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Sample records for access drifts test

  1. Test Particles, Test Modes and Drift Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, Madalina; Spineanu, Florin

    2008-10-15

    Strong electrostatic turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas is characterized by trapping or eddying of test particle trajectories produced by the ExB stochastic drift. Trapping is shown to produce non-standard statistics of trajectories: non-Gaussian distribution, memory effects and quasi-coherence. Two types of effects produced by trapping are analyzed. The first type concerns particle and energy transport and consists in very strong nonlinear modification of the diffusion coefficients. Anomalous diffusion regimes are obtained when the other components of the motion (particle collisions, plasma rotation, the motion along the confining magnetic field) do not destroy trajectory eddying. The second type of effects are evidenced by studying test modes on turbulent plasma. We show that trappyng provides the physical mechanism for the inverse cascade observed in drift turbulence.

  2. First quarter chemical borehole studies in the drift scale test

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoach, L., LLNL

    1998-05-19

    The chemistry boreholes of the Drift Scale Test (DST) have been designed to gather geochemical information and assess the impact of thermal perturbations on gas and liquid phases present in pore spaces and fractures within the rock. There are a total of ten boreholes dedicated to these chemical studies. Two arrays of five boreholes each were drilled from the access/observation drift (AOD) in planes which run normal to the heater drift and which are located approximately 15 and 45% of the way along the length of the drift as measured from the bulkhead. The boreholes each have a length of about 40 meters and have been drilled at low angles directed just above or just below the heater plane. In each array, three boreholes are directed at increasingly steeper angles (< 25-) above the line of wing heaters and two are directed at shallow angles below the wing heater plane.

  3. The Yucca Mountain Project drift scale test

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.E.; Blair, S.C.; Boyle, W.J.

    1998-06-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is currently evaluating the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical (TMHC) response of the potential repository host rock through an in situ thermal testing program. A drift scale test (DST) was constructed during 1997 and heaters were turned on in December 1997. The DST includes nine canister-sized containers with thirty operating heaters each located within the heated drift (HD) and fifty wing heaters located in boreholes in both ribs with a total power output of nominally 210kW. A total of 147 boreholes (combined length of 3.3 km) houses most of the over 3700 TMHC sensors connected with 201 km of cabling to a central data acquisition system. The DST is located in the Exploratory Studies Facility in a 5-m diameter drift approximately 50 m in length. Heating will last up to four years and cooling will last another four years. The rock mass surrounding the DST will experience a harsh thermal environment with rock surface temperatures expected to reach a maximum of about 200 C. This paper describes the process of designing the DST. The first 38 m of the 50-m long Heated Drift (HD) is dedicated to collection of data that will lead to a better understanding of the complex coupled TMHC processes in the host rock of the proposed repository. The final 12 m is dedicated to evaluating the interactions between the heated rock mass and cast-in-place (CIP) concrete ground support systems at elevated temperatures. In addition to a description of the DST design, data from site characterization, and a general description of the analyses and analysis approach used to design the test and make pretest predictions are presented. Test-scoping and pretest numerical predictions of one way thermal-hydrologic, thermal-mechanical, and thermal-chemical behaviors have been completed (TRW, 1997a). These analyses suggest that a dry-out zone will be created around the DST and a 10,000 m{sup 3} volume of rock will experience temperatures above 100 C. The HD

  4. Yucca Mountain drift scale test progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Apps, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson,J.E.; Sonnenthal, E.; Spycher, N.; Tsang, Y.W.; Williams, K.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is part of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Thermal Test being conducted underground at the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purpose of the ESF Thermal Test is to acquire a more in-depth understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes likely to be encountered in the rock mass surrounding the potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain. These processes are monitored by a multitude of sensors to measure the temperature, humidity, gas pressure, and mechanical displacement, of the rock formation in response to the heat generated by the heaters. In addition to collecting passive monitoring data, active hydrological and geophysical testing is also being carried out periodically in the DST. These active tests are intended to monitor changes in the moisture redistribution in the rock mass, to collect water and gas samples for chemical and isotopic analysis, and to detect microfiacturing due to heating. On December 3, 1998, the heaters in the DST were activated. The planned heating phase of the DST is 4 years, and the cooling phase following the power shutoff will be of similar duration. The present report summarizes interpretation and analysis of thermal, hydrological, chemical, and geophysical data for the first 6 months; it is the first of many progress reports to be prepared during the DST.

  5. Spray drift reduction test method correlation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ASTM Standard E609 Terminology Relating to Pesticides defines drift as “The physical movement of an agrochemical through the air at the time of application or soon thereafter to any non or off target site.” Since there are many commercial tank mix adjuvants designed to reduce spray drift, ASTM esta...

  6. THERMAL TEST ALCOVE HEATED DRIFT GROUND SUPPORT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bonabian

    1996-10-03

    The main purpose and objective of this analysis is to analyze the stability of the Thermal Test Facility Heated Drift and to design a ground support system. The stability of the Heated Drift is analyzed considering in situ, seismic, and thermal loading conditions. A ground support system is recommended to provide a stable opening for the Heated Drift. This report summarizes the results of the analyses and provides the details of the recommended ground support system for the Heated Drift. The details of the ground support system are then incorporated into the design output documents for implementation in the field.

  7. Baseline neutron logging measurements in the drift scale test

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.; Carlson, R.; Neubaurer, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is one of the thermal tests being conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). One of the objectives of the DST is to study the coupled thermal-mechanical- hydrological-chemical (TMHC) processes in the ESF at the repository horizon of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives, the test design, and the test layouts of the DST are included in the test design report by CRWMS M&O Contractor LLNL. The configuration of the DST includes a declining Observation Drift driven mostly east and downward from main tunnel in the ESF, at about 2.827 km from the North portal. The downward slope of the Observation Drift (11.5 to 14.0 percent) ensures a minimum 10 m of middle nonlithophysal Topopah Spring Tuff as the overburden for the DST. The length of the Observation Drift is about 136 m. At the elevation of the DST crown (nominally 10 m below the upper extent of the middle nonlithophysal Topopah Spring Tuff) the Connecting Drift breaks out to the north from the Observation Drift, 136 m from the main tunnel of the ESF. The Connecting Drift extends approximately 40 m to the north from the Observation Drift. A Heater Drift breaks out westward from the Connecting Drift at about 30 m from the Observation Drift. The Heater Drift consists of an 11 m long entry, which includes a plate- loading niche, and a 47 m long heated drift. The nominal diameter of the drifts is 5 m. The detail configuration of the DST, including diagrams showing the drift and borehole layout, is included in the test design report by CRWMS M&O Contractor LLNL. Thermal neutron logging is a method used to determine moisture content in rocks and soils and will be used to monitor moisture content in boreholes ESF-HD-NEU-1 to ESF-HD-NEU-10 (Boreholes 47 to 51 and 64 to 68), ESF-HD-TEMP-1 (Borehole 79), and ESF-HD-TEMP-2 (Borehole 80) in the DST. The neutron probe contains a source of high energy neutrons and a detector for slow (thermal

  8. Validation testing of drift reduction technology testing protocol

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of pesticide application technologies offer the potential to reduce spray drift from pesticide applications. However, limited information exists on the effectiveness of these technologies in reducing spray drift. Working with a stakeholder technical panel under EPA's Env...

  9. D. phi. vertex drift chamber construction and test results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.R.; Goozen, F.; Grudberg, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kerth, L.T.; Loken, S.C.; Oltman, E.; Strovink, M.; Trippe, T.G.

    1991-05-01

    A jet-cell based vertex chamber has been built for the D{O} experiment at Fermilab and operated in a test beam there. Low drift velocity and diffusion properties were achieved using CO{sub 2}(95%)-ethane(5%) at atmospheric pressure. The drift velocity is found to be consistent with (9.74+8.68( E -1.25)) {mu}m/nsec where E is the electric field strength in (kV/cm < E z 1.6 kV/cm.) An intrinsic spatial resolution of 60 {mu}m or better for drift distances greater than 2 mm is measured. The track pair efficiency is estimated to be better than 90% for separations greater than 630 {mu}m. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Cap Bubble Drift Velocity in a Confined Test Section

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Mamoru Ishii; Frank W. Lincoln; Stephen G. Beus

    2002-10-09

    In the two-group interfacial area transport equation, bubbles are categorized into two groups, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as group 1 and cap/slug/churn-turbulent bubbles as group 2. The bubble rise velocities for both groups of bubbles may be estimated by the drift flux model by applying different distribution parameters and drift velocities for both groups. However, the drift velocity for group 2 bubbles is not always applicable (when the wall effect becomes important) as in the current test loop of interest where the flow channel is confined by two parallel flat walls, with a dimension of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. The previous experiments indicated that no stable slug flow existed in this test section, which was designed to permit visualization of the flow patterns and bubble characteristics without the distortion associated with curved surfaces. In fact, distorted cap bubbly and churn-turbulent flow was observed. Therefore, it is essential to developed a correlation for cap bubble drift velocity in this confined flow channel. Since the rise velocity of a cap bubble depends on its size, a high-speed movie camera is used to capture images of cap bubbles to obtain the bubble size information. Meanwhile, the rise velocity of cap and elongated bubbles (called cap bubbles hereafter) is investigated by examining the captured images frame by frame. As a result, the conventional correlation of drift velocity for slug bubbles is modified and acceptable agreements between the measurements and correlation estimation are achieved.

  11. Installation of microbes into the drift scale test

    SciTech Connect

    Meike, A., LLNL

    1998-02-27

    In the past, the potential significance of the microbial activity on the chemical evolution of a radioactive waste repository, waste package lifetime, and radionuclide transport has been discussed. At present those impacts are not understood well enough to determine their significance. The purpose of including the microbial experiments in the Drift Scale Test has been to obtain complex process level information about survival and migration of microbes in an environment analogous to a radioactive waste repository. An added advantage is the ability to put our results in the context of the other data (hydrological, mechanical, and chemical) that are being obtained in this test. With the goal of understanding the significance of microbial survival and migration in this geological repository environment, we have designed the following tests: (1) survival/migration test: borehole emplacement of labeled microbes, (2) survival/migration test: heated drift emplacement of labeled microbes, (3) survival/material-microbe-rock interaction test: carbon steel-microbe-rock and carbon steel-microbe-concrete, and (4) sterile collection and freezing of pre-test rock sample.

  12. Drift scale test status report (Chapters 1-9)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    The Drift-Scale Test (DST) is one of the thermal tests being conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of the potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. One of the DST`s major objectives is to study the coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes at the potential repository`s horizon. The objectives, test design, and test layouts of the DST are included in a previous test design report. this report present results and analysis of several difference measurements made in the DST by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through the second quarter of the heating phase. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 describe the layout of the DST and the boreholes and instrumentation used to monitor the THCM processes in the rock of associated drifts. Section 2 presents an analysis of temperature data for the test through the end of May 1998. Sections 3 and 4 present results of electrical resistance tomography and neutron logging measurements, respectively. These two sets of measurements are designed to determine the movement of moisture in the test. Results of a series of geochemical measurements made on gas and water samples are presented in Section 5. The purpose of these measurements is to monitor the chemical processes occurring in the DST. Section 6 presents results of thermohydrologic modeling analysis of the test, and Section 7 presents data collected via the laboratory testing for characterization of the hydrologic properties of the rock forming the DST. A brief analysis of barometric pressure and humidity data collected through the end of May 1998 is discussed in Section 8, along with temperature data for the bulkhead. Finally, Section 9 presented an evaluation of sensors used in the DST.

  13. Scale model testing of drogues for free drifting buoys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumented model drogue tests were conducted in a ship model towing tank. The purpose of the tests was to observe and measure deployment and drag characteristics of such shapes as parachutes, crossed vanes, and window shades which may be employed in conjunction with free drifting buoys. Both Froude and Reynolds scaling laws were applied while scaling to full scale relative velocities of from 0 to 0.2 knots. A weighted window shade drogue is recommended because of its performance, high drag coefficient, simplicity, and low cost. Detailed theoretical performance curves are presented for parachutes, crossed vanes, and window shade drogues. Theoretical estimates of depth locking accuracy and buoy-induced dynamic loads pertinent to window shade drogues are presented as a design aid. An example of a window shade drogue design is presented.

  14. Testing the Concept of Drift Shadow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Paces; L.A. Neymark; T. Ghezzehei; P.F. Dobson

    2006-03-10

    If proven, the concept of drift shadow, a zone of reduced water content and slower ground-water travel time beneath openings in fractured rock of the unsaturated zone, may increase performance of a proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. To test this concept under natural-flow conditions present in the proposed repository horizon, isotopes within the uranium-series decay chain (uranium-238, uranium-234, and thorium-230, or {sup 238}U-{sup 234}U-{sup 230}Th) have been analyzed in samples of rock from beneath four naturally occurring lithophysal cavities. All samples show {sup 234}U depletion relative to parent {sup 238}U, indicating varying degrees of water-rock interaction over the past million years. Variations in {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios indicate that depletion of {sup 234}U relative to {sup 238}U can be either smaller or greater in rock beneath cavity floors relative to rock near cavity margins. These results are consistent with the concept of drift shadow and with numerical simulations of meter-scale spherical cavities in fractured tuff. Differences in distribution patterns of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in rock beneath the cavity floors are interpreted to reflect differences in the amount of past seepage into lithophysal cavities, as indicated by the abundance of secondary mineral deposits present on the cavity floors.

  15. Testing the concept of drift shadow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, J.B.; Neymark, L.A.; Ghezzehei, T.; Dobson, P.F.

    2006-01-01

    If proven, the concept of drift shadow, a zone of reduced water content and slower ground-water travel time beneath openings in fractured rock of the unsaturated zone, may increase performance of a proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, To test this concept under natural-flow conditions present in the proposed repository horizon, isotopes within the uranium-series decay chain (uranium-238, uranium-234, and thorium-230, or 238U-234U-230Th) have been analyzed in samples of rock from beneath four naturally occurring lithophysal cavities. All rock samples show 234U depletion relative to parent 238U indicating varying degrees of water-rock interaction over the past million years. Variations in 234U/238U activity ratios indicate that depletion of 234U relative to 238U can be either smaller or greater in rock beneath cavity floors relative to rock near cavity margins. These results are consistent with the concept of drift shadow and with numerical simulations of meter-scale spherical cavities in fractured tuff. Differences in distribution patterns of 234U/ 238U activity ratios in rock beneath the cavity floors are interpreted to reflect differences in the amount of past seepage into lithophysal cavities, as indicated by the abundance of secondary mineral deposits present on the cavity floors.

  16. Testing the COncept of Drift Shadow with X-Ray Absorption Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Altman; A. Forsberg; W. Peplinski; CK. Ho

    2006-04-24

    X-ray absorption imaging experiments and measurements of inflow and outflow distribution provide quantitative and vistial evidence for capillary diversion around a drift and a drift-shadow effect. Test cells were constructed from volcanic tuff with either in-plane (one fracture parallel to the face of the test cell) or multi-fracture (with a grid of fractures perpendicular to the test cell) systems. Tracer solutions were dripped in the fractures at ports along the top of the test cell. Discharge along the bottom boundary and in the drift was monitored. Variables included flow rate and fracture aperture. X-ray absorption imaging allowed for visualization of flow paths through the system. Evidence for capillary diversion and drift shadow include: (1) very small (< 1 %,of inflow in most cases) measured discharge into the drift, (2) discharge less than expected under the drift and discharge greater than expected just beyond the drift, and (3) visualization of the tracer-solution flow path from above the drift, around the drift, and shedding beyond the drift. However, tracer was also observed in a natural fracture under the drift in one system. It is unclear whether these high concentrations are due to diversion around the drift and back under the drift or capillary spreading along the bottom boundary of the test cell. Future experiments will focus on using samples collected directly from Yucca Mountain and minimizing the capillary barrier effects along the lower boundary of the test cells. The implementation of the drift shadow effect, as supported by these experiments, could impact performance of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository.

  17. THE DRIFT SCALE HEATER TEST AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Mark T.; Boyle, William J.; Datta, Robin N.; Elkins, Ned Z.; Yasek, Robert N.; Wagner, Ralph A.; Weaver, Douglas J.

    1998-01-30

    The Drift Scale Heater Test (DST) is an integral part of the program of testing and studies being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a site of a deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste. The DST is a large-scale, in situ thermal test to be conducted over nearly a decade in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain (Figure 1). The overall objective of the DST is to acquire a more indepth understanding of the physical processes that will occur in the rock surrounding the emplaced waste. There are four principal processes of concern: thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical. These processes will be intensified because of the decay heat from the emplaced waste and their interaction or coupling. An understanding of these coupled processes is essential for the assessment of the long-term (over thousands of years) performance of the repository.

  18. Effects of Introduced Materials in the Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoach, L; Jones, RL

    2002-01-11

    Water samples previously acquired from superheated (>140 C) zones within hydrological test boreholes of the Drift Scale Test (DST) show relatively high fluoride concentrations (5-66 ppm) and low pH (3.1-3.5) values. In these high temperature regions of the rock, water is present superheated vapor only--liquid water for sampling purposes is obtained during the sampling process by cooling. Based on data collected to date, it is evident that the source of the fluoride and low pH is from introduced man-made materials (Teflon{trademark} and/or Viton{trademark} fluoroelastomer) used in the test. The test materials may contribute fluoride either by degassing hydrogen fluoride (HF) directly to produce trace concentrations of HF gas ({approx}0.1 ppm) in the high temperature steam, or by leaching fluoride in the sampling tubes after condensation of the superheated steam. HF gas is known to be released from Viton{trademark} at high temperatures (Dupont Dow Elastomers L.L.C., Elkton, MD, personal communication) and the sample water compositions indicate near stoichiometric balance of hydrogen ion and fluoride ion, indicating dissolution of HF gas into the aqueous phase. These conclusions are based on a series of water samples collected to determine if the source of the fluoride is from the degradation of materials originally installed to facilitate measurements. Analyses of these water samples show that the source of the fluoride is the introduced materials, that is the Viton{trademark} packers used to isolate test zones and/or Teflon{trademark} tubing used to draw water and steam from the test zones. In particular, water samples collected from borehole (BH) 72 high temperatures ({approx} 170 C) prior to introduction of any Viton{trademark} or Teflon{trademark} show pH Values (4.8 to 5.5) and fluoride concentrations well below 1 ppm over a period of six months. These characteristics are typical of condensing DST steam that contains only some dissolved carbon dioxide generated

  19. Spray drift reduction evaluations of spray nozzles using a standardized testing protocol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development and testing of drift reduction technologies has come to the forefront of application research in the past few years in the United States. Drift reduction technologies (DRTs) can be spray nozzles, sprayer modifications, spray delivery assistance, spray property modifiers (adjuvants),...

  20. A Stepwise Test Characteristic Curve Method to Detect Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Rui; Zheng, Yi; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-01-01

    An important assumption of item response theory is item parameter invariance. Sometimes, however, item parameters are not invariant across different test administrations due to factors other than sampling error; this phenomenon is termed item parameter drift. Several methods have been developed to detect drifted items. However, most of the…

  1. Definitive test of theRh = ctuniverse using redshift drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    2016-11-01

    The redshift drift of objects moving in the Hubble flow has been proposed as a powerful model-independent probe of the underlying cosmology. A measurement of the first and second order redshift derivatives appears to be well within the reach of upcoming surveys using ELT-HIRES and the SKA Phase 2 array. Here we show that an unambiguous prediction of the R_h=ct cosmology is zero drift at all redshifts, contrasting sharply with all other models in which the expansion rate is variable. For example, multi-year monitoring of sources at redshift z=5 with the ELT-HIRES is expected to show a velocity shift Delta v = -15 cm/s/yr due to the redshift drift in Planck LCDM, while Delta v=0 cm/s/yr in R_h=ct. With an anticipated ELT-HIRES measurement error of +/-5 cm/s/yr after 5 years, these upcoming redshift drift measurements might therefore be able to differentiate between R_h=ct and Planck LCDM at ~3 sigma, assuming that any possible source evolution is well understood. Such a result would provide the strongest evidence yet in favour of the R_h=ct cosmology. With a 20-year baseline, these observations could favor one of these models over the other at better than 5 sigma.

  2. Test particle study of ion transport in drift type turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2013-12-15

    Ion transport regimes in drift type turbulence are determined in the frame of a realistic model for the turbulence spectrum based on numerical simulations. The model includes the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity, turbulence anisotropy, and dominant waves. The effects of the zonal flow modes are also analyzed. A semi-analytical method that is able to describe trajectory stochastic trapping or eddying is used for obtaining the transport coefficients as function of the parameters of the turbulence. Analytical approximations of the transport coefficients are derived from the results. They show the transition from Bohm to gyro-Bohm scaling as plasma size increases in very good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  3. The Effect of Anchor Test Construction on Scale Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antal, Judit; Melican, Gerald; Proctor, Thomas; Wiley, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Presented at the Annual Meeting of National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) in 2010. The focus of the research is to investigate the effect of applying the Sinharay & Holland (2007) midi-test idea for building anchor tests to an on-going testing program with a series of versions of the test and comparing these results to the more…

  4. Hardware Testing of the BaBar Drift Chamber Electronics Upgrade (SULI paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohn, Bryce; Chu, Yiwen; Wiik, Liv; /SLAC

    2006-01-04

    The BaBar drift chamber provides position, timing, and dE/dx measurements for charged decay products of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at 10.58 GeV. Increasing data collection rates stemming from higher PEP II luminosities and background have highlighted dead time problems in the drift chamber's data acquisition system. A proposed upgrade, called Phase II, aims to solve the problem with the introduction of rewritable, higher-memory firmware in the DAQ front-end electronics that lowers dataflow through the system. After fabrication, the new electronics components were tested to ensure proper function and reliability before installation in the detector. Some tests checked for successful operation of individual components, while others operated entire sections of the upgraded system in a mockup drift chamber environment. This paper explains the testing process and presents results regarding performance of the upgrade electronics.

  5. Model and test in a fungus of the probability that beneficial mutations survive drift.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Danna R; de Visser, J Arjan G M; Wahl, Lindi M

    2013-02-23

    Determining the probability of fixation of beneficial mutations is critically important for building predictive models of adaptive evolution. Despite considerable theoretical work, models of fixation probability have stood untested for nearly a century. However, recent advances in experimental and theoretical techniques permit the development of models with testable predictions. We developed a new model for the probability of surviving genetic drift, a major component of fixation probability, for novel beneficial mutations in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans, based on the life-history characteristics of its colony growth on a solid surface. We tested the model by measuring the probability of surviving drift in 11 adapted strains introduced into wild-type populations of different densities. We found that the probability of surviving drift increased with mutant invasion fitness, and decreased with wild-type density, as expected. The model accurately predicted the survival probability for the majority of mutants, yielding one of the first direct tests of the extinction probability of beneficial mutations.

  6. The Effect of Anchor Test Construction on Scale Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antal, Judit; Proctor, Thomas P.; Melican, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    In common-item equating the anchor block is generally built to represent a miniature form of the total test in terms of content and statistical specifications. The statistical properties frequently reflect equal mean and spread of item difficulty. Sinharay and Holland (2007) suggested that the requirement for equal spread of difficulty may be too…

  7. Geographic variation in advertisement calls of a Microhylid frog - testing the role of drift and ecology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ko-Huan; Shaner, Pei-Jen L; Lin, Yen-Po; Lin, Si-Min

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic signals for mating are important traits that could drive population differentiation and speciation. Ecology may play a role in acoustic divergence through direct selection (e.g., local adaptation to abiotic environment), constraint of correlated traits (e.g., acoustic traits linked to another trait under selection), and/or interspecific competition (e.g., character displacement). However, genetic drift alone can also drive acoustic divergence. It is not always easy to differentiate the role of ecology versus drift in acoustic divergence. In this study, we tested the role of ecology and drift in shaping geographic variation in the advertisement calls of Microhyla fissipes. We examined three predictions based on ecological processes: (1) the correlation between temperature and call properties across M. fissipes populations; (2) the correlation between call properties and body size across M. fissipes populations; and (3) reproductive character displacement (RCD) in call properties between M. fissipes populations that are sympatric with and allopatric to a congener M. heymonsi. To test genetic drift, we examined correlations among call divergence, geographic distance, and genetic distance across M. fissipes populations. We recorded the advertisement calls from 11 populations of M. fissipes in Taiwan, five of which are sympatrically distributed with M. heymonsi. We found geographic variation in both temporal and spectral properties of the advertisement calls of M. fissipes. However, the call properties were not correlated with local temperature or the callers' body size. Furthermore, we did not detect RCD. By contrast, call divergence, geographic distance, and genetic distance between M. fissipes populations were all positively correlated. The comparisons between phenotypic Q st (P st) and F st values did not show significant differences, suggesting a role of drift. We concluded that genetic drift, rather than ecological processes, is the more likely

  8. Geographic variation in advertisement calls of a Microhylid frog - testing the role of drift and ecology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ko-Huan; Shaner, Pei-Jen L; Lin, Yen-Po; Lin, Si-Min

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic signals for mating are important traits that could drive population differentiation and speciation. Ecology may play a role in acoustic divergence through direct selection (e.g., local adaptation to abiotic environment), constraint of correlated traits (e.g., acoustic traits linked to another trait under selection), and/or interspecific competition (e.g., character displacement). However, genetic drift alone can also drive acoustic divergence. It is not always easy to differentiate the role of ecology versus drift in acoustic divergence. In this study, we tested the role of ecology and drift in shaping geographic variation in the advertisement calls of Microhyla fissipes. We examined three predictions based on ecological processes: (1) the correlation between temperature and call properties across M. fissipes populations; (2) the correlation between call properties and body size across M. fissipes populations; and (3) reproductive character displacement (RCD) in call properties between M. fissipes populations that are sympatric with and allopatric to a congener M. heymonsi. To test genetic drift, we examined correlations among call divergence, geographic distance, and genetic distance across M. fissipes populations. We recorded the advertisement calls from 11 populations of M. fissipes in Taiwan, five of which are sympatrically distributed with M. heymonsi. We found geographic variation in both temporal and spectral properties of the advertisement calls of M. fissipes. However, the call properties were not correlated with local temperature or the callers' body size. Furthermore, we did not detect RCD. By contrast, call divergence, geographic distance, and genetic distance between M. fissipes populations were all positively correlated. The comparisons between phenotypic Q st (P st) and F st values did not show significant differences, suggesting a role of drift. We concluded that genetic drift, rather than ecological processes, is the more likely

  9. Construction and cosmic-ray test of the new inner drift chamber for BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yong-ji; Qin, Zhong-hua; Ma, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Ling-hui; Xie, Wan; Dong, Ming-yi; Dong, Jing; Ji, Xiao-lu; Jiang, Xiao-shan; Ou-yang, Qun; Zhu, Ke-jun; Chen, Yuan-bo

    2016-09-01

    A new inner drift chamber has been built which can replace the aged part of the BESIII drift chamber when needed. The design of the new inner drift chamber can minimize the ineffective area in the very forward and backward region and hence reduce the background event rate. With this design, the new inner drift chamber is expected to have a longer lifetime and improved performance due to the lower occupancy. The endplates and the cylinder were machined with high precision. Wire stringing was performed after the mechanical structure was assembled, and good quality of wire stringing was ensured by measurement of the tension and leakage current of the wires. After completion of the physical construction of the new chamber, a cosmic-ray test was carried out to test its performance. The results of the cosmic-ray test show that the new inner chamber achieves a spatial resolution of 127 μm and a dE/dx resolution of 6.4%, which satisfies the design specifications.

  10. Generic Verification Protocol for Testing Pesticide Application Spray Drift Reduction Technologies for Row and Field Crops (Version 1.4)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This generic verification protocol provides a detailed method for conducting and reporting results from verification testing of pesticide application technologies. It can be used to evaluate technologies for their potential to reduce spray drift, hence the term “drift reduction t...

  11. Laboratory and test beam results from a large-area silicon drift detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvicini, V.; Busso, L.; Giubellino, P.; Gregorio, A.; Idzik, M.; Kolojvari, A.; Montano, L. M.; Nouais, D.; Petta, C.; Rashevsky, A.; Randazzo, N.; Reito, S.; Tosello, F.; Vacchi, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Zampa, N.

    2000-01-01

    A very large-area (6.75×8 cm 2) silicon drift detector with integrated high-voltage divider has been designed, produced and fully characterised in the laboratory by means of ad hoc designed MOS injection electrodes. The detector is of the "butterfly" type, the sensitive area being subdivided into two regions with a maximum drift length of 3.3 cm. The device was also tested in a pion beam (at the CERN PS) tagged by means of a microstrip detector telescope. Bipolar VLSI front-end cells featuring a noise of 250 e - rms at 0 pF with a slope of 40 e -/pF have been used to read out the signals. The detector showed an excellent stability and featured the expected characteristics. Some preliminary results will be presented.

  12. Test Access & Modification for Individuals with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.

    This guide is intended to increase access for individuals with disabilities to local, state (New York), and national testing programs, as well as facilitate the consistent provision of modifications necessary to allow these individuals to demonstrate their knowledge and abilities. Ten modules cover the following topics: (1) federal and state…

  13. Test Review: ACCESS for ELLs[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Janna; Fairbairn, Shelley

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews Assessing Comprehension and Communication in English State-to-State for English Language Learners ("ACCESS for ELLs"[R]), which is a large-scale, high-stakes, standards-based, and criterion-referenced English language proficiency test administered in the USA annually to more than 840,000 English Language Learners (ELLs), in…

  14. Type I error rates for testing genetic drift with phenotypic covariance matrices: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Prôa, Miguel; O'Higgins, Paul; Monteiro, Leandro R

    2013-01-01

    Studies of evolutionary divergence using quantitative genetic methods are centered on the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix (G) of correlated traits. However, estimating G properly requires large samples and complicated experimental designs. Multivariate tests for neutral evolution commonly replace average G by the pooled phenotypic within-group variance-covariance matrix (W) for evolutionary inferences, but this approach has been criticized due to the lack of exact proportionality between genetic and phenotypic matrices. In this study, we examined the consequence, in terms of type I error rates, of replacing average G by W in a test of neutral evolution that measures the regression slope between among-population variances and within-population eigenvalues (the Ackermann and Cheverud [AC] test) using a simulation approach to generate random observations under genetic drift. Our results indicate that the type I error rates for the genetic drift test are acceptable when using W instead of average G when the matrix correlation between the ancestral G and P is higher than 0.6, the average character heritability is above 0.7, and the matrices share principal components. For less-similar G and P matrices, the type I error rates would still be acceptable if the ratio between the number of generations since divergence and the effective population size (t/N(e)) is smaller than 0.01 (large populations that diverged recently). When G is not known in real data, a simulation approach to estimate expected slopes for the AC test under genetic drift is discussed.

  15. THERMAL MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DRIFT SCALE TEST VIA DISTINCT ELEMENT MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blair; J. Wagoner; K. Dyer

    2000-12-08

    We have performed a thermal mechanical analysis of the Drift Scale Test (DST) currently underway at Yucca Mountain. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is investigating Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. The purpose of the DST is to acquire a more in-depth understanding of coupled Thermal-Mechanical-Hydrological-Chemical (TMHC) processes likely to exist in the rock mass surrounding a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. Moreover, the DST is located in a highly fractured and densely welded ash-flow tuff, and movement of fluids in this rock is thought to occur primarily through the fractures. Our work is concerned with describing fracture deformation due to thermal mechanical effects, as normal and shear deformation of fractures can substantially change the fracture permeability, and affect the coupled TMHC behavior. We modeled the DST by defining a rectangular rock mass 50m x 50m x 100m in size. The rock mass was formed by an assemblage of discrete, elastic blocks. Excavations within the DST were closely simulated, and discrete fractures mapped from video logs of several boreholes in the DST test block were incorporated. Stress boundary conditions were used on the top and sides of the rock mass, while the bottom was considered a roller boundary. Thermal inputs were based on the test design specifications. Results of the simulations show good agreement with deformations measured in the DST using multiple-point borehole extensometers. Our analysis also indicates that the most fracture deformation occurs above the drift, and co-located with micro seismic activity and acoustic emissions observed during the DST. Results to be presented include predicted temperature and stress fields, fracture displacements, and comparison between observed and predicted displacements at specific locations in the test. Maps of fractures in the DST test block will also be presented.

  16. US Geological Survey investigations in the U12n. 03 drift, Rainier Mesa, Area 12, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ege, J.R.; Carroll, R.D.; Magner, J.E.; Cunningham, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    The U12n.03 drift was designed for a nuclear test site and mining was started on April 18, 1966, and completed May 22, 1967. The drift was driven along a bearing of N. 26/sup 0/ W. at an elevation of 1849.2 m (6067 ft) to a total length of 660.2 m (2166 ft). The drift lies entirely within tunnel bed 4 of Tertiary age and crosses at nearly right angles, the Aqueduct syncline, a prominent geologic feature in Rainier Mesa. A combination of faults cutting nearly parallel to the drift, weak clay-rich tuff, and excessive ground water, all occurring in the trough of the syncline caused severe construction and support problems. These geologic factors created weak plastic rock that resulted in swelling and squeezing ground. Remedial measures were initiated that only temporarily stabilized ground and water conditions. The drift was eventually abandoned for the purposes of a nuclear test site and was subsequently used as a water storage facility. The US Geological Survey performed seismic velocity, electrical resistivity, and geologic surveys in the U12n.03 drift to provide information needed for site evaluation. Electrical resistivity measurements indicate that sections of rock which may be potentially unstable for tunnel construction due to the presence of clay may be defined by this technique.

  17. ACCESS: Design, Strategy, and Test Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Morris, M. J.; McCandliss, S. R.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Wright, E. L.; Pelton, R. S.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Riess, A. G.; Benford, D. J.; Foltz, R.; Gardner, J. P.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Woodgate, B. E.; Bohlin, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Kurucz, R. L.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.

    2013-01-01

    Improvements in the astrophysical flux scale are needed to answer fundamental scientific questions ranging from cosmology to stellar physics. In particular, the precise calibration of the flux scale across the visible-NIR bandpass is fundamental to the precise determination of dark energy parameters based on SNeIa photometry. ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass. The telescope is a Dall-Kirkham Cassegrain with a 15.5-inch primary. The spectrograph is a Rowland circle design, with the grating operating as a low order (m=1-4) echelle, a Fery prism provides cross dispersion, and a HST/WFC3 heritage HAWAII-1R HgCdTe detector is used across the full spectral bandpass. The telescope mirrors have received their flight coatings. The flight detector and detector spare have been integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been performed. Detector characterization testing is in progress (Morris et al.). Fabrication, integration, and automation of the ground-based calibration subsystems are also in progress. The ACCESS design, calibration strategy, and ground-based integration and test results will be presented. Launch is expected this year. NASA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G and DOE DE-FG02-07ER41506 support this work.

  18. Design and implementation of the detector control system for the BESIII drift chamber cosmic ray test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi-Hui; Xie, Xiao-Xi; Li, Xiao-Nan; Gao, Cui-Shan; Zhang, Yin-Hong; Nie, Zhen-Dong; Min, Jian; Xie, Yi-GANG

    2008-08-01

    After the construction of the BESIII drift chamber, a long period of cosmic rays test is necessary to verify its performance. This also provides a good opportunity to integrate the detector readout electronics and Detector Control System (DCS) into a unified working system. The goal of the DCS is to guarantee reliable physics data quality and the safe operation of the detector. It monitors and controls the HV, gas, VME crates and the environmental variables. The upper-level system is mainly developed from LabVIEW and the lower-level system mainly uses MCU and PLC technology. The system is designed to be highly flexible and scalable so that it can be applied to other detectors with little or no change. In the immediate future, it will be integrated into the entire BESIII Slow Control System.

  19. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, T.

    1989-08-01

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point.

  20. Impact of genetic drift on access and benefit sharing under the Nagoya Protocol: the case of the Meishan pig.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, H D; Plante, Y; Rohrer, G; Welch, E W; Paiva, S R

    2014-04-01

    Genetic drift (GD) randomly impacts small breeds and imported populations. Therefore, it can impact policies that affect conservation of animal genetic resources. This paper evaluates GD for a population of Meishan pigs imported into the United States and explores the ramifications of GD on access and benefit sharing of genetic resources under the Nagoya Protocol (NP) of the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity. The NP was motivated by concerns about fair and equitable benefit sharing of genetic resources across life forms. In this experiment, 35 microsatellite markers were used to quantify the level of GD that occurred between Meishan pigs (Meishan-China; n = 22) imported into the United States in the late 1980s and contemporary Meishan (Meishan-US; n = 42), which have been randomly bred since importation. The Meishan-US consisted of 2 subpopulations (Meishan-MARC and Meishan-ISU). Five other breeds were also included in the analysis to serve as reference populations: Fengjing and Minzhu, which were imported with Meishan-China, and Duroc, Berkshire, and Yorkshire from the United States. Mean shift in allele frequency was 0.11 (SE = 0.019) due to GD for Meishan-US vs. Meishan-China with some loci having changed allele frequencies by greater than 0.20. Principle coordinate analysis confirmed divergence among the Meishan populations. Model-based clustering tended to place the U.S. and Chinese breeds into 2 distinct clusters, likely due to differences in allele frequencies between U.S. and Chinese breeds. Contemporary Meishan-US has become differentiated from the original imported animals due to GD. Attributing future performance of Meishan-US to Meishan-China, as set forth by NP, is problematic due to GD. As an imported breed becomes established there will be an increasing number of breeders who may have different selection goals and private treaty contracts will govern the exchange of stock between them. Therefore, considering biological phenomena and

  1. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    SciTech Connect

    D. Tang

    2004-02-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis.

  2. Influence of heat flow on drift closure during Climax granite spent-fuel test: measurements and calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Butkovich, T.R.; Yow, J.L. Jr.; Montan, D.N.

    1982-09-08

    Measurements of drift closure caused by the thermal load have been made routinely during the Spent Fuel Test in Climax granite since about six weeks after emplacement of the fuel. Horizontal and vertical closure was measured with a manually operated tape extensometer at various locations along the lengths of the drifts. Average closures ranged from 0 to 0.6 mm, horizontal and vertical, out to about 2.2 years since the start of the test. At the same time, displacements from the thermal loads were measured with rod extensometers emplaced to measure relative displacements between hole collars and anchor points in holes drilled from two parallel heater drifts. These data are compared with thermo-elastic finite element calculations which utilized measured properties of the Climax granite. The calculations show that more than half of the closures occur between fuel installation and the first closure measurement. The comparisons show that the results track each other, in that where closure followed by dilation is measured, the calculations also show this effect. The agreement is excellent, considering the averaged measured closures remain within 30% of the total calculated drift closures and the extremely small magnitude of the relative displacements (0.5 mm), measured or calculated.

  3. Method and apparatus for globally-accessible automated testing

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sharing integrated testing services with a plurality of autonomous remote clients is disclosed. In the disclosed method, in response to an access request message, a process controller transmits an access enabling message to the remote client. The access enabling message includes instructions performable by a remote client to generate test equipment commands. A process controller interprets and transforms these commands into automated test instrument suite commands, which are provided to laboratory modules to perform the indicated tests. Test data results are then obtained and transmitted to the remote client.

  4. 9. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL ACCESS ELEVATOR, CELLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL ACCESS ELEVATOR, CELLS 2 AND 4, BASEMENT LEVEL. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  5. Redshift-Drift as a Test for Discriminating Between Decelerating Inhomogeneous and Accelerating Universe Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Priti; Célérier, Marie-Noëlle Singh, Tejinder P.

    2015-01-01

    Exact inhomogeneous solutions of Einstein's equations have been used in the literature to build models reproducing the cosmological data without dark energy. However, owing to the degrees of freedom pertaining to these models, it is necessary to get rid of the degeneracy often exhibited by the problem of distinguishing between them and accelerating universe models. We give an overview of redshift drift in inhomogeneous cosmologies, and explain how it serves to this purpose. One class of models which fits the data is the Szekeres Swiss-cheese class where non-spherically symmetric voids exhibit a typical size of about 400 Mpc. We present our calculation of the redshift drift in this model, and compare it with the results obtained by other authors for alternate scenarios.

  6. Psychological Processes Underlying Cultivation Effects: Further Tests of Construct Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrum, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that tested whether the accessibility of information in memory mediates the cultivation effect (the effect of television viewing on social perceptions), consistent with the availability heuristic. Shows that heavy viewers gave higher frequency estimates (cultivation effect) and responded faster (accessibility effect) than did…

  7. Impact of genetic drift on access and benefit sharing under the Nagoya protocol: The case of the Meishan pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Convention on Biological Diversity developed the Nagoya Protocol (NP) on access and benefit sharing (ABS) for international exchange of genetic resources. Concerns are NP will impose new costs for exchanging livestock genetic resources and interfere with commonly used private treaty contracts. N...

  8. The Role of Genetic Drift in Shaping Modern Human Cranial Evolution: A Test Using Microevolutionary Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather F.

    2011-01-01

    The means by which various microevolutionary processes have acted in the past to produce patterns of cranial variation that characterize modern humans is not thoroughly understood. Applying a microevolutionary framework, within- and among-population variance/covariance (V/CV) structure was compared for several functional and developmental modules of the skull across a worldwide sample of modern humans. V/CV patterns in the basicranium, temporal bone, and face are proportional within and among groups, which is consistent with a hypothesis of neutral evolution; however, mandibular morphology deviated from this pattern. Degree of intergroup similarity in facial, temporal bone, and mandibular morphology is significantly correlated with geographic distance; however, much of the variance remains unexplained. These findings provide insight into the evolutionary history of modern human cranial variation by identifying signatures of genetic drift, gene flow, and migration and set the stage for inferences regarding selective pressures that early humans encountered since their initial migrations around the world. PMID:21461369

  9. Using Operational Analysis to Improve Access to Pulmonary Function Testing.

    PubMed

    Ip, Ada; Asamoah-Barnieh, Raymond; Bischak, Diane P; Davidson, Warren J; Flemons, W Ward; Pendharkar, Sachin R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Timely pulmonary function testing is crucial to improving diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Perceptions of poor access at an academic pulmonary function laboratory prompted analysis of system demand and capacity to identify factors contributing to poor access. Methods. Surveys and interviews identified stakeholder perspectives on operational processes and access challenges. Retrospective data on testing demand and resource capacity was analyzed to understand utilization of testing resources. Results. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that stakeholder groups had discrepant views on access and capacity in the laboratory. Mean daily resource utilization was 0.64 (SD 0.15), with monthly average utilization consistently less than 0.75. Reserved testing slots for subspecialty clinics were poorly utilized, leaving many testing slots unfilled. When subspecialty demand exceeded number of reserved slots, there was sufficient capacity in the pulmonary function schedule to accommodate added demand. Findings were shared with stakeholders and influenced scheduling process improvements. Conclusion. This study highlights the importance of operational data to identify causes of poor access, guide system decision-making, and determine effects of improvement initiatives in a variety of healthcare settings. Importantly, simple operational analysis can help to improve efficiency of health systems with little or no added financial investment. PMID:27445545

  10. Using Operational Analysis to Improve Access to Pulmonary Function Testing.

    PubMed

    Ip, Ada; Asamoah-Barnieh, Raymond; Bischak, Diane P; Davidson, Warren J; Flemons, W Ward; Pendharkar, Sachin R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Timely pulmonary function testing is crucial to improving diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Perceptions of poor access at an academic pulmonary function laboratory prompted analysis of system demand and capacity to identify factors contributing to poor access. Methods. Surveys and interviews identified stakeholder perspectives on operational processes and access challenges. Retrospective data on testing demand and resource capacity was analyzed to understand utilization of testing resources. Results. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that stakeholder groups had discrepant views on access and capacity in the laboratory. Mean daily resource utilization was 0.64 (SD 0.15), with monthly average utilization consistently less than 0.75. Reserved testing slots for subspecialty clinics were poorly utilized, leaving many testing slots unfilled. When subspecialty demand exceeded number of reserved slots, there was sufficient capacity in the pulmonary function schedule to accommodate added demand. Findings were shared with stakeholders and influenced scheduling process improvements. Conclusion. This study highlights the importance of operational data to identify causes of poor access, guide system decision-making, and determine effects of improvement initiatives in a variety of healthcare settings. Importantly, simple operational analysis can help to improve efficiency of health systems with little or no added financial investment.

  11. Self-Testing Static Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Savio; Rennels, David

    1991-01-01

    Proposed static random-access memory for computer features improved error-detecting and -correcting capabilities. New self-testing scheme provides for detection and correction of errors at any time during normal operation - even while data being written into memory. Faults in equipment causing errors in output data detected by repeatedly testing every memory cell to determine whether it can still store both "one" and "zero", without destroying data stored in memory.

  12. Test/QA plan for the validation of the verification protocol for low speed pesticide spray drift reduction technologies for row and field crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    This test/QA plan for evaluation the generic test protocol for high speed wind tunnel, representing aerial application, pesticide spray drift reduction technologies (DRT) for row and field crops is in conformance with EPA Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA QA/R...

  13. Test/QA plan for the validation of the verification protocol for high speed pesticide spray drift reduction technologies for row and field crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    This test/QA plan for evaluation the generic test protocol for high speed wind tunnel, representing aerial application, pesticide spray drift reduction technologies (DRT) for row and field crops is in conformance with EPA Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA QA/R...

  14. A system to test the effects of materials on the electron drift lifetime in liquid argon and observations on the effect of water

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    A materials test system (MTS) has been developed at FNAL to assess the suitability of materials for use in a large liquid argon time projection chamber. During development of the MTS, it was noted that controlling the cryostat pressure with a 'raining' condenser reduced the electron drift lifetime in the liquid argon. The effect of condensing has been investigated using a series of passive materials to filter the condensate. We report the results of these studies and of tests on different candidate materials for detector construction. The inferred reduction of electron drift lifetime by water concentrations in the parts per trillion is of particular interest.

  15. Test of Continental Drift by Comparison of Radiometric Ages: A pre-drift reconstruction shows matching geologic age provinces in West Africa and Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hurley, P M; Rand, J R; Pinson, W H; Fairbairn, H W; de Almeida, F F; Melcher, G C; Cordani, U G; Kawashita, K; Vandoros, P

    1967-08-01

    1) The distribution of age values obtained by potassium-argon determinations and whole-rock rubidium-strontium determinations appears to be almost identical for West African rocks of the pervasive Eburnean Orogenic Cycle and basement rocks at opposite locations in South America. 2) There is also a close correlation, with respect to potassium-argon age determinations on micas, rubidium-strontium determinations on total-rock samples, and the extent to which these two sets of values differ, between rocks of the Pan-African Orogenic Cycle and rocks of the Caririan Orogenic Cycle in Brazil, where these two groups of rocks lie opposite each other in the two continents. 3) When Africa and South America are "fitted together," the sharply defined boundary between the Eburnean and the Pan-African age provinces in West Africa strikes directly toward the corresponding age boundary in northeast Brazil. 4) The transition from the 550-million-year Pan-African age province to the 2000-million-year age province in the Congo Craton in Cameroun-Gabon is matched in the rocks near the corresponding part of the east coast of Brazil. However the geological and age data are insufficient to do more than suggest the possibility of another age-boundary correlation here. 5) The evidence reported here supports the hypothesis of continental drift.

  16. Drift Scale THM Model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    drift to transport any exposed radionuclides out of the drift to the groundwater below, and eventually to people within the accessible environment. Absent sufficient water, radionuclides cannot be transported and there would be no significant health effect on people, even if radioactive waste containers were damaged or corroded to such an extent that radionuclides were exposed to water.

  17. Test beam results of Silicon Drift Detector prototypes for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouais, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Busso, L.; Cerello, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gregorio, A.; Hernández-Ontoya, R.; Idzik, M.; Kolojvari, A.; Mazza, G.; Montano, L. M.; Nilsen, B. S.; Petta, C.; Randazzo, N.; Rashevsky, A.; Reito, S.; Rivetti, A.; Tosello, F.; Trzaska, W. H.; Vacchi, A.; Alice Collaboration

    1999-08-01

    We report preliminary beam test results of linear Silicon Draft Detector prototypes for the ALICE experiment. Linearity, resolution, charge transport and collection, and efficiency have been studied using a minimum ionizing particle beam for a very large area detector prototype read out with the OLA preamplifier/shaper and for another detector read out using a new transimpedance amplifier with a non linear response.

  18. Uncertainties in coupled thermal-hydrological processes associated with the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, S; Tsang, Y W

    2003-01-01

    Understanding thermally driven coupled hydrological, mechanical, and chemical processes in unsaturated fractured tuff is essential for evaluating the performance of the potential radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Drift Scale Test (DST), intended for acquiring such an understanding of these processes, has generated a huge volume of temperature and moisture redistribution data. Sophisticated thermal-hydrological (TH) conceptual models have yielded a good fit between simulation results and those measured data. However, some uncertainties in understanding the TH processes associated with the DST still exist. This paper evaluates these uncertainties and provides quantitative estimates of the range of these uncertainties. Of particular interest for the DST are the uncertainties resulting from the unmonitored loss of vapor through an open bulkhead of the test. There was concern that the outcome from the test might have been significantly altered by these losses. Using alternative conceptual models, we illustrate that predicted mean temperatures from the DST are within 1 degrees C of the measured mean temperatures through the first 2 years of heating. The simulated spatial and temporal evolution of drying and condensation fronts is found to be qualitatively consistent with measured saturation data. Energy and mass balance computation shows that no more than 13% of the input energy is lost because of vapor leaving the test domain through the bulkhead. The change in average saturation in fractures is also relatively small. For a hypothetical situation in which no vapor is allowed to exit through the bulkhead, the simulated average fracture saturation is not qualitatively different enough to be discerned by measured moisture redistribution data. This leads us to conclude that the DST, despite the uncertainties associated with open field testing, has provided an excellent understanding of the TH processes.

  19. A Conceptual and Numerical Model for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes in the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas F.; Conrad, Mark; Apps, John

    2003-07-01

    A numerical model was developed to predict the coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes accompanying the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain, NV. The DST has been closely monitored through the collection of gas, water, and mineral samples as well as thermal, hydrological, and mechanical measurements. A two-dimensional dual permeability model was developed to evaluate multiphase, multicomponent, reaction-transport processes in the fractured tuff. Comparisons between results using the TOUGHREACT code and measured water (e.g., pH, SiO2(aq), Na+, K+) and gas (CO2) compositions show that the model captures the chemical evolution in the DST. Non-reactive aqueous species (e.g., Cl) show strong dilution in fracture waters, indicating little fracture-matrix interaction. Silica concentrations are higher than in the initial pore water and show a trend of increasing reaction with fracture-lining silicates at higher temperatures. The narrow precipitation zone of predominantly amorphous silica observed above the heaters was also captured.

  20. Coupled Analysis of Change in Fracture Permeability during the Cooling Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Tsang, Y.W.; Min, K.B.; Elsworth, D.

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents results from a coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical analysis of thermally-induced permeability changes during heating and cooling of fractured volcanic rock at the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The analysis extends the previous analysis of the four-year heating phase to include newly available data from the subsequent four year cooling phase. The new analysis of the cooling phase shows that the measured changes in fracture permeability follows that of a thermo-hydro-elastic model on average, but at several locations the measured permeability indicates (inelastic) irreversible behavior. At the end of the cooling phase, the air-permeability had decreased at some locations (to as low as 0.2 of initial), whereas it had increased at other locations (to as high as 1.8 of initial). Our analysis shows that such irreversible changes in fracture permeability are consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). These data are important for bounding model predictions of potential thermally-induced changes in rock-mass permeability at a future repository at Yucca Mountain.

  1. Test report: Low cost access and efficient use of TDRSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, S.

    1996-01-01

    In order to develop new ways to increase the number of users taking advantage of NASA's Space Network for space-to-ground communications links, researchers at New Mexico State University (NMSU) developed a technique for using non-gimballed antennas for accessing a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) within the Space Network (SN). This concept would allow spin-stabilized satellites to access one of the TDRS spacecraft in the SN constellation as the user satellite sweeps past the TDRS position as the satellite approaches either its ascending or descending node if this node is relatively close to the TDRS subsatellite point. ne research team from NMSU developing this concept proposed to NASA the use of the Extreme Ultra Violet Explorer (EUVE) to test this concept on orbit. EUVE differs from the desired satellite configuration in that EUVE has a relatively high-gain parabolic antenna and, most importantly, EUVE has an inertially-stabilized attitude control system while the concept to be tested was for a spin-stabilized satellite. We believed that these limitations would not affect the basic proof-of-concept test we were trying to achieve. With the approval and coordination of NASA, a total of six satellite passes through the West TDRS were requested and the necessary equipment configured for data collection at the Second TDRS Ground Terminal (STGT), also known as Danzante, at the White Sands Complex.

  2. 10 CFR 26.65 - Pre-access drug and alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-access drug and alcohol testing. 26.65 Section 26.65... § 26.65 Pre-access drug and alcohol testing. (a) Purpose. This section contains pre-access testing... days. If an individual has negative results from drug and alcohol tests that were conducted under...

  3. Microgravity access as a means for testing therapeutic pharmaceutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Robert J.; Simske, Steven J.

    1995-01-01

    Spaceflight results in a unique combination of physiological effects. Immune, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, renal and other physiological systems are deleteriously affected by the microgravity environment. Many of these effects are analogous to diseases that afflict people on earth; for instance, immunosuppressive disorders and osteoporosis. Chiron Corporation (Emeryville, CA) is interested in using spaceflight as a testing ground for its unique therapeutic pharmaceutics. On STS-60 (Feb. 1994), Chiron, heading up a consortium managed by its CCDS (Center for the Commercial Development of Space) partner Bioserve Space Technologies, investigated the effects of its recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) pharmaceutic on preventing the immune system suppression induced that mimicked spaceflight (tail suspension). The recombinant, pegulated IL-2 largely prevented the deleterious effects of spaceflight and particularly suspension on the development of macrophages and the spleen. Based on these findings, Chiron hopes to expand its original market for Il-2 to include veterinary applications. In future missions, Chiron hopes to further explore the physiological effects of IL-2 in preventing the spaceflight effects (STS-63), and to use spaceflight access as a means for testing drugs which may be useful for the treatment of other diseases (e.g., M-CSF for osteoporosis). Spaceflight access has provided Chiron with new applications and new approaches for determining the effects of their pharmaceutics.

  4. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sanpietro, M.; Kemmer, J.; Dietl, H.; Holl, P.; Klanner, R.; Lutz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements.

  6. Phase-scan analysis results for the first drift tube linac module in the ground test accelerator: Data reproducibility and comparison to simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Bolme, G.O.

    1995-05-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) had the objective of producing a high-brightness, high-current H- beam. The major accelerator components were a 35 keV injector, a Radio Frequency Quadrupole, an intertank matching section, and a drift tube linac (DTL), consisting of 10 modules. This paper discusses the phase-scan technique which was used to experimentally determine the rf operating parameters for the commissioning and routine operation of the first DTL module.

  7. Approaches to modeling coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemicalprocesses in the Drift Scale Heater Test at Yucca Mountain.

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenthal, E.; Ito, K.; Spycher, N.; Yui, M.; Apps, J.; Sugita,Y.; Conrad, M.; Kawakami, S.

    2005-03-01

    A large-scale underground thermal test (Drift Scale Test DST) in fractured volcanic tuff resulted in changes to water and gas chemistry as well as mineral precipitation and dissolution in fractures. Thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in the DST were modeled by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ''LBNL'' and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute ''JNC'' as part of the international working group DECOVALEX. Predictions of THC processes in the DST for the 4-year heating and 4-year cooling periods were initially performed by the LBNL group, with the current model reflecting a revised heater operation history and model. JNC used primarily the original data from the prediction and created a new model to evaluate a selected set of data. The approaches taken by the groups differed in several ways and a comparison of the methodologies and results of the simulations allow for a better understanding of modeling coupled processes in unsaturated fractured rock. The LBNL model represented the fractures and rock matrix as a fully interacting dual-continuum (in terms of fluid, heat, and chemical transport) with the local mineral water gas reactions treated by kinetic and equilibrium reactions. The JNC model represented the fractures and matrix as a single effective continuum, with equilibrium mineral-water reactions controlling the chemical evolution. Both models considered aqueous species transport, with gas phase CO2 transport only considered in the LBNL model. Comparisons to data collected from the DST illustrate the behavior of the models and their ability to capture the relevant THC processes. Overall, both models capture the temperature evolution in the rock quite closely, although the JNC model gave a closer match to the initial temperature rise in the rock, likely owing to the use of site-specific thermal data as opposed to average properties used for the LBNL model. Both models showed the contrasting solubility effects of increasing temperature on

  8. Extremely small test cell structure for resistive random access memory element with removable bottom electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Sang-Gyu; Kishida, Satoru; Kinoshita, Kentaro

    2014-02-24

    We established a method of preparing an extremely small memory cell by fabricating a resistive random access memory (ReRAM) structure on the tip of a cantilever of an atomic force microscope. This structure has the high robustness against the drift of the cantilever, and the effective cell size was estimated to be less than 10 nm in diameter due to the electric field concentration at the tip of the cantilever, which was confirmed using electric field simulation. The proposed structure, which has a removable bottom electrode, enables not only the preparation of a tiny ReRAM structure but also the performance of unique experiments, by making the most of its high robustness against the drift of the cantilever.

  9. 10 CFR 26.65 - Pre-access drug and alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-access drug and alcohol testing. 26.65 Section 26.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.65 Pre-access drug and alcohol testing. (a) Purpose. This section contains pre-access...

  10. 10 CFR 26.65 - Pre-access drug and alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pre-access drug and alcohol testing. 26.65 Section 26.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.65 Pre-access drug and alcohol testing. (a) Purpose. This section contains pre-access...

  11. 10 CFR 26.65 - Pre-access drug and alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pre-access drug and alcohol testing. 26.65 Section 26.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.65 Pre-access drug and alcohol testing. (a) Purpose. This section contains pre-access...

  12. 10 CFR 26.65 - Pre-access drug and alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pre-access drug and alcohol testing. 26.65 Section 26.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.65 Pre-access drug and alcohol testing. (a) Purpose. This section contains pre-access...

  13. Electrodeless drift chambers with 50-cm drift distance

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, D.S.; Price, L.E.

    1982-08-01

    The electrodeless drift-chamber technique is potentially very useful in applications requiring the drifting of ionization in gas over long distances in narrow channels. Chamber construction is simple and cheap; the technique is well suited to very large detectors operating in low-rate environments. Prototype tests on planar chambers reveal excellent drifting characteristics after the initial charging, but show a substantial degradation of pulse height from cosmic rays over a two-week period. The loss of efficiency appears to be caused by excess charge buildup on the dielectric surfaces of the chamber. Several solutions are suggested.

  14. Geographic Variation in the Acoustic Traits of Greater Horseshoe Bats: Testing the Importance of Drift and Ecological Selection in Evolutionary Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Keping; Luo, Li; Kimball, Rebecca T.; Wei, Xuewen; Jin, Longru; Jiang, Tinglei; Li, Guohong; Feng, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of intraspecific geographic variation of signaling systems provide insight into the microevolutionary processes driving phenotypic divergence. The acoustic calls of bats are sensitive to diverse evolutionary forces, but processes that shape call variation are largely unexplored. In China, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum displays a diverse call frequency and inhabits a heterogeneous landscape, presenting an excellent opportunity for this kind of research. We quantified geographic variation in resting frequency (RF) of echolocation calls, estimated genetic structure and phylogeny of R. ferrumequinum populations, and combined this with climatic factors to test three hypotheses to explain acoustic variation: genetic drift, cultural drift, and local adaptation. Our results demonstrated significant regional divergence in frequency and phylogeny among the bat populations in China's northeast (NE), central-east (CE) and southwest (SW) regions. The CE region had higher frequencies than the NE and SW regions. Drivers of RF divergence were estimated in the entire range and just the CE/NE region (since these two regions form a clade). In both cases, RF divergence was not correlated with mtDNA or nDNA genetic distance, but was significantly correlated with geographic distance and mean annual temperature, indicating cultural drift and ecological selection pressures are likely important in shaping RF divergence among different regions in China. PMID:23950926

  15. 49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206 Section 219.206 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results. Documentation of breath test results must be made...

  16. 49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206 Section 219.206 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results. Documentation of breath test results must be made...

  17. 49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206 Section 219.206 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results. Documentation of breath test results must be made...

  18. 49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206 Section 219.206 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results. Documentation of breath test results must be made...

  19. 49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206 Section 219.206 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results. Documentation of breath test results must be made...

  20. Effects of selection and drift on G matrix evolution in a heterogeneous environment: a multivariate Qst-Fst Test with the freshwater snail Galba truncatula.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Elodie; Martin, Guillaume; Goudet, Jérôme

    2008-12-01

    Unraveling the effect of selection vs. drift on the evolution of quantitative traits is commonly achieved by one of two methods. Either one contrasts population differentiation estimates for genetic markers and quantitative traits (the Q(st)-F(st) contrast) or multivariate methods are used to study the covariance between sets of traits. In particular, many studies have focused on the genetic variance-covariance matrix (the G matrix). However, both drift and selection can cause changes in G. To understand their joint effects, we recently combined the two methods into a single test (accompanying article by Martin et al.), which we apply here to a network of 16 natural populations of the freshwater snail Galba truncatula. Using this new neutrality test, extended to hierarchical population structures, we studied the multivariate equivalent of the Q(st)-F(st) contrast for several life-history traits of G. truncatula. We found strong evidence of selection acting on multivariate phenotypes. Selection was homogeneous among populations within each habitat and heterogeneous between habitats. We found that the G matrices were relatively stable within each habitat, with proportionality between the among-populations (D) and the within-populations (G) covariance matrices. The effect of habitat heterogeneity is to break this proportionality because of selection for habitat-dependent optima. Individual-based simulations mimicking our empirical system confirmed that these patterns are expected under the selective regime inferred. We show that homogenizing selection can mimic some effect of drift on the G matrix (G and D almost proportional), but that incorporating information from molecular markers (multivariate Q(st)-F(st)) allows disentangling the two effects.

  1. An Everting Ureteral Access Sheath: Concepts and In Vitro Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keith L.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral access sheaths have been a recent innovation in facilitating ureteral stone surgery. Once properly placed, access sheaths allow the movement of ureteroscopes and other instruments through the ureter with minimal injury to the urothelium. However, there are shortcomings of the current device designs. Initial sheath placement requires significant force, and shear stress can injure the ureter. In addition, inadvertent advancement of the outer sheath without the inner introducer stylet can tear and avulse the ureter. A novel eversion design incorporating a lubricous film provides marked improvement over current access sheaths. In bench top and animal models, the eversion shealths require less force during advancement, cause less injury to the urothelial tissue, and have a lower potential of introducing extraneous materials (e.g., microbes) into a simulated urinary tract. While, the everting design provides important advantages over traditional non-everting designs, further preclinical and clinical trials are required.

  2. Is the possible fine-structure constant drift also a test of a time-dependent Planck constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztas, A. M.; Smith, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The recent publication of spatial and distance variation of the fine-structure constant, α, derived from astronomical data of quasar emissions (QE) is exciting. The decreasing value of α over time, derived from data obtained from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, encourages the search for other possible running constants. We surmise that emissions from distant supernovae, type Ia (SNe Ia), which are more blue than predictions are best explained by a decreasing Planck constant with increasing lookback time. We present some results from our theoretical work and comparison to the astronomical observations and suggest that both α and h might be running constants. More data are required to answer several questions about the origin of the "drifting" α and the possible time dependence of h. Astronomical tools such as SNe and QE may be the best means to secure the exacting data needed to confirm or deny these hypotheses.

  3. An experimental test and models of drift and dispersal processes of pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) free embryos in the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braaten, P.J.; Fuller, D.B.; Lott, R.D.; Ruggles, M.P.; Brandt, T.F.; Legare, R.G.; Holm, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Free embryos of wild pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus were released in the Missouri River and captured at downstream sites through a 180-km reach of the river to examine ontogenetic drift and dispersal processes. Free embryos drifted primarily in the fastest portion of the river channel, and initial drift velocities for all age groups (mean = 0.66–0.70 m s−1) were only slightly slower than mean water column velocity (0.72 m s−1). During the multi-day long-distance drift period, drift velocities of all age groups declined an average of 9.7% day−1. Younger free embryos remained in the drift upon termination of the study; whereas, older age groups transitioned from drifting to settling during the study. Models based on growth of free embryos, drift behavior, size-related variations in drift rates, and channel hydraulic characteristics were developed to estimate cumulative distance drifted during ontogenetic development through a range of simulated water temperatures and velocity conditions. Those models indicated that the average free embryo would be expected to drift several hundred km during ontogenetic development. Empirical data and model results highlight the long-duration, long-distance drift and dispersal processes for pallid sturgeon early life stages. In addition, results provide a likely mechanism for lack of pallid sturgeon recruitment in fragmented river reaches where dams and reservoirs reduce the length of free-flowing river available for pallid sturgeon free embryos during ontogenetic development.

  4. Accessibility of Tests for Individuals with Disabilities within a Validity Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Eric G.; Mislevy, Robert J.; Steinberg, Linda S.; Lee, Moon J.; Forer, Douglas C.

    2005-01-01

    There is a great need to ensure that language tests are accessible to individuals with disabilities. Yet accessibility features can sometimes conflict with the validity of test scores. In some cases the nature of the conflict seems obvious, yet in other cases there is controversy, such as that concerning the use of a "readaloud" accessibility…

  5. Gauge cooling for the singular-drift problem in the complex Langevin method — a test in Random Matrix Theory for finite density QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Keitaro; Nishimura, Jun; Shimasaki, Shinji

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the complex Langevin method has been applied successfully to finite density QCD either in the deconfinement phase or in the heavy dense limit with the aid of a new technique called the gauge cooling. In the confinement phase with light quarks, however, convergence to wrong limits occurs due to the singularity in the drift term caused by small eigenvalues of the Dirac operator including the mass term. We propose that this singular-drift problem should also be overcome by the gauge cooling with different criteria for choosing the complexified gauge transformation. The idea is tested in chiral Random Matrix Theory for finite density QCD, where exact results are reproduced at zero temperature with light quarks. It is shown that the gauge cooling indeed changes drastically the eigenvalue distribution of the Dirac operator measured during the Langevin process. Despite its non-holomorphic nature, this eigenvalue distribution has a universal diverging behavior at the origin in the chiral limit due to a generalized Banks-Casher relation as we confirm explicitly.

  6. Observational test of shock drift and Fermi acceleration on a seed particle population upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of proposed shock acceleration mechanisms as they operate at the bow shock in the presence of a seed energetic particle population was examined using data from simultaneous observations of energetic solar-origin protons, carried out by the IMP 7 and 8 spacecraft in the vicinity of the quasi-parallel (dawn) and quasi-perpendicular (dusk) regions of the earth's bow shock, respectively. The results of observations (which include acceleration effects in the intensities of the energetic protons with energies as high as 4 MeV observed at the vicinity of the dusk bow shock, but no evidence for any particle acceleration at the energy equal to or above 50 keV at the dawn side of the bow shock) indicate that the acceleration of a seed particle population occurs only at the quasi-perpendicular bow shock through shock drift acceleration and that the major source of observed upstream ion populations is the leakage of magnetospheric ions of energies not less than 50 keV, rather than in situ acceleration.

  7. From Seismic Characterization to Coupled Process Testing Along Drifts at LSBB as an Example of Establishing an International Facility for a Worldwide Network of Underground Research Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffet, S.; Wang, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit (LSBB) at Rustrel France is a French National Instrumented Infrastructure, CNRS, dedicated to inter-Disciplinary Underground Science and Technology. The underground galleries and the surrounding carbonate rock formations are well characterized by seismic imaging studies obtained with sensors both along the ridges and underground along the drifts. The facility is horizontally accessible with the main tunnel following an L-shape. The deepest is 518m below the surface. The main tunnel continues with a long gallery below the ridge, and ends with an escape shaft to the surface. Electrical and fiber optic communication cables connect the galleries and the underground to the huts on the surface. All data from LSBB are distributed on line (http://lsbb.oca.eu) and data from the 3D broadband seismic array are fed in real time (delay of ~4s) to the European Union seismic network (see streams RUSF_01, 03, 04, 05, 06, and 07 at http://www.orfeus-eu.org/Data-info/orbstats.html). Concurrently with establishing the seismic network, the LSBB characterizes its low noise environment, including its low ambient magnetic noise with a (SQUID)2 magnetometer, located 518m below the surface in a shielded cage. The magnetic noise floor in the cage is lower than 2fT/SQRT(Hz). Together with the seismic network and the magnetic sensor, tiltmeters, radiation sensors, groundwater pressure and chemistry monitoring devices are installed to characterize the unsaturated environment along the tunnel. Seasonal seepage observations are also collected. 3 national research projects are currently carried out along dedicated tunnels: (1) the project on High-Pulse Poroelasticity Protocol (HPPP) for geophysical monitoring of CO2 injection in reservoirs (http://hppp.unice.fr/), focusing currently on hydromechanical testing in carbonate rock; (2) the MAXWELL electromagnetic project on broadband imaging which employs joint resistivity and permittivity inversion (http

  8. Impact of genetic drift on developing access and benefit sharing guidelines under the Nagoya Protocol: The case of Meishan pigs imported into the US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Convention on Biological Diversity developed the Nagoya Protocol (NP) on access and benefit sharing (ABS) for international exchange of genetic resources across life forms. Concerns are NP will be cumbersome, stifle research, and not accommodate diverse life forms, such as livestock. NP was deve...

  9. Using Technology to Create and Administer Accessible Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer

    2009-01-01

    Technology is transforming many aspects of society including the ways teachers teach and students learn. Although technology has been firmly established as a teaching tool across a range of content areas, educators are realizing that technology also offers innovative ways to help their students take standardized tests that comply with the mandates…

  10. Developing Testing Accommodations for English Language Learners: Illustrations as Visual Supports for Item Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Wang, Chao; Kachchaf, Rachel; Soltero-Gonzalez, Lucinda; Nguyen-Le, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    We address valid testing for English language learners (ELLs)--students in the United States who are schooled in English while they are still acquiring English as a second language. Also, we address the need for procedures for systematically developing ELL testing accommodations--changes in tests intended to support ELLs to gain access to the…

  11. Genetic screening technology: ethical issues in access to tests by employers and health insurance committees.

    PubMed

    Faden, R R; Kass, N E

    1993-01-01

    Whereas the introduction of new technologies previously has raised the ethical question of who ought to have access to a new procedure or device, genetic testing technology raises the new ethical question of to whom access to a new technology ought to be limited. In this article we discuss the implications of employers and private health insurance companies having access to genetic testing technology. Although there may be legitimate business interests in allowing employers and insurers to conduct genetic screening, there are other valid societal interests in regulating or limiting the use of this technology by third parties. Public policy developed in the area of new genetic technology must reflect such interests.

  12. Variation in Direct Access to Tests to Investigate Cancer: A Survey of English General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Brian D.; Oke, Jason L.; Rose, Peter W.; Mant, David

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2015 NICE guidelines for suspected cancer recommend that English General Practitioners have direct access to diagnostic tests to investigate symptoms of cancer that do not meet the criteria for urgent referral. We aimed to identify the proportion of GPs in England with direct access to these tests. Methods We recruited 533 English GPs through a national clinical research network to complete an online survey about direct access to laboratory, radiology, and endoscopy tests in the three months leading up to the release of the 2015 NICE guidance. If they had direct access to a diagnostic test, GPs were asked about the time necessary to arrange a test and receive a report. Results are reported by NHS sub-region and, adjusting for sampling, for England as a whole. Results Almost all GPs reported direct access to x-ray and laboratory investigations except faecal occult blood testing (54%, 95% CI 49–59%) and urine protein electrophoresis (89%, 95% CI 84–92%). Fewer GPs had direct access to CT scans (54%, 95% CI 49–59%) or endoscopy (colonoscopy 32%, 95% CI 28–37%; gastroscopy 72%, 95% CI 67–77%). There was significant variation in direct access between NHS regions for the majority of imaging tests—for example, from 20 to 85% to MRI. Apart from x-ray, very few GPs (1–22%) could access radiology and endoscopy within the timescales recommended by NICE. The modal request to test time was 2–4 weeks for routine radiology and 4–6 weeks for routine endoscopy with results taking another 1–2 weeks. Conclusion At the time that the 2015 NICE guideline was released, local investment was required to not only provide direct access but also reduce the interval between request and test and speed up reporting. Further research using our data as a benchmark is now required to identify whether local improvements in direct access have been achieved in response to the NICE targets. If alternative approaches to test access are to be proposed they must be

  13. Kaviar: an accessible system for testing SNV novelty

    PubMed Central

    Glusman, Gustavo; Caballero, Juan; Mauldin, Denise E.; Hood, Leroy; Roach, Jared C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: With the rapidly expanding availability of data from personal genomes, exomes and transcriptomes, medical researchers will frequently need to test whether observed genomic variants are novel or known. This task requires downloading and handling large and diverse datasets from a variety of sources, and processing them with bioinformatics tools and pipelines. Alternatively, researchers can upload data to online tools, which may conflict with privacy requirements. We present here Kaviar, a tool that greatly simplifies the assessment of novel variants. Kaviar includes: (i) an integrated and growing database of genomic variation from diverse sources, including over 55 million variants from personal genomes, family genomes, transcriptomes, SNV databases and population surveys; and (ii) software for querying the database efficiently. Availability: Kaviar is programmed in Perl and offered free of charge as Open Source Software. Kaviar may be used online as a programmatic web service or downloaded for local use from http://db.systemsbiology.net/kaviar. The database is also provided. Contact: gustavo@systemsbiology.org Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21965822

  14. Coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical analyses of the YuccaMountain Drift Scale Test - Comparison of field measurements topredictions of four different numerical models

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Barr, D.; Datta, R.; Gens, A.; Millard, A.; Olivella, S.; Tsang, C.-F.; Tsang, Y.

    2004-08-30

    The Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test (DST) is a multiyear, large-scale underground heater test designed to study coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical behavior in unsaturated fractured and welded tuff. As part of the international cooperative code-comparison project DECOVALEX, four research teams used four different numerical models to simulate and predict coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes at the DST. The simulated processes included above-boiling temperature changes, liquid and vapor water movements, rock-mass stress and displacement, and THM-induced changes in fracture permeability. Model predictions were evaluated by comparison to measurements of temperature, water saturation,displacement, and air permeability. The generally good agreement between simulated and measured THM data shows that adopted continuum model approaches are adequate for simulating relevant coupled THM processes at the DST. Moreover, TM-induced rock-mass deformations were reasonably well predicted using elastic models, although some individual displacements appeared to be better captured using an elasto-plastic model. It is concluded that fracture closure/opening caused by change in normal stress across fractures is the dominant mechanism for TM-induced changes in intrinsic fracture permeability at the DST, whereas fracture shear dilation appears to be less significant. This indicates that TM-induced changes in intrinsic permeability at the DST, which are within one order of magnitude, tend to be reversible.

  15. Dike/Drift Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  16. Drift Chamber Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walenta, A. H.; ćonka Nurdan, T.

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes a laboratory course held at ICFA 2002 Regional Instrumentation School in Morelia, Mexico. This course intends to introduce drift chambers, which play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. The experimental setup consists of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber, a plastic scintillator detector and a collimated 90Sr source. The measurements on the drift velocity of electrons, its change as a function of a drift field, gas gain and diffusion are performed at this laboratory course.

  17. Free Drifting Buoys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Information was exchanged between people directly involved with the development, use, and/or potential use of free drifting buoys. Tracking systems and techniques, where methods and accuracy of optical, radio, radar, satellite, and sonic tracking of free-drifting buoys were discussed. Deployment and retrieval covering methods currently used or planned in the deployment and retrieval of free-drifting buoys from boats, ships, helicopters, fixed platforms, and fixed-wing aircraft were reported. Simulation, sensors, and data emphasizing the status of water circulation modeling, and sensors useful on free-drifting buoys, and data display and analysis were described.

  18. 46 CFR 4.06-15 - Accessibility of chemical testing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... sufficient number of urine-specimen collection and shipping kits meeting the requirements of 49 CFR part 40... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accessibility of chemical testing devices. 4.06-15... MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Mandatory Chemical Testing Following Serious Marine...

  19. 46 CFR 4.06-15 - Accessibility of chemical testing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... sufficient number of urine-specimen collection and shipping kits meeting the requirements of 49 CFR part 40... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accessibility of chemical testing devices. 4.06-15... MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Mandatory Chemical Testing Following Serious Marine...

  20. 46 CFR 4.06-15 - Accessibility of chemical testing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sufficient number of urine-specimen collection and shipping kits meeting the requirements of 49 CFR part 40... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accessibility of chemical testing devices. 4.06-15... MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Mandatory Chemical Testing Following Serious Marine...

  1. 46 CFR 4.06-15 - Accessibility of chemical testing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... sufficient number of urine-specimen collection and shipping kits meeting the requirements of 49 CFR part 40... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accessibility of chemical testing devices. 4.06-15... MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Mandatory Chemical Testing Following Serious Marine...

  2. 46 CFR 4.06-15 - Accessibility of chemical testing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... sufficient number of urine-specimen collection and shipping kits meeting the requirements of 49 CFR part 40... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accessibility of chemical testing devices. 4.06-15... MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Mandatory Chemical Testing Following Serious Marine...

  3. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace W.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Cook, Paul J.

    2005-09-08

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an undergroundvoidthat, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rockmass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturatedrock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirmingits existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of driftshadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristicscould provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in thesubsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposednuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the fieldprogram that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadowand the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sandmine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch,California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it anexcellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. Themine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, anapproximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales,coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the minerequired the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other,driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. Thisconfiguration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rockmass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around theunderlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performedare described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radialpattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situwater content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test,water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel driftsand the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottomdrift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, andground penetrating radar may be

  4. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    SciTech Connect

    G.W. Su; T.J. Kneafsey

    2006-02-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rock mass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming the existence of the drift shadow have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow--and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sand mine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rock mass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content using a gravimetric technique, as well as analyzed for chemistry. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift

  5. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ghezzehei, T.A.; Cook, P.J.; Marshall, B.D.

    2006-01-01

    The "Drift Shadow" is defined as the relatively drier region that forms below subsurface cavities or drifts in unsaturated rock. Its existence has been predicted through analytical and numerical models of unsaturated flow. However, these theoretical predictions have not been demonstrated empirically to date. In this project we plan to test the drift shadow concept through field investigations and compare our observations to simulations. Based on modeling studies we have an identified a suitable site to perform the study at an inactive mine in a sandstone formation. Pretest modeling studies and preliminary characterization of the site are being used to develop the field scale tests.

  6. FIELD INVESTIGATIONS OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    SciTech Connect

    G. W. Su, T. J. Kneafsey, T. A. Ghezzehei, B. D. Marshall, and P. J. Cook

    2006-01-15

    The ''Drift Shadow'' is defined as the relatively drier region that forms below subsurface cavities or drifts in unsaturated rock. Its existence has been predicted through analytical and numerical models of unsaturated flow. However, these theoretical predictions have not been demonstrated empirically to date. In this project they plan to test the drift shadow concept through field investigations and compare our observations to simulations. Based on modeling studies they have an identified suitable site to perform the study at an inactive mine in a sandstone formation. Pretest modeling studies and preliminary characterization of the site are being used to develop the field scale tests.

  7. Booktalking: Avoiding Summer Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittingham, Jeff; Rickman, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Summer drift, otherwise known as loss of reading comprehension skills or reading achievement, has been a well-known and well-documented phenomenon of public education for decades. Studies from the late twentieth century to the present have demonstrated a slowdown in summer drift attributed to specific summer reading programs addressing motivation…

  8. HIV risk behavior and access to services: what predicts HIV testing among heterosexually active homeless men?

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Suzanne L; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-06-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV testing behavior of homeless men. This study examined the association between individual (HIV risk) and structural (service access) factors and past year HIV testing. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men interviewed from meal programs in the Skid Row region of Los Angeles. Logistic regression examined the association between past year HIV testing and demographic characteristics, HIV risk behavior, and access to other services in the Skid Row area in the past 30 days. Despite high rates of past year HIV testing, study participants also reported high rates of HIV risk behavior, suggesting there is still significant unmet need for HIV prevention among homeless men. Having recently used medical/dental services in the Skid Row area (OR: 1.91; CI: 1.09, 3.35), and being a military veteran (OR: 2.10; CI: 1.01-4.37) were significantly associated with HIV testing service utilization. HIV testing was not associated with HIV risk behavior, but rather with access to services and veteran status, the latter of which prior research has linked to increased service access. We suggest that programs encouraging general medical service access may be important for disseminating HIV testing services to this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:22676465

  9. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport.

  10. Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Min, K.-B.; Elsworth, D.; Tsang, Y.

    2008-06-01

    We analyzed a data set of thermally induced changes in fractured rock permeability during a four-year heating (up to 200 C) and subsequent four-year cooling of a large volume, partially saturated and highly fractured volcanic tuff at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test, in Nevada, USA. Permeability estimates were derived from about 700 pneumatic (air-injection) tests, taken periodically at 44 packed-off borehole intervals during the heating and cooling cycle from November 1997 through November 2005. We analyzed air-permeability data by numerical modeling of thermally induced stress and moisture movements and their impact on air permeability within the highly fractured rock. Our analysis shows that changes in air permeability during the initial four-year heating period, which were limited to about one order of magnitude, were caused by the combined effects of thermal-mechanically-induced stress on fracture aperture and thermal-hydrologically-induced changes in fracture moisture content. At the end of the subsequent four-year cooling period, air-permeability decreases (to as low as 0.2 of initial) and increases (to as high as 1.8 of initial) were observed. By comparison to the calculated thermo-hydro-elastic model results, we identified these remaining increases or decreases in air permeability as irreversible changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). In this paper, we discuss the possibility that such fracture asperity shortening and associated decrease in fracture permeability might be enhanced by dissolution of highly stressed surface asperities over years of elevated stress and temperature.

  11. Case Report: Direct Access Genetic Testing and A False-Positive Result For Long QT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Predham, Sarah; Hamilton, Sara; Elliott, Alison M; T Gibson, William

    2016-02-01

    We report the case of a woman who pursued direct access genetic testing and then presented with concerns regarding a positive test result for Long-QT syndrome. Although the result ultimately proved to be a false positive, this case illustrates that costs associated with follow-up of direct access genetic testing results can be non-trivial for both the patient and for health care systems. Here we raise policy questions regarding the appropriate distribution of these costs. We also discuss the possibility that, when confronted by a direct access genetic test result that reports high risk for one or more actionable diseases, a family physician might feel compelled to act out of a desire to avoid liability, even when information regarding the accuracy and validity of the testing were not easily accessible. This case outlines lessons that can easily be translated into clinical practice, not only by genetic counselors, but also by family physicians, medical specialists and members of the public.

  12. 40 CFR 1065.550 - Gas analyzer range validation, drift validation, and drift correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... correction. (a) Range validation. If an analyzer operated above 100% of its range at any time during the test... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas analyzer range validation, drift validation, and drift correction. 1065.550 Section 1065.550 Protection of Environment...

  13. Design of access-tube TDR sensor for soil water content: Testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water measurement is important in water management for irrigation and hydrologic sciences. The purpose of this paper is to develop and test the design of a cylindrical access-tube mounted waveguide for use in time-domain reflectometry (TDR) for in-situ soil water content sensing. Several prot...

  14. What Constrains the Accuracy of Metacomprehension Judgments? Testing the Transfer-Appropriate-Monitoring and Accessibility Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlosky, J.; Rawson, K.A.; Middleton, E.L.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated two hypotheses-transfer appropriate monitoring (TAM) and the accessibility hypothesis-that explain why the accuracy of metacomprehension judgments is commonly low. In 2 experiments, participants read six expository texts, made global judgments about how well they would perform on a test over each text, and made term-specific judgments…

  15. 76 FR 56712 - CLIA Program and HIPAA Privacy Rule; Patients' Access to Test Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... December 28, 2000, the Department published a final rule in the Federal Register (65 FR 82462) entitled... was amended on August 14, 2002 (67 FR 53182). The Privacy Rule at 45 CFR 164.524 provides individuals... conflict with the CLIA requirements that limited patient access to test reports (65 FR 82485)....

  16. The Changing Faces of Corruption in Georgian Higher Education: Access through Times and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orkodashvili, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a comparative-historical analysis of access to higher education in Georgia. It describes the workings of corrupt channels during the Soviet and early post-Soviet periods and the role of standardized tests in fighting corruption in higher education admission processes after introduction of the Unified National Entrance…

  17. Man-computer Inactive Data Access System (McIDAS). [design, development, fabrication, and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A technical description is given of the effort to design, develop, fabricate, and test the two dimensional data processing system, McIDAS. The system has three basic sections: an access and data archive section, a control section, and a display section. Areas reported include hardware, system software, and applications software.

  18. Lithium drifted germanium system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjarlie, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    General characteristics of the lithium-drifted germanium photodiode-Dewar-preamplifier system and particular operating instructions for the device are given. Information is included on solving operational problems.

  19. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event.

  20. Environmental Technology Verification Report: Pesticide spray drift reduction technologies--Evaluation of the verification protocol for low and high speed wind tunnel testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pesticide spray drift is defined as the movement of spray droplets through the air at the time of application or soon thereafter from the target site to any non- or off-target site, excluding pesticide movements by erosion, migration, volatility, or windblown soil particles after...

  1. HIV testing practices of South African township MSM in the era of expanded access to ART.

    PubMed

    Sandfort, Theo G M; Knox, Justin; Collier, Kate L; Lane, Tim; Reddy, Vasu

    2015-03-01

    While men who have sex with men (MSM) in Africa are at high risk for HIV infection, few of those already infected know their status. Effectively promoting frequent HIV testing-of increasing importance with the expanding accessibility of antiretroviral treatment-requires an understanding of the testing practices in this population. To understand men's HIV testing practices, including their behavior, experiences, and perceptions, we conducted in-depth interviews with 81 black South African MSM (ages 20-39), purposively recruited from four townships. Many men in the sample had tested for HIV. While ever having tested seemed to facilitate repeat testing, men still expressed a high level of discomfort with testing. It was common to test after having engaged in risky behavior, thus increasing anxiety about testing that was already present. Fear that they might test HIV positive caused some men to avoid testing until they were clearly sick, and others to avoid testing completely. HIV testing may increase in this population if it becomes a routine practice, instead of being driven by anxiety-inducing incidents. Mobilization through social support might facilitate frequent testing while education about current treatment options is needed.

  2. HIV testing practices of South African township MSM in the era of expanded access to ART

    PubMed Central

    Sandfort, Theo G. M.; Knox, Justin; Collier, Kate L.; Lane, Tim; Reddy, Vasu

    2014-01-01

    While men who have sex with men (MSM) in Africa are at high risk for HIV infection, few of those already infected know their status. Effectively promoting frequent HIV testing—of increasing importance with the expanding accessibility of antiretroviral treatment—requires an understanding of the testing practices in this population. To understand men’s HIV testing practices, including their behavior, experiences, and perceptions, we conducted in-depth interviews with 81 black South African MSM (ages 20–39), purposively recruited from four townships. Many men in the sample had tested for HIV. While ever having tested seemed to facilitate repeat testing, men still expressed a high level of discomfort with testing. It was common to test after having engaged in risky behavior, thus increasing anxiety about testing that was already present. Fear that they might test HIV positive caused some men to avoid testing until they were clearly sick, and others to avoid testing completely. HIV testing may increase in this population if it becomes a routine practice, instead of being driven by anxiety-inducing incidents. Mobilization through social support might facilitate frequent testing while education about current treatment options is needed. PMID:25103866

  3. Understanding the support needs of patients accessing test results online. PHRs offer great promise, but support issues must be addressed to ensure appropriate access.

    PubMed

    Wiljer, David; Urowitz, Sara; Apatu, Emma; Leonard, Kevin; Quartey, Naa Kwarley; Catton, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Personal health records (PHR) offer great promise in transforming the patient experience, but a number of support issues must be addressed to ensure that patients have appropriate access to their health information. Two hundred and fifty breast cancer patients registered to use a portal providing access to personal health information over a six-week period. All support calls were directed to a research triage centre and redirected either to technical, clinical or psychosocial support. Log files were coded and analyzed. Two hundred and thirty-nine support contacts were logged by 122 participants. The majority was referred to technical support; the remaining contacts were directed to clinical support. Seven categories of technical support were identified: registration problems, site access, login issues, password reset, activation key issues, result access and other difficulties. In accessing their test results, patients required support in a number of technical domains, but educational and psychosocial support were not heavily utilized.

  4. The generalized drift flux approach: Identification of the void-drift closure law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boure, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    The main characteristics and the potential advantages of generalized drift flux models are presented. In particular it is stressed that the issue on the propagation properties and on the mathematical nature (hyperbolic or not) of the model and the problem of closure are easier to tackle than in two fluid models. The problem of identifying the differential void-drift closure law inherent to generalized drift flux models is then addressed. Such a void-drift closure, based on wave properties, is proposed for bubbly flows. It involves a drift relaxation time which is of the order of 0.25 s. It is observed that, although wave properties provide essential closure validity tests, they do not represent an easily usable source of quantitative information on the closure laws.

  5. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  6. The Electron Drift Instrument for MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Granoff, M.; Widholm, M.; Gaidos, J. A.; Briggs, B. H.; Dors, I. G.; Chutter, M. W.; Macri, J.; Argall, M.; Bodet, D.; Needell, J.; Steller, M. B.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Ottacher, H.; Hasiba, J.; Hofmann, K.; Kletzing, C. A.; Bounds, S. R.; Dvorsky, R. T.; Sigsbee, K.; Kooi, V.

    2016-03-01

    The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission measures the in-situ electric and magnetic fields using the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one or more gyrations. This drift is related to the electric field and, to a lesser extent, the gradient in the magnetic field. Although these two quantities can be determined separately by use of different electron energies, for MMS regions of interest the magnetic field gradient contribution is negligible. As a by-product of the drift determination, the magnetic field strength and constraints on its direction are also determined. The present paper describes the scientific objectives, the experimental method, and the technical realization of the various elements of the instrument on MMS.

  7. Drift Degradation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  8. A RAM architecture for concurrent access and on-chip testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jyh-Charn; Shin, Kang G.

    1991-01-01

    A novel RAM architecture supporting concurrent memory access and on-chip testing (CMAT) is proposed. A large-capacity memory chip is decomposed into test neighborhoods (TNDs), each of which is tested independently. When there are data stored in a TND, the data are saved into a buffer before testing the TND, and the TND's contents are restored using buffered data after testing the TND. If an external request is not made to the TND, the request can be directed to the addressed memory cells. Otherwise, the buffered data can be loaded back into the TND, or the request is detoured to a corresponding buffer. By deriving an analytical model, the performance penalty and hardware overhead of the CMAT architecture are shown to be very small.

  9. Access to gynecological services and Papanicolau tests in HIV-infected Italian women: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Murri, R; Franceschi, S; Ravizza, M; Fiore, S; Bini, T; Mussini, C; Fasolo, M; Liuzzi, G; Ippolito, G; D'Arminio Monforte, A

    2006-05-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the access to Papanicolau (Pap) tests of HIV-infected women in Italy. A cross-sectional survey on a cohort of HIV-infected women seen at 27 HIV clinics was performed. At each clinic a female physician involved in the care of HIV-infected women was asked questions on clinic and patients' characteristics and on access to Pap tests. The outcome of the study was to find the percentage of women who had not had a Pap test before coming to the HIV clinic and the percentage having had a Pap test in 2001. In the survey, 7,600 HIV-infected women were represented. Women who came to the clinic without having ever had a Pap test were 62+/-22%, while women who had had a Pap test in 2001 were 43+/-36%. Women who reported never having had a Pap test before coming to the HIV clinic were more often from the south than the north of Italy (17.9+/-49% from the north, 18+/-53% from the center and 9.3+/-83.9% from the south; p<0.001). This a difference disappeared when comparing the women who had had a Pap test in 2001 (28+/-39.6% from the north, 31.6+/-44.2% from the center and 25.6+/-45.7% from the south; p=0.88). Despite the published guidelines in Italy, only 38% of women had ever had a Pap test before coming to the HIV clinic and only 43% had had a Pap test in 2001. Strategies aimed to improve these proportions should be rapidly implemented at all levels of care organization.

  10. Changes in constructed Brassica communities treated with glyphosate drift.

    PubMed

    Watrud, Lidia S; King, George; Londo, Jason P; Colasanti, Ricardo; Smith, Bonnie M; Waschmann, Ronald S; Lee, E Henry

    2011-03-01

    We constructed a mixed-species community designed to simulate roadside and field edge plant communities and exposed it to glyphosate drift in order to test three hypotheses: (1) higher fitness in transgenic Brassica carrying the CP4 EPSPS transgene that confers resistance to glyphosate will result in significant changes in the plant community relative to control communities; (2) given repeated years of glyphosate drift selective pressure, the increased fitness of the transgenic Brassica with CP4 EPSPS will contribute to an increase in the proportion of transgenic progeny produced in plant communities; and (3) the increased fitness of Brassica carrying the CP4 EPSPS transgene will contribute to decreased levels of mycorrhizal infection and biomass in a host species (Trifolium incarnatum). Due to regulatory constraints that prevented the use of outdoor plots for our studies, in 2005 we established multispecies communities in five large cylindrical outdoor sunlit mesocosms (plastic greenhouses) designed for pollen confinement. Three of the community members were sexually compatible Brassica spp.: transgenic glyphosate-resistant canola (B. napus) cultivar (cv.) RaideRR, glyphosate-sensitive non-transgenic B. napus cv. Sponsor, and a weedy B. rapa (GRIN Accession 21735). Additional plant community members were the broadly distributed annual weeds Digitaria sanguinalis, Panicum capillare, and Lapsana communis. Once annually in 2006 and 2007, two mesocosms were sprayed with glyphosate at 10% of the field application rate to simulate glyphosate drift as a selective pressure. After two years, changes were observed in community composition, plant density, and biomass in both control and treatment mesocosms. In control mesocosms, the weed D. sanguinalis (crabgrass) began to dominate. In glyphosate drift-treated mesocosms, Brassica remained the dominant genus and the incidence of the CP4 EPSPS transgene increased in the community. Shoot biomass and mycorrhizal infection in

  11. Changes in constructed Brassica communities treated with glyphosate drift.

    PubMed

    Watrud, Lidia S; King, George; Londo, Jason P; Colasanti, Ricardo; Smith, Bonnie M; Waschmann, Ronald S; Lee, E Henry

    2011-03-01

    We constructed a mixed-species community designed to simulate roadside and field edge plant communities and exposed it to glyphosate drift in order to test three hypotheses: (1) higher fitness in transgenic Brassica carrying the CP4 EPSPS transgene that confers resistance to glyphosate will result in significant changes in the plant community relative to control communities; (2) given repeated years of glyphosate drift selective pressure, the increased fitness of the transgenic Brassica with CP4 EPSPS will contribute to an increase in the proportion of transgenic progeny produced in plant communities; and (3) the increased fitness of Brassica carrying the CP4 EPSPS transgene will contribute to decreased levels of mycorrhizal infection and biomass in a host species (Trifolium incarnatum). Due to regulatory constraints that prevented the use of outdoor plots for our studies, in 2005 we established multispecies communities in five large cylindrical outdoor sunlit mesocosms (plastic greenhouses) designed for pollen confinement. Three of the community members were sexually compatible Brassica spp.: transgenic glyphosate-resistant canola (B. napus) cultivar (cv.) RaideRR, glyphosate-sensitive non-transgenic B. napus cv. Sponsor, and a weedy B. rapa (GRIN Accession 21735). Additional plant community members were the broadly distributed annual weeds Digitaria sanguinalis, Panicum capillare, and Lapsana communis. Once annually in 2006 and 2007, two mesocosms were sprayed with glyphosate at 10% of the field application rate to simulate glyphosate drift as a selective pressure. After two years, changes were observed in community composition, plant density, and biomass in both control and treatment mesocosms. In control mesocosms, the weed D. sanguinalis (crabgrass) began to dominate. In glyphosate drift-treated mesocosms, Brassica remained the dominant genus and the incidence of the CP4 EPSPS transgene increased in the community. Shoot biomass and mycorrhizal infection in

  12. Test and analysis of a stitched RFI graphite-epoxy panel with a fuel access door

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Waters, W. Allen, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A stitched RFI graphite-epoxy panel with a fuel access door was analyzed using a finite element analysis and loaded to failure in compression. The panel was initially 56-inches long and 36.75-inches wide and the oval access door was 18-inches long and 15-inches wide. The panel was impact damaged with impact energy of 100 ft-lb prior to compressive loading; however, no impact damage was detectable visually or by A-scan. The panel carried a failure load of 695,000 Ib and global failure strain of .00494 in/in. Analysis indicated the panel would fail due to collapse at a load of 688,100 Ib. The test data indicate that the maximum strain in a region near the access door was .0096 in/in and analysis indicates a local surface strain of .010 in/in at the panel's failure load. The panel did not fail through the impact damage, but instead failed through bolt holes for attachment of the access door in a region of high strain.

  13. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event. PMID:16057953

  14. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  15. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Pitlick, Emily; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an iron metabolism disorder that leads to excess iron buildup, especially in the heart, liver, and pancreas. Mutations in the HFE gene are the single most common cause of HH, which can be treated effectively if diagnosed early. Patents cover the HFE gene, related proteins, screening methods, and testing kits. Most initial testing for HH is biochemical, but HFE DNA testing or genotyping is used to confirm a diagnosis of inherited hemochromatosis. Concerns over patents covering HFE testing emerged in 2002, when scholars argued that exclusive licensing and the patent-enabled sole provider model then in place led to high prices and limited access. Critics of the sole provider model noted that the test was available at multiple laboratories prior to the enforcement of patents. By 2007, however, Bio-Rad, Limited, acquired the key intellectual property and sub-licensed it widely. In part because of broad, non-exclusive licensing, there are now multiple providers and testing technologies, and research continues. This case study illustrates how both changes in intellectual property ownership and evolving clinical utility of HFE genetic testing in the last decade have effected the licensing of patents and availability of genetic testing. PMID:20393306

  17. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  18. Probing Aircraft Flight Test Hazard Mitigation for the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails & Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Research Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails & Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Project Integration Manager requested in July 2012 that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) form a team to independently assess aircraft structural failure hazards associated with the ACCESS experiment and to identify potential flight test hazard mitigations to ensure flight safety. The ACCESS Project Integration Manager subsequently requested that the assessment scope be focused predominantly on structural failure risks to the aircraft empennage raft empennage.

  19. Proportional drift tubes for large area muon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, C.; Higashi, S.; Hiraoka, N.; Maruyama, A.; Okusawa, T.; Sato, T.; Suwada, T.; Takahashi, T.; Umeda, H.

    1985-01-01

    A proportional drift chamber which consists of eight rectangular drift tubes with cross section of 10 cm x 5 cm, a sense wire of 100 micron phi gold-plated tungsten wire and the length of 6 m, was tested using cosmic ray muons. Spatial resolution (rms) is between 0.5 and 1 mm over drift space of 50 mm, depending on incident angle and distance from sense wire.

  20. DRIFT COMPENSATED DIRECT COUPLED AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Windsor, A.A.

    1959-05-01

    An improved direct-coupled amplifier having zerolevel drift correction is described. The need for an auxiliary corrective-potential amplifier is eliminated thereby giving protection against overload saturation of the zero- level drift correcting circuit. (T.R.H.)

  1. Prior extended daily access to cocaine elevates the reward threshold in a conditioned place preference test.

    PubMed

    Su, Zu-In; Wenzel, Jennifer; Ettenberg, Aaron; Ben-Shahar, Osnat

    2014-09-01

    We have previously shown that extended-access subjects exhibit heightened motivation for cocaine in the runway model, as reflected by reduced number of retreats. This heightened motivation could reflect either an increase in cocaine-induced reward or a decrease in cocaine-induced aversion. The current experiment was therefore devised to assess the cocaine-induced reward and aversion in extended-access rats using a place conditioning test. Rats trained to lever press for intravenous (IV) cocaine (0.25 mg/infusion) were provided 6-hour daily access to the drug over 10 days. Lever pressing in control subjects produced IV infusions of saline. Following drug self-administration, subjects underwent place conditioning for the immediate or delayed effects of cocaine (1.0 or 2.5 mg/kg, IV). In control subjects, the immediate effects of the low dose of cocaine produced conditioned places preferences (CPPs), while the delayed effects produced conditioned place aversions (CPAs). In contrast, the animals receiving low cocaine dose for 6 hours, exhibited place aversions but not preferences; an effect that was reversed when the dose of cocaine was increased. Additionally, in the 6-hour group, delayed conditioning was associated with a reduction in zif268 immunoreactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens shell while immediate conditioning was associated with an increase in zif268-positive cells in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Collectively, these data suggest that extended daily access to cocaine produces a shift in the subject's perceived reward threshold that is paralleled by alterations in the activity of both the reward and stress pathways.

  2. Prior extended daily access to cocaine elevates the reward threshold in a conditioned place preference test.

    PubMed

    Su, Zu-In; Wenzel, Jennifer; Ettenberg, Aaron; Ben-Shahar, Osnat

    2014-09-01

    We have previously shown that extended-access subjects exhibit heightened motivation for cocaine in the runway model, as reflected by reduced number of retreats. This heightened motivation could reflect either an increase in cocaine-induced reward or a decrease in cocaine-induced aversion. The current experiment was therefore devised to assess the cocaine-induced reward and aversion in extended-access rats using a place conditioning test. Rats trained to lever press for intravenous (IV) cocaine (0.25 mg/infusion) were provided 6-hour daily access to the drug over 10 days. Lever pressing in control subjects produced IV infusions of saline. Following drug self-administration, subjects underwent place conditioning for the immediate or delayed effects of cocaine (1.0 or 2.5 mg/kg, IV). In control subjects, the immediate effects of the low dose of cocaine produced conditioned places preferences (CPPs), while the delayed effects produced conditioned place aversions (CPAs). In contrast, the animals receiving low cocaine dose for 6 hours, exhibited place aversions but not preferences; an effect that was reversed when the dose of cocaine was increased. Additionally, in the 6-hour group, delayed conditioning was associated with a reduction in zif268 immunoreactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens shell while immediate conditioning was associated with an increase in zif268-positive cells in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Collectively, these data suggest that extended daily access to cocaine produces a shift in the subject's perceived reward threshold that is paralleled by alterations in the activity of both the reward and stress pathways. PMID:23634951

  3. Toward universal access to HIV counseling and testing and antiretroviral treatment in Ethiopia: looking beyond HIV testing and ART initiation.

    PubMed

    Assefa, Yibeltal; Van Damme, Wim; Mariam, Damen Haile; Kloos, Helmut

    2010-08-01

    Expanding access to HIV counseling and testing (HCT) and antiretroviral treatment (ART) has reduced morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV/AIDS. As a result, many countries are scaling up HIV/AIDS services. In this paper we discuss challenges experienced during the move toward universal access to HCT and ART services in Ethiopia. We reviewed routine reports from the Ministry of Health and implementing partners. We also had interviews, about linkage to and retention in care of patients, with 10 HIV/AIDS program managers, as well as 2 to 7 health care providers and 5 to 15 patients in each of 23 health centers and 32 hospitals in all regions of the country. We found that the number of people tested for HIV increased 10-fold from 435,854 in 2005 to 4,559,954 in 2008. Only 61% of the HIV-positive patients were linked to chronic care immediately after tested for HIV. The number of patients initiated on ART annually increased from 26,021 in 2005 to 53,696 in 2008. Attrition of patients increased from 18% in 2005 to 26% in 2008. Our interviews indicated that fear of stigma, transport cost, feeling healthy and opting for traditional medicines were the main reasons for poor linkage to and retention in care. Lack of nutrition and feeling better were also reasons for poor retention. In conclusion, in spite of the rapid scale-up of HCT and ART services in Ethiopia, linkage and retention were not adequate. Therefore, strategies should be developed and implemented to improve linkage and retention.

  4. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; James, Tamara; Conover, Chris; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most commonly tested autosomal recessive disorders in the US. Clinical CF is associated with mutations in the CFTR gene, of which the most common mutation among Caucasians, ΔF508, was identified in 1989. The University of Michigan, Johns Hopkins University, and the Hospital for Sick Children, where much of the initial research occurred, hold key patents for CF genetic sequences, mutations and methods for detecting them. Several patents including the one that covers detection of the ΔF508 mutation are jointly held by the University of Michigan and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, with Michigan administering patent licensing in the US. The University of Michigan broadly licenses the ΔF508 patent for genetic testing with over 60 providers of genetic testing to date. Genetic testing is now used in newborn screening, diagnosis, and reproductive decisions. Interviews with key researchers and intellectual property managers, a survey of laboratories’ prices for CF genetic testing, a review of literature on CF tests’ cost effectiveness, and a review of the developing market for CF testing provide no evidence that patents have significantly hindered access to genetic tests for CF or prevented financially cost-effective screening. Current licensing practices for cystic fibrosis (CF) genetic testing appear to facilitate both academic research and commercial testing. More than one thousand different CFTR mutations have been identified, and research continues to determine their clinical significance. Patents have been nonexclusively licensed for diagnostic use, and have been variably licensed for gene transfer and other therapeutic applications. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has been engaged in licensing decisions, making CF a model of collaborative and cooperative patenting and licensing practice. PMID:20393308

  5. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  6. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-02-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  7. Direct access testing: nuts and bolts of starting DAT in a hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Chestnut, Dianna

    2005-01-01

    Direct Access Testing (DAT) is a consumer-driven phenomenon that is sweeping the country. It is a highly controversial subject, the implementation of which requires methodical planning and development to be successful. DAT's purpose is to allow the consumer to order a battery of laboratory tests previously available only with a physician's order. With proper planning, DAT can be beneficial to a medical facility in a number of ways. Whether introduced to a hospital or an integrated health system, physician buy-in is vital to the success of DAT. Physicians need to publicly champion the program, even if members of the laboratory are doing the behind-the-scenes work. DAT is growing rapidly, but everyone still wants the stamp of approval from their physician(s) when it comes to their health. PMID:15799839

  8. Testing flow-through air samplers for use in near-field vapour drift studies by measuring pyrimethanil in air after spraying.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Trudyanne S; Hageman, Kimberly J; Hewitt, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Pesticide volatilisation and subsequent vapour drift reduce a pesticide's efficiency and contribute to environmental contamination. High-volume air samplers (HVSs) are often used to measure pesticide concentrations in air but these samplers are expensive to purchase and require network electricity, limiting the number and type of sites where they can be deployed. The flow-through sampler (FTS) presents an opportunity to overcome these limitations. The FTS is a wind-driven passive sampler that has been developed to quantify organic contaminants in remote ecosystems. FTSs differ from other passive samplers in that they turn into the wind and use the wind to draw air through the sampling media. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the FTS in a near-field pesticide vapour drift study by comparing the concentrations of pyrimethanil in air measured using one HVS and three FTSs placed in the same location. Pyrimethanil was sprayed onto a vineyard as part of normal pest management procedures. Air samples were collected every eight hours for 48 h. The volume of air sampled by the FTSs was calculated using the measured relationship between ambient wind speed and the wind speed inside the sampler as determined with a separate wind tunnel study. The FTSs sampled 1.7 to 40.6 m(3) of air during each 8 h sampling period, depending on wind speed, whereas the mean volume sampled by the HVS was 128.7 m(3). Mean pyrimethanil concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 μg m(-3) of air. Inter-sampler reproducibility, as represented by percent relative standard deviation, for the three FTSs was ∼20%. The largest difference in FTS-derived versus HVS-derived pyrimethanil concentrations occurred during the lowest wind-speed period. During this period, it is likely that the FTS predominately acted like a traditional diffusion-based passive sampler. As indicated by both types of sampler, pyrimethanil concentrations in air changed by a factor of ∼2 during the two days after spaying

  9. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ferreira, Ix-B.; García-Herrera, J.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas.

  10. Redefining Accessibility on High-Stakes Tests for Postsecondary College Students with Learning Disabilities in an Era of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Manju; Gregg, Noel

    2008-01-01

    Unprecedented increases in the use of technologies throughout postsecondary education and the workplace are redefining traditional concepts of accessibility during testing for college students with learning disabilities. High stakes testing practices are under pressure to change. The challenge for professionals is to ensure that tests are designed…

  11. When access is an issue: exploring barriers to predictive testing for Huntington disease in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Alice K; Creighton, Susan; Hayden, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Predictive testing (PT) for Huntington disease (HD) requires several in-person appointments. This requirement may be a barrier to testing so that at risk individuals do not realize the potential benefits of PT. To understand the obstacles to PT in terms of the accessibility of services, as well as exploring mechanisms by which this issue may be addressed, we conducted an interview study of individuals at risk for HD throughout British Columbia, Canada. Results reveal that the accessibility of PT can be a barrier for two major reasons: distance and the inflexibility of the testing process. Distance is a structural barrier, and relates to the time and travel required to access PT, the financial and other opportunity costs associated with taking time away from work and family to attend appointments and the stress of navigating urban centers. The inflexibility of the testing process barrier relates to the emotional and psychological accessibility of PT. The results of the interview study reveal that there are access barriers to PT that deter individuals from receiving the support, information and counseling they require. What makes accessibility of PT services important is not just that it may result in differences in quality of life and care, but because these differences may be addressed with creative and adaptable solutions in the delivery of genetic services. The study findings underscore the need for us to rethink and personalize the way we deliver such services to improve access issues to prevent inequities in the health care system. PMID:22781094

  12. The genetic drift inventory: a tool for measuring what advanced undergraduates have mastered about genetic drift.

    PubMed

    Price, Rebecca M; Andrews, Tessa C; McElhinny, Teresa L; Mead, Louise S; Abraham, Joel K; Thanukos, Anna; Perez, Kathryn E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic drift is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of biology, yet it is difficult to learn because it combines the conceptual challenges of both evolution and randomness. To help assess strategies for teaching genetic drift, we have developed and evaluated the Genetic Drift Inventory (GeDI), a concept inventory that measures upper-division students' understanding of this concept. We used an iterative approach that included extensive interviews and field tests involving 1723 students across five different undergraduate campuses. The GeDI consists of 22 agree-disagree statements that assess four key concepts and six misconceptions. Student scores ranged from 4/22 to 22/22. Statements ranged in mean difficulty from 0.29 to 0.80 and in discrimination from 0.09 to 0.46. The internal consistency, as measured with Cronbach's alpha, ranged from 0.58 to 0.88 across five iterations. Test-retest analysis resulted in a coefficient of stability of 0.82. The true-false format means that the GeDI can test how well students grasp key concepts central to understanding genetic drift, while simultaneously testing for the presence of misconceptions that indicate an incomplete understanding of genetic drift. The insights gained from this testing will, over time, allow us to improve instruction about this key component of evolution.

  13. Using Institutional Theory To Reframe Research on Academic Drift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morphew, Christopher C.; Huisman, Jeroen

    2002-01-01

    Examines patterns of academic drift (a drift toward the structure and norms typical of more prestigious universities) in multiple higher education systems and tests the concept of "isomorphism in organizational fields" as discussed in institutional theory. Argues that the theoretical framework provided by institutional theory presents a useful…

  14. Emplacement Drift System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-31

    The Emplacement Drift System is part of the Engineered Barrier System and provides the interface between the various waste package (WP) systems and the Ground Control System. In conjunction with the various WPs, the Emplacement Drift System limits the release and transport of radionuclides from the WP to the Natural Barrier following waste emplacement. Collectively, the Emplacement Drift System consists of the structural support hardware (emplacement drift invert and WP emplacement pallet) and any performance-enhancing barriers (drip shields and invert ballast) installed or placed in the emplacement drifts. The Emplacement Drift System is entirely located within the emplacement drifts in the subsurface portion of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR); specifically, it is physically bounded by the Subsurface Facility System, the Ground Support System, and the Natural Barrier. The Emplacement Drift System supports the key MGR functions of limiting radionuclide release to the Natural Barrier, minimizing the likelihood of a criticality external to the WPs, limiting natural and induced environmental effects, and providing WP support. The Emplacement Drift System limits radionuclide release to the Natural Barrier by controlling the movement of radionuclides within the emplacement drift and to the Natural Barrier, and by limiting water contact with the WPs. The Emplacement Drift System provides physical support and barriers for emplaced WPs that reduce water contact. The Emplacement Drift WP spacing supports the thermal loading performance by complimenting drift layout and orientation as described in the system description document for the Subsurface Facility System. The Emplacement Drift System supports the WP and also provides an environment that aids in enhancing WP confinement performance. As part of the Engineered Barrier System, the Emplacement Drift System interfaces with the WP systems. The Emplacement Drift System also interfaces with the Natural Barrier

  15. Voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) services and their contribution to access to HIV diagnosis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Grangeiro, Alexandre; Escuder, Maria Mercedes; Veras, Maria Amélia; Barreira, Draurio; Ferraz, Dulce; Kayano, Jorge

    2009-09-01

    The Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) Network was implemented in Brazil in the 1980s to promote anonymous and confidential access to HIV diagnosis. As a function of the population and dimensions of the local epidemic, the study assessed the network's coverage, using data from a self-applied questionnaire and data from the Information Technology Department of the Unified National Health System (SUS), UNDP, and National STD/AIDS Program. The Student t test was used for comparison of means and the chi-square test for proportions. Brazil has 383 VCT centers, covering 48.9% of the population and 69.2% of the AIDS cases. The network has been implemented predominantly in regions where the epidemic shows a relevant presence, but 85.3% of the cities with high HIV incidence lack VCT centers; absence of VCT was associated with more limited health infrastructure and worse social indicators. A slowdown in expansion of the network was observed, with VCT Centers implemented on average 16 years after the first AIDS case in the given municipality. The number of HIV tests performed under the SUS is 2.3 times higher in cities with VCT centers. The network's scope is limited, thus minimizing the contribution by these services to the supply of HIV diagnosis in Brazil.

  16. Improving Inpatient Surveys: Web-Based Computer Adaptive Testing Accessed via Mobile Phone QR Codes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The National Health Service (NHS) 70-item inpatient questionnaire surveys inpatients on their perceptions of their hospitalization experience. However, it imposes more burden on the patient than other similar surveys. The literature shows that computerized adaptive testing (CAT) based on item response theory can help shorten the item length of a questionnaire without compromising its precision. Objective Our aim was to investigate whether CAT can be (1) efficient with item reduction and (2) used with quick response (QR) codes scanned by mobile phones. Methods After downloading the 2008 inpatient survey data from the Picker Institute Europe website and analyzing the difficulties of this 70-item questionnaire, we used an author-made Excel program using the Rasch partial credit model to simulate 1000 patients’ true scores followed by a standard normal distribution. The CAT was compared to two other scenarios of answering all items (AAI) and the randomized selection method (RSM), as we investigated item length (efficiency) and measurement accuracy. The author-made Web-based CAT program for gathering patient feedback was effectively accessed from mobile phones by scanning the QR code. Results We found that the CAT can be more efficient for patients answering questions (ie, fewer items to respond to) than either AAI or RSM without compromising its measurement accuracy. A Web-based CAT inpatient survey accessed by scanning a QR code on a mobile phone was viable for gathering inpatient satisfaction responses. Conclusions With advances in technology, patients can now be offered alternatives for providing feedback about hospitalization satisfaction. This Web-based CAT is a possible option in health care settings for reducing the number of survey items, as well as offering an innovative QR code access. PMID:26935793

  17. Inner and outer waste storage vaults with leak-testing accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Splinter, B.C.

    1985-04-23

    A storage arrangement for waste materials of the type which tend to pollute the environment consists of a waterproof reinforced concrete vault, preferably located underground, and a permanent reinforced concrete storage vault within the underground vault and spaced from the walls thereof by a water lock. Sealed containers filled with chemical or nuclear waste are deposited in the permanent storage vault and sealed therein with bitumen. The underground vault is provided with an access opening to the water lock to enable testing of the water periodically for contamination due to leakage from the permanent storage vault. If no leakage is evident after a predetermined time period has elapsed, the permanent storage vault is removed from the underground vault and shipped to a permanent storage site.

  18. Fingermark ridge drift.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification.

  19. Fingermark ridge drift.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification. PMID:26646735

  20. CEAREX Drift Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CEAREX Drift Group

    The Coordinated Eastern Arctic Experiment (CEAREX) was conducted to study the processes regulating eastern Arctic Ocean exchange of momentum, heat, and biomass. The primary CEAREX objectives were to understand the structure and function of mesoscale (order 10 km) and submesoscale processes in the transport of heat northward, and to understand the ice behavior and associated acoustic ambient noise and coherence. The Drift Experiment described here was one part of the comprehensive CEAREX program. It focused on the transition period during freeze up and on the dark winter period. The Drift Experiment was designed to observe atmosphere, ice, and ocean behavior simultaneously. Specific observations were carried out under independent research programs by investigators from a number of organizations. The concurrent information provided an opportunity to measure and understand the relationship between stresses observed in individual ice floes and the geophysical driving forces and overall ice conditions, and to identify and describe noise generated by different processes. The coordinated effort has resulted in a complete set of data for helping to understand the dynamic interactions among ice, ocean, and atmosphere. This large, valuable, and unique data set will be archived by the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo. Some subsets will be available on CD-ROM for simple and inexpensive use on personal computers.

  1. Stability evaluation of the Panel 1 rooms and the E140 drift at WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Maleki, H.; Chaturvedi, L.

    1996-08-01

    WIPP, intended for underground permanent disposal of defense transuranic waste, is located 40 km east of Carlsbad at a depth of 655 m in the salt beds of the 600-m thick Permian Salado Formation. It will consist of 56 ``rooms`` each 91.5 m long, 10 m wide, and 4 m high, grouped in 8 ``panels`` of 7 rooms each. About 7.5 km of access drifts will also be provided. Excavation began in 1982 and surface/access/test facilities and one panel were completed by 1988, many years before it could be used. Current plans are to start emplacing waste in WIPP in 1998 and continue for 35 years. The north- south drift E140 is the widest (25 ft) of the four main north-south drifts and is the main north-south passage. Plans to conduct experiments with waste in 1993 were abandoned, and the plan now is to use panel 1 for permanent disposal of waste starting in 1998. The stability evaluation resulted in the conclusion that, while it would be possible to safely use portions of panel 1 for waste emplacement, it would be best to abandon panel 1 and mine a new panel after the decision has been made to use WIPP as a repository and the necessary permits obtained.

  2. Drift chamber tracking with a VLSI neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H. ); Johns, K. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-10-01

    We have tested a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip for finding in real time the intercept and slope of charged particles traversing a drift chamber. Voltages proportional to the drift times were input to the Intel ETANN chip and the outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. We will discuss the chamber and test setup, the chip specifications, and results of recent tests. We'll briefly discuss possible applications in high energy physics detector triggers.

  3. Drift chamber tracking with a VLSI neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.; Johns, K.

    1992-10-01

    We have tested a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip for finding in real time the intercept and slope of charged particles traversing a drift chamber. Voltages proportional to the drift times were input to the Intel ETANN chip and the outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. We will discuss the chamber and test setup, the chip specifications, and results of recent tests. We`ll briefly discuss possible applications in high energy physics detector triggers.

  4. [Relevance of the new test Access Toxo IgM (II) in the serological interpretation of toxoplasmosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Flori, P; Hafid, J; Raberin, H; Patural, H; Varlet, M N; Tran Manh Sung, R

    2002-01-01

    The detection of specific IgM is an important element in the diagnosis of seroconversion. In this study, we compared the new test Access Toxo IgM (II) versus the previous test Access Toxo IgM (I). This comparative study was done with 507 random sera and 89 selected sera (seroconversion, residual IgM, non specific IgM). The sensitivity and the specificity are higher with the new test (100% & 100% versus 97% & 98,6% respectively). Then, the high sensitivity of Access Toxo IgM (II) is more convenient for the earlier diagnosis of primary Toxoplasma infection. Moreover, the Access Toxo IgM (II) test was evaluated with our first results in routine laboratory (11,000 serology results between June 2000 and June 2001). With these results, we can confirm the specificity of the new test, and also determine the relevance of anti-toxoplasmic IgM. Moreover, an increase of sensitivity leads to an increase of residual IgM detection: 64% (37/58) of positive IgM is residual (> 4 months) as compared to 35% (27/78) with the previous test. In these case, the initiation of other tests such as the avidity test is necessary to validate or invalidate a seroconversion during pregnancy.

  5. Fracture mapping at the Spent Fuel Test-Climax

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, D.G.; Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    Mapping of geologic discontinuities has been done in several phases at the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) in the granitic Climax stock at the Nevada Test Site. Mapping was carried out in the tail drift, access drift, canister drift, heater drifts, instrumentation alcove, and receiving room. The fractures mapped as intersecting a horizontal datum in the canister and heater drifts are shown on one figure. Fracture sketch maps have been compiled as additional figures. Geologic mapping efforts were scheduled around and significantly impacted by the excavation and construction schedules. Several people were involved in the mapping, and over 2500 geologic discontinuities were mapped, including joints, shears, and faults. Some variance between individuals` mapping efforts was noticed, and the effects of various magnetic influences upon a compass were examined. The examination of compass errors improved the credibility of the data. The compass analysis work is explained in Appendix A. Analysis of the fracture data will be presented in a future report.

  6. Filtering and analysis on the random drift of FOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yun-Peng; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Guo, Yun-Zeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Fiber optic gyro (FOG) is an optical gyroscope which is based on the Sagnac effect and uses the optical fiber coil as light propagation channel. Gyro drift consists of two components: systemic drift and random drift. Systemic drift can be compensated by testing and calibrating. Random drift changes with time, so it becomes an important indicator to measure the precision of gyroscope, which has a great impact on the inertial navigation system. It can't be compensated by the simple method. Random drift is a main error of fiber optic gyro (FOG). The static output of FOG is a random project and it has more random noise when as the inertial navigation sensor, which will affect the measurement accuracy. It is an efficient method to reduce the random drift and improve the accuracy by modeling and compensation from the output of FOG. According to the characteristic of fiber optic gyro, the random drift model is studied. Using the time series method, the constant component of the random noise original data is extracted. After stationarity and normality tests, a normal random process is acquired. Based on this, the model is established using the recursive least squares, and then the model is applied to the normal Kalman and adaptive Kalman, finally the data is process with the filter. After experimental verification, the noise variance was reduced after filtering, and the effect is obvious.

  7. Develop and test a solvent accessible surface area-based model in conformational entropy calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2012-05-25

    It is of great interest in modern drug design to accurately calculate the free energies of protein-ligand or nucleic acid-ligand binding. MM-PBSA (molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area) and MM-GBSA (molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area) have gained popularity in this field. For both methods, the conformational entropy, which is usually calculated through normal-mode analysis (NMA), is needed to calculate the absolute binding free energies. Unfortunately, NMA is computationally demanding and becomes a bottleneck of the MM-PB/GBSA-NMA methods. In this work, we have developed a fast approach to estimate the conformational entropy based upon solvent accessible surface area calculations. In our approach, the conformational entropy of a molecule, S, can be obtained by summing up the contributions of all atoms, no matter they are buried or exposed. Each atom has two types of surface areas, solvent accessible surface area (SAS) and buried SAS (BSAS). The two types of surface areas are weighted to estimate the contribution of an atom to S. Atoms having the same atom type share the same weight and a general parameter k is applied to balance the contributions of the two types of surface areas. This entropy model was parametrized using a large set of small molecules for which their conformational entropies were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G* level taking the solvent effect into account. The weighted solvent accessible surface area (WSAS) model was extensively evaluated in three tests. For convenience, TS values, the product of temperature T and conformational entropy S, were calculated in those tests. T was always set to 298.15 K through the text. First of all, good correlations were achieved between WSAS TS and NMA TS for 44 protein or nucleic acid systems sampled with molecular dynamics simulations (10 snapshots were collected for postentropy calculations): the mean correlation coefficient squares (R²) was 0.56. As to the 20 complexes, the TS

  8. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  9. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing

    PubMed Central

    Dijamco, Cheri; Kiefer, Amy K.; Eriksson, Nicholas; Moiseff, Bianca; Tung, Joyce Y.; Mountain, Joanna L.

    2013-01-01

    appreciated learning their BRCA mutation status. Conclusions. Direct access to BRCA mutation tests, considered a model for high-risk actionable genetic tests of proven clinical utility, provided clear benefits to participants. The unexpected information demonstrated a cascade effect as relatives of newly identified carriers also sought testing and more mutation carriers were identified. Given the absence of evidence for serious emotional distress or inappropriate actions in this subset of mutation-positive customers who agreed to be interviewed for this study, broader screening of Ashkenazi Jewish women for these three BRCA mutations should be considered. PMID:23638402

  10. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing.

    PubMed

    Francke, Uta; Dijamco, Cheri; Kiefer, Amy K; Eriksson, Nicholas; Moiseff, Bianca; Tung, Joyce Y; Mountain, Joanna L

    2013-01-01

    appreciated learning their BRCA mutation status. Conclusions. Direct access to BRCA mutation tests, considered a model for high-risk actionable genetic tests of proven clinical utility, provided clear benefits to participants. The unexpected information demonstrated a cascade effect as relatives of newly identified carriers also sought testing and more mutation carriers were identified. Given the absence of evidence for serious emotional distress or inappropriate actions in this subset of mutation-positive customers who agreed to be interviewed for this study, broader screening of Ashkenazi Jewish women for these three BRCA mutations should be considered. PMID:23638402

  11. Testing the fecundity advantage hypothesis with Sitobion avenae, Rhopalosiphum padi, and Schizaphis graminum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) feeding on ten wheat accessions

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiang-Shun; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thieme, Thomas; Zhang, Gai-Sheng; Liu, Tong-Xian; Zhao, Hui-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The fecundity advantage hypothesis suggests that females with a large body size produce more offspring than smaller females. We tested this hypothesis by exploring the correlations between life-history traits of three aphid species feeding on ten wheat accessions at three levels of analysis with respect to the host plant: overall, inter-accession, and intra-accession. We found that fecundity was significantly correlated with mean relative growth rate (MRGR), weight gain, and development time, and that the faster aphid develops the greater body and fecundity, depending on aphid species, wheat accession, and analyses level. Larger aphids of all three species produced more offspring overall; this held true for Sitobion avenae and Schizaphis graminum at the inter-accession level, and for S. avenae, Rhopalosiphum padi, and S. graminum for three, five, and eight accessions respectively at the intra-accession level. Only one correlation, between intrinsic rates of natural increase (rm) and MRGR, was significant for all aphid species at all three analysis levels. A more accurate statement of the fecundity advantage hypothesis is that cereal aphids with greater MRGR generally maintain higher rm on wheat. Our results also provide a method for exploring relationships between individual life-history traits and population dynamics for insects on host plants. PMID:26680508

  12. The Effect of Access and Satisfaction on Regular Mammogram and Papanicolaou Test Screening in a Multiethnic Population

    PubMed Central

    Somkin, Carol P.; McPhee, Stephen J.; Nguyen, Tung; Stewart, Susan; Shema, Sarah J.; Nguyen, Bang; Pasick, Rena

    2006-01-01

    Background Access and satisfaction are determinants of preventive service use, but few studies have evaluated their role in breast and cervical cancer screening in multiethnic populations. Objectives We sought to investigate the relationship between race/ethnicity, access, satisfaction, and regular mammogram and Papanicolaou test receipt in 5 racial/ethnic groups. Research Design We conducted a telephone survey in 4 languages. Subjects Our subjects were black, Chinese, Filipino, Latino, or white women aged 40 to 74 residing in Alameda County, California. Measures Outcome: regular mammograms (last test within 15 months and another within 2 years prior) and Papanicolaou tests (36 months and 3 years, respectively). Independent: race/ethnicity, sociodemographic variables, access (health insurance, usual site of care, regular doctor, check-up within 12 months, knowing where to go, copayment for tests), and satisfaction (overall satisfaction scale, waiting times, test-related pain and embarrassment, test satisfaction). Results Among women who had ever had a mammogram or Papanicolaou test, 54% and 77%, respectively, received regular screening. In multivariate analyses, regular mammography was positively associated with increased age (odds ratio [OR] 1.05 per year), private insurance (OR 1.7), check-up in the past year (OR 2.3), knowing where to go for mammography (OR 3.0), and greater satisfaction with processes of care (OR 1.04 per unit), and negatively with not knowing copayment amount (OR 0.4), too many forms to fill out (OR 0.5), embarrassment at the last mammogram (OR 0.6), and Filipino race/ethnicity. Similar results were found for regular Papanicolaou tests. Conclusions Access and satisfaction are important predictors of screening but do little to explain racial/ethnic variation. Tailored interventions to improve regular mammography and Papanicolaou test screening in multiethnic populations are needed. PMID:15319618

  13. Develop and Test a Solvent Accessible Surface Area-Based Model in Conformational Entropy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2012-01-01

    It is of great interest in modern drug design to accurately calculate the free energies of protein-ligand or nucleic acid-ligand binding. MM-PBSA (Molecular Mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area) and MM-GBSA (Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Surface Area) have gained popularity in this field. For both methods, the conformational entropy, which is usually calculated through normal mode analysis (NMA), is needed to calculate the absolute binding free energies. Unfortunately, NMA is computationally demanding and becomes a bottleneck of the MM-PB/GBSA-NMA methods. In this work, we have developed a fast approach to estimate the conformational entropy based upon solvent accessible surface area calculations. In our approach, the conformational entropy of a molecule, S, can be obtained by summing up the contributions of all atoms, no matter they are buried or exposed. Each atom has two types of surface areas, solvent accessible surface area (SAS) and buried SAS (BSAS). The two types of surface areas are weighted to estimate the contribution of an atom to S. Atoms having the same atom type share the same weight and a general parameter k is applied to balance the contributions of the two types of surface areas. This entropy model was parameterized using a large set of small molecules for which their conformational entropies were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G* level taking the solvent effect into account. The weighted solvent accessible surface area (WSAS) model was extensively evaluated in three tests. For the convenience, TS, the product of temperature T and conformational entropy S, were calculated in those tests. T was always set to 298.15 K through the text. First of all, good correlations were achieved between WSAS TS and NMA TS for 44 protein or nucleic acid systems sampled with molecular dynamics simulations (10 snapshots were collected for post-entropy calculations): the mean correlation coefficient squares (R2) was 0.56. As to the 20 complexes, the TS changes

  14. Toward Accessible Assessments: The Promises and Limitations of Test Item Adaptations for Students with Disabilities and English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawthon, Stephanie; Leppo, Rachel; Carr, Therese; Kopriva, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    When do item adaptations veer from their intent and, instead of increasing access, modify the construct being measured? This study analyzed early elementary student achievement data from a statewide field test containing both standard and adapted science items. Four student groups were included in this analysis: English language learners, students…

  15. Adjustable rare earth quadrupole drift tube magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Tanabe, J.; Halbach, K.; Koehler, G.; Green, M.I.

    1987-03-01

    A prototype permanent-magnet drift tube quadrupole with adjustable field strength has been constructed and tested. The magnet uses iron pole pieces to provide the required field shape along with rare earth permanent-magnet material (samarium cobalt) to energize the magnet. A unique feature of the configuration is the adjustability of the field, accomplished by rotating the outer rings consisting of permanent magnets and iron. In contrast with a previous prototype magnet, this new design uses ball bearings in place of slide bearings to eliminate potential failures. The rotation is now achieved with a bevel gear mechanism. The prototype design also incorporates a new drift tube shell vacuum seal to allow easy disassembly. Tests were made of the magnetic properties and the mechanical performance of this magnet. Field errors are extremely small, and the magnet passed an accelerated ten year lifetime test. It is planned to use this type of magnet to replace 24 of the SuperHILAC prestripper drift tubes.

  16. Spinocerebellar Ataxia: Patient and Health Professional Perspectives on Whether and How Patents Affect Access to Clinical Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ashton; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Genetic testing for spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is used in diagnosis of rare movement disorders. Such testing generally does not affect treatment, but confirmation of mutations in a known gene can confirm diagnosis and end an often years-long quest for the cause of distressing and disabling symptoms. Through interviews and a web forum hosted by the National Ataxia Foundation, patients and health professionals related their experiences with patents’ impact on access to genetic testing for SCA. In the United States, Athena Diagnostics holds either a patent or an exclusive license to a patent in the case of 6 SCA variants (SCA1-3 & 6-8) and two other hereditary ataxias (Friedreich’s Ataxia and Early Onset Ataxia). Athena has enforced its exclusive rights to SCA-related patents by sending cease and desist letters to multiple laboratories offering genetic testing for inherited neurological conditions, including SCA. Roughly half of web forum respondents had decided not to get genetic tests. Price, coverage and reimbursement by insurers and health plans, and fear of genetic discrimination were the main reasons cited for deciding not to get tested. Price was cited as an access concern by the physicians, and as sole US provider, coverage and reimbursement depend on having payment agreements between Athena and payers. In cases where payers do not reimburse, the patient is responsible for payment, although some patients can apply to the voluntary Athena Access and Patient Protection Programs offered by the company. PMID:20393313

  17. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  18. Access and Quality of HIV-Related Point-of-Care Diagnostic Testing in Global Health Programs.

    PubMed

    Fonjungo, Peter N; Boeras, Debrah I; Zeh, Clement; Alexander, Heather; Parekh, Bharat S; Nkengasong, John N

    2016-02-01

    Access to point-of-care testing (POCT) improves patient care, especially in resource-limited settings where laboratory infrastructure is poor and the bulk of the population lives in rural settings. However, because of challenges in rolling out the technology and weak quality assurance measures, the promise of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related POCT in resource-limited settings has not been fully exploited to improve patient care and impact public health. Because of these challenges, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), in partnership with other organizations, recently launched the Diagnostics Access Initiative. Expanding HIV programs, including the "test and treat" strategies and the newly established UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets, will require increased access to reliable and accurate POCT results. In this review, we examine various components that could improve access and uptake of quality-assured POC tests to ensure coverage and public health impact. These components include evaluation, policy, regulation, and innovative approaches to strengthen the quality of POCT. PMID:26423384

  19. An Investigation of How the Channel of Input and Access to Test Questions Affect L2 Listening Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Elvis

    2013-01-01

    The use of video technology has become widespread in the teaching and testing of second-language (L2) listening, yet research into how this technology affects the learning and testing process has lagged. The current study investigated how the channel of input (audiovisual vs. audio-only) used on an L2 listening test affected test-taker…

  20. GENERIC VERIFICATION PROTOCOL FOR THE VERIFICATION OF PESTICIDE SPRAY DRIFT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGIES FOR ROW AND FIELD CROPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This ETV program generic verification protocol was prepared and reviewed for the Verification of Pesticide Drift Reduction Technologies project. The protocol provides a detailed methodology for conducting and reporting results from a verification test of pesticide drift reductio...

  1. Effect of test system on the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect antigenic drift in influenza A(H1N1) virus haemagglutinins.

    PubMed

    Kendal, A P; Phillips, D J; Webster, R G; Galland, G G; Reimer, C B

    1981-06-01

    Results of analysing antigenic variation in the haemagglutinin (HA) molecule of naturally occurring influenza A (H1N1) viruses from 1977 to 1979 with monoclonal antibodies were found to be dependent in some instances on the test system used. In several instances A/USSR/90/77 HA-specific monoclonal antibodies had sharply reduced haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) titres with variant virus although they bound to the variant and A/USSR/90/77 HAs with similar efficiencies as judged by titration in a sensitive and accurate solid-phase immunofluorimetric assay. In another instance, the converse situation was observed: monoclonal antibodies having a reduced efficiency of binding to the HA of a variant virus nevertheless had comparable HI titres with the variant and with A/USSR/90/77. The chemical basis and epidemiological significance of these observations remain to be elucidated. Nevertheless, the finding that the reaction of monoclonal antibodies can, in some cases, be markedly dependent on the test system employed is of significance for the efficient design and correct interpretation of immunochemical studies which employ monoclonal antibodies to investigate the basis for variation in influenza strains.

  2. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC submodel uses a drift

  3. A clearing house for diagnostic testing: the solution to ensure access to and use of patented genetic inventions?

    PubMed Central

    van Zimmeren, Esther; Verbeure, Birgit; Matthijs, Gert; Van Overwalle, Geertrui

    2006-01-01

    In genetic diagnostics, the emergence of a so-called "patent thicket" is imminent. Such an overlapping set of patent rights may have restrictive effects on further research and development of diagnostic tests, and the provision of clinical diagnostic services. Currently, two models that may facilitate access to and use of patented genetic inventions are attracting much debate in various national and international fora: patent pools and clearing houses. In this article, we explore the concept of clearing houses. Several types of clearing houses are identified. First, we describe and discuss two types that would provide access to information on the patented inventions: the information clearing house and the technology exchange clearing house. Second, three types of clearing houses are analysed that not only offer access to information but also provide an instrument to facilitate the use of the patented inventions: the open access clearing house, the standardized licences clearing house and the royalty collection clearing house. A royalty collection clearing house for genetic diagnostic testing would be the most comprehensive as it would serve several functions: identifying patents and patent claims essential to diagnostic testing, matching licensees with licensors, developing and supplying standardized licences, collecting royalties, monitoring whether users respect licensing conditions, and providing dispute resolution services such as mediation and arbitration. In this way, it might function as an effective model for users to facilitate access to and use of the patented inventions. However, it remains to be seen whether patent holders with a strong patent portfolio will be convinced by the advantages of the royalty collection clearing house and be willing to participate. PMID:16710543

  4. Improving the Quality of and Access to HIV Rapid Testing in the Caribbean Region: Program Implementation, Outcomes, and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Alemnji, George; Guevara, Giselle; Parris, Keith; Kalou, Mireille; Behel, Stephanie; Parekh, Bharat; Nkengasong, John; Albalak, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    In 2008, HIV rapid testing (HIV RT) was only minimally used in the Caribbean region. Collaboration with countries and international partners since then has resulted in greater availability and use of HIV RT services. Surveys were conducted in 2012 and 2014 among 11 selected Caribbean countries to inform stakeholders of progress made since 2008 and to identify strategies to further improve access and uptake of high-quality HIV RT in community- and facility-based settings in support of the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets. Key accomplishments during this period include (1) presence of in-country national HIV RT algorithms, (2) use of the dried tube specimen (DTS) as an external quality assessment (EQA) program, (3) use of standardized logbooks for data collection and monitoring, and (4) use of oral fluid for HIV RT, particularly for key population surveys. Although progress has been made since 2008 to increase access and improve the quality of HIV RT among countries in the Caribbean, some work remains to be done. This includes the development of new policies and implementation of existing ones, task shifting, quality and access to testing, testing strategies, and integration of HIV RT into HIV Testing Services.

  5. Ocean modelling aspects for drift applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephane, L.; Pierre, D.

    2010-12-01

    Nowadays, many authorities in charge of rescue-at-sea operations lean on operational oceanography products to outline research perimeters. Moreover, current fields estimated with sophisticated ocean forecasting systems can be used as input data for oil spill/ adrift object fate models. This emphasises the necessity of an accurate sea state forecast, with a mastered level of reliability. This work focuses on several problems inherent to drift modeling, dealing in the first place with the efficiency of the oceanic current field representation. As we want to discriminate the relevance of a particular physical process or modeling option, the idea is to generate series of current fields of different characteristics and then qualify them in term of drift prediction efficiency. Benchmarked drift scenarios were set up from real surface drifters data, collected in the Mediterranean sea and off the coasts of Angola. The time and space scales that we are interested in are about 72 hr forecasts (typical timescale communicated in case of crisis), for distance errors that we hope about a few dozen of km around the forecast (acceptable for reconnaissance by aircrafts) For the ocean prediction, we used some regional oceanic configurations based on the NEMO 2.3 code, nested into Mercator 1/12° operational system. Drift forecasts were computed offline with Mothy (Météo France oil spill modeling system) and Ariane (B. Blanke, 1997), a Lagrangian diagnostic tool. We were particularly interested in the importance of the horizontal resolution, vertical mixing schemes, and any processes that may impact the surface layer. The aim of the study is to ultimately point at the most suitable set of parameters for drift forecast use inside operational oceanic systems. We are also motivated in assessing the relevancy of ensemble forecasts regarding determinist predictions. Several tests showed that mis-described observed trajectories can finally be modelled statistically by using uncertainties

  6. The Drifting Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  7. Wages and Unequal Access to Organizational Power: An Empirical Test of Gender Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultin, Mia; Szulkin, Ryszard

    1999-01-01

    A study of Swedish workers investigated whether earnings are affected by the gender composition of firms' managerial staff. Gender-differentiated access to organizational power structures proved essential to explaining women's relatively low wages. Women working in male-dominated establishments had lower wages than firms with more women managers.…

  8. Beyond the Test Score: A Mixed Methods Analysis of a College Access Intervention in Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treviño, Ernesto; Scheele, Judith; Flores, Stella M.

    2014-01-01

    Using both quantitative and qualitative analyses, we examine the role of a college access intervention in the enrollment and persistence outcomes of low-income students in Chile modeled partially after a Texas admissions program. We find that, although students from the program have a mean cumulative GPA significantly lower than that of their…

  9. Design and testing of access-tube TDR soil water sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed the design of a waveguide on the exterior of an access tube for use in time-domain reflectometry (TDR) for in-situ soil water content sensing. In order to optimize the design with respect to sampling volume and losses, we derived the electromagnetic (EM) fields produced by a TDR sensor...

  10. Testing an Asset-Building Approach for Young People: Early Access to Savings Predicts Later Savings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedline, Terri; Elliott, William; Chowa, Gina A. N.

    2013-01-01

    A major hypothesis of asset-building is that early access to savings accounts leads to continued and improved educational and economic outcomes over time. This study asks whether or not young adults (ages 18-22) in 2007, particularly among lower income households, are significantly more likely to own savings accounts and to accumulate more savings…

  11. Drift distance survey in DPIS for high current beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue,T.; Okamura, M.; Kondo, K.; Tamura, J.; Kashiwagi, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2009-09-20

    In a laser ion source, plasma drift distance is one of the most important design parameters. Ion current density and beam pulse width are defined by plasma drift distance between laser target and beam extraction position. In direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS), which uses a laser ion source and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac, we can apply relatively higher electric field at the beam extraction due to the unique shape of a positively biased electrode. However, when we aim at very high current acceleration like several tens of mA, we observed mismatched beam extraction conditions. We tested three different ion current at ion extraction region by changing plasma drift distance to study better extraction condition. In this experiment, C{sup 6+} beam was accelerated. We confirmed that the matching condition can be improved by controlling plasma drift distance.

  12. Professional and personal attitudes about access and confidentiality in the genetic testing of children: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elizabeth; Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2003-01-01

    The ability to perform predictive genetic testing of children raises ethical concerns regarding whether and when to test and the disclosure of results. Semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of pediatricians (12) and geneticists (13) were conducted to see how they would react to parental requests for predictive genetic testing of their children, and their attitudes about testing their own children. We also asked about disclosure attitudes and practices for their patients' relatives and within their own families. Respondents would provide predictive genetic testing for most conditions, yet were less likely to seek this information about their own children. Respondents believed it was very important for patients to share some types of genetic information with relatives, and were directive in their counseling about intrafamilial disclosure, especially within their own families. Although respondents would almost never breach patient confidentiality, many would breach confidentiality within their own families. Health care professionals distinguish between their professional and personal roles with regard to issues of access and confidentiality in predictive testing of children. They are willing to provide greater access and more confidentiality for their patients than within their own families.

  13. Effects of freely accessible computerized test systems on the spontaneous behaviors and stress level of Guinea baboons (Papio papio).

    PubMed

    Fagot, Joël; Gullstrand, Julie; Kemp, Caralyn; Defilles, Céline; Mekaouche, Mourad

    2014-01-01

    Fagot and Paleressompoulle [Fagot and Paleressompoulle (2009) Behav Res Methods 41: 396-404] described a new automated learning device for monkeys (ALDM) to test the cognitive functions of nonhuman primates within their social groups. However, the impact of the ALDM procedure on animal well-being needs to be investigated. The present study assessed the consequences of ALDM testing on the behavioral repertoire of Guinea baboons (Papio papio) and their stress levels as inferred from measurements of saliva cortisol. Accessibility to ALDM test computers reduced the number of resting periods as well as the number of stereotypies. Lower cortisol levels were also found during ALDM testing. These findings and others demonstrate that ALDM testing has a positive impact on animal well-being and can be considered as a means for behavioral enrichment in captive primates.

  14. Inoculation against Forgetting: Advantages of Immediate versus Delayed Initial Testing Due to Superior Verbatim Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pansky, Ainat

    2012-01-01

    In this study, potential benefits of early memory testing were examined in terms of "inoculating" eyewitness memory against forgetting. As predicted by fuzzy trace theory (e.g., Reyna & Titcomb, 1997), a larger testing advantage in the delayed recall of event details was expected after immediate testing than after delayed testing because of the…

  15. Access to syringes for HIV prevention for injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia: syringe purchase test study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Russia is concentrated among injection drug users (IDUs). This is especially true for St. Petersburg where high HIV incidence persists among the city’s estimated 80,000 IDUs. Although sterile syringes are legally available, access for IDUs may be hampered. To explore the feasibility of using pharmacies to expand syringe access and provide other prevention services to IDUs, we investigated the current access to sterile syringes at the pharmacies and the correlation between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence in St. Petersburg. Methods 965 pharmacies citywide were mapped, classified by ownership type, and the association between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence at the district level was tested. We selected two districts among the 18 districts – one central and one peripheral – that represented two major types of city districts and contacted all operating pharmacies by phone to inquire if they stocked syringes and obtained details about their stock. Qualitative interviews with 26 IDUs provided data regarding syringe access in pharmacies and were used to formulate hypotheses for the pharmacy syringe purchase test wherein research staff attempted to purchase syringes in all pharmacies in the two districts. Results No correlation was found between the density of pharmacies and HIV prevalence at the district level. Of 108 operating pharmacies, 38 (35%) did not sell syringes of the types used by IDUs; of these, half stocked but refused to sell syringes to research staff, and the other half did not stock syringes at all. Overall 70 (65%) of the pharmacies did sell syringes; of these, 49 pharmacies sold single syringes without any restrictions and 21 offered packages of ten. Conclusions Trainings for pharmacists need to be conducted to reduce negative attitudes towards IDUs and increase pharmacists’ willingness to sell syringes. At a structural level, access to safe injection supplies for IDUs could be increased by including syringes

  16. Atlas of Dutch drift sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riksen, Michel; Jungerius, Pieter

    2013-04-01

    The Netherlands is well known for its aeolian landscapes. Frequent storms during the High Middle Ages (1000-1300 AD) reactivated Pleistocene coversands and river dunes and are responsible for the formation of the Holocene drift sands at a scale which is unique for Europe. A hypothesized relationship with farmer practices for making plaggensoils has recently been refuted, because drift sand formation began centuries earlier. The coastal dune belt with their parabolic dunes dates from the same period as the drift sand. An estimate of the extent of drift sands can be made from soil maps: drift sands are too young to show much profile development (Regosols). With this method Koster estimated the maximum extent of Holocene drift sands in the Netherlands to be about 800 km2 (Koster 2005). Laser altimetry allows a more precise estimate of the total surface affected by wind from the characteristic relief patterns produced by the Holocene wind, which is different from the smooth surface of cover sand deposits. Laser altimetry has been used before to investigate the mechanism of drift sand formation (Jungerius & Riksen 2010). Most of the surface affected by wind is not active anymore, but the tell-tale rough surface survived ages of different landuse. The total affected surface amounts to 825 km2. It is noteworthy that both methods give comparable results. We recorded a total number of 367 of affected areas of varying shapes, ranging in size from 1.6 ha to a large complex of drif sands of 7,119.5 ha. As is to be expected from their mode of origin, most occurrences are associated with cover sands, and with river dunes along the river Meuse and smaller rivers in other parts of the country. Particularly the final phases of cover sand and river dunes that show more relief as parabolic dunes were affected. There are also small aeolian deposits at the lee side blown from fallow agricultural fields but they are (sub)recent. Most of the relief is irregular, but the larger

  17. Genetic drift and the population history of the Irish travellers.

    PubMed

    Relethford, John H; Crawford, Michael H

    2013-02-01

    The Irish Travellers are an itinerant group in Ireland that has been socially isolated. Two hypotheses have been proposed concerning the genetic origin of the Travellers: (1) they are genetically related to Roma populations in Europe that share a nomadic lifestyle or (2) they are of Irish origin, and genetic differences from the rest of Ireland reflect genetic drift. These hypotheses were tested using data on 33 alleles from 12 red blood cell polymorphism loci. Comparison with other European, Roma, and Indian populations shows that the Travellers are genetically distinct from the Roma and Indian populations and most genetically similar to Ireland, in agreement with earlier genetic analyses of the Travellers. However, the Travellers are still genetically distinct from other Irish populations, which could reflect some external gene flow and/or the action of genetic drift in a small group that was descended from a small number of founders. In order to test the drift hypothesis, we analyzed genetic distances comparing the Travellers to four geographic regions in Ireland. These distances were then compared with adjusted distances that account for differential genetic drift using a method developed by Relethford (Hum Biol 68 (1996) 29-44). The unadjusted distances show the genetic distinctiveness of the Travellers. After adjustment for the expected effects of genetic drift, the Travellers are equidistant from the other Irish samples, showing their Irish origins and population history. The observed genetic differences are thus a reflection of genetic drift, and there is no evidence of any external gene flow. PMID:23180293

  18. Genetic drift and the population history of the Irish travellers.

    PubMed

    Relethford, John H; Crawford, Michael H

    2013-02-01

    The Irish Travellers are an itinerant group in Ireland that has been socially isolated. Two hypotheses have been proposed concerning the genetic origin of the Travellers: (1) they are genetically related to Roma populations in Europe that share a nomadic lifestyle or (2) they are of Irish origin, and genetic differences from the rest of Ireland reflect genetic drift. These hypotheses were tested using data on 33 alleles from 12 red blood cell polymorphism loci. Comparison with other European, Roma, and Indian populations shows that the Travellers are genetically distinct from the Roma and Indian populations and most genetically similar to Ireland, in agreement with earlier genetic analyses of the Travellers. However, the Travellers are still genetically distinct from other Irish populations, which could reflect some external gene flow and/or the action of genetic drift in a small group that was descended from a small number of founders. In order to test the drift hypothesis, we analyzed genetic distances comparing the Travellers to four geographic regions in Ireland. These distances were then compared with adjusted distances that account for differential genetic drift using a method developed by Relethford (Hum Biol 68 (1996) 29-44). The unadjusted distances show the genetic distinctiveness of the Travellers. After adjustment for the expected effects of genetic drift, the Travellers are equidistant from the other Irish samples, showing their Irish origins and population history. The observed genetic differences are thus a reflection of genetic drift, and there is no evidence of any external gene flow.

  19. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  20. [Study of spectrum drifting of primary colors and its impact on color rendering properties].

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Xiao-dong

    2012-08-01

    LEDs are currently used widely to display text, graphics and images in large screens. With red, green and blue LEDs as three primary colors, color rendition will be realized through color mixing. However, LEDs' spectrum will produce drifts with the changes in the temperature environment. With the changes in the driving current simulating changes in the temperature, the three primary color LEDs' spectral drifts were tested, and the drift characteristics of the three primary colors were obtained respectively. Based on the typical characteristics of the LEDs and the differences between LEDs with different colors in composition and molecular structure, the paper analyzed the reason for the spectrum drifts and the drift characteristics of different color LEDs, and proposed the equations of spectrum drifts. Putting the experimental data into the spectrum drift equations, the paper analyzed the impacts of primary colors on the mixed color, pointed out a way to reduce the chromatic aberration, and provided the theory for engineering application of color LEDs.

  1. Food accessibility and food choice. A test of Schachter's externality hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Meyers, A W; Stunkard, A J; Coll, M

    1980-10-01

    A set of naturalistic observations was conducted to examine Schachter's theory that obese individuals are more responsive to external food cues than persons of normal weight. During six days of observation at a large hospital cafeteria, experimenters manipulated the accessibility of high- and low-calorie desserts. No differences in selection by obese, overweight, and normal-weight individuals of meals or desserts were observed. All weight groups were equally responsive to the experimental manipulation of food cues.

  2. Incremental learning of concept drift in nonstationary environments.

    PubMed

    Elwell, Ryan; Polikar, Robi

    2011-10-01

    We introduce an ensemble of classifiers-based approach for incremental learning of concept drift, characterized by nonstationary environments (NSEs), where the underlying data distributions change over time. The proposed algorithm, named Learn(++). NSE, learns from consecutive batches of data without making any assumptions on the nature or rate of drift; it can learn from such environments that experience constant or variable rate of drift, addition or deletion of concept classes, as well as cyclical drift. The algorithm learns incrementally, as other members of the Learn(++) family of algorithms, that is, without requiring access to previously seen data. Learn(++). NSE trains one new classifier for each batch of data it receives, and combines these classifiers using a dynamically weighted majority voting. The novelty of the approach is in determining the voting weights, based on each classifier's time-adjusted accuracy on current and past environments. This approach allows the algorithm to recognize, and act accordingly, to the changes in underlying data distributions, as well as to a possible reoccurrence of an earlier distribution. We evaluate the algorithm on several synthetic datasets designed to simulate a variety of nonstationary environments, as well as a real-world weather prediction dataset. Comparisons with several other approaches are also included. Results indicate that Learn(++). NSE can track the changing environments very closely, regardless of the type of concept drift. To allow future use, comparison and benchmarking by interested researchers, we also release our data used in this paper.

  3. The CLAS drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B.

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  4. Strengthening HIV Test Access and Treatment Uptake Study (Project STATUS): A Randomized Trial of HIV Testing and Counseling Interventions

    PubMed Central

    McNaghten, A. D.; Mneimneh, Allison Schilsky; Farirai, Thato; Wamai, Nafuna; Ntiro, Marylad; Sabatier, Jennifer; Makhunga-Ramfolo, Nondumiso; Mwanasalli, Salli; Awor, Anna; Moore, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine which of 3 HIV testing and counseling (HTC) models in outpatient departments (OPDs) increases HIV testing and entry of newly identified HIV-infected patients into care. Design Randomized trial of HTC interventions. Methods Thirty-six OPDs in South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda were randomly assigned to 3 different HTC models: (A) health care providers referred eligible patients (aged 18–49, not tested in the past year, not known HIV positive) to on-site voluntary counseling and testing for HTC offered and provided by voluntary counseling and testing counselors after clinical consultation; (B) health care providers offered and provided HTC to eligible patients during clinical consultation; and (C) nurse or lay counselors offered and provided HTC to eligible patients before clinical consultation. Data were collected from October 2011 to September 2012. We describe testing eligibility and acceptance, HIV prevalence, and referral and entry into care. Chi-square analyses were conducted to examine differences by model. Results Of 79,910 patients, 45% were age eligible and 16,099 (45%) age eligibles were tested. Ten percent tested HIV positive. Significant differences were found in percent tested by model. The proportion of age eligible patients tested by Project STATUS was highest for model C (54.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 42.4 to 65.9), followed by model A (41.7%, 95% CI: 30.7 to 52.8), and then model B (33.9%, 95% CI: 25.7 to 42.1). Of the 1596 newly identified HIV positive patients, 94% were referred to care (96.1% in model A, 94.7% in model B, and 94.9% in model C), and 58% entered on-site care (74.4% in model A, 54.8% in model B, and 55.6% in model C) with no significant differences in referrals or care entry by model. Conclusions Model C resulted in the highest proportion of all age-eligible patients receiving a test. Although 94% of STATUS patients with a positive test result were referred to care, only 58% entered care. We found no

  5. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Fiffer, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Genetic testing for heritable hearing loss involves a mix of patented and unpatented genes, mutations and testing methods. More than half of all hearing loss is linked to inherited mutations, and five genes are most commonly tested in the United States. There are no patents on three of these genes, but Athena Diagnostics holds exclusive licenses to test for a common mutation in the GJB2 gene associated with about 50% of all cases, as well as mutations in the MTRNR1 gene. This fragmented intellectual property landscape made hearing loss a useful case study for assessing whether patent rights in genetic testing can proliferate or overlap, and whether it is possible to gather the rights necessary to perform testing. Testing for hearing loss is widely available, primarily from academic medical centers. Based on literature reviews and interviews with researchers, research on the genetics of hearing loss has generally not been impeded by patents. There is no consistent evidence of a premium in testing prices attributable to patent status. Athena Diagnostics has, however, used its intellectual property to discourage other providers from offering some tests. There is no definitive answer about the suitability of current patenting and licensing of commonly tested genes because of continuing legal uncertainty about the extent of enforcement of patent rights. Clinicians have also expressed concerns that multiplex tests will be difficult to develop because of overlapping intellectual property and conflict with Athena’s sole provider business model. PMID:20393307

  6. Impact of gene patents and licensing practices on access to genetic testing for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Fiffer, Melissa

    2010-04-01

    Genetic testing for heritable hearing loss involves a mix of patented and unpatented genes, mutations and testing methods. More than half of all hearing loss is linked to inherited mutations, and five genes are most commonly tested for in the United States. There are no patents on three of these genes, but Athena Diagnostics holds exclusive licenses to test for a common mutation in the GJB2 gene associated with about 50% of all cases as well as mutations in the MTRNR1 gene. This fragmented intellectual property landscape made hearing loss a useful case study to assess whether patent rights in genetic testing can proliferate or overlap, and whether it is possible to gather the rights necessary to perform testing. Testing for hearing loss is widely available, primarily from academic medical centers. Based on literature reviews and interviews with researchers, research on the genetics of hearing loss has generally not been impeded by patents. There is no consistent evidence of a premium in testing prices attributable to patent status. Athena Diagnostics has, however, used its intellectual property to discourage other providers from offering some tests. There is no definitive answer about the suitability of current patenting and licensing of commonly tested genes because of continuing legal uncertainty about the extent of enforcement of patent rights. Clinicians have also expressed concerns that multiplex tests will be difficult to develop because of overlapping intellectual property and conflict with Athena's sole provider business model.

  7. Can the HIV Home Test Promote Access to Care? Lessons Learned from the In-home Pregnancy Test

    PubMed Central

    Schnall, Rebecca; Carballo-Dieguez, Alex; Larson, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults are the fastest growing age group of HIV+ individuals in the US and many who are infected do not know their HIV status. The HIV home test has the potential to help curb the HIV epidemic by improving detection of persons living with HIV and enabling them to seek follow-up care, but, it has not yet been evaluated in adolescents. Analogous to the home pregnancy test, which was met with much resistance and only successfully marketed during a time of social change, the HIV home test has been met with resistance since its FDA approval. This commentary summarizes the need to systematically evaluate positive and untoward/unanticipated effects of HIV home testing, particularly in young adults. PMID:24849622

  8. Market Access Advancements and Challenges in "Drug-Companion Diagnostic Test" Co-Development in Europe.

    PubMed

    Akhmetov, Ildar; Ramaswamy, Rakshambikai; Akhmetov, Illias; Thimmaraju, Phani Kishore

    2015-06-12

    The pharma ecosphere is witnessing a measured transformation from the one-size-fits-all or blockbuster model of drugs to more informed and tailored personalized treatments that facilitate higher safety and efficacy for a relevant sub-population. However, with several breakthroughs still in a nascent stage, market access becomes a crucial factor for commercial success, especially when it comes to co-creating value for pertinent stakeholders. This article highlights diverse issues from stakeholder perspectives in Europe, specifically the ones which require immediate resolution. Furthermore, the article also discusses case studies articulating potential solutions for the issues discussed.

  9. An Alcohol Test for Drifting Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, P.; Bagdonaite, J.; Ubachs, W.; Bethlem, H. L.; Kleiner, I.; Xu, L.-H.

    2013-06-01

    The Standard Model of physics is built on the fundamental constants of nature, however without providing an explanation for their values, nor requiring their constancy over space and time. Molecular spectroscopy can address this issue. Recently, we found that microwave transitions in methanol are extremely sensitive to a variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ, due to a fortuitous interplay between classically forbidden internal rotation and rotation of the molecule as a whole. In this talk, we will explain the origin of this effect and how the sensitivity coefficients in methanol are calculated. In addition, we set a limit on a possible cosmological variation of μ by comparing transitions in methanol observed in the early Universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on radio-astronomical observations of PKS1830-211, we deduce a constraint of Δμ/μ=(0.0± 1.0)× 10^{-7} at redshift z = 0.89, corresponding to a look-back time of 7 billion years. While this limit is more constraining and systematically more robust than previous ones, the methanol method opens a new search territory for probing μ-variation on cosmological timescales. P. Jansen, L.-H. Xu, I. Kleiner, W. Ubachs, and H.L. Bethlem Phys. Rev. Lett. {106}(100801) 2011. J. Bagdonaite, P. Jansen, C. Henkel, H.L. Bethlem, K.M. Menten, and W. Ubachs Science {339}(46) 2013.

  10. Measurement of Spray Drift with a Specifically Designed Lidar System.

    PubMed

    Gregorio, Eduard; Torrent, Xavier; Planas de Martí, Santiago; Solanelles, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Masip, Joan; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2016-01-01

    Field measurements of spray drift are usually carried out by passive collectors and tracers. However, these methods are labour- and time-intensive and only provide point- and time-integrated measurements. Unlike these methods, the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique allows real-time measurements, obtaining information with temporal and spatial resolution. Recently, the authors have developed the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for spray drift monitoring. This prototype is based on a 1534 nm erbium-doped glass laser and an 80 mm diameter telescope, has scanning capability, and is easily transportable. This paper presents the results of the first experimental campaign carried out with this instrument. High coefficients of determination (R² > 0.85) were observed by comparing lidar measurements of the spray drift with those obtained by horizontal collectors. Furthermore, the lidar system allowed an assessment of the drift reduction potential (DRP) when comparing low-drift nozzles with standard ones, resulting in a DRP of 57% (preliminary result) for the tested nozzles. The lidar system was also used for monitoring the evolution of the spray flux over the canopy and to generate 2-D images of these plumes. The developed instrument is an advantageous alternative to passive collectors and opens the possibility of new methods for field measurement of spray drift. PMID:27070613

  11. Measurement of Spray Drift with a Specifically Designed Lidar System

    PubMed Central

    Gregorio, Eduard; Torrent, Xavier; Planas de Martí, Santiago; Solanelles, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Masip, Joan; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Rosell-Polo, Joan R.

    2016-01-01

    Field measurements of spray drift are usually carried out by passive collectors and tracers. However, these methods are labour- and time-intensive and only provide point- and time-integrated measurements. Unlike these methods, the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique allows real-time measurements, obtaining information with temporal and spatial resolution. Recently, the authors have developed the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for spray drift monitoring. This prototype is based on a 1534 nm erbium-doped glass laser and an 80 mm diameter telescope, has scanning capability, and is easily transportable. This paper presents the results of the first experimental campaign carried out with this instrument. High coefficients of determination (R2 > 0.85) were observed by comparing lidar measurements of the spray drift with those obtained by horizontal collectors. Furthermore, the lidar system allowed an assessment of the drift reduction potential (DRP) when comparing low-drift nozzles with standard ones, resulting in a DRP of 57% (preliminary result) for the tested nozzles. The lidar system was also used for monitoring the evolution of the spray flux over the canopy and to generate 2-D images of these plumes. The developed instrument is an advantageous alternative to passive collectors and opens the possibility of new methods for field measurement of spray drift. PMID:27070613

  12. Measurement of Spray Drift with a Specifically Designed Lidar System.

    PubMed

    Gregorio, Eduard; Torrent, Xavier; Planas de Martí, Santiago; Solanelles, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Masip, Joan; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2016-04-08

    Field measurements of spray drift are usually carried out by passive collectors and tracers. However, these methods are labour- and time-intensive and only provide point- and time-integrated measurements. Unlike these methods, the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique allows real-time measurements, obtaining information with temporal and spatial resolution. Recently, the authors have developed the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for spray drift monitoring. This prototype is based on a 1534 nm erbium-doped glass laser and an 80 mm diameter telescope, has scanning capability, and is easily transportable. This paper presents the results of the first experimental campaign carried out with this instrument. High coefficients of determination (R² > 0.85) were observed by comparing lidar measurements of the spray drift with those obtained by horizontal collectors. Furthermore, the lidar system allowed an assessment of the drift reduction potential (DRP) when comparing low-drift nozzles with standard ones, resulting in a DRP of 57% (preliminary result) for the tested nozzles. The lidar system was also used for monitoring the evolution of the spray flux over the canopy and to generate 2-D images of these plumes. The developed instrument is an advantageous alternative to passive collectors and opens the possibility of new methods for field measurement of spray drift.

  13. Hydrogeologic evaluation of selected stratified-drift deposits in Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grady, S.J.; Handman, E.H.

    1983-01-01

    Test borings at 28 sites and seismic-refraction profiles at 16 sites provide data on the saturated thickness and grain-size characteristics of stratified-drift deposits in five areas of Connecticut. These data, together with information on the areal extent of the deposits and their proximity to sources of induced recharge, can be used to estimate the water-yielding potential of the stratified-drift deposits. Individual wells could potentially yield moderate to possibly very large quantities of water (50 to 2000 gallons per minute) at some locations in all five areas where saturated, dominantly coarse-grained stratified drift is 40 feet thick or greater and hydraulically connected to nearby surface-water bodies. Coarse-grained stratified drift is most extensive in the Glastonbury, Haddam, and Simsbury, Connecticut areas. Saturated thickness exceeds 150 feet in parts of the Glastonbury and Haddam areas, but is less than 100 feet in most places. The best sites for developing large quantities of water are in the Glastonbury and Haddam areas where thick, saturated, coarse-grained stratified drift is hydraulically connected to the Connecticut River. Water in the stratified drift is generally of good chemical quality except for excessive iron (0.64 to 20 mg/L) and manganese (0.1 to 10 mg/L) in some samples. (USGS)

  14. Can the HIV home test promote access to care? Lessons learned from the in-home pregnancy test.

    PubMed

    Schnall, Rebecca; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Larson, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    Adolescents and young adults are the fastest growing age group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive individuals in the US, and many who are infected do not know their HIV status. The HIV home test has the potential to help curb the HIV epidemic by improving detection of persons living with HIV and enabling them to seek follow-up care but it has not yet been evaluated in adolescents. Analogous to the home pregnancy test, which was met with much resistance and only successfully marketed during a time of social change, the HIV home test has been met with resistance since its FDA approval. This commentary summarizes the need to systematically evaluate positive and untoward/unanticipated effects of HIV home testing, particularly in young adults. The overall incidence of HIV has been declining in the US, yet it continues to grow at alarming rates for adolescents and young adults [1]. Almost 40 % of new HIV infections in the US are in this age group [2]. Further, many HIV infected adolescents and young adults are unaware of their infection. Nationwide, only 22.6 % of sexually active high school students have ever been tested for HIV [3]. While advances in drug regimens have transformed HIV into a chronic disease, infected individuals need to be identified and subsequently engaged in care [4].

  15. Does the geoid drift west?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, G. E.; Parker, R. L.; Zumberge, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    In 1970 Hide and Malin noted a correlation of about 0.8 between the geoid and the geomagnetic potential at the Earth's surface when the latter is rotated eastward in longitude by about 160 degrees and the spherical harmonic expansions of both functions are truncated at degree 4. From a century of magnetic observatory data, Hide and Malin inferred an average magnetic westward drift rate of about 0.27 degrees/year. They attributed the magnetic-gravitational correlation to a core event at about 1350 A.D. which impressed the mantle's gravity pattern at long wavelengths onto the core motion and the resulting magnetic field. The impressed pattern was then carried westward 160 degrees by the nsuing magnetic westward drift. An alternative possibility is some sort of steady physical coupling between the magnetic and gravitational fields (perhaps migration of Hide's bumps on the core-mantle interface). This model predicts that the geoid will drift west at the magnetic rate. On a rigid earth, the resulting changes in sea level would be easily observed, but they could be masked by adjustment of the mantle if it has a shell with viscosity considerably less than 10 to the 21 poise. However, steady westward drift of the geoid also predicts secular changes in g, the local acceleration of gravity, at land stations. These changes are now ruled out by recent independent high-accuracy absolute measurements of g made by several workers at various locations in the Northern Hemisphere.

  16. Drift Hamiltonian in magnetic coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Boozer, A.H.; Hay, R.

    1982-02-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of the guiding-center drift in arbitrary, steady state, magnetic and electric fields is given. The canonical variables of this formulation are simply related to the magnetic coordinates. The modifications required to treat ergodic magnetic fields using magnetic coordinates are explicitly given in the Hamiltonian formulation.

  17. Forecast of iceberg ensemble drift

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tahan, M.S.; El-Tahan, H.W.; Venkatesh, S.

    1983-05-01

    The objectives of the study are to gain a better understanding of the characteristics of iceberg motion and the factors controlling iceberg drift, and to develop an iceberg ensemble drift forecast system to be operated by the Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service. An extensive review of field and theoretical studies on iceberg behaviour, and the factors controlling iceberg motion has been carried out. Long term and short term behaviour of icebergs are critically examined. A quantitative assessment of the effects of the factors controlling iceberg motion is presented. The study indicated that wind and currents are the primary driving forces. Coriolis Force and ocean surface slope also have significant effects. As for waves, only the higher waves have a significant effect. Iceberg drift is also affected by iceberg size characteristics. Based on the findings of the study a comprehensive computerized forecast system to predict the drift of iceberg ensembles off Canada's east coast has been designed. The expected accuracy of the forecast system is discussed and recommendations are made for future improvements to the system.

  18. Making Dry Bones Live: The Role of Testing in Equity and Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purnell, Rosentene Bennett

    There is a need for more precise descriptions of the claims to truth of standardized tests, of their interpretive authority, and of the limits of understanding which are reached through their processes. Typically minority students who score poorly on such tests do because their schools fail to connect with them. Pedagogy, therefore, must somehow…

  19. The development of an optically accessible, high-power combustion test rig.

    PubMed

    Slabaugh, Carson D; Pratt, Andrew C; Lucht, Robert P; Meyer, Scott E; Benjamin, Michael; Lyle, Kent; Kelsey, Mark

    2014-03-01

    This work summarizes the development of a gas turbine combustion experiment which will allow advanced optical measurements to be made at realistic engine conditions. Facility requirements are addressed, including instrumentation and control needs for remote operation when working with high energy flows. The methodology employed in the design of the optically accessible combustion chamber is elucidated, including window considerations and thermal management of the experimental hardware under extremely high heat loads. Experimental uncertainties are also quantified. The stable operation of the experiment is validated using multiple techniques and the boundary conditions are verified. The successful prediction of operating conditions by the design analysis is documented and preliminary data are shown to demonstrate the capability of the experiment to produce high-fidelity datasets for advanced combustion research. PMID:24689618

  20. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Long QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Angrist, Misha; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Genetic testing for Long QT syndrome (LQTS) exemplifies patenting and exclusive licensing with different outcomes at different times. Exclusive licensing from the University of Utah changed the business model from sole provider to two US providers of LQTS testing. LQTS is associated with mutations in many genes, ten of which are now tested by two competing firms in the United States, PGxHealth and GeneDx. Until 2009, PGxHealth was sole provider, based largely on exclusive rights to patents from the University of Utah and other academic institutions. University of Utah patents were initially licensed to DNA Sciences, whose patent rights were acquired by Gennaissance, and then by Clinical Data, Inc., which owns PGxHealth. In 2002, DNA Sciences “cleared the market” by sending cease and desist patent enforcement letters to university and reference laboratories offering LQTS genetic testing. There was no test on the market for a one- to two-year period. From 2005-2008, most LQTS-related patents were controlled by Clinical Data, Inc., and its subsidiary PGxHealth. BioReference Laboratories, Inc., secured countervailing exclusive patent rights starting in 2006, also from the University of Utah, and broke the PGxHealth monopoly in early 2009, creating a duopoly for genetic testing in the United States, and expanding the number of genes for which commercial testing is available from five to ten. PMID:20393304

  1. Widening the Access to HIV Testing: The Contribution of Three In-Pharmacy Testing Programmes in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Balbuena, Sonia; Belza, María José; Zulaica, Daniel; Martinez, Jose Luis; Marcos, Henar; Rifá, Benet; Arrillaga, Arantxa; de la Fuente, Luis; Hoyos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Spain has implemented several in-pharmacy HIV testing programmes performed by pharmacists as part of their everyday routine. We aim to assess the feasibility and the main outcomes of three programmes implemented in three Spanish regions with different sociological profiles and also different epidemiology for HIV. Methods The characteristics of the 24151 people tested between 2009 and 2013 at 74 urban pharmacies are studied. We compare the main outcomes of the programmes with those of each Regional HIV Surveillance System (RHSS) assessing the contribution to the total new diagnosis in each region and if priority groups are being reached. Results 45.7% were heterosexual men (MSW), 14.4% men who have sex with men (MSM), and 27% women. The 35% were younger than 30 and 9.6% foreigners. The 52% were previously untested, and women were the most likely to be untested. The three programmes altogether diagnosed 226 people, resulting in a global prevalence of 0.9% (95%CI: 0.8–1.1); 3.4% in MSM (95%CI: 2.8–4.0). The prevalence among Spaniards was 0.8% (0.7–1.0) vs. 2.2 (1.6–2.9) among foreigners. The percentages of MSM diagnosed by all three programmes were higher than the one reported by their respective RHSS. Thirty four percent of the reactive MSM and the 71.4% of the reactive MSW did not have a previous HIV test although big testing history differences were observed across the programmes. Altogether, these services contributed with the 10.6% of all HIV diagnoses in these regions. Conclusions In-pharmacy HIV testing programmes are a valuable testing option, having been able to uncover 1 out of 10 the new diagnoses reported in each region. They showed a good capacity of reaching and diagnosing previously untested populations, not only a priority population such as MSM but also heterosexual population who are more affected by delayed diagnosis. They seem to be particularly suitable for regions without large cities and specific HIV diagnostic

  2. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gonnenthal; N. Spyoher

    2001-02-05

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [153447]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: (1) Performance Assessment (PA); (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); (3) UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR); and (4) Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR. The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in

  3. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Sonnenthale

    2001-04-16

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) 2000 [1534471]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: Performance Assessment (PA); Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR; Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); and UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: Continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in this AMR are required

  4. Evolution: drift will tear us apart.

    PubMed

    Maderspacher, Florian

    2012-11-01

    That the widely scattered geographical distribution of some animals could be due to continental drift is a neat idea. Now, cave animals provide evidence for extreme long-term persistence on continents drifting apart. PMID:23137684

  5. Evolution: drift will tear us apart.

    PubMed

    Maderspacher, Florian

    2012-11-01

    That the widely scattered geographical distribution of some animals could be due to continental drift is a neat idea. Now, cave animals provide evidence for extreme long-term persistence on continents drifting apart.

  6. Exploring the Relationship between Access Technology and Standardized Test Scores for Youths with Visual Impairments: Secondary Analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, Amy L.; Emerson, Robert Wall; Curtis, Amy B.; Fogarty, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 that explored the predictive association between training in access technology and performance on the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Academic Achievement: III. The results indicated that the use of access technology had a limited predictive…

  7. Information access in a dual-task context: testing a model of optimal strategy selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, C. D.; Seidler, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    Pilots were required to access information from a hierarchical aviation database by navigating under single-task conditions (Experiment 1) and when this task was time-shared with an altitude-monitoring task of varying bandwidth and priority (Experiment 2). In dual-task conditions, pilots had 2 viewports available, 1 always used for the information task and the other to be allocated to either task. Dual-task strategy, inferred from the decision of which task to allocate to the 2nd viewport, revealed that allocation was generally biased in favor of the monitoring task and was only partly sensitive to the difficulty of the 2 tasks and their relative priorities. Some dominant sources of navigational difficulties failed to adaptively influence selection strategy. The implications of the results are to provide tools for jumping to the top of the database, to provide 2 viewports into the common database, and to provide training as to the optimum viewport management strategy in a multitask environment.

  8. Repositioning of drugs using open-access data portal DTome: A test case with probenecid (Review).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohammad U; Bennett, Dylan J; Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Doonan, Barbara B; Ahmed, Saba; Wu, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    The one gene-one enzyme hypothesis, first introduced by Beadle and Tatum in the 1940s and based on their genetic analysis and observation of phenotype changes in Neurospora crassa challenged by various experimental conditions, has witnessed significant advances in recent decades. Much of our understanding of the association between genes and their phenotype expression has benefited from the completion of the human genome project, and has shown continual transformation guided by the effort directed at the annotation and characterization of human genes. Similarly, the idea of one drug‑one primary disease indication that traditionally has been the benchmark for the labeling and usage of drugs has also undergone evident progressive refinements; in recent years the science and practice of pharmaceutical development has notable success in the strategy of drug repurposing. Drug repurposing is an innovative approach where, instead of de novo synthesis and discovery of new drugs with novel indications, drug candidates with the desired usage are identified by a process of re‑profiling using an open‑source database or knowledge of known or failed drugs already in existence. In the present study, the repurposing drug strategy employing open‑access data portal drug‑target interactome (DTome) is applied to the uncovering of new clinical usage for probenecid.

  9. Diel drift of Chironomidae larvae in a pristine Idaho mountain stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilley, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    Simultaneous hourly net collections in a meadow and canyon reach of a mountain stream determined diel and spatial abundances of drifting Chironomidae larvae. Sixty-one taxa were identified to the lowest practical level, 52 in the meadow and 41 in the canyon. Orthocladiinae was the most abundant subfamily with 32 taxa and a 24 h mean density of 294 individuals 100 m-3 (meadow) and 26 taxa and a mean of 648 individuals 100 m-3 (canyon). Chironominae was the second most abundant subfamily. Nonchironomid invertebrates at both sites and total Chironomidae larvae (meadow) were predominantly night-drifting. Parakiefferiella and Psectrocladius were day-drifting (meadow) whereas 8 other chironomid taxa (meadow) and 2 taxa (canyon) were night-drifting. All others were aperiodic or too rare to test periodicity, Stempellinella cf brevis Edwards exhibited catastrophic drift in the canyon only. The different drift patterns between sites is attributed to greater loss of streambed habitat in the canyon compared to the meadow as streamflow decreased. Consequent crowding of chironomid larvae in the canyon caused catastrophic drift or interfered with drift periodicty. This study adds to knowledge of Chironomidae drift and shows influences on drift of hydrologic and geomorphic conditions. ?? 1989 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  10. Electrometer preamplifier has drift correction feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labarthe, L. C.

    1965-01-01

    Negative feedback circuit corrects output drift in an electrometer. The negative feedback is used in the no signal state to maintain the output level at zero reference. Drift voltage storage in the signal on state is also used to provide a drift-free readout.

  11. Test Scores, Class Rank and College Performance: Lessons for Broadening Access and Promoting Success

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Sunny X.; Tienda, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Using administrative data for five Texas universities that differ in selectivity, this study evaluates the relative influence of two key indicators for college success—high school class rank and standardized tests. Empirical results show that class rank is the superior predictor of college performance and that test score advantages do not insulate lower ranked students from academic underperformance. Using the UT-Austin campus as a test case, we conduct a simulation to evaluate the consequences of capping students admitted automatically using both achievement metrics. We find that using class rank to cap the number of students eligible for automatic admission would have roughly uniform impacts across high schools, but imposing a minimum test score threshold on all students would have highly unequal consequences by greatly reduce the admission eligibility of the highest performing students who attend poor high schools while not jeopardizing admissibility of students who attend affluent high schools. We discuss the implications of the Texas admissions experiment for higher education in Europe. PMID:23788828

  12. HIV Risk Behavior and Access to Services: What Predicts HIV Testing among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-01-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV…

  13. Accessing Early Behavioral Intervention for Autism: The Development and Testing of a Psychoeducational Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steever, Michele Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the utility of psychoeducation within a stepped care model as applied to the problem of autism treatment. The current study developed and pilot tested a psychoeducational website for parents who recently had a child diagnosed with autism. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design was used to evaluate the…

  14. Enhancing the Accessibility of High School Science Tests: A Multistate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettler, Ryan J.; Dickenson, Tammiee S.; Bennett, Heather L.; Morgan, Grant B.; Gilmore, Joanna A.; Beddow, Peter A.; Swaffield, Suzanne; Turner, Linda; Herrera, Bill; Turner, Charlene; Palmer, Porter W.

    2012-01-01

    This study was inspired by the final regulations for the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) indicating that each state has the option to develop a new assessment for students whose disabilities have kept them from obtaining proficiency. Sets of high school science achievement items were enhanced for the new test. A 3-by-2, within subjects,…

  15. Improving Access to Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test in Niger State, Nigeria: An Assessment of Implementation up to 2013.

    PubMed

    Awoleye, Olatunji Joshua; Thron, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Nigeria's 2009-2013 malaria strategic plan adopted WHO diagnosis and treatment guidelines, which include the use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) prior to prescribing treatment with artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs). The current study explores accessibility barriers to the use of RDTs in Niger State and makes recommendations for improving the uptake of RDTs. The study employs literature review, review of data from the Niger State Health Management Information System for January-October 2013, and application of Peters' conceptual framework for assessing access to health services. Data showed that 27 percent of public health facilities (HFs) implemented RDTs, with the aid of donor funds. In these facilities, 77 percent of fever cases presented during the study period were tested with RDTs; 53 percent of fever cases were confirmed cases of malaria, while 60 percent of fever cases were treated. Stockouts of RDTs were a major constraint, and severe fever tended to trigger presumptive treatment. We conclude that although implementation of RDTs led to a reduction in the use of ACTs at HFs, more substantial reduction could be achieved if the state government directed more resources towards the acquisition of RDTs as well as raising the level of awareness of potential users. PMID:27042376

  16. Improving Access to Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test in Niger State, Nigeria: An Assessment of Implementation up to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Awoleye, Olatunji Joshua; Thron, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Nigeria's 2009–2013 malaria strategic plan adopted WHO diagnosis and treatment guidelines, which include the use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) prior to prescribing treatment with artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs). The current study explores accessibility barriers to the use of RDTs in Niger State and makes recommendations for improving the uptake of RDTs. The study employs literature review, review of data from the Niger State Health Management Information System for January–October 2013, and application of Peters' conceptual framework for assessing access to health services. Data showed that 27 percent of public health facilities (HFs) implemented RDTs, with the aid of donor funds. In these facilities, 77 percent of fever cases presented during the study period were tested with RDTs; 53 percent of fever cases were confirmed cases of malaria, while 60 percent of fever cases were treated. Stockouts of RDTs were a major constraint, and severe fever tended to trigger presumptive treatment. We conclude that although implementation of RDTs led to a reduction in the use of ACTs at HFs, more substantial reduction could be achieved if the state government directed more resources towards the acquisition of RDTs as well as raising the level of awareness of potential users. PMID:27042376

  17. Standardizing Interfaces for External Access to Data and Processing for the NASA Ozone Product Evaluation and Test Element (PEATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt A.; Fleig, Albert J.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's traditional science data processing systems have focused on specific missions, and providing data access, processing and services to the funded science teams of those specific missions. Recently NASA has been modifying this stance, changing the focus from Missions to Measurements. Where a specific Mission has a discrete beginning and end, the Measurement considers long term data continuity across multiple missions. Total Column Ozone, a critical measurement of atmospheric composition, has been monitored for'decades on a series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments. Some important European missions also monitor ozone, including the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and SCIAMACHY. With the U.S.IEuropean cooperative launch of the Dutch Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA Aura satellite, and the GOME-2 instrumental on MetOp, the ozone monitoring record has been further extended. In conjunction with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), NASA is now preparing to evaluate data and algorithms for the next generation Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) which will launch on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP) in 2010. NASA is constructing the Science Data Segment (SDS) which is comprised of several elements to evaluate the various NPP data products and algorithms. The NPP SDS Ozone Product Evaluation and Test Element (PEATE) will build on the heritage of the TOMS and OM1 mission based processing systems. The overall measurement based system that will encompass these efforts is the Atmospheric Composition Processing System (ACPS). We have extended the system to include access to publically available data sets from other instruments where feasible, including non-NASA missions as appropriate. The heritage system was largely monolithic providing a very controlled processing flow from data.ingest of

  18. Generalized banana-drift transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1985-10-01

    The theory of tokamak ripple transport in the banana-drift and ripple-plateau regimes is extended in a number of directions. The theory is valid for small values of the toroidal periodicity number n of the perturbation, as well as for the moderate values (n approx. 10 to 20) previously assumed. It is shown that low-n perturbations can produce much greater transport than the larger-n perturbations usually studied. In addition, the ripple perturbation is allowed arbitrary values of poloidal mode number m and frequency ..omega.., making it applicable to the transport induced by MHD modes. Bounce averaging is avoided, so the theory includes the contributions to transport from all harmonics of the bounce frequency, providing a continuous description of the transition from the banana drift to the ripple-plateau regime. The implications of the theory for toroidal rotation in tokamaks are considered.

  19. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  20. Random drift and culture change.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, R. Alexander; Hahn, Matthew W.; Shennan, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    We show that the frequency distributions of cultural variants, in three different real-world examples--first names, archaeological pottery and applications for technology patents--follow power laws that can be explained by a simple model of random drift. We conclude that cultural and economic choices often reflect a decision process that is value-neutral; this result has far-reaching testable implications for social-science research. PMID:15306315

  1. MPS II drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  2. Abstraction of Seepage into Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Wilson; C.K. Ho

    2000-09-26

    A total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for a potential nuclear-waste repository requires an estimate of the amount of water that might contact waste. This paper describes the model used for part of that estimation in a recent TSPA for the Yucca Mountain site. The discussion is limited to estimation of how much water might enter emplacement drifts; additional considerations related to flow within the drifts, and how much water might actually contact waste, are not addressed here. The unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being considered for the potential repository, and a drift opening in unsaturated rock tends to act as a capillary barrier and divert much of the percolating water around it. For TSPA, the important questions regarding seepage are how many waste packages might be subjected to water flow and how much flow those packages might see. Because of heterogeneity of the rock and uncertainty about the future (how the climate will evolve, etc.), it is not possible to predict seepage amounts or locations with certainty. Thus, seepage is treated as a stochastic quantity in TSPA simulations, with the magnitude and spatial distribution of seepage sampled from uncertainty distributions. The distillation of the essential components of process modeling into a form suitable for use in TSPA simulations is referred to as abstraction. In the following sections, seepage process models and abstractions will be summarized and then some illustrative results are presented.

  3. Ionospheric Plasma Drift Analysis Technique Based On Ray Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ari, Gizem; Toker, Cenk

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric drift measurements provide important information about the variability in the ionosphere, which can be used to quantify ionospheric disturbances caused by natural phenomena such as solar, geomagnetic, gravitational and seismic activities. One of the prominent ways for drift measurement depends on instrumentation based measurements, e.g. using an ionosonde. The drift estimation of an ionosonde depends on measuring the Doppler shift on the received signal, where the main cause of Doppler shift is the change in the length of the propagation path of the signal between the transmitter and the receiver. Unfortunately, ionosondes are expensive devices and their installation and maintenance require special care. Furthermore, the ionosonde network over the world or even Europe is not dense enough to obtain a global or continental drift map. In order to overcome the difficulties related to an ionosonde, we propose a technique to perform ionospheric drift estimation based on ray tracing. First, a two dimensional TEC map is constructed by using the IONOLAB-MAP tool which spatially interpolates the VTEC estimates obtained from the EUREF CORS network. Next, a three dimensional electron density profile is generated by inputting the TEC estimates to the IRI-2015 model. Eventually, a close-to-real situation electron density profile is obtained in which ray tracing can be performed. These profiles can be constructed periodically with a period of as low as 30 seconds. By processing two consequent snapshots together and calculating the propagation paths, we estimate the drift measurements over any coordinate of concern. We test our technique by comparing the results to the drift measurements taken at the DPS ionosonde at Pruhonice, Czech Republic. This study is supported by TUBITAK 115E915 and Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR14/001 projects.

  4. Equity in access to exercise tolerance testing, coronary angiography, and coronary artery bypass grafting by age, sex and clinical indications

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, A; Bond, M; McKee, D; McClay, M; Banning, A; Dudley, N; Elder, A; Martin, A; Blackman, I

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess whether patients with heart disease in a single UK hospital have equitable access to exercise testing, coronary angiography, and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG).
METHOD—Retrospective analysis of patients' medical case notes (n = 1790), tracking each case back 12 months and forward 12 months from the patient's date of entry to the study.
SETTING—Single UK district hospital in the Thames Region.
PATIENTS—Patients (elective and emergency) with a cardiac ICD inpatient code at discharge or death, or who were referred to cardiology or care of the elderly unit over a 12 month period in 1996-7 (new episodes) were included.
RESULTS—Analysis of 1790 hospital case notes revealed that, despite having indications for intervention identical to those of younger patients, older patients (that is, those aged > 75 years) and women, independently, were significantly less likely to undergo exercise tolerance testing (exercise ECG) and cardiac catheterisation. The similar trends for age and access to CABG did not achieve significance. While clinical priority scores also independently predicted access to cardiac catheterisation and CABG, considerable numbers of patients in high clinical priority groups were not referred for either procedure.
CONCLUSIONS—The management and treatment of older patients and women with cardiac disease may be different from that of younger patients and men. Given the similarity of the indications for treatment and the lack of significant contraindications or comorbidities as a cause for these differences, one possible explanation is that these patients are being discriminated against principally because of their age and sex. Although clinical priority scores independently predicted access to catheterisation and CABG, large proportions of patients in high priority groups were not referred. This implies that the New Zealand priority scoring system may be more equitable than UK practice. The cost

  5. Increasing Public Awareness of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Health Care Access, Internet Use, and Population Density Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Finney Rutten, Lila J.; Gollust, Sarah E.; Naveed, Sana; Moser, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty around the value of and appropriate regulatory models for direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing underscores the importance of tracking public awareness of these services. We analyzed nationally representative, cross-sectional data from the Health Information National Trends Survey in 2008 (n = 7, 674) and 2011 (n = 3, 959) to assess population-level changes in awareness of DTC genetic testing in the U.S. and to explore sociodemographic, health care, Internet use, and population density correlates. Overall, awareness increased significantly from 29% in 2008 to 37% in 2011. The observed increase in awareness from 2008 to 2011 remained significant (OR = 1.39) even when adjusted for sociodemographic variables, health care access, Internet use, and population density. Independent of survey year, the odds of awareness of DTC genetic tests were significantly higher for those aged 50–64 (OR = 1.64), and 65–74 (OR = 1.60); college graduates (OR = 2.02); those with a regular source of health care (OR = 1.27); those with a prior cancer diagnosis (OR = 1.24); those who use the Internet (OR = 1.27); and those living in urban areas (OR = 1.25). Surveillance of awareness—along with empirical data on use of and response to genetic risk information—can inform public health and policy efforts to maximize benefits and minimize risks of DTC genetic testing. PMID:22899921

  6. Drift load in populations of small size and low density.

    PubMed

    Willi, Y; Griffin, P; Van Buskirk, J

    2013-03-01

    According to theory, drift load in randomly mating populations is determined by past population size, because enhanced genetic drift in small populations causes accumulation and fixation of recessive deleterious mutations of small effect. In contrast, segregating load due to mutations of low frequency should decline in smaller populations, at least when mutations are highly recessive and strongly deleterious. Strong local selection generally reduces both types of load. We tested these predictions in 13 isolated, outcrossing populations of Arabidopsis lyrata that varied in population size and plant density. Long-term size was estimated by expected heterozygosity at 20 microsatellite loci. Segregating load was assessed by comparing performance of offspring from selfings versus within-population crosses. Drift load was the heterosis effect created by interpopulation outbreeding. Results showed that segregating load was unrelated to long-term size. However, drift load was significantly higher in populations of small effective size and low density. Drift load was mostly expressed late in development, but started as early as germination and accumulated thereafter. The study largely confirms predictions of theory and illustrates that mutation accumulation can be a threat to natural populations.

  7. Scroll wave drift along steps, troughs, and corners.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hua; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional excitable systems can create nonlinear scroll waves that rotate around one-dimensional phase singularities. Recent theoretical work predicts that these filaments drift along step-like height variations. Here, we test this prediction using experiments with thin layers of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. We observe that over short distances scroll waves are attracted towards the step and then rapidly commence a steady drift along the step line. The translating filaments always reside on the shallow side of the step near the edge. Accordingly, filaments in the deep domain initially collide with and shorten at the step wall. The drift speeds obey the predicted proportional dependence on the logarithm of the height ratio and the direction depends on the vortex chirality. We also observe drift along the perimeter of rectangular plateaus and find that the filaments perform sharp turns at the corners. In addition, we investigate rectangular troughs for which vortices of equal chirality can drift in different directions. The latter two effects are reproduced in numerical simulations with the Barkley model. The simulations show that narrow troughs instigate scroll wave encounters that induce repulsive interaction and symmetry breaking. Similar phenomena could exist in the geometrically complicated ventricles of the human heart where reentrant vortex waves cause tachycardia and fibrillation. PMID:26117114

  8. New drift chamber for the Mark II at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.

    1984-04-01

    A new cylindrical drift chamber is being constructed for the Mark II detector for use at the new SLAC Linear Collider. The design of the new chamber is based on a multi-sense-wire cell of the jet-chamber type. In addition to drift-time measurements, pulse height measurements from the sense wires will provide electron-hadron separation by dE/dx. The design and construction of the chamber, tests of prototypes, and chamber electronics are discussed. 7 references, 12 figures.

  9. An Investigation of Scale Drift for Arithmetic Assessment of ACCUPLACER®. Research Report No. 2010-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Hui; Melican, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    The current study was designed to extend the current literature to study scale drift in CAT as part of improving quality control and calibration process for ACCUPLACER, a battery of large-scale adaptive placement tests. The study aims to evaluate item parameter drift using empirical data that span four years from the ACCUPLACER Arithmetic…

  10. Voltammetric and drift spectroscopy investigation in dithiophosphinate-chalcopyrite system.

    PubMed

    Güler, Taki; Hiçyilmaz, Cahit; Gökağaç, Gülsün; Ekmekçi, Zafir

    2004-11-01

    The mechanism of dithiophosphinate (DTPI) adsorption on chalcopyrite was investigated by diffuse reflectance Fourier transformation (DRIFT) spectroscopy and by cyclic voltammetry (CV) at various pHs. CV experiments showed that the redox reactions occurred at a certain degree of irreversibility on the chalcopyrite surface in the absence of a collector due to preferential dissolution of iron ions in slightly acid solution and irreversible surface coverage by iron oxyhydroxides in neutral and alkaline solutions. In the presence of DTPI, CV experiments failed to identify the type of the adsorbed DTPI species and electrochemical processes occurring on chalcopyrite due to formation of an electrochemically passive surface layer preventing electron transfer. However, DRIFT spectroscopy tests showed this passive layer to be mainly CuDTPI + (DTPI)2. Both CV and DRIFT spectroscopy established that the activity of collector species decreased with increasing pH due to formation of stable hydrophilic metal oxyhydroxides on the chalcopyrite surface. PMID:15380410

  11. Evidence that attitude accessibility augments the relationship between speeding attitudes and speeding behavior: a test of the MODE model in the context of driving.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mark A; Lee, Emme; Robertson, Jamie S; Innes, Rhona

    2015-01-01

    According to the MODE model of attitude-to-behavior processes, attitude accessibility augments attitude-behavior correspondence, reflecting an automatic influence of attitudes on behavior. We therefore tested whether attitude accessibility moderates the attitude-behavior relationship in a context that is governed by characteristically automatic behavior, namely driving. In study 1 (correlational design), participants (N=130) completed online questionnaire measures of the valences and accessibilities of their attitudes towards speeding. Two weeks later, online questionnaire measures of subsequent speeding behavior were obtained. Attitude valence was a significantly better predictor of behavior at high (mean+1SD) versus low (mean-1SD) levels of attitude accessibility. In study 2 (experimental design), attitude accessibility was manipulated with a repeated attitude expression task. Immediately after the manipulation, participants (N=122) completed online questionnaire measures of attitude valence and accessibility, and two weeks later, subsequent speeding behavior. Increased attitude accessibility in the experimental (versus control) condition generated an increase in attitude-behavior correspondence. The findings are consistent with the MODE model's proposition that attitudes can exert an automatic influence on behavior. Interventions to reduce speeding could usefully increase the accessibility of anti-speeding attitudes and reduce the accessibility of pro-speeding attitudes.

  12. Flight Services and Aircraft Access: Active Flow Control Vertical Tail and Insect Accretion and Mitigation Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    This document serves as the final report for the Flight Services and Aircraft Access task order NNL14AA57T as part of NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project ITD12A+. It includes descriptions of flight test preparations and execution for the Active Flow Control (AFC) Vertical Tail and Insect Accretion and Mitigation (IAM) experiments conducted on the 757 ecoDemonstrator. For the AFC Vertical Tail, this is the culmination of efforts under two task orders. The task order was managed by Boeing Research & Technology and executed by an enterprise-wide Boeing team that included Boeing Research & Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Boeing Defense and Space and Boeing Test and Evaluation. Boeing BR&T in St. Louis was responsible for overall Boeing project management and coordination with NASA. The 757 flight test asset was provided and managed by the BCA ecoDemonstrator Program, in partnership with Stifel Aircraft Leasing and the TUI Group. With this report, all of the required deliverables related to management of this task order have been met and delivered to NASA as summarized in Table 1. In addition, this task order is part of a broader collaboration between NASA and Boeing.

  13. Radar studies of midlatitude ionospheric plasma drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherliess, L.; Fejer, B. G.; Holt, J.; Goncharenko, L.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Buonsanto, M. J.

    2001-02-01

    We use incoherent scatter radar measurements from Millstone Hill and Saint Santin to study the midlatitude F region electrodynamic plasma drifts during geomagnetically quiet and active periods. We present initially a local time, season, and solar flux dependent analytical model of the quiet time zonal and meridional E×B drifts over these stations. We discuss, for the first time, the Saint Santin drift patterns during solar maximum. We have used these quiet time models to extract the geomagnetic perturbation drifts which were modeled as a function of the time history of the auroral electrojet indices. Our results illustrate the evolution of the disturbance drifts driven by the combined effects of prompt penetration and longer lasting perturbation electric fields. The meridional electrodynamic disturbance drifts have largest amplitudes in the midnight-noon sector. The zonal drifts are predominantly westward, with largest amplitudes in the dusk-midnight sector and, following a decrease in the high-latitude convection, they decay more slowly than the meridional drifts. The prompt penetration and steady state zonal disturbance drifts derived from radar measurements are in good agreement with results obtained from both the ion drift meter data on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) satellite and from the Rice Convection Model.

  14. Redshift drift constraints on f( T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jia-Jia; Guo, Rui-Yun; He, Dong-Ze; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-10-01

    We explore the impact of the Sandage-Loeb (SL) test on the precision of cosmological constraints for f( T) gravity theories. The SL test is an important supplement to current cosmological observations because it measures the redshift drift in the Lyman-α forest in the spectra of distant quasars, covering the "redshift desert" of 2 ≤ z ≤ 5. To avoid data inconsistency, we use the best-fit models based on current combined observational data as fiducial models to simulate 30 mock SL test data. We quantify the impact of these SL test data on parameter estimation for f( T) gravity theories. Two typical f( T) models are considered, the power-law model f( T) PL and the exponential-form model f( T) EXP . The results show that the SL test can effectively break the existing strong degeneracy between the present-day matter density Ω m and the Hubble constant H 0 in other cosmological observations. For the considered f( T) models, a 30-year observation of the SL test can improve the constraint precision of Ω m and H 0 enormously but cannot effectively improve the constraint precision of the model parameters.

  15. Investigations of SPS Orbit Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    Drøsdal, Lene; Bracco, Chiara; Cornelis, Karel; Goddard, Brennan; Kain, Verena; Meddahi, Malika; Wenninger, Jorg; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2014-07-01

    The LHC is filled from the last pre-injector, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), via two 3 km long transfer lines, TI 2 and TI 8. Over the LHC injection processes, a drift of the beam trajectories has been observed in TI 2 and TI 8, requiring regular correction of the trajectories, in order to ensure clean injection into the LHC. Investigations of the trajectory variations in the transfer lines showed that the main source of short term trajectory drifts are current variations of the SPS extraction septa (MSE). The stability of the power converters has been improved, but the variations are still present and further improvements are being investigated. The stability over a longer period of time cannot be explained by this source alone. The analysis of trajectory variations shows that there are also slow variations in the SPS closed orbit at extraction. A set of SPS orbit measurements has been saved and analysed. These observations will be used together with simulations and observed field errors to locate the second source of variations.

  16. Experimental observation of the drift shadow effect using X-ray absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Susan J.; Forsberg, Aleeca A.; Peplinski, William J.; Ho, Clifford K.

    2008-01-01

    SummaryX-ray absorption imaging is used to test the concept of the drift shadow in geological samples. The drift shadow model predicts that water travels around underground tunnels, or drifts, leaving areas of high saturation along the sides of the drift (roof-drip lobe) and an area of low saturation beneath the drift (drift shadow). The drift shadow model could impact nuclear waste repositories designed with open tunnels, such as Yucca Mountain, by impacting the flux available to transport waste beneath the repository. However, without strong evidence for the drift shadow effect, it is difficult to justify its inclusion in performance assessment calculations. Twelve experiments were run looking at the impact of fracture aperture, inflow rate and geological heterogeneity on flow in the vicinity of a drift. Test cells of dimensions 10.1 cm × 15.0 cm × 2.5 cm were constructed using geological samples relevant to the Yucca Mountain project. A semi-circle of sample was removed from one side of the cell creating an artificial drift (assuming symmetry). An artificial fracture was created through the middle of each test cell parallel to the face of the sample. Potassium iodide tracer solution was dripped into the artificial fracture at the top of the sample. X-ray imaging allowed for visualization of the tracer flow paths over the duration of the experiment. In addition, samples were collected at the bottom of the flow cell to determine the lateral distribution of the outflow. Results showed distinct flow paths of tracer solution around the drift followed by shedding at the edge of the drift (roof-drip lobes), as predicted by the drift shadow model. In addition, the distribution of discharge under the drift supported the drift shadow model with less discharge directly under the drift and greater discharge to the side of the drift in most experiments. In the experiments with smaller fracture apertures and lower flow rates, discharge beneath the drift was greater than

  17. Probing Aircraft Flight Test Hazard Mitigation for the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Research Team . Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Project Integration Manager requested in July 2012 that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) form a team to independently assess aircraft structural failure hazards associated with the ACCESS experiment and to identify potential flight test hazard mitigations to ensure flight safety. The ACCESS Project Integration Manager subsequently requested that the assessment scope be focused predominantly on structural failure risks to the aircraft empennage (horizontal and vertical tail). This report contains the Appendices to Volume I.

  18. Flow and transport in the drift shadow in a dual-continuum model.

    PubMed

    Houseworth, J E; Finsterle, S; Bodvarsson, G S

    2003-01-01

    The current concept for high-level radioactive waste disposal at Yucca Mountain is for the waste to be placed in underground tunnels (or drifts) in the middle of a thick unsaturated zone. Flow modeling and field testing have shown that not all flow encountering a drift will seep into the drift. The underlying reason for the diversion of unsaturated flow around a drift is that capillary forces in the fractures and matrix prevent water entry into the drift unless the capillary pressure in the rock decreases sufficiently to allow for gravity forces to overcome the capillary barrier. As a result of the capillary barrier effect, flow tends to be diverted around the drift, affecting the flow pattern beneath the drift. For some distance beneath the drift, water saturation and flux are reduced. This drift shadow zone is much more pronounced in the fractures than in the matrix due to dominance of gravity over capillary forces in the fractures. Moving downward, away from the drift, the shadow zone asymptotically re-equilibrates to the undisturbed flow conditions due to capillary forces. The behavior of radionuclide transport in this zone of reduced flow is investigated here because this will affect the amount of time required for radionuclides to penetrate the unsaturated zone. The delay of radionuclide movement in the geosphere is one aspect of the potential repository system that could limit public exposure to radioactive waste. The behavior of flow and transport is calculated using a two-dimensional, drift-scale dual-permeability model extending to nine drift diameters below the potential waste emplacement drift. The flow model is first compared with an analytical model for a single continuum. Then, the dual-continuum flow model is investigated with respect to drift-scale and mountain-scale property sets. Transport calculations are performed for a wide range of flow conditions and for different aqueous radionuclides and colloids. Findings indicate that transport times for

  19. Drift scanning technique for mid-infrared background subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikamp, Stephanie; Brandl, Bernhard R.; Keller, Christoph U.; Venema, Lars; Pantin, Eric; Siebenmorgen, Ralf; Ives, Derek; Kerber, Florian

    2014-08-01

    Accurate calibration of ground-based, mid-infrared observations is challenging due to the strong and rapidly varying thermal background emission. The classical solution is the chopping/nodding technique where the secondary mirror and the telescope are being moved by several tens of arcseconds on the sky. However, chopping is generally inefficient and limited in accuracy and frequency by the mass and size of the secondary mirror. A more elegant solution is a drift scan where the telescope slowly drifts across or around the region of interest; the source moves on the detector by at least one FWHM of the PSF within the time over which the detector performance and the background emission can be considered stable. The final image of a drift scan is mathematically reconstructed from a series of adjacent short exposures. The drift scan approach has recently received a lot of interest, mainly for two reasons: first, some of the new, large-format mid-IR Si:As detectors (AQUARIUS) suffer from excess low frequency noise (ELFN). To reach the nominal performance limit of the detectors, chopping would have to be performed at a high frequency, faster than what most telescopes can handle; second, the next generation of extremely large telescopes will not offer chopping/nodding, and alternative methods need to be developed and tested. In this paper we present the results from simulated drift scan data. We use drift scanning to simultaneously obtain an accurate detector flat field and the sky background. The results are relevant for the future operation and calibration of VISIR at the VLT as well as for METIS, the thermal infrared instrument for the E-ELT.

  20. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  1. WORLD SURFACE CURRENTS FROM SHIP'S DRIFT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, C.P.; Schladow, S.G.

    1980-11-01

    Over 4 million observations of ship's drift are on file at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Centre, in Washington, D. C., representing a vast amount of information on ocean surface currents. The observed drift speeds are dependent on the frequency of occurence of the particular current speeds and the frequency of observation. By comparing frequency of observation with the drift speeds observed it is possible to confirm known current patterns and detect singularities in surface currents.

  2. Electron injection in semiconductor drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P. ); Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Castoldi, A. ); Vacchi, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports the first successful results of a simple MOS structure to inject electrons at a given position in Silicon Drift Detectors. The structure allows on-line calibration of the drift velocity of electrons within the detector. The calibration is a practical method to trace the temperature dependence of the electron mobility. Several of these injection structures can be implemented in silicon drift detectors without additional steps in the fabrication process. 5 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift.

    PubMed

    Andrews, T M; Price, R M; Mead, L S; McElhinny, T L; Thanukos, A; Perez, K E; Herreid, C F; Terry, D R; Lemons, P P

    2012-01-01

    This study explores biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift. We use qualitative and quantitative methods to describe students' definitions, identify common misconceptions, and examine differences before and after instruction on genetic drift. We identify and describe five overarching categories that include 16 distinct misconceptions about genetic drift. The accuracy of students' conceptions ranges considerably, from responses indicating only superficial, if any, knowledge of any aspect of evolution to responses indicating knowledge of genetic drift but confusion about the nuances of genetic drift. After instruction, a significantly greater number of responses indicate some knowledge of genetic drift (p = 0.005), but 74.6% of responses still contain at least one misconception. We conclude by presenting a framework that organizes how students' conceptions of genetic drift change with instruction. We also articulate three hypotheses regarding undergraduates' conceptions of evolution in general and genetic drift in particular. We propose that: 1) students begin with undeveloped conceptions of evolution that do not recognize different mechanisms of change; 2) students develop more complex, but still inaccurate, conceptual frameworks that reflect experience with vocabulary but still lack deep understanding; and 3) some new misconceptions about genetic drift emerge as students comprehend more about evolution.

  4. Acceptance test report (MI-74067-009-00). SVWS access arm (Serial number AA-09-03) (drawing 75M08129-13)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagood, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Acceptance tests were conducted at Kennedy Space Center of the Saturn Vehicle Workshop Spacecraft Access Arm and related equipment. The tests were conducted to prove complete system capability to operate satisfactorily under conditions required to support spacecraft operations and activities. The SVWS Access Arm, serial number AA-09-03, is a Command Module Service Arm, S/A 9, which was removed from the mobile launcher and modified to support the SVWS operations. The C/M environmental chamber was removed and a completely new chamber was installed. The retract system was redesigned to remove the automatic/remote control capability and replaced with a local manual control. The SVWS Access Arm System was successfully tested and supported spacecraft processing without major problems.

  5. Abstraction of Seepage into Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,MICHAEL L.; HO,CLIFFORD K.

    2000-10-16

    The abstraction model used for seepage into emplacement drifts in recent TSPA simulations has been presented. This model contributes to the calculation of the quantity of water that might contact waste if it is emplaced at Yucca Mountain. Other important components of that calculation not discussed here include models for climate, infiltration, unsaturated-zone flow, and thermohydrology; drip-shield and waste-package degradation; and flow around and through the drip shield and waste package. The seepage abstraction model is stochastic because predictions of seepage are necessarily quite uncertain. The model provides uncertainty distributions for seepage fraction fraction of waste-package locations flow rate as functions of percolation flux. In addition, effects of intermediate-scale flow with seepage and seep channeling are included by means of a flow-focusing factor, which is also represented by an uncertainty distribution.

  6. The Genetic Drift Inventory: A Tool for Measuring What Advanced Undergraduates Have Mastered about Genetic Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Rebecca M.; Andrews, Tessa C.; McElhinny, Teresa L.; Mead, Louise S.; Abraham, Joel K.; Thanukos, Anna; Perez, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic drift is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of biology, yet it is difficult to learn because it combines the conceptual challenges of both evolution and randomness. To help assess strategies for teaching genetic drift, we have developed and evaluated the Genetic Drift Inventory (GeDI), a concept inventory that measures…

  7. Transient-induced climate drift

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.; Reinhold, B.; Saha, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The climate drift of various quantities associated with deep, planetary-scale, equilibrated, transient Rossby waves are estimated for the Southern Hemisphere extratropical summer as revealed by the DERF II (Dynamical Extended Range Forecasting) dataset. It is found that the vertical structures of these waves systematically become too baroclinic during the course of integration. There are two time scales associated with this climate drift. There is one very short time scale, estimated to be of the order of one day, when the waves become more barotropic. It is followed by a period when the wave baroclinicity monotonically increases, and after roughly 10 days the model structures appear to have reached their statistically equilibrated state. In the meantime, the kinetic energy of the transient waves decreases substantially to roughly half the observed value. After this initial drop, however, the transient kinetic energy increases again, and it is not clear if an equilibrium value has been reached after 30 days, which is the limit of the DERF II dataset. This third time scale is not found in the quantities directly associated with the vertical structures per se, but it is hypothesized to be a consequence of these errors. A theory is utilized that in a simplified way takes into account the processes that determine the vertical structure of baroclinic waves as well as their robustness as a means of understanding the processes leading to these errors. The implications from this theory are that the formulation and magnitude of the dissipative and diffusive processes in the model are the most likely problem, but there are other possibilities. 37 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Ability or Access-Ability: Differential Item Functioning of Items on Alternate Performance-Based Assessment Tests for Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebehazy, Kim T.; Zigmond, Naomi; Zimmerman, George J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated differential item functioning (DIF) of test items on Pennsylvania's Alternate System of Assessment (PASA) for students with visual impairments and severe cognitive disabilities and what the reasons for the differences may be. Methods: The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to analyze differences in the scores…

  9. Intonation in unaccompanied singing: accuracy, drift, and a model of reference pitch memory.

    PubMed

    Mauch, Matthias; Frieler, Klaus; Dixon, Simon

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a study on intonation and intonation drift in unaccompanied singing, and proposes a simple model of reference pitch memory that accounts for many of the effects observed. Singing experiments were conducted with 24 singers of varying ability under three conditions (Normal, Masked, Imagined). Over the duration of a recording, ∼50 s, a median absolute intonation drift of 11 cents was observed. While smaller than the median note error (19 cents), drift was significant in 22% of recordings. Drift magnitude did not correlate with other measures of singing accuracy, singing experience, or the presence of conditions tested. Furthermore, it is shown that neither a static intonation memory model nor a memoryless interval-based intonation model can account for the accuracy and drift behavior observed. The proposed causal model provides a better explanation as it treats the reference pitch as a changing latent variable. PMID:24993224

  10. Internet-using men who have sex with men would be interested in accessing authorised HIV self-tests available for purchase online.

    PubMed

    Greacen, Tim; Friboulet, David; Blachier, Audrey; Fugon, Lionel; Hefez, Serge; Lorente, Nicolas; Spire, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) recruited in sex venues have been shown to be interested in accessing HIV home-tests if reliable and authorised tests were available. To what extent is this true for MSM recruited online? In an online survey in French on the use of unauthorised HIV home-tests purchased online, MSM previously unaware of the existence of these tests were asked if they would be interested in accessing them if these tests were authorised. Among 5908 non-HIV positive respondents, 86.5% expressed interest. Independent variables associated with interest included: being younger, living in smaller towns, having a job but not tertiary education and living in a conventional family with one's parents or a wife and family. Interested men were also more likely to have never done the standard HIV test or not in the last year, to have casual sex partners but on average not more than once a week, to take sexual risks with these partners, to live their sex-lives with men in absolute secrecy and yet often to try to make a date to see their sex partners again. Of the 5109 respondents interested in accessing self-tests purchasable online, 4362 (85.4%) answered an open question on their reasons for being interested. Using thematic analysis, principle themes identified proved to be similar to those found in earlier studies with MSM recruited in sex venues: convenience, rapidity accessing results and privacy. In answer to a closed question, men not interested chose as reasons: satisfaction with current method, doubts about reliability, not wanting to be alone when discovering results and fear of incorrect use. In conclusion, although the online questionnaire may have introduced selection bias over-representing men already interested, many Internet-using MSM are interested in accessing self-tests available for purchase online.

  11. New drift chamber for the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Burchat, P.R.; Hanson, G.G.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.

    1984-10-01

    The design of the new cylindrical drift chamber for the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider is described. Prototype tests to determine the working parameters of the chamber and to study possible gas mixtures are discussed.

  12. TBV-361 RESOLUTION ANALYSIS: EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ORIENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    M. Lin; D.C. Kicker; M.D. Sellers

    1999-07-17

    The purpose of this To Be Verified/To Be Determined (TBX) resolution analysis is to release ''To Be Verified'' (TBV)-361 related to the emplacement drift orientation. The system design criterion in ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 1998a, p.9) specifies that the emplacement drift orientation relative to the dominant joint orientations should be at least 30 degrees. The specific objectives for this analysis include the following: (1) Collect and evaluate key block data developed for the repository host horizon rock mass. (2) Assess the dominant joint orientations based on available fracture data. (3) Document the maximum block size as a function of drift orientation. (4) Assess the applicability of the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion in the ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 1998a, p.9). (5) Consider the effects of seepage on drift orientation. (6) Verify that the viability assessment (VA) drift orientation complies with the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion, or provide justifications and make recommendations for modifying the VA emplacement drift layout. In addition to providing direct support to the System Description Document (SDD), the release of TBV-361 will provide support to the Repository Subsurface Design Department. The results from this activity may also provide data and information needs to support the MGR Requirements Department, the MGR Safety Assurance Department, and the Performance Assessment Organization.

  13. Banana drift transport in tokamaks with ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Linsker, R.; Boozer, A.H.

    1981-04-01

    Ripple transport in tokamaks is discussed for the banana drift collisionality regime, which lies below the ripple plateau regime treated earlier. The physical mechanisms that dominate banana drift transport are found to differ from those considered in previous work on this regime, and the resulting transport coefficients can consequently differ by several orders of magnitude.

  14. Banana drift transport in tokamaks with ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Linsker, R.; Boozer, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Ripple transport in tokamaks is discussed for the ''banana drift'' collisionality regime, which lies below the ripple plateau regime treated earlier. The physical mechanisms that dominate banana drift transport are found to differ from those considered in previous work on this regime, and consequently the resulting transport coefficients can differ by several orders of magnitude.

  15. Biology Undergraduates' Misconceptions about Genetic Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, T. M.; Price, R. M.; Mead, L. S.; McElhinny, T. L.; Thanukos, A.; Perez, K. E.; Herreid, C. F.; Terry, D. R.; Lemons, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift. We use qualitative and quantitative methods to describe students' definitions, identify common misconceptions, and examine differences before and after instruction on genetic drift. We identify and describe five overarching categories that include 16 distinct…

  16. Access to edge scenarios for testing a scraper element in early operation phases of Wendelstein 7-X

    DOE PAGES

    Holbe, H.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Geiger, J.; Bozhenkov, S.; Kornejew, P; Feng, Y.; Lore, Jeremy D.; Lumsdaine, Arnold; Konig, R.

    2016-01-29

    The edge topology of magnetic fusion devices is decisive for the control of the plasma exhaust. In Wendelstein 7-X, the island divertor concept will be used, for which the edge topology can change significantly as the internal currents in a plasma discharge evolve towards steady-state. Consequently, the device has been optimized to minimize such internal currents, in particular the bootstrap current [1]. Nonetheless, there are predicted pulse scenarios where effects of the remaining internal currents could potentially lead to overload of plasma-facing components. These internal currents are predicted to evolve on long time scales (tens of seconds) so their effectsmore » on the edge topology and the divertor heat loads may not be experimentally accessible in the first years of W7-X operation, where only relatively short pulses are possible. However, we show here that for at least one important long-pulse divertor operation issue, relevant physics experiments can be performed already in short-pulse operation, through judicious adjustment of the edge topology by the use of the existing coil sets. The specific issue studied here is a potential overload of the divertor element edges. This overload might be mitigated by the installation of an extra set of plasma-facing components, so-called scraper elements, as suggested in earlier publications. It is shown here that by a targeted control of edge topology, the effectiveness of such scraper elements can be tested already with uncooled test-scraper elements in short-pulse operation. Furthermore, this will allow an early and well-informed decision on whether long-pulse-capable (actively cooled) scraper elements should be built and installed.« less

  17. Evaluation of realtime spray drift using RTDrift Gaussian advection-diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, Frédéric; Verstraete, Arnaud; Schiffers, Bruno; Destain, Marie-France

    2009-01-01

    A spray drift model was developed to deliver real time information to the pesticide applicator. The sprayer is equipped with sensors to deliver real time measurement of operational parameters as spray pressure, boom height, horizontal boom movements and geolocalization. The spray droplet size spectrum as a function of pressure was characterized using PDI measurements. Wind speed and direction were measured using a sprayer mounted 2-D ultrasonic anemometer. For each successive boom position, a diffusion-advection Gaussian tilting plume model is used to compute the spray drift deposits downwind. Drift is computed independently for each droplet classes and each nozzle based on the operating parameters. Field trials were performed on a test plot in various wind conditions. The ground drift was measured for different drift distances using fluorimetry analysis. Results show that drift deposits are mainly affected by wind speed and direction what was correctly accounted for by the model. Short distance drift deposits values were overestimated by the model while long distance drift was underestimated. It appears that this most probably origins from embarked wind speed measurements and diffusion parameter. It is concluded that a treatment of embarked wind speed and diffusion measurement should be used to minimize these errors. PMID:20218507

  18. Detecting and correcting sensor drifts in long-term weather data.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Georg; Dobbertin, Matthias; Rebetez, Martine

    2013-06-01

    Quality control of long-term monitoring data of thousands and millions of individual records as present in meteorological data is cumbersome. In such data series, sensor drifts, stalled values, and scale shifts may occur and potentially result in flawed conclusions if not noticed and handled properly. However, there is no established standard procedure to perform quality control of high-frequency meteorological data. In this paper, we outline a procedure to remove sensor drift in high-frequency data series using the example of 15-year-long sets of hourly relative humidity (RH) data from 28 stations subdivided into 202 individual sensor operation periods. The procedure involves basic quality control, relative homogeneity testing, and drift removal. Significant sensor drifts were observed in 40.6 % of all sensor operation periods. The drifts varied between data series and depended in a complex, usually inconsistent way on absolute RH values; within single series for instance, a drift could be negative in the lower RH range and positive in the upper RH range. Detrending changed RH values by, on average, 1.96 %. For one fifth of the detrended data, adjustments were 2.75 % and more of the measured value, and in one tenth 4.75 % and more. Overall, drifts were strongest for RH values close to 100 %. The detrending procedure proved to effectively remove sensor drifts. The principles of the procedure also apply to other meteorological parameters and more generally to any time series of data for which comparable reference data are available.

  19. Eye-Safe Lidar System for Pesticide Spray Drift Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Gregorio, Eduard; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rosell-Polo, Joan R.

    2015-01-01

    Spray drift is one of the main sources of pesticide contamination. For this reason, an accurate understanding of this phenomenon is necessary in order to limit its effects. Nowadays, spray drift is usually studied by using in situ collectors which only allow time-integrated sampling of specific points of the pesticide clouds. Previous research has demonstrated that the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique can be an alternative for spray drift monitoring. This technique enables remote measurement of pesticide clouds with high temporal and distance resolution. Despite these advantages, the fact that no lidar instrument suitable for such an application is presently available has appreciably limited its practical use. This work presents the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for the monitoring of pesticide clouds. Parameter design of this system is carried out via signal-to-noise ratio simulations. The instrument is based on a 3-mJ pulse-energy erbium-doped glass laser, an 80-mm diameter telescope, an APD optoelectronic receiver and optomechanically adjustable components. In first test measurements, the lidar system has been able to measure a topographic target located over 2 km away. The instrument has also been used in spray drift studies, demonstrating its capability to monitor the temporal and distance evolution of several pesticide clouds emitted by air-assisted sprayers at distances between 50 and 100 m. PMID:25658395

  20. Eye-safe lidar system for pesticide spray drift measurement.

    PubMed

    Gregorio, Eduard; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2015-02-04

    Spray drift is one of the main sources of pesticide contamination. For this reason, an accurate understanding of this phenomenon is necessary in order to limit its effects. Nowadays, spray drift is usually studied by using in situ collectors which only allow time-integrated sampling of specific points of the pesticide clouds. Previous research has demonstrated that the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique can be an alternative for spray drift monitoring. This technique enables remote measurement of pesticide clouds with high temporal and distance resolution. Despite these advantages, the fact that no lidar instrument suitable for such an application is presently available has appreciably limited its practical use. This work presents the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for the monitoring of pesticide clouds. Parameter design of this system is carried out via signal-to-noise ratio simulations. The instrument is based on a 3-mJ pulse-energy erbium-doped glass laser, an 80-mm diameter telescope, an APD optoelectronic receiver and optomechanically adjustable components. In first test measurements, the lidar system has been able to measure a topographic target located over 2 km away. The instrument has also been used in spray drift studies, demonstrating its capability to monitor the temporal and distance evolution of several pesticide clouds emitted by air-assisted sprayers at distances between 50 and 100 m.

  1. Eye-safe lidar system for pesticide spray drift measurement.

    PubMed

    Gregorio, Eduard; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2015-01-01

    Spray drift is one of the main sources of pesticide contamination. For this reason, an accurate understanding of this phenomenon is necessary in order to limit its effects. Nowadays, spray drift is usually studied by using in situ collectors which only allow time-integrated sampling of specific points of the pesticide clouds. Previous research has demonstrated that the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique can be an alternative for spray drift monitoring. This technique enables remote measurement of pesticide clouds with high temporal and distance resolution. Despite these advantages, the fact that no lidar instrument suitable for such an application is presently available has appreciably limited its practical use. This work presents the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for the monitoring of pesticide clouds. Parameter design of this system is carried out via signal-to-noise ratio simulations. The instrument is based on a 3-mJ pulse-energy erbium-doped glass laser, an 80-mm diameter telescope, an APD optoelectronic receiver and optomechanically adjustable components. In first test measurements, the lidar system has been able to measure a topographic target located over 2 km away. The instrument has also been used in spray drift studies, demonstrating its capability to monitor the temporal and distance evolution of several pesticide clouds emitted by air-assisted sprayers at distances between 50 and 100 m. PMID:25658395

  2. Testing the Digital Divide: Does Access to High-Quality Use of Technology in Schools Affect Student Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Gregory Keith

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between access, use of technology and student achievement in public middle schools in Maryland. The objective of this study was to determine whether a digital divide (differences in access and utilization of technology based on student characteristics of race, socioeconomic status, and gender) exists among…

  3. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Sun

    2004-07-09

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c).

  4. Drift rate of the South Atlantic Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D

    1997-02-01

    A portion of the secular change of the geomagnetic field leads to a drift of the trapped belt South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). If this drift is not taken into account, models of the trapped particle population give erroneous predictions of particle fluxes. The dose rates measured on two manned spacecrafts, Skylab (50 degrees inclination x 438 km orbit) and Mir orbital station (51.65 degrees inclination x 400 km orbit), were used to determine the drift rate of the SAA. The longitude and latitude drift rates of the SAA as a whole, between 1973 and 1995, were estimated to be 0.28 +/- 0.03 degrees W per year, and 0.08 +/- 0.03 degrees N per year, respectively. These measurements are consistent with determinations made using the AP8 models for radiation trapped belts and are in excellent agreement with drift rates observed for the geomagnetic field.

  5. Drift by drift: effective population size is limited by advection

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetic estimates of effective population size often generate surprising results, including dramatically low ratios of effective population size to census size. This is particularly true for many marine species, and this effect has been associated with hypotheses of "sweepstakes" reproduction and selective hitchhiking. Results Here we show that in advective environments such as oceans and rivers, the mean asymmetric transport of passively dispersed reproductive propagules will act to limit the effective population size in species with a drifting developmental stage. As advection increases, effective population size becomes decoupled from census size as the persistence of novel genetic lineages is restricted to those that arise in a small upstream portion of the species domain. Conclusion This result leads to predictions about the maintenance of diversity in advective systems, and complements the "sweepstakes" hypothesis and other hypotheses proposed to explain cases of low allelic diversity in species with high fecundity. We describe the spatial extent of the species domain in which novel allelic diversity will be retained, thus determining how large an appropriately placed marine reserve must be to allow the persistence of endemic allelic diversity. PMID:18710549

  6. Effects of Natural Drift Degradation on In-Drift Thermohydrological Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manepally, C.; Sun, A. Y.; Fedors, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    Understanding thermohydrological processes at the potential high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is important for assessing its long-term performance. Detailed process models that provide the in-drift and near-field thermohydrological conditions are needed to estimate the composition of water that may contact the waste package and to evaluate the potential for corrosion of waste packages. Drift degradation could significantly influence the environment inside waste emplacement drifts. Degradation of the host rock may backfill portions of the repository, and drifts could potentially be backfilled within 1000 years after closure. This poster presents a two-dimensional detailed process model that incorporates the temporal variation of in-drift and drift wall geometry as a result of drift degradation. Model results indicate that radiation and convection dominate in-drift heat transfer until the drip shield is completely surrounded by rubble. Subsequently, the insulating effect of rubble causes an abrupt increase in the temperatures of the in-drift components and conduction through the rubble dominates the in-drift heat transfer. The heat generated by emplaced waste transports water vapor away from the drift creating a dryout zone and redistributing pore fluids within a potentially large volume of host rock. The likelihood of water seeping into the drift is strongly affected by the extent and duration of the dryout zone. Model results showing the temporal variability of the dryout zone, both in the host rock and the rubble pile, will be presented. Sensitivity analyses show that the in-drift thermohydrologic conditions are sensitive to the thermal properties of the rubble and the rate of drift degradation. This poster in an independent product of CNWRA and does not necessarily reflect the view or regulatory position of Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  7. Quantifying Particle Numbers and Mass Flux in Drifting Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, Philip; Paterna, Enrico; Horender, Stefan; Lehning, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We compare two of the most common methods of quantifying mass flux, particle numbers and particle-size distribution for drifting snow events, the snow-particle counter (SPC), a laser-diode-based particle detector, and particle tracking velocimetry based on digital shadowgraphic imaging. The two methods were correlated for mass flux and particle number flux. For the SPC measurements, the device was calibrated by the manufacturer beforehand. The shadowgrapic imaging method measures particle size and velocity directly from consecutive images, and before each new test the image pixel length is newly calibrated. A calibration study with artificially scattered sand particles and glass beads provides suitable settings for the shadowgraphical imaging as well as obtaining a first correlation of the two methods in a controlled environment. In addition, using snow collected in trays during snowfall, several experiments were performed to observe drifting snow events in a cold wind tunnel. The results demonstrate a high correlation between the mass flux obtained for the calibration studies (r ≥slant 0.93 ) and good correlation for the drifting snow experiments (r ≥slant 0.81 ). The impact of measurement settings is discussed in order to reliably quantify particle numbers and mass flux in drifting snow. The study was designed and performed to optimize the settings of the digital shadowgraphic imaging system for both the acquisition and the processing of particles in a drifting snow event. Our results suggest that these optimal settings can be transferred to different imaging set-ups to investigate sediment transport processes.

  8. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-05

    The purpose of this Model Report (REV02) is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes on UZ flow and transport. This Model Report has been developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.12, Work Package AUZM08, ''Coupled Effects on Flow and Seepage''. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans, Section I-3-4, of the TWP. Except for variations in acceptance criteria (Section 4.2), there were no deviations from this TWP. This report was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models''. This Model Report documents the THC Seepage Model and the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model. The THC Seepage Model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC model is a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and much of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrological, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model is the primary method for validating the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model compares predicted water and gas compositions, as well as mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The DST THC Model is used solely for the validation of the THC

  9. Genetic drift of HIV populations in culture.

    PubMed

    Voronin, Yegor; Holte, Sarah; Overbaugh, Julie; Emerman, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Populations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) undergo a surprisingly large amount of genetic drift in infected patients despite very large population sizes, which are predicted to be mostly deterministic. Several models have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, but all of them implicitly assume that the process of virus replication itself does not contribute to genetic drift. We developed an assay to measure the amount of genetic drift for HIV populations replicating in cell culture. The assay relies on creation of HIV populations of known size and measurements of variation in frequency of a neutral allele. Using this assay, we show that HIV undergoes approximately ten times more genetic drift than would be expected from its population size, which we defined as the number of infected cells in the culture. We showed that a large portion of the increase in genetic drift is due to non-synchronous infection of target cells. When infections are synchronized, genetic drift for the virus is only 3-fold higher than expected from its population size. Thus, the stochastic nature of biological processes involved in viral replication contributes to increased genetic drift in HIV populations. We propose that appreciation of these effects will allow better understanding of the evolutionary forces acting on HIV in infected patients.

  10. Seepage into drifts with mechanical degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2002-09-01

    Seepage into drifts in unsaturated tuff is an important issue for the long-term performance of the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Drifts in which waste packages will potentially be emplaced are subject to degradation in the form of rockfall from the drift ceiling induced by stress relief, seismic, or thermal effects. The objective of this study is to calculate seepage rates for various drift-degradation scenarios and for different values of percolation flux for the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and the Topopah Spring lower lithophysal (Tptpll) units. Seepage calculations are conducted by (1) defining a heterogeneous permeability model on the drift scale that is consistent with field data, (2) selecting calibrated parameters associated with the Tptpmn and Tptpll units, and (3) simulating seepage on detailed degraded-drift profiles, which were obtained from a separate rock mechanics engineering analysis. The simulation results indicate (1) that the seepage threshold (i.e., the percolation flux at which seepage first occurs) is not significantly changed by drift degradation, and (2) the degradation-induced increase in seepage above the threshold is influenced more by the shape of the cavity created by rockfall than the rockfall volume.

  11. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2003-10-21

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases, the known values are used to approximate

  12. Interaction between a drifting spiral and defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, X.; Levine, H. ); Kessler, D.A. )

    1993-02-01

    Spiral waves, a type of reentrant excitation,'' are believed to be associated with the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. Recent experimental findings have implicated defective regions as a means of trapping spirals which would otherwise drift and (eventually) disappear. Here, we model the myocardium as a simple excitable medium and study via simulation the interaction between a drifting spiral and one or more such defects. We interpret our results in terms of a criterion for the transition between trapped and untrapped drifting spirals.

  13. Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Theory With Polarization Drift

    SciTech Connect

    L. Wang and T.S. Hahm

    2010-03-25

    A set of the electrostatic toroidal gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and the Poisson equation, which explicitly includes the polarization drift, is derived systematically by using Lie-transform method. The polarization drift is introduced in the gyrocenter equations of motion, and the corresponding polarization density is derived. Contrary to the wide-spread expectation, the inclusion of the polarization drift in the gyrocenter equations of motion does not affect the expression for the polarization density significantly. This is due to modification of the gyrocenter phase-space volume caused by the electrostatic potential [T. S. Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4658 (1996)] .

  14. Ion Drift Meter for Dynamics Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.; Lippincott, C. R.; Zuccaro, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The ion drift meter for Dynamics Explorer B is discussed. It measures two mutually perpendicular angles of arrival of thermal ions with respect to the sensor look directions. These angles lie in the vertical and horizontal planes and may be thought of as pitch and yaw in the conventional aerodynamic sense. The components of the ion drift velocity along vertical and horizontal axes through the spacecraft body are derived to first order from knowledge of the spacecraft velocity vector and more accurately with additional knowledge of the component of ion drift along the sensor look direction.

  15. Limits of neutral drift: lessons from the in vitro evolution of two ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Katherine L; Joyce, Gerald F

    2014-10-01

    The relative contributions of adaptive selection and neutral drift to genetic change are unknown but likely depend on the inherent abundance of functional genotypes in sequence space and how accessible those genotypes are to one another. To better understand the relative roles of selection and drift in evolution, local fitness landscapes for two different RNA ligase ribozymes were examined using a continuous in vitro evolution system under conditions that foster the capacity for neutral drift to mediate genetic change. The exploration of sequence space was accelerated by increasing the mutation rate using mutagenic nucleotide analogs. Drift was encouraged by carrying out evolution within millions of separate compartments to exploit the founder effect. Deep sequencing of individuals from the evolved populations revealed that the distribution of genotypes did not escape the starting local fitness peak, remaining clustered around the sequence used to initiate evolution. This is consistent with a fitness landscape where high-fitness genotypes are sparse and well isolated, and suggests, at least in this context, that neutral drift alone is not a primary driver of genetic change. Neutral drift does, however, provide a repository of genetic variation upon which adaptive selection can act.

  16. 50 CFR 665.810 - Prohibition of drift gillnetting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries § 665.810 Prohibition of drift gillnetting. Fishing with drift gillnets in...

  17. 50 CFR 665.810 - Prohibition of drift gillnetting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries § 665.810 Prohibition of drift gillnetting. Fishing with drift gillnets in...

  18. 50 CFR 665.810 - Prohibition of drift gillnetting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries § 665.810 Prohibition of drift gillnetting. Fishing with drift gillnets in...

  19. Semi-Supervised Learning Techniques in AO Applications: A Novel Approach To Drift Counteraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vito, S.; Fattoruso, G.; Pardo, M.; Tortorella, F.; Di Francia, G.

    2011-11-01

    In this work we proposed and tested the use of SSL techniques in the AO domain. The SSL characteristics have been exploited to reduce the need for costly supervised samples and the effects of time dependant drift of state-of-the-art statistical learning approaches. For this purpose, an on-field recorded one year long atmospheric pollution dataset has been used. The semi-supervised approach benefitted from the use of updated unlabeled samples, adapting its knowledge to the slowly changing drift effects. We expect that semi-supervised learning can provide significant advantages to the performance of sensor fusion subsystems in artificial olfaction exhibiting an interesting drift counteraction effect.

  20. The GlueX central drift chamber: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Van Haarlem, Y; Barbosa, F; Dey, B; Lawrence, D; Razmyslovich, V; Smith, Visser; Whitlatch, T; Wilkin, G; Zihlmann, B

    2010-10-01

    Tests and studies concerning the design and performance of the GlueX Central Drift Chamber (CDC) are presented. A full-scale prototype was built to test and steer the mechanical and electronic design. Small scale prototypes were constructed to test for sagging and to do timing and resolution studies of the detector. These studies were used to choose the gas mixture and to program a Monte Carlo simulation that can predict the detector response in an external magnetic field. Particle identification and charge division possibilities were also investigated.

  1. Drift of continental rafts with asymmetric heating.

    PubMed

    Knopoff, L; Poehls, K A; Smith, R C

    1972-06-01

    A laboratory model of a lithospheric raft is propelled through a viscous asthenospheric layer with constant velocity of scaled magnitude appropriate to continental drift. The propulsion is due to differential heat concentration in the model oceanic and continental crusts.

  2. CROSS DRIFT ALCOVE/NICHE UTILITIES ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Goodin

    1999-07-08

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide the design basis and general arrangement requirements of the non-potable water, waste water, compressed air and ventilation (post excavation) utilities required in support of the Cross Drift alcoves and niches.

  3. Drift Wave Turbulence and Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, L.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2015-12-01

    An important feature in collisionless magnetic reconnection is the development of sharp discontinuities along the separatrices bounding the Alfvenic outflow. The typical scale length of these features is ρs (the Larmor radius based on the sound speed) for guide field reconnection. Temperature gradients in the inflowing plasma (as might be found in the magnetopause and the magnetotail) can lead to instabilities at these separatrices, specifically drift wave turbulence. We present standalone 2D and 3D PIC simulations of drift wave turbulence to investigate scaling properties and growth rates. We specifically consider stabilization of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) and the development of this instability in the presence of a sheared magnetic field. Further investigations of the relative importance of drift wave turbulence in the development of reconnection will also be considered.

  4. On the electron drift velocity in plasma devices with E × B drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapurin, O.; Smolyakov, A.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and various components of the electron drift velocity are discussed in application to plasma discharges with the E × B drift. In high density plasmas, the contribution of the diamagnetic drift can be of the same order magnitude as the E × B drift. It is pointed out that curvature and gradient drifts associated with magnetic field inhomogeneities manifest themselves via the electron pressure anisotropy. Estimates show that the components of the diamagnetic drift related to the electron pressure anisotropy and magnetic field gradients can be important for the parameters of modern magnetrons and Hall thrusters. Similar additional terms appear in the momentum balance as mirror forces which may affect the distribution of the electrostatic potential in Hall devices.

  5. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  6. Effects of Fault Displacement on Emplacement Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    F. Duan

    2000-04-25

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate potential effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts, including drip shields and waste packages emplaced in emplacement drifts. The output from this analysis not only provides data for the evaluation of long-term drift stability but also supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) process model report (PMR) and Disruptive Events Report currently under development. The primary scope of this analysis includes (1) examining fault displacement effects in terms of induced stresses and displacements in the rock mass surrounding an emplacement drift and (2 ) predicting fault displacement effects on the drip shield and waste package. The magnitude of the fault displacement analyzed in this analysis bounds the mean fault displacement corresponding to an annual frequency of exceedance of 10{sup -5} adopted for the preclosure period of the repository and also supports the postclosure performance assessment. This analysis is performed following the development plan prepared for analyzing effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts (CRWMS M&O 2000). The analysis will begin with the identification and preparation of requirements, criteria, and inputs. A literature survey on accommodating fault displacements encountered in underground structures such as buried oil and gas pipelines will be conducted. For a given fault displacement, the least favorable scenario in term of the spatial relation of a fault to an emplacement drift is chosen, and the analysis is then performed analytically. Based on the analysis results, conclusions are made regarding the effects and consequences of fault displacement on emplacement drifts. Specifically, the analysis will discuss loads which can be induced by fault displacement on emplacement drifts, drip shield and/or waste packages during the time period of postclosure.

  7. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. Tsang

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  8. Electrostatic drift modes in quantum pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Haijun; Cao Jintao; Wu Zhengwei

    2008-10-15

    Electrostatic drift waves in a nonuniform quantum magnetized electron-positron (pair) plasma are investigated. An explicit and straightforward analytical expression of the fluctuation frequency is presented. The effects induced by quantum fluctuations, density gradients, and magnetic field inhomogeneity on the wave frequencies are discussed and a purely quantum drift mode appears. The present analytical investigations are relevant to dense astrophysical objects as well as laboratory ultracold plasmas.

  9. Drift of dislocation tripoles under ultrasound influence.

    PubMed

    Murzaev, R T; Bachurin, D V; Nazarov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of dynamics of different stable dislocation tripoles under influence of monochromatic standing sound wave were performed. The basic conditions necessary for the drift and mutual rearrangements between dislocation structures were investigated. The dependence of the drift velocity of the dislocation tripoles as a function of the frequency and amplitude of the external influence was obtained. The results of the work can be useful in analysis of motion and self-organization of dislocation structure under ultrasound influence. PMID:26278625

  10. Calculation of drift seepage for alternative emplacementdesigns

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Birkholzer, Jens

    1999-07-30

    The calculations presented in this report are performed to obtain seepage rates into drift and boreholes for two alternative designs of drift and waste emplacement at Yucca Mountain. The two designs are defined according to the Scope of Work 14012021M1, activity 399621, drafted October 6, 1998, and further refined in a conference telephone call on October 13, 1998, between Mark Balady, Jim Blink, Rob Howard and Chin-Fu Tsang. The 2 designs considered are: (1) Design A--Horizontal boreholes 1.0 m in diameter on both sides of the drift, with each borehole 8 m long and inclined to the drift axis by 30 degrees. The pillar between boreholes, measured parallel to the drift axis, is 3.3 m. In the current calculations, a simplified model of an isolated horizontal borehole 8 m long will be simulated. The horizontal borehole will be located in a heterogeneous fracture continuum representing the repository layer. Three different realizations will be taken from the heterogeneous field, representing three different locations in the rock. Seepage for each realization is calculated as a function of the percolation flux. Design B--Vertical boreholes, 1.0 m in diameter and 8.0 m deep, drilled from the bottom of an excavated 8.0 m diameter drift. Again, the drift with the vertical borehole will be assumed to be located in a heterogeneous fracture continuum, representing the rock at the repository horizon. Two realizations are considered, and seepage is calculated for the 8-m drift with and without the vertical 1-m borehole at its bottom.

  11. The PHENIX Drift Chamber Front End Electroncs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancake, C.; Velkovska, J.; Pantuev, V.; Fong, D.; Hemmick, T.

    1998-04-01

    The PHENIX Drift Chamber (DC) is designed to operate in the high particle flux environment of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and provide high resolution track measurements. It is segmented into 80 keystones with 160 readout channels each. The Front End Electronics (FEE) developed to meet the demanding operating conditions and the large number of readout channels of the DC will be discussed. It is based on two application specific integrated circuits: the ASD8 and the TMC-PHX1. The ASD8 chip contains 8 channels of bipolar amplifier-shaper-discriminator with 6 ns shaping time and ≈ 20 ns pulse width, which satisfies the two track resolution requirements. The TMC-PHX1 chip is a high-resolution multi-hit Time-to-Digital Converter. The outputs from the ASD8 are digitized in the Time Memory Cell (TMC) every (clock period)/32 or 0.78 ns (at 40 MHz), which gives the intrinsic time resolution of the system. A 256 words deep dual port memory keeps 6.4 μs time history of data at 40 MHz clock. Each DC keystone is supplied with 4 ASD8/TMC boards and one FEM board, which performs the readout of the TMC-PHX1's, buffers and formats the data to be transmitted over the Glink. The slow speed control communication between the FEM and the system is carried out over ARCNET. The full readout chain and the data aquisition system are being tested.

  12. Modelling of the space-to-drift-time relationship of the ATLAS monitored drift-tube chambers in the presence of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Khartchenko, D.; Kortner, O.; Kotov, S.; Kroha, H.; Manz, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Rauscher, F.; Richter, R.; Staude, A.; Valderanis, Ch.

    2007-03-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer uses tracking chambers consisting of up to 5 m long drift tubes filled with Ar:CO2(93:7) at 3 bar. The chambers are run in a average toroidal magnetic field of 0.4 T created by 8 air core coils. They provide a track-point accuracy of 40 μm if the space-to-drift-time relationship r(t) is known with 20 μm accuracy. The magnetic field B influences the electron drift inside the tubes: the maximum drift time tmax=700 ns increases by ≈70 ns/T2B2. B varies by up to ±0.4 T along the tubes of the chambers mounted near the magnet coils which translates into a variation of tmax of up to 45 ns. The dependence of r(t) on B must be taken into account. Test-beam measurements show that the electron drift in case of B≠0 can be modelled with the required accuracy by a Langevin equation with a friction term which is slightly non-linear in the drift velocity.

  13. Thermodynamics Insights for the Redshift Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    The secular redshift drift is a potential measurement to directly probe the cosmic expansion. Previous study on the redshift drift mainly focused on the model-dependent simulation. Apparently, the physical insights on the redshift drift are very necessary. So in this paper, it is investigated using thermodynamics on the apparent, Hubble and event horizons. Thermodynamics could analytically present the model-independent upper bounds of redshift drift. For specific assumption on the cosmological parameters, we find that the thermodynamics bounds are nearly one order of magnitude larger than the expectation in standard ΛCDM model. We then examine ten observed redshift drift from Green Bank Telescope at redshift 0.09 < z < 0.69, and find that these observational results are inconsistent with the thermodynamics. The size of the errorbars on these measurements is about three orders of magnitude larger than the effect of thermodynamical bounds for the redshift drift. Obviously, we have not yet hit any instrumental systematics at the shift level of 1m s-1 yr-1.

  14. A fast readout algorithm for Cluster Counting/Timing drift chambers on a FPGA board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, L.; Creti, P.; Grancagnolo, F.; Pepino, A.; Tassielli, G.

    2013-08-01

    A fast readout algorithm for Cluster Counting and Timing purposes has been implemented and tested on a Virtex 6 core FPGA board. The algorithm analyses and stores data coming from a Helium based drift tube instrumented by 1 GSPS fADC and represents the outcome of balancing between cluster identification efficiency and high speed performance. The algorithm can be implemented in electronics boards serving multiple fADC channels as an online preprocessing stage for drift chamber signals.

  15. Confronting the "Acid Test": Educators' Perspectives on Expanding Access to Advanced Placement at a Diverse Florida High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, M. Lance; Shircliffe, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines educators' perspectives on accountability mandates designed to expand access to the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) classes to traditionally underserved students at a diverse suburban high school in Florida, Palm Crest High School. Consistent with Elmore (1979), district and site-based administrators focused on the…

  16. Web Site Usability Testing Involving People with Learning Disabilities Using Only Images and Audio to Access Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The need for social inclusion, informed choice and the facilitation of independent living for people with learning disabilities (LD) is being emphasised ever more by government, professionals, academics and, indeed, by people with LD themselves, particularly in self-advocacy groups. Achieving goals around inclusion and autonomy requires access to…

  17. Mesh-size effects on drift sample composition as determined with a triple net sampler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, K.V.; Tilley, L.J.; Kennelly, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    Nested nets of three different mesh apertures were used to study mesh-size effects on drift collected in a small mountain stream. The innermost, middle, and outermost nets had, respectively, 425 ??m, 209 ??m and 106 ??m openings, a design that reduced clogging while partitioning collections into three size groups. The open area of mesh in each net, from largest to smallest mesh opening, was 3.7, 5.7 and 8.0 times the area of the net mouth. Volumes of filtered water were determined with a flowmeter. The results are expressed as (1) drift retained by each net, (2) drift that would have been collected by a single net of given mesh size, and (3) the percentage of total drift (the sum of the catches from all three nets) that passed through the 425 ??m and 209 ??m nets. During a two day period in August 1986, Chironomidae larvae were dominant numerically in all 209 ??m and 106 ??m samples and midday 425 ??m samples. Large drifters (Ephemerellidae) occurred only in 425 ??m or 209 ??m nets, but the general pattern was an increase in abundance and number of taxa with decreasing mesh size. Relatively more individuals occurred in the larger mesh nets at night than during the day. The two larger mesh sizes retained 70% of the total sediment/detritus in the drift collections, and this decreased the rate of clogging of the 106 ??m net. If an objective of a sampling program is to compare drift density or drift rate between areas or sampling dates, the same mesh size should be used for all sample collection and processing. The mesh aperture used for drift collection should retain all species and life stages of significance in a study. The nested net design enables an investigator to test the adequacy of drift samples. ?? 1991 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  18. Wind selectivity and partial compensation for wind drift among nocturnally migrating passerines

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, James D.

    2012-01-01

    A migrating bird’s response to wind can impact its timing, energy expenditure, and path taken. The extent to which nocturnal migrants select departure nights based on wind (wind selectivity) and compensate for wind drift remains unclear. In this paper, we determine the effect of wind selectivity and partial drift compensation on the probability of successfully arriving at a destination area and on overall migration speed. To do so, we developed an individual-based model (IBM) to simulate full drift and partial compensation migration of juvenile Willow Warblers (Phylloscopus trochilus) along the southwesterly (SW) European migration corridor to the Iberian coast. Various degrees of wind selectivity were tested according to how large a drift angle and transport cost (mechanical energy per unit distance) individuals were willing to tolerate on departure after dusk. In order to assess model results, we used radar measurements of nocturnal migration to estimate the wind selectivity and proportional drift among passerines flying in SW directions. Migration speeds in the IBM were highest for partial compensation populations tolerating at least 25% extra transport cost compared to windless conditions, which allowed more frequent departure opportunities. Drift tolerance affected migration speeds only weakly, whereas arrival probabilities were highest with drift tolerances below 20°. The radar measurements were indicative of low drift tolerance, 25% extra transport cost tolerance and partial compensation. We conclude that along migration corridors with generally nonsupportive winds, juvenile passerines should not strictly select supportive winds but partially compensate for drift to increase their chances for timely and accurate arrival. PMID:22936843

  19. The Legal Past, Present and Future of Prenatal Genetic Testing: Professional Liability and Other Legal Challenges Affecting Patient Access to Services.

    PubMed

    Pergament, Deborah; Ilijic, Katie

    2014-12-15

    This chapter is an overview of the current status of the law in the United States regarding prenatal genetic testing with an emphasis on issues related to professional liability and other challenges affecting patient access to prenatal genetic testing. The chapter discusses the roles that federal regulations, promulgated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), play in the regulation of prenatal genetic tests. The chapter discusses tort litigation based on allegations of malpractice in the provision of prenatal genetic testing and how courts have analyzed issues related to causation, damages and mitigation of damages. The chapter provides reference information regarding how individual states address causes of action under the tort theories of wrongful birth and wrongful life. The chapter concludes with a discussion of future legal issues that may affect clinical prenatal genetic testing services arising from the continued expansion of prenatal genetic testing, legal restrictions on access to abortion and the potential development of embryonic treatments.

  20. The Legal Past, Present and Future of Prenatal Genetic Testing: Professional Liability and Other Legal Challenges Affecting Patient Access to Services

    PubMed Central

    Pergament, Deborah; Ilijic, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of the current status of the law in the United States regarding prenatal genetic testing with an emphasis on issues related to professional liability and other challenges affecting patient access to prenatal genetic testing. The chapter discusses the roles that federal regulations, promulgated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), play in the regulation of prenatal genetic tests. The chapter discusses tort litigation based on allegations of malpractice in the provision of prenatal genetic testing and how courts have analyzed issues related to causation, damages and mitigation of damages. The chapter provides reference information regarding how individual states address causes of action under the tort theories of wrongful birth and wrongful life. The chapter concludes with a discussion of future legal issues that may affect clinical prenatal genetic testing services arising from the continued expansion of prenatal genetic testing, legal restrictions on access to abortion and the potential development of embryonic treatments. PMID:26237611

  1. Field scale evaluation of spray drift reduction technologies from ground and aerial application systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work is to evaluate a proposed Test Plan for the validation testing of pesticide spray drift reduction technologies for row and field crops, focusing on the testing of ground and aerial application systems under full-scale field evaluations. The measure of performance for a gi...

  2. STATUS OF THE NEUTRALIZED DRIFT COMPRESSION EXPERIMENT (NDCX-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-04-21

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) is an 11 M$ induction accelerator project currently in construction at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for warm dense matter (WDM) experiments investigating the interaction of ion beams with matter at elevated temperature and pressure. The machine consists of a lithium injector, induction accelerator cells, diagnostic cells, a neutralized drift compression line, a final focus solenoid, and a target chamber. The induction cells and some of the pulsed power systems have been reused from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory after refurbishment and modification. The machine relies on a sequence of acceleration waveforms to longitudinally compress the initial ion pulse from 600 ns to less than 1 ns in {approx} 12 m. Radial confinement of the beam is achieved with 2.5 T pulsed solenoids. In the initial hardware configuration, 50 nC of Li{sup +} will be accelerated to 1.25 MeV and allowed to drift-compress to a peak current of {approx}40 A. The project started in the summer of 2009. Construction of the accelerator will be completed in the fall of 2011 and will provide a worldwide unique opportunity for ion-driven warm dense matter experiments as well as research related to novel beam manipulations for heavy ion fusion drivers.

  3. Redshift drift in axially symmetric quasispherical Szekeres models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Priti; Célérier, Marie-Noëlle; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2012-10-01

    Models of inhomogeneous universes constructed with exact solutions of Einstein’s general relativity have been proposed in the literature with the aim of reproducing the cosmological data without any need for a dark energy component. Besides large scale inhomogeneity models spherically symmetric around the observer, Swiss-cheese models have also been studied. Among them, Swiss cheeses where the inhomogeneous patches are modeled by different particular Szekeres solutions have been used for reproducing the apparent dimming of the type Ia supernovae. However, the problem of fitting such models to the type Ia supernovae data is completely degenerate and we need other constraints to fully characterize them. One of the tests which is known to be able to discriminate between different cosmological models is the redshift drift. This drift has already been calculated by different authors for Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi models. We compute it here for one particular axially symmetric quasispherical Szekeres Swiss cheese which has previously been shown to reproduce to a good accuracy the type Ia supernovae data, and we compare the results to the drift in the ΛCDM model and in some Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi models that can be found in the literature. We show that it is a good discriminator between them. Then, we discuss our model’s remaining degrees of freedom and propose a recipe to fully constrain them.

  4. Large-scale drift and Rossby wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, K. L.; Nazarenko, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We study drift/Rossby wave turbulence described by the large-scale limit of the Charney–Hasegawa–Mima equation. We define the zonal and meridional regions as Z:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\gt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} and M:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\lt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} respectively, where {k}=({k}x,{k}y) is in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field such that k x is along the isopycnals and k y is along the plasma density gradient. We prove that the only types of resonant triads allowed are M≤ftrightarrow M+Z and Z≤ftrightarrow Z+Z. Therefore, if the spectrum of weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence is initially in Z it will remain in Z indefinitely. We present a generalised Fjørtoft’s argument to find transfer directions for the quadratic invariants in the two-dimensional {k}-space. Using direct numerical simulations, we test and confirm our theoretical predictions for weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence, and establish qualitative differences with cases when turbulence is strong. We demonstrate that the qualitative features of the large-scale limit survive when the typical turbulent scale is only moderately greater than the Larmor/Rossby radius.

  5. Large-scale drift and Rossby wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, K. L.; Nazarenko, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We study drift/Rossby wave turbulence described by the large-scale limit of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation. We define the zonal and meridional regions as Z:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\gt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} and M:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\lt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} respectively, where {k}=({k}x,{k}y) is in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field such that k x is along the isopycnals and k y is along the plasma density gradient. We prove that the only types of resonant triads allowed are M≤ftrightarrow M+Z and Z≤ftrightarrow Z+Z. Therefore, if the spectrum of weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence is initially in Z it will remain in Z indefinitely. We present a generalised Fjørtoft’s argument to find transfer directions for the quadratic invariants in the two-dimensional {k}-space. Using direct numerical simulations, we test and confirm our theoretical predictions for weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence, and establish qualitative differences with cases when turbulence is strong. We demonstrate that the qualitative features of the large-scale limit survive when the typical turbulent scale is only moderately greater than the Larmor/Rossby radius.

  6. An Implicit "Drift-Lorentz" Mover for Plasma and Beam Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Vay, J

    2009-02-12

    In order to efficiently perform particle simulations in systems with widely varying magnetization, we developed a drift-Lorentz mover, which interpolates between full particle dynamics and drift kinetics in such a way as to preserve a physically correct gyroradius and particle drifts for both large and small ratios of the timestep to the cyclotron period. In order to extend applicability of the mover to systems with plasma frequency exceeding the cyclotron frequency such as one may have with fully neutralized drift compression of a heavy-ion beam we have developed an implicit version of the mover. A first step in this direction, in which the polarization charge was added to the field solver, was described previously. Here we describe a fully implicit algorithm (which is analogous to the direct-implicit method for conventional particle-in-cell simulation), summarize a stability analysis of it, and describe several tests of the resultant code.

  7. AN IMPLICIT"DRIFT-LORENTZ" PARTICLE MOVER FOR PLASMA AND BEAM SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Vay, J.-L; Cohen, R.H.

    2008-07-15

    In order to efficiently perform particle simulations in systems with widely varying magnetization, we developed a drift-Lorentz mover, which interpolates between full particle dynamics and drift kinetics in such a way as to preserve a physically correct gyroradius and particle drifts for both large and small ratios of the timestep to the cyclotron period. In order to extend applicability of the mover to systems with plasma frequency exceeding the cyclotron frequency such as one may have with fully neutralized drift compression of a heavy-ion beam we have developed an implicit version of the mover. A first step in this direction, in which the polarization charge was added to the field solver, was described previously. Here we describe a fully implicit algorithm (which is analogous to the direct-implicit method for conventionalparticle-in-cell simulation), summarize a stability analysis of it, and describe several tests of the resultant code.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann model for collisionless electrostatic drift wave turbulence obeying Charney-Hasegawa-Mima dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, M.; Kendl, A.

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) approach to the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model for adiabatic drift wave turbulence in magnetised plasmas is implemented. The CHM-LBM model contains a barotropic equation of state for the potential, a force term including a cross-product analogous to the Coriolis force in quasigeostrophic models, and a density gradient source term. Expansion of the resulting lattice Boltzmann model equations leads to cold-ion fluid continuity and momentum equations, which resemble CHM dynamics under drift ordering. The resulting numerical solutions of standard test cases (monopole propagation, stable drift modes and decaying turbulence) are compared to results obtained by a conventional finite difference scheme that directly discretizes the CHM equation. The LB scheme resembles characteristic CHM dynamics apart from an additional shear in the density gradient direction. The occurring shear reduces with the drift ratio and is ascribed to the compressible limit of the underlying LBM.

  9. Drift emplaced waste package thermal response

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffner, D.J.; Johnson, G.L.; Platt, E.A.; Blink, J.A.; Doering, T.W.

    1993-12-31

    Thermal calculations of the effects of radioactive waste decay heat on the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL) in conjunction with the B&W Fuel Co. For a number of waste package spacings, these 3D transient calculations use the TOPAZ3D code to predict drift wall temperatures to 10,000 years following emplacement. Systematic temperature variation occurs as a function of fuel age at emplacement and Areal Mass Loading (AML) during the first few centuries after emplacement. After about 1000 years, emplacement age is not a strong driver on rock temperature; AML has a larger impact. High AMLs occur when large waste packages are emplaced end-to-end in drifts. Drift emplacement of equivalent packages results in lower rock temperatures than borehole emplacement. For an emplacement scheme with 50% of the drift length occupied by packages, an AML of 138 MTU/acre is about three times higher than the Site Characterization Plan-Conceptual Design (SCP-CD) value. With this higher AML (requiring only 1/3 of the SCP-CD repository footprint), peak drift wall temperatures do not exceed 160{degrees}C, but rock temperatures exceed the boiling point of water for about 3000 years. These TOPAZ3D results have been compared with reasonable agreement with two other computer codes.

  10. Drift emplaced waste package thermal response

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffner, D.J.; Johnson, G.L.; Platt, E.A.; Blink, J.A.; Doering, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal calculations of the effects of radioactive waste decay heat on the I repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada have been conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in conjunction with the B&W Fuel Company. For a number of waste package spacings, these 3D transient calculations use the TOPAZ3D code to predict drift wall temperatures to 10,000 years following emplacement. Systematic tcniperature variation occurs as a function of fuel age at emplacement and Areal Mass Loading (AML) during the first few centuries after emplacement. After about 1000 years, emplacement age is not a strong driver on rock temperature; AML has a larger impact. High AMLs occur when large waste packages are emplaced end-tocnd in drifts. Drift emplacement of equivalent packages results in lower rock teniperatures than borehole emplacement. For an emplacement scheme with 50% of the drift length occupied by packages, an AML of 138 MTU/acre is about three times higher than the Site Characterization Plan-Conceptual Design (SCP-CD) value. With this higher AML (requiring only 1/3 of the SCP-CD repository footprint), peak drift wall temperatures do not exceed 160*C, but rock temperatures excetd the boiling point of water for about 3000 years. These TOPAZ3D results Iiive been compared with reasonable agreement with two other computer codes.

  11. The University of Alabama Teenage Access Project: a model for prevention, referrals, and linkages to testing for high-risk young women.

    PubMed

    Sturdevant, M S; Kohler, C L; Williams, L F; Johnson, J E

    1998-08-01

    The Teenage Access Project (TAP) was supported by the Special Projects of National Significance Program to expand and ensure access to health and support services for disadvantaged, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, and at-risk adolescent and young adult women aged 10-21 years by: (a) preventing further HIV transmission through empowerment and reduction of risk behavior, (b) providing HIV counseling and testing to increase screening of young women, and (c) facilitating referrals to medical and psychosocial services through the TAP activities. TAP served 403 young people (82% African-American and 83% young women). The basic elements of the TAP service model components were: (a) outreach to community agencies serving high-risk, disadvantaged young women; (b) My Individual Responsibility Reduces Our Risk (MIRROR), a six-module risk-reduction and empowerment activity specifically designed for young women in Jefferson County, using a small group format; and (c) the Adolescent Testing Center (ATC), a center for age and culturally appropriate HIV testing, pre- and posttest counseling, risk assessment, and referrals. HIV testing and pre- and posttest counseling were provided confidentially in both clinical and community settings. More than 200 participated in the MIRROR activity. A total of 101 young women received HIV counseling and testing services.

  12. EMPLACEMENT DRIFT INVERT-LOW STEEL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    M. E. Taylor and D. H. Tang

    2000-09-29

    This technical report evaluates and develops options for reducing the amount of steel in the emplacement drift invert. Concepts developed in the ''Invert Configuration and Drip Shield Interface'' were evaluated to determine material properties required for the proposed invert concepts. Project requirements documents prescribe the use of a carbon steel frame for the invert with a granular material of crushed tuff as ballast. The ''Invert Configuration and Drip Shield Interface'' developed three concepts: (1) All-Ballast Invert; (2) Modified Steel Invert with Ballast; and (3) Steel Tie with Ballast Invert. Analysis of the steel frame members, runway beams, and guide beams, for the modified steel invert with ballast, decreased the quantity of steel in the emplacement drift invert, however a substantial steel support frame for the gantry and waste package/pallet assembly is still required. Use of one of the other two concepts appears to be an alternative to the steel frame and each of the concepts uses considerably less steel materials. Analysis of the steel tie with ballast invert shows that the bearing pressure on the ballast under the single steel tie, C 9 x 20, loaded with the waste package/pallet assembly, drip shield, and backfill exceeds the upper bound of the allowable bearing capacity for tuff used in this study. The single tie, C 10 x 20, will also fail for the same loading condition except for the tie length of 4.2 meters and longer. Analysis also shows that with two ties, C 9 or 10 x 20's, the average ballast pressure is less than the allowable bearing capacity. Distributing the waste package/pallet, drip shield, and backfill loads to two steel ties reduces the contact bearing pressure. Modifying the emplacement pallet end beams to a greater width, reducing the tie spacing, and increasing the width of the ties would ensure that the pallet beams are always supported by two steel ties. Further analysis is required to determine compatible tie size and spacing

  13. HIV testing in community pharmacies and retail clinics: A model to expand access to screening for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Weidle, Paul J.; Lecher, Shirley; Botts, Linda W.; Jones, LaDawna; Spach, David H.; Alvarez, Jorge; Jones, Rhondette; Thomas, Vasavi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the feasibility of offering rapid, point-of-care human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing at community pharmacies and retail clinics. Design Pilot program to determine how to implement confidential HIV testing services in community pharmacies and retail clinics. Setting 21 community pharmacies and retail clinics serving urban and rural patients in the United States, from August 2011 to July 2013. Participants 106 community pharmacy and retail clinic staff members. Intervention A model was developed to implement confidential HIV counseling and testing services using community pharmacy and retail clinic staff as certified testing providers, or through collaborations with organizations that provide HIV testing. Training materials were developed and sites selected that serve patients from urban and rural areas to pilot test the model. Each site established a relationship with its local health department for HIV testing policies, developed referral lists for confirmatory HIV testing/care, secured a CLIA Certificate of Waiver, and advertised the service. Staff were trained to perform a rapid point-of-care HIV test on oral fluid, and provide patients with confidential test results and information on HIV. Patients with a preliminary positive result were referred to a physician or health department for confirmatory testing and, if needed, HIV clinical care. Main outcome measures Number of HIV tests completed and amount of time required to conduct testing. Results The 21 participating sites administered 1,540 HIV tests, with 1,087 conducted onsite by staff during regular working hours and 453 conducted at 37 different HIV testing events (e.g., local health fairs). The median amount of time required for pretest counseling/consent, waiting for test results, and posttest counseling was 4, 23, and 3 minutes, respectively. A majority of the sites (17) said they planned to continue HIV testing after the project period ended and would seek assistance or support

  14. Epigenetic drift, epigenetic clocks and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shijie C; Widschwendter, Martin; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    It is well-established that the DNA methylation landscape of normal cells undergoes a gradual modification with age, termed as 'epigenetic drift'. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of epigenetic drift and its potential role in cancer etiology. We propose a new terminology to help distinguish the different components of epigenetic drift, with the aim of clarifying the role of the epigenetic clock, mitotic clocks and active changes, which accumulate in response to environmental disease risk factors. We further highlight the growing evidence that epigenetic changes associated with cancer risk factors may play an important causal role in cancer development, and that monitoring these molecular changes in normal cells may offer novel risk prediction and disease prevention strategies.

  15. Epigenetic drift, epigenetic clocks and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shijie C; Widschwendter, Martin; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    It is well-established that the DNA methylation landscape of normal cells undergoes a gradual modification with age, termed as 'epigenetic drift'. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of epigenetic drift and its potential role in cancer etiology. We propose a new terminology to help distinguish the different components of epigenetic drift, with the aim of clarifying the role of the epigenetic clock, mitotic clocks and active changes, which accumulate in response to environmental disease risk factors. We further highlight the growing evidence that epigenetic changes associated with cancer risk factors may play an important causal role in cancer development, and that monitoring these molecular changes in normal cells may offer novel risk prediction and disease prevention strategies. PMID:27104983

  16. Health insurance for the poor decreases access to HIV testing in antenatal care: evidence of an unintended effect of health insurance reform in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ettenger, Allison; Bärnighausen, Till; Castro, Arachu

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV was added to standard antenatal care (ANC) in 2000 for Colombians enrolled in the two national health insurance schemes, the ‘subsidized regime’ (covering poor citizens) and the ‘contributory regime’ (covering salaried citizens with incomes above the poverty threshold), which jointly covered 80% of the total Colombian population as of 2007. This article examines integration of HIV testing in ANC through the relationship between ordering an HIV test with the type of health insurance, including lack of health insurance, using data from the nationally representative 2005 Colombia Demographic and Health Survey. Overall, health-care providers ordered an HIV test for only 35% of the women attending ANC. We regressed the order of an HIV test during ANC on health systems characteristics (type of insurance and type of ANC provider), women’s characteristics (age, wealth, educational attainment, month of pregnancy at first antenatal visit, HIV knowledge, urban vs. rural residence and sub-region of residence) and children’s characteristics (birth order and birth year). Women enrolled in the subsidized regime were significantly less likely to be offered and receive an HIV test in ANC than women without any health insurance (adjusted odds ratio = 0.820, P < 0.001), when controlling for the other independent variables. Wealth, urban residence, birth year of the child and the type of health-care provider seen during the ANC visit were significantly associated with providers ordering an HIV test for a woman (all P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that enrolment in the subsidized regime reduced access to HIV testing in ANC. Additional research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms through which the potential effect of health insurance coverage on HIV testing in ANC occurs and to examine whether enrolment in the subsidized regime has affected access to other essential health services. PMID:23598426

  17. Continental drift under the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Buffetaut, Eric

    2003-12-01

    Contrary to what happened in many other countries in the 1930s and 1940s, Alfred Wegener's theory of continental drift was not generally rejected in Nazi Germany, although several leading German geologists of the time did not accept it. It was actually presented as the modern view of Earth history in books and magazine articles aimed at the general public. Although outlandish geological theories such as Hörbiger's Welteislehre were favoured by some Nazi dignitaries, they were not widely accepted in scientific circles. On the other hand, continental drift received official support under the Third Reich, at a time when it was ignored or ridiculed by most earth scientists outside Germany.

  18. Do the pyramids show continental drift?

    PubMed

    Pawley, G S; Abrahamsen, N

    1973-03-01

    The mystery of the orientation of the Great Pyramids of Giza has remained unexplained for many decades. The general alignment is 4 minutes west of north. It is argued that this is not a builders' error but is caused by movement over the centuries. Modern theories of continental drift do not predict quite such large movements, but other causes of polar wandering give even smaller shifts. Thus, continental drift is the most likely explanation, although somewhat implausible, especially as relevant measurements have been made over a 50-year period, whereas geophysical measurements of sea-floor spreading relate to million-year time scales.

  19. Generalized Drift-Diffusion Model In Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, S.; Bendib-Kalache, K.; Bendib, A.

    2008-09-23

    A new drift-diffusion model is proposed based on the computation of the stationary nonlocal current density. The semi classical Boltzmann equation is solved keeping all the anisotropies of the distribution function with the use of the continued fractions. The conductivity is calculated in the linear approximation and for arbitrary collision frequency with respect to Kv{sub t} where K{sup -1} is the characteristic length scale of the system and V{sub t} is the thermal velocity. The nonlocal conductivity can be used to close the generalized drift-diffusion equations valid for arbitrary collisionality.

  20. Health care providers and direct-to-consumer access and advertising of genetic testing in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Marketing pressures, regulatory policies, clinical guidelines, and consumer demand all affect health care providers' knowledge and use of health-related genetic tests that are sold and/or advertised to consumers. In addition, clinical guidelines, regulatory policies, and educational efforts are needed to promote the informed use of genetic tests that are sold and advertised to consumers and health care providers. A shift in culture regarding the regulation of genetic tests that are sold directly to consumers is suggested: by recent actions taken by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including letters sent to direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies stating that their tests meet the definition of medical devices; by public meetings held by the FDA to discuss laboratory developed tests; and by the convening of the Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel to gather input on scientific issues concerning DTC genetic tests that make medical claims. This review provides a brief overview of DTC advertising and the regulation of pharmaceuticals and genetic tests in the United States. It highlights recent changes in the regulatory culture regarding genetic tests that are sold to consumers, and discusses the impact on health care providers of selling and advertising genetic tests directly to consumers. PMID:22204616

  1. Environmental assessment for the Area 5 radioactive waste management site access improvement at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment which analyzes the potential environmental effects of improving access to its AREA 5 RWMS at the NTS. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of constructing an extension of the Cane Springs Road between Mercury Highway and the 5-01 Road. Three alternative actions are also evaluated: (1) construction of a new road along the existing alignment of the Powerline Road between Mercury Highway and the 5-01 Road, (2) upgrading the existing 5-01 Road, and (3) taking no action. The purpose and need for improving access to the RWMS are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in Section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment and Section 4.0 the environmental effects of the proposed action and alternatives. Health and transportation effects, accident scenarios, cumulative effects, and other relevant information are found in Sections 5.0 through 12.0 of the EA. DOE determined that the alternative action of upgrading the existing 5-01 Road would best meet the needs of the agency.

  2. Small-scale lacustrine drifts in Lake Champlain, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manley, Patricia L.; Manley, T.O.; Hayo, Kathryn; Cronin, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High resolution CHIRP (Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse) seismic profiles reveal the presence of two lacustrine sediment drifts located in Lake Champlain's Juniper Deep. Both drifts are positive features composed of highly laminated sediments. Drift B sits on a basement high while Drift A is built on a trough-filling acoustically-transparent sediment unit inferred to be a mass-transport event. These drifts are oriented approximately north–south and are parallel to a steep ridge along the eastern shore of the basin. Drift A, located at the bottom of a structural trough, is classified as a confined, elongate drift that transitions northward to become a system of upslope asymmetric mudwaves. Drift B is perched atop a structural high to the west of Drift A and is classified as a detached elongate drift. Bottom current depositional control was investigated using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) located across Drift A. Sediment cores were taken at the crest and at the edges of the Drift A and were dated. Drift source, deposition, and evolution show that these drifts are formed by a water column shear with the highest deposition occurring along its crest and western flank and began developing circa 8700–8800 year BP.

  3. Use of a Terrestrial LIDAR Sensor for Drift Detection in Vineyard Spraying

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Emilio; Llorens, Jordi; Llop, Jordi; Fàbregas, Xavier; Gallart, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    The use of a scanning Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system to characterize drift during pesticide application is described. The LIDAR system is compared with an ad hoc test bench used to quantify the amount of spray liquid moving beyond the canopy. Two sprayers were used during the field test; a conventional mist blower at two air flow rates (27,507 and 34,959 m3·h−1) equipped with two different nozzle types (conventional and air injection) and a multi row sprayer with individually oriented air outlets. A simple model based on a linear function was used to predict spray deposit using LIDAR measurements and to compare with the deposits measured over the test bench. Results showed differences in the effectiveness of the LIDAR sensor depending on the sprayed droplet size (nozzle type) and air intensity. For conventional mist blower and low air flow rate; the sensor detects a greater number of drift drops obtaining a better correlation (r = 0.91; p < 0.01) than for the case of coarse droplets or high air flow rate. In the case of the multi row sprayer; drift deposition in the test bench was very poor. In general; the use of the LIDAR sensor presents an interesting and easy technique to establish the potential drift of a specific spray situation as an adequate alternative for the evaluation of drift potential. PMID:23282583

  4. Use of a terrestrial LIDAR sensor for drift detection in vineyard spraying.

    PubMed

    Gil, Emilio; Llorens, Jordi; Llop, Jordi; Fàbregas, Xavier; Gallart, Montserrat

    2013-01-02

    The use of a scanning Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system to characterize drift during pesticide application is described. The LIDAR system is compared with an ad hoc test bench used to quantify the amount of spray liquid moving beyond the canopy. Two sprayers were used during the field test; a conventional mist blower at two air flow rates (27,507 and 34,959 m3·h(-1)) equipped with two different nozzle types (conventional and air injection) and a multi row sprayer with individually oriented air outlets. A simple model based on a linear function was used to predict spray deposit using LIDAR measurements and to compare with the deposits measured over the test bench. Results showed differences in the effectiveness of the LIDAR sensor depending on the sprayed droplet size (nozzle type) and air intensity. For conventional mist blower and low air flow rate; the sensor detects a greater number of drift drops obtaining a better correlation (r = 0.91; p < 0.01) than for the case of coarse droplets or high air flow rate. In the case of the multi row sprayer; drift deposition in the test bench was very poor. In general; the use of the LIDAR sensor presents an interesting and easy technique to establish the potential drift of a specific spray situation as an adequate alternative for the evaluation of drift potential.

  5. Use of a terrestrial LIDAR sensor for drift detection in vineyard spraying.

    PubMed

    Gil, Emilio; Llorens, Jordi; Llop, Jordi; Fàbregas, Xavier; Gallart, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    The use of a scanning Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system to characterize drift during pesticide application is described. The LIDAR system is compared with an ad hoc test bench used to quantify the amount of spray liquid moving beyond the canopy. Two sprayers were used during the field test; a conventional mist blower at two air flow rates (27,507 and 34,959 m3·h(-1)) equipped with two different nozzle types (conventional and air injection) and a multi row sprayer with individually oriented air outlets. A simple model based on a linear function was used to predict spray deposit using LIDAR measurements and to compare with the deposits measured over the test bench. Results showed differences in the effectiveness of the LIDAR sensor depending on the sprayed droplet size (nozzle type) and air intensity. For conventional mist blower and low air flow rate; the sensor detects a greater number of drift drops obtaining a better correlation (r = 0.91; p < 0.01) than for the case of coarse droplets or high air flow rate. In the case of the multi row sprayer; drift deposition in the test bench was very poor. In general; the use of the LIDAR sensor presents an interesting and easy technique to establish the potential drift of a specific spray situation as an adequate alternative for the evaluation of drift potential. PMID:23282583

  6. Equivalent circuit for postcoupler stabilization in a drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grespan, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Postcouplers (PCs) are devices used in order to reduce the effect of perturbations on the operating mode of a drift tube linac (DTL), using the resonant coupling stabilization method. In this article an equivalent circuit for a DTL equipped with PCs is presented, together with a 3D simulation analysis, which can explain the principle of postcoupler stabilization and define a new tuning strategy for DTL cavities. The PC tuning procedure based on the equivalent circuit and on frequency measurements has been tested and validated with measurements on the Linac4 DTL aluminum model, present at CERN.

  7. Front-end electronics of the Belle II drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Shoichi; Taniguchi, Takashi; Uchida, Tomohisa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Nanae; Tanaka, Manobu M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the Belle II central drift chamber (CDC) front-end electronics. The front-end electronics consists of a current sensitive preamplifier, a 1/t cancellation circuit, baseline restorers, a comparator for timing measurement and an analog buffer for the dE/dx measurement on a CDC readout card. The CDC readout card is located on the endplate of the CDC. Mass production will be completed after the performance of the chip is verified. The electrical performance and results of a neutron/gamma-ray irradiation test are reported here.

  8. A Wavelet Packets Approach to Electrocardiograph Baseline Drift Cancellation

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffary, Behzad

    2006-01-01

    Baseline wander elimination is considered a classical problem. In electrocardiography (ECG) signals, baseline drift can influence the accurate diagnosis of heart disease such as ischemia and arrhythmia. We present a wavelet-transform- (WT-) based search algorithm using the energy of the signal in different scales to isolate baseline wander from the ECG signal. The algorithm computes wavelet packet coefficients and then in each scale the energy of the signal is calculated. Comparison is made and the branch of the wavelet binary tree corresponding to higher energy wavelet spaces is chosen. This algorithm is tested using the data record from MIT/BIH database and excellent results are obtained. PMID:23165064

  9. Detecting genetic drift versus selection in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Rebecca Rogers; Cheverud, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent paleoanthropological discoveries reveal a diverse, potentially speciose human fossil record. Such extensive morphological diversity results from the action of divergent evolutionary forces on an evolving lineage. Here, we apply quantitative evolutionary theory to test whether random evolutionary processes alone can explain the morphological diversity seen among fossil australopith and early Homo crania from the Plio–Pleistocene. We show that although selection may have played an important role in diversifying hominin facial morphology in the late Pliocene, this is not the case during the early evolution of the genus Homo, where genetic drift was probably the primary force responsible for facial diversification. PMID:15604148

  10. Accessibility Videos.

    PubMed

    Kurppa, Ari; Nordlund, Marika

    2016-01-01

    It can be difficult to understand accessibility, if you do not have the personal experience. The Accessibility Centre ESKE produced short videos which demonstrate the meaning of accessibility in different situations. Videos will raise accessibility awareness of architects, other planners and professionals in the construction field and maintenance. PMID:27534282

  11. Measurement of spatial distribution of total and accessible porosity in sedimentary rocks using isotopic radiation transmission: device design and testing.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Ranjit K; Hussein, Esam M A; Al, Tom A

    2010-03-01

    An isotopic radiation transmission technique for quantifying the spatial distribution of porosity in sedimentary rocks is presented. A device was designed and constructed to examine rock samples of volumes sufficiently large for studying solute migration in rocks, so that a one-millimeter spatial resolution is attained with measurement acquisition time of one point per second. The paper demonstrates how the device was optimized for these specifications, while abiding by the restrictions implicit in the utilization of the exponential law of radiation attenuation to quantify physical parameters. Total porosity was obtained from measurements of radiation attenuation in dry samples, while solute-accessible porosity was determined from measurements with samples saturated with either KNO(3) or KI solutions. Results are presented for three different rock types to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the technique.

  12. Electron plasma orbits from competing diocotron drifts.

    PubMed

    Hurst, N C; Danielson, J R; Baker, C J; Surko, C M

    2014-07-11

    The perpendicular dynamics of a pure electron plasma column are investigated when the plasma spans two Penning-Malmberg traps with noncoinciding axes. The plasma executes noncircular orbits described by competing image-charge electric-field (diocotron) drifts from the two traps. A simple model is presented that predicts a set of nested orbits in agreement with observed plasma trajectories.

  13. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  14. Drift waves in helically symmetric stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiq, T.; Hegna, C.

    2005-11-15

    The local linear stability of electron drift waves and ion temperature gradient modes (ITG) is investigated in a quasihelically symmetric (QHS) stellarator and a conventional asymmetric (Mirror) stellarator. The geometric details of the different equilibria are emphasized. Eigenvalue equations for the models are derived using the ballooning mode formalism and solved numerically using a standard shooting technique in a fully three-dimensional stellarator configuration. While the eigenfunctions have a similar shape in both magnetic geometries, they are slightly more localized along the field line in the QHS case. The most unstable electron drift modes are strongly localized at the symmetry points (where stellarator symmetry is present) and in the regions where normal curvature is unfavorable and magnitude of the local magnetic shear and magnetic field is minimum. The presence of a large positive local magnetic shear in the bad curvature region is found to be destabilizing. Electron drift modes are found to be more affected by the normal curvature than by the geodesic curvature. The threshold of stability of the ITG modes in terms of {eta}{sub i} is found to be 2/3 in this fluid model consistent with the smallest threshold for toroidal geometry with adiabatic electrons. Optimization to favorable drift wave stability has small field line curvature, short connection lengths, the proper combination of geodesic curvature and local magnetic shear, large values of local magnetic shear, and the compression of flux surfaces in the unfavorable curvature region.

  15. Stable discrete representation of relativistically drifting plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchen, M.; Lehe, R.; Godfrey, B. B.; Dornmair, I.; Jalas, S.; Peters, K.; Vay, J.-L.; Maier, A. R.

    2016-10-01

    Representing the electrodynamics of relativistically drifting particle ensembles in discrete, co-propagating Galilean coordinates enables the derivation of a Particle-In-Cell algorithm that is intrinsically free of the numerical Cherenkov instability for plasmas flowing at a uniform velocity. Application of the method is shown by modeling plasma accelerators in a Lorentz-transformed optimal frame of reference.

  16. Drift promotes speciation by sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, Josef C; Arnold, Stevan J; Hohenlohe, Paul A; Mead, Louise S

    2009-03-01

    Quantitative genetic models of sexual selection have generally failed to provide a direct connection to speciation and to explore the consequences of finite population size. The connection to speciation has been indirect because the models have treated only the evolution of male and female traits and have stopped short of modeling the evolution of sexual isolation. In this article we extend Lande's (1981) model of sexual selection to quantify predictions about the evolution of sexual isolation and speciation. Our results, based on computer simulations, support and extend Lande's claim that drift along a line of equilibria can rapidly lead to sexual isolation and speciation. Furthermore, we show that rapid speciation can occur by drift in populations of appreciable size (N(e) >or= 1000). These results are in sharp contrast to the opinion of many researchers and textbook writers who have argued that drift does not play an important role in speciation. We argue that drift may be a powerful amplifier of speciation under a wide variety of modeling assumptions, even when selection acts directly on female mating preferences.

  17. Aging effect in the BESIII drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ming-Yi; Xiu, Qing-Lei; Wu, Ling-Hui; Wu, Zhi; Qin, Zhong-Hua; Shen, Pin; An, Fen-Fen; Ju, Xu-Dong; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Kai; Qun, Ou-Yang; Chen, Yuan-Bo

    2016-01-01

    As the main tracking detector of BESIII, the drift chamber provides accurate measurements of the position and the momentum of the charged particles produced in e+e- collisions at BEPCII. After six years of operation, the drift chamber is suffering from aging problems due to huge beam-related background. The gains of the cells in the first ten layers show an obvious decrease, reaching a maximum decrease of about 29% for the first layer cells. Two calculation methods for the gain change (Bhabha events and accumulated charges with 0.3% aging ratio for inner chamber cells) give almost the same results. For the Malter effect encountered by the inner drift chamber in January 2012, about 0.2% water vapor was added to the MDC gas mixture to solve this cathode aging problem. These results provide an important reference for MDC operating high voltage settings and the upgrade of the inner drift chamber. Supported by the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  18. Drift Nets on the High Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Information is provided on the use and misuse of drift nets used internationally in the Pacific Ocean. An activity in which students acquire some understanding of the history of fishing and the effects of modern technologies on fish populations is included. (KR)

  19. Evaluation of spray drift using low speed wind tunnel measurements and dispersion modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the EPA’s proposed Test Plan for the validation testing of pesticide spray drift reduction technologies (DRTs) for row and field crops, focusing on the evaluation of ground application systems using the low-speed wind tunnel protocols and processing the dat...

  20. Preliminary geochemical and physical testing of materials for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.L.; Anttonen, G.J.; O'Rourke, J.E.; Allirot, D.

    1980-04-01

    The available data on environmental conditions (both natural and man-made) at the Hanford Site are sufficient for preconceptual plug system design. Results of the geochemical testing program indicate that preferred candidate plug materials are chemically nonreactive during laboratory tests that simulated some of the expected environmental conditions. Agitated, crushed-basalt samples and mixtures containing basalt were found to be self-cementing under the hydrothermal conditions. Materials considered most suitable for consideration in future test programs and preconceptual plug design are mixtures of natural materials (basalt, clay, glaciofluvial sand, gravel, and zeolite) and processed natural materials (portland cement Type V and grouts plus additives).

  1. Simulation of BaBar Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Rachel; /Wisconsin U., Eau Claire /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    The BaBar drift chamber (DCH) is used to measure the properties of charged particles created from e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions in the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage rings by making precise measurements of position, momentum and ionization energy loss (dE/dx). In October of 2005, the PEP-II storage rings operated with a luminosity of 10 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}; the goal for 2007 is a luminosity of 20 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, which will increase the readout dead time, causing uncertainty in drift chamber measurements to become more significant in physics results. The research described in this paper aims to reduce position and dE/dx uncertainties by improving our understanding of the BaBar drift chamber performance. A simulation program--called GARFIELD--is used to model the behavior of the drift chamber with adjustable parameters such as gas mixture, wire diameter, voltage, and magnetic field. By exploring the simulation options offered in GARFIELD, we successfully produced a simulation model of the BaBar drift chamber. We compared the time-to-distance calibration from BaBar to that calculated by GARFIELD to validate our model as well as check for discrepancies between the simulated and calibrated time-to-distance functions, and found that for a 0{sup o} entrance angle there is a very good match between calibrations, but at an entrance angle of 90{sup o} the calibration breaks down. Using this model, we also systematically varied the gas mixture to find one that would optimize chamber operation, which showed that the gas mixture of 80:20 Helium:isobutane is a good operating point, though more calculations need to be done to confirm that it is the optimal mixture.

  2. Qualitative Assessment of Barriers and Facilitators of Access to HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Sun, Xiaoyun; Qian, Han-Zhu; Yin, Lu; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Lijuan; Jiang, Shulin; Lu, Hongyan; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming; Vermund, Sten H; Amico, K Rivet

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis of HIV is the entry point into the continuum of HIV care; a well-recognized necessary condition for the ultimate prevention of onward transmission. In China, HIV testing rates among men who have sex with men (MSM) are low compared to other high risk subgroups, yet experiences with HIV testing among MSM in China are not well understood. To address this gap and prepare for intervention development to promote HIV testing and rapid linkage to treatment, six focus groups (FGs) were conducted with MSM in Beijing (40 HIV-positive MSM participated in one of four FGs and 20 HIV-negative or status unknown MSM participated in one of two FGs). Major themes reported as challenges to HIV testing included stigma and discrimination related to HIV and homosexuality, limited HIV knowledge, inconvenient clinic times, not knowing where to get a free test, fear of positive diagnosis or nosocomial infection, perceived low service quality, and concerns/doubts about HIV services. Key facilitators included compensation, peer support, professionalism, comfortable testing locations, rapid testing, referral and support after diagnosis, heightened sense of risk through engagement in high-risk behaviors, sense of responsibility to protect self, family and partner support, and publicity via social media. Themes and recommendations were generally consistent across HIV-positive and negative/status unknown groups, although examples of enacted stigma were more prevalent in the HIV-positive groups. Findings from our study provide policy suggestions for how to bolster current HIV prevention intervention efforts to enhance 'test-and-treat' strategies for Chinese MSM. PMID:26186029

  3. Qualitative Assessment of Barriers and Facilitators of Access to HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Sun, Xiaoyun; Yin, Lu; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Lijuan; Jiang, Shulin; Lu, Hongyan; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming; Vermund, Sten H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diagnosis of HIV is the entry point into the continuum of HIV care; a well-recognized necessary condition for the ultimate prevention of onward transmission. In China, HIV testing rates among men who have sex with men (MSM) are low compared to other high risk subgroups, yet experiences with HIV testing among MSM in China are not well understood. To address this gap and prepare for intervention development to promote HIV testing and rapid linkage to treatment, six focus groups (FGs) were conducted with MSM in Beijing (40 HIV-positive MSM participated in one of four FGs and 20 HIV-negative or status unknown MSM participated in one of two FGs). Major themes reported as challenges to HIV testing included stigma and discrimination related to HIV and homosexuality, limited HIV knowledge, inconvenient clinic times, not knowing where to get a free test, fear of positive diagnosis or nosocomial infection, perceived low service quality, and concerns/doubts about HIV services. Key facilitators included compensation, peer support, professionalism, comfortable testing locations, rapid testing, referral and support after diagnosis, heightened sense of risk through engagement in high-risk behaviors, sense of responsibility to protect self, family and partner support, and publicity via social media. Themes and recommendations were generally consistent across HIV-positive and negative/status unknown groups, although examples of enacted stigma were more prevalent in the HIV-positive groups. Findings from our study provide policy suggestions for how to bolster current HIV prevention intervention efforts to enhance ‘test-and-treat’ strategies for Chinese MSM. PMID:26186029

  4. Qualitative Assessment of Barriers and Facilitators of Access to HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Sun, Xiaoyun; Qian, Han-Zhu; Yin, Lu; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Lijuan; Jiang, Shulin; Lu, Hongyan; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming; Vermund, Sten H; Amico, K Rivet

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis of HIV is the entry point into the continuum of HIV care; a well-recognized necessary condition for the ultimate prevention of onward transmission. In China, HIV testing rates among men who have sex with men (MSM) are low compared to other high risk subgroups, yet experiences with HIV testing among MSM in China are not well understood. To address this gap and prepare for intervention development to promote HIV testing and rapid linkage to treatment, six focus groups (FGs) were conducted with MSM in Beijing (40 HIV-positive MSM participated in one of four FGs and 20 HIV-negative or status unknown MSM participated in one of two FGs). Major themes reported as challenges to HIV testing included stigma and discrimination related to HIV and homosexuality, limited HIV knowledge, inconvenient clinic times, not knowing where to get a free test, fear of positive diagnosis or nosocomial infection, perceived low service quality, and concerns/doubts about HIV services. Key facilitators included compensation, peer support, professionalism, comfortable testing locations, rapid testing, referral and support after diagnosis, heightened sense of risk through engagement in high-risk behaviors, sense of responsibility to protect self, family and partner support, and publicity via social media. Themes and recommendations were generally consistent across HIV-positive and negative/status unknown groups, although examples of enacted stigma were more prevalent in the HIV-positive groups. Findings from our study provide policy suggestions for how to bolster current HIV prevention intervention efforts to enhance 'test-and-treat' strategies for Chinese MSM.

  5. Ion acoustic solitons in a plasma with finite temperature drifting ions: Limit on ion drift velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, H.K.; Singh, S.; Dahiya, R.P. )

    1994-05-01

    Propagation of ion acoustic solitons in a plasma consisting of finite temperature drifting ions and nondrifting electrons has been studied. It is shown that in addition to the electron inertia and weak relativistic effects, the ion temperature also modifies the soliton behavior. By including the finite ion temperature, limit for the ion drift velocity [ital u][sub 0] for which the ion acoustic solitons are possible, is obtained. The solitons can exist for [ital v][sub [ital Te

  6. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Skeehan, Katie; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) includes genotyping for apolipoprotein E, for late-onset AD, and three rare autosomal dominant, early-onset forms of AD associated with different genes (APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2). According to researchers, patents have not impeded research in the field, nor were patents an important consideration in the quest for the genetic risk factors. Athena Diagnostics holds exclusive licenses from Duke University for three “method” patents covering APOE genetic testing. Athena offers tests for APOE and genes associated with early onset, autosomal dominant AD. One of those presenilin genes is patented and exclusively licensed to Athena; the other presenilin gene was patented but the patent was allowed to lapse; and one (APP) is patented only as a research tool and patent claims do not cover diagnostic use. Direct-to-consumer testing is available for some AD-related genes, apparently without a license. Athena Diagnostics consolidated its position in the market for AD genetic testing by collecting exclusive rights to patents arising from university research. Duke University also used its licenses to Athena to enforce adherence to clinical guidelines, including elimination of the service from Smart Genetics, which was offering direct-to-consumer risk assessment based on APOE genotyping. PMID:20393312

  7. The Effects of Clock Drift on the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Khaled S.; Vanelli, C. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    All clocks drift by some amount, and the mission clock on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is no exception. The mission clock on both MER rovers drifted significantly since the rovers were launched, and it is still drifting on the Opportunity rover. The drift rate is temperature dependent. Clock drift causes problems for onboard behaviors and spacecraft operations, such as attitude estimation, driving, operation of the robotic arm, pointing for imaging, power analysis, and telecom analysis. The MER operations team has techniques to deal with some of these problems. There are a few techniques for reducing and eliminating the clock drift, but each has drawbacks. This paper presents an explanation of what is meant by clock drift on the rovers, its relationship to temperature, how we measure it, what problems it causes, how we deal with those problems, and techniques for reducing the drift.

  8. Exploring Genetic Drift and Natural Selection through a Simulation Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maret, Timothy J.; Rissing, Steven W.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on the development of a laboratory exercise that would allow students to explore the concept of genetic drift. Discusses the concept of genetic drift that is coincident with natural selection and that closely models the real world. (DDR)

  9. Finding Oxygen Reservoir by Using Extremely Small Test Cell Structure for Resistive Random Access Memory with Replaceable Bottom Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Kentaro; Koh, Sang-Gyu; Moriyama, Takumi; Kishida, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Although the presence of an oxygen reservoir (OR) is assumed in many models that explain resistive switching of resistive random access memory (ReRAM) with electrode/metal oxide (MO)/electrode structures, the location of OR is not clear. We have previously reported a method, which involved the use of an AFM cantilever, for preparing an extremely small ReRAM cell that has a removable bottom electrode (BE). In this study, we used this cell structure to specify the location of OR. Because an anode is often assumed to work as OR, we investigated the effect of changing anodes without changing the MO layer and the cathode on the occurrence of reset. It was found that the reset occurred independently of the catalytic ability and Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of the anode. Our proposed structure enabled to determine that the reset was caused by repairing oxygen vacancies of which a filament consists due to the migration of oxygen ions from the surrounding area when high ΔG anode metal is used, whereas by oxidizing the anode due to the migration of oxygen ions from the MO layer when low ΔG anode metal is used, suggesting the location of OR depends on ΔG of the anode. PMID:26689682

  10. Evaluating Public Access On-Line Catalogs. Phase I: Development and Testing of Data Collection and Analysis Tools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    This report outlines specifications for the online transaction monitoring and questionnaire administration features of the University of California's (UC) Prototype On-Line Catalog, known as MELVYL. The development and testing of these features by the UC Division of Library Automation (DLA) is also described. This document is the final report…

  11. Wind tunnel evaluation of several tracer and collection techniques for the measurement of spray drift.

    PubMed

    Brusselman, E; Van Driessen, K; Steurbaut, W; Gabriels, D; Cornelis, W; Nuyttens, D; Sonck, B; Baetens, K; Nicolai, B; Verboven, P; Ramon, H

    2004-01-01

    In the history of pesticide drift measuring techniques, different tracers and a lot of different collection techniques have been used. At the start of a new Flemish project 'Protecting the Flemish environment against drift - The importance of drift-reducing techniques', wind tunnel tests have been executed to select the most efficient tracer and collection technique. As tracer types a fluorescent tracer Renaissance W15, 2 different chelates, a NaCl-solution and a fungicide Tolylfluanide were used. 2 different collection techniques were tested: drains incorporated in the wind tunnel floor filled with filter paper and filled with cloths. The recovery of the different tracers combined with the 2 collection materials was calculated. The advantages and disadvantages of the tracers and collection materials are enumerated in this article. PMID:15756877

  12. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, David H.

    2001-05-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4) Evaluate factors

  13. Ensuring Wire Alignment for the New COMPASS Drift Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromis, Megan; Compass Dc5 Team

    2014-09-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at CERN investigating the internal structure of the proton. Polarized Drell-Yan measurements at COMPASS will explore how the quark orbital angular momentum contributes to the spin of the proton. To enable this measurement, several straw tube chambers need to be replaced due to long term wear. One of the replacement chambers, drift chamber DC5, is being built at Old Dominion University based on a prototype from UIUC and existing COMPASS drift chambers. DC5 consists of 4 wire planes with 513 wires (256 [20 μm] sense wires and 257 [100 μm] field wires alternating) and 4 wire planes at a 10 degree offset with 641 wires each. Each of these 4616 wires need to be aligned within either 100 μm (sense wire) or 200 μm (field wire) of the center of the solder pad to ensure the accuracy of the drift chamber. Problems that arose during stringing include initial alignment of the wire and efficient soldering techniques. Also, because the field wires charged at -1750 volts will be 4 mm from the sense wires, there should be no gaps or points in the solder to prevent arcing. This poster will discuss the alignment techniques, soldering methods, testing, and repair process for the wires. COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at CERN investigating the internal structure of the proton. Polarized Drell-Yan measurements at COMPASS will explore how the quark orbital angular momentum contributes to the spin of the proton. To enable this measurement, several straw tube chambers need to be replaced due to long term wear. One of the replacement chambers, drift chamber DC5, is being built at Old Dominion University based on a prototype from UIUC and existing COMPASS drift chambers. DC5 consists of 4 wire planes with 513 wires (256 [20 μm] sense wires and 257 [100 μm] field wires alternating) and 4 wire planes at a 10 degree offset with 641 wires each. Each of these 4616 wires need to be aligned within either 100 μm (sense wire) or 200 μm (field wire

  14. A vertex drift chamber for the VENUS detector at TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Hayashi, K.; Ishihara, N.; Nakamura, S.; Ohama, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Hinode, F.; Narita, Y.; Oyama, T.; Utsumi, M.; Yabuki, F.; Hemmi, Y.; Kurashige, H.; Miyake, K.; Okamoto, A.; Daigo, M.; Tamura, N.

    1993-06-01

    A high-precision drift chamber has been constructed in order to add vertex information to the VENUS detector at the TRISTAN e+e- collider. It is a jet-type drift chamber comprising 12 tilted drift sectors filled with pressurized slow gas. The structure and initial performance are described.

  15. Age of marginal Wisconsin drift at corry, northwestern Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Droste, J.B.; Rubin, M.; White, G.W.

    1959-01-01

    Marl began to accumulate about 14,000 years ago, as determined by radiocarbon dating, in a pond in a kettle hole in Kent drift at Corry, Pa., 9 miles inside the Wisconsin drift margin. This radiocarbon age represents the minimum time since the disappearance of the ice from Corry and confirms an assignment of Cary age to the drift.

  16. 40 CFR 158.1100 - Spray drift data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Spray drift data requirements table... following table lists the data requirements that pertain to spray drift. The table notes are shown in paragraph (e) of this section. Table—Spray Drift Data Requirements Guideline Number Data Requirement...

  17. 40 CFR 158.1100 - Spray drift data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Spray drift data requirements table... following table lists the data requirements that pertain to spray drift. The table notes are shown in paragraph (e) of this section. Table—Spray Drift Data Requirements Guideline Number Data Requirement...

  18. 40 CFR 158.1100 - Spray drift data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Spray drift data requirements table... following table lists the data requirements that pertain to spray drift. The table notes are shown in paragraph (e) of this section. Table—Spray Drift Data Requirements Guideline Number Data Requirement...

  19. 40 CFR 158.1100 - Spray drift data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Spray drift data requirements table... following table lists the data requirements that pertain to spray drift. The table notes are shown in paragraph (e) of this section. Table—Spray Drift Data Requirements Guideline Number Data Requirement...

  20. Source mechanism of Saturn drifting bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenschuss, U.; Schippers, P.; Leisner, J. S.; Fischer, G.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Faden, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Saturn drifting bursts (SDBs) are a new class of Kronian radio emission detected by the Cassini spacecraft in the lower kHz frequency range (< 50 kHz). Their bursty nature and slow drift in the time-frequency spectrogram clearly distinguish them from other types of radio emissions which are observed around Saturn. A statistical analysis of more than 5 years of data (mid 2004 - 2010) constrains source regions to the middle magnetosphere (6 - 15 Rs; 1 Rs = 60268 km). For this region, we show observational evidence of mode conversion, i.e. a conversion from electrostatic upper hybrid resonance oscillations to the electromagnetic O-mode and/or Z-mode. Mode conversion is suggested to be the source for SDBs. Furthermore, the special beaming pattern of the radiation is investigated with ray-tracing studies in the frame of the cold plasma theory.

  1. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, J.H.

    1996-11-26

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

  2. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    PubMed Central

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals. PMID:25354545

  3. Electromagnetic nonlinear gyrokinetics with polarization drift

    SciTech Connect

    Duthoit, F.-X.; Hahm, T. S.; Wang, Lu

    2014-08-15

    A set of new nonlinear electromagnetic gyrokinetic Vlasov equation with polarization drift and gyrokinetic Maxwell equations is systematically derived by using the Lie-transform perturbation method in toroidal geometry. For the first time, we recover the drift-kinetic expression for parallel acceleration [R. M. Kulsrud, in Basic Plasma Physics, edited by A. A. Galeev and R. N. Sudan (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1983)] from the nonlinear gyrokinetic equations, thereby bridging a gap between the two formulations. This formalism should be useful in addressing nonlinear ion Compton scattering of intermediate-mode-number toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes for which the polarization current nonlinearity [T. S. Hahm and L. Chen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 266 (1995)] and the usual finite Larmor radius effects should compete.

  4. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ing-Shin [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W [Bethel, CT; Welch, James [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  5. Longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, David

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials (CRWMS M and O 1999a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M and O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M and O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (CRWMS M and O 1999b), and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials.

  6. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-10-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals.

  7. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the .pi.-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is .beta..lambda., where .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a .pi./2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range.

  8. Bottle appeal drifts across the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebbesmeyer, Curtis; Ingraham, W. James, Jr.; McKinnon, Richard; Okubo, Akira; Wang, Dong-Ping; Strickland, Richard; Willing, Peter

    Pacific drift currents were used by a group of oceanographers to estimate the path of a drift bottle that was found on a beach of Barkley Sound in Vancouver Island by Richard Strickland on June 10, 1990. The Chinese rice wine bottle, which remained unopened until December 18, 1991, contained six leaflets, one appealing for the release of China's well-known dissident, Wei Jingsheng. The bottle was one of thousands set adrift as part of a propaganda effort from the islands of Quemoy and Matsu off mainland China shortly after Wei was sentenced in 1979 to 15 years in prison (see Figure 1 for locations). Wei was in poor health and still in prison when the bottle made its way across the Pacific Ocean.

  9. An economical solution to cooling tower drift

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, G.C.; Lamkin, V.K.; Seich, M.

    1987-01-01

    Most processes one encounters in the refining and petrochemical industries require the rejection of waste heat. The most economical and effective means of accomplishing this is through the use of cooling towers. Heat is transferred by convection and evaporation (mass transfer) by the direct contact of the atmospheric air and water. This results in a major environmental concern of cooling towers - DRIFT, which is discussed in this paper.

  10. Inertial Orientation Trackers with Drift Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foxlin, Eric M.

    2008-01-01

    A class of inertial-sensor systems with drift compensation has been invented for use in measuring the orientations of human heads (and perhaps other, similarly sized objects). These systems can be designed to overcome some of the limitations of prior orientation-measuring systems that are based, variously, on magnetic, optical, mechanical-linkage, and acoustical principles. The orientation signals generated by the systems of this invention could be used for diverse purposes, including controlling head-orientation-dependent virtual reality visual displays or enabling persons whose limbs are paralyzed to control machinery by means of head motions. The inventive concept admits to variations too numerous to describe here, making it necessary to limit this description to a typical system, the selected aspects of which are illustrated in the figure. A set of sensors is mounted on a bracket on a band or a cap that gently but firmly grips the wearer s head to be tracked. Among the sensors are three drift-sensitive rotationrate sensors (e.g., integrated-circuit angular- rate-measuring gyroscopes), which put out DC voltages nominally proportional to the rates of rotation about their sensory axes. These sensors are mounted in mutually orthogonal orientations for measuring rates of rotation about the roll, pitch, and yaw axes of the wearer s head. The outputs of these rate sensors are conditioned and digitized, and the resulting data are fed to an integrator module implemented in software in a digital computer. In the integrator module, the angular-rate signals are jointly integrated by any of several established methods to obtain a set of angles that represent approximately the orientation of the head in an external, inertial coordinate system. Because some drift is always present as a component of an angular position computed by integrating the outputs of angular-rate sensors, the orientation signal is processed further in a drift-compensator software module.

  11. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR EMPLACEMENT DRIFT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) emplacement drift system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Preclosure Safety and Systems Engineering Section. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 2000). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 2000).

  12. Oceanic sediment volumes and continental drift.

    PubMed

    Gilluly, J

    1969-11-21

    The volume of sediment off the Atlantic Coast of the United States is at least six times as great as that off the Pacific Coast. This disparity is readily accounted for if the continent is drifting westward and has overrun large volumes of sediment on a former Benioff zone. Such an overrunning is also consonant with many features of the geology of the western United States.

  13. Drift Wave Simulations with Reduced Stellarator Equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    1999-12-10

    A three-field model to study drift-resistive, low-frequency waves in low-beta, non-axisymmetric plasmas [J.L.V. Lewandowski, Phys. Plasmas, 4 (11) 4023 (1997)] is used to analyze the effect of the inhomogeneities in the stellarator magnetic field on the fastest (linear) growth rate, gamma. Extensive numerical calculations for a toroidal heliac show that not all Fourier components in the representation of the equilibrium configuration are important as far as gamma is concerned.

  14. Global Characteristics of Drift Magnetopause Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Spence, H. E.; Singer, H. J.; Friedel, R. H.; Larsen, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    The flux level of radiation belt electrons is maintained by a competition of multiple source and loss processes occurring within the magnetosphere and driven both by the solar wind and internal processes. While most of the research community's attention has focused on understanding electron flux enhancements, data from the geosynchronous regions have uncovered many unexplained rapid flux decreases. One possible mechanism for these flux dropouts is the drift loss of electrons to the magnetopause boundary. Using magnetospheric configurations predicted by the Tsyganenko model, we found that 80% of geosynchronous flux dropouts are on open drift paths, a signature of magnetopause shadowing. In one magnetopause-shadowing event, six geosynchronous satellites (GOES and LANL), spanning a wide range of local times, observed relativistic electron dropouts within a several hour interval. The time sequence of the magnetopause-shadowing signature at each geosynchronous satellite explained the local-time dependence of dropout onsets observed by Onsager et al. [2002]. Understanding the drift magnetopause loss on a global scale is essential for further quantifying the total electron loss through the magnetopause. Therefore, we will use multi-spacecraft measurements beyond geosynchronous orbit to characterize and quantify the variability of the outer electron belt in concert with magnetopause position. We then analyze the electron dropout onsets at different L shells to estimate the inward radial transport rate of the drift magnetopause loss. Finally, the upcoming Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide exceptional data for a better understanding of this major loss mechanism even when the satellites are well inside the magnetopause location.

  15. A future for drifting seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, F. J.; Nolet, G.; Babcock, J.

    2007-12-01

    One-dimensional, radial Earth models are sufficiently well constrained to accurately locate earthquakes and calculate the paths followed by seismic rays. The differences between observations and theoretical predictions of seismograms in such Earth models can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional wave speed distribution in the regions sampled by the seismic waves, by the technique of seismic tomography. Caused by thermal, compositional, and textural variations, wave speed anomalies remain the premier data source to fully understand the structure and evolution of our planet, from the scale of mantle convection and the mechanisms of heat transfer from core to surface to the international between the deep Earth and surface processes such as plate motion and crustal deformation. Unequal geographical data coverage continues to fundamentally limit the quality of tomographic reconstructions of seismic wave speeds in the interior of the Earth. Only at great cost can geophysicists overcome the difficulties of placing seismographs on the two thirds of the Earth's surface that is covered by oceans. The lack of spatial data coverage strongly hampers the determination of the structure of the Earth in the uncovered regions: all 3-D Earth models are marked by blank spots in areas, distributed throughout the Earth, where little or no information can be obtained. As a possible solution to gaining equal geographic data coverage, we have developed MERMAID, a prototype mobile receiver that could provide an easy, cost-effective way to collect seismic data in the ocean. It is a modification of the robotic floating instruments designed and used by oceanographers. Like them, MERMAID spends its life at depth but is capable of surfacing using a pump and bladder. We have equipped it with a hydrophone to record water pressure variations induced by compressional (P) waves. Untethered and passively drifting, such a floating seismometer will surface upon detection of a "useful" seismic

  16. Wind tunnel observations of drifting snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterna, Enrico; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drifting snow has a significant impact on snow redistribution in mountains, prairies as well as on glaciers, ice shelves, and sea ice. In all these environments, the local mass balance is highly influenced by drifting snow. Understanding the dynamic of snow saltation is crucial to the accurate description of the process. We applied digital shadowgraphy in a cold wind tunnel to measure drifting snow over natural snow covers. The acquisition and evaluation of time-resolved shadowgraphy images allowed us to resolve a large part of the saltation layer. The technique has been successfully compared to the measurements obtained from a Snow Particle Counter, considered the most robust technique for snow mass-flux measurements so far. The streamwise snow transport is dominated by large-scale events. The vertical snow transport has a more equal distribution of energy across the scales, similarly to what is observed for the flow turbulence velocities. It is hypothesized that the vertical snow transport is a quantity that reflects the local entrainment of the snow crystals into the saltation layer while the streamwise snow transport results from the streamwise development of the trajectories of the snow particles once entrained, and therefore is rather a non-local quantity.

  17. Giving cosmic redshift drift a whirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Alex G.; Linder, Eric V.; Edelstein, Jerry; Erskine, David

    2015-03-01

    Redshift drift provides a direct kinematic measurement of cosmic acceleration but it occurs with a characteristic time scale of a Hubble time. Thus redshift observations with a challenging precision of 10-9 require a 10 year time span to obtain a signal-to-noise of 1. We discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to address this challenge, potentially requiring less observer time and having greater immunity to common systematics. On the theoretical side we explore allowing the universe, rather than the observer, to provide long time spans; speculative methods include radial baryon acoustic oscillations, cosmic pulsars, and strongly lensed quasars. On the experimental side, we explore beating down the redshift precision using differential interferometric techniques, including externally dispersed interferometers and spatial heterodyne spectroscopy. Low-redshift emission line galaxies are identified as having high cosmology leverage and systematics control, with an 8 h exposure on a 10-m telescope (1000 h of exposure on a 40-m telescope) potentially capable of measuring the redshift of a galaxy to a precision of 10-8 (few ×10-10). Low-redshift redshift drift also has very strong complementarity with cosmic microwave background measurements, with the combination achieving a dark energy figure of merit of nearly 300 (1400) for 5% (1%) precision on drift.

  18. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    SciTech Connect

    D. Tang

    2000-01-07

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M&O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used.

  19. Causal Drift, Robust Signaling, and Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The phenotype of many regulatory circuits in which mutations can cause complex, polygenic diseases is to some extent robust to DNA mutations that affect circuit components. Here I demonstrate how such mutational robustness can prevent the discovery of genetic disease determinants. To make my case, I use a mathematical model of the insulin signaling pathway implicated in type 2 diabetes, whose signaling output is governed by 15 genetically determined parameters. Using multiple complementary measures of a parameter’s importance for this phenotype, I show that any one disease determinant that is crucial in one genetic background will be virtually irrelevant in other backgrounds. In an evolving population that drifts through the parameter space of this or other robust circuits through DNA mutations, the genetic changes that can cause disease will vary randomly over time. I call this phenomenon causal drift. It means that mutations causing disease in one (human or non-human) population may have no effect in another population, and vice versa. Causal drift casts doubt on our ability to infer the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases from non-human model organisms. PMID:25774510

  20. Concept of a solid-state drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, E.; Rehak, P.

    1983-03-01

    The operation of a solid state drift chamber is described, and its use in a high rate, high multiplicity environment is discussed. The Solid State Drift Chamber (SSDCH) is a thin wafer of a high purity n-type silicon (few cm/sup 2/ x a few hundreds ..mu..m thick) with a single small-area, small-capacitance anode readout. The drift voltage is supplied to an array of drift electrodes on both sides of the wafer to produce a uniform drift field parallel to the surface of the wafer and to ensure the complete depletion of the wafer. (WHK)

  1. Edge magnetoplasmons in graphene: determination of carrier drift velocity in Quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Ivana; Williams, F. I. B.; Bennaceur, Keyan; Portier, Fabien; Roche, Patrice; Glattli, D. C.

    2013-03-01

    Edge Magneto-Plasmons (EMP) are gapless quasi 1D elementary excitations which are split off from the bulk magneto-plasmon modes by the sample boundary, and are a tool of choice to investigate the structure of the edge of a 2D electron gas. We give a first experimental demonstration of their presence in graphene in the quantum Hall regime and use our results to evaluate the carrier drift velocity along the edge. The group velocity of these modes is a sum of the Hall conductivity contribution and the carrier drift velocity at the edge. In graphene, due to its particular dynamics and an abrupt edge, the drift velocity is expected to be of the order of the Fermi velocity, thus becoming experimentally accessible. We show EMP to exist by timing the travel of narrow wave-packets on picosecond time scales around exfoliated samples. They show chiral propagation with low attenuation at a velocity which is quantized on Hall plateaus. We extract the carrier drift contribution and find it to be slightly less than the Fermi velocity, as expected for an abrupt edge. We also extract the spatial spread of edge accumulated charge and find it to be narrower than for soft edge systems. We acknowledge ERC Grant # 228273 and RTRA ``Gamet'' Grant.

  2. Gas analyzer's drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Tabar, Ibai; Eclache, Jean P.; Aramendi, José F.; Gorostiaga, Esteban M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2) and carbon dioxide (FCO2) of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001) in FO2 and FCO2 of −0.18% and −0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptakevalues were 5–6% lower (P < 0.001) whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8–9% higher (P < 0.001). The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 min of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise. PMID:26578980

  3. Effects of Natural Drift Degradation on In-Drift Moisture Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manepally, C.; Fedors, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the complex thermohydrological processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is essential for assessing the long-term performance of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. This task is challenging as a result of the heterogeneity of the natural system, interactions between the engineered and natural systems, the unsaturated conditions at the repository horizon, and the potential for natural drift degradation in a thermally perturbed environment. Modeling in-drift thermohydrological processes to predict the temperature and relative humidity in the potential emplacement drift and in the near-field environment is vital to determine the composition of pore water that may contact the waste package and to evaluate the potential for corrosion of waste packages. Detailed process models will serve as a basis to model abstractions used in performance assessment. Degradation of the host rock may lead to rubble covering the engineered components in portions of the repository, which will markedly change in-drift thermohydrologic conditions. This poster presents a two-dimensional detailed process model that incorporates the temporal variation of in-drift and drift wall geometry as a result of drift degradation. At early times of the postclosure period, the heat generated by emplaced waste induces water vapor transport away from the drift, creating a dryout zone and redistributing pore fluids within a potentially large volume of host rock. At later times, after the thermal pulse has substantially dissipated, the thermohydrological conditions in the rubble strongly influence the amount of water that could contact the waste and contribute to the source release and in-drift transport of radionuclides. Moisture distribution in the rubble pile is dependent on its hydrologic properties, such as porosity and permeability, and the possible capillary barrier between the intact host rock and rubble. The hydrologic properties of the rubble are difficult to estimate

  4. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2001-01-10

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), an analysis of the effects of salts and precipitates on the repository chemical environment is to be developed and documented in an Analyses/Model Report (AMR). The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The purpose of this ICN is to qualify and document qualification of the AMR's technical products. The scope of this document is to develop a model of the processes that govern salt precipitation and dissolution and resulting water composition in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). This model is developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical modeling work performed by PAO and is to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. However, the concepts may also apply to some near and far field geochemical processes and can have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone and saturated zone transport modeling efforts. The intended use of the model developed in this report is to estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the pH, chloride concentration, and ionic strength of water on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the post-closure period. These estimates are based on evaporative processes that are subject to a broad range of potential environmental conditions and are independent of the presence or absence of backfill. An additional intended use is to estimate the environmental conditions required for complete vaporization of water. The presence and composition of liquid water in

  5. Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes

    SciTech Connect

    N.D. Francis; D. Sassani

    2000-03-31

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes an abstraction, for the performance assessment total system model, of the near-field host rock water chemistry and gas-phase composition. It also provides an abstracted process model analysis of potentially important differences in the thermal hydrologic (TH) variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository obtained from models that include fully coupled reactive transport with thermal hydrology and those that include thermal hydrology alone. Specifically, the motivation of the process-level model comparison between fully coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) and thermal-hydrologic-only (TH-only) is to provide the necessary justification as to why the in-drift thermodynamic environment and the near-field host rock percolation flux, the essential TH variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository, can be obtained using a TH-only model and applied directly into a TSPA abstraction without recourse to a fully coupled reactive transport model. Abstraction as used in the context of this AMR refers to an extraction of essential data or information from the process-level model. The abstraction analysis reproduces and bounds the results of the underlying detailed process-level model. The primary purpose of this AMR is to abstract the results of the fully-coupled, THC model (CRWMS M&O 2000a) for effects on water and gas-phase composition adjacent to the drift wall (in the near-field host rock). It is assumed that drift wall fracture water and gas compositions may enter the emplacement drift before, during, and after the heating period. The heating period includes both the preclosure, in which the repository drifts are ventilated, and the postclosure periods, with backfill and drip shield emplacement at the time of repository closure. Although the preclosure period (50 years) is included in the process models, the postclosure performance assessment starts at the end of this initial period

  6. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Sun

    2000-04-07

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k_0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  7. Airborne organophosphate pesticides drift in Mediterranean climate: The importance of secondary drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivan, Ohad; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-02-01

    Pesticide application is a short-term air-pollution episode with near and far field effects due to atmospheric drift. In order to better evaluate resulting air concentrations in nearby communities following pesticide application, measurements of airborne pesticides were conducted at ∼70 m from field edge. This was done following three different application events of the organophosphate pesticide Chlorpyrifos in a persimmon orchard. Complementary information on larger spatial scale was obtained using CALPUFF modeling in which application and meteorological data was used to better evaluate dispersion patterns. Measurements indicated high airborne concentrations during application hours (few μg m-3 for 8 h average), which dropped to tens of ng m-3 in the following days. Measured atmospheric concentrations show that secondary drift (i.e., post-application drift) involves significant loads of pesticides and hence should not be ignored in exposure considerations. Furthermore, CALPUFF modeling revealed the complex dispersion pattern when weak winds prevailed, and showed that during the 24 h after application air concentrations reached levels above the hourly Texas effect screening level (0.1 μg m-3). Interestingly, weak winds on the night after application resulted in a secondary peak in measured and modeled air concentrations. Long exposure time (when secondary drift is considered) and concentrations measured following such common air-assisted orchard application, suggest pesticide drift may have health repercussions that are currently unknown, and emphasize the need for further epidemiological studies.

  8. Performance of the SLD Central Drift Chamber prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.; Carr, J.; Chadwick, G.; Csorna, S.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hodges, C.; Nauenberg, U.; Nielsen, B.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Prescott, C.Y.

    1986-03-01

    A two-cell prototype of the SLD Central Drift Chamber has been tested using CO/sub 2/-isobutane (92%-8%) at one atmosphere. Average single wire resolution of 55 ..mu..m was achieved. Charge division tests indicate a resolution for the final design of less than or equal to 0.5% of wire length. dE/dx separation of ..pi../e should be useful up to at least 7 GeV/c. 100 MHz waveform digitizers were used in parallel with conventional timing and integration techniques. The results show equivalent performance for single tracks and a two pulse resolution better than 1 mm. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Average vertical and zonal F region plasma drifts over Jicamarca

    SciTech Connect

    Fejer, B.G.; Gonzalez, S.A. ); de Paula, E.R. Utah State Univ., Logan ); Woodman, R.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The seasonal averages of the equatorial F region vertical and zonal plasma drifts are determined using extensive incoherent scatter radar observations from Jicamarca during 1968-1988. The late afternoon and nighttime vertical and zonal drifts are strongly dependent on the 10.7-cm solar flux. The authors show that the evening prereversal enhancement of vertical drifts increases linearly with solar flux during equinox but tends to saturate for large fluxes during southern hemisphere winter. They examine in detail, for the first time, the seasonal variation of the zonal plasma drifts and their dependence on solar flux and magnetic activity. The seasonal effects on the zonal drifts are most pronounced in the midnight-morning sector. The nighttime eastward drifts increase with solar flux for all seasons but decrease slightly with magnetic activity. The daytime westward drifts are essentially independent of season, solar cycle, and magnetic activity.

  10. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  11. Testing the importance of family solidarity, community structure, information access, and social capital in predicting nutrition health knowledge and food choices in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Robert L; Jicha, Karl A; Thompson, Gretchen H

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of family solidarity, community structure, information access, social capital, and socioeconomic status on the extent of nutrition and health knowledge (NHK) among primary household meal planners. In turn, we pose the question: does this knowledge influence dietary decision making? Data are taken from a survey determining socioeconomic impacts of vitamin A fortified peanut butter on Philippine households. Questions on the relationships of nutrition to health were selected to construct a knowledge index on which household respondents could be ranked. We then tested hypotheses regarding what types of individual, family-level, and community structural characteristics would predict performance on this index. The results indicate that the strongest predictors of NHK come from sociological theory related to family solidarity and community centrality, in addition to information accessibility and household income. Our findings also indicate that NHK influences dietary choices with regard to the purchase of a vitamin fortified staple food product, which is essential when addressing nutritional deficiency problems in developing countries.

  12. Measurements Verifying the Optics of the Electron Drift Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Vanessa; Kletzing, Craig; Bounds, Scott; Sigsbee, Kristine M.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the process of breaking and reconnecting of opposing magnetic field lines, and is often associated with tremendous energy transfer. The energy transferred by reconnection directly affects people through its influence on geospace weather and technological systems - such as telecommunication networks, GPS, and power grids. However, the mechanisms that cause magnetic reconnection are not well understood. The Magnetospheric Multi-Scale Mission (MMS) will use four spacecraft in a pyramid formation to make three-dimensional measurements of the structures in magnetic reconnection occurring in the Earth's magnetosphere.The spacecraft will repeatedly sample these regions for a prolonged period of time to gather data in more detail than has been previously possible. MMS is scheduled to be launched in March of 2015. The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) will be used on MMS to measure the electric fields associated with magnetic reconnection. The EDI is a device used on spacecraft to measure electric fields by emitting an electron beam and measuring the E x B drift of the returning electrons after one gyration. This paper concentrates on measurements of the EDI’s optics system. The testing process includes measuring the optics response to a uni-directional electron beam. These measurements are used to verify the response of the EDI's optics and to allow for the optimization of the desired optics state. The measurements agree well with simulations and we are confident in the performance of the EDI instrument.

  13. Drift-driven evolution of electric signals in a Neotropical knifefish.

    PubMed

    Picq, Sophie; Alda, Fernando; Bermingham, Eldredge; Krahe, Rüdiger

    2016-09-01

    Communication signals are highly diverse traits. This diversity is usually assumed to be shaped by selective forces, whereas the null hypothesis of divergence through drift is often not considered. In Panama, the weakly electric fish Brachyhypopomus occidentalis is widely distributed in multiple independent drainage systems, which provide a natural evolutionary laboratory for the study of genetic and signal divergence in separate populations. We quantified geographic variation in the electric signals of 109 fish from five populations, and compared it to the neutral genetic variation estimated from cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences of the same individuals, to test whether drift may be driving divergence of their signals. Signal distances were highly correlated with genetic distances, even after controlling for geographic distances, suggesting that drift alone is sufficient to explain geographic variation in electric signals. Significant differences at smaller geographic scales (within drainages) showed, however, that electric signals may evolve at a faster rate than expected under drift, raising the possibility that additional adaptive forces may be contributing to their evolution. Overall, our data point to stochastic forces as main drivers of signal evolution in this species and extend the role of drift in the evolution of communication systems to fish and electrocommunication. PMID:27436179

  14. Drift-driven evolution of electric signals in a Neotropical knifefish.

    PubMed

    Picq, Sophie; Alda, Fernando; Bermingham, Eldredge; Krahe, Rüdiger

    2016-09-01

    Communication signals are highly diverse traits. This diversity is usually assumed to be shaped by selective forces, whereas the null hypothesis of divergence through drift is often not considered. In Panama, the weakly electric fish Brachyhypopomus occidentalis is widely distributed in multiple independent drainage systems, which provide a natural evolutionary laboratory for the study of genetic and signal divergence in separate populations. We quantified geographic variation in the electric signals of 109 fish from five populations, and compared it to the neutral genetic variation estimated from cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences of the same individuals, to test whether drift may be driving divergence of their signals. Signal distances were highly correlated with genetic distances, even after controlling for geographic distances, suggesting that drift alone is sufficient to explain geographic variation in electric signals. Significant differences at smaller geographic scales (within drainages) showed, however, that electric signals may evolve at a faster rate than expected under drift, raising the possibility that additional adaptive forces may be contributing to their evolution. Overall, our data point to stochastic forces as main drivers of signal evolution in this species and extend the role of drift in the evolution of communication systems to fish and electrocommunication.

  15. Drift and selection influence geographic variation at immune loci of prairie-chickens.

    PubMed

    Bollmer, Jennifer L; Ruder, Elizabeth A; Johnson, Jeff A; Eimes, John A; Dunn, Peter O

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies of immunity in wild populations have focused primarily on genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, studies of model species have identified additional immune-related genes that also affect fitness. In this study, we sequenced five non-MHC immune genes in six greater prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus cupido) populations that have experienced varying degrees of genetic drift as a consequence of population bottlenecks and fragmentation. We compared patterns of geographic variation at the immune genes with six neutral microsatellite markers to investigate the relative effects of selection and genetic drift. Global F(ST) outlier tests identified positive selection on just one of five immune genes (IAP-1) in one population. In contrast, at other immune genes, standardized G'(ST) values were lower than those at microsatellites for a majority of pairwise population comparisons, consistent with balancing selection or with species-wide positive or purifying selection resulting in similar haplotype frequencies across populations. The effects of genetic drift were also evident as summary statistics (e.g., Tajima's D) did not differ from neutrality for the majority of cases, and immune gene diversity (number of haplotypes per gene) was correlated positively with population size. In summary, we found that both genetic drift and selection shaped variation at the five immune genes, and the strength and type of selection varied among genes. Our results caution that neutral forces, such as drift, can make it difficult to detect current selection on genes.

  16. Differentiation with drift: a spatio-temporal genetic analysis of Galapagos mockingbird populations (Mimus spp.).

    PubMed

    Hoeck, Paquita E A; Bollmer, Jennifer L; Parker, Patricia G; Keller, Lukas F

    2010-04-12

    Small and isolated island populations provide ideal systems to study the effects of limited population size, genetic drift and gene flow on genetic diversity. We assessed genetic diversity within and differentiation among 19 mockingbird populations on 15 Galápagos islands, covering all four endemic species, using 16 microsatellite loci. We tested for signs of drift and gene flow, and used historic specimens to assess genetic change over the last century and to estimate effective population sizes. Within-population genetic diversity and effective population sizes varied substantially among island populations and correlated strongly with island size, suggesting that island size serves as a good predictor for effective population size. Genetic differentiation among populations was pronounced and increased with geographical distance. A century of genetic drift did not change genetic diversity on an archipelago-wide scale, but genetic drift led to loss of genetic diversity in small populations, especially in one of the two remaining populations of the endangered Floreana mockingbird. Unlike in other Galápagos bird species such as the Darwin's finches, gene flow among mockingbird populations was low. The clear pattern of genetically distinct populations reflects the effects of genetic drift and suggests that Galápagos mockingbirds are evolving in relative isolation.

  17. Electric discharge fluid modelling with the contribution of convective and drift energy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elaissi, S.; Yousfi, M.; Charrada, K.; Troudi, L.

    2005-10-01

    A fluid model has been used in this work to analyze the electric and energetic behavior of a low-pressure DC glow discharge in Ar chosen as a gas test. The governing equations are the first three moments of the Boltzmann transport equations under their complete form without using the classical-drift-diffusion approximation for the momentum transfer equation while the energy conservation equation involves both thermal and drift energies. In the framework of the local energy approximation, the basic data needed more particularly in the collision source terms for both momentum transfer and energy equations are determined from a multi term solution of Boltzmann equation. Due to the strong coupling with electric field obtained from Poisson equation and the high sheath gradients, the transport equations are numerically solved using a powerful Galerkin finite elements method. This model, after a validation from comparison with literature results, is then used to analyze the convective and drift energy effects on the electric discharge characteristics. Present results show a large influence of the convective term in comparison to the drift-diffusion approximation, mainly on the electric field and charged density profiles due to the antagonist effect induced by this term on the electron and ion motion which reinforces the charge space. Present results show also the discharge characteristic changes mainly in the sheath due to the drift energy consideration.

  18. Geotechnical characterization for the Main Drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kicker, D.C.; Martin, E.R.; Brechtel, C.E.; Stone, C.A.; Kessel, D.S.

    1997-07-01

    Geotechnical characterization of the Main Drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility was based on borehole data collected in site characterization drilling and on scanline rock mass quality data collected during the excavation of the North Ramp. The Main Drift is the planned 3,131-m near-horizontal tunnel to be excavated at the potential repository horizon for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Main Drift borehole data consisted of three holes--USW SD-7, SD-9, and SD-12--drilled along the tunnel alignment. In addition, boreholes USW UZ-14, NRG-6, and NRG-7/7A were used to supplement the database on subsurface rock conditions. Specific data summarized and presented included lithologic and rock structure core logs, rock mechanics laboratory testing, and rock mass quality indices. Cross sections with stratigraphic and thermal-mechanical units were also presented. Topics discussed in the report include geologic setting, geologic features of engineering and construction significance, anticipated ground conditions, and the range of required ground support. Rock structural and rock mass quality data have been developed for each 3-m interval of core in the middle nonlithophysal stratigraphic zone of the Topopah Spring Tuff Formation. The distribution of the rock mass quality data in all boreholes used to characterize the Main Drift was assumed to be representative of the variability of the rock mass conditions to be encountered in the Main Drift. Observations in the North Ramp tunnel have been used to project conditions in the lower lithophysal zone and in fault zones.

  19. Prospective assessment of rapid diagnostic tests for the detection of antibodies to hepatitis C virus, a tool for improving access to care.

    PubMed

    Chevaliez, S; Poiteau, L; Rosa, I; Soulier, A; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Laperche, S; Hézode, C; Pawlotsky, J-M

    2016-05-01

    Large-scale hepatitis C screening is required to prevent further spread of the infection, improve access to care in the context of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) drug regimens without interferon-alpha and subsequently reduce the risk of long-term complications of chronic liver disease. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) represent an attractive alternative to enzyme immunoassay using blood from venepuncture. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess the clinical performance of CE-marked RDTs detecting anti-HCV antibodies in fingerstick capillary whole blood and/or oral fluid. A total of 513 individuals, including 318 patients with chronic HCV infection, 25 patients with resolved HCV infection and 170 HCV-seronegative individuals, were prospectively enrolled. The specificity of RDTs with fingerstick whole blood varied from 98.8% to 100%. The clinical sensitivity was high for the OraQuick(®) and Toyo(®) tests (99.4% and 95.8%, respectively), but low for the Labmen(®) test (63.1%). The specificity and clinical sensitivity in crevicular fluid were both satisfactory for the OraQuick(®) test (100% and 97.6%, respectively). HCV antibody RDTs were easy and rapid to perform in the context of patient care. They were highly specific. Both the OraQuick(®) and Toyo(®) tests reached the expected level of performance for wide-scale use, with a performance advantage for the OraQuick(®) HCV test. RDTs appear to be a promising new tool for wide-scale screening of HCV infection in high-risk to medium-risk populations. Hence, careful assessment of the performance of HCV RDTs must be recommended before they can be implemented in clinical practice. PMID:26806260

  20. Access to Diagnostic Tests and Essential Medicines for Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes Care: Cost, Availability and Affordability in the West Region of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Jingi, Ahmadou M.; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N.; Ewane Onana, Arnold; Nansseu, Jobert Richie N.; Wang, Binhuan; Kingue, Samuel; Kengne, André Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the availability and affordability of medicines and routine tests for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes in the West region of Cameroon, a low-income setting. Methods A survey was conducted on the availability and cost of twelve routine tests and twenty medicines for CVD and diabetes in eight health districts (four urban and four rural) covering over 60% of the population of the region (1.8 million). We analyzed the percentage of tests and medicines available, the median price against the international reference price (median price ratio) for the medicines, and affordability in terms of the number of days’ wages it would cost the lowest-paid unskilled government worker for initial investigation tests and procurement for one month of treatment. Results The availability of tests varied between 10% for the ECG to 100% for the fasting blood sugar. The average cost for the initial investigation using the minimum tests cost 29.76 days’ wages. The availability of medicines varied from 36.4% to 59.1% in urban and from 9.1% to 50% in rural settings. Only metformin and benzathine-benzylpenicilline had a median price ratio of ≤1.5, with statins being largely unaffordable (at least 30.51 days’ wages). One month of combination treatment for coronary heart disease costs at least 40.87 days’ wages. Conclusion The investigation and management of patients with medium-to-high cardiovascular risk remains largely unavailable and unaffordable in this setting. An effective non-communicable disease program should lay emphasis on primary prevention, and improve affordable access to essential medicines in public outlets. PMID:25369455

  1. Ionospheric vertical drift response at a mid-latitude station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Daniel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-07-01

    Vertical plasma drift data measured at a mid-latitude ionospheric station Pruhonice (50.0 ° N, 14.6 ° E) were collected and analysed for the year 2006, a year of low solar and geomagnetic activity. Hence these data provide insight into the drift behaviour during quiet conditions. The following typical diurnal trend is evident: a significant decay to negative values (downward peak) at dawn; generally less pronounced downward peak at dusk hours. Magnitude of the downward drift varies during the year. Typically it reaches values about 20 ms-1 at dawn hours and 10 ms-1 at dusk hours. Maximum dawn magnitude of about 40 ms-1 has been detected in August. During daytime the vertical drifts increases from the initial small downward drifts to zero drift around noon and to small upward drifts in the afternoon. Night-time drift values display large variability around a near zero vertical drift average. There is a significant trend to larger downward drift values near dawn and a less pronounced decrease of the afternoon upward vertical drifts near sunset. Two regular downward peaks of the drift associated with the dawn and dusk are general characteristics of the analysed data throughout the year 2006. Their seasonal course corresponds to the seasonal course of the sunrise and sunset. The duration of prevailing negative drift velocities forming these peaks and thus the influence of the dawn/dusk on the drift velocity is mostly 1.5-3 h. The dawn effect on vertical drift tends to be larger than the effect of the dusk. The observed magnitude of the sunrise and sunset peaks show significant annual course. The highest variability of the magnitude is seen during winter. High variability is detected till March equinox and again after September equinox. Around solstice, both peaks reaches lowest values. After that, the magnitudes of the drift velocity increase smoothly till maxima in summer (August). The vertical drift velocity course is smooth between June solstice and September

  2. Determination of Importance Evaluation for the ESF Enhanced Charcterization of the Repository Block Cross Drift

    SciTech Connect

    S. Goodin

    2002-01-09

    The objective of this DIE is to determine whether the ECRB-Cross-Drift-related activities, as identified in Section 6.0, could potentially impact (1) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) testing or (2) the waste isolation capabilities of a potential repository at the Yucca Mountain site. Any controls necessary to limit such potential impacts are also identified herein.

  3. Negative Ion Drift Velocity and Longitudinal Diffusion in Mixtures of Carbon Disulfide and Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dion, Michael P.; Son, S.; Hunter, S. D.; deNolfo, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Negative ion drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion has been measured for gas mixtures of carbon disulfide (CS2) and methane (CH4)' Measurements were made as a function of total pressure, CS2 partial pressure and electric field. Constant mobility and thermal-limit longitudinal diffusion is observed for all gas mixtures tested. Gas gain for some of the mixtures is also included.

  4. The Impact of Multidirectional Item Parameter Drift on IRT Scaling Coefficients and Proficiency Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.; Wells, Craig S.; Sireci, Stephen G.

    2012-01-01

    Item parameter drift (IPD) occurs when item parameter values change from their original value over time. IPD may pose a serious threat to the fairness and validity of test score interpretations, especially when the goal of the assessment is to measure growth or improvement. In this study, we examined the effect of multidirectional IPD (i.e., some…

  5. An Examination of Two Procedures for Identifying Consequential Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Craig S.; Hambleton, Ronald K.; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Meng, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop and evaluate two procedures flagging consequential item parameter drift (IPD) in an operational testing program. The first procedure was based on flagging items that exhibit a meaningful magnitude of IPD using a critical value that was defined to represent barely tolerable IPD. The second procedure…

  6. Access to Healthcare, HIV/STI Testing, and Preferred Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Providers among Men Who Have Sex with Men and Men Who Engage in Street-Based Sex Work in the US

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Kristen; Morrow, Kathleen M.; Colleran, Christopher M.; Holcomb, Richard; Operario, Don; Calabrese, Sarah K.; Galárraga, Omar; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising strategy for HIV prevention among men who have sex with men (MSM) and men who engage in sex work. But access will require routine HIV testing and contacts with healthcare providers. This study investigated men’s healthcare and HIV testing experiences to inform PrEP implementation. Methods We conducted 8 focus groups (n = 38) in 2012 and 56 in-depth qualitative interviews in 2013–14 with male sex workers (MSWs) (n = 31) and other MSM (n = 25) in Providence, RI. MSWs primarily met clients in street-based sex work venues. Facilitators asked participants about access to healthcare and HIV/STI testing, healthcare needs, and preferred PrEP providers. Results MSWs primarily accessed care in emergency rooms (ERs), substance use clinics, correctional institutions, and walk-in clinics. Rates of HIV testing were high, but MSWs reported low access to other STI testing, low insurance coverage, and unmet healthcare needs including primary care, substance use treatment, and mental health services. MSM not engaging in sex work were more likely to report access to primary and specialist care. Rates of HIV testing among these MSM were slightly lower, but they reported more STI testing, more insurance coverage, and fewer unmet needs. Preferred PrEP providers for both groups included primary care physicians, infectious disease specialists, and psychiatrists. MSWs were also willing to access PrEP in substance use treatment and ER settings. Conclusions PrEP outreach efforts for MSWs and other MSM should engage diverse providers in many settings, including mental health and substance use treatment, ERs, needle exchanges, correctional institutions, and HIV testing centers. Access to PrEP will require financial assistance, but can build on existing healthcare contacts for both populations. PMID:25386746

  7. Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolutionary Strategy for Drift Correction of Electronic Nose Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, S.; Falasconi, M.; Sanchez, E.; Sberveglieri, G.; Scionti, A.; Squillero, G.; Tonda, A.

    2011-09-01

    Electronic Noses (ENs) might represent a simple, fast, high sample throughput and economic alternative to conventional analytical instruments [1]. However, gas sensors drift still limits the EN adoption in real industrial setups due to high recalibration effort and cost [2]. In fact, pattern recognition (PaRC) models built in the training phase become useless after a period of time, in some cases a few weeks. Although algorithms to mitigate the drift date back to the early 90 this is still a challenging issue for the chemical sensor community [3]. Among other approaches, adaptive drift correction methods adjust the PaRC model in parallel with data acquisition without need of periodic calibration. Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) [4] and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) networks [5] have been already tested in the past with fair success. This paper presents and discusses an original methodology based on a Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES) [6], suited for stochastic optimization of complex problems.

  8. Accelerator drift-tube braze-joint failures in the PIGMI APF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hansborough, L.D.; Levinson, L.S.; Reiswig, R.D.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    During the assembly of the Alternating Phase Focusing cavity for the PIGMI Prototype proton accelerator, recurring failures of drift-tube braze joints occurred. In the fabrication technique, a torch braze was used to attach the stems to both the drift-tube body and the stem termination; all materials used were stainless steel. The assemblies were copper plated, using bright-acid-leveling copper plating. Some braze joints, although satisfactorily tension-tested before plating, later failed at a relatively low loading. A detailed investigation of one drift tube indicated that residual copper-plating solution in the cooling passages acted to dissolve the braze solution over a period of weeks, leading to an eventual joint failure.

  9. Influence of determination of reference position of image on rocket take-off drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shuhua; Liu, Jun; Shen, Si; Hu, Shaolin

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical analysis model for influence of reference position deviation on carrier rocket take-off drift has been made to tackle the issue on determination of reference position of reticule for optical tracking and measurement of video image in aerospace test range and the variation in rocket take-off drift due to reference position deviation has been subjected to quantitative analysis based on angular error of tracking and lateral error of measuring point as a result of deviation of reference position of reticule cross. The method serves as technical support to quality analysis of rocket take-off deviation measurement data and improvement in data processing precision for carrier rocket take-off drift.

  10. An image drift compensation system for a solar pointed space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoe, J.-D. F.

    1982-05-01

    Two sounding rocket test flights have been conducted in the development of an image drift compensation system designed for a solar-pointed space telescope. The system, whose scientific results are presented, employs limb-sensing photodiodes at the telescope focal plane and provides drift compensation to better than + or - 0.1 arcsec. A variation of this device will be employed by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab 2 flight of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) Instrument. The data gathered by the rocket flights of the drift compensation system have revealed high velocity ejecta traveling through the transition zone and corona at velocities up to 400 km/sec. The HRTS configuration and its constitutive instruments' optical parameters are described.

  11. SYSTEMS SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR FIRE EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ECRB CROSS DRIFT

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Garrett

    2001-12-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate fire hazards related to the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) East-West Cross Drift (commonly referred to as the ECRB Cross-Drift). This analysis builds upon prior Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) System Safety Analyses and incorporates Topopah Springs (TS) Main Drift fire scenarios and ECRB Cross-Drift fire scenarios. Accident scenarios involving the fires in the Main Drift and the ECRB Cross-Drift were previously evaluated in ''Topopah Springs Main Drift System Safety Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1995) and the ''Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project East-West Drift System Safety Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998). In addition to listing required mitigation/control features, this analysis identifies the potential need for procedures and training as part of defense-in-depth mitigation/control features. The inclusion of this information in the System Safety Analysis (SSA) is intended to assist the organization(s) (e.g., Construction, Environmental Safety and Health, Design) responsible for these aspects of the ECRB Cross-Drift in developing mitigation/control features for fire events, including Emergency Refuge Station(s). This SSA was prepared, in part, in response to Condition/Issue Identification and Reporting/Resolution System (CIRS) item 1966. The SSA is an integral part of the systems engineering process, whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach is used which incorporates operating experiences and recommendations from vendors, the constructor and the operating contractor. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the scenarios associated with fires in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified hazards. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures

  12. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT EAST-WEST DRIFT SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    1999-06-08

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the design of the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) East-West Cross Drift. This analysis builds upon prior ESF System Safety Analyses and incorporates TS Main Drift scenarios, where applicable, into the East-West Drift scenarios. This System Safety Analysis (SSA) focuses on the personnel safety and health hazards associated with the engineered design of the East-West Drift. The analysis also evaluates other aspects of the East-West Drift, including purchased equipment (e.g., scientific mapping platform) or Systems/Structures/Components (SSCs) and out-of-tolerance conditions. In addition to recommending design mitigation features, the analysis identifies the potential need for procedures, training, or Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). The inclusion of this information in the SSA is intended to assist the organization(s) (e.g., constructor, Safety and Health, design) responsible for these aspects of the East-West Drift in evaluating personnel hazards and augment the information developed by these organizations. The SSA is an integral part of the systems engineering process, whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach is used which incorporates operating experiences and recommendations from vendors, the constructor and the operating contractor. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the scenarios associated with East-West Drift SSCs in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified hazards. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into SSC designs. (2) Add safety features and capabilities to existing designs. (3) Develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, reduce exposure to hazards, and inform personnel of the

  13. Cardiorespiratory drift during exercise in the horse.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D P; Fregin, G F

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure the time-course and degree of cardiovascular and respiratory 'drift' during constant submaximal exercise in the horse. One Thoroughbred and four Morgan mares were instrumented for simultaneous measurement of respiratory and blood gases which also enabled cardiac output (Q) to be calculated. Data were collected at rest, and at 10, 20 and 30 mins during a constant workload which elicited an initial exercising heart rate (HR) of 150 beats/min, and an approximate 15-fold increase in oxygen consumption (VO2). Significant cardiac and respiratory drift during exercise were observed over time so that ventilation increased from 750 +/- 58 to 910 +/- 49 litres/min (21 per cent increase) from the 10 to 30 min time-point (P < 0.05) and HR went from 154 +/- 4 to 173 +/- 9 beats/min (mean +/- se) over the same time period (P < 0.05). Q also rose from 142 +/- 5 to 177 +/- 17 litres/min (P < 0.05) during the same interval while stroke volume (SV) was maintained. Rectal temperature (TR) and mixed venous lactate (LA) also showed significant increases during exercise while PaO2 and PaCO2 remained constant. The results indicate a significant degree of cardiac and respiratory drift in the horse in response to strenuous submaximal exercise. At the constant exercise work rate chosen, a levelling off, or plateauing of the selected parameters of interest was not observed. Therefore if a true exercising 'steady-state' was achieved, it must have occurred very early in the exercise bout.

  14. Demersally drifting invertebrates from Kongsfjorden, Svalbård (Arctic Ocean)-a comparison of catches from drift-pump and drift-nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Joo, Hyoung-Min; Lee, Jae Hyung; Yun, Mi Sun; Ahn, So Hyun; Lee, Sang Heon

    2015-12-01

    Demersally drifting organisms were collected at Ny Ålesund (Svalbård-Arctic Ocean) to study the taxon composition and relative abundances in the Arctic summer. Catch potentials of two collection devices for demersal drift were compared. A lowvolume submersible drift-pump and a drift-net unit were employed for the collection of demersally drifting biota, particularly for shallow aquatic habitats. With the exception of Appendicularia, Chaetognatha, Coelenterata, and Ctenophora, which were damaged at times, the pump catches were in good condition and sufficient for identification and quantification of less mobile fauna. A comparison of the two devices revealed that the drift-pump collected more specimens than the drift-net. However, the drift-net may have caused an underestimation of the abundances of invertebrates. No differences in identified taxon number and indices of richness, evenness and diversity were found. However, the proportion of invertebrate animals in the two devices was different for the three groups: zooplankton, macrofauna and meiofauna. At Svalbård, zooplankton, larvae of macrofauna, and meiofauna were successfully collected by the two collecting devices. However, the catchibility of the two devices in collecting various invertebrate taxa was different and, therefore, a sound `Device Effect' was revealed.

  15. Effects of grids in drift tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura M.; Yamauchi, H.

    2012-05-20

    In 2011, we upgraded a 201 MHz buncher in the proton injector for the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS) - relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) complex. In the buncher we installed four grids made of tungsten to improve the transit time factor. The grid installed drift tubes have 32 mm of inner diameter and the each grid consists of four quadrants. The quadrants were cut out precisely from 1mm thick tungsten plates by a computerized numerically controlled (CNC) wire cutting electrical discharge machining (EDM). The 3D electric field of the grid was simulated.

  16. Drift-induced Benjamin-Feir instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Patti, F.; Fanelli, D.; Carletti, T.

    2016-06-01

    A modified version of the Ginzburg-Landau equation is introduced which accounts for asymmetric couplings between neighbors sites on a one-dimensional lattice, with periodic boundary conditions. The drift term which reflects the imposed microscopic asymmetry seeds a generalized class of instabilities, reminiscent of the Benjamin-Feir type. The uniformly synchronized solution is spontaneously destabilized outside the region of parameters classically associated to the Benjamin-Feir instability, upon injection of a nonhomogeneous perturbation. The ensuing patterns can be of the traveling wave type or display a patchy, colorful mosaic for the modulus of the complex oscillators amplitude.

  17. Random Genetic Drift and Gamete Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Mano, Shuhei

    2005-01-01

    An analytic expression of conditional expectation of transient gamete frequency, given that one of the two loci remains polymorphic, is obtained in terms of the diffusion process by calculating the moments of the distribution. Using this expression, a model where linkage disequilibrium is introduced by a single mutation is considered. The conditional expectation of the gamete frequency given that the locus with the mutant allele remains polymorphic is presented. The behavior is significantly different from the monotonic decrease observed in the deterministic model without random genetic drift. PMID:16371518

  18. Drift Chamber Alignment using Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Hays, Christopher P.

    2014-05-07

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a general-purpose experimental apparatus with an inner tracking detector for measuring charged particles, surrounded by a calorimeter for measurements of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, and a muon detector system. We present a technique for, and results of, a precise relative alignment of the drift chamber wires of the CDF tracker. This alignment has been an important component of the track momentum calibration, which is the basis for the charged-lepton calibration for the measurement of the W boson mass at CDF.

  19. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  20. Drift-Alfven eigenmodes in inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Poedts, S.

    2006-03-15

    A set of three nonlinear equations describing drift-Alfven waves in a nonuniform magnetized plasma is derived and discussed both in linear and nonlinear limits. In the case of a cylindric radially bounded plasma with a Gaussian density distribution in the radial direction the linearized equations are solved exactly yielding general solutions for modes with quantized frequencies and with radially dependent amplitudes. The full set of nonlinear equations is also solved yielding particular solutions in the form of rotating radially limited structures. The results should be applicable to the description of electromagnetic perturbations in solar magnetic structures and in astrophysical column-like objects including cosmic tornados.

  1. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-09-03

    There are growing experimental, numerical and theoretical evidences that the anomalous transport observed in tokamaks and stellarators is caused by slow, drift-type modes (such as trapped electron modes and ion-temperature gradient-driven modes). Although typical collision frequencies in hot, magnetized fusion plasmas can be quite low in absolute values, collisional effects are nevertheless important since they act as dissipative sinks. As it is well known, dissipative systems with many (strictly speaking more than two) degrees of freedom are often chaotic and may evolve towards a so-called attractor.

  2. A drift model of interchange instability

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, E. S.; Power, O. A.

    2007-08-15

    A set of asymptotic equations is derived, describing the dynamics of the flute mode in a magnetized plasma with cold ions, under a 'local' approximation (i.e., near a particular point). The asymptotic set is then used to calculate the growth rate of interchange instability in the slab model. It is shown that, unlike the magnetohydrodynamic ordering, the drift one allows instability to occur for either sign of the pressure gradient (i.e., for both 'bad' and 'good' curvature of the magnetic field). It is also demonstrated that finite beta gives rise to an extra instability that does not exist in the small-beta limit.

  3. Effective drifts in dynamical systems with multiplicative noise: a review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Giovanni; Wehr, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Noisy dynamical models are employed to describe a wide range of phenomena. Since exact modeling of these phenomena requires access to their microscopic dynamics, whose time scales are typically much shorter than the observable time scales, there is often need to resort to effective mathematical models such as stochastic differential equations (SDEs). In particular, here we consider effective SDEs describing the behavior of systems in the limits when natural time scales become very small. In the presence of multiplicative noise (i.e. noise whose intensity depends upon the system's state), an additional drift term, called noise-induced drift or effective drift, appears. The nature of this noise-induced drift has been recently the subject of a growing number of theoretical and experimental studies. Here, we provide an extensive review of the state of the art in this field. After an introduction, we discuss a minimal model of how multiplicative noise affects the evolution of a system. Next, we consider several case studies with a focus on recent experiments: the Brownian motion of a microscopic particle in thermal equilibrium with a heat bath in the presence of a diffusion gradient; the limiting behavior of a system driven by a colored noise modulated by a multiplicative feedback; and the behavior of an autonomous agent subject to sensorial delay in a noisy environment. This allows us to present the experimental results, as well as mathematical methods and numerical techniques, that can be employed to study a wide range of systems. At the end we give an application-oriented overview of future projects involving noise-induced drifts, including both theory and experiment. PMID:27088308

  4. Effective drifts in dynamical systems with multiplicative noise: a review of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Giovanni; Wehr, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Noisy dynamical models are employed to describe a wide range of phenomena. Since exact modeling of these phenomena requires access to their microscopic dynamics, whose time scales are typically much shorter than the observable time scales, there is often need to resort to effective mathematical models such as stochastic differential equations (SDEs). In particular, here we consider effective SDEs describing the behavior of systems in the limits when natural time scales become very small. In the presence of multiplicative noise (i.e. noise whose intensity depends upon the system’s state), an additional drift term, called noise-induced drift or effective drift, appears. The nature of this noise-induced drift has been recently the subject of a growing number of theoretical and experimental studies. Here, we provide an extensive review of the state of the art in this field. After an introduction, we discuss a minimal model of how multiplicative noise affects the evolution of a system. Next, we consider several case studies with a focus on recent experiments: the Brownian motion of a microscopic particle in thermal equilibrium with a heat bath in the presence of a diffusion gradient; the limiting behavior of a system driven by a colored noise modulated by a multiplicative feedback; and the behavior of an autonomous agent subject to sensorial delay in a noisy environment. This allows us to present the experimental results, as well as mathematical methods and numerical techniques, that can be employed to study a wide range of systems. At the end we give an application-oriented overview of future projects involving noise-induced drifts, including both theory and experiment.

  5. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  6. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  7. Time-spectral modelling of drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffel, Jan

    2013-10-01

    Time spectral methods for initial-value partial differential equations avoid the time stepping being characteristic for temporal finite difference schemes. Large gains in efficiency should then be within reach for problems in plasma physics with widely separated time scales. In the recently developed Generalized Weighted Residual Method GWRM, temporal, spatial and parameter domains are all handled using a Chebyshev polynomial solution ansatz. The coefficients of the ansatz are determined using a generalized weighted residual method, for which a new efficient equation system solver has been applied. In addition, subdomain methods for the temporal and spatial domains have been developed and employed successfully in a number of test problems. We will here also present a related method, being based on least square minimization of the residual rather than on the Galerkin method. Both methods are applied to problems in drift wave turbulence from which results will be presented.

  8. Double-peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Wenbin; Chen, Bo

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports double-peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs), which is unique subset of subauroral ion drifts (SAIDs). A statistical analysis has been carried out for the first time with a database of 454 DSAID events identified from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program observations from 1987 to 2012. Both case studies and statistical analyses show that the two velocity peaks of DSAIDs are associated with two ion temperature peaks and two region-2 field-aligned currents (R2-FACs) peaks in the midlatitude ionospheric trough located in the low-conductance subauroral region. DSAIDs are regional and vary significantly with magnetic local time. DSAIDs can evolve from/to SAIDs during their lifetimes, which are from several minutes to tens of minutes. Comparisons between the ionospheric parameters of DSAIDs and SAIDs indicate that double-layer region-2 field-aligned currents (R2-FACs) may be the main driver of DSAIDs. It is also found that DSAIDs happen during more disturbed conditions compared with SAIDs.

  9. Snow particle speeds in drifting snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Kouichi; Yokoyama, Chika; Ito, Yoichi; Nemoto, Masaki; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Bellot, Hervé; Fujita, Koji

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge of snow particle speeds is necessary for deepening our understanding of the internal structures of drifting snow. In this study, we utilized a snow particle counter (SPC) developed to observe snow particle size distributions and snow mass flux. Using high-frequency signals from the SPC transducer, we obtained the sizes of individual particles and their durations in the sampling area. Measurements were first conducted in the field, with more precise measurements being obtained in a boundary layer established in a cold wind tunnel. The obtained results were compared with the results of a numerical analysis. Data on snow particle speeds, vertical velocity profiles, and their dependence on wind speed obtained in the field and in the wind tunnel experiments were in good agreement: both snow particle speed and wind speed increased with height, and the former was always 1 to 2 m s-1 less than the latter below a height of 1 m. Thus, we succeeded in obtaining snow particle speeds in drifting snow, as well as revealing the dependence of particle speed on both grain size and wind speed. The results were verified by similar trends observed using random flight simulations. However, the difference between the particle speed and the wind speed in the simulations was much greater than that observed under real conditions. Snow transport by wind is an aeolian process. Thus, the findings presented here should be also applicable to other geophysical processes relating to the aeolian transport of particles, such as blown sand and soil.

  10. Metabolic drift in the aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Ivanisevic, Julijana; Stauch, Kelly L.; Petrascheck, Michael; Benton, H. Paul; Epstein, Adrian A.; Fang, Mingliang; Gorantla, Santhi; Tran, Minerva; Hoang, Linh; Kurczy, Michael E.; Boska, Michael D.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Fox, Howard S.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Brain function is highly dependent upon controlled energy metabolism whose loss heralds cognitive impairments. This is particularly notable in the aged individuals and in age-related neurodegenerative diseases. However, how metabolic homeostasis is disrupted in the aging brain is still poorly understood. Here we performed global, metabolomic and proteomic analyses across different anatomical regions of mouse brain at different stages of its adult lifespan. Interestingly, while severe proteomic imbalance was absent, global-untargeted metabolomics revealed an energy metabolic drift or significant imbalance in core metabolite levels in aged mouse brains. Metabolic imbalance was characterized by compromised cellular energy status (NAD decline, increased AMP/ATP, purine/pyrimidine accumulation) and significantly altered oxidative phosphorylation and nucleotide biosynthesis and degradation. The central energy metabolic drift suggests a failure of the cellular machinery to restore metabostasis (metabolite homeostasis) in the aged brain and therefore an inability to respond properly to external stimuli, likely driving the alterations in signaling activity and thus in neuronal function and communication. PMID:27182841

  11. Species selection and random drift in macroevolution.

    PubMed

    Chevin, Luis-Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Species selection resulting from trait-dependent speciation and extinction is increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of phenotypic macroevolution. However, the recent bloom in statistical methods quantifying this process faces a scarcity of dynamical theory for their interpretation, notably regarding the relative contributions of deterministic versus stochastic evolutionary forces. I use simple diffusion approximations of birth-death processes to investigate how the expected and random components of macroevolutionary change depend on phenotype-dependent speciation and extinction rates, as can be estimated empirically. I show that the species selection coefficient for a binary trait, and selection differential for a quantitative trait, depend not only on differences in net diversification rates (speciation minus extinction), but also on differences in species turnover rates (speciation plus extinction), especially in small clades. The randomness in speciation and extinction events also produces a species-level equivalent to random genetic drift, which is stronger for higher turnover rates. I then show how microevolutionary processes including mutation, organismic selection, and random genetic drift cause state transitions at the species level, allowing comparison of evolutionary forces across levels. A key parameter that would be needed to apply this theory is the distribution and rate of origination of new optimum phenotypes along a phylogeny. PMID:26880617

  12. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonjae Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; Angus, J. R.

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  13. Conditional capture probability for Scaphirhynchus spp. in drifting trammel nets

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, Christopher S.; Oldenburg, Eric W.; Gerrity, Paul C.

    2009-06-01

    Pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus and shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus are commonly sampled using drifting-trammel nets in the Missouri River basin. Despite that drifting trammel nets have been used for decades to sample these species, little is known about the capture efficiency of this gear. We estimated conditional capture probability and gear efficiency for drifting trammel nets. In addition we examined several abiotic variables that were assumed to influence the success of capturing a pallid sturgeon or shovelnose sturgeon in a drifting trammel net. Conditional capture probability varied from 0.36 on the first attempt to 0.50 on the second attempt. Drifting trammel nets are relatively efficient and we suggest that they continue to be used to sample in large turbid rivers. The high variability associated with sampling pallid sturgeon and shovelnose sturgeon using drifting trammel nets is likely related to low abundance and patchy distributions. Thus, we suggest using more appropriate sampling designs for rare species.

  14. Optimal Drift Correction for Superresolution Localization Microscopy with Bayesian Inference.

    PubMed

    Elmokadem, Ahmed; Yu, Ji

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule-localization-based superresolution microscopy requires accurate sample drift correction to achieve good results. Common approaches for drift compensation include using fiducial markers and direct drift estimation by image correlation. The former increases the experimental complexity and the latter estimates drift at a reduced temporal resolution. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a new approach for drift correction based on the Bayesian statistical framework. The technique has the advantage of being able to calculate the drifts for every image frame of the data set directly from the single-molecule coordinates. We present the theoretical foundation of the algorithm and an implementation that achieves significantly higher accuracy than image-correlation-based estimations.

  15. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2004-11-09

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, H{sup +}, HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, CaHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, MgHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, HSiO{sub 3

  16. Arctic Ocean sea ice drift origin derived from artificial radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Cámara-Mor, P; Masqué, P; Garcia-Orellana, J; Cochran, J K; Mas, J L; Chamizo, E; Hanfland, C

    2010-07-15

    Since the 1950s, nuclear weapon testing and releases from the nuclear industry have introduced anthropogenic radionuclides into the sea, and in many instances their ultimate fate are the bottom sediments. The Arctic Ocean is one of the most polluted in this respect, because, in addition to global fallout, it is impacted by regional fallout from nuclear weapon testing, and indirectly by releases from nuclear reprocessing facilities and nuclear accidents. Sea-ice formed in the shallow continental shelves incorporate sediments with variable concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides that are transported through the Arctic Ocean and are finally released in the melting areas. In this work, we present the results of anthropogenic radionuclide analyses of sea-ice sediments (SIS) collected on five cruises from different Arctic regions and combine them with a database including prior measurements of these radionuclides in SIS. The distribution of (137)Cs and (239,240)Pu activities and the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in SIS showed geographical differences, in agreement with the two main sea ice drift patterns derived from the mean field of sea-ice motion, the Transpolar Drift and Beaufort Gyre, with the Fram Strait as the main ablation area. A direct comparison of data measured in SIS samples against those reported for the potential source regions permits identification of the regions from which sea ice incorporates sediments. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in SIS may be used to discern the origin of sea ice from the Kara-Laptev Sea and the Alaskan shelf. However, if the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio is similar to global fallout, it does not provide a unique diagnostic indicator of the source area, and in such cases, the source of SIS can be constrained with a combination of the (137)Cs and (239,240)Pu activities. Therefore, these anthropogenic radionuclides can be used in many instances to determine the geographical source area of sea-ice.

  17. Arrays of silicon drift detectors for an extraterrestrial X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehak, Pavel; Carini, Gabriella; Chen, Wei; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Fried, Jack; Li, Zheng; Pinelli, Donald A.; Peter Siddons, D.; Vernon, Emerson; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Ramsey, Brian D.

    2010-12-01

    Arrays of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) were designed, produced and tested. These arrays are the central part of an X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) for measuring the abundances of light surface elements (C-Fe) fluoresced by ambient radiation on the investigated celestial object. The basic building element (or cell) of the arrays consists of a single hexagonal SDD. Signal electrons drift toward the center of the hexagon where a very low capacitance anode is located. The hexagonal shape of an individual SDD allows for a continuous covering of large detection areas of various shapes. To match the number of SDD cells with the external Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), two arrays, one with 16 and another with 64 cells were developed. One side of SDDs, called the window side, is a continuous thin rectifying junction through which the X-ray radiation enters the detector. The opposite side, called the device side contains electron collecting anodes as well as all other electrodes needed to generate the drift field and to sink leakage current produced on Si-SiO 2 interface. On both sides of the detector array there is a system of guard rings, which smoothly adjusts the voltage of the boundary cells to the ground potential of the silicon outside the sensitive volume. The drift voltage inside the detector is generated by an implanted rectifying contact, which forms a hexagonal spiral. This spiral produces the main valley where signal electrons drift as well as the voltage divider to produce the drift field. System performance is shown by a spectrum of Mn X-rays produced by the decay of 55Fe.

  18. The Ion Drift Meter for Dynamics Explorer-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.; Lippincott, C. R.; Zuccaro, D. R.; Harmon, L. H.; Holt, B. J.; Doherty, J. E.; Power, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The Ion Drift Meter on Dynamics Explorer-B measures two mutually perpendicular angles of arrival of thermal ions with respect to the sensor look direction. These measurements are used to derive two components of the ambient thermal ion drift velocity, which together with the third component from the Retarding Potential Analyzer instrument provide the total velocity. The Ion Drift Meter technique yields high temporal resolution measurements essential in the studies of the convection pattern and energy deposition in the ionosphere.

  19. Vadose water flow around a backfilled drift located in tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Mondy, L.A.; Baker, B.L.; Eaton, R.R.

    1985-07-01

    Through the technique of computer simulation, the authors investigate the flow characteristics of groundwater from surface influx into a host medium of unsaturated tuff. The study is designed to assess the potential influence of backfilled drifts on the groundwater flow past vertically emplaced waste canisters in a prospective nuclear waste repository. Numerical modeling with the code SAGUARO is used to determine the magnitude and direction of flow in the vicinity of a waste package below a drift backfilled with various materials. Sand and clay represent potential backfill materials which are significantly different in hydrologic properties. Results indicate that clay in a drift reduces the flow immediately adjacent to the waste package to 91 to 96% of the natural flow. Sand in the same drift acts as an extremely effective barrier to flow; however, below the drift at the waste package level, the groundwater flow is 81% to 92% of the natural volumetric flow. Therefore, backfilling a drift does not provide a significant reduction of flow in the vicinity of a vertically emplaced waste package. The effect of the drift on flow extends only slightly over a drift length below and a drift width to the side of the backfilled region. This study is part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations.

  20. The consequences of genetic drift for bacterial genome complexity.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Horng; Moran, Nancy A; Ochman, Howard

    2009-08-01

    Genetic drift, which is particularly effective within small populations, can shape the size and complexity of genomes by affecting the fixation of deleterious mutations. In Bacteria, assessing the contribution of genetic drift to genome evolution is problematic because the usual methods, based on intraspecific polymorphisms, can be thwarted by difficulties in delineating species' boundaries. The increased availability of sequenced bacterial genomes allows application of an alternative estimator of drift, the genome-wide ratio of replacement to silent substitutions in protein-coding sequences. This ratio, which reflects the action of purifying selection across the entire genome, shows a strong inverse relationship with genome size, indicating that drift promotes genome reduction in bacteria.

  1. Drifts of auroral structures and magnetospheric electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Rumi; Oguti, Takasi )

    1987-10-01

    Drifts of pulsating auroral patches and discrete auroral arc fragments are analyzed on the basis of all-sky TV observations of auroras. The drifts of auroral structures in this study correspond on a gross scale with other measurements of magnetospheric convection. The result strongly suggests that not only auroral patches but also arc fragments, when detached from the main body of the discrete aurora, drift owing to the magnetospheric electric fields. The measurement of the drifts of auroral structures could possibly provide us with a convenient and accurate method to estimate the magnetospheric electric fields.

  2. Spin drift in highly doped n-type Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kameno, Makoto; Ando, Yuichiro; Shinjo, Teruya; Koike, Hayato; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Oikawa, Tohru; Suzuki, Toshio; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2014-03-03

    A quantitative estimation of spin drift velocity in highly doped n-type silicon (Si) at 8 K is presented in this letter. A local two-terminal Hanle measurement enables the detection of a modulation of spin signals from the Si as a function of an external electric field, and this modulation is analyzed by using a spin drift-diffusion equation and an analytical solution of the Hanle-type spin precession. The analyses reveal that the spin drift velocity is linearly proportional to the electric field. The contribution of the spin drift effect to the spin signals is crosschecked by introducing a modified nonlocal four-terminal method.

  3. Tabulated In-Drift Geometric and Thermal Properties Used In Drift-Scale Models for TSPA-SR

    SciTech Connect

    N.D. Francis

    2000-06-16

    The objective of this calculation is to provide in-drift physical properties required by the drift-scale models (both two- and three-dimensional) used in total system performance assessments (TSPA). The physical properties include waste package geometry, waste package thermal properties, emplacement drift geometry including backfill and invert geometry and properties (both thermal and hydrologic), drip shield geometry and thermal properties, all tabulated in a single source.

  4. Alternative methods for herbicide spray drift detection in corn and cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehring, Nathan Wade

    The acceptance of herbicide-resistant crops and the subsequent increase in glyphosate use throughout the growing season has led to increased problems with herbicide drift in corn and cotton. Potential yield losses due to herbicide spray drift cannot always be accurately assessed using visual ratings or by measuring reductions in plant height. This research was conducted to determine if other methods, such as biochemical assays or remote sensing, could be used to assess potential yield reductions and visual injury associated with herbicide drift. Other objectives included using hyperspectral and multispectral remote sensing for herbicide drift detection in corn and cotton. Classification accuracies were highest 14 DAA when distinguishing untreated from treated corn. When the data were classified by herbicides, overall accuracies of ≥74% resulted 14 and 28 DAA. Classifications based on yield reduction also resulted in highest overall classification accuracies 14 and 28 DAA, ranging from 69 to 70%. Within the glufosinate-treated corn, overall accuracies for classifying percent yield reductions was 85% at 3 DAA and decreased to 68% at 28 DAA. Overall classification accuracies for determining percent yield reductions with glyphosate were higher 14 and 28 DAA. With pyrithiobac, overall accuracies for determining percent yield reductions ranged from 73 to 82% across all evaluations. Of the nine vegetative indices tested to classify the data, Anthocyanin Reflective Index (ARI) and Chlorophyll Fluorescence Ratio of reflectance at 735 nm/700 nm (CF 735) were the most important for classifying, assessing, and detecting herbicide spray drift in corn. Multispectral aerial imagery was also used to identify cotton affected by a simulated bromoxynil drift event. Multispectral aerial imagery collected 9 DAA in 2002 resulted in better classification accuracies for identifying bromoxynil rate, percent visual injury, and percent yield reduction than imagery collected 21 DAA in 2001

  5. Gaining Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses issues schools and universities have encountered in complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and making their facilities more accessible to the disabled. The ADA's vagueness and the architect's need for understanding the regulations is highlighted. (GR)

  6. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  7. Capital access.

    PubMed

    Towne, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    To maintain their viability, hospitals are being compelled to invest in big capital projects such as information technology and renovation and construction. This gatefold examines the trends in credit and capital, and how they affect hospitals' access to money.

  8. Estimated energy budget along drifting buoys trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Planton, S.; Caniaux, G.; Roquet, H.

    1994-12-31

    The heat budget of upper ocean is strongly constrained by ocean-atmosphere heat exchange. The energy surface fluxes are poorly determined by the classical empirical formulae. These determinations also need good quality atmospheric and surface observations which are sparse over the global ocean. Surface solar incoming radiation is now routinely retrieved from satellite observation with a satisfactory level of confidence. The calculation of satellite-derived infrared incoming radiation gives promising results when compared to direct observation at sea. A new method of determination of the last component of the energy budget which avoid a calculation through bulk formulae, has been experimented with oceanic data. It is applied here to drifting buoys measurements collected in 1992 and 1993 in the Azores region.

  9. Lower hybrid drift waves: space observations.

    PubMed

    Norgren, Cecilia; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri V; André, Mats

    2012-08-01

    Lower hybrid drift waves (LHDWs) are commonly observed at plasma boundaries in space and laboratory, often having the strongest measured electric fields within these regions. We use data from two of the Cluster satellites (C3 and C4) located in Earth's magnetotail and separated by a distance of the order of the electron gyroscale. These conditions allow us, for the first time, to make cross-spacecraft correlations of the LHDWs and to determine the phase velocity and wavelength of the LHDWs. Our results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We show that the electrostatic potential of LHDWs is linearly related to fluctuations in the magnetic field magnitude, which allows us to determine the velocity vector through the relation ∫δEdt·v = ϕ(δB)(∥). The electrostatic potential fluctuations correspond to ∼10% of the electron temperature, which suggests that the waves can strongly affect the electron dynamics. PMID:23006181

  10. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgalla, R. J. F.

    2015-02-01

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ˜ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λr ˜ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs).

  11. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sgalla, R. J. F.

    2015-02-15

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ∼ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λ{sub r} ∼ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs)

  12. Drift-Kinetic Simulations of Neoclassical Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.

    2008-11-01

    We present results from numerical studies of neoclassical transport for multi-species plasmas. The code, NEO, provides a first-principles based calculation of the neoclassical transport coefficients directly from solution of the distribution function by solving a hierarchy of equations derived by expanding the fundamental drift-kinetic equation in powers of {rho}{sub *i}, the ratio of the ion gyroradius to system size. It extends previous studies by including the self-consistent coupling of electrons and multiple ion species and strong toroidal rotation effects. Systematic calculations of the second-order particle and energy fluxes and first-order plasma flows and bootstrap current and comparisons with existing theories are given for multi-species plasmas. The ambipolar relation {sigma}{sub a}z{sub a}{gamma}{sub a} = 0, which can only be maintained with complete cross-species collisional coupling, is confirmed. The effects of plasma shaping are also explored.

  13. Mixed Layer Drift Revealed by Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Zhao, Yun-He; Esaias, Wayne E.; Campbell, Janet W.; Moore, Timothy; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the first time we are able to derive ocean currents using the wavelet algorithm for feature tracking from two different sensors (MODIS and SeaWiFS) on different satellites. Satellite ocean color data provide an important insight to the marine biosphere because of their capability to quantify certain fundamental properties (such as phytoplankton pigment concentration, marine primary production, etc.) on a global basis. The mixed layer drift can be derived because the ocean color signal bears information from a much larger depth (10 to 30 meters) as compared with the sea surface temperature data. Although the drifter data are very limited in the study area, the comparison shows a general agreement between drifter data and satellite tracking results, especially for the cases near the Gulf Stream boundary.

  14. Nonlinear analysis of the gradient drift instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Rafael; Vega, Matías de la

    An analytical study of the gradient drift instability in the equatorial electrojet of wavelengths in the order of one kilometer is presented. Different mechanisms, linear, non-local and turbulent, are found in the literature to explain the predominance of the 1 km wavelength in the electrojet. In the present work a simplified model is proposed in which the nonlinear evolution of three coupled modes is followed. By considering that one of the modes attains the stationary state, the evolution of the other two is obtained, and it is found that they follow equations of the Lotka-Volterra type. A stable stationary nonlinear solution for these equations is also found, and the conditions under which periodic solutions are possible are analyzed.

  15. Anomalous phase shifts in drift wave fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Ahmed; Skiff, Fred

    2003-10-01

    Ion phase space density fluctuation measurements are performed in a linearly magnetized device using Laser Induced Fluorescence(LIF). An ICP source produces an 8cm diameter plasma column that drifts in a cylindrical vessel whose diameter and length are 40 cm and 3 m, respectively. These experiments are performed using a CW singly ionized Argon plasma that is immersed in a 1kG magnetic field along the axis of the cylinder. A density of the order of 10^9 cm-3 is obtained under a regulated neutral background pressure of 2.× 10-4 torr. The electron and ion temperature are respectively 2 eV and 0.1 eV. LIF is carried out by pumping the Ar II metastable (3d^1)^2G_9/2, using a CW tunable laser centered at 611.6653 nm scanned over 6 GHz, to metastable (4p^1)F_7/2, and then detecting the 460nm photons emitted from its transition to (4s^1)^2F_5/2. This collection is made possible using two low f-umber periscopes that are directed to PMTs. Here we present measurements of the complex two-point correlation function < f(v_i_allel),z_1,ω)f(v_i_allel,z_2,ω)> as a function of the spatial separation of two LIF detection systems Δ d = z_2-z_1, the ion parallel velocity v_i_allel and the frequency ω. Preliminary results show ion particle velocity dependent phase shifts at the drift wave frequency.

  16. Discordant antigenic drift of neuraminidase and hemagglutinin in H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sandbulte, Matthew R.; Westgeest, Kim B.; Gao, Jin; Xu, Xiyan; Klimov, Alexander I.; Russell, Colin A.; Burke, David F.; Smith, Derek J.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Eichelberger, Maryna C.

    2011-01-01

    Seasonal epidemics caused by influenza virus are driven by antigenic changes (drift) in viral surface glycoproteins that allow evasion from preexisting humoral immunity. Antigenic drift is a feature of not only the hemagglutinin (HA), but also of neuraminidase (NA). We have evaluated the antigenic evolution of each protein in H1N1 and H3N2 viruses used in vaccine formulations during the last 15 y by analysis of HA and NA inhibition titers and antigenic cartography. As previously shown for HA, genetic changes in NA did not always lead to an antigenic change. The noncontinuous pattern of NA drift did not correspond closely with HA drift in either subtype. Although NA drift was demonstrated using ferret sera, we show that these changes also impact recognition by NA-inhibiting antibodies in human sera. Remarkably, a single point mutation in the NA of A/Brisbane/59/2007 was primarily responsible for the lack of inhibition by polyclonal antibodies specific for earlier strains. These data underscore the importance of NA inhibition testing to define antigenic drift when there are sequence changes in NA. PMID:22143798

  17. A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This Annual Status Report describes the design, development and implementation of the Minority On-Line Information Service (MOLIS) project by Federal Information Exchange, Inc. for the period of April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992. Summary information detailing developments prior to this reporting period will also be included to establish a comprehensive perspective of the project. The goal of the MOLIS project, was to develop, design, pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities and federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since April 29, 1991, the inauguration of its on-line service, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, pre-college and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from 8 participating federal agencies.

  18. IN-DRIFT MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES MODEL VALIDATION CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Jolley

    2001-12-18

    The objective and scope of this calculation is to create the appropriate parameter input for MING 1.0 (CSCI 30018 V1.0, CRWMS M&O 1998b) that will allow the testing of the results from the MING software code with both scientific measurements of microbial populations at the site and laboratory and with natural analogs to the site. This set of calculations provides results that will be used in model validation for the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' model (CRWMS M&O 2000) which is part of the Engineered Barrier System Department (EBS) process modeling effort that eventually will feed future Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models. This calculation is being produced to replace MING model validation output that is effected by the supersession of DTN M09909SPAMINGl.003 using its replacement DTN M00106SPAIDMO 1.034 so that the calculations currently found in the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' AMR (CRWMS M&O 2000) will be brought up to date. This set of calculations replaces the calculations contained in sections 6.7.2, 6.7.3 and Attachment I of CRWMS M&O (2000) As all of these calculations are created explicitly for model validation, the data qualification status of all inputs can be considered corroborative in accordance with AP-3.15Q. This work activity has been evaluated in accordance with the AP-2.21 procedure, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', and is subject to QA controls (BSC 2001). The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12 procedure, Calculations, and prepared in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For EBS Department Modeling FY 01 Work Activities'' (BSC 200 1) which includes controls for the management of electronic data.

  19. In-Drift Microbial Communities Model Validation Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Jolley

    2001-09-24

    The objective and scope of this calculation is to create the appropriate parameter input for MING 1.0 (CSCI 30018 V1.0, CRWMS M&O 1998b) that will allow the testing of the results from the MING software code with both scientific measurements of microbial populations at the site and laboratory and with natural analogs to the site. This set of calculations provides results that will be used in model validation for the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' model (CRWMS M&O 2000) which is part of the Engineered Barrier System Department (EBS) process modeling effort that eventually will feed future Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models. This calculation is being produced to replace MING model validation output that is effected by the supersession of DTN MO9909SPAMING1.003 using its replacement DTN MO0106SPAIDM01.034 so that the calculations currently found in the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' AMR (CRWMS M&O 2000) will be brought up to date. This set of calculations replaces the calculations contained in sections 6.7.2, 6.7.3 and Attachment I of CRWMS M&O (2000) As all of these calculations are created explicitly for model validation, the data qualification status of all inputs can be considered corroborative in accordance with AP-3.15Q. This work activity has been evaluated in accordance with the AP-2.21 procedure, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', and is subject to QA controls (BSC 2001). The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12 procedure, Calculations, and prepared in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For EBS Department Modeling FY 01 Work Activities'' (BSC 2001) which includes controls for the management of electronic data.

  20. In-Drift Microbial Communities Model Validation Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Jolley

    2001-10-31

    The objective and scope of this calculation is to create the appropriate parameter input for MING 1.0 (CSCI 30018 V1.0, CRWMS M&O 1998b) that will allow the testing of the results from the MING software code with both scientific measurements of microbial populations at the site and laboratory and with natural analogs to the site. This set of calculations provides results that will be used in model validation for the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' model (CRWMS M&O 2000) which is part of the Engineered Barrier System Department (EBS) process modeling effort that eventually will feed future Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models. This calculation is being produced to replace MING model validation output that is effected by the supersession of DTN MO9909SPAMING1.003 using its replacement DTN MO0106SPAIDM01.034 so that the calculations currently found in the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' AMR (CRWMS M&O 2000) will be brought up to date. This set of calculations replaces the calculations contained in sections 6.7.2, 6.7.3 and Attachment I of CRWMS M&O (2000) As all of these calculations are created explicitly for model validation, the data qualification status of all inputs can be considered corroborative in accordance with AP-3.15Q. This work activity has been evaluated in accordance with the AP-2.21 procedure, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', and is subject to QA controls (BSC 2001). The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12 procedure, Calculations, and prepared in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For EBS Department Modeling FY 01 Work Activities'' (BSC 2001) which includes controls for the management of electronic data.

  1. LIDAR as an alternative to passive collectors to measure pesticide spray drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorio, Eduard; Rosell-Polo, Joan R.; Sanz, Ricardo; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Solanelles, Francesc; Garcerá, Cruz; Chueca, Patricia; Arnó, Jaume; del Moral, Ignacio; Masip, Joan; Camp, Ferran; Viana, Rafael; Escolà, Alexandre; Gràcia, Felip; Planas, Santiago; Moltó, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide spray drift entails a series of risks and costs in terms of human, animal and environmental well-being. A proper understanding of this phenomenon is essential to minimise these risks. However, most conventional methods used in drift measurement are based on point collectors which are unable to obtain information concerning the temporal or spatial evolution of the pesticide cloud. Such methods are also costly, labour-intensive, and require a considerable amount of time. The aim of this paper is to propose a method to measure the spray drift based on lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) and to prove that it can be an alternative to passive collectors. An analytical model is proposed to relate the measurements obtained through passive collectors and those obtained with lidar systems considering several spray application and meteorological parameters. The model was tested through an experimental campaign involving multiple ground spray tests. A lidar system and two types of passive collectors (nylon strings and water-sensitive paper) were used simultaneously to measure the drift. The results showed for each test a high coefficient of determination (R2 ≈ 0.90) between the lidar signal and the tracer mass captured by the nylon strings. This coefficient decreased (R2 = 0.77) when all tests were considered together. Lidar measurements were also used to study the evolution of the pesticide cloud with high range (1.5 m) and temporal resolution (1 s) and to estimate its velocity. Furthermore, a very satisfactory adjustment (R2 = 0.89) was observed between the tracer mass collected by the nylon lines and the coverage on water-sensitive paper sheets. These results are in accordance with the proposed analytical model and allow the conclusion that the application and meteorological parameters can be considered spatially invariant for a given test but are not invariant for different tests.

  2. Visualization experiment to investigate capillary barrier performance in the context of a Yucca Mountain emplacement drift.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Vincent C; Glass, Robert J; Chocas, Connie; Barker, Glenn; Orear, Lee

    2003-01-01

    The use of capillary barriers as engineered backfill systems to divert water away from radioactive waste potentially stored in a Yucca Mountain emplacement drift is investigated. We designed and conducted a flow visualization experiment to investigate capillary barrier performance in this context. A two-dimensional, thin slab, test system replicated the physical emplacement drift to one-quarter scale (1.4-m diameter) and included the simulated drift wall, waste canister, pedestal, capillary barrier backfill, and host-rock fracture system. Water was supplied at the top of the simulated drift and allowed to discharge by way of wicks located along the left wall of the cell (simulated fractures) or by a gravity drain at the bottom of the right side (simulated impermeable rock with floor drain). Photographs captured the migration of water and a blue dye tracer within the system, analytical balances measured the mass balance of water, while tensiometers measured the capillary pressure at numerous locations. Of particular concern to this test was the drainage of the capillary barrier, which terminates against the drift wall. We found that while the simulated fractures (left side) and drain (right side) each influenced the performance of the capillary barrier at early time, they had little differential affect at later times. Also of concern was the small disparity in capillary properties between the fine and coarse layer (limited by the need of a fine-grained material that would not filter into the coarse layer under dry conditions). While the capillary barrier was able to divert the majority of flow toward the edges of the system and away from the simulated waste canister, the barrier did not preclude flow in the coarse layer, which was noted to be visually wet next to the waste canister on day 92 and was continuing to take on water at termination on day 112.

  3. The initial value problem in Lagrangian drift kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burby, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    > Existing high-order variational drift kinetic theories contain unphysical rapidly varying modes that are not seen at low orders. These unphysical modes, which may be rapidly oscillating, damped or growing, are ushered in by a failure of conventional high-order drift kinetic theory to preserve the structure of its parent model's initial value problem. In short, the (infinite dimensional) system phase space is unphysically enlarged in conventional high-order variational drift kinetic theory. I present an alternative, `renormalized' variational approach to drift kinetic theory that manifestly respects the parent model's initial value problem. The basic philosophy underlying this alternate approach is that high-order drift kinetic theory ought to be derived by truncating the all-orders system phase-space Lagrangian instead of the usual `field particle' Lagrangian. For the sake of clarity, this story is told first through the lens of a finite-dimensional toy model of high-order variational drift kinetics; the analogous full-on drift kinetic story is discussed subsequently. The renormalized drift kinetic system, while variational and just as formally accurate as conventional formulations, does not support the troublesome rapidly varying modes.

  4. VERIFYING THE PERFORMANCE OF PESTICIDE SPRAY DRIFT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of pesticide sprays usually results in formation of small spray droplets which can drift with air currents to nearby sensitive sites. A number of technologies offer the potential to reduce the amount of spray drift from pesticide applications. Acceptance and use of ...

  5. Comparison of ionospheric plasma drifts obtained by different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Daniel; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan; Toker, Cenk; Mosna, Zbysek; Gok, Gokhan; Rejfek, Lubos; Ari, Gizem

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric observatory in Pruhonice (Czech Republic, 50N, 14.9E) provides regular ionospheric sounding using Digisonde DPS-4D. The paper is focused on F-region vertical drift data. Vertical component of the drift velocity vector can be estimated by several methods. Digisonde DPS-4D allows sounding in drift mode with direct output represented by drift velocity vector. The Digisonde located in Pruhonice provides direct drift measurement routinely once per 15 minutes. However, also other different techniques can be found in the literature, for example the indirect estimation based on the temporal evolution of measured ionospheric characteristics is often used for calculation of the vertical drift component. The vertical velocity is thus estimated according to the change of characteristics scaled from the classical quarter-hour ionograms. In present paper direct drift measurement is compared with technique based on measuring of the virtual height at fixed frequency from the F-layer trace on ionogram, technique based on variation of h`F and hmF. This comparison shows possibility of using different methods for calculating vertical drift velocity and their relationship to the direct measurement used by Digisonde. This study is supported by the Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001 projects.

  6. 40 CFR 161.440 - Spray drift data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Data Requirement Tables § 161.440 Spray drift data requirements. (a) Table. Sections 161.100 through 161.102 describe how to use this table to... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Spray drift data requirements....

  7. 40 CFR 161.440 - Spray drift data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Data Requirement Tables § 161.440 Spray drift data requirements. (a) Table. Sections 161.100 through 161.102 describe how to use this table to... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Spray drift data requirements....

  8. 40 CFR 161.440 - Spray drift data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Data Requirement Tables § 161.440 Spray drift data requirements. (a) Table. Sections 161.100 through 161.102 describe how to use this table to... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Spray drift data requirements....

  9. 50 CFR 660.713 - Drift gillnet fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drift gillnet fishery. 660.713 Section 660.713 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Highly Migratory Fisheries § 660.713 Drift gillnet fishery. (a)...

  10. Transition density of one-dimensional diffusion with discontinuous drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Weijian

    1990-01-01

    The transition density of a one-dimensional diffusion process with a discontinuous drift coefficient is studied. A probabilistic representation of the transition density is given, illustrating the close connections between discontinuities of the drift and Brownian local times. In addition, some explicit results are obtained based on the trivariate density of Brownian motion, its occupation, and local times.

  11. Variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.; Potter, James M.; Stovall, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear accelerator system includes a plurality of post-coupled drift-tubes wherein each post coupler is bistably positionable to either of two positions which result in different field distributions. With binary control over a plurality of post couplers, a significant accumlative effect in the resulting field distribution is achieved yielding a variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator.

  12. Variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.; Potter, J.M.; Stovall, J.E.

    A linear accelerator system includes a plurality of post-coupled drift-tubes wherein each post coupler is bistably positionable to either of two positions which result in different field distributions. With binary control over a plurality of post couplers, a significant accumlative effect in the resulting field distribution is achieved yielding a variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator.

  13. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, Donald J.; Schamaun, Roger G.; Clark, Donald C.; Potter, R. Christopher; Frank, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  14. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

    1980-03-11

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  15. 50 CFR 660.713 - Drift gillnet fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... with, set, or haul back drift gillnet gear in U.S. waters of the Pacific Ocean from August 15 through... drift gillnet gear in U.S. waters of the Pacific Ocean east of the 120° W. meridian from June 1 through... from the Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction Plan established under the authority of the...

  16. 50 CFR 660.713 - Drift gillnet fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with, set, or haul back drift gillnet gear in U.S. waters of the Pacific Ocean from August 15 through... drift gillnet gear in U.S. waters of the Pacific Ocean east of the 120° W. meridian from June 1 through... from the Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction Plan established under the authority of the...

  17. Ground-water resources in New Hampshire; stratified-drift aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medalie, Laura; Moore, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Stratified-drift aquifers underlie about 14 percent of the land surface in New Hampshire and are an important source of ground water for commercial, industrial, domestic, and public-water supplies in the State. This report introduces terms and concepts relevant to ground-water resources, summarizes some of the important information derived from a statewide stratified-drift-aquifer investigation, and provides examples of how the findings are used . The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the stratified-drift aquifer assessment program, thus making summary information accessible to a broad audience, including legislators, State and local officials, and the public. Different audiences will use the report in different ways . To accommodate the varied audiences, some data are summarized statewide, some are presented by major river basin, and some are provided by town. During data collection, care was taken to use consistent methods for each of the 13 study areas (fig. 1) so that results would be comparable throughout the State . If more specific or detailed information about a particular area of interest is needed, the reader is directed to one or more of the technical reports listed in the Selected References section of this report.

  18. Remote sensing as input and validation tool for oil spill drift modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baschek, Björn; Dick, Stephan; Janssen, Frank; Kübert, Carina; Massmann, Silvia; Pape, Marlon; Roers, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Remote sensing by aerial surveillance and from satellites is used operationally as a combined tool for detection and characterization of maritime pollution by oil spills. For Germany, the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies (CCME) applies two aircraft of the type Dornier 228 with multi-sensor systems. In addition, radar satellite images are received via the CleanSeaNet Service. By these means, important information is gained as a support for oil spill response and for advanced monitoring: Among other things the existence, location and distribution of spills are delivered. This is valuable input for numerical models for drift prediction. As part of the German "DeMarine-Environment" project a prototype for a processing chain has been developed, validated and tested quasi operationally by the Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) in cooperation with the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH). In this way, a partly automatic coupling of remote sensing and operational drift modelling has been realized. By using this prototype, a method for drift model validation was developed: Chains of several observations by satellite or aircraft of one individual spill are compared to the results of the drift prognosis started from the first observation.

  19. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, J.; Jaskierny, W. F.

    2015-08-21

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7 cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163 K), the drift speed is 0.193 ± 0.003 cm/μs while the drift speed in the solid phase (157 K) is 0.397 ± 0.006 cm/μs at 900 V/cm over 8.0 cm of uniform electric fields. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a factor twomore » faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.« less

  20. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, J.; Jaskierny, W. F.

    2015-08-21

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7 cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163 K), the drift speed is 0.193 ± 0.003 cm/μs while the drift speed in the solid phase (157 K) is 0.397 ± 0.006 cm/μs at 900 V/cm over 8.0 cm of uniform electric fields. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a factor two faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.