hospitals. The new Form 990 Schedule H requires nonprofit hospitals to provide additional information about their community-benefit activities. This new reporting requirement, however, places an undue focus on input-based community-benefit indicators, in particular expenditures. We argue that expanding the current input-based reporting requirement to include not only monetary inputs but also population health outcomes would achieve greater benefit for society. PMID:23409909

  9. [Local communalization of clinical records between the municipal community hospital and local medical institutes by using information technology].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Shohei; Shinoki, Keiji; Ibata, Takeshi; Nakashita, Chisako; Doi, Seiko; Hidaka, Kumi; Hata, Akiko; Matsuoka, Mio; Waguchi, Hideko; Mito, Saori; Komuro, Ryutaro

    2012-12-01

    We introduced the electronic health record system in 2002. We produced a community medical network system to consolidate all medical treatment information from the local institute in 2010. Here, we report on the present status of this system that has been in use for the previous 2 years. We obtained a private server, set up a virtual private network(VPN)in our hospital, and installed dedicated terminals to issue an electronic certificate in 50 local institutions. The local institute applies for patient agreement in the community hospital(hospital designation style). They are then entitled to access the information of the designated patient via this local network server for one year. They can access each original medical record, sorted on the basis of the medical attendant and the chief physician; a summary of hospital stay; records of medication prescription; and the results of clinical examinations. Currently, there are approximately 80 new registrations and accesses per month. Information is provided in real time allowing up to date information, helping prescribe the medical treatment at the local institute. However, this information sharing system is read-only, and there is no cooperative clinical pass system. Therefore, this system has a limit to meet the demand for cooperation with the local clinics.

  10. No Accession-Specific Effect of Rhizosphere Soil Communities on the Growth and Competition of Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Anna G.; Colón-Carmona, Adán; Kesseli, Rick; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Soil communities associated with specific plant species affect individual plants' growth and competitive ability. Limited evidence suggests that unique soil communities can also differentially influence growth and competition at the ecotype level. Previous work with Arabidopsis thaliana has shown that accessions produce distinct and reproducible rhizosphere bacterial communities, with significant differences in both species composition and relative abundance. We tested the hypothesis that soil communities uniquely affect the growth and reproduction of the plant accessions with which they are associated. Specifically, we examined the growth of four accessions when exposed to their own soil communities and the communities generated by each of the other three accessions. To do this we planted focal accessions inside a ring of six plants that created a “background” soil community. We grew focal plants in this design in three separate soil treatments: non-sterile soil, sterilized soil, and “preconditioned” soil. We preconditioned soil by growing accessions in non-sterile soil for six weeks before the start of the experiment. The main experiment was harvested after seven weeks of growth and we recorded height, silique number, and dry weight of each focal plant. Plants grown in the preconditioned soil treatment showed less growth relative to the non-sterile and sterile soil treatments. In addition, plants in the sterile soil grew larger than those in non-sterile soil. However, we saw no interaction between soil treatment and background accession. We conclude that the soil communities have a negative net impact on Arabidopsis thaliana growth, and that the unique soil communities associated with each accession do not differentially affect growth and competition of study species. PMID:22110679

  11. 76 FR 80868 - Increasing Access to Rural Community Investment Opportunities for Investors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Increasing Access to Rural Community Investment... established USDA's authority to make loans and grants to rural communities. Currently, USDA manages a loan... different investment structures that provide increased access to capital for rural communities....

  12. The accountability of nonprofit hospitals: lessons from Maryland's community benefit reporting requirements.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bradford H; Schlesinger, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Under Internal Revenue Service requirements, nonprofit hospitals will begin filing new community benefit reports in 2010. Maryland has had similar requirements since 2004. This paper, based on interviews at 20 hospitals, describes how Maryland's requirements affected hospitals and their activities. Increases in reported community benefit expenditures since the program began are due to both changes in activities and better data capture. Charity care accounts for one-third of community benefit dollars. A key distinction concerns whether hospitals take an accounting or managerial approach to community benefit. The Maryland experience suggests the issues that will arise when the national requirements are implemented. PMID:19694387

  13. Trauma in elderly people: access to the health system through pre-hospital care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Hilderjane Carla; Pessoa, Renata de Lima; de Menezes, Rejane Maria Paiva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to identify the prevalence of trauma in elderly people and how they accessed the health system through pre-hospital care. Method: documentary and retrospective study at a mobile emergency care service, using a sample of 400 elderly trauma victims selected through systematic random sampling. A form validated by experts was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied. The chi-square test was used to analyze the association between the variables. Results: Trauma was predominant among women (52.25%) and in the age range between 60 and 69 years (38.25%), average age 74.19 years (standard deviation±10.25). Among the mechanisms, falls (56.75%) and traffic accidents (31.25%) stood out, showing a significant relation with the pre-hospital care services (p<0.001). Circulation, airway opening, cervical control and immobilization actions were the most frequent and Basic Life Support Services (87.8%) were the most used, with trauma referral hospitals as the main destination (56.7%). Conclusion: trauma prevailed among women, victims of falls, who received pre-hospital care through basic life support services and actions and were transported to the trauma referral hospital. It is important to reorganize pre-hospital care, avoiding overcrowded hospitals and delivering better care to elderly trauma victims. PMID:27143543

  14. Profitability, third-party reimbursement, and access to community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Carroll, N V; Miederhoff, P A; Waters, L W

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the extent to which third-party reimbursement programs have affected the profitability and availability of community pharmacies. Data were taken from records maintained by the Virginia Board of Pharmacy and a survey of 177 community pharmacies. Between 1989 and 1994, 258 outpatient pharmacies opened and 342 closed. Chain and independent pharmacies suffered net losses, and supermarket and mass merchandiser pharmacies experienced net increases. Few significant changes occurred in the distribution of pharmacies over the study period. Fifty-nine chain and independent pharmacies and 1 supermarket pharmacy chain provided usable profit and reimbursement data. These pharmacies experienced declines in profits and increases in the percentage of prescriptions reimbursed by private third-party prescription programs over the last several years. Regression analyses indicated that higher ratios of sales of private third-party prescriptions to private-pay prescriptions were associated with lower profits. All respondents indicated that changes in private third-party reimbursement had substantially reduced profits over the past 5 years. The results indicate that the growth of private third-party payment has led to lower pharmacy profits but has not yet resulted in problems of consumer access.

  15. Community benefit prevails. Are radical changes in hospital tax-exemption laws necessary?

    PubMed

    Seay, J D

    1992-01-01

    Voluntary, not-for-profit hospitals are in danger of losing their tax-exempt status as policymakers lean toward stricter charity care requirements that would penalize hospitals which failed to provide at least a predetermined level of charity care. Proposed legislation abandons community benefit and advocates a relief-of-poverty standard. The relief-of-poverty standard advances the notion that hospitals are not providing enough charity care to merit their tax exemption. However, the voluntary hospitals' share of uncompensated care costs (as a percentage of total costs) increased from 70 percent in 1981 to 75 percent in 1989. The relief-of-poverty standard is inferior to the community benefit standard because it does not take into account that the character of community benefit varies among hospitals and communities. However, community benefit must be better defined. Some current activities--individual hospital reassessments, collective hospital reassessments, voluntary development of criteria, and statutory standards--will be instructive in efforts to arrive at a definition of community benefit that is appropriate for the specific community. Leaders in voluntary, not-for-profit hospitals need to develop positive and equitable criteria for hospital tax exemption. These hospitals' accountability is in question, but it is their integrity that is at stake. PMID:10115598

  16. [Access to health care for destitute persons at Public Assistance Hospitals in Paris].

    PubMed

    Brücker, G; Nguyen, D T; Lebas, J

    1997-11-01

    All legal French residents are entitled to health care. The 1992 regulatory measures, which create a contractual agreement between the government and public medical institutions, aim at facilitating access to health care by resolving the financial obstacles to accessing health care. The Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP) has set up a medical reception center in several hospitals since 1993. This system is integrated in the general structure of each hospital: in some cases, there is a single and centralized unit; in other cases, all departments of the hospital, including the emergency room, are involved in caring for destitute patients. Whatever the type of the structure may be, social workers are a key element to helping the patients recover their social rights. Thirty to seventy-percent of patients visiting these centers regain access to social and health care coverage. The epidemiological survey of the active file of patients revealed that 70% are male, more than 50% are non-French nationals, half of which do not have legal immigration status in France. Homeless people represent 40 to 80% of the population. The average age is around 35. The number of medical visits varies greatly from one hospital to another and range from 20 to 60 per month. The reasons for visiting the center and the identified medical disorders are strongly related to the patients' life conditions and vary significantly with the risk factors related to the social and economic situation. The frequency of some diseases (psychiatric disorders, tuberculosis, infections by the HIV and HCV) is higher in this population than in general population. Delayed visits to the medical center represents a severity factor. The hospitals' mission statement is not only to ensure that patients facing a precarious social and professional situation have equal access to health care, but also to help such patients recover their social rights, facilitate their integration in the society and fight against

  17. Dying from cancer in community hospitals or a hospice: closest lay carers' perceptions.

    PubMed Central

    Seamark, D A; Williams, S; Hall, M; Lawrence, C J; Gilbert, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite there being around 400 community hospitals in the United Kingdom, there is little published research on the quality of service provided by these hospitals. AIM: To compare the quality of terminal cancer care in community hospitals with a hospice as assessed by patients' closest lay carer (relative or friend). METHOD: Structured interview (or questionnaire based on the interview proforma) with closest lay carers of all patients dying over one year in 12 community hospitals in east Devon and a purpose-built hospice in the city of Exeter. RESULTS: A total of 292 cases (176 in community hospitals and 116 in a hospice) were identified, resulting in 238 carers being eligible for interview or questionnaire survey. Overall, 106 successful interviews and 55 questionnaires were completed, giving a response rate of 67.6%. Carers gave a near unanimous vote of excellence for the total care given by the hospice, while around 40% of carers of patients in community hospitals considered that improvements were possible. Community hospitals attracted more negative comments than hospices, with criticism being directed at problems of communication, lack of nursing staff, and lack of support in bereavement. Carers of hospice patients were significantly more likely to be present at the time of death than those of community hospital patients [45/70 (64%) vs. 31/89 (35%); chi 2 = 13.6, P < 0.001], an observation possibly because nursing staff in community hospitals are less experienced at dealing with terminally ill patients and such hospitals have fewer adequate facilities. CONCLUSIONS: Lay carers indicated great satisfaction with care given in the hospice and less satisfaction with care given in the community hospitals. However, the community hospitals are non-specialist units with far lower levels of trained staff. Improvements in terms of the communication skills of doctors and nurses, specific training for nurses in palliative care, and structured bereavement care

  18. Developing a strategic marketing plan for physical and occupational therapy services: a collaborative project between a critical access hospital and a graduate program in health care management.

    PubMed

    Kash, Bita A; Deshmukh, A A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a marketing plan for the Physical and Occupational Therapy (PT/OT) department at a Critical Access Hospital (CAH). We took the approach of understanding and analyzing the rural community and health care environment, problems faced by the PT/OT department, and developing a strategic marketing plan to resolve those problems. We used hospital admissions data, public and physician surveys, a SWOT analysis, and tools to evaluate alternative strategies. Lack of awareness and negative perception were key issues. Recommended strategies included building relationships with physicians, partnering with the school district, and enhancing the wellness program.

  19. Access to and value of information to support good practice for staff in Kenyan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Muinga, Naomi; Sen, Barbara; Ayieko, Philip; Todd, Jim; English, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies have sought to define information needs of health workers within very specific settings or projects. Lacking in the literature is how hospitals in low-income settings are able to meet the information needs of their staff and the use of information communication technologies (ICT) in day-to-day information searching. Objective The study aimed to explore where professionals in Kenyan hospitals turn to for work-related information in their day-to-day work. Additionally, it examined what existing solutions are provided by hospitals with regard to provision of best practice care. Lastly, the study explored the use of ICT in information searching. Design Data for this study were collected in July 2012. Self-administered questionnaires (SAQs) were distributed across 22 study hospitals with an aim to get a response from 34 health workers per hospital. Results SAQs were collected from 657 health workers. The most popular sources of information to guide work were fellow health workers and printed guidelines while the least popular were scientific journals. Of value to health workers were: national treatment policies, new research findings, regular reports from surveillance data, information on costs of services and information on their performance of routine clinical tasks; however, hospitals only partially met these needs. Barriers to accessing information sources included: ‘not available/difficult to get’ and ‘difficult to understand’. ICT use for information seeking was reported and with demographic specific differences noted from the multivariate logistic regression model; nurses compared to medical doctors and older workers were less likely to use ICT for health information searching. Barriers to accessing Internet were identified as: high costs and the lack of the service at home or at work. Conclusions Hospitals need to provide appropriate information by improving information dissemination efforts and providing an enabling environment that

  20. Hospital-integrated PACS: R&D effort of the European communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottes, Fenno P.; Bakker, Albert R.; Mattheus, Rudy A.; Osteaux, Michel; Kouwenberg, Jef M.

    1990-08-01

    A PACS research project under the name " FOUNDATIONS FOR A HOSPITAL INThGRATED PICTURE ARCHIVING AND COMMUNICATION SYSTEM" is currently conducted. The overall objective is the modular conception of an experimental knowledge-based medical information management and distribution system. Image/text document access and display will be based on an intelligent user interface for diagnostic image workstations. The concept will comprise the integration of PA.S with the functions of the Hospital Information System. It will be based upon standards and be realized by an interactive collaborationbetween 7 european research groups from universities, hospitals and industries. The multi-disciplinary groups will consist of engineers, computer scientists, medical doctors (both radiologists and clinicians) and physicists. The HIPACS project has a budget of ECU 1.3 million, of which 50% is provided by the Commission of European Communities (CEC) within the scope of the exploratory phase of the Advanced Informatics in Medicine (AIM) research programme. HIPACS is directed by Prof. M. Osteaux, the prime contractor. This paper first explains the backgrounds of the AIM program. Next, the objectives of the HIPACS project are reviewed. The cooperating partners and their (scheduled) research activities are listed. Finally, the continuation of HIPACS within scope of the main phase of AIM is discussed.

  1. SOCIALIZATION OF THE YOUNGER PSYCHIATRIC PATIENT--THE COMMUNITY AND THE HOSPITAL-A DUAL RESPONSIBILITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GIORDANO, JOSEPH; AND OTHERS

    TO ASSIST YOUNG, MENTAL PATIENTS IN OVERCOMING SOME OF THEIR SOCIAL DEFICITS, TWO RESOCIALIZATION PROJECTS (PRE- AND POST-DISCHARGE) WERE INITIATED TO MOVE THE PATIENT FROM A MENTAL HOSPITAL SETTING INTO THE LARGER COMMUNITY, WITH A COMMUNITY CENTER AS THE LEARNING GROUND. CAREFULLY SELECTED PATIENTS FROM THE HOSPITAL WERE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO…

  2. The effects of innovation factors on smartphone adoption among nurses in community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Putzer, Gavin J; Park, Yangil

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new mobile technological device is the smartphone-a phone with advanced features such as Windows Mobile software, access to the Internet, and other computer processing capabilities. This article investigates the decision to adopt a smartphone among healthcare professionals, specifically nurses. The study examines constructs that affect an individual's decision to adopt a smartphone by employing innovation attributes leading to perceived attitudes. We hypothesize that individual intentions to use a smartphone are mostly determined by attitudes toward using a smartphone, which in turn are affected by innovation characteristics. Innovation characteristics are factors that help explain whether a user will adopt a new technology. The study consisted of a survey disseminated to 200 practicing nurses selected from two community hospitals in the southeastern United States. In our model, the innovation characteristics of observability, compatibility, job relevance, internal environment, and external environment were significant predictors of attitude toward using a smartphone. PMID:20697467

  3. The effects of innovation factors on smartphone adoption among nurses in community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Putzer, Gavin J; Park, Yangil

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new mobile technological device is the smartphone-a phone with advanced features such as Windows Mobile software, access to the Internet, and other computer processing capabilities. This article investigates the decision to adopt a smartphone among healthcare professionals, specifically nurses. The study examines constructs that affect an individual's decision to adopt a smartphone by employing innovation attributes leading to perceived attitudes. We hypothesize that individual intentions to use a smartphone are mostly determined by attitudes toward using a smartphone, which in turn are affected by innovation characteristics. Innovation characteristics are factors that help explain whether a user will adopt a new technology. The study consisted of a survey disseminated to 200 practicing nurses selected from two community hospitals in the southeastern United States. In our model, the innovation characteristics of observability, compatibility, job relevance, internal environment, and external environment were significant predictors of attitude toward using a smartphone.

  4. Improving Community Health While Satisfying a Critical Community Need: A Case Study for Nonprofit Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kephart, Donna K.; Dillon, Judith F.; McCullough, Jody R.; Blatt, Barbara J.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Background School-based student health screenings identify issues that may affect physical and intellectual development and are an important way to maintain student health. Nonprofit hospitals can provide a unique resource to school districts by assisting in the timely completion of school-based screenings and meet requirements of the Affordable Care Act. This case study describes the collaboration between an academic medical center and a local school district to conduct school-based health screenings. Community Context Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State Hershey PRO Wellness Center collaborated with Lebanon School District to facilitate student health screenings, a need identified in part by a community health needs assessment. Methods From June 2012 through February 2013, district-wide student health screenings were planned and implemented by teams of hospital nursing leadership, school district leadership, and school nurses. In fall 2013, students were screened through standardized procedures for height, weight, scoliosis, vision, and hearing. Outcomes In 2 days, 3,105 students (67% of all students in the district) were screened. Letters explaining screening results were mailed to parents of all students screened. Debriefing meetings and follow-up surveys for the participating nurses provided feedback for future screenings. Interpretation The 2-day collaborative screening event decreased the amount of time spent by school nurses in screening students throughout the year and allowed them more time in their role as school wellness champion. Additionally, parents found out early in the school year whether their child needed physician follow-up. Partnerships between school districts and hospitals to conduct student health screenings are a practical option for increasing outreach while satisfying community needs. PMID:26513441

  5. The Impacts of Free Public Internet Access on Public Library Patrons and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertot, John Carlo; McClure, Charles R.; Jaeger, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Public libraries have evolved into a primary source of Internet access in many communities, generating wide-ranging impacts in the communities that public libraries serve. Based on the findings of the 2007 Public Libraries and the Internet study, this article examines the ways in which the Internet access delivered by public libraries affects…

  6. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 412.92 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) The hospital must provide patient origin data (for example, the number of patients from each zip code... its service area. (B) The hospital must provide patient origin data from all other hospitals...

  7. Creating a “culture of research” in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program

    PubMed Central

    St. Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. Methods To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. Limitations The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important

  8. Inequality in Preschool Quality? Community-Level Disparities in Access to High-Quality Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Daphna; Galdo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, unequal access to high-quality preschool has emerged as a growing public policy concern. Because of data limitations, it is notoriously difficult to measure disparities in access to early learning opportunities across communities and particularly challenging to quantify gaps in access to "high-quality" programs. Research…

  9. Developing a Multicomponent Model of Nutritious Food Access and Related Implications for Community and Policy Practice

    PubMed Central

    FREEDMAN, DARCY A.; BLAKE, CHRISTINE E.; LIESE, ANGELA D.

    2014-01-01

    Access to nutritious foods is limited in disenfranchised communities in the United States. Policies are beginning to focus on improving nutritious food access in these contexts; yet, few theories are available to guide this work. We developed a conceptual model of nutritious food access based on the qualitative responses of food consumers in 2 different regions of the American South. Five domains (economic, service delivery, spatial–temporal, social, and personal) and related dimensions of nutritious food access were identified. The conceptual model provides practical guidance to researchers, policy makers, and practitioners working to improve nutritious food access in communities. PMID:24563605

  10. The contribution of hospitals and health care systems to community health.

    PubMed

    Shortell, Stephen M; Washington, Pamela K; Baxter, Raymond J

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews evidence on hospitals' and health systems' impacts on community health improvement. We begin with an overview of the history of community benefit and then discuss the lack of a widely accepted definition and measurement of community benefit activities as well as the expectations and accountability of tax-exempt not-for-profit hospitals and health systems in community initiatives. We highlight the approaches of two systems and identify strategic, cultural, technical, and structural challenges associated with increasing community benefit and health-improvement activities. We conclude by offering recommendations for policy and practice. PMID:19296780

  11. Spatial distribution and accessibility to public sector tertiary care teaching hospitals in Karachi: A Geographic Information Systems application.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Masood Ali; Ali, Mir Shabbar

    2016-07-01

    Optimal utilization of specialized curative healthcare services is contingent on spatial access to tertiary-care hospitals by the targeted population. The objectives of this study were to determine the spatial distribution of public sector tertiary-care teaching hospitals in Karachi, and to use GIS and network analysis for modeling the accessibility to these hospitals for Karachi residents. Maps of three, six, and nine kilometer buffers were created around the five selected hospitals to determine which towns of Karachi are either entirely or partially covered/accessible. Most of the towns in Karachi were covered either partially or completely by the three buffers and service areas of 3,6, and 9 kilometers around the five selected hospitals. This study highlights the limitations of using publicly available data for road network, and the need for creating and making available in public domain, comprehensive road network vector dataset in conjunction with population breakdowns by administrative subdivisions. PMID:27427142

  12. Spatial distribution and accessibility to public sector tertiary care teaching hospitals in Karachi: A Geographic Information Systems application.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Masood Ali; Ali, Mir Shabbar

    2016-07-01

    Optimal utilization of specialized curative healthcare services is contingent on spatial access to tertiary-care hospitals by the targeted population. The objectives of this study were to determine the spatial distribution of public sector tertiary-care teaching hospitals in Karachi, and to use GIS and network analysis for modeling the accessibility to these hospitals for Karachi residents. Maps of three, six, and nine kilometer buffers were created around the five selected hospitals to determine which towns of Karachi are either entirely or partially covered/accessible. Most of the towns in Karachi were covered either partially or completely by the three buffers and service areas of 3,6, and 9 kilometers around the five selected hospitals. This study highlights the limitations of using publicly available data for road network, and the need for creating and making available in public domain, comprehensive road network vector dataset in conjunction with population breakdowns by administrative subdivisions.

  13. Survive On Call - A QI Project to Improve Access to Hospital Clinical Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Penders, Robert; Mallet, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Accessing clinical guidelines and telephone numbers can be time consuming for junior doctors, particularly during a busy on-call shift. Smartphones allow instant access to this information, without leaving a patient's bedside. This overcomes the relative paucity of fixed desktop computers available in most clinical areas. In this project, a trainee doctor developed a clinical smartphone app to improve the access of clinical and hospital-specific information. A representative sample of ten junior doctors were recruited to quantify the amount of time spent accessing guidelines using desktop computers, versus the App. The average time to access a common guideline (Hypokalaemia management) with the App was 12.4 seconds (95% CI 2.3), versus 76.8 seconds (95% CI 30.6) using a computer. A difference of 64.4 seconds (p < 0.001). The average time to access an Amiodarone prescribing guideline with the App was 25.9 seconds (95% CI 12.9), versus 142.0 seconds (95% CI 44.8) using a computer. A difference of 116.1 seconds (p < 0.001). User feedback was collected after each stage of release within the hospital. Following final release, users rated how much time they felt it saved them. 96.1% of respondents felt it either saved them time a ‘few times a week’ (53.85%) or ‘significantly saved time every day’ (42.31%). The project has significantly improved staff satisfaction with how easily they can access clinical guidelines and telephone numbers. They clearly feel it has improved their working efficiency. This has been supported by quantitative measures of actual time saved using the App. The ability to access such information in as little time as possible may be even more pertinent where decision-making is time-critical - for example in Anaesthesia and Emergency Medicine. Further study into these specialties is warranted to determine whether mobile information can impact upon patient safety and clinical outcomes. PMID:27239310

  14. The HOSPITAL score as a predictor of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    .63 with a p value of 0.20. Discussion This single center retrospective study indicates that the HOSPITAL score has good discriminatory ability to predict hospital readmissions within 30 days for a medical hospitalist service at a university-affiliated hospital. This data for all causes of hospital readmission is comparable to the discriminatory ability of the HOSPITAL score in the international validation study (C statistics of 0.72 vs. 0.77) conducted at considerably larger hospitals (975 average beds vs. 507 at MMC) for potentially avoidable hospital readmissions. Conclusions The internationally validated HOSPITAL score may be a useful tool in moderate sized community hospitals to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission within 30 days. This easy to use scoring system using readily available data can be used as part of interventional strategies to reduce the rate of hospital readmission. PMID:27651999

  15. The HOSPITAL score as a predictor of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    .63 with a p value of 0.20. Discussion This single center retrospective study indicates that the HOSPITAL score has good discriminatory ability to predict hospital readmissions within 30 days for a medical hospitalist service at a university-affiliated hospital. This data for all causes of hospital readmission is comparable to the discriminatory ability of the HOSPITAL score in the international validation study (C statistics of 0.72 vs. 0.77) conducted at considerably larger hospitals (975 average beds vs. 507 at MMC) for potentially avoidable hospital readmissions. Conclusions The internationally validated HOSPITAL score may be a useful tool in moderate sized community hospitals to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission within 30 days. This easy to use scoring system using readily available data can be used as part of interventional strategies to reduce the rate of hospital readmission.

  16. Bloodstream Infections in Community Hospitals in the 21st Century: A Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Moehring, Rebekah W.; Sloane, Richard; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Weber, David J.; Fowler, Vance G.; Smathers, Emily; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background While the majority of healthcare in the US is provided in community hospitals, the epidemiology and treatment of bloodstream infections in this setting is unknown. Methods and Findings We undertook this multicenter, retrospective cohort study to 1) describe the epidemiology of bloodstream infections (BSI) in a network of community hospitals and 2) determine risk factors for inappropriate therapy for bloodstream infections in community hospitals. 1,470 patients were identified as having a BSI in 9 community hospitals in the southeastern US from 2003 through 2006. The majority of BSIs were community-onset, healthcare associated (n = 823, 56%); 432 (29%) patients had community-acquired BSI, and 215 (15%) had hospital-onset, healthcare-associated BSI. BSIs due to multidrug-resistant pathogens occurred in 340 patients (23%). Overall, the three most common pathogens were S. aureus (n = 428, 28%), E. coli (n = 359, 24%), coagulase-negative Staphylococci (n = 148, 10%), though type of infecting organism varied by location of acquisition (e.g., community-acquired). Inappropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy was given to 542 (38%) patients. Proportions of inappropriate therapy varied by hospital (median = 33%, range 21–71%). Multivariate logistic regression identified the following factors independently associated with failure to receive appropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy: hospital where the patient received care (p<0.001), assistance with ≥3 ADLs (p = 0.005), Charlson score (p = 0.05), community-onset, healthcare-associated infection (p = 0.01), and hospital-onset, healthcare-associated infection (p = 0.02). Important interaction was observed between Charlson score and location of acquisition. Conclusions Our large, multicenter study provides the most complete picture of BSIs in community hospitals in the US to date. The epidemiology of BSIs in community hospitals has changed: community-onset, healthcare

  17. The Quality of Urban Environments: Mapping Variation in Access to Community Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witten, Karen; Exeter, Daniel; Field, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between community infrastructure and health through the development of the Community Resource Accessibility Index (CRAI) research tool.This area-based index of community services, facilities, and amenities enables comparisons between opportunity structures in the local environment and residents' health and wellbeing. It…

  18. Improving post-hospital care for people who are homeless: Community-based participatory research to community-based action.

    PubMed

    Doran, Kelly M; Greysen, S Ryan; Cunningham, Alison; Tynan-McKiernan, Kathleen; Lucas, Georgina I; Rosenthal, Marjorie S

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses how community-based participatory research (CBPR) on hospital care transitions in New Haven, Connecticut led to the development of a new medical respite program to better serve patients who are homeless. Key insights include: • Homelessness is an important driver of hospital utilization and must be addressed in efforts to decrease hospital readmissions. • Hospitals and community organizations often serve a shared patient/client base and can work together to develop innovative programs that are beneficial to all parties. • Community-based participatory research methods are particularly conducive to producing research that is translatable to policy and new programs. • Targeted dissemination of research results played a pivotal role in securing resources and funding for the new program. PMID:26699351

  19. Community benefit in exchange for non-profit hospital tax exemption: current trends and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Singh, Simone Rauscher

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the adequacy of the community benefits that not-for-profit hospitals provide in exchange for tax exemption remains a challenge. While recent changes to Internal Revenue Service (IRS) reporting requirements have improved transparency, the lack of clearly defined charitable expectations has resulted in critical scrutiny of not-for-profit hospitals' community benefits and numerous challenges to their tax exempt status. Using data from the revised IRS Form 990 Schedule H for 2009, this article documents the wide range of community benefit activities that not-for-profit hospitals in California engage in and compares them to a set of minimum spending thresholds. The findings show that when community benefit was defined narrowly in terms of charity care, very few hospitals would have met any of the minimum spending thresholds. When community benefit was defined as in the revised IRS Form 990 Schedule H, however, a majority of hospitals in California would have been considered charitable. Whether focusing on expenditures is the most appropriate way to assess the adequacy of a hospital's community benefits remains an open question. To that end, this article concludes by outlining a more comprehensive evaluation approach that builds on recent changes to non-profit hospital tax exemption implemented by the Affordable Care Act.

  20. Community benefit in exchange for non-profit hospital tax exemption: current trends and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Singh, Simone Rauscher

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the adequacy of the community benefits that not-for-profit hospitals provide in exchange for tax exemption remains a challenge. While recent changes to Internal Revenue Service (IRS) reporting requirements have improved transparency, the lack of clearly defined charitable expectations has resulted in critical scrutiny of not-for-profit hospitals' community benefits and numerous challenges to their tax exempt status. Using data from the revised IRS Form 990 Schedule H for 2009, this article documents the wide range of community benefit activities that not-for-profit hospitals in California engage in and compares them to a set of minimum spending thresholds. The findings show that when community benefit was defined narrowly in terms of charity care, very few hospitals would have met any of the minimum spending thresholds. When community benefit was defined as in the revised IRS Form 990 Schedule H, however, a majority of hospitals in California would have been considered charitable. Whether focusing on expenditures is the most appropriate way to assess the adequacy of a hospital's community benefits remains an open question. To that end, this article concludes by outlining a more comprehensive evaluation approach that builds on recent changes to non-profit hospital tax exemption implemented by the Affordable Care Act. PMID:23614265

  1. A Study of the Access to the Scholarly Record from a Hospital Health Science Core Collection *

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James F.; Pings, Vern M.

    1973-01-01

    This study is an effort to determine possible service performance levels in hospital libraries based on access to the scholarly record of medicine through selected lists of clinical journals and indexing and abstracting journals. The study was designed to test a methodology as well as to provide data for planning and management decisions for health science libraries. Findings and conclusions cover the value of a core collection of journals, length of journal files, performance of certain bibliographic instruments in citation verification, and the implications of study data for library planning and management. PMID:4744345

  2. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... § 412.92, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... local topography or periods of prolonged severe weather conditions, the other like hospitals are... from other like hospitals but because of local topography or periods of prolonged severe...

  3. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... local topography or periods of prolonged severe weather conditions, the other like hospitals are... from other like hospitals but because of local topography or periods of prolonged severe weather...) Because of distance, posted speed limits, and predictable weather conditions, the travel time between...

  4. 'Pharmacy deserts' are prevalent in Chicago's predominantly minority communities, raising medication access concerns.

    PubMed

    Qato, Dima M; Daviglus, Martha L; Wilder, Jocelyn; Lee, Todd; Qato, Danya; Lambert, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    Attempts to explain and address disparities in the use of prescription medications have focused almost exclusively on their affordability. However, the segregation of residential neighborhoods by race or ethnicity also may influence access to the pharmacies that, in turn, provide access to prescription medications within a community. We examined whether trends in the availability of pharmacies varied across communities in Chicago with different racial or ethnic compositions. We also examined the geographic accessibility of pharmacies to determine whether "pharmacy deserts," or low-access neighborhoods, were more common in segregated black and Hispanic communities than elsewhere. We found that throughout the period 2000-2012 the number of pharmacies was lower in segregated minority communities than in segregated white communities and integrated communities. In 2012 there were disproportionately more pharmacy deserts in segregated black communities, as well as in low-income communities and federally designated Medically Underserved Areas. Our findings suggest that public policies aimed at improving access to prescription medications may need to address factors beyond insurance coverage and medication affordability. Such policies could include financial incentives to locate pharmacies in pharmacy deserts or the incorporation of pharmacies into community health centers in Medically Underserved Areas.

  5. Perceived quality of an alternative to acute hospitalization: an analytical study at a community hospital in Hallingdal, Norway.

    PubMed

    Lappegard, Øystein; Hjortdahl, Per

    2014-10-01

    There is growing international interest in the geography of health care provision, with health care providers searching for alternatives to acute hospitalization. In Norway, the government has recently legislated for municipal authorities to develop local health services for a selected group of patients, with a quality equal to or better than that provided by hospitals for emergency admissions. General practitioners in Hallingdal, a rural district in southern Norway, have for several years referred acutely somatically ill patients to a community hospital, Hallingdal sjukestugu (HSS). This article analyzes patients' perceived quality of HSS to demonstrate factors applicable nationally and internationally to aid in the development of local alternatives to general hospitals. We used a mixed-methods approach with questionnaires, individual interviews and a focus group interview. Sixty patients who were taking part in a randomized, controlled study of acute admissions at HSS answered the questionnaire. Selected patients were interviewed about their experiences and a focus group interview was conducted with representatives of local authorities, administrative personnel and health professionals. Patients admitted to HSS reported statistically significant greater satisfaction with several care aspects than those admitted to the general hospital. Factors highlighted by the patients were the quiet and homelike atmosphere; a small facility which allowed them a good overall view of the unit; close ties to the local community and continuity in the patient-staff relationship. The focus group members identified some overarching factors: an interdisciplinary and holistic approach, local ownership, proximity to local general practices and close cooperation with the specialist health services at the hospital. Most of these factors can be viewed as general elements relevant to the development of local alternatives to acute hospitalization both nationally and internationally. This

  6. A Systematic Approach to Clinical Peer Review in a Critical Access Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Deyo-Svendsen, Mark E.; Phillips, Michael R.; Albright, Jill K.; Schilling, Keith A.; Palmer, Karl B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical provider peer review (CPPR) is a process for evaluating a patient's experience in encounters of care. It is part of ongoing professional practice evaluation and focused professional practice evaluation—important contributors to provider credentialing and privileging. Critical access hospitals are hindered in CPPR by having a limited number of providers, shortages of staff resources, and relationships among staff members that make unbiased review difficult. Small departments within larger institutions may face similar challenges. Methods: A CPPR process created at Mayo Clinic Health System is described. It involved a case review questionnaire built on the Institute of Medicine “Six Aims for Changing the Health Care System,” a standardized intervention algorithm and tracking tool. Outcomes: During 2007 through 2014, a total of 994 cases were reviewed; 31% led to provider dialog and education or intervention. Findings were applied to core measure processes with success rate going from 87% to 97%. Changes were adopted in end-of-life care, contributing to a 50% reduction in all-cause mortality rate. Conclusions: Providing peer review tools to a critical access hospital can keep peer review within a group with knowledge of the individual provider's practice and can make process improvement the everyday work of those involved. PMID:27749718

  7. The role of intraosseous vascular access in the out-of-hospital environment (resource document to NAEMSP position statement).

    PubMed

    Fowler, Raymond; Gallagher, John V; Isaacs, S Marshal; Ossman, Eric; Pepe, Paul; Wayne, Marvin

    2007-01-01

    Thousands of critically ill emergency patients are treated in the out-of-hospital setting in the United States every year. In many patients intravenous (IV) therapy cannot be initiated because of inadequate access to peripheral veins. In some cases, this lack of vascular access may limit benefit of medications because of late administration.[1] Both speed and overall success of vascular access are important when evaluating potential methodologies for their use in the out-of-hospital environment. Insertion of an IV cannula has been reported to require substantial time in the prehospital environment, with a recent study reporting an average successful intravenous line placement time of 4.4+/-2.8 minutes.[2] In critically ill pediatric patients, vascular access may present substantial difficulties to the provide.[3] Intraosseous access may provide a significant time saving which may benefit many critically ill patients, both by decreasing the time to achieve access and by decreasing the time to administration of indicated medications.[4] Achieving rapid administration of medications may facilitate the care of critically ill patients.[1] Devices are now available that permit rapid, accurate access to the intraosseous space. Recent changes in the American Heart Association's resuscitation guidelines state that the intraosseous route should be the first alternative to difficult or delayed intravenous access.[5] With these considerations, the role of intraosseous vascular access in the out-of-hospital environment should be reemphasized.

  8. Visualizing Access: Knowledge Development in University-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strier, Roni; Shechter, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    This article tackles the need to democratize processes of knowledge production in the context of university-community partnerships. These partnerships, which are a rich source of academic research, allow universities to create more reciprocal relationships with communities, especially those affected by social inequalities. Through their social…

  9. Teaching through "Testimonio": Accessing Community Cultural Wealth in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeNicolo, Christina Passos; González, Mónica; Morales, Socorro; Romaní, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Using the concept of community cultural wealth, this article examines the ways that a group of 3rd-grade students engaged in writing "testimonios," or personal narratives, to reflect on their cultural and linguistic lives in and outside of the classroom. Countering deficit notions of Latina/o students, families, and communities, this…

  10. Gender and Transportation Access among Community-Dwelling Seniors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Josette; Weiss, Deborah R.; Wolfson, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study estimates the prevalence of problems with transportation in a sample of community-dwelling seniors residing in an urban setting and investigates the role that gender plays in the ability of seniors to remain mobile in their communities. Design and Methods: Data collected as part of a study assessing the prevalence and…

  11. Accessing packaged food and beverages in hospital. Exploring experiences of patients and staff.

    PubMed

    Bell, A F; Walton, K; Chevis, J S; Davies, K; Manson, C; Wypych, A; Yoxall, A; Kirkby, J; Alexander, N

    2013-01-01

    Food and beverage packaging has been identified as a contributing factor to malnutrition among elderly patients in hospitals. The focus of this research was to describe the types of food and beverage packaging used in NSW hospitals, determine the 'problematic' packaging from the users' perspective, investigate the effect of hand strength on the ability to open the packaging and to survey users' (patients and staff) views on the 'accessibility' of the packaging. The study was conducted in the Illawarra region of NSW, Australia. Participants (140 mostly elderly inpatients and 64 staff members) were recruited from four local public hospitals. Data were collected using interviews, questionnaires, observations and grip strength testing. Several food and beverage packages were found difficult to open by at least 40% of patients. These included milk and juices (52%), cereal (49%), condiments (46%), tetra packs (40%) and water bottles (40%). The difficulties were attributed to 'fiddly' packaging, hand strength and vision; however, only tetra packs demonstrated a relationship between time taken to open and hand strength, suggesting other aspects of hand function may be more important than strength when opening food and beverage packages.

  12. Integration of an academic medical center and a community hospital: the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Andrew J; Otten, Jeffrey R; Goldszer, Robert C; Hanson, Margaret; Trull, David J; Paulus, Kenneth; Brown, Monte; Dzau, Victor; Brennan, Troyen A

    2005-03-01

    Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), a major academic tertiary medical center, and Faulkner Hospital (Faulkner), a nearby community teaching hospital, both in the Boston, Massachusetts area, have established a close affiliation relationship under a common corporate parent that achieves a variety of synergistic benefits. Formed under the pressures of limited capacity at BWH and excess capacity at Faulkner, and the need for lower-cost clinical space in an era of provider risk-sharing, BWH and Faulkner entered into a comprehensive affiliation agreement. Over the past seven years, the relationship has enhanced overall volume, broadened training programs, lowered the cost of resources for secondary care, and improved financial performance for both institutions. The lessons of this relationship, both in terms of success factors and ongoing challenges for the hospitals, medical staffs, and a large multispecialty referring physician group, are reviewed. The key factors for success of the relationship have been integration of training programs and some clinical services, provision of complementary clinical capabilities, geographic proximity, clear role definition of each institution, commitment and flexibility of leadership and medical staff, active and responsive communication, and the support of a large referring physician group that embraced the affiliation concept. Principal challenges have been maintaining the community hospital's cost structure, addressing cultural differences, avoiding competition among professional staff, anticipating the pace of patient migration, choosing a name for the new affiliation, and adapting to a changing payer environment. PMID:15734807

  13. California hospital networks are narrower in Marketplace than in commercial plans, but access and quality are similar.

    PubMed

    Haeder, Simon F; Weimer, David L; Mukamel, Dana B

    2015-05-01

    Do insurance plans offered through the Marketplace implemented by the State of California under the Affordable Care Act restrict consumers' access to hospitals relative to plans offered on the commercial market? And are the hospitals included in Marketplace networks of lower quality compared to those included in the commercial plans? To answer these questions, we analyzed differences in hospital networks across similar plan types offered both in the Marketplace and commercially, by region and insurer. We found that the common belief that Marketplace plans have narrower networks than their commercial counterparts appears empirically valid. However, there does not appear to be a substantive difference in geographic access as measured by the percentage of people residing in at least one hospital market area. More surprisingly, depending on the measure of hospital quality employed, the Marketplace plans have networks with comparable or even higher average quality than the networks of their commercial counterparts.

  14. Electromagnetic interference-aware transmission scheduling and power control for dynamic wireless access in hospital environments.

    PubMed

    Phunchongharn, Phond; Hossain, Ekram; Camorlinga, Sergio

    2011-11-01

    We study the multiple access problem for e-Health applications (referred to as secondary users) coexisting with medical devices (referred to as primary or protected users) in a hospital environment. In particular, we focus on transmission scheduling and power control of secondary users in multiple spatial reuse time-division multiple access (STDMA) networks. The objective is to maximize the spectrum utilization of secondary users and minimize their power consumption subject to the electromagnetic interference (EMI) constraints for active and passive medical devices and minimum throughput guarantee for secondary users. The multiple access problem is formulated as a dual objective optimization problem which is shown to be NP-complete. We propose a joint scheduling and power control algorithm based on a greedy approach to solve the problem with much lower computational complexity. To this end, an enhanced greedy algorithm is proposed to improve the performance of the greedy algorithm by finding the optimal sequence of secondary users for scheduling. Using extensive simulations, the tradeoff in performance in terms of spectrum utilization, energy consumption, and computational complexity is evaluated for both the algorithms. PMID:21843997

  15. Electromagnetic interference-aware transmission scheduling and power control for dynamic wireless access in hospital environments.

    PubMed

    Phunchongharn, Phond; Hossain, Ekram; Camorlinga, Sergio

    2011-11-01

    We study the multiple access problem for e-Health applications (referred to as secondary users) coexisting with medical devices (referred to as primary or protected users) in a hospital environment. In particular, we focus on transmission scheduling and power control of secondary users in multiple spatial reuse time-division multiple access (STDMA) networks. The objective is to maximize the spectrum utilization of secondary users and minimize their power consumption subject to the electromagnetic interference (EMI) constraints for active and passive medical devices and minimum throughput guarantee for secondary users. The multiple access problem is formulated as a dual objective optimization problem which is shown to be NP-complete. We propose a joint scheduling and power control algorithm based on a greedy approach to solve the problem with much lower computational complexity. To this end, an enhanced greedy algorithm is proposed to improve the performance of the greedy algorithm by finding the optimal sequence of secondary users for scheduling. Using extensive simulations, the tradeoff in performance in terms of spectrum utilization, energy consumption, and computational complexity is evaluated for both the algorithms.

  16. The Community Health Information Network: A Model for Hospital and Public Library Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartenfeld, Ellen

    1978-01-01

    The Community Health Information Network, a cooperative library network established between a community hospital and six public libraries, is described. This model program provides health education and information services to patient/consumers and library services to health personnel through their public libraries. Funding, factors leading to the…

  17. Language Access Toolkit: An Organizing and Advocacy Resource for Community-Based Youth Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyersdorf, Mark Ro

    2013-01-01

    Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) developed this language access toolkit to share the expertise and experiences of National Asian American Education Advocates Network (NAAEA) member organizations with other community organizations interested in developing language access campaigns. This toolkit includes an overview of…

  18. End of an experiment: report from an inner city community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Christina R.

    1988-01-01

    Community hospitals are associated with the provision of health care in rural rather than urban areas. However, the urban community hospital can reduce the pressure on acute hospitals and decrease the isolation of community health workers. In 1982 a community hospital was established in an inner London health district. This paper examines the role and function of this hospital over a oneyear period in 1986-87 and makes comparisons with the hospital's first two years of operation. The problems identified in the initial evaluation, such as low bed occupancy and the limited participation by general practitioners in the area, were still present. It was found that there had been a decrease in the number of patients treated for musculoskeletal, nervous system and respiratory problems but an increase in circulatory disorders and injuries or poisoning. There was also a marked decrease in the percentage of acute admissions but an increase in admissions for convalescence, rehabilitation and carer relief. Following a severe financial crisis in the health district the hospital was closed temporarily in November 1987. PMID:3256656

  19. Getting more for your money: designing community needs assessments to build collaboration and capacity in hospital system community benefit work.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Dale; Diaz, Heather; Schmidtlein, Mathew C

    2013-11-01

    Most community health needs assessments (CHNAs) are unilateral in nature and fail to include a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, limiting them in their scope. Nonprofit hospitals are required to conduct CHNAs every 3 years to determine where community prevention dollars should be spent. In 2010, a CBPR CHNA approach was conducted with four hospital systems in Northern California. Merging concepts from organization development, the approach included (a) goal determination, (b) use of a guiding framework, (c) creation of a container in which to interact, (d) established feedback loops, and (e) intentional trust-building exercises. The approach was to build lasting relationships between hospital systems that would extend beyond the CHNA. Results using this approach revealed that members representing all four hospital systems (a) began to meet regularly after the CHNA was completed, (b) increased collaboration with other community organizations, (c) expanded their level of intraorganization partnerships, (d) enjoyed the process, (e) felt that their professional knowledge expanded, and (f) felt connected professionally and personally with other hospital representatives. As a result, other joint projects are underway. The results of this study indicate that using CBPR to design a CHNA can build sustained collaborative relationships between study participants that continue.

  20. Accessibility patterns and community integration among previously homeless adults: a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dara V; Gopal, Sucharita; Helfrich, Christine A

    2014-11-01

    Although a desired rehabilitation goal, research continues to document that community integration significantly lags behind housing stability success rates for people of a variety of ages who used to be homeless. While accessibility to resources is an environmental factor that may promote or impede integration activity, there has been little empirical investigation into the impact of proximity of community features on resource use and integration. Using a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach, the current study examines how accessibility or proximity to community features in Boston, United States related to the types of locations used and the size of an individual's "activity space," or spatial presence in the community. Significant findings include an inverse relationship between activity space size and proximity to the number and type of community features in one's immediate area. Specifically, larger activity spaces were associated with neighborhoods with less community features, and smaller activity spaces corresponded with greater availability of resources within one's immediate area. Activity space size also varied, however, based on proximity to different types of resources, namely transportation and health care. Greater community function, or the ability to navigate and use community resources, was associated with better accessibility and feeling part of the community. Finally, proximity to a greater number of individual identified preferred community features was associated with better social integration. The current study suggests the ongoing challenges of successful integration may vary not just based on accessibility to, but relative importance of, specific community features and affinity with one's surroundings. Community integration researchers and housing providers may need to attend to the meaning attached to resources, not just presence or use in the community.

  1. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section... hospitals subject to fiscal year 2006 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)...

  2. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section... hospitals subject to fiscal year 2006 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)...

  3. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section...) Based costs for hospitals subject to fiscal year 1996 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided...

  4. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section... hospitals subject to fiscal year 2006 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)...

  5. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section... hospitals subject to fiscal year 2006 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)...

  6. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section...) Based costs for hospitals subject to fiscal year 1996 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided...

  7. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section...) Based costs for hospitals subject to fiscal year 1996 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided...

  8. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section...) Based costs for hospitals subject to fiscal year 1996 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided...

  9. Pharmacy Access to Emergency Contraception in Rural and Frontier Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigbee, Jeri L.; Abood, Richard; Landau, Sharon Cohen; Maderas, Nicole Monastersky; Foster, Diana Greene; Ravnan, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Context: Timely access to emergency contraception (EC) has emerged as a major public health effort in the prevention of unintended pregnancies. The recent FDA decision to allow over-the-counter availability of emergency contraception for adult women presents important rural health implications. American women, especially those living in rural and…

  10. Environmental Justice and Information Technologies: Overcoming the Information-Access Paradox in Urban Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Wendy A.; Mathur, Anjali

    2003-01-01

    Studies suggest that urban residents in low-income and minority communities are subject to an unequal amount of environmental pollution and inequitable enforcement practices. Projects such as Sustainable Cleveland show that key components of implementing policies are access to Internet-based information and participation community-based…

  11. The Changing Role of Community Networks in Providing Citizen Access to the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Thomas P.; Trotter, David Mitchell

    1999-01-01

    Examines the changing role of community network associations or freenets in providing Internet access by examining the case of the Calgary Community Network Association (CCNA) in Alberta, Canada. Discusses the withdrawal of states from the telecommunications field, priorities of the Canadian government, and the role of the private sector.…

  12. Preserving Access with Excellence: Financing for Rural Community Colleges. Policy Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.; Alexander, King F.; Opp, Ronald D.

    This document argues that for the 1.8 million students attending the 731 rural community colleges in the United States, the community college is often the only option for higher education. However, both access and excellence for rural students are being negatively impacted by recent federal and state policy that has decreased funding to community…

  13. Transfer Access from Community Colleges and the Distribution of Elite Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Alicia C.; Cheslock, John J.; Melguizo, Tatiana

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study that improves the authors' understanding of the potential impact of expanded community college transfer access to elite institutions by examining a variety of key questions using two national databases with complementary strengths. By estimating the number of low-income community college students currently transferring…

  14. E-Learning Access, Opportunities, and Challenges for Aboriginal Adult Learners Located in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawalilak, Colleen; Wells, Noella; Connell, Lynn; Beamer, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study focused on 1) the learning needs of Aboriginal adult learners residing in selected First Nations communities in rural Alberta and 2) the potential for increasing access to e-learning education. Through open dialogue with First Nations community leaders, Aboriginal adult learners, and Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal…

  15. Cultural Health Capital on the margins: Cultural resources for navigating healthcare in communities with limited access.

    PubMed

    Madden, Erin Fanning

    2015-05-01

    Communities struggling with access to healthcare in the U.S. are often considered to be disadvantaged and lacking in resources. Yet, these communities develop and nurture valuable strategies for healthcare access that are underrecognized by health scholars. Combining medical sociology and critical race theory perspectives on cultural capital, this paper examines the health-relevant cultural resources, or Cultural Health Capital, in South Texas Mexican American border communities. Ethnographic data collected during 2011-2013 in Cameron and Hidalgo counties on the U.S.-Mexico border provide empirical evidence for expanding existing notions of health-relevant cultural capital. These Mexican American communities use a range of cultural resources to manage healthcare exclusion and negotiate care in alternative healthcare spaces like community clinics, flea markets and Mexican pharmacies. Navigational, social, familial, and linguistic skills and knowledge are used to access doctors and prescription drugs in these spaces despite social barriers to mainstream healthcare (e.g. cost, English language skills, etc.). Cultural capital used in marginalized communities to navigate limited healthcare options may not always fully counteract healthcare exclusion. Nevertheless, recognizing the cultural resources used in Mexican American communities to facilitate healthcare challenges deficit views and yields important findings for policymakers, healthcare providers, and advocates seeking to capitalize on community resources to improve healthcare access.

  16. The Impact of Computer Technology on Student Access and Success in the California Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, Sacramento.

    In spring 2001, the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges passed a resolution whose aim is to narrow the digital divide among California community college students. The digital divide is defined as the disparity between those who have access to technology and those who do not. The resolution suggests two questions: (1) How has…

  17. Community College Retention and Access Issues: A View from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankin, Kristie R.; Katsinas, Stephen G.; Hardy, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Rankin's 2008 study and literature on retention and community colleges, this study presents perceptions of community college Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) and Chief Academic Officers (CAOs) in relation to issues affecting retention and access. Childcare, transportation, and funding concerns are examined. (Contains 2 tables.)

  18. The Open Course Library: Using Open Educational Resources to Improve Community College Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Mary Ann Lund

    2011-01-01

    Community colleges are committed to meeting the educational needs of the communities they serve and they have increased access to higher education by offering new and innovative services to students often unable to attend traditional baccalaureate institutions. An innovation known as Open Educational Resources (OER) promises to make college more…

  19. (Re)Examining the Role of Family and Community in College Access and Choice: A Metasynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwangi, Chrystal A. George

    2015-01-01

    Using meta-synthesis, this study analyzes higher education literature to provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of nonparent family and community (NPFC) members such as siblings, extended family, fictive kin, and peers in college access and choice. Findings revealed the diverse familial and community networks of today's college going…

  20. The political correctness of a physician hospital organization may precipitate its demise in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, J S

    1995-01-01

    Health maintenance organizations are placing an increased pressure on physicians and hospitals to assume the risk of providing health care services under capitated agreements. They believe that if the providers' profits are based upon their cost-efficient provision of medical services, they will control their use of medical resources and reduce health care spending. Managing the risks of a capitated contract necessitates the integration of the hospital's and the physician's incentives. However, is the most appropriate legal structure that will enable physicians and hospitals to form risk-sharing contracts with managed care entities and manage these contracts profitably a physician-hospital organization? It is estimated that over 50 percent of the physician-hospital organizations that are created each year fail within the first two years of their operation because of political and financial reasons. A multispecialty group composed of select physicians, who are willing to integrate their practices and who have a low length of stay in the hospital, may be in a better position to manage the risks imposed by capitated contracts.

  1. The association between depressive symptoms in the community, non-psychiatric hospital admission and hospital outcomes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Prina, A. Matthew; Cosco, Theodore D.; Dening, Tom; Beekman, Aartjan; Brayne, Carol; Huisman, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to systematically review observational studies that have analysed whether depressive symptoms in the community are associated with higher general hospital admissions, longer hospital stays and increased risk of re-admission. Methods We identified prospective studies that looked at depressive symptoms in the community as a risk factor for non-psychiatric general hospital admissions, length of stay or risk of re-admission. The search was carried out on MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library Database, and followed up with contact with authors and scanning of reference lists. Results Eleven studies fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria, and all were deemed to be of moderate to high quality. Meta-analysis of seven studies with relevant data suggested that depressive symptoms may be a predictor of subsequent admission to a general hospital in unadjusted analyses (RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.28–1.44), but findings after adjustment for confounding variables were inconsistent. The narrative synthesis also reported depressive symptoms to be independently associated with longer length of stay, and higher re-admission risk. Conclusions Depressive symptoms are associated with a higher risk of hospitalisation, longer length of stay and a higher re-admission risk. Some of these associations may be mediated by other factors, and should be explored in more details. PMID:25466985

  2. 78 FR 20523 - Community Health Needs Assessments for Charitable Hospitals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... rulemaking in the Federal Register (REG-130266-11; 77 FR 38148) (``2012 proposed regulations'') that contains... Charitable Hospitals AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: This document contains proposed regulations that provide guidance to charitable...

  3. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospitals, or it is located in a rural area (as defined in § 412.64) and meets one of the following... new road between itself and a like provider within 35 miles. (C) An increase in the number of beds to... in miles measured over improved roads. An improved road for this purpose is any road that...

  4. Teaching hospital performance: towards a community of shared values?

    PubMed

    Mauro, Marianna; Cardamone, Emma; Cavallaro, Giusy; Minvielle, Etienne; Rania, Francesco; Sicotte, Claude; Trotta, Annarita

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the performance dimensions of Italian teaching hospitals (THs) by considering the multiple constituent model approach, using measures that are subjective and based on individual ideals and preferences. Our research replicates a study of a French TH and deepens it by adjusting it to the context of an Italian TH. The purposes of this research were as follows: to identify emerging views on the performance of teaching hospitals and to analyze how these views vary among hospital stakeholders. We conducted an in-depth case study of a TH using a quantitative survey method. The survey uses a questionnaire based on Parsons' social system action theory, which embraces the major models of organizational performance and covers three groups of internal stakeholders: physicians, caregivers and administrative staff. The questionnaires were distributed between April and September 2011. The results confirm that hospital performance is multifaceted and includes the dimensions of efficiency, effectiveness and quality of care, as well as organizational and human features. There is a high degree of consensus among all observed stakeholder groups about these values, and a shared view of performance is emerging. Our research provides useful information for defining management priorities to improve the performance of THs. PMID:24560230

  5. The Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research: a network of community and hospital pharmacies in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Koster, Ellen S; Blom, Lyda; Philbert, Daphne; Rump, Willem; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2014-08-01

    Practice-based networks can serve as effective mechanisms for the development of the profession of pharmacists, on the one hand by supporting student internships and on the other hand by collection of research data and implementation of research outcomes among public health practice settings. This paper presents the characteristics and benefits of the Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research, a practice based research network affiliated with the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Utrecht University. Yearly, this network is used to realize approximately 600 student internships (in hospital and community pharmacies) and 20 research projects. To date, most research has been performed in community pharmacy and research questions frequently concerned prescribing behavior or adherence and subjects related to uptake of regulations in the pharmacy setting. Researchers gain access to different types of data from daily practice, pharmacists receive feedback on the functioning of their own pharmacy and students get in depth insight into pharmacy practice.

  6. Direct access testing: nuts and bolts of starting DAT in a hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Chestnut, Dianna

    2005-01-01

    Direct Access Testing (DAT) is a consumer-driven phenomenon that is sweeping the country. It is a highly controversial subject, the implementation of which requires methodical planning and development to be successful. DAT's purpose is to allow the consumer to order a battery of laboratory tests previously available only with a physician's order. With proper planning, DAT can be beneficial to a medical facility in a number of ways. Whether introduced to a hospital or an integrated health system, physician buy-in is vital to the success of DAT. Physicians need to publicly champion the program, even if members of the laboratory are doing the behind-the-scenes work. DAT is growing rapidly, but everyone still wants the stamp of approval from their physician(s) when it comes to their health. PMID:15799839

  7. Has the Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh Addressed the Educational Divide in Accessing Health Care?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mala; Singh, Prabal Vikram; Katyal, Anuradha; Samarth, Amit; Bergkvist, Sofi; Renton, Adrian; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Background Equity of access to healthcare remains a major challenge with families continuing to face financial and non-financial barriers to services. Lack of education has been shown to be a key risk factor for 'catastrophic' health expenditure (CHE), in many countries including India. Consequently, ways to address the education divide need to be explored. We aimed to assess whether the innovative state-funded Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh state launched in 2007, has achieved equity of access to hospital inpatient care among households with varying levels of education. Methods We used the National Sample Survey Organization 2004 survey as our baseline and the same survey design to collect post-intervention data from 8623 households in the state in 2012. Two outcomes, hospitalisation and CHE for inpatient care, were estimated using education as a measure of socio-economic status and transforming levels of education into ridit scores. We derived relative indices of inequality by regressing the outcome measures on education, transformed as a ridit score, using logistic regression models with appropriate weights and accounting for the complex survey design. Findings Between 2004 and 2012, there was a 39% reduction in the likelihood of the most educated person being hospitalised compared to the least educated, with reductions observed in all households as well as those that had used the Aarogyasri. For CHE the inequality disappeared in 2012 in both groups. Sub-group analyses by economic status, social groups and rural-urban residence showed a decrease in relative indices of inequality in most groups. Nevertheless, inequalities in hospitalisation and CHE persisted across most groups. Conclusion During the time of the Aarogyasri scheme implementation inequalities in access to hospital care were substantially reduced but not eliminated across the education divide. Universal access to education and schemes such as Aarogyasri have the

  8. Governance and community benefit: are nonprofit hospitals good candidates for Sarbanes-Oxley type reforms?

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Young, Gary J; Weiner, Bryan J; Hearld, Larry R

    2008-04-01

    Recent investigations into the activities of nonprofit hospitals have pointed to weak or lax governance on the part of some of these organizations. As a result of these events, various federal and state initiatives are now either under way or under discussion to strengthen the governance of hospitals and other nonprofit corporations through mandatory board structures and practices. However, despite policy makers' growing interest in these types of governance reforms, there is in fact little empirical evidence to support their contribution to the effectiveness of hospital boards. The purpose of this article is to report the results of a study examining the relationship between the structure and practices of nonprofit hospital boards relative to the hospital's provision of community benefits. Our results point to modest relationships between these sets of variables, suggesting considerable limitations to what federal and state policy makers can accomplish through legislative initiatives to improve the governance of nonprofit hospitals.

  9. Using Community Access Cable in an Extension Parenting Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Steve A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Utah State Extension collaborated with community groups and local cable providers to broadcast programs for parents on teen sexuality and substance abuse. A survey of cable subscribers yielded 638 responses (4.5%). Of the 103 who watched programs, most were positive, but better ways to advertise the programs were needed. (SK)

  10. Accessing Imagined Communities and Reinscribing Regimes of Truth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Sherrie; Motha, Suhanthie; Price, Jeremy N.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we explore the complex and nebulous terrain between two theoretical concepts, imagined communities (Norton, 2000, 2001), that is, individuals' imagined affiliations with certain groups, and regimes of truth (Foucault, 1980), dominant images inscribed and reinscribed into individual consciousness until they become normative. Using…

  11. The 1000 Genomes Project: data management and community access.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Laura; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Smith, Richard; Kulesha, Eugene; Xiao, Chunlin; Toneva, Iliana; Vaughan, Brendan; Preuss, Don; Leinonen, Rasko; Shumway, Martin; Sherry, Stephen; Flicek, Paul

    2012-04-27

    The 1000 Genomes Project was launched as one of the largest distributed data collection and analysis projects ever undertaken in biology. In addition to the primary scientific goals of creating both a deep catalog of human genetic variation and extensive methods to accurately discover and characterize variation using new sequencing technologies, the project makes all of its data publicly available. Members of the project data coordination center have developed and deployed several tools to enable widespread data access.

  12. Which Patients, and Where: A Qualitative Study of Patient Transfers from Community Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Bosk, Emily A.; Veinot, Tiffany; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Interhospital transfer of patients is a routine part of the care at community hospitals, but the current process may lead to sub-optimal patient outcomes. A micro-level analysis of the processes of patient transfer has not previously been performed. Research Design We carried out semi-structured qualitative interviews with care providers at 3 purposively sampled community hospitals in order to describe patient transfer mechanisms, focusing on perceptions of transfers and transfer candidates, choice of transfer destination, and perceived process. We interviewed physicians, nurses and care technicians from emergency departments and intensive care units at the hospitals, and analyzed the resultant transcripts via content analysis. Results Appropriate triage and transfer of patients was a highly valued skill at community hospitals. Based on participant accounts, the transfer process had four components: (1) Identifying Transfer-Eligible Patients; (2) Identifying a Destination Hospital; (3) Negotiating the Transfer; and (4) Accomplishing the Transfer. There were common challenges at each component across hospitals. Protocolization of care was perceived to substantially facilitate transfers. Informal arrangements played a key role in the identification of the receiving hospital, but patient preferences and hospital quality were not discussed as important in decision-making. The process of arranging a patient transfer placed a significant burden on the staff of community hospitals. Conclusions The patient transfer process is often cumbersome, varies by condition, and may not be focused on optimizing patient outcomes. Development of a more fluid transfer infrastructure may aid in implementing policies such as selective referral and regionalization. PMID:21430581

  13. Safety net hospital, community providers collaborate to improve transitions.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    A Care Transitional Task Force at San Francisco General Hospital created a cross-continuum program that has reduced readmissions and increased timely primary care visits for discharged patients. A basic bundle of services includes communication between inpatient and outpatient providers, providing the right information to the next level of providers, and giving patients and family members the right level of education. Transitional care nurses work with heart failure patients of any age and patients over 55 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, renal failure, or who are recovering from a myocardial infarction. The nurses work closely with patients and family members during the hospital stay and follow up weekly for 30 days after discharge. PMID:26964416

  14. [Desirable medical technologists in a community support hospital].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kyoko

    2008-07-01

    Recently, there have been marked advances in the technological strategies employed in medical examinations. The educational concept to nurture highly capable medical technologists is considered to be a priority issue by not only educators but also employers, even though the medical educational levels have markedly improved in every college and university. It is commonly acknowledged that the results of any examination in the clinical laboratory should be accurate and fed back to medical doctors as soon as possible. The business outline of medical technologists in our hospital is becoming more extensive because we act as a core hospital in the area, and so knowledge regarding many kinds of chemical and transfusion examinations is required in operations performed around the clock. Furthermore, medical doctors, clerical workers, nurses, and volunteers comprise a team of sophisticated workers in our hospital. To accomplish our daily work, character traits such as accuracy, honesty, perseverance, and ability to follow instruction manuals, are the most fundamental and valuable. To nurture a highly career-oriented medical technologist, we propose that the following should be focused on: self-responsibility, reduction of malpractices, economic profitability, brainstorming, education of subsequent generations, and the spirit of cooperativeness and reconciliation. Additionally, it is another basic requirement of competent medical technologists to learn to adapt to laboratory-based changes in their work throughout their career. In conclusion, how to adapt to any social demand and learn strategies in any era should be taught in college or university as well as after graduation because each hospital and institute has a different philosophy and requirements of newcomers. It is important for medical technologists and doctors to develop flexible ways of thinking, although we sometimes might accede to traditional ways. PMID:18709992

  15. [Desirable medical technologists in a community support hospital].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kyoko

    2008-07-01

    Recently, there have been marked advances in the technological strategies employed in medical examinations. The educational concept to nurture highly capable medical technologists is considered to be a priority issue by not only educators but also employers, even though the medical educational levels have markedly improved in every college and university. It is commonly acknowledged that the results of any examination in the clinical laboratory should be accurate and fed back to medical doctors as soon as possible. The business outline of medical technologists in our hospital is becoming more extensive because we act as a core hospital in the area, and so knowledge regarding many kinds of chemical and transfusion examinations is required in operations performed around the clock. Furthermore, medical doctors, clerical workers, nurses, and volunteers comprise a team of sophisticated workers in our hospital. To accomplish our daily work, character traits such as accuracy, honesty, perseverance, and ability to follow instruction manuals, are the most fundamental and valuable. To nurture a highly career-oriented medical technologist, we propose that the following should be focused on: self-responsibility, reduction of malpractices, economic profitability, brainstorming, education of subsequent generations, and the spirit of cooperativeness and reconciliation. Additionally, it is another basic requirement of competent medical technologists to learn to adapt to laboratory-based changes in their work throughout their career. In conclusion, how to adapt to any social demand and learn strategies in any era should be taught in college or university as well as after graduation because each hospital and institute has a different philosophy and requirements of newcomers. It is important for medical technologists and doctors to develop flexible ways of thinking, although we sometimes might accede to traditional ways.

  16. Heat-recovery incinerator for a community hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, D.

    1996-12-01

    This article describes a project which features a heat recovery boiler that uses incinerator exhaust gas to produce free steam for a not-for-profit hospital in Boca Raton, Fla. Free steam is also used to reheat scrubber exhaust gas to provide for plume suppression and improved pollutant dispersion. The project saves $266,129 in annual energy and waste hauling costs. The project also has a simple payback of five years.

  17. Barriers to accessing HIV services for Black African communities in Cambridgeshire, the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Shangase, Phindile; Egbe, Catherine O

    2015-02-01

    The majority of new HIV diagnoses in the United Kingdom (UK) occur in people with heterosexually acquired HIV infection, the majority of whom are African communities. Current research shows that despite health promotion efforts and advances in therapy these communities are accessing HIV care late. This study therefore explored barriers to equal access to HIV services by African migrants in the UK. Kleinman's (Patients and healers in the context of culture: an exploration of the borderland between anthropology, medicine, and psychiatry, vol 3. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1980) model of health care systems was applied in this research as a theoretical framework and lens through which the reported findings are viewed as it places health within the broader context of culture. In this research a qualitative approach with focus groups was used. A total of thirty participants were recruited from African migrant community organisations in Cambridgeshire in the East of England strategic health authority in order to study the experiences of African migrants when accessing sexual health services. It was found that barriers to equal access to HIV services exist for African communities in Cambridgeshire. These included language barriers and others bordering on the use of traditional medicine by African migrants, understanding of cultural diversity, awareness of how and where to access HIV services, and getting information about HIV. Findings highlighted the importance of taking the sectors of Kleinman's [1] model into consideration when planning HIV services for African communities. PMID:24878614

  18. In-hospital and long-term mortality in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a community hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Vriz, Olga; Brosolo, Gabriele; Martina, Stefano; Pertoldi, Franco; Citro, Rodolfo; Mos, Lucio; Ferrara, Francesco; Bossone, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, frequently precipitated by a stressful event. Despite the favorable course and good long-term prognosis, a variety of complications may occur in the acute phase of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-hospital and long-term outcomes of a cohort of TTC patients. Methods Fifty-five patients (mean age 68.1±12 years) were prospectively followed for a mean of 69.6±32.2 months (64,635 days). In-hospital (death, heart failure, arrhythmias) and long-term events (death and recurrences) were recorded. Results Patients were predominantly women (87.3%) who experienced a recent stressful event (emotional or physical) and were admitted to hospital for chest pain. Eleven patients (20%) had a diagnosis of depressive disorder, and arterial hypertension was the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor. The ECG revealed ST-segment elevation in 43.6% of patients. At angiography, seven cases (12.7%) had at least one significant (≥50%) coronary artery stenosis and four patients (7.3%) had myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery. During hospitalization, three patients died (one from cardiac causes) and cardiovascular complications occurred in 12 patients. During follow-up, five patients died (none from cardiac causes), six patients had recurrences within the first year. Two patients had two recurrences: one after 114 days, triggered by an asthma attack as the first event, and the other after 1,850 days. Conclusions In TTC patients, in-hospital and long-term mortality is primarily due to non-cardiovascular causes. Recurrences are not infrequent and coronary artery disease is not an uncommon finding. PMID:27406446

  19. Improving efficiency or impairing access? Health care consolidation and quality of care: Evidence from emergency hospital closures in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Avdic, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Recent health care consolidation trends raise the important policy question whether improved emergency medical services and enhanced productivity can offset adverse quality effects from decreased access. This paper empirically analyzes how geographical distance from an emergency hospital affects the probability of surviving an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), accounting for health-based spatial sorting and data limitations on out-of-hospital mortality. Exploiting policy-induced variation in hospital distance derived from emergency hospital closures and detailed Swedish mortality data over two decades, results show a drastically decreasing probability of surviving an AMI as residential distance from a hospital increases one year after a closure occurred. The effect disappears in subsequent years, however, suggesting that involved agents quickly adapted to the new environment. PMID:27060525

  20. Increasing access to healthful foods: a qualitative study with residents of low-income communities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate access to healthful foods has been identified as a significant barrier to healthful dietary behaviors among individuals who live in low-income communities. The purpose of this study was to gather low-income community members’ opinions about their food purchasing choices and their perceptions of the most effective ways to increase access to healthful foods in their communities. Methods Spanish and English focus groups were conducted in low-income, ethnically-diverse communities. Participants were asked about their knowledge, factors influencing their food purchasing decisions, and their perceptions regarding solutions to increase access to healthful foods. Results A total of 148 people participated in 13 focus groups. The majority of participants were female and ethnically diverse (63% Hispanic, 17% African American, 16% Caucasian, and 4% “other”). More than 75% of the participants reported making less than $1999 USD per month. Participants reported high levels of knowledge and preference for healthful foods. The most important barriers influencing healthful shopping behaviors included high price of healthful food, inadequate geographical access to healthful food, poor quality of available healthful food, and lack of overall quality of the proximate retail stores. Suggested solutions to inadequate access included placement of new chain supermarkets in their communities. Strategies implemented in convenience stores were not seen as effective. Farmers’ markets, with specific stipulations, and community gardens were regarded as beneficial supplementary solutions. Conclusion The results from the focus groups provide important input from a needs assessment perspective from the community, identify gaps in access, and offer potential effective solutions to provide direction for the future. PMID:26222910

  1. Contextual and Community Factors Associated with Youth Access to Cigarettes through Commercial Sources

    PubMed Central

    Grube, Joel W.; Friend, Karen B.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study examines contextual and community level characteristics associated with youth access to tobacco through commercial sources in 50 non-contiguous mid-sized California communities. Methods The study is based on data from access surveys conducted by 4 confederate buyers (2 males and 2 females) in 997 tobacco outlets. City demographics, adult smoking prevalence and measures of tobacco outlet density, local tobacco retailer licensing and cigarette tax were included. Results Multilevel regression analyses indicated that buyer actual age, a male clerk and asking young buyers about their age were related to successful cigarette purchases. Buyer actual age and minimum age signs increased the likelihood that clerks will request an ID. At the community level, higher percentage of minors, higher education, and a greater percentage of African Americans were associated with increased likelihood of a successful purchase. Lower percentage of minors, lower education, lower percentage of African Americans, and having a local tobacco retailer licensing were associated with retailer asked for ID. Additionally, supermarkets charged significantly more for a pack of cigarettes than small markets whereas smoke/tobacco shops and drug stores/pharmacies charged less. Higher prices were associated with higher median household income and greater percentage of Hispanics. Findings about community characteristics, however, differed by cigarette brand. Conclusions This study enhances our understanding of the associations between contextual and community characteristics and youth access to tobacco through commercial sources which can help policymakers to identify and target at-risk communities and outlets to decrease youth access to tobacco. PMID:23092887

  2. Fewer Hospitalizations for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Communities With Smoke-Free Public Policies

    PubMed Central

    Rayens, Mary Kay; Adkins, Sarah; Simpson, Nick; Frazier, Susan; Mannino, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the impact of smoke-free municipal public policies on hospitalizations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods. We conducted a secondary analysis of hospital discharges with a primary diagnosis of COPD in Kentucky between July 1, 2003, and June 30, 2011 using Poisson regression. We compared the hospitalization rates of regions with and without smoke-free laws, adjusting for personal and population covariates, seasonality, secular trends over time, and geographic region. Results. Controlling for covariates such as sex, age, length of stay, race/ethnicity, education, income, and urban–rural status, among others, we found that those living in a community with a comprehensive smoke-free law or regulation were 22% less likely to experience hospitalizations for COPD than those living in a community with a moderate–weak law or no law. Those living in a community with an established law were 21% less likely to be hospitalized for COPD than those with newer laws or no laws. Conclusions. Strong smoke-free public policies may provide protection against COPD hospitalizations, particularly after 12 months, with the potential to save lives and decrease health care costs. PMID:24825207

  3. Conversations with the community: the Methodist Hospital System's experience with social media.

    PubMed

    Angelle, Denny; Rose, Clare L

    2011-01-01

    The Methodist Hospital System has maintained a social media presence on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube since 2009. After initial unofficial excursions into the world of social media, we discovered that social media can be a useful tool to extend a conversation with our patients and the community at large and share our hospital's culture with a larger base of like-minded people. But with this new power comes a heightened responsibility--platforms that can potentially reach millions of viewers and readers also provide a potential for misuse that can jeopardize patient privacy and place hospitals at risk. Because of their unique restrictions, even hospitals that use the tools regularly have much left to learn about social media. With constant monitoring and stewardship and a commitment to educating staff, hospitals can effectively use social media tools for marketing and education. PMID:22256507

  4. Tax-exempt hospitals and community benefits: a review of state reporting requirements.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Fred Joseph

    2009-02-01

    In June 2007 the Internal Revenue Service proposed a major overhaul of its reporting requirements for tax-exempt hospitals and released draft Form 990 (the IRS form filed by tax-exempt organizations each year). In December 2007 the IRS promulgated the final Form 990 after incorporating some of the recommendations made in the almost seven hundred public comments on the discussion draft. One recommendation adopted in the final Form 990 is the postponement until tax year 2009 (returns filed in 2010) of the requirement for hospitals to submit detailed information on the percentage of total expenses attributable to charity care, unreimbursed Medicaid costs, and community-health improvement programs (the discussion draft required this information for tax year 2007). Although the IRS will not require tax-exempt hospitals to provide detailed information about community benefits until the 2009 tax year, sixteen states have laws requiring tax-exempt hospitals to enumerate the benefits that they provide to the community. Information about the impact of these laws on the provision of community benefits (e.g., charity and uncompensated care) is examined in this study whose primary purpose is to highlight information policy makers may glean from states that have adopted community-benefit reporting laws. PMID:19234293

  5. Robotic Transhiatal Esophagectomy in a Community Hospital: Evolution of Technique.

    PubMed

    Horst, Vernon D; Patel, Hetal D; Hewlett, Stan C

    2016-08-01

    Esophageal cancer is an uncommon but highly lethal disease. Surgical resection is the gold standard of treatment for early-stage disease. Traditional surgical approach entailed significant convalescence, hospital stay, and morbidity and mortality. Transhiatal esophagectomy (THE) involves blind dissection of the esophagus with minimal mediastinal lymphadenectomy. Integration of robotic surgery is an alternate platform for minimally invasive approach while maintaining safety and following oncologic principles. We review our technique for minimally invasive THE using robotic technology, demonstrating the safety and efficacy of robotic technology surgery. We present a retrospective review of a single surgeon's data of patients treated with robotic-assisted THE, with a chart review to evaluate pathology, adequacy of surgical resection, nodal harvest, and perioperative course. Robotic THE (rTHE) shows promise as a valid option for esophageal resection, including premalignant and advanced stages of cancer. Adequate transhiatal mediastinal nodal resection can be performed with the robot. PMID:27657589

  6. Getting over the rainbow: one community hospital's vision.

    PubMed

    Reno, Kathy; Cerone, Phyllis; Ferket, Kathy; Wojcieszak, Elaine; Reshoft, Meaghan

    2005-01-01

    Nursing faces a challenging future due to both a projected nursing shortage and changing needs of patients. This will require greater flexibility, an increased knowledge base, and a strengthening of our caring foundations through more evidence-based practices. A nursing taxonomy needs to be determined so that we can support the research of nursing effectiveness through the use of technology. Institutions will need to increase their investments in continuing education, nursing research, and technology to enable more efficient and effective nursing practice. New relationships will need to be forged and new roles designed to maximize the profession's contributions to patient care. Questions that have been asked for decades regarding differentiated nursing practice and entry level into practice will need to be answered. This article describes a large suburban hospital's strategic initiatives that have been designed to meet the nursing challenges of the 21st century.

  7. Anaemia and malaria in Yanomami communities with differing access to healthcare.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, P; Fanello, C I; Magris, M; Goncalves, J; Metzger, W G; Vivas-Martínez, S; Curtis, C; Vivas, L

    2008-07-01

    Inequitable access to healthcare has a profound impact on the health of marginalised groups that typically suffer an excess burden of infectious disease morbidity and mortality. The Yanomami are traditionally semi-nomadic people living in widely dispersed communities in Amazonian Venezuela and Brazil. Only communities living in the vicinity of a health post have relatively constant access to healthcare. To monitor the improvement in the development of Yanomami healthcare a cross-sectional survey of 183 individuals was conducted to investigate malaria and anaemia prevalence in communities with constant and intermittent access to healthcare. Demographic and clinical data were collected. Malaria was diagnosed by microscopy and haemoglobin concentration by HemoCue. Prevalence of malaria, anaemia, splenomegaly, fever and diarrhoea were all significantly higher in communities with intermittent access to healthcare (anaemia 80.8% vs. 53.6%, P<0.001; malaria 18.2% vs. 6.0%, P=0.013; splenomegaly 85.4% vs.12.5%, P<0.001; fever 50.5% vs. 28.6%, P=0.003; diarrhoea 30.3% vs.10.7% P=0.001). Haemoglobin level (10.0 g/dl vs. 11.5 g/dl) was significantly associated with access to healthcare when controlling for age, sex, malaria and splenomegaly (P=0.01). These findings indicate a heavy burden of anaemia in both areas and the need for interventions against anaemia and malaria, along with more frequent medical visits to remote areas.

  8. Influence of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions on rhizobacterial communities and natural variation in root exudates

    PubMed Central

    Micallef, Shirley A.; Shiaris, Michael P.; Colón-Carmona, Adán

    2009-01-01

    Plant species is considered to be one of the most important factors in shaping rhizobacterial communities, but specific plant–microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are still not fully understood. Arabidopsis thaliana, for which a large number of naturally occurring ecotype accessions exist, lacks mycorrhizal associations and is hence an ideal model for rhizobacterial studies. Eight Arabidopsis accessions were found to exert a marked selective influence on bacteria associated with their roots, as determined by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). Community differences in species composition and relative abundance were both significant (P <0.001). The eight distinct and reproducible accession-dependent community profiles also differed from control bulk soil. Root exudates of these variants were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to try to establish whether the unique rhizobacterial assemblages among accessions could be attributed to plant-regulated chemical changes in the rhizosphere. Natural variation in root exudation patterns was clearly exhibited, suggesting that differences in exudation patterns among accessions could be influencing bacterial assemblages. Other factors such as root system architecture are also probably involved. Finally, to investigate the Arabidopsis rhizosphere further, the phylogenetic diversity of rhizobacteria from accession Cvi-0 is described. PMID:19342429

  9. Potential impact of public access defibrillators on survival after out of hospital cardiopulmonary arrest: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pell, Jill P; Sirel, Jane M; Marsden, Andrew K; Ford, Ian; Walker, Nicola L; Cobbe, Stuart M

    2002-01-01

    Objective To estimate the potential impact of public access defibrillators on overall survival after out of hospital cardiac arrest. Design Retrospective cohort study using data from an electronic register. A statistical model was used to estimate the effect on survival of placing public access defibrillators at suitable or possibly suitable sites. Setting Scottish Ambulance Service. Subjects Records of all out of hospital cardiac arrests due to heart disease in Scotland in 1991-8. Main outcome measures Observed and predicted survival to discharge from hospital. Results Of 15 189 arrests, 12 004 (79.0%) occurred in sites not suitable for the location of public access defibrillators, 453 (3.0%) in sites where they may be suitable, and 2732 (18.0%) in suitable sites. Defibrillation was given in 67.9% of arrests that occurred in possibly suitable sites for locating defibrillators and in 72.9% of arrests that occurred in suitable sites. Compared with an actual overall survival of 744 (5.0%), the predicted survival with public access defibrillators ranged from 942 (6.3%) to 959 (6.5%), depending on the assumptions made regarding defibrillator coverage. Conclusions The predicted increase in survival from targeted provision of public access defibrillators is less than the increase achievable through expansion of first responder defibrillation to non-ambulance personnel, such as police or firefighters, or of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Additional resources for wide scale coverage of public access defibrillators are probably not justified by the marginal improvement in survival. What is already known on this topicThree quarters of all deaths from acute coronary events occur before the patient reaches a hospitalDefibrillation is an independent predictor of survival from out of hospital cardiac arrestThe probability of a rhythm being amenable to defibrillation declines with timeInterest in providing public access defibrillators to reduce the time to

  10. Re-engineering surgical services in a community teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M M; Wreford, M; Barnes, M; Voight, P

    1997-04-01

    The Grace Hospital Surgical Services redesign project began in December 1995 and concluded in November 1996. It was led by the Chief of Surgery, the Surgical/Anesthesia Services Director, and the Associate Director of Critical Care/Trauma. The project was undertaken in order to radically redesign the delivery of surgical services in the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) Northwest Region. It encompassed the Grace Hospital Main Operating Room (10 operating theatres) and Post-Anesthesia Recovery Unit, and a satellite Ambulatory Surgery Center in Southfield, Michigan. The four areas of focus were materials management, case scheduling, patient flow/staffing, and business planning. The guiding objectives of the project were to improve upon the quality of surgical services for patients and physicians, to substantially reduce costs, and to increase case volume. Because the Grace Surgical Services redesign project was conducted in a markedly open communicative, and inclusive fashion and drew participation from a broad range of medical professionals, support staff, and management, it created positive ripple effects across the institution by raising staff cost-consciousness, satisfaction, and morale. Other important accomplishments of the project included: Introduction of block scheduling in the ORs, which improved room utilization and turnaround efficiencies, and greatly smoothed the boarding process for physicians. Centralization of all surgical boarding, upgrading of computer equipment to implement "one call" surgery scheduling, and enlarging the capacity for archiving, managing and retrieving OR data. Installation of a 23-hour, overnight recovery unit and provision of physician assistants at the Ambulatory Surgery Center, opening the doors to an expanded number of surgical procedures, and enabling higher quality care for patients. Reduction of FTE positions by 27 percent at the Ambulatory Surgery Center. This yielded a total cost reduction of +1.5 million per annum in the

  11. Two-tier charging in Maputo Central Hospital: Costs, revenues and effects on equity of access to hospital services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Special services within public hospitals are becoming increasingly common in low and middle income countries with the stated objective of providing higher comfort services to affluent customers and generating resources for under funded hospitals. In the present study expenditures, outputs and costs are analysed for the Maputo Central Hospital and its Special Clinic with the objective of identifying net resource flows between a system operating two-tier charging, and, ultimately, understanding whether public hospitals can somehow benefit from running Special Clinic operations. Methods A combination of step-down and bottom-up costing strategies were used to calculate recurrent as well as capital expenses, apportion them to identified cost centres and link costs to selected output measures. Results The results show that cost differences between main hospital and clinic are marked and significant, with the Special Clinic's cost per patient and cost per outpatient visit respectively over four times and over thirteen times their equivalent in the main hospital. Discussion While the main hospital cost structure appeared in line with those from similar studies, salary expenditures were found to drive costs in the Special Clinic (73% of total), where capital and drug costs were surprisingly low (2 and 4% respectively). We attributed low capital and drug costs to underestimation by our study owing to difficulties in attributing the use of shared resources and to the Special Clinic's outsourcing policy. The large staff expenditure would be explained by higher physician time commitment, economic rents and subsidies to hospital staff. On the whole it was observed that: (a) the flow of capital and human resources was not fully captured by the financial systems in place and stayed largely unaccounted for; (b) because of the little consideration given to capital costs, the main hospital is more likely to be subsidising its Special Clinic operations, rather than the

  12. Residential accessibility to information technology retailers and self reported computer use among patients attending community clinics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul; Shaheen, Madga; Smith, James; Ryan, Daniel; Baker, Richard

    2009-11-14

    The actual mechanisms that maintain the individual disparities in home computer use and internet access that are collectively termed "the digital divide" remain unclear. We hypothesized that geographic accessibility to IT retailers would independently influence community clinic patients self reported use of computers at home thus limiting their ability to access health related information via the internet. To test this we obtained information on the locations of IT retailers in Los Angeles County, California and generated accessibility scores for the patient's home residence. Geographic measures of accessibility to IT retailers independently predicted clinic patient's self reported use of computers at home, and this effect was driven by low income individuals. Our results indicate that the causes of the digital divide are influenced by less commonly considered factors such as local IT retailer availability.

  13. Enteropathogens associated with acute diarrhea in community and hospital patients in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Oyofo, Buhari A; Subekti, Decy; Tjaniadi, Periska; Machpud, Nunung; Komalarini, S; Setiawan, B; Simanjuntak, C; Punjabi, Narain; Corwin, Andrew L; Wasfy, Momtaz; Campbell, James R; Lesmana, Murad

    2002-10-11

    The prevalence of bacteria, parasite and viral pathogens in 3875 patients with diarrhea in community and hospital settings from March 1997 through August 1999 in Jakarta, Indonesia was determined using routine bacteriology and molecular assay techniques. Bacterial pathogens isolated from hospital patients were, in decreasing frequency, Vibrio cholerae O1, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter jejuni, while S. flexneri, V. cholerae O1, Salmonella spp. and C. jejuni were isolated from the community patients. V. cholerae O1 was isolated more frequently (P<0.005) from the hospital patients than the community patients. Overall, bacterial pathogens were isolated from 538 of 3875 (14%) enrolled cases of diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli were detected in 218 (18%) of 1244 rectal swabs. A small percentage of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (1%) and of Clostridium difficile (1.3%) was detected. Parasitic examination of 389 samples resulted in 43 (11%) positives comprising Ascaris lumbricoides (1.5%), Blastocystis hominis (5.7%), Giardia lamblia (0.8%), Trichuris trichiura (2.1%) and Endolimax nana (0.5%). Rotavirus (37.5%), adenovirus (3.3%) and Norwalk-like virus (17.6%) were also detected. Antimicrobial resistance was observed among some isolates. Bacterial isolates were susceptible to quinolones, with the exception of some isolates of C. jejuni which were resistant to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and norfloxacin. Data obtained from this community- and hospital-based study will enable the Indonesian Ministry of Health to plan relevant studies on diarrheal diseases in the archipelago. PMID:12381465

  14. 78 FR 31454 - Community Health Needs Assessments for Charitable Hospitals; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 53 RIN 1545-BL30 Community Health Needs Assessments for Charitable Hospitals; Correction Correction In proposed rule document 2013-12013, appearing on pages...

  15. From Long-Stay Hospitals to Community Care: Reconstructing the Narratives of People with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaning, Brian; Adderley, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Raymond, a 62 year old gentleman diagnosed with severe and profound learning disabilities, autistic spectrum disorder and severe challenging behaviour, who had lived in long stay campus-based hospital accommodation for 46 years was supported to move to a community project developed to support people to live in their own bespoke flat. This…

  16. The Effects of Monitoring the Use of Gentamicin in a Community Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, David N.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a combined education and monitoring program on the use of gentamicin in a community hospital is described. The data support the tenet that the ways antibiotics are used can be altered by an education program. (Author/LBH)

  17. Project Return: Community Education Initiative and Babygram Hospital Outreach, 1991-92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    Project Return, a dropout recovery program to assist pregnant and parenting teenagers and parents of elementary school children to return to school, was first implemented in 1989-90. By 1991-92, there were two components of Project Return: its community education initiative in seven elementary schools, and the Babygram Hospital Outreach Program…

  18. Hospitalization Rates of Nursing Home Residents and Community-Dwelling Seniors in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Lisa A.; McGregor, Margaret J.; McGrail, Kimberlyn M.; Tate, Robert B.; Broemling, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    The overall use of acute care services by nursing home (NH) residents in Canada has not been well documented. Our objectives were to identify the major causes of hospitalization among NH facility residents and to compare rates to those of community-dwelling seniors. A retrospective cohort was defined using population-level health administrative…

  19. Cross-cultural healthcare challenges: an insight into small American community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M P; Kothari, V

    1997-01-01

    The healthcare industry in the United States is faced with many strategic challenges, because of the nation's growing culturally diverse population. Growing cultural diversity now calls for better trained medical staff that is capable of handling language, religious and cultural differences. In the rural communities, where cultural diversity is rapidly becoming a demographic fact, small hospitals with limited resources are especially confronted with medical challenges for which they seem to be least prepared. Based on an exploratory research that includes a study of small town hospitals, this paper provides insights into cross-cultural problems facing healthcare professionals in small communities. The paper highlights also the ways in which hospitals are responding to such challenges.

  20. Starting a General Surgery Program at a Small Rural Critical Access Hospital: A Case Study from Southeastern Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Brit Cruse; Heneghan, Steven; Zuckerman, Randall

    2007-01-01

    Context: Surgical services are frequently unavailable in rural American communities. Therefore, rural residents often must travel long distances to receive surgical care. Rural hospitals commonly have difficulty providing surgical services despite potential economic benefits. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to identify the key challenges…

  1. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Children

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Seema; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Ampofo, Krow; Bramley, Anna M.; Reed, Carrie; Stockmann, Chris; Anderson, Evan J.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Self, Wesley H.; Zhu, Yuwei; Patel, Anami; Hymas, Weston; Chappell, James D.; Kaufman, Robert A.; Kan, J. Herman; Dansie, David; Lenny, Noel; Hillyard, David R.; Haynes, Lia M.; Levine, Min; Lindstrom, Stephen; Winchell, Jonas M.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Erdman, Dean; Schneider, Eileen; Hicks, Lauri A.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Pavia, Andrew T.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Finelli, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Background U.S. incidence estimates of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations based on prospective data collection are limited. Updated estimates with radiographic confirmation and current laboratory diagnostics are needed. Methods We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among children <18 years in three hospitals in Memphis, Nashville, and Salt Lake City. We excluded children with recent hospitalization and severe immunosuppression. Blood and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for pathogen detection by multiple modalities. Chest radiographs were independently reviewed by study radiologists. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations, overall and by age and pathogen. Results From January 2010-June 2012, we enrolled 2638 (69%) of 3803 eligible children; 2358 (89%) had radiographic pneumonia. Median age was 2 years (interquartile range 1-6); 497 (21%) children required intensive care, and three (<1%) died. Among 2222 children with radiographic pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a viral and/or bacterial pathogen was detected in 1802 (81%); ≥1 virus in 1472 (66%), bacteria in 175 (8%), and bacterial-viral co-detection in 155 (7%). Annual pneumonia incidence was 15.7/10,000 children [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-16.5], with highest rates among children <2 years [62.2/10,000 (CI 57.6-67.1)]. Respiratory syncytial virus (37% vs. 8%), adenovirus (15% vs. 3%), and human metapneumovirus (15% vs. 8%) were more commonly detected in children <5 years compared with older children; Mycoplasma pneumoniae (19% vs. 3%) was more common in children ≥5 years. Conclusions Pediatric community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization burden was highest among the very young, with respiratory viruses most commonly detected. PMID:25714161

  2. Development of an Automated, Real Time Surveillance Tool for Predicting Readmissions at a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gildersleeve, R.; Cooper, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Readmissions Reduction Program adjusts payments to hospitals based on 30-day readmission rates for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. This holds hospitals accountable for a complex phenomenon about which there is little evidence regarding effective interventions. Further study may benefit from a method for efficiently and inexpensively identifying patients at risk of readmission. Several models have been developed to assess this risk, many of which may not translate to a U.S. community hospital setting. Objective To develop a real-time, automated tool to stratify risk of 30-day readmission at a semirural community hospital. Methods A derivation cohort was created by extracting demographic and clinical variables from the data repository for adult discharges from calendar year 2010. Multivariate logistic regression identified variables that were significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission. Those variables were incorporated into a formula to produce a Risk of Readmission Score (RRS). A validation cohort from 2011 assessed the predictive value of the RRS. A SQL stored procedure was created to calculate the RRS for any patient and publish its value, along with an estimate of readmission risk and other factors, to a secure intranet site. Results Eleven variables were significantly associated with readmission in the multivariate analysis of each cohort. The RRS had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (c-statistic) of 0.74 (95% CI 0.73-0.75) in the derivation cohort and 0.70 (95% CI 0.69-0.71) in the validation cohort. Conclusion Clinical and administrative data available in a typical community hospital database can be used to create a validated, predictive scoring system that automatically assigns a probability of 30-day readmission to hospitalized patients. This does not require manual data extraction or manipulation and uses commonly

  3. North Carolina health network McGaw Prize winner. Attention to community service revives Bladen County Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    1998-01-01

    Bladen County Hospital receives the prestigious 1997 Foster G. McGaw Prize for Excellence in Community Service. The county hospital funneled the $75,000 award money back to the community as seed money for the development of a wellness/fitness center.

  4. Incidence and survival of hospitalized acute decompensated heart failure in four US communities (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study).

    PubMed

    Chang, Patricia P; Chambless, Lloyd E; Shahar, Eyal; Bertoni, Alain G; Russell, Stuart D; Ni, Hanyu; He, Max; Mosley, Thomas H; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Samdarshi, Tandaw E; Wruck, Lisa M; Rosamond, Wayne D

    2014-02-01

    Most population-based estimates of incident hospitalized heart failure (HF) have not differentiated acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) from chronic stable HF nor included racially diverse populations. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study conducted surveillance of hospitalized HF events (age ≥55 years) in 4 US communities. We estimated hospitalized ADHF incidence and survival by race and gender. Potential 2005 to 2009 HF hospitalizations were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, codes; 6,168 records were reviewed to validate ADHF cases. Population estimates were derived from US Census data; 50% of eligible hospitalizations were classified as ADHF, of which 63.6% were incident ADHF and 36.4% were recurrent ADHF. The average incidence of hospitalized ADHF was 11.6 per 1,000 persons, aged ≥55 years, per year, and recurrent hospitalized ADHF was 6.6 per 1,000 persons/yr. Age-adjusted annual ADHF incidence was highest for black men (15.7 per 1,000), followed by black women (13.3 per 1,000), white men (12.3 per 1,000), and white women (9.9 per 1,000). Of incident ADHF events with heart function assessment (89%), 53% had reduced the ejection fraction (heart failure with reduced ejection fraction [HFrEF]) and 47% had preserved ejection fraction (heart failure with preserved ejection fraction [HFpEF]). Black men had the highest proportion of acute HFrEF events (70%); white women had the highest proportion of acute HFpEF (59%). Age-adjusted 28-day and 1-year case fatality after an incident ADHF was 10.4% and 29.5%, respectively. Survival did not differ by race or gender. In conclusion, ADHF hospitalization and HF type varied by both race and gender, but case fatality rates did not. Further studies are needed to explain why black men are at higher risk of hospitalized ADHF and HFrEF.

  5. Establishing interfaces between community- and hospital-based service systems for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Netting, F E; Williams, F G

    1989-05-01

    The gerontological service delivery system often fails to integrate the different types of services needed at different times by older clients. Social workers need to address the urgent and increasing need for communication among acute care hospitals that are diversifying into areas previously the domain of community-based providers of services for the aged. Coordinated care case management programs were developed in seven hospitals to determine whether hospitals could serve as a logical entry point of frail elderly persons into the system. Examination of the experiences of these hospitals illustrated the need for models of service integration and resulted in several approaches to comprehensive service delivery and coordination. Social work professionals in both acute and long-term care settings need to understand all aspects of the service delivery system to ensure that elderly clients receive appropriate levels and continuity of care in a complex and constantly changing system.

  6. Access, Quality, and Opportunity: A Case Study of Zambia Open Community Schools (ZOCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwalimu, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Community schools and other approaches to Alternative Primary Education or APE have increased access to primary education for underserved populations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America as a major goal of the Education for All (EFA) movement. In Zambia, a country where an estimated 20 percent of the basic education enrollment now attends community…

  7. Access to Success: Truman, Obama, and the Evolution of Presidential Agendas for Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Thashundray C.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation examined two higher education federal activities, President Harry Truman's 1947 Presidential Commission on Higher Education and President Barack Obama's 2009 American Graduation Initiative, to understand how the federal government's mission for community colleges has evolved from one of student access to student success over the…

  8. Save Lives! Recommendations To Reduce Underage Access to Alcohol & Action Steps for Your Community. Update 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    Each year thousands of young people are killed and injured in alcohol-related crashes. In 1992, Join Together, convened a national policy panel on underage drinking in direct response to communities' demands for action. This document is a product of the panel's findings. Section 1, Recommendations to Reduce Underage Access to Alcohol, made five…

  9. Unrealized Promises: Unequal Access, Affordability, and Excellence at Community Colleges in Southern California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Wenzl, Mary; Marquez, Rigoberto

    2012-01-01

    California community colleges are, by design, the only entry point to four-year institutions for the majority of students in the state. Yet, many of these institutions perpetuate racial and class segregation, thus disrupting the California Master Plan for Higher Education's promise of access, equity, and excellence in higher education. This report…

  10. Assessing Police Community Readiness to Work on Youth Access and Possession of Tobacco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunz, Charlotte B.; Jason, Leonard A.; Adams, Monica; Pokorny, Steven B.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers are only beginning to investigate how to measure a community's readiness to engage in an intervention. In this study, we investigated the readiness of police departments to deal with tobacco policies about youth access to tobacco and youth possession of tobacco. Police officers in 24 towns completed structured interviews designed to…

  11. Ensuring Access with Quality to California's Community Colleges. National Center Report #04-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Gerald C.; Jones, Dennis P.; McGuinness, Aims C., Jr.; Timar, Allene

    2004-01-01

    This report finds that enrollment growth pressures, fee increases, and recent budget cuts in the California Community Colleges are having significant detrimental effects on student access and program quality. The report also provides recommendations for creating improvements that build from the state policy context and from existing promising…

  12. Balancing Open Access with Academic Standards: Implications for Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbard, Anita; Mupinga, Davison M.

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges act as the gateway for students to higher education. Many of these colleges realize this mission through open-door policies where students lacking in basic reading, writing, and mathematics skills can enroll. But, this open-access policy often creates challenges when meeting academic standards. Based on data collected from…

  13. DELIVERING TIMELY WATER QUALITY INFORMATION TO YOUR COMMUNITY. THE LAKE ACCESS-MINNEAPOLIS PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a summary of the near-real-time water quality-monitoring project conducted by a consortium of interested parties in the greater Minneapolis area. It was funded by an EPA program known as EMPACT (Environmental Monitoring, Public Access, and Community Tracking). In 1...

  14. HOSPITAL NUTRITIONAL CARE: PROPOSITIONS ENDORSED BY THE SCIENTIFIC COMMUNITY.

    PubMed

    Diez-Garcia, Rosa Wanda; Zangiacomi Martinez, Edson; Penaforte, Fernanda Rodrigues de Oliveira; Japur, Camila Cremonezi

    2015-09-01

    Antecedentes/objetivos: la incidencia de desnutrición hospitalaria y sus consecuencias tanto para el paciente como para el hospital ha exigido procedimientos que aseguren un servicio de atención nutricional hospitalaria de buena calidad. Basado en los informes de la literatura, este estudio tuvo como objetivo construir proposiciones sobre los cuidados nutricionales hospitalarios, que después fueran evaluados y aprobados por la comunidad científica. Métodos: fueron desarrolladas cuarenta y una proposiciones relativas a la atención nutricional clínica del paciente y a la gestión del servicio de alimentación por el Servicio de Alimentación y Nutrición Hospitalaria. Un total de cien profesionales, investigadores y profesores evaluaron las proposiciones. Para analizar si los evaluadores estaban de acuerdo con las proposiciones se utilizó una escala Likert de cinco puntos (estoy en total desacuerdo, estoy parcialmente en desacuerdo, no tengo opinión, estoy parcialmente de acuerdo, estoy totalmente de acuerdo) asociada a cada proposición. Fue considerada concordancia cuando el 70% o más de los evaluadores estaban de acuerdo (totalmente o parcialmente) con la proposición. Para el análisis estadístico fue utilizado el procedimiento Proc Corresp del software SAS 10, versión 8, estadística descriptiva y análisis de correspondencias. Resultados: más del 90% de los entrevistados estaban total o parcialmente de acuerdo con el 85% (35) de las 41 proposiciones; entre el 80 y 90% de los entrevistados estaban total o parcialmente de acuerdo con el 15% (6) de las 41 proposiciones. Todos los criterios propuestos tuvieron más del 70% de concordancia (total y parcial). El menor valor de concordancia total fue del 70%, atribuido a la proposición que sugiere la participación del paciente en la intervención nutricional. Conclusiones: la comunidad científica presentó alto nivel de concordancia con las proposiciones para la atención nutricional hospitalaria, lo

  15. Developing Accessible Cyberinfrastructure-Enabled Knowledge Communities in the National Disability Community: Theory, Practice, and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myhill, William N.; Cogburn, Derrick L.; Samant, Deepti

    2008-01-01

    Since publication of the Atkins Commission report 2003, the national scientific community has placed significant emphasis on developing cyberinfrastructure-enabled knowledge communities, which are designed to facilitate enhanced efficiency and collaboration in geographically distributed networks of researchers. This article suggests that the new…

  16. Hospitals Participating In ACOs Tend To Be Large And Urban, Allowing Access To Capital And Data.

    PubMed

    Colla, Carrie H; Lewis, Valerie A; Tierney, Emily; Muhlestein, David B

    2016-03-01

    Relationships between physicians and hospitals have changed considerably over the past decade, as hospitals and physician groups have integrated and new public and private payment policies have created financial interdependence. The extent to which accountable care organizations (ACOs) involve hospitals in their operations may prove to be vitally important, because managing hospital care is a key part of improving health care quality and lowering cost growth. Using primary data on ACO composition and capabilities paired with hospital characteristics, we found that 20 percent of US hospitals were part of an ACO in 2014. Hospitals that were in urban areas, were nonprofit, or had a smaller share of Medicare patients were more likely to participate in ACOs, compared to hospitals that were in more rural areas, were for-profit or government owned, or had a larger share of Medicare patients, respectively. Qualitative data identified the following advantages of including a hospital in an ACO: the availability of start-up capital, advanced data sharing, and engagement of providers across the care continuum. Although the 63 percent of ACOs that included hospitals offered more comprehensive services compared to ACOs without hospitals, we found no differences between the two groups in their ability to manage hospital-related aspects of patient care.

  17. Lessons learned from implementation of computerized provider order entry in 5 community hospitals: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) can improve patient safety, quality and efficiency, but hospitals face a host of barriers to adopting CPOE, ranging from resistance among physicians to the cost of the systems. In response to the incentives for meaningful use of health information technology and other market forces, hospitals in the United States are increasingly moving toward the adoption of CPOE. The purpose of this study was to characterize the experiences of hospitals that have successfully implemented CPOE. Methods We used a qualitative approach to observe clinical activities and capture the experiences of physicians, nurses, pharmacists and administrators at five community hospitals in Massachusetts (USA) that adopted CPOE in the past few years. We conducted formal, structured observations of care processes in diverse inpatient settings within each of the hospitals and completed in-depth, semi-structured interviews with clinicians and staff by telephone. After transcribing the audiorecorded interviews, we analyzed the content of the transcripts iteratively, guided by principles of the Immersion and Crystallization analytic approach. Our objective was to identify attitudes, behaviors and experiences that would constitute useful lessons for other hospitals embarking on CPOE implementation. Results Analysis of observations and interviews resulted in findings about the CPOE implementation process in five domains: governance, preparation, support, perceptions and consequences. Successful institutions implemented clear organizational decision-making mechanisms that involved clinicians (governance). They anticipated the need for education and training of a wide range of users (preparation). These hospitals deployed ample human resources for live, in-person training and support during implementation. Successful implementation hinged on the ability of clinical leaders to address and manage perceptions and the fear of change. Implementation proceeded

  18. Nursing outside hospitals: the working experience of community nurses. Educational characteristics and job perceptions.

    PubMed

    Temple-Smith, M J; Johnson, K A; Dunt, D R

    1989-01-01

    The community nursing practice research project reports the results of a mailed questionnaire survey of nurses employed outside hospitals and nursing homes in Victoria in 1985. Two 10 per cent random samples stratified across practice areas were selected from listings of community nurses providing detailed employment information to the Victorian Nursing Council. An 84 per cent response rate was obtained from these listings yielding 689 responses. This paper reports that part of the study relevant to job entry, job satisfaction, job mobility and perceived career options as well as educational preparation. One half of community nurses entered community nursing after five years of hospital experience. The major reasons for choosing employment in community health nursing were its conditions of work, its autonomy and a dissatisfaction with hospital nursing, rather than a specific orientation to community nursing. These can be appreciated in terms of competing demands by the nurse's family life and her sense of growing professional maturity. Job satisfaction was high, with 87 per cent of nurses in the study population being satisfied or very satisfied. Only one quarter considered opportunities for career advancement to exist in their practice area. In the event only one fifth of nurses regarded promotion as important. The high levels of job satisfaction and the low importance attached to promotion are explicable given the nature of female employment and dissatisfaction with hospital nursing. Despite this high level of job satisfaction, one third of nurses believed they would not be nursing in five years time. Less than one third of nurses felt there was adequate opportunity for advancement in their practice area.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2605904

  19. The application of a biometric identification technique for linking community and hospital data in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Odei-Lartey, Eliezer Ofori; Boateng, Dennis; Danso, Samuel; Kwarteng, Anthony; Abokyi, Livesy; Amenga-Etego, Seeba; Gyaase, Stephaney; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Background The reliability of counts for estimating population dynamics and disease burdens in communities depends on the availability of a common unique identifier for matching general population data with health facility data. Biometric data has been explored as a feasible common identifier between the health data and sociocultural data of resident members in rural communities within the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System located in the central part of Ghana. Objective Our goal was to assess the feasibility of using fingerprint identification to link community data and hospital data in a rural African setting. Design A combination of biometrics and other personal identification techniques were used to identify individual's resident within a surveillance population seeking care in two district hospitals. Visits from resident individuals were successfully recorded and categorized by the success of the techniques applied during identification. The successes of visits that involved identification by fingerprint were further examined by age. Results A total of 27,662 hospital visits were linked to resident individuals. Over 85% of those visits were successfully identified using at least one identification method. Over 65% were successfully identified and linked using their fingerprints. Supervisory support from the hospital administration was critical in integrating this identification system into its routine activities. No concerns were expressed by community members about the fingerprint registration and identification processes. Conclusions Fingerprint identification should be combined with other methods to be feasible in identifying community members in African rural settings. This can be enhanced in communities with some basic Demographic Surveillance System or census information. PMID:26993473

  20. Understanding access to care and health needs of Hispanic women from an urban community.

    PubMed

    Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie; Dunphy Suplee, Patricia; Gardner, Marcia R

    2014-01-01

    As a first step in a proposed program of community-based participatory research, this study investigated access to care and specific health needs in a population of Hispanic women from a medically underserved, urban community. There were 66 Hispanic women recruited at a local church to complete a 94-item researcher-developed survey. Thirty-two percent of women in the study were not U.S. citizens. Being insured, being a citizen, and having a medical diagnosis were significant in satisfaction with care. The most prevalent health issue for this population was being overweight or obese. This study demonstrates the use of the community needs assessment process in the development of interventions to improve a community's health and health care. This is especially true in the Hispanic community in which large variations based on culture and country of origin will impact the success of planned interventions.

  1. Increasing access to care for Brazos Valley, Texas: a rural community of solution.

    PubMed

    Garney, Whitney R; Drake, Kelly; Wendel, Monica L; McLeroy, Kenneth; Clark, Heather R; Ryder, Byron

    2013-01-01

    Compared with their urban counterparts, rural populations face substantial disparities in terms of health care and health outcomes, particularly with regard to access to health services. To address ongoing inequities, community perspectives are increasingly important in identifying health issues and developing local solutions that are effective and sustainable. This article has been developed by both academic and community representatives and presents a brief case study of the evolution of a regional community of solution (COS) servicing a 7-county region called the Brazos Valley, Texas. The regional COS gave rise to multiple, more localized COSs that implemented similar strategies designed to address access to care within rural communities. The regional COS, known as the Brazos Valley Health Partnership, was a result of a 2002 health status assessment that revealed that rural residents face poorer access to health services and their care is often fragmented. Their localized strategy, called a health resource center, was created as a "one-stop shop" where multiple health and social service providers could be housed to deliver services to rural residents. Initially piloted in Madison County, the resource center model was expanded into Burleson, Grimes, and Leon Counties because of community buy-in at each of these sites. The resource center concept allowed service providers, who previously were able to offer services only in more populous areas, to expand into the rural communities because of reduced overhead costs. The services provided at the health resource centers include transportation, information and referral, and case management along with others, depending on the location. To ensure successful ongoing operations and future planning of the resource centers, local oversight bodies known as health resource commissions were organized within each of the rural communities to represent local COSs. Through collaboration with local entities, these partnerships have

  2. The role of non-operating income in community benefit provision by not-for-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Song, Paula H; McCullough, Jeffrey S; Reiter, Kristin L

    2013-01-01

    Not-for-profit hospitals are under increased public scrutiny for providing what some view as insufficient levels of community benefit compared to their tax-exempt benefits. One potential driver of community benefit is financial surplus, which arises from both patient care (operating) activities and non-patient care (non-operating) activities. This study addresses the effect of hospitals' non-operating income on not-for-profit hospitals' provision of community benefit. The study sample includes 217 unique not-for-profit, non-governmental, general, acute care hospitals in California between 1997 and 2010 that filed annual reports with the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD). We model the effect of hospitals' operating and non-operating incomes on hospitals' community benefit, controlling for observable hospital characteristics such as scale and system membership, local competition, time trends, and hospital fixed effects. Our results indicate that non-operating income has no effect on levels of community benefit provided by not-for-profit hospitals. This finding suggests that not-for-profit hospitals budget for uncompensated care at levels that are prioritized over other potential investments if non-operating income falls, but remain fixed if non-operating income rises.

  3. National Bloodstream Infection Surveillance in Switzerland 2008-2014: Different Patterns and Trends for University and Community Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Buetti, Niccolò; Marschall, Jonas; Atkinson, Andrew; Kronenberg, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the epidemiology of bloodstream infections in Switzerland, comparing selected pathogens in community and university hospitals. DESIGN Observational, retrospective, multicenter laboratory surveillance study. METHODS Data on bloodstream infections from 2008 through 2014 were obtained from the Swiss infection surveillance system, which is part of the Swiss Centre for Antibiotic Resistance (ANRESIS). We compared pathogen prevalences across 26 acute care hospitals. A subanalysis for community-acquired and hospital-acquired bloodstream infections in community and university hospitals was performed. RESULTS A total of 42,802 bloodstream infection episodes were analyzed. The most common etiologies were Escherichia coli (28.3%), Staphylococcus aureus (12.4%), and polymicrobial bloodstream infections (11.4%). The proportion of E. coli increased from 27.5% in 2008 to 29.6% in 2014 (P = .04). E. coli and S. aureus were more commonly reported in community than university hospitals (34.3% vs 22.7%, P<.001 and 13.9% vs 11.1%, P<.001, respectively). Fifty percent of episodes were community-acquired, with E. coli again being more common in community hospitals (41.0% vs 32.4%, P<.001). The proportion of E. coli in community-acquired bloodstream infections increased in community hospitals only. Community-acquired polymicrobial infections (9.9% vs 5.6%, P<.001) and community-acquired coagulase-negative staphylococci (6.7% vs 3.4%, P<0.001) were more prevalent in university hospitals. CONCLUSIONS The role of E. coli as predominant pathogen in bloodstream infections has become more pronounced. There are distinct patterns in community and university hospitals, potentially influencing empirical antibiotic treatment. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:1060-1067.

  4. Identifying Patients with Bacteremia in Community-Hospital Emergency Rooms: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Taro; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Maki, Nobuyuki; Gibo, Koichiro; Tsugihashi, Yukio; Doi, Asako; Fukuma, Shingo; Yamazaki, Shin; Kajii, Eiji; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To develop a clinical prediction rule to identify patients with bacteremia, using only information that is readily available in the emergency room (ER) of community hospitals, and (2) to test the validity of that rule with a separate, independent set of data. Design Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Setting To derive the clinical prediction rule we used data from 3 community hospitals in Japan (derivation). We tested the rule using data from one other community hospital (validation), which was not among the three “derivation” hospitals. Participants Adults (age ≥ 16 years old) who had undergone blood-culture testing while in the ER between April 2011 and March 2012. For the derivation data, n = 1515 (randomly sampled from 7026 patients), and for the validation data n = 467 (from 823 patients). Analysis We analyzed 28 candidate predictors of bacteremia, including demographic data, signs and symptoms, comorbid conditions, and basic laboratory data. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression were used to derive an integer risk score (the “ID-BactER” score). Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (i.e., the AUC) were computed. Results There were 241 cases of bacteremia in the derivation data. Eleven candidate predictors were used in the ID-BactER score: age, chills, vomiting, mental status, temperature, systolic blood pressure, abdominal sign, white blood-cell count, platelets, blood urea nitrogen, and C-reactive protein. The AUCs was 0.80 (derivation) and 0.74 (validation). For ID-BactER scores ≥ 2, the sensitivities for derivation and validation data were 98% and 97%, and specificities were 20% and 14%, respectively. Conclusions The ID-BactER score can be computed from information that is readily available in the ERs of community hospitals. Future studies should focus on developing a score with a higher specificity while maintaining the desired sensitivity

  5. Occupational stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region.

    PubMed

    McTiernan, K; McDonald, N

    2015-04-01

    Burnout negatively impacts the delivery of mental health services. Psychiatric nurses face stressors that are distinct from other nursing specialities. The research was conducted in Ireland and captured a relatively large sample of respondents. The results compared the stressors, coping strategies and burnout levels between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses. Occupational stress can negatively impact on the well-being of psychiatric nurses, which in turn can lead to poor client care. There is a dearth of published research conducted in Ireland that examines stress within the discipline. A between-groups study, undertaken in February 2011, investigated stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region. Sixty-nine participants (8 males and 61 females), aged between 18 to 60 years voluntarily completed the Mental Health Professional Stress Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the PsychNurse Methods of Coping Scale. The findings revealed that nurses were operating in a moderately stressful environment. Stressors focused on organizational issues as opposed to client issues. The main stressors identified were lack of resources, workload and organizational structures/processes. Both groups reported average levels of emotional exhaustion, low levels of depersonalization and average levels of personal accomplishment. A Mann-Whitney U-test and Independent Samples t-test found significant differences between hospital and community-based nurses regarding depersonalization and personal accomplishment, respectively. Hospital nurses reported higher depersonalization scores, and community nurses had a greater sense of personal accomplishment. The personal accomplishment scores of hospital nurses were below mental health professional norms. No significant differences emerged regarding coping strategies. Avoidant coping strategies were favoured by both groups. It is recommended that interventions

  6. Comparison of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Healthy Community Hospital Visitors [CA-MRSA] and Hospital Staff [HA-MRSA

    PubMed Central

    Pathare, Nirmal A; Tejani, Sara; Asogan, Harshini; Al Mahruqi, Gaitha; Al Fakhri, Salma; Zafarulla, Roshna; Pathare, Anil V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] is unknown in Oman. Methods Nasal and cell phones swabs were collected from hospital visitors and health-care workers on sterile polyester swabs and directly inoculated onto a mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin, allowing growth of methicillin-resistant microorganisms. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using Kirby Bauer’s disc diffusion method on the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for vancomycin and teicoplanin against the resistant isolates of MRSA by the Epsilometer [E] test. A brief survey questionnaire was requested be filled to ascertain the exposure to known risk factors for CA-MRSA carriage. Results Overall, nasal colonization with CA-MRSA was seen in 34 individuals (18%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =12.5%–23.5%), whereas, CA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 12 participants (6.3%, 95% CI =5.6%–6.98%). Nasal colonization prevalence with hospital-acquired [HA] MRSA was seen in 16 individuals (13.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =7.5%–20.06%), whereas, HA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 3 participants (2.6%, 95% CI =1.7–4.54). Antibiotic sensitivity was 100% to linezolid and rifampicin in the CA-MRSA isolates. Antibiotic resistance to vancomycin and clindamycin varied between 9–11 % in the CA-MRSA isolates. Mean MIC for vancomycin amongst CA- and HA-MRSA were 6.3 and 9.3 μg/ml, whereas for teicoplanin they were 13 and 14 μg/ml respectively by the E-test. There was no statistically significant correlation between CA-MRSA nasal carriage and the risk factors (P>0.05, Chi-square test). Conclusions The prevalence of CA-MRSA in the healthy community hospital visitors was 18 % (95% CI, 12.5% to 23.5%) as compared to 13.8% HA-MRSA in the hospital health-care staff. Despite a significant prevalence of CA-MRSA, these strains were mostly sensitive

  7. [Access, use and preferences of Information and Communication Technologies by physicians in a general hospital in Peru].

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Silva, Luis; Ticse, Ray; Alfaro-Carballido, Luz; Guerra-Castañon, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the access, use and preferences of information and communication technology (ICT) by physicians who practice at Cayetano Heredia National Hospital. The questionnaire explored the availability and skills of ICT, time, educational activities, search engines and technological applications most used as well as ICT preferences in education.211 physicians were surveyed; laptop use was 93%, tablet and smartphone use was 66% and 88%.68% have mobile Internet. Differences were evident in the frequency of use of ICT in 25-34 year old age group as well as a higher level of skills (p<0.05). 86% use PubMed, Facebook and WhatsApp as a means of exchanging images and data related to health, 50% participated in medical blogs, online courses or videoconferences. The use and access of ICT is common among doctors in this hospital and there is positive interest in its use in education. PMID:26338389

  8. [Access, use and preferences of Information and Communication Technologies by physicians in a general hospital in Peru].

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Silva, Luis; Ticse, Ray; Alfaro-Carballido, Luz; Guerra-Castañon, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the access, use and preferences of information and communication technology (ICT) by physicians who practice at Cayetano Heredia National Hospital. The questionnaire explored the availability and skills of ICT, time, educational activities, search engines and technological applications most used as well as ICT preferences in education.211 physicians were surveyed; laptop use was 93%, tablet and smartphone use was 66% and 88%.68% have mobile Internet. Differences were evident in the frequency of use of ICT in 25-34 year old age group as well as a higher level of skills (p<0.05). 86% use PubMed, Facebook and WhatsApp as a means of exchanging images and data related to health, 50% participated in medical blogs, online courses or videoconferences. The use and access of ICT is common among doctors in this hospital and there is positive interest in its use in education.

  9. Reducing youth access to alcohol: findings from a community-based randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Flewelling, Robert L; Grube, Joel W; Paschall, M J; Biglan, Anthony; Kraft, Anne; Black, Carol; Hanley, Sean M; Ringwalt, Christopher; Wiesen, Chris; Ruscoe, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Underage drinking continues to be an important public health problem and a challenge to the substance abuse prevention field. Community-based interventions designed to more rigorously control underage access to alcohol through retailer education and greater enforcement of underage drinking laws have been advocated as potentially effective strategies to help address this problem, but studies designed to evaluate such interventions are sparse. To address this issue we conducted a randomized trial involving 36 communities to test the combined effectiveness of five interrelated intervention components designed to reduce underage access to alcohol. The intervention was found to be effective in reducing the likelihood that retail clerks would sell alcohol to underage-looking buyers, but did not reduce underage drinking or the perceived availability of alcohol among high school students. Post hoc analyses, however, revealed significant associations between the level of underage drinking law enforcement in the intervention communities and reductions in both 30-day use of alcohol and binge drinking. The findings highlight the difficulty in reducing youth drinking even when efforts to curtail retail access are successful. Study findings also suggest that high intensity implementation of underage drinking law enforcement can reduce underage drinking. Any such effects of enhanced enforcement on underage drinking appear to be more directly attributable to an increase in perceived likelihood of enforcement and the resultant perceived inconveniences and/or sanctions to potential drinkers, than to a reduction in access to alcohol per se.

  10. Technical efficiency of Critical Access Hospitals: an application of the two-stage approach with double bootstrap.

    PubMed

    Nedelea, Iustin Cristian; Fannin, James Matthew

    2013-03-01

    The Critical Access Hospital (CAH) Program has offered Medicare cost-based reimbursement to small hospitals that meet certain eligibility criteria to improve their financial viability and quality of care. However, cost-based reimbursement has been associated with inefficiency in hospital operations. This study uses a two-stage approach and bootstrap procedures to examine the effects of environmental variables on the technical efficiency of CAHs. The two-stage approach with quality controls significantly improved statistical efficiency of parameter estimates in the second stage bootstrapped truncated regression relative to a similar model without quality controls. Overall, our results suggest that enhanced Medicare reimbursement may not have had detrimental effects on the technical efficiency of CAHs.

  11. A growing opportunity: Community gardens affiliated with US hospitals and academic health centers

    PubMed Central

    George, Daniel R.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Hanson, Ryan; Sciamanna, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community gardens can reduce public health disparities through promoting physical activity and healthy eating, growing food for underserved populations, and accelerating healing from injury or disease. Despite their potential to contribute to comprehensive patient care, no prior studies have investigated the prevalence of community gardens affiliated with US healthcare institutions, and the demographic characteristics of communities served by these gardens. Methods In 2013, national community garden databases, scientific abstracts, and public search engines (e.g., Google Scholar) were used to identify gardens. Outcomes included the prevalence of hospital-based community gardens by US regions, and demographic characteristics (age, race/ethnicity, education, household income, and obesity rates) of communities served by gardens. Results There were 110 healthcare-based gardens, with 39 in the Midwest, 25 in the South, 24 in the Northeast, and 22 in the West. Compared to US population averages, communities served by healthcare-based gardens had similar demographic characteristics, but significantly lower rates of obesity (27% versus 34%, P < .001). Conclusions Healthcare-based gardens are located in regions that are demographically representative of the US population, and are associated with lower rates of obesity in communities they serve. PMID:25599017

  12. A Needs Assessment of the Accessibility of Distance Education in the California Community College System. Part II: Costs and Promising Practices Associated with Making Distance Education Courses Accessible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, Beverly; Studier, Carol; Sipes, Laurel; Coombs, Norman

    2009-01-01

    As the number of online distance education (DE) courses mushrooms in the California community college system, the need to address the accessibility of these courses becomes more and more urgent. With this in mind, the California Community College System Office (CCCSO) retained MPR Associates, Inc. to complete a needs assessment to help determine…

  13. Capital cost reimbursement to community hospitals under Federal health insurance programs.

    PubMed

    Kinney, E D; Lefkowitz, B

    1982-01-01

    Issues in current capital cost reimbursement to community hospitals by Medicare and Medicaid are described, and options for change analyzed. Major reforms in the way the federal government pays for capital costs--in particular substitution of other methods of payment for existing depreciation reimbursement--could have significant impact on the structure of the health care system and on government expenditures. While such reforms are likely to engender substantial political opposition, they may be facilitated by broader changes in the reimbursement system.

  14. Improving Medication Administration Safety in a Community Hospital Setting Using Lean Methodology.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all health care organizations have goals of improving patient safety, but despite clear goals and considerable investments, gains have been limited. This article explores a community hospital's resounding success using Lean methodology to improve medication administration safety with process changes designed by engaged employees and leaders with the knowledge and skill to effect improvements. This article inspires an interdisciplinary approach to quality improvement using reproducible strategies. PMID:25599523

  15. Expanding Federal Funding to Community Health Centers Slows Decline in Access for Low-Income Adults

    PubMed Central

    McMorrow, Stacey; Zuckerman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the impact of the Health Center Growth Initiative on access to care for low-income adults. Data Sources Data on federal funding for health centers are from the Bureau of Primary Health Care's Uniform Data System (2000–2007), and individual-level measures of access and use are derived from the National Health Interview Survey (2001–2008). Study Design We estimate person-level models of access and use as a function of individual- and market-level characteristics. By using market-level fixed effects, we identify the effects of health center funding on access using changes within markets over time. We explore effects on low-income adults and further examine how those effects vary by insurance coverage. Data Collection We calculate health center funding per poor person in a health care market and attach this information to individual observations on the National Health Interview Survey. Health care markets are defined as hospital referral regions. Principal Findings Low-income adults in markets with larger funding increases were more likely to have an office visit and to have a general doctor visit. These results were stronger for uninsured and publicly insured adults. Conclusions Expansions in federal health center funding had some mitigating effects on the access declines that were generally experienced by low-income adults over this time period. PMID:24344818

  16. Technical and scale efficiency of public community hospitals in Eritrea: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Eritrean gross national income of Int$610 per capita is lower than the average for Africa (Int$1620) and considerably lower than the global average (Int$6977). It is therefore imperative that the country’s resources, including those specifically allocated to the health sector, are put to optimal use. The objectives of this study were (a) to estimate the relative technical and scale efficiency of public secondary level community hospitals in Eritrea, based on data generated in 2007, (b) to estimate the magnitudes of output increases and/or input reductions that would have been required to make relatively inefficient hospitals more efficient, and (c) to estimate using Tobit regression analysis the impact of institutional and contextual/environmental variables on hospital inefficiencies. Methods A two-stage Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) method is used to estimate efficiency of hospitals and to explain the inefficiencies. In the first stage, the efficient frontier and the hospital-level efficiency scores are first estimated using DEA. In the second stage, the estimated DEA efficiency scores are regressed on some institutional and contextual/environmental variables using a Tobit model. In 2007 there were a total of 20 secondary public community hospitals in Eritrea, nineteen of which generated data that could be included in the study. The input and output data were obtained from the Ministry of Health (MOH) annual health service activity report of 2007. Since our study employs data that are five years old, the results are not meant to uncritically inform current decision-making processes, but rather to illustrate the potential value of such efficiency analyses. Results The key findings were as follows: (i) the average constant returns to scale technical efficiency score was 90.3%; (ii) the average variable returns to scale technical efficiency score was 96.9%; and (iii) the average scale efficiency score was 93.3%. In 2007, the inefficient hospitals could

  17. Physician clinical alignment and integration: a community-academic hospital approach.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Weiss, Sandra Jarva; Nester, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming need for change in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, coupled with the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes, has prompted hospitals to direct renewed efforts toward achieving high quality and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, with the dawn of accountable care organizations and increasing focus on patient expectations, hospitals have begun to seek physician partners through clinical alignment. Contrary to the unsuccessful alignment strategies of the 1990s, today's efforts are more mutually beneficial, driven by the need to achieve better care coordination, increased access to infrastructure, improved quality, and lower costs. In this article, we describe a large, academic, tertiary care hospital's approach to developing and implementing alignment and integration models with its collaboration-ready physicians and physician groups. We developed four models--short of physicians' employment with the organization--tailored to meet the needs of both the physician group and the hospital: (1) medical directorship (group physicians are appointed to serve as medical directors of a clinical area), (2) professional services agreement (specific clinical services, such as overnight admissions help, are contracted), (3) co-management services agreement (one specialty group co-manages all services within the specialty service lines), and (4) lease arrangement (closest in scope to employment, in which the hospital pays all expenses and receives all revenue). Successful hospital-physician alignment requires careful planning and the early engagement of legal counsel to ensure compliance with federal statutes. Establishing an integrated system with mutually identified goals better positions hospitals to deliver cost-effective and high-quality care under the new paradigm of healthcare reform. PMID:24988674

  18. Physician clinical alignment and integration: a community-academic hospital approach.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Weiss, Sandra Jarva; Nester, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming need for change in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, coupled with the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes, has prompted hospitals to direct renewed efforts toward achieving high quality and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, with the dawn of accountable care organizations and increasing focus on patient expectations, hospitals have begun to seek physician partners through clinical alignment. Contrary to the unsuccessful alignment strategies of the 1990s, today's efforts are more mutually beneficial, driven by the need to achieve better care coordination, increased access to infrastructure, improved quality, and lower costs. In this article, we describe a large, academic, tertiary care hospital's approach to developing and implementing alignment and integration models with its collaboration-ready physicians and physician groups. We developed four models--short of physicians' employment with the organization--tailored to meet the needs of both the physician group and the hospital: (1) medical directorship (group physicians are appointed to serve as medical directors of a clinical area), (2) professional services agreement (specific clinical services, such as overnight admissions help, are contracted), (3) co-management services agreement (one specialty group co-manages all services within the specialty service lines), and (4) lease arrangement (closest in scope to employment, in which the hospital pays all expenses and receives all revenue). Successful hospital-physician alignment requires careful planning and the early engagement of legal counsel to ensure compliance with federal statutes. Establishing an integrated system with mutually identified goals better positions hospitals to deliver cost-effective and high-quality care under the new paradigm of healthcare reform.

  19. Access to care issues for African American communities: implications for STD disparities.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Deidra D; Kent, Charlotte K

    2008-12-01

    Reduced access to care is a major contributor to health disparities in black communities. This review discusses factors that serve to diminish access to care among blacks in the context of STD disparities and highlights strategies to improve access to STD care. At the individual level, structural factors such as poverty, lack of insurance, and lack of a regular source of care are known to decrease health service utilization and have been identified as barriers to STD care as well. Other individual level factors that influence access to care, particularly for STDs, include concerns about confidentiality and privacy, perceptions of discrimination, and perceptions of risk. At the health system level, availability of services, organizational inefficiencies, and staff perceptions affect access. Strategies to improve access to STD care include expanding services in high-risk nontraditional venues, developing multilevel partnerships, incorporating STD services into routine healthcare, integrating services with HIV, improving the quality of public STD clinic care, and ultimately addressing the broader underlying factors that contribute to health disparities.

  20. The GDAHA hospital performance reports project: a successful community-based quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Snow, Richard J; Engler, David; Krella, Joseph M

    2003-01-01

    During the past decade there has been increasing distribution of hospital performance information but few examples of how this information is affecting the quality of health care delivery. This article describes the methods of implementation and factors influencing a successful community-based quality improvement initiative in Dayton, Ohio, involving a collaborative of five competing hospitals in partnership with the business community and local and state hospital associations. The initiative contributed to a 36% reduction in acute myocardial infarction mortality over a 3-year period by changing reperfusion patterns in patients with ST segment elevated myocardial infarction. Identification of an opportunity gap, root cause analysis, and development of process measures used to facilitate health care provider change are summarized. The driving and restraining forces that have shaped this initiative from a report card to a quality improvement program are outlined and a list of five contributors to success are presented. These factors can serve as a basis for how other communities can benefit from this collaborative model.

  1. Access to Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery under Pay for Performance: Evidence from the Premier Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Arnold M.; Joynt, Karen E.; Jha, Ashish K.; Orav, E. John

    2014-01-01

    Background Although Pay for Performance (P4P) has become common, many worry that P4P will lead providers to avoid offering surgical procedures to the sickest patients out of concern that poor outcomes will lead to financial penalties. Methods and Results We used Medicare data to compare change in rates of coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) between 2002–03 and 2008–09 among patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) admitted to 126 hospitals participating in Medicare’s Premier Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration P4P program (HQID) with patients in 848 control hospitals participating in public reporting alone. We examined rates for all AMI patients and those in the top decile of predicted mortality based on demographics, medical comorbidities and AMI characteristics. We identified 91,393 patients admitted for AMI in Premier hospitals and 502,536 Medicare patients admitted for AMI in control hospitals. CABG rates for AMI patients in Premier decreased from 13.6% in 2002–03 to 10.4% in 2008–09; there was a comparable decrease in non-Premier hospitals (13.6% to 10.6%, p-value for comparison of changes between Premier and non-Premier of 0.67). CABG rates for high-risk patients in Premier decreased from 8.4% in FY 2002–3 to 8.2% in 2008–9. Patterns were similar in non-Premier hospitals (8.4% to 8.3%, p-value for comparison of changes between Premier and non-Premier, 0.82). Conclusions Our results show no evidence of a deleterious impact of P4P on access to CABG for high-risk patients with AMI. These results should be reassuring to those concerned about the potential negative impact of P4P on high-risk patients. PMID:25160840

  2. Predictors of Severe Sepsis among Patients Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Antoni; Reyes, Soledad; Méndez, Raúl; Zalacaín, Rafael; Capelastegui, Alberto; Rajas, Olga; Borderías, Luis; Martin-Villasclaras, Juan; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Rello, Jordi; Molinos, Luis; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis, may be present on hospital arrival in approximately one-third of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Objective To determine the host characteristics and micro-organisms associated with severe sepsis in patients hospitalized with CAP. Results We performed a prospective multicenter cohort study in 13 Spanish hospital, on 4070 hospitalized CAP patients, 1529 of whom (37.6%) presented with severe sepsis. Severe sepsis CAP was independently associated with older age (>65 years), alcohol abuse (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.07–1.61), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.50–2.04) and renal disease (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.21–2.03), whereas prior antibiotic treatment was a protective factor (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.52–0.73). Bacteremia (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05–1.79), S pneumoniae (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31–1.95) and mixed microbial etiology (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49) were associated with severe sepsis CAP. Conclusions CAP patients with COPD, renal disease and alcohol abuse, as well as those with CAP due to S pneumonia or mixed micro-organisms are more likely to present to the hospital with severe sepsis. PMID:26727202

  3. Ethical issues arising in pharmacoepidemiologic research in a community hospital in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Tzimis, L

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents the various issues encountered in planning, designing, performing, and reporting pharmacoepidemiologic research. Five hundred and fifty-one indigent patients insured by Social Care visited the Hospital Pharmacy of Chania General Hospital, and were compared with 551 patients insured under Social Security funds who visited three community pharmacies. The study had no external funding. Before we started the study, we officially sought approval from the Scientific Committee of our Hospital and from the local Pharmaceutical Association. We asked also for approval from the Medical School of the University of Crete. Patient privacy was of great concern in the design and performance of the study. The law in Greece, according to the directives of European Union, affects the way we use records in hospitals and protect patient rights. After these studies were completed, we made proposals to the authorities concerning continuous health education for both patients and health workers. Pharmacoepidemiologic research is difficult in hospitals outside universities or institutions, because of the lack of adequate funding and grants to support research staff.

  4. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S.; Self, W.H.; Wunderink, R.G.; Fakhran, S.; Balk, R.; Bramley, A.M.; Reed, C.; Grijalva, C.G.; Anderson, E.J.; Courtney, D.M.; Chappell, J.D.; Qi, C.; Hart, E.M.; Carroll, F.; Trabue, C.; Donnelly, H.K.; Williams, D.J.; Zhu, Y.; Arnold, S.R.; Ampofo, K.; Waterer, G.W.; Levine, M.; Lindstrom, S.; Winchell, J.M.; Katz, J.M.; Erdman, D.; Schneider, E.; Hicks, L.A.; McCullers, J.A.; Pavia, A.T.; Edwards, K.M.; Finelli, L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Community-acquired pneumonia is a leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death among U.S. adults. Incidence estimates of pneumonia confirmed radio-graphically and with the use of current laboratory diagnostic tests are needed. METHODS We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among adults 18 years of age or older in five hospitals in Chicago and Nashville. Patients with recent hospitalization or severe immunosuppression were excluded. Blood, urine, and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for culture, serologic testing, antigen detection, and molecular diagnostic testing. Study radiologists independently reviewed chest radiographs. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization according to age and pathogen. RESULTS From January 2010 through June 2012, we enrolled 2488 of 3634 eligible adults (68%). Among 2320 adults with radiographic evidence of pneumonia (93%), the median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range, 46 to 71); 498 patients (21%) required intensive care, and 52 (2%) died. Among 2259 patients who had radio-graphic evidence of pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a pathogen was detected in 853 (38%): one or more viruses in 530 (23%), bacteria in 247 (11%), bacterial and viral pathogens in 59 (3%), and a fungal or mycobacterial pathogen in 17 (1%). The most common pathogens were human rhinovirus (in 9% of patients), influenza virus (in 6%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (in 5%). The annual incidence of pneumonia was 24.8 cases (95% confidence interval, 23.5 to 26.1) per 10,000 adults, with the highest rates among adults 65 to 79 years of age (63.0 cases per 10,000 adults) and those 80 years of age or older (164.3 cases per 10,000 adults). For each pathogen, the incidence increased with age. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia

  5. A Web-based Clearing-house for Community Telescope Information and Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmany, C. D.; Boroson, T. A.

    2004-12-01

    Where can one find information on all available community telescopes and their instrumentation? With the growth of a very diverse set of ground-based O/IR telescopes and instruments there is an increasing need for corresponding information on these facilities, as has been pointed out by the 2nd community workshop on the ground-based O/IR system (May 2004). In response, NOAO has agreed to develop a web site for the community that summarizes all publicly available observing opportunities and acts as a clearing -house for information. While much of the information is currently available on the web, it requires consolidation. Observing opportunities include not only those scheduled through NOAO, but other facilities as well. In particular, PREST (Program for Research and Education with Small Telescopes), a new NSF initiative, will provide community access to smaller (< 2.5 m) telescopes . We envision a web site that includes NOAO facilities, the TSIP program (which provides public time on Keck, HET, MMT, Magellan, LBT), and other telescopes giving public access through NOAO: WIYN, SOAR, SMARTS. Facilities that provide public access but not through NOAO, will also be included. The site should include time available, how and when to apply, instrument and detector capabilities, selection criteria, typical weather, lodging accommodations, and technical assistance or training available at the telescope. Also, feedback from observers on the performance of the facilities will be made available to potential proposers. As we develop this site, we welcome input from the astronomical community on how to make it most useful to astronomers.

  6. Closing Italian Forensic Psychiatry Hospitals in Favor of Treating Insanity Acquittees in the Community.

    PubMed

    Carabellese, Felice; Felthous, Alan R

    2016-03-01

    Originally a hedge against the death penalty, the insanity defense came to offer hospitalization as an alternative to imprisonment. In the late 19th century Italy opened inpatient services first for mentally ill prisoners and then for offenders found not guilty by reason of insanity. Within the past decade, a series of decrees has resulted in transferring the responsibility for treating NGRI acquittees and "dangerous" mentally ill prisoners from the Department of Justice to the Department of Health, and their treatment from Italy's high security forensic psychiatric hospitals (OPGs) to community regional facilities (REMSs, Residences for the Execution of Security Measures), community mental health facilities, one of which is located in each region of Italy. Today community REMSs provide the treatment and management of socially dangerous offenders. The dynamic evolution of Italy's progressive mental health system for insanity acquittees, to our knowledge the most libertarian, community oriented approach of any country, is retraced. Discussion includes cautionary concerns as well as potential opportunities for improvements in mental health services. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Closing Italian Forensic Psychiatry Hospitals in Favor of Treating Insanity Acquittees in the Community.

    PubMed

    Carabellese, Felice; Felthous, Alan R

    2016-03-01

    Originally a hedge against the death penalty, the insanity defense came to offer hospitalization as an alternative to imprisonment. In the late 19th century Italy opened inpatient services first for mentally ill prisoners and then for offenders found not guilty by reason of insanity. Within the past decade, a series of decrees has resulted in transferring the responsibility for treating NGRI acquittees and "dangerous" mentally ill prisoners from the Department of Justice to the Department of Health, and their treatment from Italy's high security forensic psychiatric hospitals (OPGs) to community regional facilities (REMSs, Residences for the Execution of Security Measures), community mental health facilities, one of which is located in each region of Italy. Today community REMSs provide the treatment and management of socially dangerous offenders. The dynamic evolution of Italy's progressive mental health system for insanity acquittees, to our knowledge the most libertarian, community oriented approach of any country, is retraced. Discussion includes cautionary concerns as well as potential opportunities for improvements in mental health services. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27256003

  8. A Review of Tools to Assist Hospitals in Meeting Community Health Assessment and Implementation Strategy Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Bazos, Dorothy A.; Sutherland, Kaleb A.; LaFave, Lea R. Ayers; Fedrizzi, Rudolph; Hoebeke, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Recent changes in U.S. national policies and regulations have created an opportunity for meaningful collaborations to take place between health systems, public health departments, and social service organizations. For medical systems, and particularly tax-exempt hospitals, new requirements include community health assessments (CHAs) and implementation strategies to address identified health needs. Individuals and groups responsible for meeting the new CHA and implementation strategy requirements may be unsure about the best ways to achieve specific aspects of the CHA process. In this report, we provide an in-depth review and rating of tools developed by public health and community experts that cover the steps necessary to meet the new requirements. A team of three community and public health experts and the authors developed a rating sheet based on a well-known community health improvement process model and on the steps in the new requirements to identify and systematically rate nine comprehensive tools. The ratings and recommendations provide a guide for hospitals in choosing tools that will best assist them in meeting the new requirements. PMID:26904778

  9. Lack of Pharmacy Access May Send Some Seniors Back to Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Science University. They analyzed data from patients aged 65 and older in Oregon and focused on 507 pharmacies and 58 hospitals. The average rate of readmissions in rural areas was 15.3 percent, compared to 14.7 ...

  10. Effectiveness of various hospital-based solutions against community- acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Perona, Paul J; Johnson, Aaron J; Perona, John P; Issa, Kimona; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Bonutti, Peter M; Mont, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be particularly burdensome and difficult to eradicate. One of the measures that infection control officers have emphasized in our hospitals has been the use of various hand sanitizers throughout the hospital. Our objective was to determine the level of growth inhibition of common hand sanitizers and surgical scrub solutions that are used to prevent the spread of community-acquired strains of MRSA. Various hospital and surgical agents (n = 13) were applied to community-acquired MRSA bacteria that had been cultured on agar plates. These different commercially available solutions were incubated for 48 h, and the plates were assessed to determine the level of growth inhibition (0, 25, 75, or 100%). The negative control was a test in which no agent was added to the MRSA culture, while a positive control tested 100% alcohol. Eight of the solutions tested had 100% growth inhibition, four solutions had partial growth inhibition effects, and one solution did not inhibit MRSA. Of the solutions with alcohol, the 62% solution did not kill MRSA, while the 80% solution only inhibited MRSA. Both the 95 and 100% alcohol solutions had 100% growth inhibition. Of the two surgical scrub solutions, only the one with iodine had 100% growth inhibition, whereas the solution with chloroxylenol (PCMX 3%) had only partial growth inhibition. This study suggests that the solutions with high levels of alcohol, chlorhexidine, or iodine appear to better kill MRSA and might best be used to prevent the spread of community-acquired MRSA in both the hospital and the surgical environment. PMID:24266441

  11. Prevention literacy: community-based advocacy for access and ownership of the HIV prevention toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Richard G; Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Garcia, Jonathan; Gavigan, Kelly; Ramirez, Ana; Milnor, Jack; Terto, Veriano

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Critical technological advances have yielded a toolkit of HIV prevention strategies. This literature review sought to provide contextual and historical reflection needed to bridge the conceptual gap between clinical efficacy and community effectiveness (i.e. knowledge and usage) of existing HIV prevention options, especially in resource-poor settings. Methods Between January 2015 and October 2015, we reviewed scholarly and grey literatures to define treatment literacy and health literacy and assess the current need for literacy related to HIV prevention. The review included searches in electronic databases including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Google Scholar. Permutations of the following search terms were used: “treatment literacy,” “treatment education,” “health literacy,” and “prevention literacy.” Through an iterative process of analyses and searches, titles and/or abstracts and reference lists of retrieved articles were reviewed for additional articles, and historical content analyses of grey literature and websites were additionally conducted. Results and discussion Treatment literacy was a well-established concept developed in the global South, which was later partially adopted by international agencies such as the World Health Organization. Treatment literacy emerged as more effective antiretroviral therapies became available. Developed from popular pedagogy and grassroots efforts during an intense struggle for treatment access, treatment literacy addressed the need to extend access to underserved communities and low-income settings that might otherwise be excluded from access. In contrast, prevention literacy is absent in the recent surge of new biomedical prevention strategies; prevention literacy was scarcely referenced and undertheorized in the available literature. Prevention efforts today include multimodal techniques, which jointly comprise a toolkit of biomedical, behavioural, and structural/environmental approaches

  12. Prevention literacy: community-based advocacy for access and ownership of the HIV prevention toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Richard G; Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Garcia, Jonathan; Gavigan, Kelly; Ramirez, Ana; Milnor, Jack; Terto, Veriano

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Critical technological advances have yielded a toolkit of HIV prevention strategies. This literature review sought to provide contextual and historical reflection needed to bridge the conceptual gap between clinical efficacy and community effectiveness (i.e. knowledge and usage) of existing HIV prevention options, especially in resource-poor settings. Methods Between January 2015 and October 2015, we reviewed scholarly and grey literatures to define treatment literacy and health literacy and assess the current need for literacy related to HIV prevention. The review included searches in electronic databases including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Google Scholar. Permutations of the following search terms were used: “treatment literacy,” “treatment education,” “health literacy,” and “prevention literacy.” Through an iterative process of analyses and searches, titles and/or abstracts and reference lists of retrieved articles were reviewed for additional articles, and historical content analyses of grey literature and websites were additionally conducted. Results and discussion Treatment literacy was a well-established concept developed in the global South, which was later partially adopted by international agencies such as the World Health Organization. Treatment literacy emerged as more effective antiretroviral therapies became available. Developed from popular pedagogy and grassroots efforts during an intense struggle for treatment access, treatment literacy addressed the need to extend access to underserved communities and low-income settings that might otherwise be excluded from access. In contrast, prevention literacy is absent in the recent surge of new biomedical prevention strategies; prevention literacy was scarcely referenced and undertheorized in the available literature. Prevention efforts today include multimodal techniques, which jointly comprise a toolkit of biomedical, behavioural, and structural/environmental approaches

  13. Increasing Access and Participation of Pastoralist Communities in Primary Education in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifuna, Daniel N.

    2005-11-01

    This study shows how the provision of educational facilities in Kenya since the colonial era has been skewed in favour of densely populated agricultural communities. It analyses interventions to redress the resultant imbalances, such as the school-fees waiver, free primary education, the construction of boarding schools, and school feeding programmes. These measures are shown to have had little impact on increasing access and participation of pastoralist communities in primary education; for they have usually been introduced without serious consideration of the prevailing socio-economic conditions. It is proposed here that for their future development, the government needs to articulate clearer policies and involve such communities in planning as well as incorporate elements of their existing traditional education institutions.

  14. Studies of antibiotic resistance within the patient, hospitals and the community using simple mathematical models.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, D J; Anderson, R M

    1999-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in a wide variety of important pathogens of humans presents a worldwide threat to public health. This paper describes recent work on the use of mathematical models of the emergence and spread of resistance bacteria, on scales ranging from within the patient, in hospitals and within communities of people. Model development starts within the treated patient, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles are melded within a framework that mirrors the interaction between bacterial population growth, drug treatment and the immunological responses targeted at the pathogen. The model helps identify areas in which more precise information is needed, particularly in the context of how drugs influence pathogen birth and death rates (pharmacodynamics). The next area addressed is the spread of multiply drug-resistant bacteria in hospital settings. Models of the transmission dynamics of the pathogen provide a framework for assessing the relative merits of different forms of intervention, and provide criteria for control or eradication. The model is applied to the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in an intensive care setting. This model framework is generalized to consider the spread of resistant organisms between hospitals. The model framework allows for heterogeneity in hospital size and highlights the importance of large hospitals in the maintenance of resistant organisms within a defined country. The spread of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in England and Wales provides a template for model construction and analysis. The final section addresses the emergence and spread of resistant organisms in communities of people and the dependence on the intensity of selection as measured by the volume or rate of drug use. Model output is fitted to data for Finland and Iceland and conclusions drawn concerning the key factors determining the rate of spread and decay once drug pressure is relaxed. PMID:10365398

  15. Chasing Zero: A Nurse-Driven Process for Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Reduction In a Community Hospital.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Due to treatment costs and lack of reimbursement, community hospitals are charged with implementing innovative strategies that will reduce the incidence of hospital-acquired catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI). A nurse-driven system for decreasing the number of hospital-acquired CAUTI is effective and useful for a community hospital. One nurse with accountability for implementing a simple evidence-based protocol can dramatically decrease the total incidence of hospital-acquired CAUTI. The basis for the success of this initiative relied heavily on the ease of using the eight-point Question the Foley criteria, the availability of the electronic medical record, interdisciplinary collaboration, and support from nursing and physician administration. With collaboration and support from nursing leadership, the goals for patient safety by reducing hospital-acquired CAUTI can become a reality in a short period of time. PMID:27281867

  16. Chasing Zero: A Nurse-Driven Process For Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Reduction in a Community Hospital.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Due to treatment costs and lack of reimbursement, community hospitals are charged with implementing innovative strategies that will reduce the incidence of hospital-acquired catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI). A nurse-driven system for decreasing the number of hospital-acquired CAUTI is effective and useful for a community hospital. One nurse with accountability for implementing a simple evidence-based protocol can dramatically decrease the total incidence of hospital-acquired CAUTI. The basis for the success of this initiative relied heavily on the ease of using the eight-point Question the Foley criteria, the availability of the electronic medical record, interdisciplinary collaboration, and support from nursing and physician administration. With collaboration and support from nursing leadership, the goals for patient safety by reducing hospital-acquired CAUTI can become a reality in a short period of time. PMID:26845820

  17. Net Income of Pharmacy Faculty Compared to Community and Hospital Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Gatwood, Justin; Spivey, Christina A.; Dickey, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare the net cumulative income of community pharmacists, hospital pharmacists, and full-time pharmacy faculty members (residency-trained or with a PhD after obtaining a PharmD) in pharmacy practice, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, pharmacology, and social and administrative sciences. Methods. Markov modeling was conducted to calculate net projected cumulative earnings of career paths by estimating the costs of education, including the costs of obtaining degrees and student loans. Results. The economic model spanned 49 years, from ages 18 to 67 years. Earning a PharmD and pursuing an academic career resulted in projected net cumulative lifetime earnings ranging from approximately $4.7 million to $6.3 million. A pharmacy practice faculty position following public pharmacy school and one year of residency resulted in higher net cumulative income than community pharmacy. Faculty members with postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) training also had higher net income than other faculty and hospital pharmacy career paths, given similar years of prepharmacy education and type of pharmacy school attended. Faculty members with either a PharmD or PhD in the pharmacology discipline may net as much as $5.9 million and outpace all other PhD graduates by at least $75 000 in lifetime earnings. Projected career earnings of postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) trained faculty and PharmD/PhD faculty members were lower than those of community pharmacists. Findings were more variable when comparing pharmacy faculty members and hospital pharmacists. Conclusion. With the exception of PGY1 trained academic pharmacists, faculty projected net cumulative incomes generally lagged behind community pharmacists, likely because of delayed entry into the job market as a result of advanced training/education. However, nonsalary benefits such as greater flexibility and autonomy may enhance the desirability of academic pharmacy as a career path. PMID:27756925

  18. FORMREVU: an online formulary adjunct to the HELP System in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Michael, P A

    1991-01-01

    The hospital formulary is an important information source on drug availability for staff physicians, nurses and therapists. To facilitate rapid access to formulary data and reduce printing costs, an online formulary review program, FORMREVU, was developed as an adjunct to the HELP System at Rex Hospital. FORMREVU, written in the PTXT Application Language (PAL), is menu-driven, and qualified users can select drug entries from lists matching a specific drug category or subcategory (e.g. cardiovascular drugs, cephalosporins) or keyword (e.g. lasix). Individual drug entries consist of trade and generic names, category and subcategory, comments, and available doses and corresponding manufacturers. A detailed description of the formulary review program, along with a review of implementation objectives and qualitative and quantitative benefits, will be presented.

  19. Partnering to Promote Evidence-Based Practice in a Community Hospital: Implications for Nursing Professional Development Specialists.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Martha E F; Collier, Andrea; Collins, Mara; Crowley, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Nursing professional development specialists working in community hospitals face significant barriers to evidence-based practice that academic medical centers do not. This article describes 7 years of a multifaceted, service academic partnership in a large, urban, community hospital. The partnership has strengthened the nursing professional development role in promoting evidence-based practice across the scope of practice and serves as a model for others. PMID:27187827

  20. Prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria in hospital and community sewage in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Basode, Vinod Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Sewage samples were collected from hospital and community sewage tanks, and bacterial strains and antibiotic sensitivity patterns were analyzed using the VITEK 2 microbial identification system p(bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). Three of the 12 isolates (25%) from the hospital sewage and 1 of the 13 isolates (7.69%) from the community sewage was extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria.

  1. Collective response to public health emergencies and large-scale disasters: putting hospitals at the core of community resilience.

    PubMed

    Paturas, James L; Smith, Deborah; Smith, Stewart; Albanese, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Healthcare organisations are a critical part of a community's resilience and play a prominent role as the backbone of medical response to natural and manmade disasters. The importance of healthcare organisations, in particular hospitals, to remain operational extends beyond the necessity to sustain uninterrupted medical services for the community, in the aftermath of a large-scale disaster. Hospitals are viewed as safe havens where affected individuals go for shelter, food, water and psychosocial assistance, as well as to obtain information about missing family members or learn of impending dangers related to the incident. The ability of hospitals to respond effectively to high-consequence incidents producing a massive arrival of patients that disrupt daily operations requires surge capacity and capability. The activation of hospital emergency support functions provides an approach by which hospitals manage a short-term shortfall of hospital personnel through the reallocation of hospital employees, thereby obviating the reliance on external qualified volunteers for surge capacity and capability. Recent revisions to the Joint Commission's hospital emergency preparedness standard have impelled healthcare facilities to participate actively in community-wide planning, rather than confining planning exclusively to a single healthcare facility, in order to harmonise disaster management strategies and effectively coordinate the allocation of community resources and expertise across all local response agencies.

  2. ACCESS TO TREATMENT IN HIV PREVENTION TRIALS: PERSPECTIVES FROM A SOUTH AFRICAN COMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    BARSDORF, NICOLA; MAMAN, SUZANNE; KASS, NANCY; SLACK, CATHERINE

    2009-01-01

    Access to treatment, in HIV vaccine trials (HVTs), remains ethically controversial. In most prevention trials, including in South Africa, participants who seroconvert are referred to publicly funded programmes for treatment. This strategy is problematic when there is inadequate and uneven access to public sector antiretroviral therapy (ART) and support resources. The responsibilities, if any, of researchers, sponsors and public health authorities involved in HVTs has been hotly debated among academics, scholars, representatives of international organizations and sponsors. However, there is little published on community perceptions. Recent guidance asserts that communities should make inputs into treatment and care decisions. This qualitative study explored a South African community’s perceptions of who should provide what to HVT participants as well as how and why this should be done. Twenty-nine adults working at or attending five primary health care clinics in two rural areas in KwaZulu-Natal participated in in-depth interviews. Respondents expressed that researchers should ‘help participants to access’ treatment and care ‘because they are in a position to do so’ and ‘are in a relationship with’ trial participants. Respondents suggested that researchers could help by ‘facilitating referral’ until such time that participants can access care and treatment on their own. We highlight a series of implications for researchers in HVTs, including their need to be aware of prospective participants’ considerable trust in and respect for researchers, the responsibility that this places on them, and the need for clear communication with communities so as not to erode community trust. PMID:19793135

  3. Energy engineering analysis program. Kimbrough Army Community Hospital, Ft. George G, Meade, Maryland. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    Mueller Associates, Inc. (MAI) was retained by the Baltimore District of Army Corps of Engineers in September of 1985 to perform energy conservation services at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. The contract included studies of the following buildings: number 2480 - Kimbrough Army Community Hospital (KACH), number 8472 - Dental Clinic, number 2481 - Barracks, number 2484 - Medical Supply Warehouse. The Scope of this study included the following objectives: Perform a complete energy audit and analysis of the entire Kimbrough Army Community Hospital including the attached Outpatient Clinic. Investigate the feasibility of an Energy Monitoring and Control System (EMCS) for the hospital. Investigate exhaust systems in the Dental Clinic. Investigate window replacement and chilled water temperature of the Barracks. Investigate the feasibility of infra-red heaters, loading dock door seals, and air stratification in the Medical Supply Warehouse. Identify all energy conservation opportunities, including low cost/no cost items and perform complete evaluations of each. Prepare programming documentation for all energy conservation investment program projects including DD Form 1391, a life cycle cost analysis summary sheet with backup calculations, and a Project Development Brochure. Prepare implementation documentation for all justifiable energy conservation opportunities. List and prioritize all recommended energy conservation opportunities.

  4. Results of curative therapy for esophageal cancer in a community training hospital.

    PubMed

    Averbach, Andrew; Akbarov, Alisher; Sidel, Todd; Mech, Karl; Parandian, Bahman; Waterfield, William; Poussin-Rosillo, Hipolito; Chang, David; Sardi, Armando

    2002-01-01

    A 12-year experience of therapy for esophageal carcinoma in a community-based cancer center was reviewed retrospectively. Of a total of 88 patients with histologically proven carcinoma of the esophagus 30 (34.1%) underwent curative esophagectomy. Twelve patients received preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Fourteen esophagectomies were performed transhiatally and 16 via the thoracolaparotomy approach. The average distance from incisors was 32.2 and 32.1 cm, respectively. Overall morbidity was 36.7%, with major complications in 30% of patients. Mortality was 3.3%. A comparison of patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (12 patients) and surgery alone (18 patients) showed no statistical difference in morbidity, mortality, or length of hospital stay. Analysis of these parameters in groups of patients operated via the transhiatal versus thoracolaparotomy approach demonstrated statistically lower morbidity (14.3% versus 56.3%, respectively), with no difference in mortality and a trend toward a shorter hospital stay in the former group. Overall survival at 3 years was 63.9%. In the combined therapy group, 90.9% of patients survived 3 years compared to 40.4% in the surgery only group (P = 0.0177). There was a trend toward better survival in the group of patients treated via the transhiatal approach. This study demonstrated that curative therapy for esophageal carcinoma can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality in a community teaching hospital.

  5. Mode of birth and social inequalities in health: the effect of maternal education and access to hospital care on cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Kottwitz, Anita

    2014-05-01

    Access to health care is an important factor in explaining health inequalities. This study focuses on the issue of access to health care as a driving force behind the social discrepancies in cesarean delivery using data from 707 newborn children in the 2006-2011 birth cohorts of the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP). Data on individual birth outcomes are linked to hospital data using extracts of the quality assessment reports of nearly all German hospitals. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used to assess hospital service clusters within a 20-km radius buffer around mother׳s homes. Logistic regression models adjusting for maternal characteristics indicate that the likelihood to deliver by a cesarean section increases for the least educated women when they face constraints with regard to access to hospital care. No differences between the education groups are observed when access to obstetric care is high, thus a high access to hospital care seems to balance out health inequalities that are related to differences in education. The results emphasize the importance of focusing on unequal access to hospital care in explaining differences in birth outcomes.

  6. Access to Electric Light Is Associated with Shorter Sleep Duration in a Traditionally Hunter-Gatherer Community.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Fernández-Duque, Eduardo; Golombek, Diego A; Lanza, Norberto; Duffy, Jeanne F; Czeisler, Charles A; Valeggia, Claudia R

    2015-08-01

    Access to electric light might have shifted the ancestral timing and duration of human sleep. To test this hypothesis, we studied two communities of the historically hunter-gatherer indigenous Toba/Qom in the Argentinean Chaco. These communities share the same ethnic and sociocultural background, but one has free access to electricity while the other relies exclusively on natural light. We fitted participants in each community with wrist activity data loggers to assess their sleep-wake cycles during one week in the summer and one week in the winter. During the summer, participants with access to electricity had a tendency to a shorter daily sleep bout (43 ± 21 min) than those living under natural light conditions. This difference was due to a later daily bedtime and sleep onset in the community with electricity, but a similar sleep offset and rise time in both communities. In the winter, participants without access to electricity slept longer (56 ± 17 min) than those with access to electricity, and this was also related to earlier bedtimes and sleep onsets than participants in the community with electricity. In both communities, daily sleep duration was longer during the winter than during the summer. Our field study supports the notion that access to inexpensive sources of artificial light and the ability to create artificially lit environments must have been key factors in reducing sleep in industrialized human societies. PMID:26092820

  7. Access to Electric Light Is Associated with Shorter Sleep Duration in a Traditionally Hunter-Gatherer Community.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Fernández-Duque, Eduardo; Golombek, Diego A; Lanza, Norberto; Duffy, Jeanne F; Czeisler, Charles A; Valeggia, Claudia R

    2015-08-01

    Access to electric light might have shifted the ancestral timing and duration of human sleep. To test this hypothesis, we studied two communities of the historically hunter-gatherer indigenous Toba/Qom in the Argentinean Chaco. These communities share the same ethnic and sociocultural background, but one has free access to electricity while the other relies exclusively on natural light. We fitted participants in each community with wrist activity data loggers to assess their sleep-wake cycles during one week in the summer and one week in the winter. During the summer, participants with access to electricity had a tendency to a shorter daily sleep bout (43 ± 21 min) than those living under natural light conditions. This difference was due to a later daily bedtime and sleep onset in the community with electricity, but a similar sleep offset and rise time in both communities. In the winter, participants without access to electricity slept longer (56 ± 17 min) than those with access to electricity, and this was also related to earlier bedtimes and sleep onsets than participants in the community with electricity. In both communities, daily sleep duration was longer during the winter than during the summer. Our field study supports the notion that access to inexpensive sources of artificial light and the ability to create artificially lit environments must have been key factors in reducing sleep in industrialized human societies.

  8. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  9. Community treatment orders and reduced time in hospital: a nationwide study, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Mark; Macpherson, Melanie; Macleod, Callum; Lyons, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Community treatment orders (CTOs) were introduced in Scotland in 2005, but are controversial owing to a lack of supportive randomised evidence. The non-randomised studies provide mixed results on their efficacy and utility. We aimed to examine hospital bed day usage across Scotland both before and after CTOs were initiated in a national cohort of patients, spanning 5 years. Results In total, 1558 individuals who were subject to a CTO between 2007 and 2012, of whom 63% were male, were included. After CTO initiation the number of hospital bed days fell, on average, from 66 to 39 per annum per patient. Those with a longer psychiatric history appeared to benefit more from a CTO, in terms of reduced time in hospital. Clinical implications Our data offer cautious support for the use of CTOs in routine practice, in terms of reducing time spent in psychiatric hospital. This finding is balanced by the more rigorous randomised studies which do not find any benefit to CTOs. PMID:27280031

  10. Leveraging Open Standards and Technologies to Enhance Community Access to Earth Science Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, C. J.; Nandigam, V.; Krishnan, S.; Cowart, C.; Baru, C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2011-12-01

    Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) data, collected from space, airborne and terrestrial platforms, have emerged as an invaluable tool for a variety of Earth science applications ranging from ice sheet monitoring to modeling of earth surface processes. However, lidar present a unique suite of challenges from the perspective of building cyberinfrastructure systems that enable the scientific community to access these valuable research datasets. Lidar data are typically characterized by millions to billions of individual measurements of x,y,z position plus attributes; these "raw" data are also often accompanied by derived raster products and are frequently terabytes in size. As a relatively new and rapidly evolving data collection technology, relevant open data standards and software projects are immature compared to those for other remote sensing platforms. The NSF-funded OpenTopography Facility project has developed an online lidar data access and processing system that co-locates data with on-demand processing tools to enable users to access both raw point cloud data as well as custom derived products and visualizations. OpenTopography is built on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) in which applications and data resources are deployed as standards compliant (XML and SOAP) Web services with the open source Opal Toolkit. To develop the underlying applications for data access, filtering and conversion, and various processing tasks, OpenTopography has heavily leveraged existing open source software efforts for both lidar and raster data. Operating on the de facto LAS binary point cloud format (maintained by ASPRS), open source libLAS and LASlib libraries provide OpenTopography data ingestion, query and translation capabilities. Similarly, raster data manipulation is performed through a suite of services built on the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). OpenTopography has also developed our own algorithm for high-performance gridding of lidar point cloud data

  11. Increasing access to quality health care for the poor: Community perceptions on quality care in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kiguli, Julie; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Okui, Olico; Mutebi, Aloysius; Macgregor, Hayley; Pariyo, George William

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the community's perspectives and perceptions on quality of health care delivery in two Uganda districts. The paper addresses community concerns on service quality. It focuses on the poor because they are a vulnerable group and often bear a huge burden of disease. Community views were solicited and obtained using eight focus group discussions, six in-depth and 12 key informant interviews. User perceptions and definitions of the quality of health services depended on a number of variables related to technical competence, accessibility to services, interpersonal relations and presence of adequate drugs, supplies, staff, and facility amenities. Results indicate that service delivery to the poor in the general population is perceived to be of low quality. The factors that were mentioned as affecting the quality of services delivered were inadequate trained health workers, shortage of essential drugs, poor attitude of the health workers, and long distances to health facilities. This paper argues that there should be an improvement in the quality of health services with particular attention being paid to the poor. Despite wide focus on improvement of the existing infrastructure and donor funding, there is still low satisfaction with health services and poor perceived accessibility. PMID:19936148

  12. Homeless and Housed Inpatients with Schizophrenia: Disparities in Service Access upon Discharge from Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burra, Tara A.; Hwang, Stephen W.; Rourke, Sean B.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in services available at the time of discharge for homeless and housed psychiatric inpatients. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient unit. Thirty homeless individuals and 21 housed controls (matched for diagnosis, gender,…

  13. Translating Research Into Practice: Voluntary Reporting of Medication Errors in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine J.; Cochran, Gary; Hicks, Rodney W.; Mueller, Keith J.

    2004-01-01

    Context:Low service volume, insufficient information technology, and limited human resources are barriers to learning about and correcting system failures in small rural hospitals. This paper describes the implementation of and initial findings from a voluntary medication error reporting program developed by the Nebraska Center for Rural Health…

  14. Multidimensional structures of comprehensive accessibility of community support for people with mental disorders in Japan: a nationwide investigation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Takae; Yamazaki, Hideo

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the concept of comprehensive accessibility of community support for people with mental disorders and to clarify the multidimensional structures of comprehensive accessibility. We developed a self-administered questionnaire consisting of 47 items. A complete list of the municipalities in Japan was prepared, and the questionnaire was mailed to 3310 municipalities. Principal component analyses were applied to valid data in order to analyse the index and multidimensional structures of comprehensive accessibility. As a result, 14 principal components of community support for people with mental disorders were extracted. These principal components were interpreted as the scales for the evaluation of comprehensive accessibility. The two first principal component scores were interpreted as the index indicating the level of comprehensive accessibility. The other 12 principal components were interpreted as the scales constituting the multidimensional space of comprehensive accessibility.

  15. Exploring the Role of Community Cultural Wealth in Graduate School Access and Persistence for Mexican American PhDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espino, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the extent to which devalued forms of capital along with limited access to valued cultural capital facilitated the access and persistence of 33 Mexican American PhDs who earned their doctorates in a variety of disciplines at 15 universities across the United States. Using the framework of community cultural wealth, this…

  16. Rural Community-Dwelling Elders' Reports of Access to Care: Are There Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic White Disparities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, Tyrone F.

    2004-01-01

    Consumer reports can provide useful information about the dimensions of access in need of improvement for particular population subgroups. To determine if there are Hispanic versus non- Hispanic white disparities in rural elders' reports of their health care access. A telephone survey was conducted among 2,097 rural community-dwelling elders in…

  17. The impact of the individual mandate and Internal Revenue Service Form 990 Schedule H on community benefits from nonprofit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Principe, Kristine; Adams, E Kathleen; Maynard, Jenifer; Becker, Edmund R

    2012-02-01

    In response to a growing concern that nonprofit hospitals are not providing sufficient benefit to their communities in return for their tax-exempt status, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) now requires nonprofit hospitals to formally document the extent of their community contributions. While the IRS is increasing financial scrutiny of nonprofit hospitals, many provisions in the recently passed historical health reform legislation will also have a significant impact on the provision of uncompensated care and other community benefits. We argue that health reform does not render the nonprofit organizational form obsolete. Rather, health reform should strengthen the nonprofit hospitals' ability to fulfill their missions by better targeting subsidies for uncompensated care and potentially increasing subsidized health services provision, many of which affect the public's health.

  18. Exposure to Community Violence is Associated with Asthma Hospitalizations and ED Visits

    PubMed Central

    Apter, Andrea J.; Garcia, Laura A.; Boyd, Rhonda C.; Wang, Xingmei; Bogen, Daniel K.; Have, Thomas Ten

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to community violence (ECV) has been associated with asthma morbidity of children living in inner-city neighborhoods. Objective To examine with prospective longitudinal data whether ECV is independently associated with asthma-related health outcomes in adults. Methods Adults with moderate-severe asthma, recruited from clinics serving inner-city neighborhoods, completed questionnaires covering socio-demographics, asthma severity, and ECV and were followed for 26 weeks. Longitudinal models were employed to assess unadjusted and adjusted associations of subsequent asthma outcomes (emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, FEV1, quality of life). Results 397 adults, 47±14 years, 73% female, 70% African American, 7% Latino, mean FEV1 66%±19%, 133 with hospitalizations and 222 with ED visits for asthma in the year before entry were evaluated. 91 reported ECV. Controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and household income, those exposed to violence had 2.27 (95% CI: 1.32-3.90) times more asthma-related ED visits per month and 2.49 (95% CI: 1.11-5.60) times more asthma-related hospitalizations per month over the 26-week study period compared to those unexposed. Violence-exposed participants also had 1.71 (95% CI: 1.14-2.56) times more overall ED visits per month and 1.72 (95% CI: 0.95-3.11) times more overall hospitalizations per month from any cause. Asthma-related quality of life was lower in the violence-exposed participants (-0.40 (95%CI: -0.77-0.025), p=0.04). Effect modification by depressive symptoms was only statistically significant for the ECV association with overall ED visits and quality of life outcomes (p<.01). Conclusion In adults, ECV is associated with increased hospitalizations and emergency care for asthma or any condition and with asthma-related quality of life. PMID:20816190

  19. [Efficacy and safety of levofloxacin treatment of community--acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Karwat, Krzysztof J; Grabczak, Magdalena; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the efficacy and safety of levofloxacin in the treatment of community-aquired pneumonia (CAP) in outpatient with ineffective antibiotic management, requiring hospitalization. The examined group included 25 patients (11 M, 14 F) of mean age 70+/-17,5 years with abnormalities in X-ray on admission to hospital. Risk factors for pneumonia and previous antibacterial therapy were analyzed. In the hospital they were treated for 7 days with levofloxacin 500 mg twice a day administred intravenously. Body temperature, blood cell count, ESR, CRP, AST, ALT, LDH, CPK, creatine, urea, potassium, sodium, ABG, and ECG were measured on admission and in the 3-rd and 7- th day of therapy. The chest X-rays were performed and analyzed on hospital discharge. 18 patients were aged > 65 yrs, cardiovascular diseases co-existed in 14, COPD in 9, smoking habit in 12, renal failure in 3, diabetes in 3 and alkohol addiction in 1 cases. On admission 4 patients had respiratory failure, 10 hypoxaemia. During therapy a decrease of body temperature (p<0,001), concentration of CRP (p<0,004) and LDH (p<0,03), CPK (p<0,04) and increase of PaO2 (p<0,012) were observed. The changes of other parameters were not statistically significant. We did not observe any changes in ECG. On discharge from the hospital in 16 patients complete regression and in 6 patients partial regression of lesions in chest X-ray examination were observed. In 3 patients levofloxacin therapy was noneffective: in 2 because of persistent high body temperature after 3 days of treatment and in 1 patients because of recurrent of fever. Adverse events were mild. Transient exacerbation of renal failure was observed in 3 patients. Our study demonstrates that levofloxacine ni dose 2x500 mg given intravenously for 7 days is effective and safe in treatment of CAP in patients with previously ineffective antibacterial therapy.

  20. Medicaid home and community-based services: how consumer access is restricted by state policies.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terence; Stone, Julie; Harrington, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    State Medicaid programs have expanded home and community-based services (HCBS). This article compares trends and variations in state policies for Medicaid HCBS programs in 2005 and 2010. State limitations on financial eligibility criteria and service benefits have remained stable. Although the use of consumer direction, independent providers, and family care providers has increased, some states do not have these options. The increased adoption of state cost control policies have led to large increases in persons on waiver wait lists. Access could be improved by standardizing and liberalizing state HCBS policies, but state fiscal concerns are barriers to rebalancing between HCBS and institutional services. PMID:25299976

  1. Optimal Decision Model for Sustainable Hospital Building Renovation-A Case Study of a Vacant School Building Converting into a Community Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yi-Kai; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Perng, Yeng-Horng; Castro-Lacouture, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to hospitals environments since modern pandemics have emerged. The building sector is considered to be the largest world energy consumer, so many global organizations are attempting to create a sustainable environment in building construction by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, maintaining high standards of hygiene while reducing energy consumption has become a major task for hospitals. This study develops a decision model based on genetic algorithms and A* graph search algorithms to evaluate existing hospital environmental conditions and to recommend an optimal scheme of sustainable renovation strategies, considering trade-offs among minimal renovation cost, maximum quality improvement, and low environmental impact. Reusing vacant buildings is a global and sustainable trend. In Taiwan, for example, more and more school space will be unoccupied due to a rapidly declining birth rate. Integrating medical care with local community elder-care efforts becomes important because of the aging population. This research introduces a model that converts a simulated vacant school building into a community public hospital renovation project in order to validate the solutions made by hospital managers and suggested by the system. The result reveals that the system performs well and its solutions are more successful than the actions undertaken by decision-makers. This system can improve traditional hospital building condition assessment while making it more effective and efficient. PMID:27347986

  2. Optimal Decision Model for Sustainable Hospital Building Renovation—A Case Study of a Vacant School Building Converting into a Community Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Yi-Kai; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Perng, Yeng-Horng; Castro-Lacouture, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to hospitals environments since modern pandemics have emerged. The building sector is considered to be the largest world energy consumer, so many global organizations are attempting to create a sustainable environment in building construction by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, maintaining high standards of hygiene while reducing energy consumption has become a major task for hospitals. This study develops a decision model based on genetic algorithms and A* graph search algorithms to evaluate existing hospital environmental conditions and to recommend an optimal scheme of sustainable renovation strategies, considering trade-offs among minimal renovation cost, maximum quality improvement, and low environmental impact. Reusing vacant buildings is a global and sustainable trend. In Taiwan, for example, more and more school space will be unoccupied due to a rapidly declining birth rate. Integrating medical care with local community elder-care efforts becomes important because of the aging population. This research introduces a model that converts a simulated vacant school building into a community public hospital renovation project in order to validate the solutions made by hospital managers and suggested by the system. The result reveals that the system performs well and its solutions are more successful than the actions undertaken by decision-makers. This system can improve traditional hospital building condition assessment while making it more effective and efficient. PMID:27347986

  3. Optimal Decision Model for Sustainable Hospital Building Renovation-A Case Study of a Vacant School Building Converting into a Community Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yi-Kai; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Perng, Yeng-Horng; Castro-Lacouture, Daniel

    2016-06-24

    Much attention has been paid to hospitals environments since modern pandemics have emerged. The building sector is considered to be the largest world energy consumer, so many global organizations are attempting to create a sustainable environment in building construction by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, maintaining high standards of hygiene while reducing energy consumption has become a major task for hospitals. This study develops a decision model based on genetic algorithms and A* graph search algorithms to evaluate existing hospital environmental conditions and to recommend an optimal scheme of sustainable renovation strategies, considering trade-offs among minimal renovation cost, maximum quality improvement, and low environmental impact. Reusing vacant buildings is a global and sustainable trend. In Taiwan, for example, more and more school space will be unoccupied due to a rapidly declining birth rate. Integrating medical care with local community elder-care efforts becomes important because of the aging population. This research introduces a model that converts a simulated vacant school building into a community public hospital renovation project in order to validate the solutions made by hospital managers and suggested by the system. The result reveals that the system performs well and its solutions are more successful than the actions undertaken by decision-makers. This system can improve traditional hospital building condition assessment while making it more effective and efficient.

  4. Effect of evaluations of competency to stand trial on the state hospital in an era of increased community services.

    PubMed

    Geller, J L; Fisher, W H; Kaye, N S

    1991-08-01

    The authors studied court-ordered inpatient evaluations of competency to stand trial at two Massachusetts state hospitals for the period from 1972 to 1987, with particular attention to the effects of a 1978 federal court consent decree that created an extensive system of community-based services in the catchment area of one of the hospitals. The authors found that the broad array of community services developed under the consent decree did not reduce commitments to the state hospital for evaluation of competency to stand trial at the same rate as it reduced civil commitments, with the result that the composition of the patient population changed to include a significantly larger proportion of patients referred by the criminal justice system. This proportion was as high as 17.8 percent in 1985. These patients used a disproportionate share of the hospital's resources, staying in the hospital for a median of 28 days, compared with 12 days for all other patients.

  5. Access to hospitals in the wake of terrorism: challenges and needs for maintaining public confidence.

    PubMed

    May, Thomas; Aulisio, Mark P

    2006-01-01

    The problem of surge capacity in the wake of a terror-related emergency has lead to a number of interesting proposals designed to mitigate the effects of crowds as well as deficiencies in patient care capacities. The most controversial of these is a proposal to close hospital doors in the wake of a mass casualty terror event. However, several specific challenges posed by mass casualty events make closing hospitals doors undesirable. These include the need for efficient movement of resources, maintenance of social order, and providing the moral reassurance needed by the general public in times of crisis. Importantly, these challenges are related to features of terrorist events that distinguish such events from circumstances of "normal" surge that might result in, for example, closure of emergency rooms. PMID:16904615

  6. Targeted Access to the Genomes of Low Abundance Organisms in Complex Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Podar, Mircea; Abulencia, Carl; Walcher, Marion; Hutchinson, Don; Zengler, Karsten; Garcia, Joseph; Holland, Trevin; Cotton, Dave; Hauser, Loren John; Keller, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Current metagenomic approaches to the study of complex microbial consortia provide a glimpse into the community metabolism, and occasionally allow genomic assemblies for the most abundant organisms. However, little information is gained for the members of the community present at low frequency, especially those representing yet uncultured taxa-which includes the bulk of the diversity present in most environments. Here we used phylogenetically directed cell separation by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry, followed by amplification and sequencing of a fraction of the genomic DNA of several bacterial cells that belong to the TM7 phylum. Partial genomic assembly allowed, for the first time, a look into the evolution and potential metabolism of a soil representative from this group of organisms for which there are no species in stable laboratory cultures. Genomic reconstruction from targeted cells of uncultured organisms directly isolated from the environment represents a powerful approach to access any specific members of a community and an alternative way to assess the community metabolic potential.

  7. Improving Post-Hospitalization Transition Outcomes through Accessible Health Information Technology and Caregiver Support: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Piette, John D; Striplin, Dana; Marinec, Nicolle; Chen, Jenny; Gregory, Lynn A; Sumerlin, Denise L; DeSantis, Angela M; Gibson, Carolyn; Crause, Ingrid; Rouse, Marylena; Aikens, James E

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this trial is to evaluate a novel intervention designed to improve post-hospitalization support for older adults with chronic conditions via: (a) direct tailored communication to patients using regular automated calls post discharge, (b) support for informal caregivers outside of the patient’s household via structured automated feedback about the patient’s status plus advice about how caregivers can help, and (c) support for care management including a web-based disease management tool and alerts about potential problems. Methods 846 older adults with common chronic conditions are being identified upon hospital admission. Patients are asked to identify a “CarePartner” (CP) living outside their household, i.e., an adult child or other social network member willing to play an active role in their post-discharge transition support. Patient-CP pairs are randomized to the intervention or usual care. Intervention patients receive automated assessment and behavior change calls, and their CPs receives structured feedback and advice via email and automated calls following each assessment. Clinical teams have access to assessment results via the web and receive automated reports about urgent health problems. Patients complete surveys at baseline, 30 days, and 90 days post discharge; utilization data is obtained from hospital records. CPs, other caregivers, and clinicians are interviewed to evaluate intervention effects on processes of self-care support, caregiver stress and communication, and the intervention’s potential for broader implementation. The primary outcome is 30-day readmission rates; other outcomes measured at 30 days and 90 days include functional status, self-care behaviors, and mortality risk. Conclusion This trial uses accessible health technologies and coordinated communication among informal caregivers and clinicians to fill the growing gap between what discharged patients need and available resources. A unique feature of

  8. Incidence, Outcomes, and Risk Factors of Community-Acquired and Hospital-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chien-Ning; Lee, Chien-Te; Su, Chien-Hao; Wang, Yu-Ching Lily; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The disease burden and outcomes of community-acquired (CA-) and hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) are not well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence, outcomes, and risk factors of AKI in a large Taiwanese adult cohort. This retrospective cohort study examined 734,340 hospital admissions from a group of hospitals within an organization in Taiwan between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014. Patients with AKI at discharge were classified as either CA- or HA-AKI based on the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of function, end stage of kidney disease) classification criteria. Outcomes were in-hospital mortality, dialysis, recovery of renal function, and length of stay. Risks of developing AKI were determined using multivariate logistic regression based on demographic and baseline clinical characteristics and nephrotoxin use before admission. AKI occurred in 1.68% to 2% hospital discharges among adults without and with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD), respectively. The incidence of CA-AKI was 17.25 and HA-AKI was 8.14 per 1000 admissions. The annual rate of CA-AKI increased from 12.43 to 19.96 per 1000 people, but the change in HA-AKI was insignificant. Comparing to CA-AKI, those with HA-AKI had higher levels of in-hospital mortality (26.07% vs 51.58%), mean length of stay (21.25 ± 22.35 vs 35.84 ± 34.62 days), and dialysis during hospitalization (1.45% vs 2.06%). Preexisting systemic diseases, including CKD were associated with increased risks of CA-AKI, and nephrotoxic polypharmacy increased risk of both CA- and HA-AKI. Patients with HA-AKI had more severe outcomes than patients with CA-AKI, and demonstrated different spectrum of risk factors. Although patients with CA-AKI with better outcomes, the incidence increased over time. It is also clear that optimal preventive and management strategies of HA- and CA-AKI are urgently needed to limit the risks in susceptible individuals. PMID:27175701

  9. Where are the food deserts? An evaluation of policy-relevant measures of community food access in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Liese, Angela D.; Hibbert, James D.; Ma, Xiaoguang; Bell, Bethany A.; Battersby, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Several recent United States (US) policies target spatial access to healthier food retailers. We evaluated two measures of community food access developed by two different agencies, using a 2009 food environment validation study in South Carolina as a reference. While the US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service’s (USDA ERS) measure designated 22.5% of census tracts as food deserts, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) measure designated 29.0% as non-healthier retail tracts; 71% of tracts were designated consistently between USDA ERS and CDC. Our findings suggest a need for greater harmonization of these measures of community food access. PMID:26294937

  10. Population Screening Using Sewage Reveals Pan-Resistant Bacteria in Hospital and Community Samples

    PubMed Central

    Mileguir, Fernando; Azar, Roberto; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Rahav, Galia; Shamiss, Ari; Mendelson, Ella; Keller, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pan-resistant bacteria worldwide possesses a threat to global health. It is difficult to evaluate the extent of carriage of resistant bacteria in the population. Sewage sampling is a possible way to monitor populations. We evaluated the presence of pan-resistant bacteria in Israeli sewage collected from all over Israel, by modifying the pour plate method for heterotrophic plate count technique using commercial selective agar plates. This method enables convenient and fast sewage sampling and detection. We found that sewage in Israel contains multiple pan-resistant bacteria including carbapenemase resistant Enterobacteriacae carrying blaKPC and blaNDM-1, MRSA and VRE. blaKPC carrying Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter cloacae were the most common Enterobacteriacae drug resistant bacteria found in the sewage locations we sampled. Klebsiella pneumonia, Enterobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Citrobacter spp. were the 4 main CRE isolated from Israeli sewage and also from clinical samples in our clinical microbiology laboratory. Hospitals and Community sewage had similar percentage of positive samplings for blaKPC and blaNDM-1. VRE was found to be more abundant in sewage in Israel than MRSA but there were more locations positive for MRSA and VRE bacteria in Hospital sewage than in the Community. Therefore, our upgrade of the pour plate method for heterotrophic plate count technique using commercial selective agar plates can be a useful tool for routine screening and monitoring of the population for pan-resistant bacteria using sewage. PMID:27780222

  11. Antibiotic Consumption During a 4-year Period in a Community Hospital with an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

    PubMed Central

    Garcell, Humberto Guanche; Arias, Ariadna Villanueva; Fernandez, Eliezer Alemán; Guerrero, Yaquelín Batista; Serrano, Ramon N. Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to evaluate the trend of antibiotic consumption in patients admitted to a community hospital in Qatar with an antimicrobial stewardship program. Methods This observational study was carried out in a 75-bed facility in Western Qatar over a 4-year period (2012–2015). The monitoring of antimicrobial consumption from inpatient wards was performed from the pharmacy records and presented as defined daily dose (DDD) divided by the patient days and expressed as 100 bed-days (DBD). Results The consumption of antimicrobials in 2012 was 171.3 DBD, and increased to 252.7 DBD in 2013, 229.1 DBD in 2014, and 184.7 DBD in 2015. Cephalosporins use reduced from 98.2 DBD in 2013 to 51.5 DBD in 2015 while the consumption of penicillins increased during the beginning of 2014 with a slight decrease in 2015. Carbapenems consumption during 2014–2015 was lower than previous years, and vice-versa for aminoglycosides. Fluoroquinolones had a sustained increase with 37.1% increased consumption in 2015 compared to the two previous years. There was an increase in the use of intravenous (IV) (108.5%) and oral azithromycin (55.1%) and the use of oral (152.8%) and IV moxifloxacin (22.9%). Conclusions We observed a decrease in antibiotic use in patients admitted to a community hospital with an antimicrobial stewardship program, but the increase in fluoroquinolones consumption is a concern that requires focused strategies. PMID:27602189

  12. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Walson Army Community Hospital, Fort Dix, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    1984-12-31

    In September of 1984, the firm of Einhorn Yaffee Prescott, P.C. was retained by the Army Corps of Engineers to perform energy conservation services for the Walson Army Community Hospital at Fort Dix and the Ainsworth Clinic at Fort Hamilton. The architectural/engineerinq/health planning field team studied the existing heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and electrical systems, results of all prior or ongoing energy conservation studies, projects, and designs or plans, the facilities operation and environment, and past energy usage. A comprehensive report has been prepared which documents the work accomplished, the results and the recommendations. This report reflects a joint effort between the field investigation team and the hospital staff. The scope of this study included the following objectives: Perform a complete energy audit and analysis of the entire hospital facility. Identify all energy conservation opportunities, including low cost/no cost items and perform complete evaluations of each. Prepare programming documentation for all energy conservation investment program projects including DD Form 1391, a life cycle cost analysis summary sheet with backup calculations and a Project Development Brochure. Prepare implementation documentation for all justifiable energy conservation opportunities. List and prioritize all recommended energy conservation opportunities.

  13. Role of Physical Therapists in Reducing Hospital Readmissions: Optimizing Outcomes for Older Adults During Care Transitions From Hospital to Community.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Jason R; Burke, Robert E; Malone, Daniel; Ridgeway, Kyle J; McManus, Beth M; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    Hospital readmissions in older adult populations are an emerging quality indicator for acute care hospitals. Recent evidence has linked functional decline during and after hospitalization with an elevated risk of hospital readmission. However, models of care that have been developed to reduce hospital readmission rates do not adequately address functional deficits. Physical therapists, as experts in optimizing physical function, have a strong opportunity to contribute meaningfully to care transition models and demonstrate the value of physical therapy interventions in reducing readmissions. Thus, the purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to describe the need for physical therapist input during care transitions for older adults and (2) to outline strategies for expanding physical therapy participation in care transitions for older adults, with an overall goal of reducing avoidable 30-day hospital readmissions. PMID:26939601

  14. Role of Physical Therapists in Reducing Hospital Readmissions: Optimizing Outcomes for Older Adults During Care Transitions From Hospital to Community.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Jason R; Burke, Robert E; Malone, Daniel; Ridgeway, Kyle J; McManus, Beth M; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    Hospital readmissions in older adult populations are an emerging quality indicator for acute care hospitals. Recent evidence has linked functional decline during and after hospitalization with an elevated risk of hospital readmission. However, models of care that have been developed to reduce hospital readmission rates do not adequately address functional deficits. Physical therapists, as experts in optimizing physical function, have a strong opportunity to contribute meaningfully to care transition models and demonstrate the value of physical therapy interventions in reducing readmissions. Thus, the purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to describe the need for physical therapist input during care transitions for older adults and (2) to outline strategies for expanding physical therapy participation in care transitions for older adults, with an overall goal of reducing avoidable 30-day hospital readmissions.

  15. Multi-hospital Community NICU Quality Improvement Improves Survival of ELBW Infants.

    PubMed

    Owens, Jack D; Soltau, Thomas; McCaughn, Danny; Miller, Jason; O'Mara, Patrick; Robbins, Kenny; Temple, David M; Wender, David F

    2015-08-01

    Quality improvement or high reliability in medicine is an evolving science where we seek to integrate evidence-based medicine, structural resources, process management, leadership models, culture, and education. Newborn Associates is a community-based neonatology practice that staffs and manages neonatal intensive care units (NICU's) at Central Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, River Oaks Hospital, St Dominic's Hospital and Woman's Hospital within the Jackson, Mississippi, metropolitan area. These hospitals participate in the Vermont-Oxford Neonatal Network (VON), which is a voluntary national network of about 1000 NICU groups that submit data allowing them to benchmark their patient outcome. This network currently holds data on 1.5 million infants. Participation may also include the Newborn Improvement Quality Collaborative (NICQ) which is an intensive quality improvement program where 40-60 of the almost 1000 VON centers participate each year or the iNICQ, which is an internet-based collaborative involving about 150 centers per year. From 2008-2009, our group concentrated efforts on quality improvement which included consolidating resources of three corporately managed hospitals to allow focused care of babies under 800-1000 grams at a single center, expanding participation in the VON NICQ to include all physicians and centers, and establishing a group QI focused committee aimed at sharing practice bundles and adopting quality improvement methodology. The goal of this article is to report the impact of these QI activities on survival of the smallest preterm infants who weigh less than 1500 grams at birth. Two epochs were compared: 2006-2009, and 2010-2013. 551 VLBW (< 1 500 grams) infants from epoch I were compared to 583 VLBW infants from epoch 2. Mortality in this group decreased from 18% to 11.1% (OR 0.62,95% CI 0.44-0.88). Mortality in the 501-750 grams birth weight category decreased from 45.7% to 18% (OR 0.39,95% CI 0

  16. Multi-hospital Community NICU Quality Improvement Improves Survival of ELBW Infants.

    PubMed

    Owens, Jack D; Soltau, Thomas; McCaughn, Danny; Miller, Jason; O'Mara, Patrick; Robbins, Kenny; Temple, David M; Wender, David F

    2015-08-01

    Quality improvement or high reliability in medicine is an evolving science where we seek to integrate evidence-based medicine, structural resources, process management, leadership models, culture, and education. Newborn Associates is a community-based neonatology practice that staffs and manages neonatal intensive care units (NICU's) at Central Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, River Oaks Hospital, St Dominic's Hospital and Woman's Hospital within the Jackson, Mississippi, metropolitan area. These hospitals participate in the Vermont-Oxford Neonatal Network (VON), which is a voluntary national network of about 1000 NICU groups that submit data allowing them to benchmark their patient outcome. This network currently holds data on 1.5 million infants. Participation may also include the Newborn Improvement Quality Collaborative (NICQ) which is an intensive quality improvement program where 40-60 of the almost 1000 VON centers participate each year or the iNICQ, which is an internet-based collaborative involving about 150 centers per year. From 2008-2009, our group concentrated efforts on quality improvement which included consolidating resources of three corporately managed hospitals to allow focused care of babies under 800-1000 grams at a single center, expanding participation in the VON NICQ to include all physicians and centers, and establishing a group QI focused committee aimed at sharing practice bundles and adopting quality improvement methodology. The goal of this article is to report the impact of these QI activities on survival of the smallest preterm infants who weigh less than 1500 grams at birth. Two epochs were compared: 2006-2009, and 2010-2013. 551 VLBW (< 1 500 grams) infants from epoch I were compared to 583 VLBW infants from epoch 2. Mortality in this group decreased from 18% to 11.1% (OR 0.62,95% CI 0.44-0.88). Mortality in the 501-750 grams birth weight category decreased from 45.7% to 18% (OR 0.39,95% CI 0

  17. Transforming Community Access Services through Client- and Family-Centred Homecare Transitions.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Carl; Camus, Susann; Fraser, Julie

    2015-03-01

    This article describes how one provincial health region adopted a client- and family-centred approach to improve access to community health services. Transition best practices and the "Triple Aim" supplied a framework for the transformation of transition of clients needing home healthcare services (Berwick et al. 2008). The need to improve the patient and family experience, establish and streamline professional practice standards, strengthen interprofessional collaborations, increase efficiency, create a critical mass of experts in the clinical domain of care transitions and program access, and evaluate customer experience were the organizational drivers for this transformation. The new framework identifies clients' needs and assigns a priority code. It also identifies which family member provides what support to the client and offers a one-stop service number staffed by individuals trained to provide client- and family-centred homecare services. This transformation of home healthcare transitions has improved the client and family experience, strengthened service provider satisfaction and generated efficiencies in prioritizing and delivering community healthcare services. PMID:26154123

  18. Diagnosis of atypical pathogens in patients hospitalized with community-acquired respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Peter M; Dorigo-Zetsma, J Wendeline; van der Zee, Anneke; van Bon, Marion; van Opstal, Jean-Louis

    2004-01-01

    The object of our study was to determine the proportion of atypical respiratory pathogens among patients hospitalized with a community-acquired respiratory infection. From September 1997 to May 1999, 159 patients (57% male, median age 55, range 1-88 y) admitted to 3 regional hospitals for a community acquired respiratory infection, were enrolled in the study. Microbiological diagnosis for the atypical pathogens Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila was performed with PCR on a throat swab, sputum and/or broncho alveolar lavage (BAL). In addition, Legionella species other than L. pneumophila (L. non-pneumophila species) were detected by PCR. Two serum samples were collected and processed for M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae serology. In total, 27 patients (17%) were diagnosed with an atypical pathogen. Infection with M. pneumoniae was detected in 19 patients (12%) (PCR positive n = 7), with C. pneumoniae in 5 patients (3%) (PCR positive n = 0) and with L. pneumophila in 4 patients (2.5%) (PCR positive n = 4). In 54 (34%) patients routine microbiological investigations revealed aetiological agents other than the 3 atypical pathogens, the most frequently diagnosed pathogens being Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 18), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 17), Gram-negative rods (n = 13), Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 6) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 6). More than 1 pathogen was found in 13 patients. Atypical pathogens were found more often in the young age group (0-18 y), in contrast to bacterial pathogens that were found more often in the older age groups (> or = 65 y). Atypical pathogens were found less often in patients with a clinical presentation of atypical pneumonia. Legionella species other than L. pneumophila were found by PCR in 13 patients (8%), and in 6 patients in combination with another pathogen. An atypical pathogen (M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae or L. pneumophila) was found in 17% of the patients hospitalized with a community acquired

  19. Access to Care and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: A Cross-Sectional Study in 2 Latino Communities.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, Héctor E; Albert, Stephanie L; Roby, Dylan H; Beckerman, Jacob; Champagne, Philippe; Brookmeyer, Ron; Prelip, Michael L; Glik, Deborah C; Inkelas, Moira; Garcia, Rosa-Elenna; Ortega, Alexander N

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading killer of Americans. CVD is understudied among Latinos, who have high levels of CVD risk factors. This study aimed to determine whether access to health care (ie, insurance status and having a usual source of care) is associated with 4 CVD prevention factors (ie, health care utilization, CVD screening, information received from health care providers, and lifestyle factors) among Latino adults and to evaluate whether the associations depended on CVD clinical risk/disease.Data were collected as part of a community-engaged food environment intervention study in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights, CA. Logistic regressions were fitted with insurance status and usual source of care as predictors of the 4 CVD prevention factors while controlling for demographics. Analyses were repeated with interactions between self-reported CVD clinical risk/disease and access to care measures.Access to health care significantly increased the odds of CVD prevention. Having a usual source of care was associated with all factors of prevention, whereas being insured was only associated with some factors of prevention. CVD clinical risk/disease did not moderate any associations.Although efforts to reduce CVD risk among Latinos through the Affordable Care Act could be impactful, they might have limited impact in curbing CVD among Latinos, via the law's expansion of insurance coverage. CVD prevention efforts must expand beyond the provision of insurance to effectively lower CVD rates.

  20. Institutions in transitioning peri-urban communities: spatial differences in groundwater access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Sharlene L.; Hermans, Leon M.

    2016-05-01

    Urbanization creates challenges for water management in an evolving socio-economic context. This is particularly relevant in transitioning peri-urban areas like Khulna, Bangladesh where competing demands have put pressure on local groundwater resources. Users are unable to sufficiently meet their needs through existing institutions. These institutions provide the rules for service provision and act as guidelines for actors to resolve their water related issues. However, the evolving peri-urban context can produce fragmented institutional arrangements. For example in Khulna, water supply is based on urban and rural boundaries that has created water access issues for peri-urban communities. This has motivated local actors to manage their groundwater needs in various ways. General institutional theories are well developed in literature, yet little is known about institutions in transitioning peri-urban areas. Institutions that fail to adapt to changing dynamics run the risk of becoming obsolete or counter-productive, hence the need for investigating institutional change mechanisms in this context. This paper examines peri-urban case studies from Khulna using the Institutional Analysis and Development framework to demonstrate how institutions have contributed to spatial differences in groundwater access with local actors investing in formal and informal institutional change as a means of accessing groundwater.

  1. A RESTful API for accessing microbial community data for MG-RAST

    DOE PAGES

    Wilke, Andreas; Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Brettin, Tom; D'Souza, Mark; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Matthews, Hunter; Paczian, Tobias; Wilkening, Jared; Glass, Elizabeth M.; et al

    2015-01-08

    Metagenomic sequencing has produced significant amounts of data in recent years. For example, as of summer 2013, MGRAST has been used to annotate over 110,000 data sets totaling over 43 Terabases. With metagenomic sequencing finding even wider adoption in the scientific community, the existing web-based analysis tools and infrastructure in MG-RAST provide limited capability for data retrieval and analysis, such as comparative analysis between multiple data sets. Moreover, although the system provides many analysis tools, it is not comprehensive. By opening MG-RAST up via a web services API (application programmers interface) we have greatly expanded access to MG-RAST data, asmore » well as provided a mechanism for the use of third-party analysis tools with MG-RAST data. This RESTful API makes all data and data objects created by the MG-RAST pipeline accessible as JSON objects. As part of the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase project (KBase, http:// kbase.us) we have implemented a web services API for MG-RAST. This API complements the existing MG-RAST web interface and constitutes the basis of KBase’s microbial community capabilities. In addition, the API exposes a comprehensive collection of data to programmers. This API, which uses a RESTful (Representational State Transfer) implementation, is compatible with most programming environments and should be easy to use for end users and third parties. It provides comprehensive access to sequence data, quality control results, annotations, and many other data types. Where feasible, we have used standards to expose data and metadata. Code examples are provided in a number of languages both to show the versatility of the API and to provide a starting point for users. We present an API that exposes the data in MG-RAST for consumption by our users, greatly enhancing the utility of the MG-RAST service.« less

  2. A RESTful API for accessing microbial community data for MG-RAST.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Andreas; Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Brettin, Tom; D'Souza, Mark; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Matthews, Hunter; Paczian, Tobias; Wilkening, Jared; Glass, Elizabeth M; Desai, Narayan; Meyer, Folker

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic sequencing has produced significant amounts of data in recent years. For example, as of summer 2013, MG-RAST has been used to annotate over 110,000 data sets totaling over 43 Terabases. With metagenomic sequencing finding even wider adoption in the scientific community, the existing web-based analysis tools and infrastructure in MG-RAST provide limited capability for data retrieval and analysis, such as comparative analysis between multiple data sets. Moreover, although the system provides many analysis tools, it is not comprehensive. By opening MG-RAST up via a web services API (application programmers interface) we have greatly expanded access to MG-RAST data, as well as provided a mechanism for the use of third-party analysis tools with MG-RAST data. This RESTful API makes all data and data objects created by the MG-RAST pipeline accessible as JSON objects. As part of the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase project (KBase, http://kbase.us) we have implemented a web services API for MG-RAST. This API complements the existing MG-RAST web interface and constitutes the basis of KBase's microbial community capabilities. In addition, the API exposes a comprehensive collection of data to programmers. This API, which uses a RESTful (Representational State Transfer) implementation, is compatible with most programming environments and should be easy to use for end users and third parties. It provides comprehensive access to sequence data, quality control results, annotations, and many other data types. Where feasible, we have used standards to expose data and metadata. Code examples are provided in a number of languages both to show the versatility of the API and to provide a starting point for users. We present an API that exposes the data in MG-RAST for consumption by our users, greatly enhancing the utility of the MG-RAST service.

  3. A RESTful API for accessing microbial community data for MG-RAST

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, Andreas; Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Brettin, Tom; D'Souza, Mark; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Matthews, Hunter; Paczian, Tobias; Wilkening, Jared; Glass, Elizabeth M.; Desai, Narayan; Meyer, Folker; Gardner, Paul P.

    2015-01-08

    Metagenomic sequencing has produced significant amounts of data in recent years. For example, as of summer 2013, MGRAST has been used to annotate over 110,000 data sets totaling over 43 Terabases. With metagenomic sequencing finding even wider adoption in the scientific community, the existing web-based analysis tools and infrastructure in MG-RAST provide limited capability for data retrieval and analysis, such as comparative analysis between multiple data sets. Moreover, although the system provides many analysis tools, it is not comprehensive. By opening MG-RAST up via a web services API (application programmers interface) we have greatly expanded access to MG-RAST data, as well as provided a mechanism for the use of third-party analysis tools with MG-RAST data. This RESTful API makes all data and data objects created by the MG-RAST pipeline accessible as JSON objects. As part of the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase project (KBase, http:// kbase.us) we have implemented a web services API for MG-RAST. This API complements the existing MG-RAST web interface and constitutes the basis of KBase’s microbial community capabilities. In addition, the API exposes a comprehensive collection of data to programmers. This API, which uses a RESTful (Representational State Transfer) implementation, is compatible with most programming environments and should be easy to use for end users and third parties. It provides comprehensive access to sequence data, quality control results, annotations, and many other data types. Where feasible, we have used standards to expose data and metadata. Code examples are provided in a number of languages both to show the versatility of the API and to provide a starting point for users. We present an API that exposes the data in MG-RAST for consumption by our users, greatly enhancing the utility of the MG-RAST service.

  4. Bottle-blowing in hospital-treated patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Björkqvist, M; Wiberg, B; Bodin, L; Bárány, M; Holmberg, H

    1997-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine whether bottle-blowing has any positive effects in patients with pneumonia. In a prospective open study 145 adults with untreated community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization were randomized to early mobilization (group A), to sit up and take 20 deep breaths on 10 occasions daily (group B), or to sit up and to blow bubbles in a bottle containing 10 cm water through a plastic tube 20 times on 10 occasions daily (group C). Peak expiratory flow (PEF), vital capacity (VC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) and serum concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) were determined on admission, and on days 4 and 42. Fever duration and hospital stay were recorded. In a subset of 16 patients, single breath diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide was measured on 3 occasions. The patients in group A were hospitalized for a mean of 5.3 days, group B for 4.6 days and group C for 3.9 days. Treatment was a significant factor (p = 0.037) in a Cox regression model, with group C significantly better than group A (p = 0.01). The number of days with fever was 2.3, 1.7 and 1.6 in groups A, B and C respectively. These differences were not significant (p = 0.28). No significant differences were found between the groups regarding CRP, PEF, VC, FEV1, or diffusion capacity. Intensive bottle-blowing shortens the hospital stay in patients with pneumonia. The underlying mechanism is not clear.

  5. Biomaterials use in Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda: Access and affordability.

    PubMed

    Bakwatanisa, Bosco; Enywaku, Alfred; Kiwanuka, Martin; Lamunu, Claire; Mbowa, Nicholas; Mukiibi, Denis; Namayega, Catherine; Ngabirano, Beryl; Ntambi, Henry; Reichert, William

    2016-01-01

    Students in Biomaterials BBE3102 at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda were assigned semester long group projects in the first semester of the 2014-15 academic year to determine the biomaterials type and usage in Mulago National Referral Hospital, which is emblematic of large public hospitals across East Africa. Information gathering was conducted through student interviews with Mulago physicians because there were no archival records. The students divided themselves into seven project groups covering biomaterials use in the areas of wound closure, dental and oral surgery, cardiology, burn care, bone repair, ophthalmology and total joint replacement. As in the developed world, the majority of biomaterials used in Mulago are basic wound closure materials, dental materials, and bone fixation materials, all of which are comparatively inexpensive, easy to store, and readily available from either the government or local suppliers; however, there were significant issues with the implant supply chain, affordability, and patient compliance and follow-up in cases where specialty expertise and expensive implants were employed. PMID:26190587

  6. Housing as an intervention on hospital use: access among chronically homeless persons with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Parker, David

    2010-12-01

    A study examining demographics and hospital utilization for chronically homeless persons with disabilities was conducted at pre-housing enrollment and at 6 months post-housing. Of the 20 participants, 70% (n = 14) were Black American and 30% (n = 6) were White; 100% (n = 20) were non-Hispanic; 90% (n = 18) were men; 40% (n = 8) were veterans; Median years since last permanent housing and total homelessness were 7 and 10.5 respectively. The following increases were observed: employment (0 to 1); income (20%, n = 4 to 35%, n = 7); primary care (25%, n = 5 to 95%, n = 19); and mental health service use (25%, n = 5 to 60%, n = 12). Known disabilities included HIV (15%, n = 3); hepatitis C (45%, n = 9); mental illness (60%, n = 12) and substance abuse (80%, n = 16) with 45% (n = 9) dually diagnosed. Over the course of the study, Emergency department visits and inpatient hospitalization use decreased. While these differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.14 and p = 0.31, respectively), they translate to an estimated $250,208 savings.

  7. [The permanence of access to health care: a tradition of hospitality and innovative organizational model].

    PubMed

    Georges-Tarragano, C

    2015-01-01

    The PASS ("Permanence d'Accès aux Soins de Santé") are hospital-based units providing primary care services to patients who lack health care coverage. Using a "whole person" approach and providing a combination of health and social care, the PASS offer an appropriately adapted response to complex health problems within a context of marked social vulnerability and contribute to reducing health inequalities. The PASS are an example of an interdisciplinary approach to health care which contrasts with the segmentary approach typical of conventional hospital departments. Operating at the interface between primary and secondary care, the PASS have the potential to become key players in developing models of patient pathways. Their presence reduces inappropriate emergency attendances and hospitalisation by offering medical care in a timely fashion, in an outpatient-type setting. The PASS can provide a resource for research into optimum models of health care, where the social context of health needs are fully recognized and inform medical treatment appropriately. According to their potential development, PASS are living labs of an innovative organizational model of care.

  8. Facilitating access to voluntary and community services for patients with psychosocial problems: a before-after evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Grayer, Justin; Cape, John; Orpwood, Lisa; Leibowitz, Judy; Buszewicz, Marta

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with psychosocial problems may benefit from a variety of community, educational, recreational and voluntary sector resources, but GPs often under-refer to these through lack of knowledge and time. This study evaluated the acceptability and effectiveness of graduate primary care mental health workers (GPCMHWs) facilitating access to voluntary and community sector services for patients with psychosocial problems. Methods Patients with psychosocial problems from 13 general practices in London were referred to a GPCMHW Community Link scheme providing information and support to access voluntary and community resources. Patient satisfaction, mental health and social outcomes, and use of primary care resources, were evaluated. Results 108 patients consented to take part in the study. At three-month follow-up, 63 (58%) had made contact with a community service identified as suitable for their needs. Most were satisfied with the help provided by the GPCMHW in identifying and supporting access to a suitable service. There was a reduction in the number of patients with a probable mental health problem on the GHQ-12 from 83% to 52% (difference 31% (95% CI, 17% – 44%). Social adjustment improved and frequencies of primary care consultations and of prescription of psychotropic medications were reduced. Conclusion Graduates with limited training in mental health and no prior knowledge of local community resources can help patients with psychosocial problems access voluntary and community services, and patients value such a scheme. There was some evidence of effectiveness in reducing psychosocial and mental health problems. PMID:18462500

  9. Community, service, and policy strategies to improve health care access in the changing urban environment.

    PubMed

    Andrulis, D P

    2000-06-01

    Urban communities continue to face formidable historic challenges to improving public health. However, reinvestment initiatives, changing demographics, and growth in urban areas are creating changes that offer new opportunities for improving health while requiring that health systems be adapted to residents' health needs. This commentary suggests that health care improvement in metropolitan areas will require setting local, state, and national agendas around 3 priorities. First, health care must reorient around powerful population dynamics, in particular, cultural diversity, growing numbers of elderly, those in welfare-workplace transition, and those unable to negotiate an increasingly complex health system. Second, communities and governments must assess the consequences of health professional shortages, safety net provider closures and conversions, and new marketplace pressures in terms of their effects on access to care for vulnerable urban populations; they must also weigh the potential value of emerging models for improving those populations' care. Finally, governments at all levels should use their influence through accreditation, standards, tobacco settlements, and other financing streams to educate and guide urban providers in directions that respond to urban communities' health care needs.

  10. Community, service, and policy strategies to improve health care access in the changing urban environment.

    PubMed

    Andrulis, D P

    2000-06-01

    Urban communities continue to face formidable historic challenges to improving public health. However, reinvestment initiatives, changing demographics, and growth in urban areas are creating changes that offer new opportunities for improving health while requiring that health systems be adapted to residents' health needs. This commentary suggests that health care improvement in metropolitan areas will require setting local, state, and national agendas around 3 priorities. First, health care must reorient around powerful population dynamics, in particular, cultural diversity, growing numbers of elderly, those in welfare-workplace transition, and those unable to negotiate an increasingly complex health system. Second, communities and governments must assess the consequences of health professional shortages, safety net provider closures and conversions, and new marketplace pressures in terms of their effects on access to care for vulnerable urban populations; they must also weigh the potential value of emerging models for improving those populations' care. Finally, governments at all levels should use their influence through accreditation, standards, tobacco settlements, and other financing streams to educate and guide urban providers in directions that respond to urban communities' health care needs. PMID:10846501

  11. Community, service, and policy strategies to improve health care access in the changing urban environment.

    PubMed Central

    Andrulis, D P

    2000-01-01

    Urban communities continue to face formidable historic challenges to improving public health. However, reinvestment initiatives, changing demographics, and growth in urban areas are creating changes that offer new opportunities for improving health while requiring that health systems be adapted to residents' health needs. This commentary suggests that health care improvement in metropolitan areas will require setting local, state, and national agendas around 3 priorities. First, health care must reorient around powerful population dynamics, in particular, cultural diversity, growing numbers of elderly, those in welfare-workplace transition, and those unable to negotiate an increasingly complex health system. Second, communities and governments must assess the consequences of health professional shortages, safety net provider closures and conversions, and new marketplace pressures in terms of their effects on access to care for vulnerable urban populations; they must also weigh the potential value of emerging models for improving those populations' care. Finally, governments at all levels should use their influence through accreditation, standards, tobacco settlements, and other financing streams to educate and guide urban providers in directions that respond to urban communities' health care needs. PMID:10846501

  12. Atypical crusted "Norwegian" scabies: report of nosocomial transmission in a community hospital and an approach to control.

    PubMed

    Lerche, N W; Currier, R W; Juranek, D D; Baer, W; Dubay, N J

    1983-06-01

    During August, 1981, a person with an unrecognized case of atypical Norwegian scabies was admitted to a community hospital in Chariton, Iowa. Twenty cases of symptomatic scabies were reported among hospital staff; mites were recovered from four. Subsequent evaluation confirmed scabies transmission to family and friends of this patient before hospitalization; twelve cases of symptomatic scabies, three of them slide positive, were identified in this group. The patient was treated sequentially with 1 percent lindane lotion, 10 percent crotamiton lotion, and 6 percent sulfur ointment to successfully eradicate the infestation. Secondary cases in the hospital and community were treated with 10 percent crotamiton which also was used to prophylactically treat exposed contacts. Control measures and patient management are presented.

  13. Community spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria detected in social insurance hospitals throughout Japan.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Mayumi; Komatsu, Masaru; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Maeda, Misaho; Uchida, Takae; Yonezawa, Hitoshi; Inagaki, Kenji; Omi, Ayako; Matsumoto, Hidenobu; Murotani, Makiko; Iwamoto, Tsukasa; Kodaka, Yoshihiro; Kieda, Hideto; Tokiwa, Manabu; Masuwa, Bunji; Kinoshita, Mari; Saito, Kazuei; Katou, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    We surveyed the status of community-acquired infections involving four extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Proteus mirabilis) isolated from clinical specimens from 11 social insurance hospitals in Japan in 2012. These are member hospitals of the Japan Community Healthcare Organization, an independent administrative hospital organization. The isolation rates for E. coli, K. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, and P. mirabilis were 14.0% (165/1176), 3.3% (16/480), 3.1% (4/130), and 15.9% (17/107), respectively. The CTX-M-9 group, the most frequently detected genotype, was found in 77.0% (127/165) of E. coli and 43.8% (7/16) of K. pneumoniae isolates. Among K. oxytoca isolates, 75% (3/4) were the CTX-M-1 group, and all 17 P. mirabilis strains were the CTX-M-2 group. ESBL-producing bacteria isolation rates in each hospital ranged from 5.8% to 21.5% (median 9.5%), and the proportion of community-acquired infections among ESBL-producing bacteria isolates ranged from 1.6% to 30.8% (median 11.4%) in each hospital. Overall, the rates of ESBL-producing bacterial infection in all community-acquired infections and in all hospital infections were 10.6% (115/1081) and 10.7% (87/812), respectively. The ESBL-producing bacteria are not limited to certain regions or hospitals but are spreading in communities throughout Japan.

  14. Access to Global Land Cover Reference Datasets and Their Suitability for Different User Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsendbazar, N. E.; Mora, B.; de Bruin, S.; Herold, M.

    2014-12-01

    Global land cover (GLC) maps and their validation can provide important information to different user communities. As an Essential Climate Variables, land cover observations can be used by climate modelling, forest resource and biodiversity assessments and so on. These applications have varying requirements for GLC maps. To date, several global land cover reference (GLCR) datasets have been produced and used for production and validation of specific maps. Despite significant efforts put into generating them, their availability and role in applications outside their intended use have been very limited. We analysed the suitability of GLCR datasets for a range of GLC validation applications. The potential use of GLCR datasets were assessed for main user communities such as the Climate modelling, Global forest change analysts, the GEO community of practice for agricultural monitoring and GLC map producers. We assessed 12 GLCR datasets using sets of criteria reflecting the main user requirements on the sampling, thematic and spatio-temporal detail, and quality. The analysis revealed the dataset suitability is highly dependent on specific applications by the user communities. The LC-CCI, GOFC-GOLD, FAO-FRA and Geo-Wiki datasets had the broadest applicability for multiple uses. Furthermore, we present the reference data portal from the GOFC-GOLD Land-Cover Project Office. This portal, currently under development, not only aims to make available GLCR datasets freely accessible but it will also guide the user to the most suitable dataset based on their specific needs. This portal intends to advocate also the use of best practices for the validation of land cover maps, following the recommendations from the CEOS. We present some GLCR datasets that are available on the portal (e.g. GLC2000, STEP, VIIRS). This portal will enhance the re-usability of the GLCR datasets greatly by making them available in an expert framework with a guide on proper usage for specific applications.

  15. Capital access.

    PubMed

    Towne, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    To maintain their viability, hospitals are being compelled to invest in big capital projects such as information technology and renovation and construction. This gatefold examines the trends in credit and capital, and how they affect hospitals' access to money.

  16. YouthAccess to Alcohol: early findings from a community action project to reduce the supply of alcohol to teens.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sam

    2007-01-01

    The Youth Access to Alcohol (YATA) project was implemented in 2002 by the Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand (ALAC) in thirty communities in New Zealand, with the aim of reducing the harm experienced by young people as a result of alcohol misuse in New Zealand through reducing the supply of alcohol by adults to young people. The communities include a mix of rural and urban from both Islands in New Zealand. The project uses a community action approach, which has included setting up collaborative partnerships of key agencies, the delivery of key strategies, and multimedia awareness raising campaigns. The communities are encouraged to identify unique issues in their community regarding alcohol abuse and young people and to develop action plans incorporating a range of strategies that include tested strategies as well as innovative ideas. Communities are trained to implement several tools to monitor changes in their community over time. The study's limitations are noted and future needed research is suggested. PMID:18075928

  17. The barriers to accessing primary care resulting in hospital presentation for exacerbation of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a large teaching hospital in London.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Marium; Khachi, Hasanin

    2016-08-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) account direct costs of £1 billion each per year in the United Kingdom (UK). A national review of asthma deaths found that a significant proportion of patients die without seeking medical assistance or before emergency medical care could be provided. This study aims to establish the pathway that patients undertake to access care in the lead up to an accident and emergency (A&E) attendance and/or inpatient admission. Patients attending A&E and/or following an inpatient admission due to an exacerbation of asthma or COPD were reviewed by a specialist respiratory pharmacist during weekday working hours. Over a one-year period, 920 (224 asthma and 696 COPD) presentations for exacerbation of asthma and COPD were reviewed. Although the majority of the patients were registered with a general practitioner (GP), less than 50% received medical attention from their GP and/or had an active intervention prior to presenting to hospital. These findings correlate with those found in the national review of asthma deaths. At a time of increasing demands on healthcare resources, these results pose the question of how we can better triage patients to appropriate care settings to minimise unscheduled care and improve patient outcomes. PMID:27492527

  18. Differential phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of qnrS1-harboring plasmids carried by hospital and community commensal enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Vien, Le Thi Minh; Abuoun, Manal; Morrison, Victoria; Thomson, Nicholas; Campbell, James I; Woodward, Martin J; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance; Baker, Stephen

    2011-04-01

    The qnrS1 gene induces reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones in enterobacteria. We investigated the structure, antimicrobial susceptibility phenotype, and antimicrobial resistance gene characteristics of qnrS1 plasmids from hospitalized patients and community controls in southern Vietnam. We found that the antimicrobial susceptibilities, resistance gene characteristics, and plasmid structures of qnrS1 plasmids from the hospital differed from those from the community. Our data imply that the characteristics of the two plasmid groups are indicative of distinct selective pressures in the differing environments. PMID:21282449

  19. 42 CFR 412.109 - Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... located outside any area that is a Metropolitan Statistical Area as defined by the Office of Management... 405, subpart R of this chapter, including the time limits for filing requests for hearings...

  20. Getting published in an academic-community hospital: the success of writing groups.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Deitrick, Lynn; Mahady, Erica T; Moser, Kathleen; Gertner, Eric J; Sabino, Judith N

    2012-01-01

    Expressed barriers to writing for publication include lack of time, competing demands, anxiety about writing and a lack of knowledge about the submission process. These limitations can be magnified for practitioners in non-university environments in which there are fewer incentives or expectations regarding academic publication productivity. However, as members of professional disciplines, practitioners have both the responsibility and, oftentimes, the insights to make valuable contributions to the professional literature. Collaborative writing groups can be a useful intervention to overcome barriers, provide the necessary skills and encouragement as well as produce publications and conference presentations that make worthy additions to the professional body of knowledge. This article discusses the evolution and outcomes of writing groups at Lehigh Valley Health Network and describes how this strategy can be adopted by other academic community hospitals to promote professional development and publication. PMID:21922155

  1. Partners advancing clinical excellence: building professional councils for quality improvement at six community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sakowski, Julie Ann; Hooper, Lynda; Holton, Thomas; Brody, Abraham A

    2012-01-01

    Engaging bedside clinicians, especially nurses, is essential for the success of sustainable process improvement programs and thus for improving the quality of health care. Studies have shown that properly implemented professional councils can be effective in engaging and empowering bedside clinicians to create lasting and meaningful improvements. This case study describes a 5-year program to implement and operate staff-led councils to lead evidence-based practice (EBP) quality improvement initiatives at 6 community hospitals. The outcomes presented in this case study demonstrate that staff-led councils have the potential to improve patient safety and quality of care as evidenced by observed reductions in ventilator-associated pneumonias, central line-associated bloodstream infections, and mortality from acute myocardial infarction and severe sepsis.

  2. Getting published in an academic-community hospital: the success of writing groups.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Deitrick, Lynn; Mahady, Erica T; Moser, Kathleen; Gertner, Eric J; Sabino, Judith N

    2012-01-01

    Expressed barriers to writing for publication include lack of time, competing demands, anxiety about writing and a lack of knowledge about the submission process. These limitations can be magnified for practitioners in non-university environments in which there are fewer incentives or expectations regarding academic publication productivity. However, as members of professional disciplines, practitioners have both the responsibility and, oftentimes, the insights to make valuable contributions to the professional literature. Collaborative writing groups can be a useful intervention to overcome barriers, provide the necessary skills and encouragement as well as produce publications and conference presentations that make worthy additions to the professional body of knowledge. This article discusses the evolution and outcomes of writing groups at Lehigh Valley Health Network and describes how this strategy can be adopted by other academic community hospitals to promote professional development and publication.

  3. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) mutants in the community and hospitals in Oxfordshire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcal protein A (spa) is an important virulence factor which enables Staphylococcus aureus to evade host immune responses. Genotypes known as “spa-types”, based on highly variable Xr region sequences of the spa-gene, are frequently used to classify strains. A weakness of current spa-typing primers is that rearrangements in the IgG-binding region of the gene cause 1-2% of strains to be designated as “non-typeable”. Results We developed an improved primer which enabled sequencing of all strains, containing any type of genetic rearrangement, in a large study among community carriers and hospital inpatients in Oxfordshire, UK (6110 isolates). We identified eight novel spa-gene variants, plus one previously described. Three of these rearrangements would be designated “non-typeable” using current spa-typing methods; they occurred in 1.8% (72/3905) asymptomatically carried and 0.6% (14/2205) inpatient S. aureus strains. Some individuals were simultaneously colonized by both formerly non-typeable and typeable strains; previously such patients would have been identified as carrying only currently typeable strains, underestimating mixed carriage prevalence and diversity. Formerly non-typeable strains were found in more spa-types associated with multilocus sequence type ST398 (35%), common among livestock, compared to other groups with any non-typeable strains (1-4%), suggesting particular spa-types may have been under-represented in previous human studies. Conclusions This improved method allows us to spa-type previously non-typeable strains with rearrangements in the spa-gene and to resolve cases of mixed colonization with deletions in one or more strains, thus accounting for hidden diversity of S. aureus in both community and hospital environments. PMID:24621342

  4. Early surgery for hospital-acquired and community-acquired active infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hirai, Hidekazu; Fukui, Toshihiro; Hosono, Mitsuharu; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2007-06-01

    Active infective endocarditis (IE) is classified into two groups; hospital acquired IE (HIE) and IE other than HIE, which was defined as community-acquired IE (CIE). Eighty-two patients underwent surgical treatment for active IE. Seventy-one cases were CIE group and eleven were HIE. There were six patients with native valve endocarditis and five cases of prosthetic valve endocarditis in the HIE group. We compared the surgical outcome of both types of active IE retrospectively. The preoperative status of the patients in the HIE group was more critical than that in the CIE group. Streptococcus spp. were the major micro-organisms in the CIE group (39%), while 82% of the HIE cases were caused by Staphylococcus spp. All Staphylococcus organisms in the HIE group were methicillin resistant. There were 10 hospital deaths, three in the CIE group and seven in the HIE group. Operative mortality in the HIE group was significantly higher than in the CIE group (63.6% vs. 4.2%, P<0.001). The outcome of early operation was satisfactory for active CIE, but poor for HIE. These types of active IE should be considered separately.

  5. Gender, sexuality and the discursive representation of access and equity in health services literature: implications for LGBT communities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This article considers how health services access and equity documents represent the problem of access to health services and what the effects of that representation might be for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) communities. We conducted a critical discourse analysis on selected access and equity documents using a gender-based diversity framework as determined by two objectives: 1) to identify dominant and counter discourses in health services access and equity literature; and 2) to develop understanding of how particular discourses impact the inclusion, or not, of LGBT communities in health services access and equity frameworks.The analysis was conducted in response to public health and clinical research that has documented barriers to health services access for LGBT communities including institutionalized heterosexism, biphobia, and transphobia, invisibility and lack of health provider knowledge and comfort. The analysis was also conducted as the first step of exploring LGBT access issues in home care services for LGBT populations in Ontario, Canada. Methods A critical discourse analysis of selected health services access and equity documents, using a gender-based diversity framework, was conducted to offer insight into dominant and counter discourses underlying health services access and equity initiatives. Results A continuum of five discourses that characterize the health services access and equity literature were identified including two dominant discourses: 1) multicultural discourse, and 2) diversity discourse; and three counter discourses: 3) social determinants of health (SDOH) discourse; 4) anti-oppression (AOP) discourse; and 5) citizen/social rights discourse. Conclusions The analysis offers a continuum of dominant and counter discourses on health services access and equity as determined from a gender-based diversity perspective. The continuum of discourses offers a framework to identify and redress organizational assumptions

  6. Food access and cost in American Indian communities in Washington State.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Meghan; Buchwald, Dedra S; Duncan, Glen E

    2011-09-01

    Limited access to foods that make up a nutritious diet at minimal cost may influence eating behaviors and, ultimately, obesity. This study examined the number and type of food stores (convenience, grocery, supermarket) on federal reservations in Washington State, and the availability and cost of foods in the US Department of Agriculture Community Food Security Assessment Toolkit market basket, to describe the food environment of American Indians. Stores were identified by telephone survey of tribal headquarters, a commercial database, and on-site visitation. Foods were assessed using a standardized instrument containing 68 items in seven major food groups during April and May 2009. Store type and availability and cost of foods were recorded on a checklist. Fifty stores were identified on 22 American Indian reservations, including 25 convenience, 16 grocery, and 9 supermarkets. Across all stores, about 38% of checklist items were available, with supermarkets having the most and convenience stores the fewest. Foods from the dairy and sugars/sweets groups were the most prevalent, while fresh fruits/vegetables were the least. Cost of the most commonly available items was lowest in supermarkets. Seventeen reservations did not have a supermarket on their reservation, and the nearest off-reservation supermarket was about 10 miles from the tribe's headquarters, which was used as the standard for distance calculations. These results demonstrate that American Indians living on federal reservations in Washington State may have limited access to foods that make up a nutritious diet at minimal cost.

  7. Opening Doors to the Seismic Data Community: IRIS Developments for Seamless Data Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahern, T.; Casey, R.; Kamb, L.; Laughbon, C.; Muench, J.; Schoch, S.

    2006-05-01

    For the past five years, IRIS has enabled programmatic access to seismological databases worldwide through a data service technology called the Data Handling Interface (DHI). Basing the DHI on industry-standard CORBA technology has allowed a number of client programs to be developed in Java, Matlab and C/C++ which can access data from 6 regional and 2 global-area seismic data centers. More recently, the commonly used program SAC (Seismic Analysis Code) has been updated to interface with DHI, bringing seamless data access and powerful analysis tools together. In addition, noting the maturation of web services into an accepted data service technology, IRIS has developed a prototype web service version of the DHI using the SOAP protocol. As work continues in refining and expanding the utility of DHI, IRIS is also developing a searchable data product repository to allow registered data producers from locations across the globe to make their products available to the community. Here, scientists will be able to discover a myriad of data sources through a single web-service-oriented interface, searching via both common geographic and time-oriented attributes as well as product-specific metadata attributes. A facility for packaging and downloading these products is also being provided. As we move forward towards fully developing a service-oriented architecture (SOA) for IRIS data sources and facilities, we are creating software to allow data discovery and workflow computing to be at anyone's fingertips. Web service and portlet technologies allow easy incorporation of IRIS tools and data into research programs, educational websites and government planning. Data conversion and presentation are also concepts that are being explored in this growing field of cyberinfrastructure development.

  8. 42 CFR 413.124 - Reduction to hospital outpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reduction to hospital outpatient operating costs... Specific Categories of Costs § 413.124 Reduction to hospital outpatient operating costs. (a) Except for sole community hospitals, as defined in § 412.92 of this chapter, and critical access hospitals,...

  9. [Evidence-based pharmacology in community and hospital pharmacies--a vision of the future?].

    PubMed

    Eisert, Albrecht; Günther, Judith

    2003-07-01

    Pharmacists are academically trained drug and medication specialists. Also in the eyes of the law, pharmacists are more than just specialised sales people for medication. As laid out in the regulations governing pharmacies, pharmacists see patients and experts in the fields of medicine, dentistry and veterinary science to whom they have to offer advice. The pharmacist's advisory activities, though, must not interfere with an existing doctor-patient relationship. All pharmaceutical activities in community and hospital pharmacies should therefore be based--similar to the medical faculty--on an evidence-based practice in the sense of an evidence-based pharmacy adopting all principles of Evidence-based Medicine. The challenge for pharmacists and doctors should therefore be to work together to increasingly develop common strategies in order to achieve optimal treatment for the benefit of the patient. Especially in the treatment of chronically ill patients, synergistic effects could be reached through open exchange and a closer linkage between medical and pharmaceutical activities. Such closer contacts between the two disciplines could be made at interdisciplinary colloquia or special subject-specific round table discussions. Pharmaceutical Care (PhC), i.e. the optimisation of medicational therapy of chronically ill patients through accompanying intensive pharmaceutical advice is desirable from the patient's point of view and could take some load off medical practitioners. Any questions as to the use of medication, potential side-effects or undesirable interaction with other medications, but also regarding additional preventive measures can be posed to qualified personnel by the patient collecting his/her medication in the pharmacy. Also, as community pharmacists see themselves as active medication specialists and valuable qualified advisors to the patient with regard of self-medication, increased investment in internal communication between colleagues and external

  10. Evaluation of Dabigatran for Appropriateness of Use and Bleeding Events in a Community Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Anastasia L.; Buehler, Katie S.; Min, Sun H.; Riley, Margaret; Daly, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Warfarin has been the predominant anticoagulant for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Its disadvantages are well-known and include a narrow therapeutic index, drug interactions, and the need for frequent monitoring. Dabigatran etexilate, a direct thrombin inhibitor, presents less complexity in prescribing and has emerged as an alternate therapy to warfarin. Although dabigatran does not require routine monitoring, concerns associated with its use include the lack of a reversal agent, complex dose adjustments, and limited guidance to the management of drug interactions. Objectives The goals of this study are to describe and to evaluate the use of dabigatran at a community hospital to identify areas for improvement in its prescribing. Methods This retrospective chart review of patients at a community hospital in St Louis, MO, included patients who received at least 1 dose of dabigatran between December 2010 and June 2012. The appropriateness of dabigatran was evaluated based on recommendations approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for stroke prophylaxis in the setting of NVAF. The composite end point of bleeding included hospital readmission within 1 year of receiving at least 1 dose of dabigatran at the study institution secondary to bleeding, bleeding associated with a decrease in hemoglobin level by ≥2 g/dL or transfusion of ≥2 units of blood, or a notation of bleeding in the patient's medical record. Results Of the 458 patients included in the evaluation, 76 (16.6%) patients receiving dabigatran were using an inappropriate regimen of this drug, based on dose and frequency on the first day of therapy of dabigatran or the presence of valvular disease. Many patients (42.3%) received at least 1 dose of a concomitant parenteral anticoagulant. The composite end point for bleeding was reported in 66 (14.4%) patients, including 23 (5%) with confirmed gastrointestinal bleeding

  11. Sources of tobacco for youths in communities with strong enforcement of youth access laws

    PubMed Central

    DiFranza, J.; Coleman, M.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To determine how youths obtain tobacco in communities with strong enforcement of tobacco sales laws.
SETTING—Ten communities in Massachusetts with merchant compliance rates at or above 90%.
METHODS—Paper surveys and focus group discussions with 68 adolescent smokers.
RESULTS—Parents and friends are the primary sources of tobacco for new smokers. When stealing from parents can no longer satisfy the need for cigarettes, young adolescents ask strangers to buy them tobacco. For high school age smokers, teenage store clerks are a major source. Teenage clerks sell to other teenagers, steal tobacco, and help their friends steal from their employers. Friends who are 18 years of age or over are a second major source for older adolescents. Parents often purchase tobacco for older adolescents.
CONCLUSION—Recommended actions include raising the minimum age for the purchase of tobacco to 21 years, and prohibiting individuals less than 21 years of age from selling tobacco.


Keywords: youth; youth access laws PMID:11740022

  12. Developing an agenda for research about policies to improve access to healthy foods in rural communities: a concept mapping study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Policies that improve access to healthy, affordable foods may improve population health and reduce health disparities. In the United States most food access policy research focuses on urban communities even though residents of rural communities face disproportionately higher risk for nutrition-related chronic diseases compared to residents of urban communities. The purpose of this study was to (1) identify the factors associated with access to healthy, affordable food in rural communities in the United States; and (2) prioritize a meaningful and feasible rural food policy research agenda. Methods This study was conducted by the Rural Food Access Workgroup (RFAWG), a workgroup facilitated by the Nutrition and Obesity Policy Research and Evaluation Network. A national sample of academic and non-academic researchers, public health and cooperative extension practitioners, and other experts who focus on rural food access and economic development was invited to complete a concept mapping process that included brainstorming the factors that are associated with rural food access, sorting and organizing the factors into similar domains, and rating the importance of policies and research to address these factors. As a last step, RFAWG members convened to interpret the data and establish research recommendations. Results Seventy-five participants in the brainstorming exercise represented the following sectors: non-extension research (n = 27), non-extension program administration (n = 18), “other” (n = 14), policy advocacy (n = 10), and cooperative extension service (n = 6). The brainstorming exercise generated 90 distinct statements about factors associated with rural food access in the United States; these were sorted into 5 clusters. Go Zones were established for the factors that were rated highly as both a priority policy target and a priority for research. The highest ranked policy and research priorities include strategies designed to

  13. Integrating Rapid Diagnostics and Antimicrobial Stewardship in Two Community Hospitals Improved Process Measures and Antibiotic Adjustment Time.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Ashley M; Perez, Katherine K; Musick, William L; Ikwuagwu, Judy O; Attia, Engie; Fasoranti, Oyejoke O; Cernoch, Patricia L; Olsen, Randall J; Musser, James M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the impact of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for rapid pathogen identification directly from early-positive blood cultures coupled with an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) in two community hospitals. Process measures and outcomes prior and after implementation of MALDI-TOF/ASP were evaluated. DESIGN Multicenter retrospective study. SETTING Two community hospitals in a system setting, Houston Methodist (HM) Sugar Land Hospital (235 beds) or HM Willowbrook Hospital (241 beds). PATIENTS Patients ≥ 18 years of age with culture-proven Gram-negative bacteremia. INTERVENTION Blood cultures from both hospitals were sent to and processed at our central microbiology laboratory. Clinical pharmacists at respective hospitals were notified of pathogen ID and susceptibility results. RESULTS We evaluated 572 patients for possible inclusion. After pre-defined exclusion criteria, 151 patients were included in the pre-intervention group and 242 were included in the intervention group. After MALDI-TOF/ASP implementation, the mean identification time after culture positivity was significantly reduced from 32 hours (±16 hours) to 6.5 hours (±5.4 hours) (P<.001); mean time to susceptibility results was significantly reduced from 48 (±22) hours to 23 (±14) hours (P<.001); and time to therapy adjustment was significantly reduced from 75 (±59) hours to 30 (±30) hours (P<.001). Mean hospital costs per patient were $3,411 less in the intervention group compared with the pre-intervention group ($18,645 vs $15,234; P=.04). CONCLUSION This study is the first to analyze the impact of MALDI-TOF coupled with an ASP in a community hospital setting. Time to results significantly differed with the use of MALDI-TOF, and time to appropriate therapy was significantly improved with the addition of ASP. PMID:26738993

  14. Community pharmacist–administered influenza immunization improves patient access to vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Folkins, Chris; Li, Wilson; Zervas, John

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the demographic characteristics and risk factors of patients receiving influenza vaccination in community pharmacies and to understand patient experiences and perceptions surrounding being vaccinated by a pharmacist. Methods: Survey data were collected by research pharmacists at 4 different community pharmacy locations in Toronto throughout a period of 8 weeks during October and November 2013. Participation in the survey was voluntary, and all patients vaccinated by pharmacists were invited to complete a survey following immunization. Results: During the course of the study, 2498 vaccine doses were administered among all study sites, and 1502 surveys were completed. Our data showed a high degree of patient satisfaction, with 92% of patients indicating they were very satisfied with the pharmacist’s injection technique and the services they received. Furthermore, 86% of patients were very comfortable with being vaccinated by a pharmacist, and 99% of patients reported they would recommend that friends and family be vaccinated by a pharmacist. Convenience and accessibility were major determinants of patient satisfaction, as shown by 46% of all written comments specifically addressing these factors. Of the patients surveyed, 25% were not regular annual vaccine recipients, and 47% were classified as being at high risk for influenza complications according to Public Health Agency of Canada criteria. Notably, 28% of total patients and 21% of high-risk patients reported that they would not have been immunized this year if pharmacy-based vaccination were not available. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that pharmacists provide a highly convenient and accessible option for seasonal flu vaccination that is viewed favourably by patients. Administration of the flu vaccine by pharmacists has the potential to positively affect public health by improving vaccination rates among high-risk patients, first-time or occasional vaccine recipients, and patients

  15. MY NASA DATA: Making Earth Science Data Accessible to the K-12 Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Alston, E. J.; Diones, D. D.; Moore, S. W.; Oots, P. C.; Phelps, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    In 2004, the Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and Earth science for Teachers and Amateurs (MY NASA DATA) project began. The goal of this project is to enable K-12 and citizen science communities to make use of the large volume of Earth System Science data that NASA has collected and archived. One major outcome is to allow students to select a problem of real-life importance, and to explore it using high quality data sources without spending months looking for and then learning how to use a dataset. The key element of the MY NASA DATA project is the implementation of a Live Access Server (LAS). The LAS is an open source software tool, developed by NOAA, that provides access to a variety of data sources through a single, fairly simple, point- and- click interface. This tool truly enables use of the available data - more than 100 parameters are offered so far - in an inquiry-based educational setting. It readily gives students the opportunity to browse images for times and places they define, and also provides direct access to the underlying data values - a key feature of this educational effort. The team quickly discovered, however, that even a simple and fairly intuitive tool is not enough to make most teachers comfortable with data exploration. User feedback has led us to create a friendly LAS Introduction page, which uses the analogy of a restaurant to explain to our audience the basic concept of an LAS. In addition, we have created a "Time Coverage at a Glance" chart to show what data are available when. This keeps our audience from being too confused by the patchwork of data availability caused by the start and end of individual missions. Finally, we have found it necessary to develop a substantial amount of age appropriate documentation, including topical pages and a science glossary, to help our audience understand the parameters they are exploring and how these parameters fit into the larger picture of Earth System Science. MY NASA DATA

  16. Fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of salivary gland disorders in the community hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Pitts, D B; Hilsinger, R L; Karandy, E; Ross, J C; Caro, J E

    1992-05-01

    From 1983 to 1988, 47 patients with salivary gland disorders were assessed with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) before surgery. The preoperative fine-needle diagnoses were then compared with the postoperative pathologic findings. In the same period, 63 patients from two other community hospitals who had been evaluated preoperatively with FNA were studied retrospectively. The overall sensitivity of FNA for salivary neoplasms was 80.6%. Fine-needle aspiration was more sensitive in identifying benign tumors (88.4%) than malignant neoplasms (58.3%) and was least sensitive in identifying nonneoplastic salivary diseases (35.3%). Pleomorphic adenomas were correctly identified preoperatively in 96.2% of cases, whereas for malignant neoplasms, the diagnostic accuracy was highest for mucoepidermoid carcinoma (50%). To demonstrate the strengths of FNA as a diagnostic tool, as well as to delineate its limitations, we present our 5-year experience. Our FNA results are similar to those reported by the major European and American referral centers. Because our medical centers are community based, our results may more accurately reflect those seen by otolaryngologists in private practice. To date, no evidence of tumor seeding along the FNA tract has been reported.

  17. Medication safety program reduces adverse drug events in a community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, M; Kimmel, N; Benage, M; Cox, M; Sanders, N; Spence, D; Chen, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is widespread interest in improving medication safety, particularly in the hospital setting. Numerous suggestions have been made as to how this should be done, but there is a paucity of data demonstrating the effectiveness of any of the interventions that have been proposed. Objectives: To assess the impact of a wide ranging, community hospital based patient safety program on patient harm as measured by the rate of adverse drug events. Design: An audit of discharged hospital patients was conducted from January 2001 to December 2003. Baseline data were collected for the first 6 months and multiple drug protocols and other interventions were instituted on the nursing units and in the pharmacy department over the subsequent 9 months (transition period). These interventions were largely based on information about medication risks acquired from internal medication event reporting. Each month of the study adverse drug events (ADE) were sought from a random sample of inpatient charts. A trigger tool was used to detect clues to ADEs, the presence of which was confirmed or excluded by detailed manual chart review. The severity of these events was categorized using the classification system of the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error and Reporting and Prevention. Main outcome measures and results: Median ADEs per 1000 doses of medication dispensed declined significantly from 2.04 to 0.65 (p<0.001). Median ADEs per 100 patient days declined significantly from 5.07 to 1.30 (p<0.001). The proportion of inpatients with one or more ADE in the baseline period was 31% and declined threefold (p<0.001). The severity of reported medication events also declined. The number of ADEs associated conclusively with patient harm was 1.67 per total doses delivered in the baseline period and declined eightfold (p<0.001). Conclusion: The implementation of a carefully planned series of low cost interventions focused on high risk medications, driven by information

  18. Increasing access to modern contraceptives: the potential role of community solidarity through altruistic contributions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for universal access to modern contraceptives in Nigeria, to facilitate the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and other national goals. This study provides information on the potential role of community solidarity in increasing access to contraceptives for the most-poor people through exploration of the role of altruism by determining level of altruistic willingness to pay (WTP) for modern contraceptives across different geographic contexts in Nigeria. Methods It was a cross-sectional national survey which took place in six states spread across the six-geopolitical zones of the country. In each state, an urban and a rural area were selected for the study, giving a total of 6 urban and 6 rural sites. A pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from at least 720 randomly selected householders from each state. The targeted respondent in a household was a female primary care giver of child bearing age (usually the wives), or in her absence, another female household member of child bearing age. A scenario on altruistic WTP was presented before the value was elicited using a binary with open-ended follow-up question format. Test of validity of elicited altruistic WTP was undertaken using Tobit regression. Findings More than 50 % of the respondents across all the states were willing to contribute some money so that the very poor would be provided with modern contraceptives. The average amount of money that people were willing to contribute annually was 650 Naira (US$4.5). Mean altruistic WTP differed across SES quintiles and urban-rural divide (p < .01). Multiple regression analysis showed that age was negatively related to altruistic WTP (p < 0.05). However, years of schooling, being employed by government or being a big business person, prior experience of paying for contraceptives and socioeconomic status had statistically significant effects on altruistic WTP (p < 0

  19. Evolution of the Data Access Protocol in Response to Community Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J.; Caron, J. L.; Davis, E.; Fulker, D.; Heimbigner, D.; Holloway, D.; Howe, B.; Moe, S.; Potter, N.

    2012-12-01

    Under the aegis of the OPULS (OPeNDAP-Unidata Linked Servers) Project, funded by NOAA, version 2 of OPeNDAP's Data Access Protocol (DAP2) is being updated to version 4. DAP4 is the first major upgrade in almost two decades and will embody three main areas of advancement. First, the data-model extensions developed by the OPULS team focus on three areas: Better support for coverages, access to HDF5 files and access to relational databases. DAP2 support for coverages (defined as a sampled functions) was limited to simple rectangular coverages that work well for (some) model outputs and processed satellite data but that cannot represent trajectories or satellite swath data, for example. We have extended the coverage concept in DAP4 to remove these limitations. These changes are informed by work at Unidata on the Common Data Model and also by the OGC's abstract coverages specification. In a similar vein, we have extended DAP2's support for relations by including the concept of foreign keys, so that tables can be explicitly related to one another. Second, the web interfaces - web services - that provides access to data using via DAP will be more clearly defined and use other (, orthogonal), standards where they are appropriate. An important case is the XML interface, which provides a cleaner way to build other response media types such as JSON and RDF (for metadata) and to build support for Atom, thus simplify the integration of DAP servers with tools that support OpenSearch. Input from the ESIP federation and work performed with IOOS have informed our choices here. Last, DAP4-compliant servers will support richer data-processing capabilities than DAP2, enabling a wider array of server functions that manipulate data before returning values. Two projects currently are exploring just what can be done even with DAP2's server-function model: The MIIC project at LARC and OPULS itself (with work performed at the University of Washington). Both projects have demonstrated that

  20. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412...'s last cost reporting period ending before September 30, 2007 is for less than 12 months, the base... 1, 2005 and before October 1, 2006, that cost reporting period is the base period unless the...

  1. Guidelines for Libraries Serving Hospital Patients and Disabled People in the Community. IFLA Professional Reports, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    These guidelines are based on the experiences of a number of librarians working in the area of library services for hospital patients and disabled people in the community, as well as work done previously by a number of national library associations. The guidelines indicate the essential features of services to disabled people and suggest…

  2. Healthcare-associated, community-acquired and hospital-acquired bacteraemic urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients: a prospective multicentre cohort study in the era of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Horcajada, J P; Shaw, E; Padilla, B; Pintado, V; Calbo, E; Benito, N; Gamallo, R; Gozalo, M; Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2013-10-01

    The clinical and microbiological characteristics of community-onset healthcare-associated (HCA) bacteraemia of urinary source are not well defined. We conducted a prospective cohort study at eight tertiary-care hospitals in Spain, from October 2010 to June 2011. All consecutive adult patients hospitalized with bacteraemic urinary tract infection (BUTI) were included. HCA-BUTI episodes were compared with community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) BUTI. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify 30-day mortality risk factors. We included 667 episodes of BUTI (246 HCA, 279 CA and 142 HA). Differences between HCA-BUTI and CA-BUTI were female gender (40% vs 69%, p <0.001), McCabe score II-III (48% vs 14%, p <0.001), Pitt score ≥2 (40% vs 31%, p 0.03), isolation of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaciae (13% vs 5%, p <0.001), median hospital stay (9 vs 7 days, p 0.03), inappropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy (21% vs 13%, p 0.02) and mortality (11.4% vs 3.9%, p 0.001). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was more frequently isolated in HA-BUTI (16%) than in HCA-BUTI (4%, p <0.001). Independent factors for mortality were age (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01-1.07), McCabe score II-III (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.8-5.5), Pitt score ≥2 (OR 3.2 (1.8-5.5) and HA-BUTI OR 3.4 (1.2-9.0)). Patients with HCA-BUTI are a specific group with significant clinical and microbiological differences from patients with CA-BUTI, and some similarities with patients with HA-BUTI. Mortality was associated with patient condition, the severity of infection and hospital acquisition.

  3. What Rural Women Want the Public Health Community to Know About Access to Healthful Food: A Qualitative Study, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Kristine; Peacock, Nadine R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Living in a rural food desert has been linked to poor dietary habits. Understanding community perspectives about available resources and feasible solutions may inform strategies to improve food access in rural food deserts. The objective of our study was to identify resources and solutions to the food access problems of women in rural, southernmost Illinois. Methods Fourteen focus groups with women (n = 110 participants) in 4 age groups were conducted in a 7-county region as part of a community assessment focused on women’s health. We used content analysis with inductive and deductive approaches to explore food access barriers and facilitators. Results Similar to participants in previous studies, participants in our study reported insufficient local food sources, which they believe contributed to poor dietary habits, high food prices, and the need to travel for healthful food. Participants identified existing local activities and resources that help to increase access, such as home and community gardens, food pantries, and public transportation, as well as local solutions, such as improving nutrition education and public transportation options. Conclusion Multilevel and collaborative strategies and policies are needed to address food access barriers in rural communities. At the individual level, education may help residents navigate geographic and economic barriers. Community solutions include collaborative strategies to increase availability of healthful foods through traditional and nontraditional food sources. Policy change is needed to promote local agriculture and distribution of privately grown food. Understanding needs and strengths in rural communities will ensure responsive and effective strategies to improve the rural food environment. PMID:27126555

  4. What Is the Impact of Health Reforms on Uncompensated Care in Critical Access Hospitals? A 5-Year Forecast in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Joseph; Fry, Benjamin; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Gary; Short, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Context: The 2008 financial crisis had a far-reaching impact on nearly every sector of the economy. As unemployment increased so did the uninsured. Already operating on a slim margin and poor payer mix, many critical access hospitals are facing a tough road ahead. Purpose: We seek to examine the increasing impact of uncompensated care on the…

  5. Access to alcohol and heart disease among patients in hospital: observational cohort study using differences in alcohol sales laws

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, Jonathan W; Dewland, Thomas A; Vittinghoff, Eric; Olgin, Jeffrey E; Pletcher, Mark J; Hahn, Judith A; Gladstone, Rachel A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relation between alcohol consumption and heart disease by using differences in county level alcohol sales laws as a natural experiment. Design Observational cohort study using differences in alcohol sales laws. Setting Hospital based healthcare encounters in Texas, USA. Population 1 106 968 patients aged 21 or older who were residents of “wet” (no alcohol restrictions) and “dry” (complete prohibition of alcohol sales) counties and admitted to hospital between 2005 and 2010, identified using the Texas Inpatient Research Data File. Outcome measures Prevalent and incident alcohol misuse and alcoholic liver disease were used for validation analyses. The main cardiovascular outcomes were atrial fibrillation, acute myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. Results Residents of wet counties had a greater prevalence and incidence of alcohol misuse and alcoholic liver disease. After multivariable adjustment, wet county residents had a greater prevalence (odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.09; P=0.007) and incidence (hazard ratio 1.07, 1.01 to 1.13; P=0.014) of atrial fibrillation, a lower prevalence (odds ratio 0.83, 0.79 to 0.87; P<0.001) and incidence (hazard ratio 0.91, 0.87 to 0.99; P=0.019) of myocardial infarction, and a lower prevalence (odds ratio 0.87, 0.84 to 0.90; P<0.001) of congestive heart failure. Conversion of counties from dry to wet resulted in statistically significantly higher rates of alcohol misuse, alcoholic liver disease, atrial fibrillation, and congestive heart failure, with no detectable difference in myocardial infarction. Conclusions Greater access to alcohol was associated with more atrial fibrillation and less myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure, although an increased risk of congestive heart failure was seen shortly after alcohol sales were liberalized. PMID:27301557

  6. Why do Families of Sick Newborns Accept Hospital Care? A Community-Based Cohort Study in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Owais, Aatekah; Sultana, Shazia; Stein, Aryeh D.; Bashir, Nasira H.; Awaldad, Razia; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2011-01-01

    Objective Sick young infants are at high risk of mortality in developing countries but families often decline hospital referral. Our objective was to identify the predictors of acceptance of referral for hospital care among families of severely ill newborns and infants <59 days old in three low-income communities of Karachi, Pakistan. Study design A cohort of 541 newborns and infants referred from home by community health workers doing household surveillance, and diagnosed with a serious illness at local community clinics between January 1 and December 31, 2007, was followed-up within 1 month of referral to the public hospital. Results Only 24% of families accepted hospital referral. Major reasons for refusal were financial difficulties (67%) and father/elder denying permission (65%). Religious/cultural beliefs were cited by 20% of families. Referral acceptance was higher with recognition of severity of the illness by mother (OR=12.7; 95% CI=4.6–35.2), family’s ability to speak the dominant language at hospital (OR=2.0; 95% CI=1.3–3.1), presence of grunting in the infant (OR=3.3; 95% CI=1.2–9.0), and infant temperature <35.5°C (OR=4.1; 95% CI=2.3–7.4). No gender differential was observed. Conclusion Refusal of hospital referral for sick young infants is very common. Interventions that encourage appropriate care seeking, as well as community-based management of young infant illnesses when referral is not feasible are needed to improve neonatal survival in low-income countries. PMID:21273989

  7. Where Do the Rural Poor Deliver When High Coverage of Health Facility Delivery Is Achieved? Findings from a Community and Hospital Survey in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Straneo, Manuela; Fogliati, Piera; Azzimonti, Gaetano; Mangi, Sabina; Kisika, Firma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As part of maternal mortality reducing strategies, coverage of delivery care among sub-Saharan African rural poor will improve, with a range of facilities providing services. Whether high coverage will benefit all socio-economic groups is unknown. Iringa rural District, Southern Tanzania, with high facility delivery coverage, offers a paradigm to address this question. Delivery services are available in first-line facilities (dispensaries, health centres) and one hospital. We assessed whether all socio-economic groups access the only comprehensive emergency obstetric care facility equally, and surveyed existing delivery services. Methods District population characteristics were obtained from a household community survey (n = 463). A Hospital survey collected data on women who delivered in this facility (n = 1072). Principal component analysis on household assets was used to assess socio-economic status. Hospital population socio-demographic characteristics were compared to District population using multivariable logistic regression. Deliveries' distribution in District facilities and staffing were analysed using routine data. Results Women from the hospital compared to the District population were more likely to be wealthier. Adjusted odds ratio of hospital delivery increased progressively across socio-economic groups, from 1.73 for the poorer (p = 0.0031) to 4.53 (p<0.0001) for the richest. Remarkable dispersion of deliveries and poor staffing were found. In 2012, 5505/7645 (72%) institutional deliveries took place in 68 first-line facilities, the remaining in the hospital. 56/68 (67.6%) first-line facilities reported ≤100 deliveries/year, attending 33% of deliveries. Insufficient numbers of skilled birth attendants were found in 42.9% of facilities. Discussion Poorer women remain disadvantaged in high coverage, as they access lower level facilities and are under-represented where life-saving transfusions and caesarean sections are

  8. The Widespread Presence of a Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli ST131 Clade among Community-Associated and Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    den Reijer, P. Martijn; van Burgh, Sebastian; Burggraaf, Arjan; Ossewaarde, Jacobus M.; van der Zee, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The extent of entry of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli from the community into the hospital and subsequent clonal spread amongst patients is unclear. To investigate the extent and direction of clonal spread of these bacteria within a large teaching hospital, we prospectively genotyped multidrug-resistant E. coli obtained from community- and hospital associated patient groups and compared the distribution of diverse genetic markers. Methods A total of 222 E. coli, classified as multi-drug resistant according to national guidelines, were retrieved from both screening (n = 184) and non-screening clinical cultures (n = 38) from outpatients and patients hospitalized for various periods. All isolates were routinely genotyped using an amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) assay and real-time PCR for CTX-M genes. Multi-locus sequence typing was additionally performed to confirm clusters. Based on demographics, patients were categorized into two groups: patients that were not hospitalized or less than 72 hours at time of strain isolation (group I) and patients that were hospitalized for at least 72 hours (group II). Results Genotyping showed that most multi-drug resistant E. coli either had unique AFLP profiles or grouped in small clusters of maximally 8 isolates. We identified one large ST131 clade comprising 31% of all isolates, containing several AFLP clusters with similar profiles. Although different AFLP clusters were found in the two patient groups, overall genetic heterogeneity was similar (35% vs 28% of isolates containing unique AFLP profiles, respectively). In addition, similar distributions of CTX-M groups, including CTX-M 15 (40% and 44% of isolates in group I and II, respectively) and ST131 (32% and 30% of isolates, respectively) were found. Conclusion We conclude that multi-drug resistant E. coli from the CTX-M 15 associated lineage ST131 are widespread amongst both community- and hospital associated patient groups, with similar

  9. Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in community hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Jun-Ichiro; Asagi, Tsukasa; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kasai, Atsushi; Mizuguchi, Yukie; Araake, Minako; Fujino, Tomoko; Kikuchi, Hideko; Sasaki, Satoru; Watari, Hajime; Kojima, Tadashi; Miki, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Kaku, Mitsuo; Yoshikura, Hiroshi; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Kirikae, Teruo

    2007-03-01

    We previously reported an outbreak in a neurosurgery ward of catheter-associated urinary tract infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain IMCJ2.S1, carrying the 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase gene [aac(6')-Iae]. For further epidemiologic studies, 214 clinical isolates of MDR P. aeruginosa showing resistance to imipenem (MIC >or= 16 microg/ml), amikacin (MIC >or= 64 microg/ml), and ciprofloxacin (MIC >or= 4 microg/ml) were collected from 13 hospitals in the same prefecture in Japan. We also collected 70 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa that were sensitive to one or more of these antibiotics and compared their characteristics with those of the MDR P. aeruginosa isolates. Of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 (99%) were serotype O11. We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay and a slide agglutination test for detection of the aac(6')-Iae gene and the AAC(6')-Iae protein, respectively. Of the 212 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 (100%) and 207 (98%) were positive in the LAMP assay and in the agglutination test, respectively. Mutations of gyrA and parC genes resulting in amino acid substitutions were detected in 213 of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates (99%). Of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 showed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns with >or=70% similarity to that of IMCJ2.S1 and 83 showed a pattern identical to that of IMCJ2.S1, indicating that clonal expansion of MDR P. aeruginosa occurred in community hospitals in this area. The methods developed in this study to detect aac(6')-Iae were rapid and effective in diagnosing infections caused by various MDR P. aeruginosa clones.

  10. Computerized Provider Order Entry Reduces Length of Stay in a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Peters, K.; Shaha, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Does computerized provider order entry (CPOE) improve clinical, cost, and efficiency outcomes as quantified in shortened hospital length of stay (LOS)? Most prior studies were done in university settings with home-grown electronic records, and are now 20 years old. This study asked whether CPOE exerts a downward force on LOS in the current era of HITECH incentives, using a vendor product in a community hospital. Methods The methodology retrospectively evaluated correlation between CPOE and LOS on a perpatient, per-visit basis over 22 consecutive quarters, organized by discipline. All orders from all areas were eligible, except verbals, and medication orders in the emergency department which were not available via CPOE. These results were compared with quarterly case mix indices organized by discipline. Correlational and regression analyses were cross-checked to ensure validity of R-square coefficients, and data were smoothed for ease of display. Standard models were used to calculate the inflection point. Results Gains in CPOE adoption occurred iteratively house-wide, and in each discipline. LOS decreased in a sigmoid shaped curve. The inflection point shows that once CPOE adoption approaches 60%, further lowering of LOS accelerates. Overall there was a 20.2% reduction in LOS correlated with adoption of CPOE. Case mix index increased during the study period showing that reductions in LOS occurred despite increased patient complexity and resource utilization. Conclusions There was a 20.2% reduction in LOS correlated with rising adoption of CPOE. CPOE contributes to improved clinical, cost, and efficiency outcomes as quantified in reduced LOS, over and above other processes introduced to lower LOS. CPOE enabled a reduction in LOS despite an increase in the case mix index during the time frame of this study. PMID:25298809

  11. Antimicrobial Stewardship in a Community Hospital: Attacking the More Difficult Problems

    PubMed Central

    Philmon, Carla L.; Johnson, Gregory D.; Ward, William S.; Rivers, LaToya L.; Williamson, Sharon A.; Goodman, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic stewardship has been proposed as an important way to reduce or prevent antibiotic resistance. In 2001, a community hospital implemented an antimicrobial management program. It was successful in reducing antimicrobial utilization and expenditure. In 2011, with the implementation of a data-mining tool, the program was expanded and its focus transitioned from control of antimicrobial use to guiding judicious antimicrobial prescribing. Objective: To test the hypothesis that adding a data-mining tool to an existing antimicrobial stewardship program will further increase appropriate use of antimicrobials. Design: Interventional study with historical comparison. Methods: Rules and alerts were built into the data-mining tool to aid in identifying inappropriate antibiotic utilization. Decentralized pharmacists acted on alerts for intravenous (IV) to oral conversion, perioperative antibiotic duration, and restricted antimicrobials. An Infectious Diseases (ID) Pharmacist and ID Physician/Hospital Epidemiologist focused on all other identified alert types such as antibiotic de-escalation, bug-drug mismatch, and double coverage. Electronic chart notes and phone calls to physicians were utilized to make recommendations. Results: During 2012, 2,003 antimicrobial interventions were made with a 90% acceptance rate. Targeted broad-spectrum antimicrobial use decreased by 15% in 2012 compared to 2010, which represented cost savings of $1,621,730. There were no statistically significant changes in antimicrobial resistance, and no adverse patient outcomes were noted. Conclusions: The addition of a data-mining tool to an antimicrobial stewardship program can further decrease inappropriate use of antimicrobials, provide a greater reduction in overall antimicrobial use, and provide increased cost savings without negatively affecting patient outcomes. PMID:25477615

  12. Molecular Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae Causing Community- and Hospital-Acquired Infections in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haoqin; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Tianming; Liu, Hong; Gong, Ye; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, a colonizing agent in pregnant women and the main cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, has been increasingly associated with invasive disease in nonpregnant adults. We collected a total of 87 non-repetitive S. agalactiae isolates causing community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) infections in nonpregnant adults from a teaching hospital in Shanghai between 2009 and 2013. We identified and characterized their antibiotic resistance, sequence type (ST), serotype, virulence, and biofilm formation. The most frequent STs were ST19 (29.9%), ST23 (16.1%), ST12 (13.8%), and ST1 (12.6%). ST19 had significantly different distributions between CA- and HA-group B Streptococci (GBS) isolates. The most frequent serotypes were III (32.2%), Ia (26.4%), V (14.9%), Ib (13.8%), and II (5.7%). Serotype III/ST19 was significantly associated with levofloxacin resistance in all isoates. The HA-GBS multidrug resistant rate was much higher than that of CA-GBS. Virulence genes pavA, cfb were found in all isolates. Strong correlations exist between serotype Ib (CA and HA) and surface protein genes spb1 and bac, serotype III (HA) and surface protein gene cps and GBS pilus cluster. The serotype, epidemic clone, PFGE-based genotype, and virulence gene are closely related between CA-GBS and HA-GBS, and certain serotypes and clone types were significantly associated with antibiotic resistance. However, CA-GBS and HA-GBS still had significant differences in their distribution of clone types, antibiotic resistance, and specific virulence genes, which may provide a basis for infection control. PMID:27625635

  13. Tigecycline Versus Levofloxacin in Hospitalized Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Analysis of Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dartois, Nathalie; Cooper, C Angel; Castaing, Nathalie; Gandjini, Hassan; Sarkozy, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of tigecycline (TGC) versus levofloxacin (LEV) in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) using pooled data and to perform exploratory analyses of risk factors associated with poor outcome. Materials and Methodology: Pooled analyses of 2 phase 3 studies in patients randomized to intravenous (IV) TGC (100 mg, then 50 mg q12h) or IV LEV (500 mg q24h or q12h). Clinical responses at test of cure visit for the clinically evaluable (CE) and clinical modified intention to treat populations were assessed for patients with risk factors including aged ≥65 years, prior antibiotic failure, bacteremia, multilobar disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, alcohol abuse, altered mental status, hypoxemia, renal insufficiency, diabetes mellitus, white blood cell count >30 x 109/L or <4 x 109/L, CURB-65 score ≥2, Fine score category of III to V and at least 2 clinical instability criteria on physical examination. Results: In the CE population of 574 patients, overall cure rates were similar: TGC (253/282, 89.7%); LEV (252/292, 86.3%). For all but one risk factor, cure rates for TGC were similar to or higher than those for LEV. For individual risk factors, the greatest difference between treatment groups was observed in patients with diabetes mellitus (difference of 22.9 for TGC versus LEV; 95% confidence interval, 4.8 - 39.9). Conclusions: TGC achieved cure rates similar to those of LEV in hospitalized patients with CAP. For patients with risk factors, TGC provided generally favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:23526572

  14. Molecular Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae Causing Community- and Hospital-Acquired Infections in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haoqin; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Tianming; Liu, Hong; Gong, Ye; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, a colonizing agent in pregnant women and the main cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, has been increasingly associated with invasive disease in nonpregnant adults. We collected a total of 87 non-repetitive S. agalactiae isolates causing community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) infections in nonpregnant adults from a teaching hospital in Shanghai between 2009 and 2013. We identified and characterized their antibiotic resistance, sequence type (ST), serotype, virulence, and biofilm formation. The most frequent STs were ST19 (29.9%), ST23 (16.1%), ST12 (13.8%), and ST1 (12.6%). ST19 had significantly different distributions between CA- and HA-group B Streptococci (GBS) isolates. The most frequent serotypes were III (32.2%), Ia (26.4%), V (14.9%), Ib (13.8%), and II (5.7%). Serotype III/ST19 was significantly associated with levofloxacin resistance in all isoates. The HA-GBS multidrug resistant rate was much higher than that of CA-GBS. Virulence genes pavA, cfb were found in all isolates. Strong correlations exist between serotype Ib (CA and HA) and surface protein genes spb1 and bac, serotype III (HA) and surface protein gene cps and GBS pilus cluster. The serotype, epidemic clone, PFGE-based genotype, and virulence gene are closely related between CA-GBS and HA-GBS, and certain serotypes and clone types were significantly associated with antibiotic resistance. However, CA-GBS and HA-GBS still had significant differences in their distribution of clone types, antibiotic resistance, and specific virulence genes, which may provide a basis for infection control.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae Causing Community- and Hospital-Acquired Infections in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haoqin; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Tianming; Liu, Hong; Gong, Ye; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, a colonizing agent in pregnant women and the main cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, has been increasingly associated with invasive disease in nonpregnant adults. We collected a total of 87 non-repetitive S. agalactiae isolates causing community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) infections in nonpregnant adults from a teaching hospital in Shanghai between 2009 and 2013. We identified and characterized their antibiotic resistance, sequence type (ST), serotype, virulence, and biofilm formation. The most frequent STs were ST19 (29.9%), ST23 (16.1%), ST12 (13.8%), and ST1 (12.6%). ST19 had significantly different distributions between CA- and HA-group B Streptococci (GBS) isolates. The most frequent serotypes were III (32.2%), Ia (26.4%), V (14.9%), Ib (13.8%), and II (5.7%). Serotype III/ST19 was significantly associated with levofloxacin resistance in all isoates. The HA-GBS multidrug resistant rate was much higher than that of CA-GBS. Virulence genes pavA, cfb were found in all isolates. Strong correlations exist between serotype Ib (CA and HA) and surface protein genes spb1 and bac, serotype III (HA) and surface protein gene cps and GBS pilus cluster. The serotype, epidemic clone, PFGE-based genotype, and virulence gene are closely related between CA-GBS and HA-GBS, and certain serotypes and clone types were significantly associated with antibiotic resistance. However, CA-GBS and HA-GBS still had significant differences in their distribution of clone types, antibiotic resistance, and specific virulence genes, which may provide a basis for infection control. PMID:27625635

  16. Assessing access to paediatric trauma centres in Canada, and the impact of the golden hour on length of stay at the hospital: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Amram, Ofer; Schuurman, Nadine; Pike, Ian; Friger, Michael; Yanchar, Natalie L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In Canada injuries are a leading cause of death and morbidity among the paediatric population. Trauma systems have been established across North America to provide comprehensive injury care and to lead injury control efforts. However, not all populations have equal access to trauma care services. This is an observational study with the aim of assessing the impact of geographical access to paediatric trauma centres (PTCs) on patient outcomes, and to determine spatial access to PTCs across Canada. Setting To examine the relationship between access to PTC and injury outcome, length of stay at the PTC was determined for all injured patients who live within and outside of 60 min driving time of the PTC. To determine spatial access to PTCs across Canada, a list of level 1 and 2 PTCs was identified across Canada. A 1 h driving time catchment was created around each PTC in order to estimate spatial accessibility. Participants Hospital administration data sets from British Columbia (BC) and the Nova Scotia (NS) trauma registry were used to assess the impact of spatial access on paediatric injury (ages 0–15 years) outcomes. The data sets provided case-level data including the Injury Severity Score, postal code of place of residence, age and length of hospital stay. Results In NS and BC, average length of stay at the hospital is significantly lower inside 60 min driving time compared to outside of 60 min driving time from a PTC (p<0.05, using a non-parametric t test). In Canada, approximately 65% of the paediatric population resides within 1 h of a PTC. Conclusions This paper highlights differences in injury outcomes as a result of access. However, further investigation is needed as other considerations such as type of injury, age and/or gender may also affect injury outcomes. PMID:26747041

  17. The effect of education plus access on perceived fruit and vegetable consumption in a rural African American community intervention

    PubMed Central

    Barnidge, E. K.; Baker, E. A.; Schootman, M.; Motton, F.; Sawicki, M.; Rose, F.

    2015-01-01

    African Americans have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease partly due to low fruit and vegetable consumption. This article reports the results of an intervention to provide nutrition education and access to fruits and vegetables through community gardens to change dietary behaviors among African Americans in rural Missouri. Cross-sectional surveys evaluated the intervention effect on blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and perceived fruit and vegetable consumption in this quasi-experimental study with a comparison group. Hypertension (OR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.38–0.71) and BMI (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.52–1.02) were lower in the intervention county at mid-intervention. Participation in nutrition education (OR = 2.67, 95% CI: 1.63–4.40) and access to fruits and vegetables from a community garden (OR = 1.95, 95% CI: 1.20–3.15) were independently associated with perceived fruit and vegetable consumption. The strongest effect on perceived fruit and vegetable consumption occurred with high participation in nutrition education and access to community gardens (OR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.24–3.81). Those with access but without education had a reduced likelihood of consuming recommended servings of fruits and vegetables (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.34–0.95). Education plus access interventions may be best at increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables in a rural African American population. PMID:26338985

  18. The effect of education plus access on perceived fruit and vegetable consumption in a rural African American community intervention.

    PubMed

    Barnidge, E K; Baker, E A; Schootman, M; Motton, F; Sawicki, M; Rose, F

    2015-10-01

    African Americans have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease partly due to low fruit and vegetable consumption. This article reports the results of an intervention to provide nutrition education and access to fruits and vegetables through community gardens to change dietary behaviors among African Americans in rural Missouri. Cross-sectional surveys evaluated the intervention effect on blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and perceived fruit and vegetable consumption in this quasi-experimental study with a comparison group. Hypertension (OR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.38-0.71) and BMI (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.52-1.02) were lower in the intervention county at mid-intervention. Participation in nutrition education (OR = 2.67, 95% CI: 1.63-4.40) and access to fruits and vegetables from a community garden (OR = 1.95, 95% CI: 1.20-3.15) were independently associated with perceived fruit and vegetable consumption. The strongest effect on perceived fruit and vegetable consumption occurred with high participation in nutrition education and access to community gardens (OR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.24-3.81). Those with access but without education had a reduced likelihood of consuming recommended servings of fruits and vegetables (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.34-0.95). Education plus access interventions may be best at increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables in a rural African American population.

  19. Communicative social capital and collective efficacy as determinants of access to health-enhancing resources in residential communities.

    PubMed

    Matsaganis, Matthew D; Wilkin, Holley A

    2015-04-01

    This article contributes to the burgeoning literature on the social determinants of health disparities. The authors investigate how communication resources and collective efficacy, independently and in combination, shape residents' access to health enhancing resources (including healthcare services, sources of healthier food options, and public recreation spaces) in their communities. Using random digit dial telephone survey data from 833 residents of South Los Angeles communities the authors show that communicative social capital-that is, an information and problem-solving resource that accrues to residents as they become more integrated into their local communication network of neighbors, community organizations, and local media-plays a significant role in access to health resources. This relationship is complicated by individuals' health insurance and health status, as communicative social capital magnifies the sense of absence of resources for those who are in worse health and lack insurance. Communicative social capital builds collective efficacy, which is positively related to access to health-enhancing resources, but it also mediates the negative relationship between communicative social capital and access to health resources. Residents with richer stores of communicative social capital and collective efficacy report better access to health resources. The authors conclude with a discussion of implications of these findings and suggestions for future research.

  20. The Effect of Education plus Access on Perceived Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in a Rural African American Community Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnidge, E. K.; Baker, E. A.; Schootman, M.; Motton, F.; Sawicki, M.; Rose, F.

    2015-01-01

    African Americans have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease partly due to low fruit and vegetable consumption. This article reports the results of an intervention to provide nutrition education and access to fruits and vegetables through community gardens to change dietary behaviors among African Americans in rural Missouri. Cross-sectional…

  1. Work-First Federal Policies: Eroding Access to Community Colleges for Latinos and Low-Income Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Kathleen M.; Goldrick-Rab, Sara

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes how the implementation of the 1996 welfare reform and the 1998 Workforce Investment Acts affected community colleges' willingness and capacity to provide access to postsecondary education and training for Latinos and other low-income populations. (Contains 3 figures.)

  2. Critical Incidents of Nonadherence with Standard Precautions Guidelines Among Community Hospital-based Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Kristi J; Waitzkin, Howard; Beekmann, Susan E; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify, categorize, and assess critical incidents of nonadherence to standard precautions. DESIGN Qualitative and quantitative analysis of a written, mail-out survey. SETTING Community hospitals. PARTICIPANTS Statewide stratified random sample of community hospital-based health care workers at risk for blood exposure. MAIN VARIABLE Responses to the question: “Think of an incident during the past year when you didn't adhere to universal precautions. Please describe the situation and why you didn't adhere.” RESULTS Reasons given for not using precautions included: belief that stopping to use standard precautions would have put the patient at risk (22%); using precautions would have interfered with patient care (20%); precautions were not warranted in a specific situation (14%); did not anticipate the potential for exposure (14%); and high job demands that had caused respondent to be in a hurry (11%). Less often, equipment was not available (7%), respondent forgot (6%), respondent thought that the patient did not pose a risk (4%), or the available equipment was not effective (3%). In terms of overall exposure rates, 34% of those who described an incident had experienced a sharps injury during the previous 3 months and 42% had experienced a mucocutaneous exposure. In terms of overall nonadherence, 44% wore gloves less than 100% of the time, while 61% washed their hands less than 100% of the time. Needlestick injuries were lowest among those who had forgotten to use precautions, while mucocutaneous exposures were highest among those who had not anticipated potential exposure while performing the task. Failure to wear gloves routinely was highest among those who said that following precautions interfered with their ability to provide care and among those who believed a particular patient to be low risk; failure to wash hands routinely was also highest among the latter group and lowest among those who said necessary equipment was not available

  3. Breastfeeding Support in a Community Pharmacy: Improving Access through the Well Babies at Walgreens Program.

    PubMed

    Lenell, Amy; Friesen, Carol A; Hormuth, Laura

    2015-11-01

    Well Babies at Walgreens is a unique community-based corporate partnership program that offers breastfeeding support by a lactation professional in a private room at the pharmacy. Walgreens is a community pharmacy chain with more than 8000 locations in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands. The primary goal of Well Babies is to support breastfeeding women using a model that is expandable to other Walgreens pharmacy sites. The Well Babies program offers drop-in services, with a professional consultation by a lactation consultant and baby weight check, if desired. Well Babies creators are developing a business plan for Walgreens and a toolkit that would help other stores implement the program. An additional goal is to improve continuity of care for breastfeeding by engaging pharmacists as vital members of the health care team. Offering breastfeeding support at a pharmacy improves access and encourages support persons to attend while simultaneously allowing the family to complete other errands. This initiative included education for pharmacists to improve the recommendations they make for breastfeeding mothers and to improve awareness among pharmacists of the benefits associated with breastfeeding and the need to preserve the breastfeeding relationship. The first drop-in location opened in April 2012. Grant funding from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, awarded to the Indiana State Department of Health, made it possible to open a second drop-in location in June 2013. Future plans include developing an employee lactation program and expanding Well Babies at Walgreens at other store locations. PMID:25829476

  4. Breastfeeding Support in a Community Pharmacy: Improving Access through the Well Babies at Walgreens Program.

    PubMed

    Lenell, Amy; Friesen, Carol A; Hormuth, Laura

    2015-11-01

    Well Babies at Walgreens is a unique community-based corporate partnership program that offers breastfeeding support by a lactation professional in a private room at the pharmacy. Walgreens is a community pharmacy chain with more than 8000 locations in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands. The primary goal of Well Babies is to support breastfeeding women using a model that is expandable to other Walgreens pharmacy sites. The Well Babies program offers drop-in services, with a professional consultation by a lactation consultant and baby weight check, if desired. Well Babies creators are developing a business plan for Walgreens and a toolkit that would help other stores implement the program. An additional goal is to improve continuity of care for breastfeeding by engaging pharmacists as vital members of the health care team. Offering breastfeeding support at a pharmacy improves access and encourages support persons to attend while simultaneously allowing the family to complete other errands. This initiative included education for pharmacists to improve the recommendations they make for breastfeeding mothers and to improve awareness among pharmacists of the benefits associated with breastfeeding and the need to preserve the breastfeeding relationship. The first drop-in location opened in April 2012. Grant funding from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, awarded to the Indiana State Department of Health, made it possible to open a second drop-in location in June 2013. Future plans include developing an employee lactation program and expanding Well Babies at Walgreens at other store locations.

  5. ClimatePipes: User-Friendly Data Access, Manipulation, Analysis & Visualization of Community Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, A.; DeMarle, D.; Burnett, B.; Harris, C.; Silva, W.; Osmari, D.; Geveci, B.; Silva, C.; Doutriaux, C.; Williams, D. N.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of climate change will resonate through a broad range of fields including public health, infrastructure, water resources, and many others. Long-term coordinated planning, funding, and action are required for climate change adaptation and mitigation. Unfortunately, widespread use of climate data (simulated and observed) in non-climate science communities is impeded by factors such as large data size, lack of adequate metadata, poor documentation, and lack of sufficient computational and visualization resources. We present ClimatePipes to address many of these challenges by creating an open source platform that provides state-of-the-art, user-friendly data access, analysis, and visualization for climate and other relevant geospatial datasets, making the climate data available to non-researchers, decision-makers, and other stakeholders. The overarching goals of ClimatePipes are: - Enable users to explore real-world questions related to climate change. - Provide tools for data access, analysis, and visualization. - Facilitate collaboration by enabling users to share datasets, workflows, and visualization. ClimatePipes uses a web-based application platform for its widespread support on mainstream operating systems, ease-of-use, and inherent collaboration support. The front-end of ClimatePipes uses HTML5 (WebGL, Canvas2D, CSS3) to deliver state-of-the-art visualization and to provide a best-in-class user experience. The back-end of the ClimatePipes is built around Python using the Visualization Toolkit (VTK, http://vtk.org), Climate Data Analysis Tools (CDAT, http://uv-cdat.llnl.gov), and other climate and geospatial data processing tools such as GDAL and PROJ4. ClimatePipes web-interface to query and access data from remote sources (such as ESGF). Shown in the figure is climate data layer from ESGF on top of map data layer from OpenStreetMap. The ClimatePipes workflow editor provides flexibility and fine grained control, and uses the VisTrails (http

  6. U.S. Geological Survey community for data integration: data upload, registry, and access tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2012-01-01

    As a leading science and information agency and in fulfillment of its mission to provide reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ensures that all scientific data are effectively hosted, adequately described, and appropriately accessible to scientists, collaborators, and the general public. To succeed in this task, the USGS established the Community for Data Integration (CDI) to address data and information management issues affecting the proficiency of earth science research. Through the CDI, the USGS is providing data and metadata management tools, cyber infrastructure, collaboration tools, and training in support of scientists and technology specialists throughout the project life cycle. One of the significant tools recently created to contribute to this mission is the Uploader tool. This tool allows scientists with limited data management resources to address many of the key aspects of the data life cycle: the ability to protect, preserve, publish and share data. By implementing this application inside ScienceBase, scientists also can take advantage of other collaboration capabilities provided by the ScienceBase platform.

  7. ORegAnno: an open-access community-driven resource for regulatory annotation.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Obi L; Montgomery, Stephen B; Bernier, Bridget; Chu, Bryan; Kasaian, Katayoon; Aerts, Stein; Mahony, Shaun; Sleumer, Monica C; Bilenky, Mikhail; Haeussler, Maximilian; Griffith, Malachi; Gallo, Steven M; Giardine, Belinda; Hooghe, Bart; Van Loo, Peter; Blanco, Enrique; Ticoll, Amy; Lithwick, Stuart; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Donaldson, Ian J; Robertson, Gordon; Wadelius, Claes; De Bleser, Pieter; Vlieghe, Dominique; Halfon, Marc S; Wasserman, Wyeth; Hardison, Ross; Bergman, Casey M; Jones, Steven J M

    2008-01-01

    ORegAnno is an open-source, open-access database and literature curation system for community-based annotation of experimentally identified DNA regulatory regions, transcription factor binding sites and regulatory variants. The current release comprises 30 145 records curated from 922 publications and describing regulatory sequences for over 3853 genes and 465 transcription factors from 19 species. A new feature called the 'publication queue' allows users to input relevant papers from scientific literature as targets for annotation. The queue contains 4438 gene regulation papers entered by experts and another 54 351 identified by text-mining methods. Users can enter or 'check out' papers from the queue for manual curation using a series of user-friendly annotation pages. A typical record entry consists of species, sequence type, sequence, target gene, binding factor, experimental outcome and one or more lines of experimental evidence. An evidence ontology was developed to describe and categorize these experiments. Records are cross-referenced to Ensembl or Entrez gene identifiers, PubMed and dbSNP and can be visualized in the Ensembl or UCSC genome browsers. All data are freely available through search pages, XML data dumps or web services at: http://www.oreganno.org.

  8. Learning to Thrive: Building Diverse Scientists’ Access to Community and Resources through the BRAINS Program

    PubMed Central

    Margherio, Cara; Horner-Devine, M. Claire; Mizumori, Sheri J. Y.; Yen, Joyce W.

    2016-01-01

    BRAINS: Broadening the Representation of Academic Investigators in NeuroScience is a National Institutes of Health–funded, national program that addresses challenges to the persistence of diverse early-career neuroscientists. In doing so, BRAINS aims to advance diversity in neuroscience by increasing career advancement and retention of post-PhD, early-career neuroscientists from underrepresented groups (URGs). The comprehensive professional development program is structured to catalyze conversations specific to URGs in neuroscience and explicitly addresses factors known to impact persistence such as a weak sense of belonging to the scientific community, isolation and solo status, inequitable access to resources that impact career success, and marginalization from informal networks and mentoring relationships. While we do not yet have data on the long-term impact of the BRAINS program on participants’ career trajectory and persistence, we introduce the BRAINS program theory and report early quantitative and qualitative data on shorter-term individual impacts within the realms of career-advancing behaviors and career experiences. These early results suggest promising, positive career productivity, increased self-efficacy, stronger sense of belonging, and new perspectives on navigating careers for BRAINS participants. We finish by discussing recommendations for future professional development programs and research designed to broaden participation in the biomedical and life sciences. PMID:27587858

  9. Gender identity, healthcare access, and risk reduction among Malaysia's mak nyah community.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Britton A; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Rutledge, Ronnye; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-01-01

    Transgender women (TGW) face compounded levels of stigma and discrimination, resulting in multiple health risks and poor health outcomes. TGW identities are erased by forcing them into binary sex categories in society or treating them as men who have sex with men (MSM). In Malaysia, where both civil and religious law criminalise them for their identities, many TGW turn to sex work with inconsistent prevention methods, which increases their health risks. This qualitative study aims to understand how the identities of TGW sex workers shapes their healthcare utilisation patterns and harm reduction behaviours. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 male-to-female transgender (mak nyah) sex workers in Malaysia. Interviews were transcribed, translated into English, and analysed using thematic coding. Results suggest that TGW identity is shaped at an early age followed by incorporation into the mak nyah community where TGW were assisted in gender transition and introduced to sex work. While healthcare was accessible, it failed to address the multiple healthcare needs of TGW. Pressure for gender-affirming health procedures and fear of HIV and sexually transmitted infection screening led to potentially hazardous health behaviours. These findings have implications for developing holistic, culturally sensitive prevention and healthcare services for TGW.

  10. ORegAnno: an open-access community-driven resource for regulatory annotation

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Obi L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Bernier, Bridget; Chu, Bryan; Kasaian, Katayoon; Aerts, Stein; Mahony, Shaun; Sleumer, Monica C.; Bilenky, Mikhail; Haeussler, Maximilian; Griffith, Malachi; Gallo, Steven M.; Giardine, Belinda; Hooghe, Bart; Van Loo, Peter; Blanco, Enrique; Ticoll, Amy; Lithwick, Stuart; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Donaldson, Ian J.; Robertson, Gordon; Wadelius, Claes; De Bleser, Pieter; Vlieghe, Dominique; Halfon, Marc S.; Wasserman, Wyeth; Hardison, Ross; Bergman, Casey M.; Jones, Steven J.M.

    2008-01-01

    ORegAnno is an open-source, open-access database and literature curation system for community-based annotation of experimentally identified DNA regulatory regions, transcription factor binding sites and regulatory variants. The current release comprises 30 145 records curated from 922 publications and describing regulatory sequences for over 3853 genes and 465 transcription factors from 19 species. A new feature called the ‘publication queue’ allows users to input relevant papers from scientific literature as targets for annotation. The queue contains 4438 gene regulation papers entered by experts and another 54 351 identified by text-mining methods. Users can enter or ‘check out’ papers from the queue for manual curation using a series of user-friendly annotation pages. A typical record entry consists of species, sequence type, sequence, target gene, binding factor, experimental outcome and one or more lines of experimental evidence. An evidence ontology was developed to describe and categorize these experiments. Records are cross-referenced to Ensembl or Entrez gene identifiers, PubMed and dbSNP and can be visualized in the Ensembl or UCSC genome browsers. All data are freely available through search pages, XML data dumps or web services at: http://www.oreganno.org. PMID:18006570

  11. Establishment of a renal supportive care program: Experience from a rural community hospital in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Shih, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Su-Hsuan; Hung, Yu-Chien; Lai, Chun-Fu; Ueng, Ruey-Hsiuang; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Huang, Sheng-Jean

    2016-07-01

    Renal supportive care (RSC) denotes a care program dedicated for patients with acute, chronic renal failure, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), aiming to offer maximal symptom relief and optimize patients' quality of life. The uncertainty of prognosis for patients with chronic kidney disease and ESRD, the sociocultural issues inherent to the Taiwanese society, and the void of structured and practical RSC pathway, contributes to the underrecognition and poor utilization of RSC. Taiwanese patients rarely receive information regarding RSC as part of a standardized care and are not commonly offered this option. In National Taiwan University Hospital Jinshan branch, we started a RSC subprogram, supported by the community-based palliative/hospice care main program. We focused on understanding the need and providing the choice of RSC to suitable candidates. A three-step and four-phase protocol was designed and implemented to identify appropriate patients and to enhance the applicability of the RSC. We harnessed family visit and home-based family meeting as a vehicle to understand the patients' preferences, to discover what ESRD patients and their family value most, and to introduce the option of RSC. In the current review, we described our pilot experience of establishing a RSC program in Taiwan, and discuss its potential advantage.

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Eravacycline (TP-434), a Novel Fluorocycline, against Hospital and Community Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, W.; Fyfe, C.; Grossman, T. H.

    2013-01-01

    Eravacycline (TP-434 or 7-fluoro-9-pyrrolidinoacetamido-6-demethyl-6-deoxytetracycline) is a novel fluorocycline that was evaluated for antimicrobial activity against panels of recently isolated aerobic and anaerobic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Eravacycline showed potent broad-spectrum activity against 90% of the isolates (MIC90) in each panel at concentrations ranging from ≤0.008 to 2 μg/ml for all species panels except those of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia (MIC90 values of 32 μg/ml for both organisms). The antibacterial activity of eravacycline was minimally affected by expression of tetracycline-specific efflux and ribosomal protection mechanisms in clinical isolates. Furthermore, eravacycline was active against multidrug-resistant bacteria, including those expressing extended-spectrum β-lactamases and mechanisms conferring resistance to other classes of antibiotics, including carbapenem resistance. Eravacycline has the potential to be a promising new intravenous (i.v.)/oral antibiotic for the empirical treatment of complicated hospital/health care infections and moderate-to-severe community-acquired infections. PMID:23979750

  13. Laser operator training and competency assessment in the community hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Connor, M A; Cook, A F

    1995-09-01

    At the 279 bed Marymount community hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, the importance of providing a safe laser environment for patients as well as staff was identified. The decision was made to cross-train all full-time RNs, LPNs, and SAs to allow flexibility in staffing all laser procedures with a qualified operator. A competency based training program was implemented, utilizing a combination of techniques to assist the adult learner. Selected video tapes were used to teach laser physics and applications. Comprehension was assessed through written and oral quizzing. Individual time was spent familiarizing trainees with the equipment and accessories. Practice setups were performed until that individual reached a comfort level satisfactory to him/her and the laser coordinator. Actual experience in the various surgical specialties was dependent upon our case load. Initially very close supervision was provided. Each trainee was gradually given more autonomy as his/her skills improved and permitted to operate the laser independently after passing our competency assessment. During the first year, each operator was given competency assessment reviews at regular intervals. This approach was found to have both strengths and weaknesses and the program was modified accordingly.

  14. Incidence and Predictors of Hospitalization for Bacterial Infection in Community-Based Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Emma J.; Martin, Natalie; Makepeace, Ashley; Sillars, Brett A.; Davis, Wendy A.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The few studies that have examined the relationship between diabetes and bacterial infections have utilized administrative databases and/or have had limited/incomplete data including recognized infection risk factors. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and associates of bacterial infection severe enough to require hospitalization in well-characterized community-based patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods and Findings We studied a cohort of 1,294 patients (mean±SD age 64.1±11.3 years) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) and 5,156 age-, gender- and zip-code-matched non-diabetic controls. The main outcome measure was incident hospitalization for bacterial infection as principal diagnosis between 1993 and 2010. We also examined differences in statin use in 52 FDS1 pairs hospitalized with pneumonia (cases) or a contemporaneous non-infection-related cause (controls). During 12.0±5.4 years of follow-up, 251 (19.4%) patients were hospitalized on 368 occasions for infection (23.7/1,000 patient-years). This was more than double the rate in matched controls (incident rate ratio (IRR) (95% CI), 2.13 (1.88–2.42), P<0.001). IRRs for pneumonia, cellulitis, and septicemia/bacteremia were 1.86 (1.55–2.21), 2.45 (1.92–3.12), and 2.08 (1.41–3.04), respectively (P<0.001). Among the diabetic patients, older age, male sex, prior recent infection-related hospitalization, obesity, albuminuria, retinopathy and Aboriginal ethnicity were baseline variables independently associated with risk of first hospitalization with any infection (P≤0.005). After adjustment for these variables, baseline statin treatment was not significant (hazard ratio (95% CI), 0.70 (0.39–1.25), P = 0.22). Statin use at hospitalization for pneumonia among the case-control pairs was similar (23.1% vs. 13.5%, P = 0.27). Conclusions The risk of severe infection is increased among type 2 diabetic patients and is not reduced by

  15. Protocol for ACCESS: a qualitative study exploring barriers and facilitators to accessing the emergency contraceptive pill from community pharmacies in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Hussainy, Safeera Yasmeen; Ghosh, Ayesha; Taft, Angela; Mazza, Danielle; Black, Kirsten Isla; Clifford, Rhonda; Mc Namara, Kevin Peter; Ryan, Kath; Jackson, John Keith

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rate of unplanned pregnancy in Australia remains high, which has contributed to Australia having one of the highest abortion rates of developed countries with an estimated 1 in 5 women having an abortion. The emergency contraceptive pill (ECP) offers a safe way of preventing unintended pregnancy after unprotected sex has occurred. While the ECP has been available over-the-counter in Australian pharmacies for over a decade, its use has not significantly increased. This paper presents a protocol for a qualitative study that aims to identify the barriers and facilitators to accessing the ECP from community pharmacies in Australia. Methods and analysis Data will be collected through one-on-one interviews that are semistructured and in-depth. Partnerships have been established with 2 pharmacy groups and 2 women's health organisations to aid with the recruitment of women and pharmacists for data collection purposes. Interview questions explore domains from the Theoretical Domains Framework in order to assess the factors aiding and/or hindering access to ECP from community pharmacies. Data collected will be analysed using deductive content analysis. The expected benefits of this study are that it will help develop evidence-based workforce interventions to strengthen the capacity and performance of community pharmacists as key ECP providers. Ethics and dissemination The findings will be disseminated to the research team and study partners, who will brainstorm ideas for interventions that would address barriers and facilitators to access identified from the interviews. Dissemination will also occur through presentations and peer-reviewed publications and the study participants will receive an executive summary of the findings. The study has been evaluated and approved by the Monash Human Research Ethics Committee. PMID:26656987

  16. Provider-related barriers to rapid HIV testing in U.S. urban non-profit community clinics, community-based organizations (CBOs) and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Laura M; Howerton, Devery; Lange, James; Setodji, Claude Messan; Becker, Kirsten; Klein, David J; Asch, Steven M

    2010-06-01

    We examined provider-reported barriers to rapid HIV testing in U.S. urban non-profit community clinics, community-based organizations (CBOs), and hospitals. 12 primary metropolitan statistical areas (PMSAs; three per region) were sampled randomly, with sampling weights proportional to AIDS case reports. Across PMSAs, all 671 hospitals and a random sample of 738 clinics/CBOs were telephoned for a survey on rapid HIV test availability. Of the 671 hospitals, 172 hospitals were randomly selected for barriers questions, for which 158 laboratory and 136 department staff were eligible and interviewed in 2005. Of the 738 clinics/CBOs, 276 were randomly selected for barriers questions, 206 were reached, and 118 were eligible and interviewed in 2005-2006. In multivariate models, barriers regarding translation of administrative/quality assurance policies into practice were significantly associated with rapid HIV testing availability. For greater rapid testing diffusion, policies are needed to reduce administrative barriers and provide quality assurance training to non-laboratory staff.

  17. Developing Community-School-University Partnerships to Control Youth Access to Tobacco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Leonard A.; Pokorny, Steven B.; Ji, Peter; Kunz, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    Dalton et al. (2001) described the field of community psychology as focused on the interdependent relationships of individuals to communities and society, committed to generating valid knowledge that is useful to communities, and involved in research and action through collaborative partnerships with individuals and communities. These principles…

  18. Latino Access to Community Colleges and Hispanic-Serving Institutions: A National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunez, Anne-Marie; Sparks, P. Johnelle; Hernandez, Eliza A.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the factors that affect Latinos' enrollment in community colleges that are Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs). Compared with community colleges that are not HSIs, HSI community colleges are serving students at greater risk for not completing college. Latinos who are enrolled in community college HSIs, compared with their…

  19. Use and cost of hospitalization in dementia: longitudinal results from a community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Carolyn W.; Cosentino, Stephanie; Ornstein, Katherine; Gu, Yian; Andrews, Howard; Stern, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to examine the relative contribution of functional impairment and cognitive deficits on risk of hospitalization and costs. Methods A prospective cohort of Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older who participated in the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP) were followed approximately every 18 months for over 10 years (1805 never diagnosed with dementia during study period, 221 diagnosed with dementia at enrollment). Hospitalization and Medicare expenditures data (1999–2010) were obtained from Medicare claims. Multivariate analyses were conducted to examine (1) risk of all-cause hospitalizations, (2) hospitalizations from ambulatory care sensitive (ACSs) conditions, (3) hospital length of stay (LOS), and (4) Medicare expenditures. Propensity score matching methods were used to reduce observed differences between demented and non-demented groups at study enrollment. Analyses took into account repeated observations within each individual. Results Compared to propensity-matched individuals without dementia, individuals with dementia had significantly higher risk for all-cause hospitalization, longer LOS, and higher Medicare expenditures. Functional and cognitive deficits were significantly associated with higher risks for hospitalizations, hospital LOS, and Medicare expenditures. Functional and cognitive deficits were associated with higher risks of for some ACS but not all admissions. Conclusions These results allow us to differentiate the impact of functional and cognitive deficits on hospitalizations. To develop strategies to reduce hospitalizations and expenditures, better understanding of which types of hospitalizations and which disease characteristics impact these outcomes will be critical. PMID:25351909

  20. Hospitals for sale.

    PubMed

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve.

  1. Exploring access to cancer control services for Asian-American and Pacific Islander communities in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Tanjasiri, Sora Park; Tran, Jacqueline H; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Foo, Mary Anne; Foong, Heng L; Lee, Susan W; Nguyen, Tu-Uyen Ngoc; Rickles, Jordan; Wang, Jennifer S

    2004-01-01

    During the last 25 years, numerous studies have been conducted to promote breast cancer and cervical cancer screening. Most of these studies focused on individual-level factors predicting screening, but we are unaware of any that directly examined community and ecological influences. The goal of this project, Promoting Access to Health for Pacific Islander and Southeast Asian Women (PATH for Women), was to increase community capacity for breast and cervical cancer screening and follow up in Los Angeles and Orange counties. We focused on Southeast Asian and Pacific Islander women because, although they have the lowest rates for cancer, compared to all other ethnic groups, relatively few programs have specifically targeted Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women to promote and sustain screening practices. The PATH for Women project involved a partnership between 5 community-based organizations and 2 universities, and included 7 Asian-American and Pacific Islander communities: Cambodians, Chamorros, Laotians, Thais, Tongans, Samoans, and Vietnamese. In this paper, we share our experiences in developing a Geographic Information System (GIS)-mapping evaluation component that was used to explore availability and accessibility to culturally responsive breast and cervical cancer screening services for Southeast Asian and Pacific Islander women in all 7 communities. We describe the methods used to develop the maps, and present the preliminary findings that demonstrate significant geographic and language barriers to accessing healthcare providers, services for breast and cervical cancer screening, and follow up, in each of the communities. Finally, we discuss implications for programs designed to promote breast and cervical screening and policy education.

  2. Implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program on the medical-surgical service of a 100-bed community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial stewardship has been promoted as a key strategy for coping with the problems of antimicrobial resistance and Clostridium difficile. Despite the current call for stewardship in community hospitals, including smaller community hospitals, practical examples of stewardship programs are scarce in the reported literature. The purpose of the current report is to describe the implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program on the medical-surgical service of a 100-bed community hospital employing a core strategy of post-prescriptive audit with intervention and feedback. Methods For one hour twice weekly, an infectious diseases physician and a clinical pharmacist audited medical records of inpatients receiving systemic antimicrobial therapy and made non-binding, written recommendations that were subsequently scored for implementation. Defined daily doses (DDDs; World Health Organization Center for Drug Statistics Methodology) and acquisition costs per admission and per patient-day were calculated monthly for all administered antimicrobial agents. Results The antimicrobial stewardship team (AST) made one or more recommendations for 313 of 367 audits during a 16-month intervention period (September 2009 – December 2010). Physicians implemented recommendation(s) from each of 234 (75%) audits, including from 85 of 115 for which discontinuation of all antimicrobial therapy was recommended. In comparison to an 8-month baseline period (January 2009 – August 2009), there was a 22% decrease in defined daily doses per 100 admissions (P = .006) and a 16% reduction per 1000 patient-days (P = .013). There was a 32% reduction in antimicrobial acquisition cost per admission (P = .013) and a 25% acquisition cost reduction per patient-day (P = .022). Conclusions An effective antimicrobial stewardship program was implemented with limited resources on the medical-surgical service of a 100-bed community hospital. PMID:23043720

  3. Development of a Patient Registry to Evaluate Hospital Admissions Related to Chemotherapy Toxicity in a Community Cancer Center1

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Treacy, Jean; Maloney, Betty; Lavino, Antoinette; Jacobson, Joseph O.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Most chemotherapy (CT) administration occurs in routine care settings, yet little is known about treatment-related toxicity outside of clinical trials. To examine trends in toxicity, modify practice, and establish benchmarks for severe toxicity in a community cancer center we created a prospective registry of all treatment-related hospitalizations at the North Shore Medical Center Cancer Center, a community-based cancer facility in Peabody, MA. Methods Eligible population consisted of all adult cancer patients admitted to the hospital within 30 days of their last CT administration. Each admission was reviewed by a panel of hospital staff to determine whether admission was treatment-related. Information on admission was collected using a standard form. Results Between October 2001 and December 2003, there were 365 hospitalizations among patients receiving CT, 117 (32%) of which were deemed treatment-related. The median age of the cohort with treatment-related toxicity was 67 years, and 41% were male. Most frequent diagnoses were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (23%) and colorectal cancer (21%), with 49% of the patients receiving treatment with palliative intent. The most common reasons for admission were gastrointestinal toxicity or infection. The mean length of stay was 7.1 days. Seven patients (6%) died during hospitalization. When the registry was reviewed to identify areas where care may be improved, several admissions for decadron-related hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients with myeloma were noted. This led to introduction of glucose monitoring guidelines with no subsequent admissions for this toxicity since then. Conclusions About one third of hospital admissions in patients receiving CT are treatment-related and most occur in patients with advanced disease. Collection of data on toxicity in the routine care setting is feasible and may facilitate quality improvement. PMID:20871674

  4. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Community in Luanda, Angola: Blurred Boundaries with the Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Teresa; Coelho, Céline; Santos Silva, Isabel; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Although the nosocomial prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Angola is over 60% and one of the highest in Africa, the extent of MRSA in the community is unknown. To fill this gap, we conducted a hospital-based study in which 158 children attending the emergency ward and ambulatory services of a pediatric hospital in Luanda, the capital of Angola, were screened for S. aureus nasal colonization. Overall, 70 (44.3%) individuals were colonized with S. aureus, of which 20 (28.6%) carried MRSA, resulting in a prevalence of 12.7% (20/158) of MRSA in the population screened. Molecular characterization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, and SCCmec typing distributed the isolates into two major MRSA clones and one dominant methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) lineage, corresponding to the main clones circulating in hospitals in Luanda. The MRSA isolates mainly belonged to clones A (PFGE type A, spa type t105, ST5-IVa-65%) and B (PFGE B, t3869, ST88-IVa-30%), while MSSA isolates mainly belonged to clone L (PFGE type L, t861, ST508-42%). S. aureus isolates showed resistance to penicillin (96%), rifampin (87%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (21%). In conclusion, the prevalence of MRSA among children in the community in Luanda is high and seems to originate from hospitals, warranting continuous monitoring and implementation of additional infection control measures.

  5. Food Choices and Consequences for the Nutritional Status: Insights into Nutrition Transition in an Hospital Community

    PubMed Central

    Piple, Jitendra; Gora, Ranjeet; Purbiya, Pragati; Puliyel, Ashish; Chugh, Parul; Bahl, Pinky; Puliyel, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although economic development is generally accompanied by improvements in the overall nutritional status of the country’s population the ‘nutritional transition’ often involves a shift to high energy diets and less exercise with negative consequences. This pilot study was done to examine if education of parents operates at the household level to influence dietary choices and the nutritional status of children in a small community of hospital workers. Material and Methods 3 groups of persons with varying skill and education levels participated. Weighed food logs were used in all households to calculate ‘adult equivalent’ per-capita-consumption. Nutrients were calculated using nutrients calculator software. BMI was used to classify children as underweight, normal weight and overweight. Results 128 individuals participated from 30 families included 47 children. 10 children (21%) were underweight, 29 (62%) were normal and 8 (17%) were overweight. Energy consumption was highest in families with overweight children 2692 +/-502 compared to 2259 +/-359 in families with normal weight and 2031+/-354 in the family of underweight children. These differences were statistically significant. 42% underweight children belonged to Class 1 at the lowest skill level and there were no overweight children in this group. Most of the overweight children belonged to Class 2. In Class 3 there were no underweight children and the majority was normal weight children. Conclusion Underweight children came from the poorer households. Per capita intake of the family as a whole correlated well with BMI in the children. There was increased obesity in middle income families belonging to Class 2—probably in families who move up the scale from deprivation. Nutritional status in children correlated mostly with maternal education status. PMID:26559817

  6. Shifting contours of boundaries: an exploration of inter-agency integration between hospital and community interprofessional diabetes programs.

    PubMed

    Wong, Rene; Breiner, Petra; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2014-09-01

    This article reports on research into the relationships that emerged between hospital-based and community-based interprofessional diabetes programs involved in inter-agency care. Using constructivist grounded theory methodology we interviewed a purposive theoretical sample of 21 clinicians and administrators from both types of programs. Emergent themes were identified through a process of constant comparative analysis. Initial boundaries were constructed based on contrasts in beliefs, practices and expertise. In response to bureaucratic and social pressures, boundaries were redefined in a way that created role uncertainty and disempowered community programs, ultimately preventing collaboration. We illustrate the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of social and symbolic boundaries in inter-agency diabetes care and the tacit ways in which hospitals can maintain a power position at the expense of other actors in the field. As efforts continue in Canada and elsewhere to move knowledge and resources into community sectors, we highlight the importance of hospitals seeing beyond their own interests and adopting more altruistic models of inter-agency integration.

  7. Shifting contours of boundaries: an exploration of inter-agency integration between hospital and community interprofessional diabetes programs.

    PubMed

    Wong, Rene; Breiner, Petra; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2014-09-01

    This article reports on research into the relationships that emerged between hospital-based and community-based interprofessional diabetes programs involved in inter-agency care. Using constructivist grounded theory methodology we interviewed a purposive theoretical sample of 21 clinicians and administrators from both types of programs. Emergent themes were identified through a process of constant comparative analysis. Initial boundaries were constructed based on contrasts in beliefs, practices and expertise. In response to bureaucratic and social pressures, boundaries were redefined in a way that created role uncertainty and disempowered community programs, ultimately preventing collaboration. We illustrate the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of social and symbolic boundaries in inter-agency diabetes care and the tacit ways in which hospitals can maintain a power position at the expense of other actors in the field. As efforts continue in Canada and elsewhere to move knowledge and resources into community sectors, we highlight the importance of hospitals seeing beyond their own interests and adopting more altruistic models of inter-agency integration. PMID:24766617

  8. Separate treatment of hospital and urban wastewaters: A real scale comparison of effluents and their effect on microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Chonova, Teofana; Keck, François; Labanowski, Jérôme; Montuelle, Bernard; Rimet, Frédéric; Bouchez, Agnès

    2016-01-15

    Hospital wastewaters (HWW) contain wider spectrum and higher quantity of pharmaceuticals than urban wastewaters (UWW), but they are generally discharged in sewers without pretreatment. Since traditional urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) are not designed to treat HWWs, treated effluents may still contain pollutants that could impair receiving aquatic environments. Hence, a better understanding of the effect of pharmaceuticals in the environment is required. Biofilms are effective "biological sensors" for assessing the environmental effects of pharmaceuticals due to their ability to respond rapidly to physical, chemical and biological fluctuations by changes in their structure and composition. This study evaluated the efficiency of biological treatment with conventional activated sludge system performed parallel on HWW and UWW. Furthermore, six successive monthly colonizations of biofilms were done on autoclaved stones, placed in grid-baskets in the hospital treated effluents (HTE) and urban treated effluents (UTE). The biomass of these biofilms as well as the structure and diversity of their bacterial communities were investigated. Results showed better treatment efficiency for phosphate and nitrite/nitrate during the treatment of UWW. Pharmaceuticals from all investigated therapeutic classes (beta-blockers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, analgesics and anticonvulsants) were efficiently removed, except for carbamazepine. The removal efficiency of the antibiotics, NSAIDs and beta-blockers was higher during the treatment of HWW. HTE and UTE shaped the bacterial communities in different ways. Higher concentrations of pharmaceuticals in the HTE caused adapted development of the microbial community, leading to less developed biomass and lower bacterial diversity. Seasonal changes in solar irradiance and temperature, caused changes in the community composition of biofilms in both effluents. According to the removal efficiency of pharmaceuticals

  9. Access and acceptability of community-based services for older Greek migrants in Australia: user and provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Catherine; Panagiotopoulos, Georgia; Tsianikas, Michael; Newman, Lareen; Walker, Ruth

    2013-03-01

    In most developed nations, ageing migrants represent a growing proportion of the older population. Policies that emphasise care in the community depend on older migrants having access to formal services along with informal support, yet little is known about how older migrants experience community-based formal services. By examining the views of both Greek elders in Australia and those of formal service providers, this research fills an important gap in the literature around access to and acceptability of formal community-based services for older migrants. A research team including two Greek background researchers used existing social groups and a snowball sampling method to conduct face-to-face interviews and focus groups with seventy older Greeks in Adelaide, Australia. In addition, 22 community-based service providers were interviewed over the telephone. Results from users and providers showed that while many older Greeks experience service access issues, they also relied heavily on family for support and assistance at home. Reliance on family was both in preference to formal services or where formal services were used, to locate, negotiate and monitor such services. Common barriers identified by both groups included cost, transport and availability, but additional challenges were posed by language, literacy and cultural attitudes. Demographic changes including greater employment mobility and female workforce participation among adult children will have implications for both formal and informal care providers. Formal service providers need to ensure that services are promoted and delivered to take account of the important role of family in informal support while also addressing the access challenges posed by language and literacy. Research conducted by researchers from the same cultural background in the respondent's native language can further advance knowledge in this area. PMID:23009742

  10. Accessibility and Use of Recreational Sports Facilities at Florida's Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Michele, Douglas

    In an effort to determine the percent of use of sports facilities on Florida community college campuses, a survey was sent to community college presidents and campus recreation directors throughout the Florida Community College System (FCCS). The survey, distributed to all 25 branch campuses and 28 primary campuses in the system, was designed to…

  11. Increasing Community Access to Solar: Designing and Developing a Shared Solar Photovoltaic System (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    This document introduces the Energy Department's new Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project Development. The guide is designed to help those who want to develop community shared solar projects - from community organizers and advocates to utility managers and government officials - navigate the process of developing shared systems, from early planning to implementation.

  12. Best Practices in Community Garden Management to Address Participation, Water Access, and Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Luke; Lawson, Laura

    2015-01-01

    As community gardens expand across the U.S., Extension professionals can support them not only in horticultural education but also in planning and organization. Knowledge of community garden management is helpful in this regard. Existing research focuses on outcomes and criteria for successful gardens, but is less clear about how community gardens…

  13. Restructuring the organizational culture of medical institutions: a study on a community hospital in the I-Lan area.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2008-09-01

    Launched in 1995, the National Health Insurance Program has imposed tremendous pressure on hospitals across Taiwan. As a result, most hospitals, especially those of small and medium scale, have gone to great lengths to restructure their organizations in order to continue operating under the new medical setting. Using a community hospital in I-Lan area as its focus, this study attempts to identify the process of organizational culture restructuring in medical institutions. This process includes the two phases of (1) analyzing difficulties faced, with particular emphasis on three problems associated with the existing organizational culture and (2) restructuring the organizational culture and evaluating the restructuring process, with emphasis on four strategies geared to modify the organizational culture and a pre-and-post quasi-experimental study to evaluate outcomes. This study uses a triangulated data collection approach comprising four qualitative data collection techniques that include semi-structured interviews, focus groups, reflective participant observation, and critical review of relevant organizational materials. The evaluation reveals a significant level of difference between employee perspectives on organizational culture before and after restructuring. In short, employees expressed that, after the restructuring, they feel more respected and recognized than before. Research results, based on an organization's cultural restructuring process, show the process by which a hospital successfully restructured its organizational culture. Empirical data derived from the restructuring process may serve as reference for other hospitals contemplating restructuring.

  14. Accessing community-based and long-term care services: challenges facing persons with frontotemporal dementia and their families.

    PubMed

    Morhardt, Darby

    2011-11-01

    There are several barriers to accessing services for persons with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and few studies have examined service needs and satisfaction with services for family caregivers of persons with FTD. Persons with FTD and their families have reported consistent difficulties in their attempts to access care and support. These are: (1) difficulty obtaining a diagnosis; (2) financial concerns due to loss of employment, job-related income; (3) problems accessing social security disability insurance; and (4) lack of adequate community-based and long-term care services and resources. Successful care practices such as use of an interdisciplinary team and helpful care models such as person-centered care and the antecedent-behavior-consequence method are described. Further investigation and research are needed to understand best care strategies for persons with FTD. PMID:21826393

  15. Helping members of a community-based health insurance scheme access quality inpatient care through development of a preferred provider system in rural Gujarat

    PubMed Central

    RANSON, M. KENT; SINHA, TARA; GANDHI, FENIL; JAYSWAL, RUPAL; MILLS, ANNE J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe and analyse the experience of piloting a preferred provider system (PPS) for rural members of Vimo SEWA, a fixed-indemnity, community-based health insurance (CBHI) scheme run by the Self-Employed Women’s Association (SEWA). The objectives of the PPS were (i) to facilitate access to hospitalization by providing financial benefits at the time of service utilization; (ii) to shift the burden of compiling a claim away from members and towards Vimo SEWA staff; and (iii) to direct members to inpatient facilities of acceptable quality. The PPS was launched between August and October 2004, in 8 subdistricts covering 15 000 insured. The impact of the scheme was analysed using data from a household survey of claimants and qualitative data from in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. The PPS appears to have been successful in terms of two of the three primary objectives—it has transferred much of the burden of compiling a health insurance claim onto Vimo SEWA staff, and it has directed members to inpatient facilities with acceptable levels of technical quality (defined in terms of structural indicators). However, even under the PPS, user fees pose a financial barrier, as the insured have to mobilize funds to cover the costs of medicines, supplies, registration fee, etc. before receipt of cash payment from Vimo SEWA. Other barriers to the success of the PPS were the geographic inaccessibility of some of the selected hospitals, lack of awareness about the PPS among members and a variety of administrative problems. This pilot project provides useful lessons relating to strategic purchasing by CBHI schemes and, more broadly, managed care in India. In particular, the pragmatic approach taken to assessing hospitals and identifying preferred providers is likely to be useful elsewhere. PMID:17203684

  16. An evidence-based strategy for transitioning patients from the hospital to the community.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Improving transitional care from hospital to home requires comprehensive and highly coordinated intervention during the immediate days following discharge. The Hospital to Home Program addresses both medical and social needs, prevents unnecessary readmissions, promotes improvements in patient perceptions of physical and mental health, and results in excellent patient satisfaction.

  17. Transforming Health Care Coalitions From Hospitals to Whole of Community: Lessons Learned From Two Large Health Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Scott; Wargo, Michael; Winslow, Walter

    2015-12-01

    A health care emergency preparedness coalition (coalition) is a group of health care organizations, public safety agencies, and public health partners that join forces for the common cause of making their communities safer, healthier, and more resilient. Coalitions have been characterized as being focused on hospital systems instead of the health care of the community as a whole. We discuss 2 examples of coalition partners that use a more inclusive approach to planning, response, and recovery. The first is a large health care system spread across 23 states, and the other is a public safety agency in northeast Pennsylvania that took the lead to address the preparedness and response toward a large influx of burn patients and grew to encompass all aspects of community health care.

  18. A multilevel intervention to increase community hospital use of alteplase for acute stroke (INSTINCT): a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Phillip A; Meurer, William J; Frederiksen, Shirley M; Kalbfleisch, John D; Xu, Zhenzhen; Haan, Mary N; Silbergleit, Robert; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Use of alteplase improves outcome in some patients with stroke. Several types of barrier frequently prevent its use. We assessed whether a standardised, barrier-assessment, multicomponent intervention could increase alteplase use in community hospitals in Michigan, USA. Methods In a cluster-randomised controlled trial, we selected adult, non-specialty, acute-care community hospitals in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, USA. Eligible hospitals discharged at least 100 patients who had had a stroke per year, had less than 100 000 visits to the emergency department per year, and were not academic comprehensive stroke centres. Using a computer-generated randomisation sequence, we selected 12 matched pairs of eligible hospitals. Within pairs, the hospitals were allocated to intervention or control groups with restricted randomisation in January, 2007. Between January, 2007, and December, 2007, intervention hospitals implemented a multicomponent intervention that included qualitative and quantitative assessment of barriers to alteplase use and ways to address the findings, and provided additional support. The primary outcome was change in alteplase use in patients with stroke in emergency departments between the pre-intervention period (January, 2005, to December, 2006) and the post-intervention period (January, 2008, to January, 2010). Physicians in participating hospitals and the coordinating centre could not be masked to group assignment, but were masked to progress made in paired control hospitals. External medical reviewers who were masked to group assignment assessed outcomes. We did intention-to-treat (ITT) and target-population (without one pair that was excluded after randomisation) analyses. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00349479. Findings All 24 hospitals completed the study. Overall, 745 of 40 823 patients with stroke received intravenous alteplase treatment. In the ITT analysis, the proportion of patients with

  19. Data Management for Flexible Access - Implementation and Lessons Learned from work with Multiple User Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, K. K.; Scott, S.; Hudspeth, W. B.

    2012-12-01

    There is no shortage of community-specific and generic data discovery and download platforms and protocols (e.g. CUAHSI HIS, DataONE, GeoNetwork Open Source, GeoPortal, OGC CSW, OAI PMH), documentation standards (e.g. FGDC, ISO 19115, EML, Dublin Core), data access and visualization standards and models (e.g. OGC WxS, OpenDAP), and general-purpose web service models (i.e. REST & SOAP) upon which Geo-informatics cyberinfrastructure (CI) may be built. When attempting to develop a robust platform that may service a wide variety of users and use cases the challenge is one of identifying which existing platform (if any) may support those current needs while also allowing for future expansion for additional capabilities. In the case of the implementation of a data storage, discovery and delivery platform to support the multiple projects at the Earth Data Analysis Center at UNM, no single platform or protocol met the joint requirements of two initial applications (the New Mexico Resource Geographic Information System [http://rgis.unm.edu] and the New Mexico EPSCoR Data Portal [http://nmepscor.org/dataportal]) and furthermore none met anticipated additional requirements as new applications of the platform emerged. As a result of this assessment three years ago EDAC embarked on the development of the Geographic Storage, Transformation, and Retrieval Engine (GSToRE) platform as a general purpose platform upon which n-tiered geospatially enabled data intensive applications could be built. When initially released in 2010 the focus was on the publication of dynamically generated Open Geospatial Consortium services based upon a PostgreSQL/PostGIS backend database. The identification of additional service interface requirements (implementation of the DataONE API and CUAHSI WaterML services), use cases provided by the NM EPSCoR education working group, and expanded metadata publication needs have led to a significant update to the underlying data management tier for GSToRE - the

  20. Acceptability of Delivering and Accessing Health Information Through Text Messaging Among Community Health Advisors

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Janice; Mohiuddin, Mohammed Omar; McNees, Patrick; Scarinci, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Communication technologies can play a significant role in decreasing communication inequalities and cancer disparities by promoting cancer control and enhancing population and individual health. Studies have shown that technology, such as the mobile phone short message service (SMS) or text messaging, can be an effective health communication strategy that influences individuals’ health-related decisions, behaviors, and outcomes. Objective The purpose of this study was to explore usage of communication technologies, assess the acceptability of mobile technology for delivery and access of health information, and identify cancer and health information needs among Deep South Network for Cancer Control trained Community Health Advisors as Research Partners (CHARPs). Methods A mixed-method design was used, and a triangulation protocol was followed to combine quantitative and qualitative data. Focus groups (4 focus groups; n=37) and self-administered surveys (n=77) were conducted to determine CHARPs mobile phone and text message usage. The objective was to include identification of barriers and facilitators to a mobile phone intervention. Results All participants were African American (37/37, 100%), 11/37 (89%) were women, and the mean age was 53.4 (SD 13.9; focus groups) and 59.9 (SD 8.7; survey). Nearly all (33/37, 89%) of focus group participants reported owning a mobile phone. Of those, 8/33 (24%) owned a smartphone, 22/33 (67%) had a text messaging plan, and 18/33 (55%) and 11/33 (33%) received and sent text messages several times a week or day, respectively. Similar responses were seen among the survey participants, with 75/77 (97%) reporting owning a mobile phone, and of those, 22/75 (30%) owned a smartphone, 39/75 (53%) had a text messaging plan, and 37/75 (50%) received and 27/75 (37%) sent text messages several times a week or day. The benefits of a text messaging system mentioned by focus group participants included alternative form of

  1. Two Obese Patients with Presumptive Diagnosis of Anaphylactoid Syndrome of Pregnancy Presenting at a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kradel, Brian K.; Hinson, Scarlett B.; Smith, Carr J.

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Female, 21 • Female, 29 Final Diagnosis: Anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy Symptoms: Coagulation dysfunctional Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardiac intensive care Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology Objective: Rare disease Background: Anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy (ASP) is a rare but extremely serious complication, with an estimated incidence in North America of 1 in 15 200 deliveries. Despite its rarity, ASP is responsible for approximately 10% of all childbirth-associated deaths in the United States. At present, there is no validated biomarker or specific set of risk factors sufficiently predictive of ASP risk to incorporate into clinical practice. Toward the goal of developing a methodology predictive of an impending ASP event for use by obstetricians, anesthesiologists, and other practitioners participating in infant deliveries, physicians encountering an ASP event have been encouraged to report the occurrence of a case and its biologically plausible risk factors. Case Report: Herein, we report on 2 patients who presented with a presumptive diagnosis of ASP to the delivery unit of a community hospital. Patient One was a 21-year-old, obese (5′11″ tall, 250 lbs., BMI 34.9) white female, 1 pregnancy, no live births (G1P0), estimated gestational age (EGA) 40.2 weeks. Patient Two was a 29-year-old, obese (5′7″ tall, 307 lbs., BMI 48.1) Hispanic female, second pregnancy, with 1 previous live birth via C-section (G2P1-0-0-1). Her pregnancy was at gestational age 38 weeks plus 2 days. Conclusions: Patient One had 2 possible risk factors: administration of Pitocin to induce labor and post-coital spotting from recent intercourse. Patient Two suffered premature rupture of the placental membranes. Both Patient One and Patient Two had very high body mass indices (BMIs), at the 97th and 99th percentiles, respectively. In the relatively few cases of anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy described to date, this is the first report

  2. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: Prevalence and Risk Factors in a Single Community-Based Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Ki; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are Gram-negative bacteria with increasing prevalence of infection worldwide. In Korea, 25 cases of CPE isolates were reported by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2011. Most CPE cases were detected mainly at tertiary referral hospitals. We analyzed the prevalence and risk factors for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in a mid-sized community-based hospital in Korea. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed all consecutive episodes of Enterobacteriaceae in a mid-sized community-based hospital from January 2013 to February 2014. CRE was defined as organisms of Enterobacteriaceae showing decreased susceptibility to carbapenems. Risk factors for CRE were evaluated by a case–double control design. Carbapenemase was confirmed for CRE using a combined disc test. Results During 229,710 patient-days, 2,510 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were obtained. A total of 41 (1.6%) CRE isolates were enrolled in the study period. Thirteen species (31.7%) were Enterobacter aerogenes, 8 (19.5%) Klebsiella pneumoniae, 5 (12.2%) Enterobacter cloacae, and 15 other species of Enterobacteriaceae, respectively. Among the 41 isolates, only one (2.4%) E. aerogenes isolate belonged to CPE. For evaluation of risk factors, a total of 111 patients were enrolled and this included 37 patients in the CRE group, 37 in control group I (identical species), and 37 in control group II (different species). Based on multivariate analysis, regularly visiting the outpatient clinic was a risk factor for CRE acquisition in the control group I (P = 0.003), while vascular catheter and Charlson comorbidity index score ≥ 3 were risk factors in control group II (P = 0.010 and 0.011, each). Patients with CRE were more likely to experience a reduced level of consciousness, use a vasopressor, be under intensive care, and suffer from acute kidney injury. However, CRE was not an independent predictor of mortality

  3. Long-term morbidity and mortality after hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Jennie; Eurich, Dean T; Majumdar, Sumit R; Jin, Yan; Marrie, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term sequelae of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Therefore, we describe the long-term morbidity and mortality of patients after pneumonia requiring hospitalization. We specifically hypothesized that the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI), designed to predict 30-day pneumonia-related mortality, would also be associated with longer-term all-cause mortality. Between 2000 and 2002, 3415 adults with CAP admitted to 6 hospitals in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, were prospectively enrolled in a population-based cohort. At the time of hospital admission, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected and the PSI was calculated for each patient. Postdischarge outcomes through to 2006 were ascertained using multiple linked administrative databases. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, hospital admissions, and re-hospitalization for pneumonia over a maximum of 5.4 years of follow-up. Follow-up data were available for 3284 (96%) patients; 66%were > or =65 years of age, 53% were male, and according to the PSI fully 63% were predicted to have greater than 18% 30-day pneumonia-related mortality (that is, PSI class IV-V). Median follow-up was 3.8 years. The 30-day, 1-year, and end of study mortality rates were 12%, 28%, and 53%, respectively. Overall, 82(19%) patients aged <45 years died compared with 1456 (67%) patients aged > or =65 years (hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.06-6.34). Male patients were more likely to die than female patients during follow-up (971 [56%] vs. 767 [49%], respectively; HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.13-1.37). Initial PSI classification predicted not only 30-day mortality, but also long-term postdischarge mortality, with 92 (15%) of PSI class I-II patients dying compared with 616 (82%) PSI class V patients (HR, 11.80; 95% CI, 4.70-14.70). Of 2950 patients who survived the initial CAP hospitalization, 72% were hospitalized again (median, 2 admissions over follow-up) and 16% were re-hospitalized with

  4. Development of a hospital-based cardiovascular risk factor reduction program for the community: Beyond Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Lipon, K R; Carlson, L R

    1994-01-01

    The current and future trend of the health care delivery system is prevention and health promotion. Long-term viability of hospitals depends on meeting community health education needs. With heart disease as the leading cause of death among adults nationwide, hospitals have an opportunity to offer appropriate lifestyle theory and guidance beyond conventional medical and interventional practices. Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City is one of the first hospitals in Northern California to develop a comprehensive outpatient program to complement its world renowned cardiovascular services. This paper details the Beyond Heart Disease (BHD) program designed by nurses. The goal of this program is to effectively help people reduce their risk of coronary events via successful long-term risk factor interventions. BHD, a unique medical and business venture, spans a six-week period. Group members meet in the evening for two hours, twice a week. The program includes lipid testing, a complete program syllabus, didactic lectures, small group discussion, support and goal-setting, nutritional analysis, and experiential stress reduction sessions.

  5. Fighting Degree Creep: AACC Fights to Protect Access to the Health Professions at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Roxanne

    2009-01-01

    The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) works with community colleges across the nation to uphold the value of the education they provide, in states where proposals to devaluate associate-degree education are openly discussed up to the conference rooms of state legislatures as well as in states where the risk is not yet apparent.…

  6. Providing Access to Developmental Reading Courses at the Community College: An Evaluation of Three Presentation Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Susan K.

    2010-01-01

    Rural community colleges often face the problem of having to cancel classes due to low enrollment. To eliminate this problem one western community college developed several presentation modes for College Reading I (CR1) to combine low-enrollment classes. This study was a program evaluation on non-equivalent groups to determine which presentation…

  7. A Promising Development: "Promise" Scholarships Targeting Individual Communities Reduce Barriers to College Access--and Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses Promise Scholarships in community colleges and sources of funding. The following community colleges and their scholarships are mentioned in this article: (1) Oregon Promise, Oregon; (2) Ventura College Promise, California; (3) Kalamazoo Promise, Michigan; (4) Pittsburgh Promise, Pennsylvania; (5) SEED Scholarship, Delaware;…

  8. ERIC Review: The Impact of Financial Crisis on Access and Support Services in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Caroline Q.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the impact of fiscal contraction on community colleges. Explores how reduced state appropriations have adversely affected community college instruction and student support systems. Research shows that because instruction and student support services suffer when budget is reduced, fiscal contraction can hamper the ability of colleges to…

  9. Cable Television in the Cities: Community Control, Public Access, and Minority Ownership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Charles, Ed.

    This report is aimed at urban groups, particularly minority groups, who want to participate in cable television (CATV) planning and ownership in their communities. The first section of the report describes the growth of CATV and the potential of CATV to help or hurt minority communities. Part two states "although this chapter focuses on…

  10. The Impact of Facebook Access in Creating a Sense of Community in Tourism and Recreation Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuma, Lorie A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that college students use social networking sites such as Facebook to establish friendships, maintain communication, and foster a sense of community; research also has indicated that many college instructors do not. Many college faculty acknowledge the importance of a sense of community in the classroom but are…

  11. Unmet Need and Unclaimed Aid: Increasing Access to Financial Aid for Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Julia I.

    2013-01-01

    In California, public financial aid aimed at low-income students is not reaching some of the poorest students enrolled in community colleges. Outreach efforts to students are important, but high schools and community colleges must also make financial aid receipt a priority.

  12. Community Colleges as Gateways and Gatekeepers: Moving beyond the Access "Saga" toward Outcome Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Alicia C.

    2007-01-01

    Community colleges are essential--though often overlooked--institutions of higher education. In this essay, Alicia C. Dowd draws attention to the challenges facing community colleges as they seek to balance their roles as both gateways and gatekeepers with their multiple missions, which include meeting the diverse needs of students at the…

  13. Developing Access between Universities and Local Community Groups: A University Helpdesk in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Angie; Northmore, Simon; Gerhardt, Chloe; Rodriguez, Polly

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer the University of Brighton's Community-University Partnership Programme (CUPP) Helpdesk as a model of an "enabling platform" for university-community engagement. Despite the growth of practical and scholarly activity in this area, there is a relative lack of research focused on the processes by which higher…

  14. High prevalence of community-acquired norovirus gastroenteritis among hospitalized children: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Galan, V; Sánchez-Fauqier, A; Obando, I; Montero, V; Fernandez, M; Torres, M J; Neth, O; Aznar-Martin, J

    2011-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) causes significant morbidity, especially in young children, and frequently requires hospitalization even in developed countries. Surveillance studies of AGE are important to determine the prevalence and variety of bacterial and viral pathogens, to initiate targeted preventive measures, such as vaccine programmes, and to monitor its impact. A prospective study was conducted in children <5 years old, admitted with AGE between April 2006 and April 2007 to the Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Seville, Spain. Demographic and clinical data were collected and patients followed-up after hospital discharge. A stool sample from each child was screened for enteropathogenic bacteria and tested by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for rotavirus, astrovirus, norovirus and sapovirus and by the immunochromatographic method for enteric adenoviruses. Norovirus was the most common pathogen in hospitalized children, being detected in 27%, followed by rotavirus 21%. Mixed infection occurred in nearly 20% of all norovirus infections and was most commonly associated with Salmonella spp. Rotavirus infection was associated with an overall higher severe clinical score compared with norovirus infection. Lactose intolerance was observed in 29 children (7.5%) and most commonly due to rotavirus infection (p <0.001). Seizures were reported in four children. Norovirus was the commonest cause of AGE in hospitalized children <5 years during 2006-2007 in Seville, Spain. The use of these molecular techniques should be included routinely for the surveillance of sporadic cases and outbreaks of norovirus AGE in children attending hospitals as well as healthcare centres.

  15. Delivery Complications Associated With Prenatal Care Access for Medicaid-Insured Mothers in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Bennett, Kevin J.; Probst, Janice C.

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy complications affect many women. It is likely that some complications can be avoided through routine primary and prenatal care of reasonable quality. The authors examined access to health care during pregnancy for mothers insured by Medicaid. The access indicator is potentially avoidable maternity complications (PAMCs). Potentially…

  16. Implementing "lean" principles to improve the efficiency of the endoscopy department of a community hospital: a case study.

    PubMed

    Laing, Karen; Baumgartner, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Many endoscopy units are looking for ways to improve their efficiency without increasing the number of staff, purchasing additional equipment, or making the patients feel as if they have been rushed through the care process. To accomplish this, a few hospitals have looked to other industries for help. Recently, "lean" methods and tools from the manufacturing industry, have been applied successfully in health care systems, and have proven to be an effective way to eliminate waste and redundancy in workplace processes. The "lean" method and tools in service organizations focuses on providing the most efficient and effective flow of service and products. This article will describe the journey of one endoscopy department within a community hospital to illustrate application of "lean" methods and tools and results.

  17. Advancing Long Tail Data Capture and Access Through Trusted, Community-Driven Data Services at the IEDA Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Hsu, L.; Arko, R. A.; Walker, J. D.; O'hara, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    Substantial volumes of data in the Earth Sciences are collected in small- to medium-size projects by individual investigators or small research teams, known as the 'Long Tail' of science. Traditionally, these data have largely stayed 'in the dark', i.e. they have not been properly archived, and have therefore been inaccessible and underutilized. The primary reason has been the lack of appropriate infrastructure, from adequate repositories to resources and support for investigators to properly manage their data, to community standards and best practices. Lack of credit for data management and for the data themselves has contributed to the reluctance of investigators to share their data. IEDA (Integrated Earth Data Applications), a NSF-funded data facility for solid earth geoscience data, has developed a comprehensive suite of data services that are designed to address the concerns and needs of investigators. IEDA's data publication service registers datasets with DOI and ensures their proper citation and attribution. IEDA is working with publishers on advanced linkages between datasets in the IEDA repository and scientific online articles to facilitate access to the data, enhance their visibility, and augment their use and citation. IEDA's investigator support ranges from individual support for data management to tools, tutorials, and virtual or face-to-face workshops that guide and assist investigators with data management planning, data submission, and data documentation. A critical aspect of IEDA's concept has been the disciplinary expertise within the team and its strong liaison with the science community, as well as a community-based governance. These have been fundamental to gain the trust and support of the community that have lead to significantly improved data preservation and access in the communities served by IEDA.

  18. Clinical and economic value of performing dialysis vascular access procedures in a freestanding office-based center as compared with the hospital outpatient department among Medicare ESRD beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Al; El-Gamil, Audrey M; Shimer, Matthew T; DaVanzo, Joan E; Urbanes, Aris Q; Beathard, Gerald A; Litchfield, Terry Foust

    2013-01-01

    Dialysis vascular access (DVA) care is being increasingly provided in freestanding office-based centers (FOC). Small-scale studies have suggested that DVA care in a FOC results in favorable patient outcomes and lower costs. To further evaluate this issue, data were drawn from incident and prevalent ESRD patients within a 4-year sample (2006-2009) of Medicare claims (USRDS) on cases who receive at least 80% of their DVA care in a FOC or a hospital outpatient department (HOPD). Using propensity score matching techniques, cases with a similar clinical and demographic profile from these two sites of service were matched. Medicare utilization, payments, and patient outcomes were compared across the matched cohorts (n = 27,613). Patients treated in the FOC had significantly better outcomes (p < 0.001), including fewer related or unrelated hospitalizations (3.8 vs. 4.4), vascular access-related infections (0.18 vs. 0.29), and septicemia-related hospitalizations (0.15 vs. 0.18). Mortality rate was lower (47.9% vs. 53.5%) as were PMPM payments ($4,982 vs. $5,566). This study shows that DVA management provided in a FOC has multiple advantages over that provided in a HOPD.

  19. Outreach services to improve access to health care in South Africa: lessons from three community health worker programmes

    PubMed Central

    Nxumalo, Nonhlanhla; Goudge, Jane; Thomas, Liz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In South Africa, there are renewed efforts to strengthen primary health care and community health worker (CHW) programmes. This article examines three South African CHW programmes, a small local non-governmental organisation (NGO), a local satellite of a national NGO, and a government-initiated service, that provide a range of services from home-based care, childcare, and health promotion to assist clients in overcoming poverty-related barriers to health care. Methods The comparative case studies, located in Eastern Cape and Gauteng, were investigated using qualitative methods. Thematic analysis was used to identify factors that constrain and enable outreach services to improve access to care. Results The local satellite (of a national NGO), successful in addressing multi-dimensional barriers to care, provided CHWs with continuous training focused on the social determinants of ill-health, regular context-related supervision, and resources such as travel and cell-phone allowances. These workers engaged with, and linked their clients to, agencies in a wide range of sectors. Relationships with participatory structures at community level stimulated coordinated responses from service providers. In contrast, an absence of these elements curtailed the ability of CHWs in the small NGO and government-initiated service to provide effective outreach services or to improve access to care. Conclusion Significant investment in resources, training, and support can enable CHWs to address barriers to care by negotiating with poorly functioning government services and community participation structures. PMID:23364101

  20. Using a service sector segmented approach to identify community stakeholders who can improve access to suicide prevention services for veterans.

    PubMed

    Matthieu, Monica M; Gardiner, Giovanina; Ziegemeier, Ellen; Buxton, Miranda

    2014-04-01

    Veterans in need of social services may access many different community agencies within the public and private sectors. Each of these settings has the potential to be a pipeline for attaining needed health, mental health, and benefits services; however, many service providers lack information on how to conceptualize where Veterans go for services within their local community. This article describes a conceptual framework for outreach that uses a service sector segmented approach. This framework was developed to aid recruitment of a provider-based sample of stakeholders (N = 70) for a study on improving access to the Department of Veterans Affairs and community-based suicide prevention services. Results indicate that although there are statistically significant differences in the percent of Veterans served by the different service sectors (F(9, 55) = 2.71, p = 0.04), exposure to suicidal Veterans and providers' referral behavior is consistent across the sectors. Challenges to using this framework include isolating the appropriate sectors for targeted outreach efforts. The service sector segmented approach holds promise for identifying and referring at-risk Veterans in need of services.

  1. Transforming Practice Through Publication: A Community Hospital Approach to the Creation of a Research-Intensive Environment.

    PubMed

    Brockopp, Dorothy; Hill, Karen; Moe, Krista; Wright, Lonnie

    2016-01-01

    Publication of 28 data-based articles in peer-reviewed journals over a 4-year period is the result of a commitment to conducting and publishing research at a 383-bed Magnet®-redesignated community hospital. The research-intensive environment in nursing at this institution supports publication as the desired outcome of all projects. The provision of appropriate resources, the development of 2 models to guide the conduct of research and nursing leadership that encourages and supports research activities enables nurses to submit manuscripts describing their work. Steps taken to support the publication of findings can be adapted for other practice settings.

  2. Transforming Practice Through Publication: A Community Hospital Approach to the Creation of a Research-Intensive Environment.

    PubMed

    Brockopp, Dorothy; Hill, Karen; Moe, Krista; Wright, Lonnie

    2016-01-01

    Publication of 28 data-based articles in peer-reviewed journals over a 4-year period is the result of a commitment to conducting and publishing research at a 383-bed Magnet®-redesignated community hospital. The research-intensive environment in nursing at this institution supports publication as the desired outcome of all projects. The provision of appropriate resources, the development of 2 models to guide the conduct of research and nursing leadership that encourages and supports research activities enables nurses to submit manuscripts describing their work. Steps taken to support the publication of findings can be adapted for other practice settings. PMID:26641469

  3. Trials and tribulations of year one: initiating cross-continuum care management in a community-based hospital.

    PubMed

    Edson, J W; Hyland-Hill, B M; Kronlund, S

    2000-02-01

    To prepare to enter the Last Great Race, the Iditarod, you need a great team with experience, dedication, training, sponsorship, and the ability to work towards the desired goal. Planning a cross-continuum care management system is equally challenging. In this article, we present a real-life example of how a community-based hospital system has begun to integrate existing case management and care coordination efforts into a unified approach to care management. This scenario challenges organizations developing, refining, and evaluating care management efforts to think about what is being done, how, and why. PMID:10747431

  4. Influenza immunization coverage for healthcare workers in a community hospital in Qatar (2011-2012 and 2012-2013 seasons).

    PubMed

    Garcell, Humberto Guanche; Ramirez, Eduardo Crespo

    2014-02-01

    Influenza vaccination is recommended for all healthcare workers (HCW) to prevent transmission within healthcare facilities. We conducted a descriptive study on influenza vaccination coverage during 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 campaigns in a community hospital in Qatar. 61.7% of the HCW were immunized in the first campaign, with an increase of up to 71.1% (p<0.05) in the second one, which was mainly due to better compliance of doctors (46.9% and 69.2%, respectively). Our results show proper coverage rates according US standards and highlight the need to implement additional strategies to improve health workers adherence of influenza, vaccination.

  5. Does Global Progress on Sanitation Really Lag behind Water? An Analysis of Global Progress on Community- and Household-Level Access to Safe Water and Sanitation

    PubMed Central

    Cumming, Oliver; Elliott, Mark; Overbo, Alycia; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Safe drinking water and sanitation are important determinants of human health and wellbeing and have recently been declared human rights by the international community. Increased access to both were included in the Millennium Development Goals under a single dedicated target for 2015. This target was reached in 2010 for water but sanitation will fall short; however, there is an important difference in the benchmarks used for assessing global access. For drinking water the benchmark is community-level access whilst for sanitation it is household-level access, so a pit latrine shared between households does not count toward the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target. We estimated global progress for water and sanitation under two scenarios: with equivalent household- and community-level benchmarks. Our results demonstrate that the “sanitation deficit” is apparent only when household-level sanitation access is contrasted with community-level water access. When equivalent benchmarks are used for water and sanitation, the global deficit is as great for water as it is for sanitation, and sanitation progress in the MDG-period (1990–2015) outstrips that in water. As both drinking water and sanitation access yield greater benefits at the household-level than at the community-level, we conclude that any post–2015 goals should consider a household-level benchmark for both. PMID:25502659

  6. Integrating Hospital-Acquired Lessons into Community Health Practice: Optimizing Antimicrobial Use in Bangalore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Rakesh; Dineshan, Vineeth; Narasimhamurthy, N. S.; Kasthuri, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Even as antimicrobial resistance is a serious public health concern worldwide, the uncertainties of diagnosis and treatment of fever strongly influence community practitioners toward prescribing antibiotics. To help community practitioners resolve their diagnostic questions and reduce the unnecessary use of antibiotics for viral…

  7. Community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in south Florida hospital and recreational environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a frequent human pathogen, may also be found in the flora of healthy persons and in the environments that they frequent. Strains of MRSA circulating in the community classified as USA 300 are now found not only in the community but also...

  8. Hospital/Health Facilities and the Hill-Burton Obligations: A Secret from the Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Mitchell F.

    1986-01-01

    Uncompensated/free care and community service obligations under the Hill-Burton Act can assist substantially in providing needed health care services to the Black community. Blacks, however, must become knowledgeable about these obligations, develop monitoring projects, and be prepared to take legal steps to bring Hill-Burton facilities into…

  9. Mobilizing positive reinforcement in communities to reduce youth access to tobacco.

    PubMed

    Biglan, A; Ary, D; Koehn, V; Levings, D; Smith, S; Wright, Z; James, L; Henderson, J

    1996-10-01

    A community intervention to mobilize positive reinforcement for not selling tobacco to young people was evaluated. The intervention had five components: (a) mobilization of community support, (b) merchant education, (c) changing consequences to clerks for selling or not selling to those under 18, (d) publicity about clerks' refusals to sell, and (e) feedback to store owners or managers about the extent of their sales to adolescents. A multiple baseline design experiment was conducted, in which two small Oregon communities received the intervention, while two other continued in baseline. Outlets' willingness to sell was assessed repeatedly by teenage volunteers. The intervention significantly reduced the proportion of stores willing to sell. Mobilizing social and material reinforcement for stores not selling tobacco to young people is a viable means of reducing such sales. It may be especially valuable in communities where laws against sales to minors go unenforced.

  10. The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database. The Community Resource for Access to Diverse Maize Data1

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Carolyn J.; Seigfried, Trent E.; Brendel, Volker

    2005-01-01

    The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database (MaizeGDB) serves the maize (Zea mays) research community by making a wealth of genetics and genomics data available through an intuitive Web-based interface. The goals of the MaizeGDB project are 3-fold: to provide a central repository for public maize information; to present the data through the MaizeGDB Web site in a way that recapitulates biological relationships; and to provide an array of computational tools that address biological questions in an easy-to-use manner at the site. In addition to these primary tasks, MaizeGDB team members also serve the community of maize geneticists by lending technical support for community activities, including the annual Maize Genetics Conference and various workshops, teaching researchers to use both the MaizeGDB Web site and Community Curation Tools, and engaging in collaboration with individual research groups to make their unique data types available through MaizeGDB. PMID:15888678

  11. A Novel Housing-Based Socioeconomic Measure Predicts Hospitalization and Multiple Chronic Conditions in a Community Population

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Paul Y.; Ryu, Euijung; Hathcock, Matthew A.; Olson, Janet E.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Cerhan, James R.; Rand-Weaver, Jennifer; Juhn, Young J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic status (SES) is an important predictor for outcomes of chronic diseases. However, it is often unavailable in clinical data. We sought to determine whether an individual housing-based SES index termed HOUSES can influence the likelihood of multiple chronic conditions (MCC) and hospitalization in a community population. Methods Participants were residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, aged >18 years who were enrolled in Mayo Clinic Biobank on December 31, 2010, with follow-up until December 31, 2011. Primary outcome was all-cause hospitalization over 1 calendar year. Secondary outcome was MCC determined through Minnesota Medical Tiering score. Logistic regression model was used to assess association of HOUSES with Minnesota tiering score. With adjustment for age, sex, and MCC, the association of HOUSES with hospitalization risk was tested using Cox proportional hazards model. Results Eligible patients totaled 6,402 persons (median age, 57 years; 25th-75th quartiles, 45-68 years). The lowest quartile of HOUSES was associated with higher Minnesota tiering score after adjustment for age and sex (odds ratio [95% CI], 2.4 [2.0-3.1]) when compared with the highest HOUSES quartile. Patients in the lowest HOUSES quartile had higher risk of all-cause hospitalization (age, sex, MCC-adjusted hazard ratio [95% CI], 1.53 [1.18-1.98]) compared with those in the highest quartile. Conclusion Low SES, as assessed by HOUSES, was associated with increased risk of hospitalization and greater MCC health burden. HOUSES may be a clinically useful surrogate for SES to assess risk stratification for patient care and clinical research. PMID:26458399

  12. Internet Access and Use of the Web for Instruction: A National Study of Full-Time and Part-Time Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akroyd, Duane; Jaeger, Audrey; Jackowski, Melissa; Jones, Logan C.

    2004-01-01

    This research explored the issues of access to the internet and use of the web for instructional purposes between full-time and part-time community college faculty. The findings that 40% of part-time faculty do not have Internet access at work would seem to indicate that part-time faculty are poorly integrated into the technology infrastructure of…

  13. Accessibility and Responsiveness Review Tool: community agency capacity to respond to survivors with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Jenson, Ronda J; Peterson-Besse, Jana; Fleming, Lisa; Blumel, Angie; Day, Arden

    2015-01-01

    For persons with disabilities who have experienced trauma in the forms of abuse and violence, options for accessible and trauma-informed services are often limited. Using a self-assessment and planning process, disability service providers and victim/survivor service providers are able to strategize ways of addressing the needs of survivors with disabilities. The Accessibility and Responsiveness Review Tool (Review Tool) incorporates the principles of universal design and trauma-informed practices into an agency-wide discussion tool leading to increases in knowledge, reduction in barriers, and overall improved programs for survivors with disabilities. Results of agencies that participated in the Review Tool process are presented. PMID:26016999

  14. The impact of ongoing national terror on the community of hospital nurses in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ron, Pnina; Shamai, Michal

    2014-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the connections between the exposure of nurses in Israel to national terror and the levels of distress experienced due to ongoing terror attacks. The data were collected from 214 nurses from various parts of Israel who work in three types of heath services (mainly hospital departments) and provide help to victims of terror. The nurses reported very high levels of burnout, high levels of stress and medium-to high levels of intrusive memories. Levels of exposure were associated with burnout, intrusive memories and level of stress. More professional attention should be given to hospital nurses who provide care for trauma patients.

  15. Accessing inpatient rehabilitation after acute severe stroke: age, mobility, prestroke function and hospital unit are associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe stroke (Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke ≤ 15). Physiotherapists assessed patients on day 3 poststroke, collecting demographic information and information relating to their prestroke status, social status and current status. Stepwise logistic-regression modelling was used to examine the association between age, type of stroke, prestroke living situation, comorbidities, availability of carer on discharge, current mobility, bladder continence, bowel continence, cognition and communication and the dependent variable, discharge destination (rehabilitation/other). The resulting model was analysed using hierarchical logistic regression with hospital unit as the clustering variable. Of the 108 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria, 70 (64.8%) were discharged to rehabilitation. The variables independently associated with discharge to rehabilitation were younger age [odds ratio (OR)=0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.83-0.95, P=0.001], independent premorbid functional status (OR=14.92, 95% CI=2.43-91.60, P=0.004) and higher level of current mobility (OR=1.31, 95% CI=1.02-1.66, P<0.03). The multilevel model estimated that 12% of the total variability in discharge destination was explained by differences between the hospital units (ρ=0.12, 95% CI=0.02-0.55, P=0.048). The results indicate that the variables associated with discharge to rehabilitation following severe stroke are younger age, independent prestroke functional status and higher level of current mobility. In addition, organizational factors play a role in selection for rehabilitation, suggesting inequity in access for this patient group. PMID:22728683

  16. The role of auxiliary nurse-midwives and community health volunteers in expanding access to medical abortion in rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Puri, Mahesh; Tamang, Anand; Shrestha, Prabhakar; Joshi, Deepak

    2015-02-01

    Medical abortion was introduced in Nepal in 2009, but rural women's access to medical abortion services remained limited. We conducted a district-level operations research study to assess the effectiveness of training 13 auxiliary nurse-midwives as medical abortion providers, and 120 female community health volunteers as communicators and referral agents for expanding access to medical abortion for rural women. Interviews with service providers and women who received medical abortion were undertaken and service statistics were analysed. Compared to a neighbouring district with no intervention, there was a significant increase in the intervention area in community health volunteers' knowledge of the legal conditions for abortion, the advantages and disadvantages of medical abortion, safe places for an abortion, medical abortion drugs, correct gestational age for home use of medical abortion, and carrying out a urine pregnancy test. In a one-year period in 2011-12, the community health volunteers did pregnancy tests for 584 women and referred 114 women to the auxiliary nurse-midwives for abortion; 307 women in the intervention area received medical abortion services from auxiliary nurse-midwives. There were no complications that required referral to a higher-level facility except for one incomplete abortion. Almost all women who opted for medical abortion were happy with the services provided. The study demonstrated that auxiliary nurse-midwives can independently and confidently provide medical abortion safely and effectively at the sub-health post level, and community health volunteers are effective change agents in informing women about medical abortion. PMID:25702073

  17. Improving equitable access to imaging under universal-access medicine: the ontario wait time information program and its impact on hospital policy and process.

    PubMed

    Kielar, Ania Z; El-Maraghi, Robert H; Schweitzer, Mark E

    2010-08-01

    In Canada, equal access to health care is the goal, but this is associated with wait times. Wait times should be fair rather than uniform, taking into account the urgency of the problem as well as the time an individual has already waited. In November 2004, the Ontario government began addressing this issue. One of the first steps was to institute benchmarks reflecting "acceptable" wait times for CT and MRI. A public Web site was developed indicating wait times at each Local Health Integration Network. Since starting the Wait Time Information Program, there has been a sustained reduction in wait times for Ontarians requiring CT and MRI. The average wait time for a CT scan went from 81 days in September 2005 to 47 days in September 2009. For MRI, the resulting wait time was reduced from 120 to 105 days. Increased patient scans have been achieved by purchasing new CT and MRI scanners, expanding hours of operation, and improving patient throughput using strategies learned from the Lean initiative, based on Toyota's manufacturing philosophy for car production. Institution-specific changes in booking procedures have been implemented. Concurrently, government guidelines have been developed to ensure accountability for monies received. The Ontario Wait Time Information Program is an innovative first step in improving fair and equitable access to publicly funded imaging services. There have been reductions in wait times for both CT and MRI. As various new processes are implemented, further review will be necessary for each step to determine their individual efficacy. PMID:20678727

  18. Access to HIV community services by vulnerable populations: evidence from an enhanced HIV/AIDS surveillance system.

    PubMed

    Madden, H C E; Phillips-Howard, P A; Hargreaves, S C; Downing, J; Bellis, M A; Vivancos, R; Morley, C; Syed, Q; Cook, P A

    2011-05-01

    HIV disproportionately affects vulnerable populations such as black and minority ethnic groups, men who have sex with men (MSM) and migrants, in many countries including those in the UK. Community organisations in the UK are charitable non-governmental organisations with a proportion of the workforce who volunteer, and provide invaluable additional support for people living with HIV (PLWHIV). Information on their contribution to HIV care in vulnerable groups is relatively sparse. Data generated from an enhanced HIV surveillance system in North West England, UK, was utilised for this study. We aimed to determine the characteristics of individuals who chose to access community services in addition to clinical services (1375 out of 4195 records of PLWHIV in clinical services). Demographic information, risk factors including residency status, uniquely gathered in this region, and deprivation scores were examined. Multivariate logistic regression modelling was conducted to predict the relative effect of patient characteristics on attendance at community services. Attendance at community services was highest in those living in the most, compared with least, deprived areas (p<0.001), and was most evident in MSM and heterosexuals. Compared to white UK nationals attendance was significantly higher in non-UK nationals of uncertain residency status (Adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 21.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 10.48-45.83; p<0.001), refugees (AOR = 5.75, 95% CI 3.3-10.03; p<0.001), migrant workers (AOR = 5.48, 95% CI 2.22-13.51; p<0.001) and temporary visitors (AOR = 3.44, 95% CI 1.68-7.05; p<0.001). Community services, initially established predominantly to support MSM, have responded to the changing demography of HIV and reach the most vulnerable members of society. Consequent to their support of migrant populations, community services are vital for the management of HIV in black and minority groups. Paradoxically, this coincides with increasing funding pressures on these

  19. Success with ACCESS: Use of Community-Based Participatory Research for Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilola, Carolyn; Fishman, Kathryn; Greenburg, Arielle; Moore, Crystal Dea; Schrijver, Andrew; Totino, Jamin

    2011-01-01

    The Assessment of Campus Climate to Enhance Student Success survey (ACCESS) is a set of four questionnaires designed to elicit feedback from five campus constituencies including faculty, administration, staff, students with disabilities, and students without disabilities "to use in planning and garnering support for meaningful activities and…

  20. Universal Access to Preschool Education: Approaches to Integrating Preschool with School in Rural and Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the government of South Australia responded to Federal agreements aimed at universal access to preschool education for children in the year before starting formal schooling by introducing a trial designed to "integrate" preschool children into first year of school programmes in rural and remote areas of the state. This paper…

  1. Multi-component access to a community-based weight loss program: 12 week results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study examined weight loss between a comprehensive lifestyle modification program (Weight Watchers PointsPlus program) that included three ways to access and a self-help (SH) condition. A total of 293 participants were randomized to either a Weight Watchers condition (WW) (n=148) or a SH...

  2. University and Community Partnership: Access and Economic Development in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audley, Barbara; Thompson, Ann McKay

    This report describes an educational partnership between South Dakota State University and Capital University Center, Inc. (CUC), (Pierre, South Dakota). CUC is a nonprofit organization founded in 1982 to provide access to higher education for residents of rural central South Dakota. CUC contracts with South Dakota State University for educational…

  3. Diversity of Bacterial Communities on Four Frequently Used Surfaces in a Large Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Pereira da Fonseca, Tairacan Augusto; Pessôa, Rodrigo; Felix, Alvina Clara; Sanabani, Sabri Saeed

    2016-02-01

    Frequently used hand-touch surfaces in hospital settings have been implicated as a vehicle of microbial transmission. In this study, we aimed to investigate the overall bacterial population on four frequently used surfaces using a culture-independent Illumina massively parallel sequencing approach of the 16S rRNA genes. Surface samples were collected from four sites, namely elevator buttons (EB), bank machine keyboard buttons (BMKB), restroom surfaces, and the employee biometric time clock system (EBTCS), in a large public and teaching hospital in São Paulo. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, with a total of 926 bacterial families and 2832 bacterial genera. Moreover, our analysis revealed the presence of some potential pathogenic bacterial genera, including Salmonella enterica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The presence of these pathogens in frequently used surfaces enhances the risk of exposure to any susceptible individuals. Some of the factors that may contribute to the richness of bacterial diversity on these surfaces are poor personal hygiene and ineffective routine schedules of cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting. Strict standards of infection control in hospitals and increased public education about hand hygiene are recommended to decrease the risk of transmission in hospitals among patients. PMID:26805866

  4. 78 FR 48303 - TRICARE; Reimbursement of Sole Community Hospitals and Adjustment to Reimbursement of Critical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... FR 39043), also proposed a CAH GTMCPA for TRICARE network hospitals deemed essential for military..., 2011 (76 FR 39043), DoD published for public comment a Proposed Rule regarding an inpatient payment.... G. CAH GTMCPA On August 31, 2009, we published in the Federal Register a Final Rule (74 FR...

  5. 78 FR 29628 - Community Health Needs Assessments for Charitable Hospitals; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... Revenue Code. Need for Correction As published April 5, 2013 (78 FR 20523), the notice of proposed... subject of FR Doc. 2013-07959, is corrected as follows: 1. On page 20523, in the preamble, column 3, under... Charitable Hospitals; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Correction to...

  6. Diversity of Bacterial Communities on Four Frequently Used Surfaces in a Large Brazilian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pereira da Fonseca, Tairacan Augusto; Pessôa, Rodrigo; Felix, Alvina Clara; Sanabani, Sabri Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Frequently used hand-touch surfaces in hospital settings have been implicated as a vehicle of microbial transmission. In this study, we aimed to investigate the overall bacterial population on four frequently used surfaces using a culture-independent Illumina massively parallel sequencing approach of the 16S rRNA genes. Surface samples were collected from four sites, namely elevator buttons (EB), bank machine keyboard buttons (BMKB), restroom surfaces, and the employee biometric time clock system (EBTCS), in a large public and teaching hospital in São Paulo. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, with a total of 926 bacterial families and 2832 bacterial genera. Moreover, our analysis revealed the presence of some potential pathogenic bacterial genera, including Salmonella enterica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The presence of these pathogens in frequently used surfaces enhances the risk of exposure to any susceptible individuals. Some of the factors that may contribute to the richness of bacterial diversity on these surfaces are poor personal hygiene and ineffective routine schedules of cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting. Strict standards of infection control in hospitals and increased public education about hand hygiene are recommended to decrease the risk of transmission in hospitals among patients. PMID:26805866

  7. Hospital And Community Ratings Of Psychopathology As Predictors Of Employment And Readmission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurel, Lee; Lorei, Theodore W.

    1972-01-01

    The relationships of symptom ratings to employment and readmission of 957 schizophrenics are reported. Low motivation'' was the most potent work predictor at both time points. The implications of this finding for developing hospital experiences conducive to heightened motivation are discussed. (Author)

  8. Community Pathways: Hospital-Based Services that Individualize Supports for Families and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Harriet A.; Freund, Peggy J.; Barlow, Jane H.; Van Ark, Gwenn G.; Wilson, Thea K.

    2004-01-01

    Increasing numbers of infants and toddlers who were premature, had low birth weight, or experience chronic medical conditions are referred to early intervention services (Bernstein, Heimler, & Sasidharan, 1998). These young children often endure prolonged hospitalizations and are at risk for developmental disabilities by nature of their illnesses,…

  9. Professional Development Needs of Registered Nurses Practicing at a Military Community Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibb, Sandra C.; Malebranche, Mark; Crowell, Debra; Altman, Colleen; Lyon, Sylvia; Carlson, Ariel; Miller, Steven; Miller, Teresa; Rybarczyk, Jeanine

    2003-01-01

    Six focus groups with 21 nurses in military hospitals identified five professional development themes: (1) critical topics; (2) appropriate continuing education methods; (3) evaluation of effectiveness and efficiency of continuing education; (4) barriers to professional development; and (5) staff retention issues. Recommendations for mentoring,…

  10. The long term prognosis in patients following thrombolysis for acute myocardial infarction: a view from a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Brophy, J M; Boulerice, M; Kerouac, M

    1996-08-01

    Thrombolysis in patients with acute myocardial infarction has been established to improve hospital survival. Less information is available about the long term evolution of unselected patients seen in community hospitals. Consequently, consecutive patients treated with thrombolysis for acute myocardial infarction and surviving until hospital discharge (n = 129) were followed for an average of 22 months. Mortality, recurrent ischemic events, coronary angiography and re-vascularizations were recorded for all patients. Two-year total and cardiovascular survival rates of 95 and 98% respectively were obtained with a conservative approach to early re-vascularization (n = 17, 13%). A history of prior myocardial infarction and early recurrent myocardial ischemia were significant predictors of increased cardiac events, while thallium stress testing provided no incremental value. Angiography and re-vascularizations were more frequently performed in younger patients (under 65 years old), anterior vs. inferior infarction and those with early residual ischemia. Women received less aggressive investigation and therapy then men and this may represent a gender bias, unmeasured residual confounding or the play of chance in a small sample size. Further studies are needed to confirm or refute these findings.

  11. Promoting accountability: hospital charity care in California, Washington state, and Texas.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Janet P; Stensland, Jeffrey

    2004-05-01

    Debate as to whether private hospitals meet their charitable obligations is heated. This study examines how alternative state approaches for ensuring hospital accountability to the community affects charitable expenditures and potentially affects access to care for the uninsured. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were used to compare private California hospitals' charity care expenditures with those of hospitals in Texas and Washington state. The key finding from this study is that net of hospital characteristics, market characteristics and community need, Texas hospitals were estimated to provide over 3 times more charity care and Washington hospitals were estimated to provide 66% more charity care than California hospitals. This finding suggests that more prescriptive community benefit or charity care requirements may be necessary to ensure that private hospitals assume a larger role in the care of the uninsured. PMID:15253376

  12. How do Trends for Behavioral Health Inpatient Care Differ from Medical Inpatient Care in U.S. Community Hospitals?

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuhua; Sturm, Roland

    2001-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Inpatient care in the United States accounts for one third of the health care expenditures. There exists a well-established trend towards fewer inpatient admissions and shorter lengths of stay for all inpatient care, which can be attributed to cost containment efforts through managed care and advances in treatment technologies. However, different illnesses may not necessarily share the same pattern of change in inpatient care utilization. In particular, mental health and substance abuse (MHSA) care has experienced a particularly dramatic growth of specialized managed behavioral organizations, which could have led to an even faster decline. AIMS OF THE STUDY: This study contrasts the trends of MHSA inpatient care in U.S. community hospitals with medical inpatient care over the years 1988 to 1997. It also analyzes the trends for subgroups of MHSA stays by diagnostic groups, age and primary payer. METHODS: We use the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) from the Health Care Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) to estimate both number of inpatient discharges per 1,000 population and average length of stay over the years and relate the two indices. Inpatient MHSA stays are categorized into subgroups by age, primary payer of the care, and diagnostic group. We use the Clinical Classification Software (CCS) to distinguish between affective disorders, schizophrenia and related disorders, other psychoses, anxiety and related disorders, pre-adult disorders, and alcohol-, substance- related mental disorders and other mental disorders. Trends of population adjusted discharges and length of stay were tested using a weighted least squares method. RESULTS: Population-adjusted MHSA discharges from community hospitals increased by 8.1% over the study period, whereas discharges for all conditions decreased. Within MHSA discharges, the 20-39 and 40-64 age groups experienced significant increase relative to other age group; the increase was particularly high for affective and

  13. Long-term course of cognitive function in chronically hospitalized patients with schizophrenia transitioning to community-based living.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Niimura, Hidehito; Ryu, Yonosuke; Sakuma, Kei; Mizuno, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with impairments in social interactions, and the conditions under which patients live and undergo treatment appear to have an important role in the course of the disease. However, the influences of care settings on the course of cognition remain controversial. The closure of psychiatric hospitals and the transition to community-based living is a golden opportunity to address this issue. The aims of the present study were to examine (1) the longitudinal course of cognition as well as the psychopathology and social functioning of schizophrenia patients who had been chronically hospitalized and then discharged, and (2) the key cognitive predictors of the functional outcome of such patients. Seventy-eight patients were transferred to the community after the closure of a psychiatric hospital. These patients were followed-up for 5 years and underwent annual examinations that included measures of cognition, psychiatric symptoms, and social functioning. Fifty-six patients completed all the assessments. Although consistent improvements were shown in the cognitive domains for attention and memory, the initial improvements in global cognition and processing speed ultimately began to decline. Symptoms and global functioning improved almost consistently over the course of the follow-up period. Stepwise multiple regressions revealed category fluency at baseline predicted social functioning at 5 years. However, this correlation was no longer significant when psychopathological variables were included as predictors. These results suggest that care settings affect the course of cognition, and addressing these conditions may lead to a certain degree of cognitive improvement even among schizophrenia patients who have been chronically institutionalized. PMID:24725850

  14. Five-year outbreak of community- and hospital-acquired Mycobacterium porcinum infections related to public water supplies.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wallace, Richard J; Tichindelean, Carmen; Sarria, Juan C; McNulty, Steven; Vasireddy, Ravikaran; Bridge, Linda; Mayhall, C Glenn; Turenne, Christine; Loeffelholz, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacterium porcinum is a rarely encountered rapidly growing Mycobacterium (RGM). We identified M. porcinum from 24 patients at a Galveston university hospital (University of Texas Medical Branch) over a 5-year period. M. porcinum was considered a pathogen in 11 (46%) of 24 infected patients, including 4 patients with community-acquired disease. Retrospective patient data were collected, and water samples were cultured. Molecular analysis of water isolates, clustered clinical isolates, and 15 unrelated control strains of M. porcinum was performed. Among samples of hospital ice and tap water, 63% were positive for RGM, 50% of which were M. porcinum. Among samples of water from the city of Galveston, four of five households (80%) were positive for M. porcinum. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), 8 of 10 environmental M. porcinum were determined to belong to two closely related clones. A total of 26 of 29 clinical isolates subjected to PFGE (including isolates from all positive patients) were clonal with the water patterns, including patients with community-acquired disease. Fifteen control strains of M. porcinum had unique profiles. Sequencing of hsp65, recA, and rpoB revealed the PFGE outbreak clones to have identical sequences, while unrelated strains exhibited multiple sequence variants. M. porcinum from 22 (92%) of 24 patients were clonal, matched hospital- and household water-acquired isolates, and differed from epidemiologically unrelated strains. M. porcinum can be a drinking water contaminant, serve as a long-term reservoir (years) for patient contamination (especially sputum), and be a source of clinical disease. This study expands concern about public health issues regarding nontuberculous mycobacteria. Multilocus gene sequencing helped define clonal populations.

  15. Implementation of an optimal stomatal conductance model in the Australian Community Climate Earth Systems Simulator (ACCESS1.3b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, J.; De Kauwe, M. G.; Pitman, A. J.; Lorenz, R.; Medlyn, B. E.; Wang, Y.-P.; Lin, Y.-S.; Abramowitz, G.

    2015-07-01

    We implement a new stomatal conductance model, based on the optimality approach, within the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) land surface model. Coupled land-atmosphere simulations are then performed using CABLE within the Australian Community Climate and Earth Systems Simulator (ACCESS) with prescribed sea surface temperatures. As in most land surface models, the default stomatal conductance scheme only accounts for differences in model parameters in relation to the photosynthetic pathway, but not in relation to plant functional types. The new scheme allows model parameters to vary by plant functional type, based on a global synthesis of observations of stomatal conductance under different climate regimes over a wide range of species. We show that the new scheme reduces the latent heat flux from the land surface over the boreal forests during the Northern Hemisphere summer by 0.5 to 1.0 mm day-1. This leads to warmer daily maximum and minimum temperatures by up to 1.0 °C and warmer extreme maximum temperatures by up to 1.5 °C. These changes generally improve the climate model's climatology and improve existing biases by 10-20 %. The change in the surface energy balance also affects net primary productivity and the terrestrial carbon balance. We conclude that the improvements in the global climate model which result from the new stomatal scheme, constrained by a global synthesis of experimental data, provide a valuable advance in the long-term development of the ACCESS modelling system.

  16. Narrowing the treatment gap with equitable access: mid-term outcomes of a community case management program in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Littrell, Megan; Moukam, Laure Vartan; Libite, Roger; Youmba, Jean Christian; Baugh, Gunther

    2013-10-01

    Coverage of case management interventions remains low and inadequate to achieve millennium development goal (MDG) target reductions in child mortality. Children living in the poorest households are particularly disadvantaged. Community case management (CCM) uses trained and supervised community health workers to improve access to, quality of and demand for effective case management. Evidence that CCM programs can achieve equitable improvements in coverage is limited. This cross-sectional study uses a quasi-experimental design with intervention and comparison areas. Outcomes of a CCM program for malaria and diarrhoea operating in two districts of Cameroon were measured after 1 year of implementation. A household census (N = 16 954) provided measurement of treatment-seeking behaviour for recent episodes of fever and diarrhoea. Results were compared between areas using chi-square tests. Intervention-area children with fever or diarrhoea were nearly nine times more likely to receive treatment with artemisinin combination therapy or oral rehydration salts, respectively, vs neighbouring comparison-area children. High levels of effective treatment were equitable across socioeconomic status in intervention areas, whereas disparities were observed in neighbouring comparison areas. CCM can achieve rapid and equitable improvements in coverage of case management for malaria and diarrhoea, and is a promising strategy for achieving MDG 4. Improved access to treatment, quality of care and caregiver demand were achieved in two districts of Cameroon. CCM must be scaled up to demonstrate outcomes and impact at scale.

  17. Service-Learning in the Financial Planning Curriculum: Expanding Access to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annis, Paul M.; Palmer, Lance; Goetz, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Service-learning projects are a cornerstone of student experiential learning. Such programs have proven to be mutually beneficial to communities and students within a variety of family and consumer sciences courses. However, there is a paucity of literature addressing service-learning efforts within the field of financial planning. There is an…

  18. Community College Education for the Incarcerated: The Provision of Access, Persistence and Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeter, Christian B.

    2010-01-01

    This study details an investigation of community college studies for the incarcerated, focusing on the offerings of South Coast College for inmates within California. The study interviewed ten former inmates, each of whom studied with South Coast College while in prison, as well as faculty members, educational administrators, and a corrections…

  19. Equal Access-Equal Opportunity Data for Florida Community Colleges: Fall 1977 and Fall 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Community Colleges.

    Tables present 1977 and 1978 data, collected by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, that trace the progress of Blacks and other minorities in Florida community colleges. Tables 1 through 3D describe student enrollment in terms of college-level headcount as of the end of the drop/add period, recent high school graduates, and…

  20. Military Veterans Face Challenges in Accessing Educational Benefits at Florida Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Rivka; Hill, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Florida's community colleges are seeing an influx of students who face unique challenges. They are the men and women who served in the military after the attacks of September 11, 2001, and who are now attending college on the new Post-9/11 GI Bill, with its greatly enhanced educational benefits, and on the expanded, old Montgomery GI Bill, which…