Science.gov

Sample records for access equity quality

  1. Resource Adequacy, Equity, and the Right to Learn: Access to High-Quality Teachers in Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoeppel, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Using school-level descriptive data, this study examined the distribution of teachers in the Commonwealth of Kentucky in an attempt to build on previous research concerning the equity of the finance system in the state. Rather than focusing on revenue from the perspective of horizontal equity, this study used human resource data to examine the…

  2. South Africa: Distance Higher Education Policies for Access, Social Equity, Quality, and Social and Economic Responsiveness in a Context of the Diversity of Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badat, Saleem

    2005-01-01

    The principal concern of this paper is the implication of the increasing diversity of higher education provision in South Africa for equity of access and opportunity for historically disadvantaged social groups, high-quality provision, and social and economic responsiveness in distance higher education. This diversity is signalled by a variety of…

  3. Globalisation and schooling: equity and access issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajda, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    This review essay focuses on the prominence given to globalisation and discourses of globalisation in education reforms and pedagogy, as well as the way conceptual thinking in this area has changed and developed, due to competing ideologies, forces of globalisation and political, economic and cultural transformations. It analyses and evaluates the shifts in methodological approaches to globalisation and its effects on education policy and pedagogy. It focuses on forces of globalisation, ideology, social inequality and implications for equity and access to quality education.

  4. Education between Quality and Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Lutz-Rainer; And Others

    Papers read by three German educationalists at a workshop on "Education between Quality and Equity" are included in this document. The first, by Han Leo Reimann, is entitled "Simulated Reality: The Instructional Objectives within the Framework of Pedagogical Paper Plays." This paper describes a gaming method of simulating realistic planning and…

  5. Language Diversity and Language Policy in Educational Access and Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tollefson, James W.; Tsui, Amy B. M.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the role of language policies in mediating access and equity in education. By examining a range of research and case studies on language policies, the authors explore how educational language policies serve as a central gatekeeper to education itself, as well as to quality education that may fundamentally depend on language…

  6. Money, Equity, and College Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orfield, Gary

    1992-01-01

    Three decades after massive government commitment to financial aid, minority and low income access is declining and aid going to middle class students. Policies and political deadlock have worsened the situation of those in need, and hard choices must be made if college access is to be restored without greater expenditures. (SK)

  7. Access and utilisation of healthcare services in rural Tanzania: A comparison of public and non-public facilities using quality, equity, and trust dimensions.

    PubMed

    Shayo, Elizabeth H; Senkoro, Kesheni P; Momburi, Romanus; Olsen, Øystein E; Byskov, Jens; Makundi, Emmanuel A; Kamuzora, Peter; Mboera, Leonard E G

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the access and utilisation of health services in public and non-public health facilities in terms of quality, equity and trust in the Mbarali district, Tanzania. Interviews, focus group discussions, and informal discussions were used to generate data. Of the 1836 respondents, 1157 and 679 respondents sought healthcare services on their last visit at public or non-public health facilities, respectively. While 45.5% rated the quality of services to be good in both types of facilities, reported medicine shortages were more pronounced among those who visited public rather than non-public health facilities (OR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.4, 2.1). Respondents who visited public facilities were 4.9 times less likely than those who visited non-public facilities to emphasise the influence of cost in accessing and utilising health care (OR = 4.9, CI 3.9-6.1). A significant difference was also found in the provider-client relationship satisfaction level between non-public (89.1%) and public facilities (74.7%) (OR = 2.8, CI: 1.5-5.0), indicating a level of lower trust in the later. Revised strategies are needed to ensure availability of medicines in public facilities, which are used by the majority of the population, while strengthening private-public partnerships to harmonise healthcare costs. PMID:26883021

  8. Public health care provisions: access and equity.

    PubMed

    Bin Juni, M H

    1996-09-01

    Within the current exercise of reforming the health care system, underlying all issues, is the reassessment of the role of government. It is a government's responsibility and concern that the health sector be accessible and equitable to the population, and more important that the health sector be more efficient and affordable. Many governments in the world attempt to provide universal health care services to their population through public health care provisions. This paper reviews and analyses the experience of the Malaysian health system, focusing on the performance of the system in relation to access and equity. The performance of the Malaysian health system has been impressive. At minimum cost it has achieved virtually accessible and equitable health care to the entire population. This is evident by analysing almost all the commonly used indicators. These clearly show that when matched to comparable countries, health outcome is even better than predicted value. PMID:8870140

  9. Equity and Access in the Workplace: A Feminist HRD Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenziano, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The issues of equity and access are becoming increasingly important as the workforce becomes diversified. As the number of minority groups in the ranks of organizations grows, there is a need to examine the issues related to equity and access from a perspective that strives for equality, e.g. feminist theory. This paper examines feminism's…

  10. Three Dimensions of Equity of Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    Concerns over equity of access to higher education are widespread, but there is significant disagreement over what should constitute a fair system. This article assesses diverse conceptualisations of equity and explores the ways in which they embody themselves in the policies of three systems, those of England, Brazil and Kenya. While showing…

  11. The South Carolina Higher Education Access & Equity Program, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Access and Equity Program vision is to achieve educational equity for all students and faculty in higher education. Success in college should not be affected by a student's race. Minority enrollment should be at least proportional to the minority population in South Carolina and minority graduation rates should be comparable to the graduation…

  12. The Sublime Objects of Education Policy: Quality, Equity and Ideology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Quality and equity are touchstones of education policy in the twenty-first century in a range of global contexts. On the surface, this seems fitting: after all, who could object to more quality and greater equity in education? Yet what do we mean by quality and equity, and how are they related? This paper draws on Lacanian psychoanalytic theory to…

  13. Equity for open-access journal publishing.

    PubMed

    Shieber, Stuart M

    2009-08-01

    Open-access journals, which provide access to their scholarly articles freely and without limitations, are at a systematic disadvantage relative to traditional closed-access journal publishing and its subscription-based business model. A simple, cost-effective remedy to this inequity could put open-access publishing on a path to become a sustainable, efficient system. PMID:19652697

  14. Some Myths on Equity and Access in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitzer, E. M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is not a direct response to any particular contribution in the debate on the race-based affirmative action policy at the University of Cape Town (UCT). Rather, while I try to understand the essential line of argumentation of each of the UCT authors, my article points to the importance of equity and access as crucial factors in higher…

  15. Gender, sexuality and the discursive representation of access and equity in health services literature: implications for LGBT communities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    about, and ideological commitments to, sexual and gender diversity and health services access and equity. Thus, the continuum of discourses may serve as an important element of a health care organization's access and equity framework for the evaluation of access to good quality care for diverse LGBT populations. More specfically, the analysis offers four important points of consideration in relation to the development of a health services access and equity framework. PMID:21957894

  16. Equity, Quality and Cost in Higher Education: Research Study on Republic of Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korean Council for Univ. Education, Seoul (South Korea).

    Equity, quality, and cost in higher education is examined as it exists within the Republic of Korea. Chapter 1 of the report explores the background rationale for the study, which stemmed from an earlier study's conclusion that the Asian Pacific Region was experiencing deteriorating quality levels, access discrimination, and serious resource…

  17. Equity in access to fortified maize flour and corn meal

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Gerardo; De-Regil, Luz Maria

    2014-01-01

    Mass fortification of maize flour and corn meal with a single or multiple micronutrients is a public health intervention that aims to improve vitamin and mineral intake, micronutrient nutritional status, health, and development of the general population. Micronutrient malnutrition is unevenly distributed among population groups and is importantly determined by social factors, such as living conditions, socioeconomic position, gender, cultural norms, health systems, and the socioeconomic and political context in which people access food. Efforts trying to make fortified foods accessible to the population groups that most need them require acknowledgment of the role of these determinants. Using a perspective of social determinants of health, this article presents a conceptual framework to approach equity in access to fortified maize flour and corn meal, and provides nonexhaustive examples that illustrate the different levels included in the framework. Key monitoring areas and issues to consider in order to expand and guarantee a more equitable access to maize flour and corn meal are described. PMID:24329609

  18. Access and Equity for all Students: Students with Disabilities. Report 09-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Karen; Angeli, Mallory

    2009-01-01

    Access and equity for all students in higher education continues to be a high priority for the California Postsecondary Education Commission. Recent work in this area has focused on students with disabilities as well as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) students. The Commission formed an Access and Equity for All Students Advisory…

  19. Equity of access under Korean universal health insurance.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Moon

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the extent to which equity in the use of physician services has been achieved in the Republic of Korea. Descriptive and logistic regression analysis was performed examining the relationship between the dependent variable and the independent variables and the relative importance of factors. The results indicate that a universal health insurance system has not yielded a fully equitable distribution of services. Access differences arise from coverage limitation, as well as urban/rural variations in the distributions of providers. The policy options for expansion of coverage should be encouraged to ease the financial burden of out-of-pocket payments on patients and to limit the range of noninsured services. Urban/rural variations in the distributions of providers are caused by the government's "laissez-faire" policy for the private medical sector. To solve this geographic misdistribution, the attention of policy makers is required, with changing of the government's "laissez-faire" policy. PMID:22652252

  20. The University of Saskatchewan's Aboriginal Equity Access Program in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Teplitsky, Paul Elliot; Uswak, Gerald Stephen

    2014-02-01

    Persons of Aboriginal ancestry are underrepresented in the dental profession in North America. In Canada, the University of Saskatchewan College of Dentistry began a proactive program to recruit, retain, and graduate more Aboriginal students in 1996. This program, entitled the Aboriginal Equity Access Program, has seen the inclusion of twenty-two Aboriginal students in the predoctoral program. This article describes the program and reports on the success of the students enrolled via this route. The primary conclusion is that selection of Aboriginal dental students with lower entry scores--who would not have gained entry if the program did not exist--has not impaired their ability to successfully complete the dental undergraduate program and pass the National Dental Examining Board licensure examination. PMID:24489025

  1. Towards Equity in the Futures Market: Curriculum as a Condition of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Linda J.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a consideration of the problem of equity in education. In the first part of the discussion, the author draws on philosophical and sociological literature to consider what equity means and its implications for education. Drawing on work by Burbules, Lord and Sherman, she looks to curriculum as a condition of access and the…

  2. Student Equity at Antelope Valley College: An Examination of Underrepresented Student Access and Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewallen, Willard Clark

    In February 1994, Antelope Valley College (AVC), in California, adopted a Student Equity Plan to determine the access and success of historically underrepresented students. As part of the Plan, AVC collected data on five student equity indicators: a comparison of ethnic group enrollment to representation in the service area, the ratio of courses…

  3. Equity 2001. Strategies To Achieve Access and Equity in Vocational Education and Training for the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Training Authority, Brisbane.

    This report, based on national consultations with community, industry, and government stakeholders in Australia, as well as an analysis of the recommendations of 60 major reports on access and equity in vocational education and training prepared since 1990, brings together the key strategic areas where cooperative and concerted activity for access…

  4. Access to Education and Equity in Plural Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiztegui-Onate, Concepcion; Santibanez-Gruber, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of school systems which, under the assumption of formal equality, do not correct, but rather legitimate, social differences, has a long tradition in educational research. This topic has been broadened and enriched through the discourse of equity. In effect, equity in education pivots on redistribution proportional to the needs of…

  5. Social Equity and Access to a Philippine STEM School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talaue, Frederick Toralballa

    2014-01-01

    Like most developing countries in the world, there is a huge gap in opportunities to access quality science education between students from the high- and low-socioeconomic strata of Philippine society. In establishing its own science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) high school, despite limited public funding in 1964, the…

  6. The impact of alternative cost recovery schemes on access and equity in Niger.

    PubMed

    Diop, F; Yazbeck, A; Bitrán, R

    1995-09-01

    The authors examine accessibility and the sustainability of quality health care in a rural setting under two alternative cost recovery methods, a fee-for-service method and a type of social financing (risk-sharing) strategy based on an annual tax+fee-for-service. Both methods were accompanied by similar interventions aimed at improving the quality of primary health services. Based on pilot tests of cost recovery in the non-hospital sector in Niger, the article presents results from baseline and final survey data, as well as from facility utilization, cost, and revenue data collected in two test districts and a control district. Cost recovery accompanied by quality improvements increases equity and access to health care and the type of cost recovery method used can make a difference. In Niger, higher access for women, children, and the poor resulted from the tax+fee method, than from the pure fee-for-service method. Moreover, revenue generation per capita under the tax+fee method was two times higher than under the fee-for-service method, suggesting that the prospects of sustainability were better under the social financing strategy. However, sustainability under cost recovery and improved quality depends as much on policy measures aimed at cost containment, particularly for drugs, as on specific cost recovery methods. PMID:10151841

  7. Quality and equity in early childhood care in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izu, Regina Moromizato

    2007-01-01

    The present study examines educational policy documents and programs on early childhood development and education in Peru. The author provides an evaluation of early childhood learning programs and their outcomes in different education centers in Peru. Health, nutrition, development, and participation are identified as key areas of concern. The study concludes with a reference to the importance of monitoring quality and equity in early childhood care.

  8. Universal Health Insurance in India: Ensuring Equity, Efficiency, and Quality

    PubMed Central

    Prinja, Shankar; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Indian health system is characterized by a vast public health infrastructure which lies underutilized, and a largely unregulated private market which caters to greater need for curative treatment. High out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenditures poses barrier to access for healthcare. Among those who get hospitalized, nearly 25% are pushed below poverty line by catastrophic impact of OOP healthcare expenditure. Moreover, healthcare costs are spiraling due to epidemiologic, demographic, and social transition. Hence, the need for risk pooling is imperative. The present article applies economic theories to various possibilities for providing risk pooling mechanism with the objective of ensuring equity, efficiency, and quality care. Asymmetry of information leads to failure of actuarially administered private health insurance (PHI). Large proportion of informal sector labor in India's workforce prevents major upscaling of social health insurance (SHI). Community health insurance schemes are difficult to replicate on a large scale. We strongly recommend institutionalization of tax-funded Universal Health Insurance Scheme (UHIS), with complementary role of PHI. The contextual factors for development of UHIS are favorable. SHI schemes should be merged with UHIS. Benefit package of this scheme should include preventive and in-patient curative care to begin with, and gradually include out-patient care. State-specific priorities should be incorporated in benefit package. Application of such an insurance system besides being essential to the goals of an effective health system provides opportunity to regulate private market, negotiate costs, and plan health services efficiently. Purchaser-provider split provides an opportunity to strengthen public sector by allowing providers to compete. PMID:23112438

  9. Universal health insurance in India: ensuring equity, efficiency, and quality.

    PubMed

    Prinja, Shankar; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    Indian health system is characterized by a vast public health infrastructure which lies underutilized, and a largely unregulated private market which caters to greater need for curative treatment. High out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenditures poses barrier to access for healthcare. Among those who get hospitalized, nearly 25% are pushed below poverty line by catastrophic impact of OOP healthcare expenditure. Moreover, healthcare costs are spiraling due to epidemiologic, demographic, and social transition. Hence, the need for risk pooling is imperative. The present article applies economic theories to various possibilities for providing risk pooling mechanism with the objective of ensuring equity, efficiency, and quality care. Asymmetry of information leads to failure of actuarially administered private health insurance (PHI). Large proportion of informal sector labor in India's workforce prevents major upscaling of social health insurance (SHI). Community health insurance schemes are difficult to replicate on a large scale. We strongly recommend institutionalization of tax-funded Universal Health Insurance Scheme (UHIS), with complementary role of PHI. The contextual factors for development of UHIS are favorable. SHI schemes should be merged with UHIS. Benefit package of this scheme should include preventive and in-patient curative care to begin with, and gradually include out-patient care. State-specific priorities should be incorporated in benefit package. Application of such an insurance system besides being essential to the goals of an effective health system provides opportunity to regulate private market, negotiate costs, and plan health services efficiently. Purchaser-provider split provides an opportunity to strengthen public sector by allowing providers to compete. PMID:23112438

  10. Rocks in the Whirlpool: Equity of Access and the American Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCook, Kathleen de la Pena

    This paper provides some of the historical context of the efforts of the American Library Association (ALA) to define, extend, protect and advocate for equity of access, focusing on central tendencies rather than internal debate. The first section, "Toward the Concept of Access," discusses: how ALA became a public service organization; extension…

  11. New Technology and Digital Worlds: Analyzing Evidence of Equity in Access, Use, and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warschauer, Mark; Matuchniak, Tina

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors take a broad perspective on how to analyze issues of technology and equity for youth in the United States. They begin with "access" as a starting point, but consider not only whether diverse groups of youth have digital media available to them but also how that access is supported or constrained by technological and…

  12. Australia's Research Quality Framework and Gender Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austen, Siobhan

    2008-01-01

    This article presents quantitative evidence that shows that the introduction of a research assessment scheme similar to the proposed Research Quality Framework (RQF) is likely to exacerbate gender inequity in the Australian university sector. It contributes new measures of gender differences in the publications records of Australian academics. It…

  13. After-School for All? Exploring Access and Equity in After-School Programs. Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Karen; Wilson-Ahlstrom, Alicia; Yohalem, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    While significant progress has occurred over the past several years regarding the expansion of the quantity and quality of after-school opportunities, the ambitious idea of "after-school for all" remains a distant goal. In this commentary, we push beyond some of the numbers to take a close look at questions related to access and equity, in order…

  14. Incorporating Access to More Effective Teachers into Assessments of Educational Resource Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastian, Kevin C.; Henry, Gary T.; Thompson, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    To address gaps in achievement between more- and less-affluent students, states and districts need to ensure that high-poverty students and schools have equitable access to educational resources. Traditionally, assessments of resource equity have focused on per-pupil expenditures and more proximal inputs, such as teacher credentials and class…

  15. Access and Equity for All Students: Meeting the Needs of LGBT Students. Report 09-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Mallory

    2009-01-01

    Access and equity for all students in California colleges and universities is a high priority of the California Postsecondary Education Commission. Over the past year, CPEC staff have reviewed research, collected data, convened an advisory committee, and hosted a panel of experts, students, and advocates on the issues faced by lesbian, gay,…

  16. Equity and Access to Higher Education in the Context of Educational Expansion and Differentiation in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    Internationally, higher education has expanded greatly since the closing decades of the twentieth century. China was no exception. This study is intended to examine the status quo of issues relating to equity and access to higher education in the context of educational expansion and differentiation in China. Two research questions are addressed in…

  17. Exploring Access and Equity in Higher Education: Policy and Performance in a Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clancy, Patrick; Goastellec, Gaele

    2007-01-01

    A comparative analysis of how access and equity are defined and how policies have evolved reveals a number of commonalities and differences between countries. The overall trend is a movement from the priority given to "inherited merit" in the admission process through a commitment to formal equality, towards the application of some modes of…

  18. Social Justice in Chinese Higher Education: Regional Issues of Equity and Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, W. James

    2006-01-01

    A topic of growing concern in Chinese higher education to policy-makers, scholars, and future student applicants is social justice. With the trend toward increasing enrollments in China's higher-education institutions, issues of equity and access have begun to surface, especially as they relate to China's minority population of over 100 million…

  19. Implications of Financing Higher Education for Access and Equity: The Case of Syria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabbani, Nader; Salloum, Siba

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the implications for access and equity of the Syrian government's efforts to reform higher education in the country over the past decade. In the context of social and economic reforms that are moving the county from a state-controlled to a social market economy, it focuses on adequacy in financing higher education, as well as…

  20. Access, Equity, and Capacity in Asia-Pacific Higher Education. International and Development Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Deane, Ed.; Tanaka, Yoshiro, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Access, equity and capacity are elements within the higher education environment that interact in complex ways to affect virtually all other aspects of such institutions. This volume examines various features of how these concepts are generated, transformed throughout policy environments, and deployed across the complex differences of higher…

  1. Access and Equity: California Master Plan for Higher Education and Disadvantaged Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    The California Master Plan for Higher Education sets a policy objective of equity through access to higher education. The California State University system is California's primary institution for providing the social mobility that accompanies a four-year college degree. The purpose of this study is to examine the education lifecycle outcomes for…

  2. Faculty Collaboration to Improve Equity, Access, and Inclusion in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernacchio, Charlie; Ross, Flynn; Washburn, Kimberley Robinson; Whitney, Jean; Wood, Diane R.

    2007-01-01

    This article documents the Critical Friends Group (CFG) process five university colleagues used to blend the theoretical frameworks of Universal Design for Learning (Rose & Meyer, 2002) and Interactive Phase Theory (McIntosh, 1990) as tools to increase equity and access in our classrooms. Using the CFG reflective approach, the faculty…

  3. Adult Instructors' Perceptions on ICT and Diffusion Practices: Implications for Equity of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas-Amescua, Bertha

    2007-01-01

    This study suggests equity of access goes beyond technological availability. Based on a larger exploratory study of the initial implementation stage of the Mexican government's community technology centers, CTCs ("plazas comunitarias"), adult education instructors' perceptions and diffusion practices are described as a mediating factor…

  4. Equity in Access to Health Promotion and Risk Reduction Services: Implications for Elder Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nancy H.; Howze, Elizabeth Harper

    Although there is a national emphasis on health promotion and preventive practices, questions remain regarding the equity of access to these services by low income and minority groups, and the implications of inequities for elder health. Data from a systematic survey of 500 public and private providers of health promotion services in northern…

  5. Revisiting Educational Equity and Quality in China through Confucianism, Policy, Research, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mu, Guanglun Michael; Zheng, Xinrong; Jia, Ning; Li, Xiaohua; Wang, Shaoyi; Chen, Yanchuan; He, Ying; May, Lyn; Carter, Merilyn; Dooley, Karen; Berwick, Adon; Sobyra, Angela; Diezmann, Carmel

    2013-01-01

    The promotion of educational equity and improvement of educational quality in China are contextualised in tenets of Confucianism and policy directives, inspiring educational research and practice. In this paper, we first explore the historical and cultural roots of educational equity and quality through Confucianism and elaborate on the current…

  6. Girls' Education: Community Approaches to Access and Quality. Strong Beginnings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Amy Jo; Greer, Heather

    Noting that girls' lack of access to education is related to a number of economic, social, religious, and cultural factors as well as a scarcity of places in schools and that promoting gender equity in school may help equity spread throughout the entire community, this report illustrates the gender equity approach used in the Save the Children's…

  7. Poverty, Equity and Access to Education in Bangladesh. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 51

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Altaf; Zeitlyn, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Bangladesh has made great improvements in the scale and quality of access to education in recent years and gender equality has almost been achieved in primary education (World Bank, 2008). Evidence from CREATE's nationwide community and school survey (ComSS) confirms results from other research (such as Al-Samarrai, 2009) which suggests that…

  8. Access and Equity in Higher Education in Antigua and Barbuda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewlett-Thomas, Elsie

    2009-01-01

    Across the international higher education spectrum access represents a significant issue. The literature is replete with analyses of access in various higher education systems. Low and inequitable patterns of participation in higher education are particularly prominent in developing countries. This dissertation is a case study of the higher…

  9. The Equity and Quality (EQual) Health-Care Project: A Connecticut Health Foundation initiative with Qualidigm.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Mahier, Stephen E; Barr, Judith K; Krause, Elizabeth M S; Kelvey-Albert, Michele; Curry, Maureen; Meehan, Thomas P

    2010-05-01

    In response to the growing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, quality and disparity of care concerns, and the increasing diversity of the US and Connecticut's populations, the Connecticut Health Foundation funded Qualidigm to implement the Equity and Quality (EQual) Health-Care Project. Now in its second full year, the EQualHealth-CareProject is helping eight primary-care practices in Connecticut improve the equity and quality of diabetes care through technology, education, and quality improvement. PMID:20509420

  10. Equity in health care access to: assessing the urban health insurance reform in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gordon G; Zhao, Zhongyun; Cai, Renhua; Yamada, Tetsuji; Yamada, Tadashi

    2002-11-01

    This study evaluates changes in access to health care in response to the pilot experiment of urban health insurance reform in China. The pilot reform began in Zhenjiang and Jiujiang cities in 1994, followed by an expansion to 57 other cities in 1996, and finally to a nationwide campaign in the end of 1998. Specifically, this study examines the pre- and post-reform changes in the likelihood of obtaining various health care services across sub-population groups with different socioeconomic status and health conditions, in an attempt to shed light on the impact of reform on both vertical and horizontal equity measures in health care utilization. Empirical estimates were obtained in an econometric model using data from the annual surveys conducted in Zhenjiang City from 1994 through 1996. The main findings are as follows. Before the insurance reform, the likelihood of obtaining basic care at outpatient setting was much higher for those with higher income, education, and job status at work, indicating a significant measure of horizontal inequity against the lower socioeconomic groups. On the other hand, there was no evidence suggesting vertical inequity against people of chronic disease conditions in access to care at various settings. After the reform, the new insurance plan led to a significant increase in outpatient care utilization by the lower socioeconomic groups, making a great contribution to achieving horizontal equity in access to basic care. The new plan also has maintained the measure of vertical equity in the use of all types of care. Despite reform, people with poor socioeconomic status continue to be disadvantaged in accessing expensive and advanced diagnostic technologies. In conclusion, the reform model has demonstrated promising advantages over pre-reform insurance programs in many aspects, especially in the improvement of equity in access to basic care provided at outpatient settings. It also appears to be more efficient overall in allocating health

  11. Equity and Access Issues: A Discussion with Yolanda Moses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carriuolo, Nancy E.; Rodgers, Arondo; Stout, C. Michol

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Dr. Yolanda T. Moses, President of the American Association for Higher Education (AAHE). Stresses the need to make student success a goal as important as access to education. Argues that developmental education, women's studies, and ethnic studies are areas that are moving to center stage. (NB)

  12. 'Net Equity: A Report on Income and Internet Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Mitchell; Mitra, Steve

    1998-01-01

    Examines the structure of the subscriber base formed under the current pricing policies of Internet providers and investigates how access to the Internet varies in communities with different demographic characteristics. Report is based on a survey from a national Internet service provided in 1997. (SLD)

  13. New reproductive technologies: Equity and access to reproductive health care.

    PubMed

    Henifin, M S

    1993-01-01

    While attention has focused on the promise of new reproductive technologies to provide cures for infertility, efforts aimed at preventing infertility have languished, and the major cause of infant morbidity and morality--lack of prenatal care--has worsened. This article explores the social and ethical issues arising out of the uses of three new reproductive technologies: surrogacy, in vitro fertilization, and prenatal screening. In addition, coerced medical interventions during pregnancy are described. Examination of the social circumstances surrounding the use of these medical technologies supports the conclusion that new reproductive technologies have increased, rather than decreased, inequities in access to and allocation of health care resources. PMID:17165238

  14. The Impact of a Middle School 1:1 Laptop Initiative on the Quality of Instruction, Teacher Engagement, and Digital Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pack, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated a school district's middle school 1:1 initiative and its potential to raise the quality of instruction, to increase levels of teacher engagement, and to provide equity of access to enriched learning experiences for students within the district's two middle schools. Through utilizing a mixed method design, data were…

  15. Language Access and Health Equity: Changes under the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Applebaum, Bethany; Robbins, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Health disparities between English-proficient and limited English-proficient (LEP) groups in the United States have been widely documented. Provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), including increased funding to community health centers and resources to help consumers who are purchasing Marketplace coverage afford new access to health care for speakers of languages other than English, which includes more than 60 million individuals, one-third of whom are LEP. This commentary discusses the legislative precedent for, successes of, and potential future directions for the implementation of the ACA as it relates to language access, health disparities, health equity, access to health care, and the linguistic needs of the LEP population in the United States. PMID:27180685

  16. Cyber Charter Schools and Students with Dis/abilities: Rebooting the IDEA to Address Equity, Access, and Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathleen M.; Green, Preston C., III; Nelson, Steven L.; Madahar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    This article takes up the question of equity, access, and cyber charter schools from the perspective of disability studies in education (DSE). DSE positions inclusion and educational access as social justice concerns. In doing so, we assert the importance of making visible the social justice implications of the current laws that impact cyber…

  17. Measuring Equity in Access to Pharmaceutical Services Using Concentration Curve; Model Development

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Majid; Khorasani, Elahe; Bakhshizade, Zahra; Jafarian Jazi, Marzie; Ghaffari Darab, Mohsen; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    This paper has two objectives. First, it establishes a model for scoring the access to pharmaceutical services. Second, it develops a model for measuring socioeconomic indicators independent of the time and place of study. These two measures are used for measuring equity in access to pharmaceutical services using concentration curve. We prepared an open-ended questionnaire and distributed it to academic experts to get their ideas to form access indicators and assign score to each indicator based on the pharmaceutical system. An extensive literature review was undertaken for the selection of indicators in order to determine the socioeconomic status (SES) of individuals. Experts’ opinions were also considered for scoring these indicators. These indicators were weighted by the Stepwise Adoption of Weights and were used to develop a model for measuring SES independent of the time and place of study. Nine factors were introduced for assessing the access to pharmaceutical services, based on pharmaceutical systems in middle-income countries. Five indicators were selected for determining the SES of individuals. A model for income classification based on poverty line was established. Likewise, a model for scoring home status based on national minimum wage was introduced. In summary, five important findings emerged from this study. These findings may assist researchers in measuring equity in access to pharmaceutical services and also could help them to apply a model for determining SES independent of the time and place of study. These also could provide a good opportunity for researchers to compare the results of various studies in a reasonable way; particularly in middle-income countries. PMID:26664403

  18. Measuring Equity in Access to Pharmaceutical Services Using Concentration Curve; Model Development.

    PubMed

    Davari, Majid; Khorasani, Elahe; Bakhshizade, Zahra; Jafarian Jazi, Marzie; Ghaffari Darab, Mohsen; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    This paper has two objectives. First, it establishes a model for scoring the access to pharmaceutical services. Second, it develops a model for measuring socioeconomic indicators independent of the time and place of study. These two measures are used for measuring equity in access to pharmaceutical services using concentration curve. We prepared an open-ended questionnaire and distributed it to academic experts to get their ideas to form access indicators and assign score to each indicator based on the pharmaceutical system. An extensive literature review was undertaken for the selection of indicators in order to determine the socioeconomic status (SES) of individuals. Experts' opinions were also considered for scoring these indicators. These indicators were weighted by the Stepwise Adoption of Weights and were used to develop a model for measuring SES independent of the time and place of study. Nine factors were introduced for assessing the access to pharmaceutical services, based on pharmaceutical systems in middle-income countries. Five indicators were selected for determining the SES of individuals. A model for income classification based on poverty line was established. Likewise, a model for scoring home status based on national minimum wage was introduced. In summary, five important findings emerged from this study. These findings may assist researchers in measuring equity in access to pharmaceutical services and also could help them to apply a model for determining SES independent of the time and place of study. These also could provide a good opportunity for researchers to compare the results of various studies in a reasonable way; particularly in middle-income countries. PMID:26664403

  19. Assessing Coverage, Equity and Quality Gaps in Maternal and Neonatal Care in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Integrated Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wilunda, Calistus; Putoto, Giovanni; Riva, Donata Dalla; Manenti, Fabio; Atzori, Andrea; Calia, Federico; Assefa, Tigist; Turri, Bruno; Emmanuel, Onapa; Straneo, Manuela; Kisika, Firma; Tarmbulini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Background Gaps in coverage, equity and quality of health services hinder the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in most countries of sub-Saharan Africa as well as in other high-burden countries, yet few studies attempt to assess all these dimensions as part of the situation analysis. We present the base-line data of a project aimed at simultaneously addressing coverage, equity and quality issues in maternal and neonatal health care in five districts belonging to three African countries. Methods Data were collected in cross-sectional studies with three types of tools. Coverage was assessed in three hospitals and 19 health centres (HCs) utilising emergency obstetric and newborn care needs assessment tools developed by the Averting Maternal Death and Disability program. Emergency obstetrics care (EmOC) indicators were calculated. Equity was assessed in three hospitals and 13 HCs by means of proxy wealth indices and women delivering in health facilities were compared with those in the general population to identify inequities. Quality was assessed in three hospitals using the World Health Organization’s maternal and neonatal quality of hospital care assessment tool which evaluates the whole range of aspects of obstetric and neonatal care and produces an average score for each main area of care. Results All the three hospitals qualified as comprehensive EmOC facilities but none of the HCs qualified for basic EmOC. None of the districts met the minimum requisites for EmOC indicators. In two out of three hospitals, there were major quality gaps which were generally greater in neonatal care, management of emergency and complicated cases and monitoring. Higher access to care was coupled by low quality and good quality by very low access. Stark inequities in utilisation of institutional delivery care were present in all districts and across all health facilities, especially at hospital level. Conclusion Our findings confirm the existence of serious

  20. Coverage, universal access and equity in health: a characterization of scientific production in nursing

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Parra, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to characterize the scientific contribution nursing has made regarding coverage, universal access and equity in health, and to understand this production in terms of subjects and objects of study. Material and methods: this was cross-sectional, documentary research; the units of analysis were 97 journals and 410 documents, retrieved from the Web of Science in the category, "nursing". Descriptors associated to coverage, access and equity in health, and the Mesh thesaurus, were applied. We used bibliometric laws and indicators, and analyzed the most important articles according to amount of citations and collaboration. Results: the document retrieval allowed for 25 years of observation of production, an institutional and an international collaboration of 31% and 7%, respectively. The mean number of coauthors per article was 3.5, with a transience rate of 93%. The visibility index was 67.7%, and 24.6% of production was concentrated in four core journals. A review from the nursing category with 286 citations, and a Brazilian author who was the most productive, are issues worth highlighting. Conclusions: the nursing collective should strengthen future research on the subject, defining lines and sub-lines of research, increasing internationalization and building it with the joint participation of the academy and nursing community. PMID:26959329

  1. Access and Equity for All Students: Meeting the Needs of Students with Disabilities. Report 09-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Mallory

    2009-01-01

    Access and equity for all students in California colleges and universities continues to be a high priority of the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC). Over the past year, CPEC staff conducted research, collected data, convened an advisory committee and hosted a panel of service providers and students. They identified areas where…

  2. Pathways to Results: How Practitioners Address Student Access, Outcomes, and Equity in an Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickel, Jessica; Bragg, Debra D.

    2015-01-01

    At a time when the nation is focusing so much attention on college completion, what do we know about how students are completing their community college programs? Does the open-access mission of community colleges translate into equitable outcomes? Pathways to Results (PTR) engages practitioners in using data to close equity gaps for student…

  3. An Investigation of the Use of Telecommunications To Increase Equity and Access to Education in Rural Schools in Western Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, R.; Reeves, T.

    The provision of diverse and specialized educational programs to students in rural schools is hindered by many factors associated with the demography and sociology of the schools. This paper reports on a project in Western Australia called the PCAP (Priority Country Access Program) Project, that used audiographic systems to enhance the equity and…

  4. Access, Equity, and Community Colleges: The Truman Commission and Federal Higher Education Policy from 1947 To 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Claire Krendl; Heller, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    The 1947 President's Commission on Higher Education offers insight into higher education policy in the United States. This article reviews and assesses the adoption of its policy recommendations in two key areas: 1) improving college access and equity and 2) expanding the role of community colleges. (Contains 1 figure and 4 notes.)

  5. An Ethics of Access: Using Life History to Trace Preservice Teachers' Initial Viewpoints on Teaching for Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Amy Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    This article demonstrates how life history methods can be used to trace preservice teachers' emergent ethics toward teaching for equity and social justice. Through qualitative analyses of 10 European American, middle-class, female preservice teachers' life history interviews, access to diverse individuals and diverse materials was identified as a…

  6. Social justice in Chinese higher education: Regional issues of equity and access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, W. James

    2007-01-01

    A topic of growing concern in Chinese higher education to policy-makers, scholars, and future student applicants is social justice. With the trend toward increasing enrollments in China's higher-education institutions, issues of equity and access have begun to surface, especially as they relate to China's minority population of over 100 million persons. The present contribution offers an overview of the regional boundaries of China, both geographic and historical. It then looks at the development of urbanicity in connection with higher education. Third, it describes the recent history of the gender gap in education both in general and in higher education in particular. Fourth, it examines the ethnic boundaries that exist in higher education. The final section analyzes related findings drawn from interviews and questionnaires administered to faculty members, administrators, and students at ten sample universities.

  7. Excellence, Equity, and Access: Educators' Perceptions of Students in Open Access Advanced Placement Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Justyna Plichta

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines educators' perceptions regarding open access Advanced Placement (AP) program courses and their impact on non-traditional AP students in one suburban school district. The data were collected during the 2009-2010 school year through a 15-item Likert scale (and one open-ended item) survey which was disseminated during…

  8. The Master Plan Renewed: Unity, Equity, Quality, and Efficiency in California Postsecondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Commission for the Review of the Master Plan for Higher Education, Sacramento.

    This report presents 33 recommendations for improving the 1960 California State Master Plan for Higher Education. The report's five sections focus on: (1) a unified educational system; (2) greater equity; (3) educational quality; (4) efficient use of educational resources; and (5) resources and responsibility. Recommendations for increased unity…

  9. Equity, Quality, and Cost in Higher Education: Research Study on Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macquarie Univ., North Ryde (Australia). School of Education.

    Equity, quality, and cost in higher education is examined as it exists in Australia. The first chapter provides a broad overview, both current and historical, of the complex structure of higher education in Australia and identifies issues and concerns. Chapter 2 examines enrollment trends in different fields of study. The third chapter looks at…

  10. An Examination of Possible Relationships between Service Quality and Brand Equity in Online Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrell, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers and marketers lack information about possible relationships between service quality and online brand equity in intangible and often undifferentiated service businesses. The services sector of the economy is large with 72% of the economic output and 80% of the workers in the United States in 2007. Within the services sector, Internet…

  11. Teaching Large Classes in an Increasingly Internationalising Higher Education Environment: Pedagogical, Quality and Equity Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maringe, Felix; Sing, Nevensha

    2014-01-01

    Marketisation, increased student mobility, the massification of Higher Education (HE) and stagnating staff numbers in universities have combined to cause a ripple effect of change both in the demography and size of university classes across the world. This has implications for the quality and equity of learning and the need to examine and to…

  12. The United States and South Africa: Pursuing Quality and Equity in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collinson, Vivienne; Vakalisa, Ntombizolile

    2000-01-01

    Addresses three critical issues challenging South African and U.S. efforts to improve teacher quality: equity, demographics, and violence. Both countries want education to ameliorate long-standing racial inequities by improving teacher qualifications; both face increasing enrollments and teacher shortages; and both have high crime rates. (Contains…

  13. Can Schools Achieve Both Quality and Equity? Investigating the Two Dimensions of Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyriakides, L.; Creemers, B. P. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the extent to which schools can achieve both equity and quality. Data emerged from two effectiveness studies in teaching mathematics and Greek language, which were conducted to test the validity of the dynamic model of educational effectiveness. Separate multilevel analyses for each subject were conducted and it was found…

  14. Simple Solutions to Complex Problems: Moral Panic and the Fluid Shift from "Equity" to "Quality" in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockler, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Education is increasingly conceptualised by governments and policymakers in western democracies in terms of productivity and human capital, emphasising elements of individualism and competition over concerns around democracy and equity. More and more, solutions to intransigent educational problems related to equity are seen in terms of quality and…

  15. Project Exploration's personalized curriculum: Fostering access and equity in science out-of-school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Gabrielle Helena

    Participation and achievement in science by students of color and girls remains inequitable despite decades of initiatives aimed at leveling the playing field. Science in out-of-school-time is a strategy that emphasizes the role of informal education, however, robust descriptions of learning environments which effectively recruit and retain historically underrepresented populations to science are lacking. Greater understanding of the potential of such efforts for increasing access and equity in science is needed. In 1999, I co-founded Project Exploration, a science education organization, to increase access to science for minority youth and girls through personalized experiences with science and scientists. This dissertation explores the personalized curriculum at the heart of Project Exploration's approach to science out-of-school, and contextualizes this approach in terms of the historic and present-day landscape of out-of-school efforts intended to increase the diversity of participation in science. This thesis is intended to be a contribution to an intellectual and practical curriculum conversation about how to effectively engage and retain minorities and girls to science. Ultimately I hope this study will raise questions about the hidden curriculum of a national competitiveness framework and offer an alternative way to value science in---and out---of school.

  16. Targeted health insurance in a low income country and its impact on access and equity in access: Egypt's school health insurance.

    PubMed

    Yip, W; Berman, P

    2001-04-01

    Governments are constantly faced with competing demands for public funds, thereby necessitating careful use of scarce resources. In Egypt, the School Health Insurance Programme (SHIP) is a government subsidized health insurance system that targets school children. The primary goals of the SHIP include improving access and equity in access to health care for children while, at the same time, ensuring programme sustainability. Using the Egyptian Household Health Utilization and Expenditure Survey (1995), this paper empirically assesses the extent to which the SHIP achieves its stated goals. Our findings show that the SHIP significantly improved access by increasing visit rates and reducing financial burden of use (out-of-pocket expenditures). With regard to the success of targeting the poor, conditional upon being covered, the SHIP reduced the differentials in visit rates between the highest and lowest income children. However, only the middle-income children benefitted from reduced financial burden (within group equity). Moreover, by targeting the children through school enrollment, the SHIP increased the differentials in the average level of access between school-going children and those not attending school (overall equity). Children not attending school tend to be poor and living in rural areas. Our results also indicate that original calculations may underestimate the SHIP financial outlays, thereby threatening the long run financial sustainability of the programme. PMID:11288187

  17. Access and Equity in Financing Higher Education: The Case of Morocco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bougroum, Mohammed; Ibourk, Aomar

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the higher education financing policy in Morocco in light of the central issue of equity. First, it surveys the current situation, using a critical approach to the present financing policy, and looking at the three dimensions of adequacy, efficiency, and equity. Second, it describes the principal policy challenges in financing…

  18. Cross-border assisted reproduction care in Asia: implications for access, equity and regulations.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of the global commercialised market in assisted reproduction treatment in low-resource countries in Asia and raises concerns about access and equity, the potential commercial exploitation of the bodies of subaltern women to service the demand for donated ova and surrogate pregnancy, and the need for protections through regulations. A lack of systematic data about cross-border reproductive care is a significant obstacle to debate and policy intervention. Little is known about the extent, experience or conditions of cross-border reproductive care outside of Europe and the United States. Further research is needed in Asia on the local effects of this trade upon local health systems, couples seeking care, and those women whose body tissues and nurturing capacities facilitate it. More attention needs to be paid to the provision of publicly funded reproductive health services to address the inequitable distribution of treatment and to investigate means to regulate this trade by governments, international NGOs, professional organisations and civil society groups in developing countries. The global trade in assisted reproduction challenges us to balance the rights of individuals to pursue health care across national borders with the rights of those providing services to meet their needs, especially vulnerable groups in situations of economic disparity. PMID:21555091

  19. The 20-Year Trajectory of Marital Quality in Enduring Marriages: Does Equity Matter?

    PubMed Central

    DeMaris, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    I examine the trajectory of marital quality as a function of relationship equity with data from a six-wave panel study of 704 married respondents between 1980 and 2000. Reporting that one “gives more” to the marriage (subjective underbenefit) is more likely for women than men at any given marital duration. Respondent’s relative contribution to income, paid labor, housework, and health (objective underbenefit) raises this probability for women of average religiosity. For the more religious, objective underbenefit has no effect on women’s sense of underbenefit, but reduces men’s sense of underbenefit. Objective underbenefit lowers women’s, but raises men’s, marital quality, at any marital duration. The relevance of equity was not diluted by the passage of time in marriage. PMID:21966079

  20. Expansion without Equity: An Analysis of Current Policy on Access to Higher Education in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Access to higher education in Brazil is to a large extent restricted to the higher socio-economic groups. Public universities have limited places and entry is determined by highly competitive exams, thereby excluding those who have not had a high quality secondary education or attended an expensive preparatory course. There has been considerable…

  1. Equity and Quality in Private Education: The Haitian Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmi, J.

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of the Haitian educational system. Assesses whether private education is playing an appropriate role in Haiti in terms of providing and promoting quality education. Reviews strategies that could allow the government to use its limited financial resources in a more cost-effective and equitable manner. (CMK)

  2. Equity in Informal Science Education: Developing an Access and Equity Framework for Science Museums and Science Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Informal science education (ISE) is a popular pursuit, with millions of people visiting science museums, science centres, zoos, botanic gardens, aquaria, science festivals and more around the world. Questions remain, however, about how accessible and inclusive ISE practices are. This article reviews research on participation in ISE through the…

  3. In pursuit of high-value healthcare: the case for improving quality and achieving equity in a time of healthcare transformation.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    The passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and current efforts in payment reform signal the beginning of a significant transformation for the US healthcare system. As we embark on this transformation, disparities have emerged as the hallmark of low-value healthcare--care that does not meet quality standards, is inefficient, and is usually of high cost. A new set of structures is being developed to facilitate increased access to care that is cost-effective and high in quality--otherwise known as high-value healthcare. Addressing disparities and achieving equity are the perfect target areas for recouping value, and doing so will pave the way for high-value healthcare. As healthcare leaders make difficult choices, they should consider the realities of healthcare equity. First, racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare persist and are a clear sign of poor-quality, low-value healthcare. Second, the root causes of these disparities are complex, but a well-developed set of evidence-based approaches is available to help leaders address healthcare inequity. Third, evidence suggests that being inattentive to the root causes of disparities adversely affects efficiency and an organization's bottom line. Finally, if healthcare organizations are progressive, thoughtful, and prepared for success in such an environment, a new healthcare system that offers accessible, high-value, equitable, culturally competent, and high-quality care to all is well within reach. PMID:25291891

  4. Assessing barriers to health insurance and threats to equity in comparative perspective: The Health Insurance Access Database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Typologies traditionally used for international comparisons of health systems often conflate many system characteristics. To capture policy changes over time and by service in health systems regulation of public and private insurance, we propose a database containing explicit, standardized indicators of policy instruments. Methods The Health Insurance Access Database (HIAD) will collect policy information for ten OECD countries, over a range of eight health services, from 1990–2010. Policy indicators were selected through a comprehensive literature review which identified policy instruments most likely to constitute barriers to health insurance, thus potentially posing a threat to equity. As data collection is still underway, we present here the theoretical bases and methodology adopted, with a focus on the rationale underpinning the study instruments. Results These harmonized data will allow the capture of policy changes in health systems regulation of public and private insurance over time and by service. The standardization process will permit international comparisons of systems’ performance with regards to health insurance access and equity. Conclusion This research will inform and feed the current debate on the future of health care in developed countries and on the role of the private sector in these changes. PMID:22551599

  5. Environmental equity in air quality management: local and international implications for human health and climate change.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Marie S; Kinney, Patrick L; Cohen, Aaron J

    2008-01-01

    The health burden of environmental exposures, including ambient air pollution and climate-change-related health impacts, is not equally distributed between or within regions and countries. These inequalities are currently receiving increased attention in environmental research as well as enhanced appreciation in environmental policy, where calls for environmental equity are more frequently heard. The World Health Organization (WHO) 2006 Global Update of the Air Quality Guidelines attempted to address the global-scale inequalities in exposures to air pollution and the burden of diseases due to air pollution. The guidelines stop short, however, of addressing explicitly the inequalities in exposure and adverse health effects within countries and urban areas due to differential distribution of sources of air pollution such as motor vehicles and local industry, and differences in susceptibility to the adverse health effects attributed to air pollution. These inequalities, may, however, be addressed in local air quality and land use management decisions. Locally, community-based participatory research can play an important role in documenting potential inequities and fostering corrective action. Research on environmental inequities will also benefit from current efforts to (1) better understand social determinants of health and (2) apply research evidence to reduce health disparities. Similarly, future research and policy action will benefit from stronger linkages between equity concerns related to health consequences of both air pollution exposure and climate change, since combustion products are important contributors to both of these environmental problems. PMID:18569628

  6. Designing at Scale: Lessons in Relevance, Quality, and Equity from ChangeScale, a Bay Area environmental education collaborative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, E.

    2015-12-01

    The best environmental education equips people with the know-how and drive to create healthy communities and a healthy planet. While there are many wonderful organizations providing environmental learning, ensuring quality, cultural relevance and equity of access remains an elusive goal--especially if environmental education organizations work in isolation. Organizations across 12 counties in the Bay Area have come together to create a different model. They have founded ChangeScale, a regional collaborative dedicated to providing high quality environmental education to hundreds of thousands of youth---by working together. ChangeScale's work involves setting up school district-level partnerships, providing technical assistance to local environmental education networks, and training environmental educators across the region. In this talk, the presenter, who is a founding member and steering committee chair for ChangeScale, will outline the challenges of working at a regional scale with dozens of organizations. She will share the processes ChangeScale has used to develop a business plan and build membership. She will conclude by sharing the short term and long term potential impacts of working collectively for environmental literacy in the Bay Area.

  7. Equity of access to and utilization of reproductive health services in Thailand: national Reproductive Health Survey data, 2006 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Kongsri, Suratchada; Limwattananon, Supon; Sirilak, Supakit; Prakongsai, Phusit; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2011-05-01

    This study assessed trends in equity of access to reproductive health services and service utilization in terms of coverage of family planning, antenatal care and skilled birth attendance in Thailand. Two health indicators were measured: the prevalence of low birthweight and exclusive breastfeeding. Equity was measured against the combined urban-rural areas and geographic regions, women's education level and quintiles of household assets index. The study used data from two nationally representative household surveys, the 2006 and 2009 Reproductive Health Surveys. Very high coverage of family planning (79.6%), universal antenatal care (98.9%) and skilled birth attendance (99.7%), with very small socioeconomic and geographic disparities, were observed. The public sector played a dominant role in maternity care (90.9% of all deliveries in 2009). The private sector also had a role among the higher educated, wealthier women living in urban areas. Public sector facilities, followed by drug stores, were a major supplier of contraception, which had a high use rate. High coverage and low inequity were the result of extensive investment in the health system by successive governments, in particular primary health care at district and sub-district levels, reaching universality by 2002. While maintaining these achievements, methodological improvements in measuring low birthweight and exclusive breastfeeding for future reproductive health surveys are recommended. PMID:21555089

  8. Education and Social Equity: With a Special Focus on Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes in Elementary Education. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedwal, Mona; Kamat, Sangeeta

    2008-01-01

    The Scheduled Castes (SCs, also known as Dalits) and Scheduled Tribes (STs, also known as Adivasis) are among the most socially and educationally disadvantaged groups in India. This paper examines issues concerning school access and equity for Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribe communities and also highlights their unique problems, which may…

  9. Educational Equity in the Access to Post-Secondary Education: A Comparison of Ethnic Minorities in China with Aboriginals in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Fei

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insight into equity issues in post-secondary education by exploring and assessing the history, the reality and the potential developments in higher education for minority students in China, in comparison to post-secondary education for aboriginal students in Canada. It highlights access to post-secondary education by these…

  10. New Directions For Foundations In Health Equity.

    PubMed

    Doykos, Patricia; Gray-Akpa, Kristina; Mitchell, Faith

    2016-08-01

    Rising income inequality and pessimism about the current and future status of race relations in the United States make this both a challenging time for the pursuit of health equity and also an important opportunity for action. We glean lessons from past and ongoing philanthropic investments in health equity and recommend approaches that can guide future work by foundations. Improving health equity is a complex process that must take into account a variety of factors that affect health, of which access to high-quality health care is just one element. Accordingly, improving health equity will require the combined forces of philanthropy, the public sector, and sectors that have not traditionally been identified with health. PMID:27503980

  11. Educational Quality, Access, and Tuition Policy at State Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seneca, Joseph J.; Taussig, Michael K.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative study of the relationship between educational quality, access, and tuition rates at state universities suggests that these institutions face a trade-off between the goals of improving educational program quality and providing greater access, but that increases in student financial aid can improve access. (MSE)

  12. Equity in access to health care provision under the medicare security for small scale entrepreneurs in Dar es Salaam.

    PubMed

    Urassa, J A E

    2012-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess equity in access to health care provision under the Medicare Security for Small Scale Entrepreneurs (SSE). Methodological triangulation was used to an exploratory and randomized cross- sectional study in order to supplement information on the topic under investigation. Questionnaires were administered to 281 respondents and 6 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were held with males and females. Documentary review was also used. For quantitative aspect of the study, significant associations were measured using confidence intervals (95% CI) testing. Qualitative data were analyzed with assistance of Open code software. The results show that inequalities in access to health care services were found in respect to affordability of medical care costs, distance from home to health facilities, availability of drugs as well as medical equipments and supplies. As the result of existing inequalities some of clients were not satisfied with the provided health services. The study concludes by drawing policy and research implications of the findings. PMID:23120940

  13. Open access: academic publishing and its implications for knowledge equity in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Traditional, subscription-based scientific publishing has its limitations: often, articles are inaccessible to the majority of researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where journal subscriptions or one-time access fees are cost-prohibitive. Open access (OA) publishing, in which journals provide online access to articles free of charge, breaks this barrier and allows unrestricted access to scientific and scholarly information to researchers all over the globe. At the same time, one major limitation to OA is a high publishing cost that is placed on authors. Following recent developments to OA publishing policies in the UK and even LMICs, this article highlights the current status and future challenges of OA in Africa. We place particular emphasis on Kenya, where multidisciplinary efforts to improve access have been established. We note that these efforts in Kenya can be further strengthened and potentially replicated in other African countries, with the goal of elevating the visibility of African research and improving access for African researchers to global research, and, ultimately, bring social and economic benefits to the region. We (1) offer recommendations for overcoming the challenges of implementing OA in Africa and (2) call for urgent action by African governments to follow the suit of high-income countries like the UK and Australia, mandating OA for publicly-funded research in their region and supporting future research into how OA might bring social and economic benefits to Africa. PMID:24716579

  14. Accessibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/accessibility.html MedlinePlus Accessibility To use the sharing features on this page, ... Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs ...

  15. An Equity Perspective on Access to, Enrolment in and Finance of Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asplund, Rita; Adbelkarim, Oussama Ben; Skalli, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Failure to achieve equitable access to university studies has contributed to turning the focus to the funding of higher education systems. This paper aims to review critically the literature assessing the effectiveness of existing financing schemes and changes in them as a means for reducing the prevalent under-representation of students from a…

  16. Equity and Equality in Access to Higher Education: The Experiences of Students with Disabilities in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwaipopo, Rosemarie Nyigulila; Lihamba, Amandina; Njewele, Delphine Cosmas

    2011-01-01

    Social development policies in Tanzania are exemplary in terms of their recognition of the rights of access to higher education institutions by specific demographic groups. Policy documents such as the 2005 "National Strategy for Growth and Reduction of Poverty" (known as the MKUKUTA) and the 2004 "National Policy on Disability" emphasise this…

  17. Abolishing School Fees in Malawi: The Impact on Education Access and Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Samarrai, Samer; Zaman, Hassan

    2007-01-01

    In 1994, the newly elected Government in Malawi abolished primary school fees. Using household survey data from 1990/91 and 1997/98, this paper assesses the impact this major policy change, combined with increased Government spending on education, has had on access to schooling by the poor. This paper shows that enrolment rates have increased…

  18. Broadband Access and Implications for Efforts to Address Equity Gaps in Postsecondary Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisneros, Lauren; Sponsler, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    This education trends report focuses on two related but distinct challenges confronting state policy leaders and students as they seek to leverage online distance education to meet personal and statewide education goals: (1) access to the infrastructure necessary to provide industry-standard broadband speeds and (2) ensuring availability of the…

  19. Social Exclusion and School Participation in India: Expanding Access with Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Govinda, Rangachar; Bandyopadhyay, Madhumita

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, increased demand and massive expansion have brought into Indian schools huge numbers of children who might not have attended in the past. Still, large numbers, and specific groups, of children remain excluded from schooling for various reasons, jeopardizing equitable access to elementary education. Further accentuating this…

  20. Minority Group Equity at Delta College: Trends in Student Access and Affirmative Action Hiring. Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John W.; Morris, Anita

    To provide a progress report on efforts to increase access to minority students and diversify the teaching and administrative ranks, a study was conducted at San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC), in California, of recent trends in minority student attendance and graduation rates and the ethnic composition of faculty and administrative staff. Results…

  1. The Impact Factor: Implications of Open Access on Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grozanick, Sara E.

    2010-01-01

    There has been debate about the extent to which open access affects the quality of scholarly work. At the same time, researchers have begun to look for ways to evaluate the quality of open access publications. Dating back to the growth of citation indexes during the 1960s and 1970s, citation analysis--examining citation statistics--has since been…

  2. Gender Equity Expert Panel: Exemplary & Promising Gender Equity Programs, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    The U.S. Department of Education developed the Gender Equity Expert Panel to identify promising and exemplary programs that promote gender equity in and through education. This panel of experts reviewed self-nominated programs to determine whether they met four criteria: evidence of success/effectiveness in promoting gender equity; quality of the…

  3. Social equity and access to the World Wide Web and E-mail: implications for design and implementation of medical applications.

    PubMed Central

    Mandl, K. D.; Katz, S. B.; Kohane, I. S.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The distribution and types of Internet connectivity will determine the equity of access by patient populations to emerging health technologies. We sought to measure the rates, types, and predictors of access in a patient population targeted for Web-based medical services. METHODS: Design. Cross sectional in-person interview. Setting. Emergency department of a large urban pediatric teaching hospital. Subjects. Primary caretakers of patients or patients at least 16 years old. Procedure and measures. Subjects were asked about access to e-mail and the Internet as well as about willingness to use and concerns about Web-based services. Views of equity and access and sociodemographic data were also elicited. RESULTS: 132 subjects were enrolled in the study. Of respondents, 67.2% use a computer and 36.4% can access the Internet or e-mail from home. Including Internet connections and/or e-mail accounts at work, school and public libraries, 50.7% of the sample has access. Forty percent of families have e-mail accounts. The rate at which families have connectivity is primarily correlated with income (r = 0.6, p < 0.01). At all income levels, rates of access to the World Wide Web are higher than to e-mail. White patients are much more likely to have e-mail (OR 5.0, 95% CI 2.4-10.8) and Web access (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.5). CONCLUSIONS: Connectivity is directly correlated with income and distributed unevenly across racial and ethnic groups. World Wide Web access is more prevalent than e-mail accounts, and both are often obtained outside the home. Design of health applications should account for these attributes of patient access. PMID:9929213

  4. Inequality in Preschool Quality? Community-Level Disparities in Access to High-Quality Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Daphna; Galdo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, unequal access to high-quality preschool has emerged as a growing public policy concern. Because of data limitations, it is notoriously difficult to measure disparities in access to early learning opportunities across communities and particularly challenging to quantify gaps in access to "high-quality" programs. Research…

  5. Distance Education: Access, Quality, Cautions, and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Paul Jay

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the impact of widely distributed learning opportunities now accessible through distance education must take into account the re-imposition of values and motives long associated with traditional education. The expectations of new higher education consumers should be tempered by institutional acknowledgement of pre-existing value…

  6. Using shared goal setting to improve access and equity: a mixed methods study of the Good Goals intervention in children’s occupational therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Access and equity in children’s therapy services may be improved by directing clinicians’ use of resources toward specific goals that are important to patients. A practice-change intervention (titled ‘Good Goals’) was designed to achieve this. This study investigated uptake, adoption, and possible effects of that intervention in children’s occupational therapy services. Methods Mixed methods case studies (n = 3 services, including 46 therapists and 558 children) were conducted. The intervention was delivered over 25 weeks through face-to-face training, team workbooks, and ‘tools for change’. Data were collected before, during, and after the intervention on a range of factors using interviews, a focus group, case note analysis, routine data, document analysis, and researchers’ observations. Results Factors related to uptake and adoptions were: mode of intervention delivery, competing demands on therapists’ time, and leadership by service manager. Service managers and therapists reported that the intervention: helped therapists establish a shared rationale for clinical decisions; increased clarity in service provision; and improved interactions with families and schools. During the study period, therapists’ behaviours changed: identifying goals, odds ratio 2.4 (95% CI 1.5 to 3.8); agreeing goals, 3.5 (2.4 to 5.1); evaluating progress, 2.0 (1.1 to 3.5). Children’s LoT decreased by two months [95% CI −8 to +4 months] across the services. Cost per therapist trained ranged from £1,003 to £1,277, depending upon service size and therapists’ salary bands. Conclusions Good Goals is a promising quality improvement intervention that can be delivered and adopted in practice and may have benefits. Further research is required to evaluate its: (i) impact on patient outcomes, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and (ii) transferability to other clinical contexts. PMID:22898191

  7. Social determinants of equity in access to healthcare for tuberculosis patients in Republic of Macedonia – results from a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Gudeva Nikovska, Dance; Tozija, Fimka

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health is a complex phenomenon and equity as a basic human right an integral part of constitutions in almost all countries in the world. In Republic of Macedonia (RM), Tuberculosis (TB) is clustered regionally and in certain ethnic groups. The main objective of this study was to analyze Social Determinants of Health (SDH) and equity in access to healthcare services for TB patients in RM, aimed at complex analysis of factors that cause inequities. Methods: Case-control study was conducted in the period March–December, 2013; "cases" are households of TB patients registered in the period July, 2012–June, 2013 and controls are households with no TB patients in their immediate vicinity. World Health Organization (WHO) World Health Survey questionnaire was used to collect data. Results: Analysis of SDH of TB patients shows that patients are mostly males, of lower socio-economic status, are less educated, unemployed and TB is clustered in certain ethnic groups. Analysis of access has identified these determinants as important barriers in access to health services. Conclusion: The study has documented the basic SDH of TB patients in RM, as well as barriers in access to healthcare, providing useful baseline information to facilitate determination where to concentrate future efforts. PMID:25279382

  8. Quality of internet access: barrier behind internet use statistics.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Harvey; Biscope, Sherry; Poland, Blake

    2003-09-01

    The rapid growth of the Internet is increasingly international with young people being the early adopters in most countries. However, the quality of Internet access looms as a major barrier hidden behind Internet use statistics. The goal of this study was to provide an in-depth evaluation of young people's perspectives on using the Internet to obtain health information and resources (e-health). Using an inductive qualitative research design, 27 focus groups were conducted in Ontario, Canada. The 210 young participants were selected to reflect diversity in age, sex, geographic location, cultural identity and risk. A major finding was how the quality of Internet access influenced young people's ability to obtain health information and resources. Quality of Internet access was affected by four key factors: 1. Privacy, 2. Gate-keeping, 3. Timeliness and 4. Functionality. Privacy was particularly relevant to these young people in getting access to sensitive health information (e.g. sexual activities). Variations in access quality also impacted participation in mutual support, fostering social networks and getting specific health questions answered. These results serve as a warning about using Internet penetration statistics alone as a measure of access. Concerted attention is needed on improving the quality of Internet access for achieving the potential of e-health. This is imperative for addressing the digital divide affecting populations both within countries and globally between countries. PMID:12850112

  9. Quality Improvement Strategies and Best Practices in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Michelle M.; Moscovice, Ira

    2004-01-01

    Critical access hospitals (CAHs) face many challenges in implementing quality improvement (QI) initiatives, which include limited resources, low volume of patients, small staffs, and inadequate information technology. A primary goal of the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program is to improve the quality of care provided by CAHs. This article…

  10. School Choice and Segregation: "Tracking" Racial Equity in Magnet Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Tomeka M.

    2014-01-01

    Three arguments regarding racial equity have arisen in the school choice debate. Choice advocates charge that choice will improve access to quality schools for disadvantaged minority students (Chubb & Moe 1990; Coons & Sugarman, 1978; Godwin & Kemerer, 2002; Viteritti, 1999). Critics argue that choice is unlikely to benefit minority…

  11. The Equity Challenge in China's Higher Education Finance Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Fengshou; Barrientos, Armando

    2009-01-01

    Sustaining China's rapid economic growth in the future will come to depend in large part on the quantity and quality of the human resources it can mobilize. The paper considers the prospects for higher education financing, and highlights the importance of improving equity in access to higher education as a precondition for a sustainable expansion…

  12. The Practice of Equity. Access to, Treatment in, and Outcomes of Vocational Education in the Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plihal, Jane; And Others

    A study examined the issue of educational equity in vocational education in 14 classrooms at 8 public secondary schools in Minnesota. The study used a naturalistic inquiry approach based on classroom observations and interviews with students, teachers, administrators, and counselors. Each of the members of the research team prepared a different…

  13. Accessing Quality Online Health Information: What Is the Solution?

    PubMed

    Boyer, Célia

    2016-01-01

    The majority of the adult population in both Europe and North America have access to the internet. Over 70% state that they have used the internet to look for health information and the majority started their search at a search engine. Given that search engines list sites according to popularity and not quality, it is imperative that users have a means of discerning trustworthy and honest information from non-reliable health information. The HONcode, a set of eight quality guidelines, ensures access to standardized trustworthy health information which can be used as a tool to guide consumers. PMID:27332317

  14. Is open access sufficient? A review of the quality of open-access nursing journals.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Marie; Carlyle, Dave

    2015-02-01

    The present study aims to review the quality of open-access nursing journals listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals that published papers in 2013 with a nursing focus, written in English, and were freely accessible. Each journal was reviewed in relation to their publisher, year of commencement, number of papers published in 2013, fee for publication, indexing, impact factor, and evidence of requirements for ethics and disclosure statements. The quality of the journals was assessed by impact factors and the requirements for indexing in PubMed. A total of 552 were published in 2013 in the 19 open-access nursing journals that met the inclusion criteria. No journals had impact factors listed in Web of Knowledge, but three had low Scopus impact factors. Only five journals were indexed with PubMed. The quality of the 19 journals included in the review was evaluated as inferior to most subscription-fee journals. Mental health nursing has some responsibility to the general public, and in particular, consumers of mental health services and their families, for the quality of papers published in open-access journals. The way forward might involve dual-platform publication or a process that enables assessment of how research has improved clinical outcomes. PMID:25388929

  15. Education and the Consolidation of Democracy in Latin America: Innovations To Provide Quality Basic Education with Equity. Advocacy Series Education and Development 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimers, Fernando

    Three case studies show innovative education programs that provide quality basic education with equity. After explaining the significance of educational innovation of democracy in Latin America and the constraints to educational development, the investigation of the three programs follows. The program of Fe y Alegria (Faith and Joy) in 12…

  16. Breaking Higher Education's Iron Triangle: Access, Cost, and Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, John; Kanwar, Asha; Uvalic-Trumbic, Stamenka

    2009-01-01

    The requirements for a model that could allow higher education to expand rapidly in the developing world are that it be readily scalable (wide access), academically credible (high quality) and affordable (low cost). This could be achieved by building higher education networks around credible examination systems run by national or independent…

  17. Technology Access and Quality: The Importance of Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camper, Elzar, Jr.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Educators at all levels should participate in the process of making public policy concerning access to and quality of information technology, particularly in the following areas: strategic planning, telecommunications, regulation, resource allocation and training, technology development, and market determination and standards. (MSE)

  18. Increasing equity of access to point-of-use water treatment products through social marketing and entrepreneurship: a case study in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Matthew C; Quick, Robert E; Abbott, Daniel P; Ogutu, Paul; Rheingans, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Point-of-use water chlorination reduces diarrhoea risk by 25-85%. Social marketing has expanded access to inexpensive sodium hypochlorite for water treatment, at a cost of less than US$0.01 per day, in Kenya. To increase product access, women's groups in western Kenya were trained to educate neighbours and sell health products to generate income. We evaluated this programme's impact on equity of access to water treatment products in a cross-sectional survey. We surveyed 487 randomly selected households in eight communities served by the women's groups. Overall, 20% (range 5-39%) of households in eight communities purchased and used chlorine, as confirmed by residual chlorine observed in stored water. Multivariate models using illiteracy and the poorest socioeconomic status as a referent showed that persons with at least some primary education (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.8, 3.5) or secondary education (OR 5.4, 95% CI 1.6, 17.5) and persons in the four wealthiest quintiles (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.0, 6.0) were more likely to chlorinate stored water. While this implementation model was associated with good product penetration and use, barriers to access to inexpensive water treatment remained among the very poor and less educated. PMID:19491503

  19. Computer Equity @ School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equity Coalition for Race, Gender, and National Origin, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This edition of "Equity Coalition" is designed to be a resource to assist those who have responsibility for technology in the schools. The authors of these articles discuss a variety of issues related to computer uses in education and equal access to educational technology. The issue contains the following articles: (1) "Technology--A New Kind of…

  20. Achieving Health Equity: Closing The Gaps In Health Care Disparities, Interventions, And Research.

    PubMed

    Purnell, Tanjala S; Calhoun, Elizabeth A; Golden, Sherita H; Halladay, Jacqueline R; Krok-Schoen, Jessica L; Appelhans, Bradley M; Cooper, Lisa A

    2016-08-01

    In the United States, racial/ethnic minority, rural, and low-income populations continue to experience suboptimal access to and quality of health care despite decades of recognition of health disparities and policy mandates to eliminate them. Many health care interventions that were designed to achieve health equity fall short because of gaps in knowledge and translation. We discuss these gaps and highlight innovative interventions that help address them, focusing on cardiovascular disease and cancer. We also provide recommendations for advancing the field of health equity and informing the implementation and evaluation of policies that target health disparities through improved access to care and quality of care. PMID:27503965

  1. Health care and equity in India

    PubMed Central

    Balarajan, Yarlini; Selvaraj, S; Subramanian, S V

    2011-01-01

    India’s health system faces the ongoing challenge of responding to the needs of the most disadvantaged members of Indian society. Despite progress in improving access to health care, inequalities by socioeconomic status, geography and gender continue to persist. This is compounded by high out-of-pocket expenditures, with the rising financial burden of health care falling overwhelming on private households, which account for more than three-quarter of health spending in India. Health expenditures are responsible for more than half of Indian households falling into poverty; the impact of this has been increasing pushing around 39 million Indians into poverty each year. In this paper, we identify key challenges to equity in service delivery, and equity in financing and financial risk protection in India. These include imbalanced resource allocation, limited physical access to quality health services and inadequate human resources for health; high out-of-pocket health expenditures, health spending inflation, and behavioral factors that affect the demand for appropriate health care. Complementing other paper in this Series, we argue for the application of certain principles in the pursuit of equity in health care in India. These are the adoption of equity metrics in monitoring, evaluation and strategic planning, investment in developing a rigorous knowledge-base of health systems research; development of more equity-focused process of deliberative decision-making in health reform, and redefinition of the specific responsibilities and accountabilities of key actors. The implementation of these principles, together with strengthening of public health and primary care services, provide an approach for ensuring more equitable health care for India’s population. PMID:21227492

  2. Investing Equity Funding in Early Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batten, Pat

    2004-01-01

    The United States has long been concerned with providing equal, quality education for all its citizens. With state-granted equity funding to needy districts comes the responsibility of wise use of equity monies. This study is an example of how three New Jersey districts invested their equity funding in a highly effective early literacy…

  3. Equity and Excellence: African-American Children's Access to Quality Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Steve; Carolan, Megan; Johns, David

    2013-01-01

    The White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African-Americans (WHIEEAA) has a mandate on behalf of African-American students to close the achievement gap. This goal requires attention to the full education continuum, from the early childhood years through adulthood. Learning begins at birth and the preparation for learning starts well…

  4. Foreign Language Instructed Programs in Public Universities in Egypt: Implications for Resource Diversification, Quality and Equity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabry, Manar A.

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to assess the impact of tuition fees of the Foreign language Instructed Programs (FLIP) at Cairo University on increasing other-than-governmental resources for these programs as well as for the university, increasing student satisfaction with the quality of education, and maintaining equitable access. The study uses a theoretical…

  5. Rates of Beginning Teachers: Examining One Indicator of School Quality in an Equity Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Douglas J.; Mattingly, Marybeth J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors use national data to examine variation in the proportion of beginning teachers in school districts across the United States by poverty, race, and urbanicity. In addition to being a proxy for teacher quality, the proportion of beginning teachers in a district also speaks to teacher turnover and therefore broader school quality issues.…

  6. What's Love Got to Do with It? Equality, Equity, Commitment and Women's Marital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, W. Bradford; Nock, Steven L.

    2006-01-01

    The companionate theory of marriage suggests that egalitarianism in practice and belief leads to higher marital quality for wives and higher levels of positive emotion work on the part of husbands. Our analysis of women's marital quality and men's marital emotion work provides little evidence in support of this theory. Rather, in examining women's…

  7. 38 CFR 17.508 - Access to quality assurance records and documents within the agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to quality...' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Confidentiality of Healthcare Quality Assurance Review Records § 17.508 Access to quality assurance records and documents within the agency. (a) Access...

  8. Linking research to global health equity: the contribution of product development partnerships to access to medicines and research capacity building.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Loff, Bebe

    2013-11-01

    Certain product development partnerships (PDPs) recognize that to promote the reduction of global health disparities they must create access to their products and strengthen research capacity in developing countries. We evaluated the contribution of 3 PDPs--Medicines for Malaria Venture, Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative, and Institute for One World Health--according to Frost and Reich's access framework. We also evaluated PDPs' capacity building in low- and middle-income countries at the individual, institutional, and system levels. We found that these PDPs advance public health by ensuring their products' registration, distribution, and adoption into national treatment policies in disease-endemic countries. Nonetheless, ensuring broad, equitable access for these populations--high distribution coverage; affordability, particularly for the poor; and adoption at provider and end-user levels--remains a challenge. PMID:24028246

  9. Linking Research to Global Health Equity: The Contribution of Product Development Partnerships to Access to Medicines and Research Capacity Building

    PubMed Central

    Loff, Bebe

    2013-01-01

    Certain product development partnerships (PDPs) recognize that to promote the reduction of global health disparities they must create access to their products and strengthen research capacity in developing countries. We evaluated the contribution of 3 PDPs—Medicines for Malaria Venture, Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative, and Institute for One World Health—according to Frost and Reich’s access framework. We also evaluated PDPs’ capacity building in low- and middle-income countries at the individual, institutional, and system levels. We found that these PDPs advance public health by ensuring their products’ registration, distribution, and adoption into national treatment policies in disease-endemic countries. Nonetheless, ensuring broad, equitable access for these populations—high distribution coverage; affordability, particularly for the poor; and adoption at provider and end-user levels—remains a challenge. PMID:24028246

  10. The Growth of Private Higher Education in Brazil: Implications for Equity and Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Tristan

    2004-01-01

    There has been a dramatic growth in private higher education in Brazil in recent years. The World Bank has promoted this expansion on the basis of the private providers' ability to ensure a rapid increase in enrolment, to improve quality through competition between institutions and to bring benefits for society at little public cost. However, the…

  11. Financial Aid, Access & Equity, and State Policy: An Interview with Richard Freeland, Commissioner of Higher Education for Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs for the Future, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Many states are looking at effective ways to use financial incentives to encourage students to complete a postsecondary credential. JFF's new report, "Statewide Aid Policies to Improve College Access and Success", originally commissioned by the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education's Vision Project, has provided valuable background for that…

  12. Equity in Education in Chile: The Tensions between Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matear, Ann

    2007-01-01

    The article examines education policy in Chile after the return to democracy in 1990 from an equity perspective. Since then, policies have aimed for continuity, coherence and complementarity with the aim of furthering national development, promoting social mobility, and equitable access to quality education at all levels. However, Chile faces the…

  13. Committing to Equity and Inclusive Excellence: A Campus Guide for Self-Study and Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Colleges and Universities, 2015

    2015-01-01

    To serve students and society well, higher education needs to make a pervasive commitment to equity and inclusive excellence--both preparing students for and providing them with access to high-quality learning opportunities, and ensuring that students of color and low-income students participate in the most empowering forms of college learning.…

  14. Perceptions of Physical Inspections as a Tool to Protect Housing Quality and Promote Health Equity.

    PubMed

    Holtzen, Holly; Klein, Elizabeth G; Keller, Brittney; Hood, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Physical inspections that assess how well affordable housing properties meet quality and safety standards help to ensure that low-income tenants live in a healthy built environment. This study was part of a larger Health Impact Assessment (HIA) conducted between January 2012 and November 2013 to inform policymakers about the potential health consequences of a proposed policy decision to align the physical inspections required by housing funding agencies, which would result in a reduction of the frequency of physical inspections. Key informant interviews (n=18) of property managers and tenants were used to explore the inspection process, identification of housing quality issues, and potential effects on the health of affordable housing tenants and the impact on property management practices. Results indicate that physical inspection frequency may be an important trigger for property managers and tenants to adhere to proper maintenance schedules. PMID:27180694

  15. Quality through Access, Access with Quality. The New Imperative for Higher Education. First Edition. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergquist, William H.

    This volume examines the often tense interplay between the objectives of quality and access in U.S. higher education. Part 1 frames the basic premises of the book regarding the environment in which contemporary colleges and universities operate, the need for integration of quality and access in such an environment, the central role played by…

  16. Recent Advances in Point-of-Access Water Quality Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostynska, O.; Arshak, K.; Velusamy, V.; Arshak, A.; Vaseashta, Ashok

    Clean water is one of our most valuable natural resources. In addition to providing safe drinking water it assures functional ecosystems that support fisheries and recreation. Human population growth and its associated increased demands on water pose risks to maintaining acceptable water quality. It is vital to assess source waters and the aquatic systems that receive inputs from industrial waste and sewage treatment plants, storm water systems, and runoff from urban and agricultural lands. Rapid and confident assessments of aquatic resources form the basis for sound environmental management. Current methods engaged in tracing the presence of various bacteria in water employ bulky laboratory equipment and are time consuming. Thus, real-time water quality monitoring is essential for National and International Health and Safety. Environmental water monitoring includes measurements of physical characteristics (e.g. pH, temperature, conductivity), chemical parameters (e.g. oxygen, alkalinity, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds), and abundance of certain biological taxa. Monitoring could also include assays of biological activity such as alkaline phosphatase, tests for toxins such as microcystins and direct measurements of pollutants such as heavy metals or hydrocarbons. Real time detection can significantly reduce the level of damage and also the cost to remedy the problem. This paper presents overview of state-of-the-art methods and devices used for point-of-access water quality monitoring and suggest further developments in this area.

  17. Newton in the Big Apple: Issues of equity in physics access and enrollment in New York City public high schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Angela Marian

    High school physics is a gateway course for post-secondary study in science, medicine, and engineering, as well as an essential component in the formation of students' scientific literacy. However, physics is widely considered appropriate only for an academic elite. The existence of policies that restrict science opportunities for secondary students results in diminished outcomes in terms of scientific proficiency. Although the national trend in physics enrollment has shown an increase in recent years, the rate of participation is much lower for students in urban schools. This study examines the availability of physics in New York City, and whether access is related to organizational and school-level variables. The statistical distribution of physics students throughout the city is compiled and analyzed. High schools that successfully offer physics are compared with those that do not. Other factors are explored to determine their relationship to physics access, such as the presence of science magnet schools, the availability of Advanced Placement Physics and Non-Regents Physics, the science curricular sequence, and teacher certification. The results show that physics is not widely available to students in New York City, with 55% of high schools simply not offering the subject. Only 27% of schools with fewer than 600 students offer physics. The science magnet schools enroll a significant proportion of physics students when compared with larger, economically depressed neighborhood schools. The causes of these disparities are complex, and the implications serious for those students who do not have equal access to physics. The implications of these findings are important. By highlighting descriptive variables, as well as statistical evidence of systemic discrimination and inequities, urban districts may formulate effective models for the promotion of physics study. School policies and structures need to target better rates of physics participation among all students

  18. Internet pharmacy: issues of access, quality, costs, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Stephanie Y

    2003-02-01

    Internet pharmacy has been the focus of heightened interest over the past 3 years since the first major Web site was introduced in the United States. This paper addresses issues pertaining to Internet pharmacies that sell prescriptions and other products to consumers at the retail level. The Internet pharmacy industry has shifted rapidly in the short time span. This paper begins with a summary of historical considerations and the shifting organization of Internet pharmacy. The advantages and disadvantages of online pharmacy practice are listed. Issues of access, quality, and cost are described. The challenges in regulation at the state and federal levels are presented. Advice to consumers is offered regarding the use of Internet pharmacy sites for purchasing prescription drug products. PMID:12617198

  19. ARM User Survey Report: Data Access, Quality, and Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, JH; Roeder, LR; Sivaraman, C

    2012-06-28

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to determine how users of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Data Archive interact with the more than 2000 available types of datastreams. The survey also gathered information about data discovery and data quality. The Market and Competitive Analysis group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory worked with web administrators to develop a landing page from which users could access the survey. A survey invitation was sent by ARM via email to about 6100 users on February 22, 2012. The invitation was also posted on the ARM website and Facebook page. Reminders were sent via e-mail and posted on Facebook while the survey was open, February 22-March 23, 2012.

  20. Increasing access to quality health care for the poor: Community perceptions on quality care in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kiguli, Julie; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Okui, Olico; Mutebi, Aloysius; MacGregor, Hayley; Pariyo, George William

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the community’s perspectives and perceptions on quality of health care delivery in two Uganda districts. The paper addresses community concerns on service quality. It focuses on the poor because they are a vulnerable group and often bear a huge burden of disease. Community views were solicited and obtained using eight focus group discussions, six in-depth and 12 key informant interviews. User perceptions and definitions of the quality of health services depended on a number of variables related to technical competence, accessibility to services, interpersonal relations and presence of adequate drugs, supplies, staff, and facility amenities. Results indicate that service delivery to the poor in the general population is perceived to be of low quality. The factors that were mentioned as affecting the quality of services delivered were inadequate trained health workers, shortage of essential drugs, poor attitude of the health workers, and long distances to health facilities. This paper argues that there should be an improvement in the quality of health services with particular attention being paid to the poor. Despite wide focus on improvement of the existing infrastructure and donor funding, there is still low satisfaction with health services and poor perceived accessibility. PMID:19936148

  1. How To Promote Data Quality And Access? Publish It!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. J.; Pfeiffenberger, H.

    2011-12-01

    Started during IPY 2007-2008, the Earth System Science Data journal (Copernicus) has now 'tested the waters' of earth system data publishing for approximately 2 years with some success. The journal has published more than 30 data sets, of remarkable breadth and variety, all under a Creative Commons Attribution license. Users can now find well-described, quality-controlled and freely accessible data on soils, permafrost, sediment transport, ice sheets, surface radiation, ocean-atmosphere fluxes, ocean chemistry, gravity fields, and combined radar and web cam observations of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption plume. Several of the data sets derive specifically from IPY or from polar regions, but a large portion, including a substantial special issue on ocean carbon, cover broad temporal and geographic domains; the contributors themselves come from leading science institutions around the world. ESSD has attracted the particular interest of international research teams, particularly those who, as in the case of ocean carbon data, have spent many years gathering, collating and calibrating global data sets under long-term named programs, but who lack within those programs the mechanisms to distribute those data sets widely outside their specialist teams and to ensure proper citation credit for those remarkable collaborative data processing efforts. An in-progress special issue on global ocean plankton function types, again representing years of international data collaboration, provides a further example of ESSD utility to large research programs. We anticipate an interesting test case of parallel special issues with companion science journals - data sets in ESSD to accompany science publications in a prominent research journal. We see the ESSD practices and products as useful steps to increase quality of and access to important data sets.

  2. Learning Equity in a University Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Westhuizen, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1994, education policy documents in South Africa have prioritised the goal of equity in education, understood as increased access to programmes, more equitable staff and student profiles, and curricula that are more responsive to the needs of all students. The challenge of effecting the goal of equity at levels of teaching and learning in…

  3. Investigating Ten Years of Equity Policy in Australian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Hamish; Krause, Kerri-Lee

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports issues arising from a longitudinal study of 1991 to 2002 Australian higher education equity data. The national equity framework uses an empirical performance indicator system to monitor access, participation, success and retention of six designated equity groups. The paper examines three possible approaches for defining new…

  4. Gender Equity and Mass Communication's Female Student Majority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golombisky, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of the history and politics of gender equity to make problematic the phrase "gender equity," to introduce the gender equity in education literature, and to outline some issues relevant to mass communication. Suggests that equal access represents a sex-blind approach dependent on a male standard. (SG)

  5. Aspects of Student Equity and Higher Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, J.

    2008-01-01

    Badat (2004, 4) refers to the triple challenge facing higher education: to promote equity and growth within a democratic framework and to consolidate a fledgling democracy. In higher education there is inherent tension between growth (access to education) and equity. The article argues that the vagueness in which the term "equity" is generally…

  6. 38 CFR 17.508 - Access to quality assurance records and documents within the agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to quality assurance records and documents within the agency. 17.508 Section 17.508 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Confidentiality of Healthcare Quality Assurance Review Records § 17.508 Access to quality...

  7. Equity in community care.

    PubMed

    Challis, L; Henwood, M

    1994-06-01

    The implementation of the NHS and Community Care Act 1990 made local authority social services departments responsible for the organisation and funding of support and care in the community. This development took effect at the same time as a blurring of the boundaries between health and social care. One consequence is that the relevance of equity (a guiding principle of the 1946 National Health Service Act, but relatively lacking from the 1948 National Assistance Act, the foundation of many social services) has come to be more keenly appreciated within personal social services. Equity questions arise in community care over the distribution of public resources between different client groups, income groups, generations, and localities. Moreover, no mechanisms exist to monitor the trends that emerge from different ways that people get access to care. Yet there is a risk that substantial divisive consequences may occur, particularly between generations. PMID:8019286

  8. Availability and Distribution of Emergency Obstetric Care Services in Karnataka State, South India: Access and Equity Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Mony, Prem K.; Krishnamurthy, Jayanna; Thomas, Annamma; Sankar, Kiruba; Ramesh, B. M.; Moses, Stephen; Blanchard, James; Avery, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of efforts to reduce maternal deaths in Karnataka state, India, there has been a concerted effort to increase institutional deliveries. However, little is known about the quality of care in these healthcare facilities. We investigated the availability and distribution of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) services in eight northern districts of Karnataka state in south India. Methods & Findings We undertook a cross-sectional study of 444 government and 422 private health facilities, functional 24-hours-a-day 7-days-a-week. EmOC availability and distribution were evaluated for 8 districts and 42 taluks (sub-districts) during the year 2010, based on a combination of self-reporting, record review and direct observation. Overall, the availability of EmOC services at the sub-state level [EmOC = 5.9/500,000; comprehensive EmOC (CEmOC) = 4.5/500,000 and basic EmOC (BEmOC) = 1.4/500,000] was seen to meet the benchmark. These services however were largely located in the private sector (90% of CEmOC and 70% of BemOC facilities). Thirty six percent of private facilities and six percent of government facilities were EmOC centres. Although half of eight districts had a sufficient number of EmOC facilities and all eight districts had a sufficient number of CEmOC facilities, only two-fifths of the 42 taluks had a sufficient number of EmOC facilities. With the private facilities being largely located in select towns only, the ‘non-headquarter’ taluks and ‘backward’ taluks suffered from a marked lack of coverage of these services. Spatial mapping further helped identify the clustering of a large number of contiguous taluks without adequate government EmOC facilities in northeastern Karnataka. Conclusions In conclusion, disaggregating information on emergency obstetric care service availability at district and subdistrict levels is critical for health policy and planning in the Indian setting. Reducing maternal deaths will require greater

  9. Managing Both Quality and Access at Higher Educational Institutions in Tobago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julien Sealey, Beverley

    2011-01-01

    This paper will focus on the island of Tobago and indicate what practical solutions are best suited for administrators to manage quality and access at higher educational institutions on the island. The key areas to managing quality identified are the inclusiveness of a quality plan, administrators desire to see quality as an institutional culture…

  10. Promoting Household Water Treatment through Women's Self Help Groups in Rural India: Assessing Impact on Drinking Water Quality and Equity

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Matthew C.; Trinies, Victoria; Boisson, Sophie; Mak, Gregory; Clasen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Household water treatment, including boiling, chlorination and filtration, has been shown effective in improving drinking water quality and preventing diarrheal disease among vulnerable populations. We used a case-control study design to evaluate the extent to which the commercial promotion of household water filters through microfinance institutions to women's self-help group (SHG) members improved access to safe drinking water. This pilot program achieved a 9.8% adoption rate among women targeted for adoption. Data from surveys and assays of fecal contamination (thermotolerant coliforms, TTC) of drinking water samples (source and household) were analyzed from 281 filter adopters and 247 non-adopters exposed to the program; 251 non-SHG members were also surveyed. While adopters were more likely than non-adopters to have children under 5 years, they were also more educated, less poor, more likely to have access to improved water supplies, and more likely to have previously used a water filter. Adopters had lower levels of fecal contamination of household drinking water than non-adopters, even among those non-adopters who treated their water by boiling or using traditional ceramic filters. Nevertheless, one-third of water samples from adopter households exceeded 100 TTC/100ml (high risk), and more than a quarter of the filters had no stored treated water available when visited by an investigator, raising concerns about correct, consistent use. In addition, the poorest adopters were less likely to see improvements in their water quality. Comparisons of SHG and non-SHG members suggest similar demographic characteristics, indicating SHG members are an appropriate target group for this promotion campaign. However, in order to increase the potential for health gains, future programs will need to increase uptake, particularly among the poorest households who are most susceptible to disease morbidity and mortality, and focus on strategies to improve the correct, consistent

  11. Digital Equity and Intercultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resta, Paul; Laferrière, Thérèse

    2015-01-01

    Digital equity and intercultural education continue to be areas of concern in the emerging knowledge-based society. The digital divide is present across the globe as the result of a complex of factors such as the inequality in: access to hardware and connectivity; autonomy of use; digital and literacy skills; availability of technical and social…

  12. Private-Sector Social Franchising to Accelerate Family Planning Access, Choice, and Quality: Results From Marie Stopes International

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Erik; Hayes, Brendan; Taft, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background: To achieve the global Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) goal of reaching 120 million more women with voluntary family planning services, rapid scale-up of services is needed. Clinical social franchising, a service delivery approach used by Marie Stopes International (MSI) in which small, independent health care businesses are organized into quality-assured networks, provides an opportunity to engage the private sector in improving access to family planning and other health services. Methods: We analyzed MSI’s social franchising program against the 4 intended outputs of access, efficiency, quality, and equity. The analysis used routine service data from social franchising programs in 17 African and Asian countries (2008–2014) to estimate number of clients reached, couple-years of protection (CYPs) provided, and efficiency of services; clinical quality audits of 636 social franchisees from a subset of the 17 countries (2011–2014); and exit interviews with 4,844 clients in 14 countries (2013) to examine client satisfaction, demographics (age and poverty), and prior contraceptive use. The MSI “Impact 2” model was used to estimate population-level outcomes by converting service data into estimated health outcomes. Results: Between 2008 and 2014, an estimated 3,753,065 women cumulatively received voluntary family planning services via 17 national social franchise programs, with a sizable 68% choosing long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs). While the number of social franchisee outlets increased over time, efficiency also significantly improved over time, with each outlet delivering, on average, 178 CYPs in 2008 compared with 941 CYPs in 2014 (P = .02). Clinical quality audit scores also significantly improved; 39.8% of social franchisee outlets scored over 80% in 2011 compared with 84.1% in 2014. In 2013, 40.7% of the clients reported they had not been using a modern method during the 3 months prior to their visit (95% CI = 37.4, 44

  13. The Water Quality Portal: a single point of access for water quality data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Water Quality Portal (WQP) is a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) overseen by the National Water Quality Monitoring Council (NWQMC). It was launched in April of 2012 as a single point of access for discrete water quality samples stored in the USGS NWIS and EPA STORET systems. Since launch thousands of users have visited the Water Quality Portal to download billions of results that are pertinent to their interests. Numerous tools have also been developed that use WQP web services as a source of data for further analysis. Since the launch of the Portal, the WQP development team at the USGS Center for Integrated Data Analytics has worked with USGS and EPA stakeholders as well as the wider user community to add significant new features to the WQP. WQP users can now directly plot sites of interest on a web map based on any of the 164 WQP query parameters, and then download data of interest directly from that map. In addition, the WQP has expanded beyond just serving out NWIS and STORET data, and provides data from the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service STEWARDS system, the USGS BioData system and is working with others to bring in additional data. Finally, the WQP is linked to another NWQMC-supported project, the National Environmental Methods Index (NEMI), so WQP users can easily find the method behind the data that they are using. Future work is focused on incorporating additional biological data from the USGS BioData system, broadening the scope of discrete water quality sample types from STORET, and developing approaches to make the data in the WQP more visible and usable. The WQP team is also exploring ways to further integrate with other systems, such as those operated the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service and other federal agencies to facilitate the overarching goal of improving access to water quality data for all users.

  14. Timely Access to Quality Health Care Among Georgia Children Ages 4 to 17 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ogbuanu, Chinelo; Goodman, David A.; Kahn, Katherine; Long, Cherie; Noggle, Brendan; Bagchi, Suparna; Barradas, Danielle; Castrucci, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We examined factors associated with children's access to quality health care, a major concern in Georgia, identified through the 2010 Title V Needs Assessment. Data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health were merged with the 2008 Area Resource File and Health Resources and Services Administration medically under-served area variable, and restricted to Georgia children ages 4–17 years (N = 1,397). The study outcome, access to quality health care was derived from access to care (timely utilization of preventive medical care in the previous 12 months) and quality of care (compassionate/culturally effective/family-centered care). Andersen's behavioral model of health services utilization guided independent variable selection. Analyses included Chi-square tests and multinomial logit regressions. In our study population, 32.8 % reported access to higher quality care, 24.8 % reported access to moderate quality care, 22.8 % reported access to lower quality care, and 19.6 % reported having no access. Factors positively associated with having access to higher/moderate versus lower quality care include having a usual source of care (USC) (adjusted odds ratio, AOR:3.27; 95 % confidence interval, 95 % CI 1.15–9.26), and special health care needs (AOR:2.68; 95 % CI 1.42–5.05). Lower odds of access to higher/moderate versus lower quality care were observed for non-Hispanic Black (AOR:0.31; 95 % CI 0.18–0.53) and Hispanic (AOR:0.20; 95 % CI 0.08–0.50) children compared with non-Hispanic White children and for children with all other forms of insurance coverage compared with children with continuous-adequate-private insurance. Ensuring that children have continuous, adequate insurance coverage and a USC may positively affect their access to quality health care in Georgia. PMID:23054451

  15. Digital Equity in Education: A Multilevel Examination of Differences in and Relationships between Computer Access, Computer Use and State-Level Technology Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Jonathan D.

    2006-01-01

    Using data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) state assessment and a survey of state-level technology policies, this study examined digital equity in education as a multilevel organizational phenomenon with data from 70,382 students in 3,479 schools and 40 states. Students in rural schools or schools with higher…

  16. Equity and Efficiency in Greek Higher Education Policies in the Past Three Decades: A Shift of Emphasis to the Issue of Efficiency/"Quality Assurance" in the 2000s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokou, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that, in Greek higher education policies of the 2000s, "equality of educational opportunities" is not given as much importance as in the 1980s and the 1990s, when higher education had been massively expanded. In the 2000s, the issue of equity is giving way to that of efficiency/quality, in accordance with a neoliberal…

  17. Balancing Considerations of Equity, Content Quality, and Technical Excellence in Designing, Validating and Implementing Performance Assessments in the Context of Mathematics Instructional Reform: The Experience of the QUASAR Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Edward A.; Lane, Suzanne

    Issues of educational equity and quality are explored in the context of the Quantitative Understanding: Amplifying Student Achievement and Reasoning (QUASAR) project, a national educational reform project aimed at fostering and studying the development and implementation of enhanced mathematics instructional programs for students attending middle…

  18. Quality Matters[TM] Accessibility Survey: Institutional Practices and Policies for Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Barbara A.; King, Denise K.

    2011-01-01

    Quality Matters (QM) is a professional organization that offers a faculty-centered, peer review process to certify the quality of online and blended courses. The purpose of this white paper is to share the results of a Quality Matters accessibility benchmarking study administered to 84 subscriber institutions. The primary goal of the survey was to…

  19. Dilemma of Access and Provision of Quality Basic Education in Central Region, Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amakyi, Michael; Ampah-Mensah, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    A survey research was conducted to find out if reported improvements in access to education in Ghana are reflected in comparable improvements in delivery of quality education. The study examined theoretical constructs on adequacy and quality assurance in education to ascertain the state of quality provision in education, and whether there is a…

  20. Quality in Undergraduate Education: A Collaborative Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertine, Susan; Henry, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    The Quality in Undergraduate Education project (QUE) is an equity project, founded on a belief that a high-quality public baccalaureate education should be accessible to all students. QUE is a collaboration among twenty-one colleges and universities in four states (California, Georgia, Maryland, and Nevada). It groups regional two- and four-year…

  1. Poverty, equity, human rights and health.

    PubMed Central

    Braveman, Paula; Gruskin, Sofia

    2003-01-01

    Those concerned with poverty and health have sometimes viewed equity and human rights as abstract concepts with little practical application, and links between health, equity and human rights have not been examined systematically. Examination of the concepts of poverty, equity, and human rights in relation to health and to each other demonstrates that they are closely linked conceptually and operationally and that each provides valuable, unique guidance for health institutions' work. Equity and human rights perspectives can contribute concretely to health institutions' efforts to tackle poverty and health, and focusing on poverty is essential to operationalizing those commitments. Both equity and human rights principles dictate the necessity to strive for equal opportunity for health for groups of people who have suffered marginalization or discrimination. Health institutions can deal with poverty and health within a framework encompassing equity and human rights concerns in five general ways: (1) institutionalizing the systematic and routine application of equity and human rights perspectives to all health sector actions; (2) strengthening and extending the public health functions, other than health care, that create the conditions necessary for health; (3) implementing equitable health care financing, which should help reduce poverty while increasing access for the poor; (4) ensuring that health services respond effectively to the major causes of preventable ill-health among the poor and disadvantaged; and (5) monitoring, advocating and taking action to address the potential health equity and human rights implications of policies in all sectors affecting health, not only the health sector. PMID:12973647

  2. A Quality of Context-Aware Approach to Access Control in Pervasive Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toninelli, Alessandra; Corradi, Antonio; Montanari, Rebecca

    The widespread diffusion of wireless-enabled portable devices creates novel opportunities for users to share resources anywhere and anytime, but makes access control a crucial issue. User/device mobility and heterogeneity, together with network topology and conditions variability, complicate access control and call for novel solutions to dynamically adapt access decisions to the different operating conditions. Several research efforts have emerged in recent years that propose to exploit context-awareness to control access to resources based on context visibility and changes. Context-based access control requires, however, to take into account the quality of context information used to drive access decisions (QoC). Quality of context has in fact a profound impact on the correct behavior of any context-aware access control framework. Using context information with insufficient quality might increase the risk of incorrect access control decisions, thus leading to dangerous security breaches in resource sharing. In this paper we propose a QoC-aware approach to access control for anywhere, anytime resource sharing. The paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of the Proteus policy framework, which combines two design guidelines to enable dynamic adaptation of policies depending on context changes: context-awareness with QoC guarantees and semantic technologies to allow high-level description of context/policy specification and reasoning about context/policies.

  3. Contraceptive Equity

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The Equity in Prescription Insurance and Contraceptive Coverage Act, introduced in Congress in 1997 and still unpassed, seeks to redress health insurers’ failure to pay for birth control as they pay for other prescription drugs, most paradoxically Viagra. In 1936 the International Workers Order (IWO), a fraternal society, became the first insurer to include contraception in its benefits package. A forerunner in the movement for prepaid medical care, the IWO offered its members primary care and contraceptive services for annual flat fees. Founded at a time when the legal status of contraception was in flux, the IWO’s Birth Control Center was the only such clinic to operate on an insurance system. Recent state laws and judicial actions have revived the IWO’s groundbreaking view of contraception as a basic preventive service deserving of insurance coverage. PMID:17761562

  4. Progress towards Good-Quality Education for All in Turkey: A Qualified Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köseleci, Nihan

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from a range of secondary data sources, this paper succinctly overviews patterns of access to good-quality education in Turkey over the last 15 years. It also maps the policy context within which issues of access, quality and equity are examined. As a result of effective supply and demand side strategies, enrolment ratios beyond the…

  5. [Notes on equity in health outcomes].

    PubMed

    Fresneda-Bautista, Oscar

    2008-12-01

    The article locates analysing health outcomes within a set of elements covering evaluating equity in health and suggests some orientations for such analysis. The model of analysis for examining equity in health which has been adopted by the Equity in Quality of Life and Health> has been taken as a point of reference. The text approaches the following questions: What is the role played by evaluating health outcomes within the context of equity in health? How can inequities in health outcomes be evaluated? What should be evaluated regarding health outcomes? The final part deals with how the topic of equity in health does not become exhausted in examining unjust inequalities between individuals or groups. PMID:19377730

  6. Variation in cooking and eating quality traits in Japanese rice germplasm accessions

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Kiyosumi; Suzuki, Keitaro; Iijima, Ken; Ebana, Kaworu

    2016-01-01

    The eating quality of cooked rice is important and determines its market price and consumer acceptance. To comprehensively describe the variation of eating quality in 183 rice germplasm accessions, we evaluated 33 eating-quality traits including amylose and protein contents, pasting properties of rice flour, and texture of cooked rice grains. All eating-quality traits varied widely in the germplasm accessions. Principal-components analysis (PCA) revealed that allelic differences in the Wx gene explained the largest proportion of phenotypic variation of the eating-quality traits. In 146 accessions of non-glutinous temperate japonica rice, PCA revealed that protein content and surface texture of the cooked rice grains significantly explained phenotypic variations of the eating-quality traits. An allelic difference based on simple sequence repeats, which was located near a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on the short arm of chromosome 3, was associated with differences in the eating quality of non-glutinous temperate japonica rice. These results suggest that eating quality is controlled by genetic factors, including the Wx gene and the QTL on chromosome 3, in Japanese rice accessions. These genetic factors have been consciously selected for eating quality during rice breeding programs in Japan. PMID:27162502

  7. Variation in cooking and eating quality traits in Japanese rice germplasm accessions.

    PubMed

    Hori, Kiyosumi; Suzuki, Keitaro; Iijima, Ken; Ebana, Kaworu

    2016-03-01

    The eating quality of cooked rice is important and determines its market price and consumer acceptance. To comprehensively describe the variation of eating quality in 183 rice germplasm accessions, we evaluated 33 eating-quality traits including amylose and protein contents, pasting properties of rice flour, and texture of cooked rice grains. All eating-quality traits varied widely in the germplasm accessions. Principal-components analysis (PCA) revealed that allelic differences in the Wx gene explained the largest proportion of phenotypic variation of the eating-quality traits. In 146 accessions of non-glutinous temperate japonica rice, PCA revealed that protein content and surface texture of the cooked rice grains significantly explained phenotypic variations of the eating-quality traits. An allelic difference based on simple sequence repeats, which was located near a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on the short arm of chromosome 3, was associated with differences in the eating quality of non-glutinous temperate japonica rice. These results suggest that eating quality is controlled by genetic factors, including the Wx gene and the QTL on chromosome 3, in Japanese rice accessions. These genetic factors have been consciously selected for eating quality during rice breeding programs in Japan. PMID:27162502

  8. [Health policy and practice towards equity].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Renilson Rehem

    2007-12-01

    The article discusses the concepts of equality and equity in the health area in Brazilian scenario, which means under the Unified Health System (UHS). The author shows the principles of UHS, emphasizing the principles of Universality and Integrality. Also reviews briefly the history of UHS and its construction process. It shows singularity of present issues such as technological advances and its consequences to the quality of health attention, both reflecting to the costs of the health care. It analyses some advances that were possible in Brazilian health attention and especially in São Paulo State. In conclusion, he explains a brief analyze about UHS news challenges: the increasing of accessibility to the health services, increasing of needs and the limited resources. PMID:20608374

  9. Access to Quality: Common Directions for Uncommon Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota Board of Regents, Pierre.

    This report discusses the formulation of a common mission statement by the South Dakota Board of Regents System of state-supported higher education. Twelve directions are identified in light of the system's needs and the state environment in South Dakota. These include: (1) ensuring the quality of undergraduate education; (2) selectively improving…

  10. The Fourth R: Responsibility: Ensuring Educational Excellence through Equitable and Effective School Practices. An Equity Handbook for Learning Communities. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR. Center for National Origin, Race and Sex Equity.

    Every learner must be guaranteed access to quality instruction, resources, and assessment. This handbook was designed to assist educators in making responsible local educational decisions with an informed and attuned understanding of equity and effective school practices. The publication is intended to help engage education stakeholders in…

  11. Hearing Parents' and Carers' Voices: Experiences of Accessing Quality Long Day Care in Northern Regional Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Nonie; Tinning, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This article explores parents' and carers' experiences of accessing quality long day care in northern regional Australia. The data was gathered in 2009, after the collapse of ABC Developmental Learning Centres (herein referred to as ABC Learning) and before the implementation of the "National Quality Framework," and provides a snapshot of…

  12. Assessing equity in access to health care provision in the UK: does where you live affect your chances of getting a coronary artery bypass graft?

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shlomo, Y; Chaturvedi, N

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES--Equity should be monitored routinely for all health care services, but ideal studies for each service would be prohibitively expensive and time consuming. A simple, quick, and cheap method for the preliminary exploration of equity in health care provision using routine data was devised. This method was illustrated by examining whether coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operations reflect socioeconomic differences in ischaemic heart disease (IHD) mortality. DESIGN--Ecological comparison of operation rates was undertaken for CABG for 1991 and IHD mortality for 1981-85 by quartiles of Townsend deprivation score. SETTING--North East Thames Regional Health Authority, London, UK. SUBJECTS--All residents of this region aged 35-74 were the denominator population. Numerators were 26,834 IHD deaths and 1041 CABG operations for the defined time periods. MAIN RESULTS--IHD mortality showed a steady, significant increase with increasing area deprivation scores for both men and women. CABG rate ratios increased linearly for women, while for men there was a U shaped pattern, being lowest for the second and third quartiles. This pattern was attenuated, but not abolished, when adjusted for geographical proximity to cardiothoracic surgical units. The ratio of CABG operations to IHD mortality by deprivation was relatively constant in women suggesting equitable provision. In men, this ratio was significantly lower for the third quartile. CONCLUSIONS--Inequities may exist in the provision of CABG operations for men in this region and this finding should be the stimulus for further detailed studies. Other health care systems should also examine equity in provision. PMID:7798051

  13. Access High Quality Imagery from the NOAA View Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisut, D.; Powell, A. M.; Loomis, T.; Goel, V.; Mills, B.; Cowan, D.

    2013-12-01

    NOAA curates a vast treasure trove of environmental data, but one that is sometimes not easily accessed, especially for education, outreach, and media purposes. Traditional data portals in NOAA require extensive knowledge of the specific names of observation platforms, models, and analyses, along with nomenclature for variable outputs. A new website and web mapping service (WMS) from NOAA attempts to remedy such issues. The NOAA View data imagery portal provides a seamless entry point into data from across the agency: satellite, models, in-situ analysis, etc. The system provides the user with ability to browse, animate, and download high resolution (e.g., 4,000 x 2,000 pixel) imagery, Google Earth, and even proxy data files. The WMS architecture also allows the resources to be ingested into other software systems or applications.

  14. Access to orphan drugs despite poor quality of clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Alain G; Van Wilder, Philippe B

    2011-01-01

    AIM We analysed the Belgian reimbursement decisions of orphan drugs as compared with those of innovative drugs for more common but equally severe diseases, with special emphasis on the quality of clinical evidence. METHODS Using the National Health Insurance Agency administrative database, we evaluated all submitted orphan drug files between 2002 and 2007. A quality analysis of the clinical evidence in the orphan reimbursement files was performed. The evaluation reports of the French ‘Haute Autorité de Santé’, including the five-point scale parameter ‘Service Médical Rendu (SMR), were examined to compare disease severity. Chi-squared tests (at P < 0.05 significance level) were used to compare the outcome of the reimbursement decisions between orphan and non-orphan innovative medicines. RESULTS Twenty-five files of orphan drugs and 117 files of non-orphan drugs were evaluated. Twenty-two of 25 (88%) submissions of orphan drugs were granted reimbursement as opposed to 74 of the 117 (63%) non-orphan innovative medicines (P = 0.02). Only 52% of the 25 orphan drug files included a randomized controlled trial as opposed to 84% in a random control sample of 25 non-orphan innovative submissions (P < 0.01). The duration of drug exposure was in most cases far too short in relation to the natural history of the disease. CONCLUSIONS Orphan drug designation predicts reimbursement despite poor quality of clinical evidence. The evidence gap at market authorization should be reduced by post-marketing programmes, in which the centralized regulatory and the local reimbursement authorities collaborate in an efficient way across the European Union member states. PMID:21395641

  15. Potential access to primary health care: what does the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement data show?

    PubMed Central

    Uchôa, Severina Alice da Costa; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Fronteira, Inês Santos Estevinho; Coêlho, Ardigleusa Alves; Martiniano, Claudia Santos; Brandão, Isabel Cristina Araújo; Yamamura, Mellina; Maroto, Renata Melo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the influence of contextual indicators on the performance of municipalities regarding potential access to primary health care in Brazil and to discuss the contribution from nurses working on this access. Method: a multicenter descriptive study based on secondary data from External Evaluation of the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement in Primary Care, with the participation of 17,202 primary care teams. The chi-square test of proportions was used to verify differences between the municipalities stratified based on size of the coverage area, supply, coordination, and integration; when necessary, the chi-square test with Yates correction or Fisher's exact test were employed. For the population variable, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used. Results: the majority of participants were nurses (n=15.876; 92,3%). Statistically significant differences were observed between the municipalities in terms of territory (p=0.0000), availability (p=0.0000), coordination of care (p=0.0000), integration (p=0.0000) and supply (p=0.0000), verifying that the municipalities that make up area 6 tend to have better performance in these dimensions. Conclusion: areas 4,5 and 6 performed better in every analyzed dimension, and the nurse had a leading role in the potential to access primary health care in Brazil. PMID:26959332

  16. Private equity investment in health care services.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Catherine J; Rudsenske, Todd; Vaughan, James S

    2008-01-01

    Sophisticated private equity investors in health services provide venture capital for early-stage companies, growth capital for mid-stage companies, and equity capital for buyouts of mid-stage and mature companies. They pursue opportunities in provider sectors that are large and have a stable reimbursement environment, such as acute care services; sectors with room to execute consolidation strategies, such as labs; alternative-site sectors, such as "storefront" medicine; and clinical services, such as behavioral health, that are subject to profitably increasing quality and lowering costs. The innovations created through private equity investments could challenge established health services organizations. PMID:18780929

  17. Science Education and Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Percy; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This double issue of "Equity Coalition" deals with issues related to the need for inclusive science training and encouraging the interest of women and minorities groups in science. The following articles are included: (1) "Say Yes to Science" (Percy Bates); (2) "Science and Equity: Why This Issue Is Important" (Eleanor Linn); (3) "Race Equity and…

  18. Schools Achieving Gender Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revis, Emma

    This guide is designed to assist teachers presenting the Schools Achieving Gender Equity (SAGE) curriculum for vocational education students, which was developed to align gender equity concepts with the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). Included in the guide are lesson plans for classes on the following topics: legal issues of gender equity,…

  19. Iranian nursing students' perspectives of educational equity.

    PubMed

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza; Mohammadpour, Ali; Abbasi, Mahmoud; Javadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Around the world there is a growing consensus that students' rights must be protected, regardless of race, creed, color, sex, religion, and socioeconomic status. One of these rights is the educational equity. However, little is known about these phenomena in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the educational equity from the perspective of nursing students. A qualitative study was conducted. Thus, we purposefully recruited for in-depth interviews 13 nursing students (8 female and 5 male). All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis approach to identify categories and themes. Four main themes emerged from the data: Fair Educational Opportunity, fair evaluation, attempts to combat discrimination, and employing qualified teachers.  It is argued that educational equity should be developed in higher education. Principles of equity and students' rights may form the most basic rationale for all formal and informal efforts to extend the right of equal access to education. PMID:25530059

  20. Why do we observe a limited impact of primary care access measures on clinical quality indicators?

    PubMed

    Chung, Sukyung; Panattoni, Laura; Hung, Dorothy; Johns, Nicole; Trujillo, Laurel; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the effects of enhanced primary care access and continuity on clinical quality in a large, multipayer, multispecialty ambulatory care organization with fee-for-service provider incentives. The difference-in-differences estimates indicate that access to own primary care physician is a statistically significant predictor of improved clinical quality, although the effect size is small such that clinical significance may be negligible. Reduced time for own primary care physician appointment and increased enrollment in electronic personal health record are positive predictors of chronic disease management processes and preventive screening but are inconsistently associated with clinical outcomes. Challenges in identifying relationships between access and quality outcomes in a real-world setting are also discussed. PMID:24594563

  1. An Introductory Mixed-Methods Intersectionality Analysis of College Access and Equity: An Examination of First-Generation Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Museus, Samuel D.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how researchers can use mixed-methods approaches and intersectional analyses to understand college access among first-generation Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). First, he discusses the utility of mixed-methods approaches and intersectionality research in studying college access. Then, he…

  2. DELIVERING TIMELY WATER QUALITY INFORMATION TO YOUR COMMUNITY. THE LAKE ACCESS-MINNEAPOLIS PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a summary of the near-real-time water quality-monitoring project conducted by a consortium of interested parties in the greater Minneapolis area. It was funded by an EPA program known as EMPACT (Environmental Monitoring, Public Access, and Community Tracking). In 1...

  3. Ensuring Access with Quality to California's Community Colleges. National Center Report #04-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Gerald C.; Jones, Dennis P.; McGuinness, Aims C., Jr.; Timar, Allene

    2004-01-01

    This report finds that enrollment growth pressures, fee increases, and recent budget cuts in the California Community Colleges are having significant detrimental effects on student access and program quality. The report also provides recommendations for creating improvements that build from the state policy context and from existing promising…

  4. A Correlational Analysis: Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Quality of Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Arshia A.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the compulsion to improve the evident paucity in quality of care, especially in critical access hospitals in the United States, policy makers, healthcare providers, and administrators have taken the advise of researchers suggesting the integration of technology in healthcare. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) System composed of multiple…

  5. The Relationship of IEP Quality to Curricular Access and Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Salle, Tamika P.; Roach, Andrew T.; McGrath, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality of Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and its influence on academic achievement, inclusion in general education classrooms, and curricular access for students with disabilities. 130 teachers from the state of Indiana were asked to submit the most recent IEP of one of their students in…

  6. Information-Seeking in Family Day Care: Access, Quality and Personal Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corr, L.; Davis, E.; Cook, K.; Mackinnon, A.; Sims, M.; Herrman, H.

    2014-01-01

    Family day-care (FDC) educators work autonomously to provide care and education for children of mixed ages, backgrounds and abilities. To meet the demands and opportunities of their work and regulatory requirements, educators need access to context-relevant and high quality information. No previous research has examined how and where these workers…

  7. 42 CFR 417.106 - Quality assurance program; Availability, accessibility, and continuity of basic and supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quality assurance program; Availability, accessibility, and continuity of basic and supplemental health services. 417.106 Section 417.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  8. 42 CFR 417.106 - Quality assurance program; Availability, accessibility, and continuity of basic and supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quality assurance program; Availability, accessibility, and continuity of basic and supplemental health services. 417.106 Section 417.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  9. 42 CFR 417.106 - Quality assurance program; Availability, accessibility, and continuity of basic and supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Quality assurance program; Availability, accessibility, and continuity of basic and supplemental health services. 417.106 Section 417.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  10. 42 CFR 417.106 - Quality assurance program; Availability, accessibility, and continuity of basic and supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quality assurance program; Availability, accessibility, and continuity of basic and supplemental health services. 417.106 Section 417.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  11. Higher Education Marketplaces: A Comparison of Variety, Access, Dependence, and Quality in 15 Metropolitan Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dluhy, Milan J.; Maidique, Modesto A.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of 15 U.S. metropolitan areas illustrates that characteristics of higher education in urban marketplaces are diverse. Metropolitan areas of the west and southwest rank highest when variety, access, dependence, and quality are used to assess the marketplaces. Size, region, and strategic economic location explain some of the variations.…

  12. Educational Access Is Educational Quality: Indigenous Parents' Perceptions of Schooling in Rural Guatemala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishihara-Brito, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings and implications of a qualitative study conducted in Guatemala, which focused on rural, indigenous parents' perceptions of their children's schooling and educational quality. For these parents, the simple fact that their children had improved access to school signifies a satisfactory educational…

  13. Access, Participation, and Supports: The Defining Features of High-Quality Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buysse, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    This article describes current knowledge about early childhood inclusion, summarizing research and the DEC/NAEYC joint position statement on inclusion. The article also describes effective or promising educational practices that promote access, participation, and supports--the defining features of high-quality inclusion. Future efforts to improve…

  14. The Role of Boards in College Access Programs: Creating and Maintaining Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis, University of Southern California, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Access programs are facing increased scrutiny. Not all programs are equally effective. In an environment in which resources are short, funders increasingly require criteria that enable them to make informed decisions about program quality. As elaborated in this report , one role of a high performance board is to help develop benchmarks of…

  15. Girls' Access to Education in China: Actors, Cultures and the Windmill of Development Management. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xiaojun Grace

    2010-01-01

    The world has a mixed record towards achieving EFA [Education for All] and the MDGs [Millennium Development Goals] in relation to the targets on gender equity in basic education. For researchers and practitioners, this raises the question of which factors influence the processes leading to the improvement of access and quality of girls' education…

  16. Primary health-care nurses and Internet health information-seeking: Access, barriers and quality checks.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Jean; Strong, Alison; Chan, Helen; Hanna, Sue; Huntington, Annette

    2016-02-01

    Online information is a critical resource for evidence-based practice and patient education. This study aimed to establish New Zealand nurses' access and evaluation of online health information in the primary care context using a postal questionnaire survey; there were 630 respondents from a random sample of 931 nurses. The majority of respondents were satisfied with work access to online information (84.5%, n = 501) and searched for online information at least several times a week (57.5%, n = 343). The major barrier to online information seeking was insufficient time, but 68 respondents had no work online information access. The level of nursing qualification was significantly correlated with computer confidence and information quality checking. A range of information evaluation approaches was used. Most nurses in study accessed and evaluated Internet information in contrast to the findings of earlier studies, but there were barriers preventing universal integration into practice. PMID:25355072

  17. Socioeconomic inequalities in the access to and quality of health care services

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Thumé, Elaine; Tomasi, Elaine; Duro, Suele Manjourany Silva; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the inequalities in access, utilization, and quality of health care services according to the socioeconomic status. METHODS This population-based cross-sectional study evaluated 2,927 individuals aged ≥ 20 years living in Pelotas, RS, Southern Brazil, in 2012. The associations between socioeconomic indicators and the following outcomes were evaluated: lack of access to health services, utilization of services, waiting period (in days) for assistance, and waiting time (in hours) in lines. We used Poisson regression for the crude and adjusted analyses. RESULTS The lack of access to health services was reported by 6.5% of the individuals who sought health care. The prevalence of use of health care services in the 30 days prior to the interview was 29.3%. Of these, 26.4% waited five days or more to receive care and 32.1% waited at least an hour in lines. Approximately 50.0% of the health care services were funded through the Unified Health System. The use of health care services was similar across socioeconomic groups. The lack of access to health care services and waiting time in lines were higher among individuals of lower economic status, even after adjusting for health care needs. The waiting period to receive care was higher among those with higher socioeconomic status. CONCLUSIONS Although no differences were observed in the use of health care services across socioeconomic groups, inequalities were evident in the access to and quality of these services. PMID:26039400

  18. Complex Instruction: Equity in Cooperative Learning Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Elizabeth G.; Lotan, Rachel A.; Scarloss, Beth A.; Arellano, Adele R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses two dimensions of equity within small-group learning--access and equitable relations--describing complex instruction (CI) as an approach that lets educators address these issues. CI teachers use cooperative learning to teach at high academic levels in diverse classrooms. The paper describes CI in action, achievement results in CI…

  19. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. A...

  20. The Quality and Accessibility of Primary School Music Education: Provision, Perceptions and Hopes in Six Non-Metropolitan Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardcastle, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The National Review of School Music Education has systematically documented the variations in quality and accessibility of school music education in Australia. Rural and remote schools were found to be particularly vulnerable to relatively poorer quality and accessibility. These findings were not new; they echoed similar observations made by…

  1. Access to Knowledge: The Continuing Agenda for Our Nation's Schools. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodlad, John I., Ed.; Keating, Pamela, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of essays by education researchers and practitioners about issues of educational equity and excellence. The authors examine the problem of failure in schools and describe the various curricular and structural factors that block access to an equal and quality education for all students. Chapters are entitled: (1)…

  2. Strategic purchasing reform in Estonia: Reducing inequalities in access while improving care concentration and quality.

    PubMed

    Habicht, Triin; Habicht, Jarno; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2015-08-01

    As of 2014, the Estonian Health Insurance Fund has adopted new purchasing procedures and criteria, which it now has started to implement in specialist care. Main changes include (1) redefined access criteria based on population need rather than historical supply, which aim to achieve more equal access of providers and specialties; (2) stricter definition and use of optimal workload criteria to increase the concentration of specialist care (3) better consideration of patient movement; and (4) an increased emphasis on quality to foster quality improvement. The new criteria were first used in the contract cycle that started in 2014 and resulted in fewer contracted providers for a similar volume of care compared to the previous contract cycle. This implies that provision of specialized care has become concentrated at fewer providers. It is too early to draw firm conclusions on the impact on care quality or on actors, but the process has sparked debate on the role of selective contracting and the role of public and private providers in Estonian health care. Lastly, the Estonian experience may hold important lessons for other countries looking to overcome inequalities in access while concentrating care and improving care quality. PMID:26149322

  3. Equity/Equality Issues of Gender, Race, and Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan, Margaret

    1999-01-01

    Critiquing two "Handbook" chapters on gender and race, this article observes that equity concerns have given way to concerns with quality and excellence. Both chapters explore reasons behind lack of equity (for poor students of color and women in school administration) and criticize "liberal" solutions to social problems. (Contains 55 references.)…

  4. Equality or Equity, Player or Guardian? The Dutch Government and Its Role in Providing Access Opportunities for Government Sponsored International Secondary Education, 1979-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickarts, Boris

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the Dutch government's International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) Pilot, allowing Dutch pre-university students to take part in the IB DP. Is it likely to create "equal", or rather "equitable", access opportunities for government-sponsored Dutch international secondary schools? The article advances the position…

  5. How the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement could undermine PHARMAC and threaten access to affordable medicines and health equity in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Deborah; Lopert, Ruth; Reid, Papaarangi

    2013-10-01

    New Zealand's Pharmaceutical Management Agency (PHARMAC) has been highly successful in facilitating affordable access to medicines through a combination of aggressive price negotiations, innovative procurement mechanisms, and careful evaluation of value for money. Recently the US government, through the establishment of a series of bilateral and plurilateral "free" trade agreements, has attempted to constrain the pharmaceutical access programs of other countries in order to promote the interests of the pharmaceutical industry. The Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) represents the latest example; through the TPPA the US is seeking to eliminate therapeutic reference pricing, introduce appeals processes for pharmaceutical companies to challenge formulary listing and pricing decisions, and introduce onerous disclosure and "transparency" provisions that facilitate industry involvement in decision-making around coverage and pricing of medicines (and medical devices). This paper argues that the US agenda, if successfully prosecuted, would be likely to increase costs and reduce access to affordable medicines for New Zealanders. This would in turn be likely to exacerbate known inequities in access to medicines and thus disproportionately affect disadvantaged population groups, including Māori and Pacific peoples. PMID:23992756

  6. Comparing private sector family planning services to government and NGO services in Ethiopia and Pakistan: how do social franchises compare across quality, equity and cost?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirali M; Wang, Wenjuan; Bishai, David M

    2011-01-01

    Policy makers in developing countries need to assess how public health programmes function across both public and private sectors. We propose an evaluation framework to assist in simultaneously tracking performance on efficiency, quality and access by the poor in family planning services. We apply this framework to field data from family planning programmes in Ethiopia and Pakistan, comparing (1) independent private sector providers; (2) social franchises of private providers; (3) non-government organization (NGO) providers; and (4) government providers on these three factors. Franchised private clinics have higher quality than non-franchised private clinics in both countries. In Pakistan, the costs per client and the proportion of poorest clients showed no differences between franchised and non-franchised private clinics, whereas in Ethiopia, franchised clinics had higher costs and fewer clients from the poorest quintile. Our results highlight that there are trade-offs between access, cost and quality of care that must be balanced as competing priorities. The relative programme performance of various service arrangements on each metric will be context specific. PMID:21729919

  7. Die another day: the obstacles facing fat people in accessing quality healthcare.

    PubMed

    Pausé, Cat

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Narrative Inquiries in Bioethics, fat individuals share their healthcare experiences. Through reading the narratives, it becomes clear that access to proper healthcare is often blocked for fat patients by a variety of things, including shame and fat stigma. From physical spaces in which they do not fit, to doctors who diagnose all of their problems as 'fat', similar themes are echoed across the stories. And common are the refrains for better treatment, less shame, and access to evidenced based care from educated providers. In this manuscript, I highlight common themes from the stories and integrate them with themes from the literature. I allow the two dissenting narratives to suggest other ways of thinking about fatness and well-being. And I conclude by suggesting ways to provide better access to quality healthcare for fat individuals. PMID:25130353

  8. Gender Equity. IDRA Forum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains six articles on issues of gender equity for Chicanas and other women. "Recognizing Chicana Contributions: Cultural History & Gender Equity on the Line" (Mikki Symonds) discusses the invisibility of Mexican Americans in general and of Chicanas in particular in U.S. history books, school curricula, and pop culture, and…

  9. Melding Excellence and Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, David A.

    1983-01-01

    This document examines the issues of educational excellence and equity. The Milwaukee Public School System, Wisconsin, is cited as an example of a desegregation program that both exceeded court requirements of equity and also made a substantial contribution to the goals of excellence in education. The school effectiveness movement, like…

  10. Quality of Early Childhood Development Programs in Global Contexts: Rationale for Investment, Conceptual Framework and Implications for Equity. Social Policy Report. Volume 25, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britto, Pia Rebello; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Boller, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Across nations, Early Childhood Development (ECD) programs are of great interest to policymakers, service providers, and families. ECD programs are cross-cutting, often involving the health, education, child welfare, and other sectors, and their emphases shift over the early childhood years. In this paper, the authors propose equity as the…

  11. Information Communication Technology for Educational Quality: Challenges, Prospects in Ethiopian Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sani, Dureti; Tasisa, Wakgari; Panigraphi, Manas Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    The major purpose of this project was to assess and review the principal role of ICT in supplementing the General Quality Improvement program (GEQIP) in Western Harerghe, Ethiopia. The project also further analyzed the contribution of Information Communication Technology (ICT) to the indicators of GEQIP like quality, equity, access and internal…

  12. Medical pluralism: global perspectives on equity issues.

    PubMed

    Marian, Florica

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decades, awareness has increased about the phenomenon of medical pluralism and the importance to integrate biomedicine and other forms of health care. The broad variety of healing cultures existing alongside biomedicine is called complementary or alternative medicine (CAM) in industrialized countries and traditional medicine (TM) in developing countries. Considerable debate has arisen about ethical problems related to the growing use of CAM in industrialized countries. This article focuses on equity issues and aims to consider them from a global perspective of medical pluralism. Several dimensions of equity are explored and their interrelatedness discussed: access to care, research (paradigm and founding) and recognition. This so-called 'equity circle' is then related to Iris Marion Young's justice theory and particularly to the concepts of cultural imperialism, powerlessness and marginalisation. PMID:18219205

  13. Improving application of data quality information in accessing and using satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Huang, T.; Xing, Z.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Chin, T. M.; Alarcon, C.

    2014-12-01

    A recurring demand in working with satellite-based earth science data records is the need to apply data quality information. Such quality information is often contained within the data files as an array of "flags", but can also be represented by more complex quality descriptions such as combinations of bit flags, or even other ancillary variables indicating thresholds to be applied to the geophysical variable of interest. For example, with Level 2 granules from the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) project up to 6 independent variables can be used to screen the sea surface temperature measurements on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Quality screening of Level 3 data from the upcoming Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) instrument can be become even more complex, involving 26 unique bit states or conditions a user can screen for. The application of quality information is often a laborious process until the user understands the implications of all the flags and bit conditions, and requires iterative approaches using custom software. In addition, most visualization packages do not understand how to apply quality information. The Virtual Quality Screening Service, a recently funded 2013 NASA ACCESS project, aims to address these issues and concerns. The project will develop an infrastructure to expose, apply, and extract quality screening information, building off known and proven NASA components for data extraction and subset-by-value, implementations of Map Reduce workflows, data discovery, ontologies and exposure to the user of granule-based quality information. Further sharing of results through well defined URLs and visualization capabilities will also be described. The presentation will focus on overall description of the technologies and informatics principals employed by the project, and recent results and infrastructure status. Examples of implementations of the end-to-end web service for quality screening with GHRSST and SMAP granules will be

  14. Equity and Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridge, Elaine; Waghid, Yusef

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how distance education can solve South Africa's problems of access to quality higher education, noting the need for radical shifts in perspective and sophisticated understanding of academic literacy. Explores key features of proposals by the Council on Higher Education (developing human capital and reducing high levels of structural…

  15. A Forward Glance in a Mirror: Diversity Challenged--Access, Equity, and Success in Higher Education. 2005 DeWitt Wallace-"Reader's Digest" Distinguished Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Walter R.

    2005-01-01

    Affirmative action addresses disparities in higher education. Recent trends threaten gains, resegregation is underway nationally. California outlawed affirmative action, the quality of K-12 education is declining, and prison construction is soaring. African American and Latino participation in higher education has declined; both groups are…

  16. Quality of Recovery Evaluation of the Protection Schemes for Fiber-Wireless Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Minglei; Chai, Zhicheng; Le, Zichun

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of fiber-wireless (FiWi) access network, the protection schemes have got more and more attention due to the risk of huge data loss when failures occur. However, there are few studies on the performance evaluation of the FiWi protection schemes by the unified evaluation criterion. In this paper, quality of recovery (QoR) method was adopted to evaluate the performance of three typical protection schemes (MPMC scheme, OBOF scheme and RPMF scheme) against the segment-level failure in FiWi access network. The QoR models of the three schemes were derived in terms of availability, quality of backup path, recovery time and redundancy. To compare the performance of the three protection schemes comprehensively, five different classes of network services such as emergency service, prioritized elastic service, conversational service, etc. were utilized by means of assigning different QoR weights. Simulation results showed that, for the most service cases, RPMF scheme was proved to be the best solution to enhance the survivability when planning the FiWi access network.

  17. Are migrants health policies aimed at improving access to quality healthcare? An analysis of Spanish policies.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, María Luisa; Terraza-Núñez, Rebeca; S-Hernández, Silvia; Vargas, Ingrid; Bosch, Lola; González, Andrea; Pequeño, Sandra; Cantos, Raquel; Martínez, Juan Ignacio; López, Luís Andrés

    2013-12-01

    Although until April 2012, all Spanish citizens regardless of their origin, residence status and work situation were entitled to health care, available evidence suggested inadequate access for immigrants. Following the Aday and Andersen model, we conducted an analysis of policy elements that affect immigrants' access to health care in Spain, based on documentary analysis of national policies and selected regional policies related to migrant health care. Selected documents were (a) laws and plans in force at the time containing migrant health policies and (b) evaluations. The analysis included policy principles, objectives, strategies and evaluations. Results show that the national and regional policies analyzed are based on the principle that health care is a right granted to immigrants by law. These policies include strategies to facilitate access to health care, reducing barriers for entry to the system, for example simplifying requirements and raising awareness, but mostly they address the necessary qualities for services to be able to attend to a more diverse population, such as the adaptation of resources and programs, or improved communication and training. However, limited planning was identified in terms of their implementation, necessary resources and evaluation. In conclusion, the policies address relevant barriers of access for migrants and signal improvements in the health system's responsiveness, but reinforcement is required in order for them to be effectively implemented. PMID:23850165

  18. Higher Educational Cost-Sharing, Dual-Track Tuition Fees, and Higher Educational Access: The East African Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcucci, Pamela; Johnstone, D. Bruce; Ngolovoi, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Three universal demands characterize higher education globally: the demand for higher quality, for increased access, and for greater equity. In East Africa, where resources are highly constrained, no nation has been able to meet these demands on the basis of public expenditures alone. Instead countries have had to increase resources from nonpublic…

  19. Accessibility: global gateway to health literacy.

    PubMed

    Perlow, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy, cited as essential to achieving Healthy People 2010's goals to "increase quality and years of healthy life" and to "eliminate health disparities," is defined by Healthy People as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions." Accessibility, by definition, the aforementioned "capacity to obtain," thus is health literacy's primary prerequisite. Accessibility's designation as the global gateway to health literacy is predicated also on life's realities: global aging and climate change, war and terrorism, and life-extending medical and technological advances. People with diverse access needs are health professionals' raison d'être. However, accessibility, consummately cross-cultural and universal, is virtually absent as a topic of health promotion and practice research and scholarly discussion of health literacy and equity. A call to action to place accessibility in its rightful premier position on the profession's agenda is issued. PMID:18955546

  20. Air Quality uFIND: User-oriented Tool Set for Air Quality Data Discovery and Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoijarvi, K.; Robinson, E. M.; Husar, R. B.; Falke, S. R.; Schultz, M. G.; Keating, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Historically, there have been major impediments to seamless and effective data usage encountered by both data providers and users. Over the last five years, the international Air Quality (AQ) Community has worked through forums such as the Group on Earth Observations AQ Community of Practice, the ESIP AQ Working Group, and the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution to converge on data format standards (e.g., netCDF), data access standards (e.g., Open Geospatial Consortium Web Coverage Services), metadata standards (e.g., ISO 19115), as well as other conventions (e.g., CF Naming Convention) in order to build an Air Quality Data Network. The centerpiece of the AQ Data Network is the web service-based tool set: user-oriented Filtering and Identification of Networked Data. The purpose of uFIND is to provide rich and powerful facilities for the user to: a) discover and choose a desired dataset by navigation through the multi-dimensional metadata space using faceted search, b) seamlessly access and browse datasets, and c) use uFINDs facilities as a web service for mashups with other AQ applications and portals. In a user-centric information system such as uFIND, the user experience is improved by metadata that includes the general fields for discovery as well as community-specific metadata to narrow the search beyond space, time and generic keyword searches. However, even with the community-specific additions, the ISO 19115 records were formed in compliance with the standard, so that other standards-based search interface could leverage this additional information. To identify the fields necessary for metadata discovery we started with the ISO 19115 Core Metadata fields and fields that were needed for a Catalog Service for the Web (CSW) Record. This fulfilled two goals - one to create valid ISO 19115 records and the other to be able to retrieve the records through a Catalog Service for the Web query. Beyond the required set of fields, the AQ Community added

  1. Drinking water sources, availability, quality, access and utilization for goats in the Karak Governorate, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Khaza'leh, Ja'far Mansur; Reiber, Christoph; Al Baqain, Raid; Valle Zárate, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Goat production is an important agricultural activity in Jordan. The country is one of the poorest countries in the world in terms of water scarcity. Provision of sufficient quantity of good quality drinking water is important for goats to maintain feed intake and production. This study aimed to evaluate the seasonal availability and quality of goats' drinking water sources, accessibility, and utilization in different zones in the Karak Governorate in southern Jordan. Data collection methods comprised interviews with purposively selected farmers and quality assessment of water sources. The provision of drinking water was considered as one of the major constraints for goat production, particularly during the dry season (DS). Long travel distances to the water sources, waiting time at watering points, and high fuel and labor costs were the key reasons associated with the problem. All the values of water quality (WQ) parameters were within acceptable limits of the guidelines for livestock drinking WQ with exception of iron, which showed slightly elevated concentration in one borehole source in the DS. These findings show that water shortage is an important problem leading to consequences for goat keepers. To alleviate the water shortage constraint and in view of the depleted groundwater sources, alternative water sources at reasonable distance have to be tapped and monitored for water quality and more efficient use of rainwater harvesting systems in the study area is recommended. PMID:25307764

  2. Image size invariant visual cryptography for general access structures subject to display quality constraints.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kai-Hui; Chiu, Pei-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Conventional visual cryptography (VC) suffers from a pixel-expansion problem, or an uncontrollable display quality problem for recovered images, and lacks a general approach to construct visual secret sharing schemes for general access structures. We propose a general and systematic approach to address these issues without sophisticated codebook design. This approach can be used for binary secret images in non-computer-aided decryption environments. To avoid pixel expansion, we design a set of column vectors to encrypt secret pixels rather than using the conventional VC-based approach. We begin by formulating a mathematic model for the VC construction problem to find the column vectors for the optimal VC construction, after which we develop a simulated-annealing-based algorithm to solve the problem. The experimental results show that the display quality of the recovered image is superior to that of previous papers. PMID:23674454

  3. Unofficial fees in Bangladesh: price, equity and institutional issues.

    PubMed

    Killingsworth, J R; Hossain, N; Hedrick-Wong, Y; Thomas, S D; Rahman, A; Begum, T

    1999-06-01

    The widespread collection of unofficial fees at health facilities is a common form of rent-seeking behaviour in Bangladesh. Typically, unofficial fees come in the form of cash payments for the performance of required services, for direct purchase of drugs and medical-surgical requisites, and for service access. Using observational and interview methods, this study explores linkages between official and unofficial fees at three Bangladesh health facility levels; primary care Thana Health Complexes, secondary or district hospitals, and medical college hospitals. The study estimates payment levels for different income classes and different payor types at these facilities, thereby highlighting potential equity, price and institutional questions associated with unofficial fees. Not only does the practice have clear income and equity effects, there also appear to be direct effects upon patient satisfaction, perception of quality, and the ability to pay for health services. The article concludes with a discussion of 'rent capture' processes at Bangladesh facilities and the effect of unofficial fees in six areas of health sector reform: displaced official policies, reduced merit goods production, upward income redistribution, distorted human resource development, growth of facility inefficiency, and obstruction of market reforms. PMID:10538718

  4. Measurement of equity sensitivity: a comparison of the Equity Sensitivity Instrument and Equity Preference Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Shore, Ted H; Strauss, Judy

    2008-02-01

    The psychometric properties of the Equity Sensitivity Instrument (Huseman, Hatfield, & Miles, 1985, 1987) and Equity Preference Questionnaire (Sauley & Bedeian, 2000) are compared. 173 undergraduate business majors completed several work attitude and personality measures. Results suggest that the Equity Preference Questionnaire may be a better measure of the equity sensitivity construct than the Equity Sensitivity Instrument which is typically used in research. Reliabilities for the scores on the Equity Sensitivity Instrument and Equity Preference Questionnaire were equivalent (coefficient alphas of .85 and .86, respectively); however, evidence for convergent and content validity was greater for the Equity Preference Questionnaire. Understanding individual differences in perceptions of equity and how best to measure these differences can affect workplace outcomes (e.g., turnover, employee engagement. PMID:18481667

  5. Technical requirements of spirometers in the strategy for guaranteeing the access to quality spirometry.

    PubMed

    Salas, Tomàs; Rubies, Carles; Gallego, Carlos; Muñoz, Pilar; Burgos, Felip; Escarrabill, Joan

    2011-09-01

    Access to quality spirometry is an essential objective in order to be able to minimize the underdiagnosis of respiratory diseases, especially in those that are most frequent, such as COPD and asthma. This objective can be reached in the short term, but it requires the simultaneous integration of different strategies: training of the health-care professionals who perform spirometry, definition of standards for the transmission of the information, technical requirements for acquiring apparatuses and the correct interpretation of the results. This present study shows the use of standards for the electronic exchange of clinical information. In order to normalize the treatment of the data related with spirometry and to enable the exchange of information, we have used the standard CDA R2 (Clinical Document Architecture, Release 2) of HL7 (Health Level Seven), version 3. HL7 is a product by HL7 International, a non-profit organization that deals in the production of standards in the health-care setting in order to facilitate interoperability. Furthermore, defining these standards is essential for ensuring that they are adopted by spirometer manufacturers. Be means of this process, the base is set for facilitating access to spirometry at the health-care level, while at the same time it is a fundamental technical element for designing quality control programs of the explorations. PMID:21821333

  6. [The law and equity in health].

    PubMed

    Bolis, Mónica

    2002-01-01

    What role does the law play in reducing inequalities in health that are unnecessary, avoidable, and unfair? The question is addressed in this paper, whose purpose is to examine how the legal system, as a regulatory agency of the State, contributes to achieving greater equity in access to and use of health-related goods and services. From the legal viewpoint, health is a public commodity that is critical to human well-being and survival. But in prioritizing health as a human right, the legal system is challenged with finding ways to make health equally accessible to all, while bearing in mind the particular needs of different groups. There are currently important gaps in health legislation in the Region that must be addressed if greater equity in health is to be achieved. Such gaps, along with potential ways to correct them, are discussed throughout the paper. PMID:12162844

  7. Dairy cows welfare quality in tie-stall housing system with or without access to exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tie-stall housing of dairy cows is used extensively worldwide, despite of the welfare concerns regarding the restriction of voluntary movement and limitation of expression of the cows’ natural behaviour. The aim of this study was to compare the welfare quality of dairy cows kept in two types of tie-stall housing systems: with regular outdoor exercise and without access to exercise. In addition, the study investigated the relationship between different welfare measures of dairy cows kept in tie-stalls. Methods 3,192 lactating cows were assessed using the Welfare Quality® assessment protocol for cattle in 80 commercial dairy farms, half of the farms providing outdoor access for the animals to exercise. The descriptive statistical indicators were determined for the assessed measures and for the welfare criteria and principle scores. The data obtained in the two housing types were compared and the correlation coefficients were calculated between the different welfare measures. Results The significant differences found between the two housing systems for the majority of the animal based measures indicate the positive effect of exercise on the welfare of tethered cows. Many of the animal welfare parameters correlated with each other. For the farms allowing the cows’ turnout in a paddock, pasture or both, the mean scores for the welfare criteria and principles were higher than for the farms with permanent tethering of the cows, except the criteria absence of prolonged hunger and expression of social behaviours. The lowest scores were obtained for the criterion positive emotional state, in both housing systems. With regard to the overall classification, none of the farms were considered excellent. In the not classified category were only farms with all-year-round tethering of the animals and in the enhanced category only farms where the cows had outdoor access. Conclusions The welfare quality of the investigated dairy cows was significantly better in the

  8. The Impact of Medicaid Expansion on Oral Health Equity for Older Adults: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Sara S.; Birenz, Shirley S.; Kunzel, Carol; Wang, Hua; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Marshall, Stephen E.; Northridge, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses a collaborative, interdisciplinary systems science inquiry to explore implications of Medicaid expansion on achieving oral health equity for older adults. Through an iterative modeling process oriented toward the experiences of both patients and oral health care providers, complex feedback mechanisms for promoting oral health equity are articulated that acknowledge the potential for stigma as well as disparities in oral health care accessibility. Multiple factors mediate the impact of Medicaid expansion on oral health equity. PMID:26457047

  9. Reorganizing pediatric rehabilitation services to improve accessibility: do we sacrifice quality?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The impact of a pediatric rehabilitation service delivery reorganization to improve access to services on parents' and service providers' perception of service quality was evaluated. Child-, family-, service- and service provider-related characteristics possibly associated with these perceptions were explored. Methods Perceptions were measured using the Measure of Processes of Care tools and open ended questions before (2007), during (2008) and following (2009) service reorganization. Child and family characteristics, services received and service provider data were documented. Mean MPOC scores were compared over time (ANOVAs and Generalized Estimating Equations) and t-tests, correlations and ANOVAs determined whether the characteristics influenced scores. Results Families' (n = 222) and service providers' (n = 129) perceptions of quality were high in 2007 (3.67 to 6.31/7) and remained high over the next 2 years (p ≥ 0.16). Two MPOC domain scores (Respectful care and Providing general information) were consistently scored the highest (mean ≥ 5.66/7) and the lowest (mean ≤ 4.75/7), respectively. Families with more education and those with children 12-21 years old tended to attribute lower MPOC scores. Participants were generally satisfied with the new service model and recommendations included improving information exchange. Conclusions Results suggest that it is possible to reorganize pediatric rehabilitation services while maintaining quality. PMID:20687932

  10. Restructuring Schooling: The Equity Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Argues that the school restructuring movement offers considerable promise for enhancing educational equity. Reviews equity definitions, outlines restructuring principles, and describes three powerful ethics (competitive/utilitarian, social justice, and caring) underlying current attempts to highlight equity values in education. Presents a strategy…

  11. Quality Assessment of Studies Published in Open Access and Subscription Journals: Results of a Systematic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Roberta; Milovanovic, Sonja; Stojanovic, Jovana; Efremov, Ljupcho; Amore, Rosarita; Boccia, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Along with the proliferation of Open Access (OA) publishing, the interest for comparing the scientific quality of studies published in OA journals versus subscription journals has also increased. With our study we aimed to compare the methodological quality and the quality of reporting of primary epidemiological studies and systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in OA and non-OA journals. Methods In order to identify the studies to appraise, we listed all OA and non-OA journals which published in 2013 at least one primary epidemiologic study (case-control or cohort study design), and at least one systematic review or meta-analysis in the field of oncology. For the appraisal, we picked up the first studies published in 2013 with case-control or cohort study design from OA journals (Group A; n = 12), and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group B; n = 26); the first systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in 2013 from OA journals (Group C; n = 15), and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group D; n = 32). We evaluated the methodological quality of studies by assessing the compliance of case-control and cohort studies to Newcastle and Ottawa Scale (NOS) scale, and the compliance of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) scale. The quality of reporting was assessed considering the adherence of case-control and cohort studies to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist, and the adherence of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) checklist. Results Among case-control and cohort studies published in OA and non-OA journals, we did not observe significant differences in the median value of NOS score (Group A: 7 (IQR 7–8) versus Group B: 8 (7–9); p = 0.5) and in the adherence to STROBE checklist (Group A, 75% versus Group B, 80%; p = 0.1). The

  12. Changes in perceptions of quality of, and access to, services among clients of a fractional franchise network in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Agha, Sohail; Gage, Anastasia; Balal, Asma

    2007-05-01

    With declining levels of international donor funding for financing reproductive health programmes, developing country governments and international donors are looking towards private sector strategies to expand the supply of quality reproductive health services. One of the challenges of a health franchise is to improve the quality of services provided by independent private practitioners. Private providers are more likely to abide by the quality standards set by a franchiser if they see a financial benefit resulting from franchise participation. This study was conducted to measure whether (a) there were improvements in perceived quality of care and perceived access to health facilities once these facilities became part of a franchise and (b) improvements in perceived quality and perceived access were associated with increased client loyalty to franchised clinics. Franchisees were given basic reproductive health training for seven days and services marketing training for two days. Exit interviews were conducted with male and female clients at health facilities. A pre-test measurement was taken in April 2001, prior to the start of project activities. A post-test measurement was taken in February/March 2002, about 9 months after the pre-test. Multilevel regression analysis, which takes the hierarchical structure of the data into account, was used for the analysis. After taking provider-level variation into account and controlling for client characteristics, the analyses showed significant improvements in perceived quality of care and perceived access to services. Private provider participation in a franchise network helps improve client perceptions of quality of, and access to, services. Improvements in client perceptions of quality and access contribute to increased client loyalty to franchised clinics. Once increased client loyalty translates into higher client volumes, providers are likely to see the benefits of franchise participation. In turn, this should lead to

  13. Standardized quality assurance forms for organ transplantations with multilingual support, open access and UMLS coding.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Julian; Sünninghausen, Sarah Schulze; Dugas, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) is a key factor to evaluate success of organ transplantations. In Germany QA documentation is progressively developed and enforced by law. Our objective is to share QA models from Germany in a standardized format within a form repository for world-wide reuse and exchange. Original QA forms were converted into standardized study forms according to the Operational Data Model (ODM) and shared for open access in an international forms repository. Form elements were translated into English and semantically enriched with Concept Unique Identifiers from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) based on medical expert decision. All forms are available on the web as multilingual ODM documents. UMLS concept coverage analysis indicates 92% coverage with few but critically important definition gaps. New content and infrastructure for harmonized documentation forms is provided in the domain of organ transplantations enabling world-wide reuse and exchange. PMID:26063252

  14. Financing American Indian health care: impacts and options for improving access and quality.

    PubMed

    Langwell, Kathryn; Anagnopoulos, Cheryl; Ryan, Frank; Melson, Jacob; Iron Rope, Sandor

    2009-10-01

    (1) Indian Health Service (HIS) per patient funding is less than half of national per capita health spending, and declined further between 2003 and 2006. (2) Under-funding of the IHS system has led to explicit rationing of services to American Indian and Alaska Native patients, with many specialized services provided only for "life or limb threatening" conditions. (3) IHS patients report experiencing access barriers and rate the quality of care process substantially lower than do Medicaid beneficiaries, but most indicate they prefer to use IHS for their health care. (4) Options to increase the funding for American Indian and Alaska Native health care exist, but would impose higher costs on federal and state budgets and are unlikely to be feasible in the current economic environment. However, IHS might be able to make certain organizational changes that would increase efficiency and its ability to extend existing funding to cover more services. PMID:19847975

  15. Equity v. Equity: Why "Education Week" and the "Education Trust" Don't Agree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costrell, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Each January since 1997, "Education Week," the K-12 industry's newspaper of record, has issued its "Quality Counts" report, ranking states by, among other things, the "equity" of their school finances. On the other hand, every fall since 2001, the "Education Trust," a national organization devoted to closing the achievement gap in public schools,…

  16. The DEDUCE Guided Query tool: providing simplified access to clinical data for research and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Monica M; Winfield, Stephanie; Evans, Steve; Slopek, Steve; Shang, Howard; Ferranti, Jeffrey

    2011-04-01

    In many healthcare organizations, comparative effectiveness research and quality improvement (QI) investigations are hampered by a lack of access to data created as a byproduct of patient care. Data collection often hinges upon either manual chart review or ad hoc requests to technical experts who support legacy clinical systems. In order to facilitate this needed capacity for data exploration at our institution (Duke University Health System), we have designed and deployed a robust Web application for cohort identification and data extraction--the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE). DEDUCE is envisioned as a simple, web-based environment that allows investigators access to administrative, financial, and clinical information generated during patient care. By using business intelligence tools to create a view into Duke Medicine's enterprise data warehouse, DEDUCE provides a Guided Query functionality using a wizard-like interface that lets users filter through millions of clinical records, explore aggregate reports, and, export extracts. Researchers and QI specialists can obtain detailed patient- and observation-level extracts without needing to understand structured query language or the underlying database model. Developers designing such tools must devote sufficient training and develop application safeguards to ensure that patient-centered clinical researchers understand when observation-level extracts should be used. This may mitigate the risk of data being misunderstood and consequently used in an improper fashion. PMID:21130181

  17. Equity, by what measure?

    PubMed

    Houston, Shane

    2006-12-01

    Equity has in many instances been framed around the notion of fairness. But the metric used to determine what is fair leaves some people at a disadvantage because the things that they value are not always taken properly into account. If I value mangoes and you value oranges is a measure of fairness based on how many oranges I seek appropriate? If I am expected to give up my love of mangoes in order to get ahead is that fair? The debate about judging equity - about measuring fairness - needs to find the conceptual and methodological space to allow the voices and claims of the other to be heard. PMID:17176236

  18. SIAST Education Equity Program Annual Monitoring Report Summary, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Inst. of Applied Science and Technology, Saskatoon.

    This annual report for 1999-2000 monitors the Education Equity Program for the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST). The program assures potential students access to adult and postsecondary educational opportunities such that the proportions of targeted equity groups to the total student body are the same as in the…

  19. Patient choice and equity in the British National Health Service: towards developing an alternative framework.

    PubMed

    Fotaki, Marianna

    2010-09-01

    Choice and competition have been phased into many public health systems with the aim of achieving various and potentially exclusive goals such as improving efficiency, quality and responsiveness to users' needs. Yet their use to promote equity of access as evidenced recently in the British National Health Service (the NHS) is unprecedented. Giving users the power of exit over unresponsive providers is meant to address the failures of previous policies. This paper shows that there is a potential conflict between choice and equity, in terms of both the values and the outcomes each policy is likely to produce. Using a multidisciplinary and multidimensional framework, drawn from Bourdieusian sociology, feminist theory and economics, the study highlights the implications of the simplistic and one-sided conception of individual patient choice in relation to equity. It also uses the existing evidence on the impact of market competition and choice, in the UK and elsewhere, to emphasise the importance of socio-economic and psycho-social factors, which are left out of current policy considerations. PMID:20553424

  20. The IEO Data Center Management System: Tools for quality control, analysis and access marine data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Antonia; Garcia, Maria Jesus; Nikouline, Andrei

    2010-05-01

    Since 1994 the Data Centre of the Spanish Oceanographic Institute develops system for archiving and quality control of oceanographic data. The work started in the frame of the European Marine Science & Technology Programme (MAST) when a consortium of several Mediterranean Data Centres began to work on the MEDATLAS project. Along the years, old software modules for MS DOS were rewritten, improved and migrated to Windows environment. Oceanographic data quality control includes now not only vertical profiles (mainly CTD and bottles observations) but also time series of currents and sea level observations. New powerful routines for analysis and for graphic visualization were added. Data presented originally in ASCII format were organized recently in an open source MySQL database. Nowadays, the IEO, as part of SeaDataNet Infrastructure, has designed and developed a new information system, consistent with the ISO 19115 and SeaDataNet standards, in order to manage the large and diverse marine data and information originated in Spain by different sources, and to interoperate with SeaDataNet. The system works with data stored in ASCII files (MEDATLAS, ODV) as well as data stored within the relational database. The components of the system are: 1.MEDATLAS Format and Quality Control - QCDAMAR: Quality Control of Marine Data. Main set of tools for working with data presented as text files. Includes extended quality control (searching for duplicated cruises and profiles, checking date, position, ship velocity, constant profiles, spikes, density inversion, sounding, acceptable data, impossible regional values,...) and input/output filters. - QCMareas: A set of procedures for the quality control of tide gauge data according to standard international Sea Level Observing System. These procedures include checking for unexpected anomalies in the time series, interpolation, filtering, computation of basic statistics and residuals. 2. DAMAR: A relational data base (MySql) designed to

  1. Urban Farmers' Markets: accessibility, offerings, and produce variety, quality, and price compared to nearby stores

    PubMed Central

    Maroko, Andrew; Sanon, Omar; Frias, Rafael; Schechter, Clyde B.

    2015-01-01

    Most food-environment research has focused narrowly on select stores and restaurants. There has been comparatively less attention to non-storefront food sources like farmers' markets (FMs), particularly in urban communities. The objective of the present study was to assess FMs' potential contribution to an urban food environment in terms of specific foods offered, and compare FM accessibility as well as produce variety, quality, and price to that of nearby stores. Investigators conducted a detailed cross-sectional assessment of all FMs in Bronx County, NY, and of the nearest store(s) selling produce within a half-mile walking distance (up to two stores per FM). The study included 26 FMs and 44 stores. Investigators assessed accessibility (locations of FMs and stores relative to each other, and hours of operation for each), variety (the number and type of all food items offered at FMs and all fresh produce items offered at stores), quality (where produce items were grown and if they were organic), and price (including any sales prices or promotional discounts). Analyses included frequencies, proportions, and variable distributions, as well as mixed-effect regressions, paired t-tests, and signed rank tests to compare FMs to stores. Geographic information systems (GIS) allowed for mapping of FM and store locations and determining street-network distances between them. The mean distance between FMs and the nearest store selling fresh produce was 0.15 miles (range 0.02-0.36 miles). FMs were open substantially fewer months, days, and hours than stores. FMs offered 26.4 fewer fresh produce items on average than stores (p values <0.02). FM produce items were more frequently local and organic, but often tended towards less-common/more-exotic and heirloom varieties. FMs were more expensive on average (p values <0.001 for pairwise comparisons to stores)—even for more-commonplace and “conventional” produce—especially when discounts or sales prices were considered

  2. Urban farmers' markets: accessibility, offerings, and produce variety, quality, and price compared to nearby stores.

    PubMed

    Lucan, Sean C; Maroko, Andrew R; Sanon, Omar; Frias, Rafael; Schechter, Clyde B

    2015-07-01

    Most food-environment research has focused narrowly on select stores and restaurants. There has been comparatively less attention to non-storefront food sources like farmers' markets (FMs), particularly in urban communities. The objective of the present study was to assess FMs' potential contribution to an urban food environment in terms of specific foods offered, and compare FM accessibility as well as produce variety, quality, and price to that of nearby stores. Investigators conducted a detailed cross-sectional assessment of all FMs in Bronx County, NY, and of the nearest store(s) selling produce within a half-mile walking distance (up to two stores per FM). The study included 26 FMs and 44 stores. Investigators assessed accessibility (locations of FMs and stores relative to each other, and hours of operation for each), variety (the number and type of all food items offered at FMs and all fresh produce items offered at stores), quality (where produce items were grown and if they were organic), and price (including any sales prices or promotional discounts). Analyses included frequencies, proportions, and variable distributions, as well as mixed-effect regressions, paired t-tests, and signed rank tests to compare FMs to stores. Geographic information systems (GIS) allowed for mapping of FM and store locations and determining street-network distances between them. The mean distance between FMs and the nearest store selling fresh produce was 0.15 miles (range 0.02-0.36 miles). FMs were open substantially fewer months, days, and hours than stores. FMs offered 26.4 fewer fresh produce items on average than stores (p values <0.02). FM produce items were more frequently local and organic, but often tended toward less-common/more-exotic and heirloom varieties. FMs were more expensive on average (p values <0.001 for pairwise comparisons to stores) - even for more-commonplace and "conventional" produce - especially when discounts or sales prices were considered. Fully, 32

  3. The Debates about Higher Education Quality in Britain and the USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Graeme C.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison of the public debates over higher education quality finds that, despite much common ground, the American concern focuses more on equity, access, curriculum content, and academic standards, whereas the British concern is for value for the money spent. It concludes that each debate can benefit from the other. (MSE)

  4. Cyberinfrastructure for Online Access to High-Quality Data: Advances and Opportunities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.

    2010-12-01

    Advanced cyberinfrastructure capabilities are enabling end-to-end management of data flows in observing system networks and online access to very large data archives. We provide an overview of several projects in earth and environmental sciences that have developed and deployed cyberinfrastructure for collecting and organizing field observations and remote sensing data, to make them available to a community of users. The data cyberinfrastructure framework should cover the range from data acquisition, quality control, data archiving, discovery, access, integration, and modeling. Using examples from different earth and environmental science cyberinfrastructure efforts, we will describe the state of the art in data cyberinfrastructure and future directions and challenges. The Tropical Ecology, Assessment and Monitoring (TEAM) Network (http://teamnetwork.org), which is a network of forested sites—currently consisting of 15 sites, and growing—distributed across Central America, South America, Africa, and Asia. Each site implements a standardized set of data collection protocols, all under the control of a common cyberinfrastructure. The data are available via a portal from a central site, but with appropriate access controls. The TEAM Network is run by Conservation International, in partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Society, Smithsonian Institute, and the Missouri Botanical Gardens, and is funded by the Moore Foundation. The EarthScope Data Portal (portal.earthscope.org) implements a virtual metadata catalog and a data cart to provides a means for simultaneously exploring EarthScope's various instrument networks, as well as seamlessly downloading data from multiple stations and instrument types. The prototype of the US Geoinformatics Information Network (US GIN) project is implementing a federated catalog, using the Catalog Services for Web (CSW) standard. The NSF-funded Opentopography.org—a spinoff of the GEON project, www.geongrid.org—provides online

  5. A Spectrum Access Based on Quality of Service (QoS) in Cognitive Radio Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Linbo; Wang, Hua; Gao, Chuangen

    2016-01-01

    The quality of service (QoS) is important issue for cognitive radio networks. In the cognitive radio system, the licensed users, also called primary users (PUs), are authorized to utilize the wireless spectrum, while unlicensed users, also called secondary users (SUs), are not authorized to use the wireless spectrum. SUs access the wireless spectrum opportunistically when the spectrum is idle. While SUs use an idle channel, the instance that PUs come back makes SUs terminate their communications and leave the current channel. Therefore, quality of service (QoS) is difficult to be ensured for SUs. In this paper, we first propose an analysis model to obtain QoS for cognitive radio networks such as blocking probability, completed traffic and termination probability of SUs. When the primary users use the channels frequently, QoS of SUs is difficult to be ensured, especially the termination probability. Then, we propose a channel reservation scheme to improve QoS of SUs. The scheme makes the terminated SUs move to the reserved channels and keep on communications. Simulation results show that our scheme can improve QoS of SUs especially the termination probability with a little cost of blocking probability in dynamic environment. PMID:27171196

  6. A Spectrum Access Based on Quality of Service (QoS) in Cognitive Radio Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Linbo; Wang, Hua; Gao, Chuangen

    2016-01-01

    The quality of service (QoS) is important issue for cognitive radio networks. In the cognitive radio system, the licensed users, also called primary users (PUs), are authorized to utilize the wireless spectrum, while unlicensed users, also called secondary users (SUs), are not authorized to use the wireless spectrum. SUs access the wireless spectrum opportunistically when the spectrum is idle. While SUs use an idle channel, the instance that PUs come back makes SUs terminate their communications and leave the current channel. Therefore, quality of service (QoS) is difficult to be ensured for SUs. In this paper, we first propose an analysis model to obtain QoS for cognitive radio networks such as blocking probability, completed traffic and termination probability of SUs. When the primary users use the channels frequently, QoS of SUs is difficult to be ensured, especially the termination probability. Then, we propose a channel reservation scheme to improve QoS of SUs. The scheme makes the terminated SUs move to the reserved channels and keep on communications. Simulation results show that our scheme can improve QoS of SUs especially the termination probability with a little cost of blocking probability in dynamic environment. PMID:27171196

  7. Public library computer training for older adults to access high-quality Internet health information

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bo; Bugg, Julie M.

    2010-01-01

    An innovative experiment to develop and evaluate a public library computer training program to teach older adults to access and use high-quality Internet health information involved a productive collaboration among public libraries, the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and a Library and Information Science (LIS) academic program at a state university. One hundred and thirty-one older adults aged 54–89 participated in the study between September 2007 and July 2008. Key findings include: a) participants had overwhelmingly positive perceptions of the training program; b) after learning about two NIH websites (http://nihseniorhealth.gov and http://medlineplus.gov) from the training, many participants started using these online resources to find high quality health and medical information and, further, to guide their decision-making regarding a health- or medically-related matter; and c) computer anxiety significantly decreased (p < .001) while computer interest and efficacy significantly increased (p = .001 and p < .001, respectively) from pre- to post-training, suggesting statistically significant improvements in computer attitudes between pre- and post-training. The findings have implications for public libraries, LIS academic programs, and other organizations interested in providing similar programs in their communities. PMID:20161649

  8. Gender Equity. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter includes five articles on gender equity and related issues in education, with particular reference to the education of Hispanic girls. "IDRA's MIJA Program Expands" (Aurora Yanez-Perez) describes a program for sixth-grade Hispanic girls that promotes awareness of science- and math-related careers, provides training in science and…

  9. Equity and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veale, Ann

    In an effort to ensure that the arts receive equity with other areas of study, this paper presents an argument for the value of arts education in children's development. The argument is based on the work of four experts: (1) Nelson Goodman, who held that symbols are indispensable to communication, and that children's capacity for acquiring…

  10. Student Equity Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guichard, Gus

    Following a decrease in minority student enrollment within the California Community Colleges (CCC), the Board of Governors (BOG) convened a special statewide symposium to examine issues of minority student enrollment, retention, and transfer, and established a standing Board Committee on Equity and Diversity. Over the past 2 years, a system policy…

  11. Teacher Communities for Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Teachers working together in learning communities is a popular aspect of school reform projects in countries around the world. However, teacher communities vary greatly from one another. This article describes two communities whose purpose is to help teachers work for equity by focusing on questions that emerge from practice and from genuine…

  12. Equity Literacy for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorski, Paul C.; Swalwell, Katy

    2015-01-01

    If the authors have learned anything working with schools across the United States, they've learned this: When it comes to educational equity, the trouble is not a lack of multicultural programs or diversity initiatives in schools. Nor is it a lack of educators who appreciate and even champion diversity. The trouble lies in how so many diversity…

  13. Recommendations for mass spectrometry data quality metrics for open access data(corollary to the Amsterdam principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsinger, Christopher R.; Apffel, James; Baker, Mark S.; Bian, Xiaopeng; Borchers, Christoph H.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Brusniak, Mi-Youn; Chan, Daniel W.; Deutsch, Eric W.; Domon, Bruno; Gorman, Jeff; Grimm, Rudolf; Hancock, William S.; Hermjakob, Henning; Horn, David; Hunter, Christie; Kolar, Patrik; Kraus, Hans-Joachim; Langen, Hanno; Linding, Rune; Moritz, Robert L.; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Orlando, Ron; Pandey, Akhilesh; Ping, Peipei; Rahbar, Amir; Rivers, Robert; Seymour, Sean L.; Simpson, Richard J.; Slotta, Douglas; Smith, Richard D.; Stein, Stephen E.; Tabb, David L.; Tagle, Danilo; Yates, John R.; Rodriguez, Henry

    2011-12-01

    Policies supporting the rapid and open sharing of proteomic data are being implemented by the leading journals in the field. The proteomics community is taking steps to ensure that data are made publicly accessible and are of high quality, a challenging task that requires the development and deployment of methods for measuring and documenting data quality metrics. On September 18, 2010, the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) convened the 'International Workshop on Proteomic Data Quality Metrics' in Sydney, Australia, to identify and address issues facing the development and use of such methods for open access proteomics data. The stakeholders at the workshop enumerated the key principles underlying a framework for data quality assessment in mass spectrometry data that will meet the needs of the search community, journals, funding agencies, and data repositories. Attendees discussed and agreed upon two primary needs for the wide use of quality metrics: (i)an evolving list of comprehensive quality metrics and (ii)standards accompanied by software analytics. Attendees stressed the importance of increased education and training programs to promote reliable protocols in proteomics. This workshop report explores the historic precedents, key discussions, and necessary next steps to enhance the quality of open access data. By agreement, this article is published simultaneously in Proteomics, Proteomics Clinical Applications, Journal of Proteome Research, and Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, as a public service to the research community.The peer review process was a coordinated effort conducted by a panel of referees selected by the journals.

  14. [Equity, gender, and health: challenges for action].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Elsa Gómez

    2002-01-01

    The Governing Bodies of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) have mandated that the Organization apply a gender perspective in all aspects of the Organization's activities and its technical cooperation in the area of health with the PAHO Member States. This article points out the need to eradicate unjust gender differences that affect the right and access to health care that is appropriate for women. The piece explains the differences between equity and equality and between gender and sex, and how gender equity should come about in the state of health, in health care, and in all people's efforts to engender health. It is hoped the piece will contribute to a better understanding of the situation, thus helping to eliminate inequities that are due to sex, socioeconomic factors, and the distribution of power. PMID:12162846

  15. Physician equity alliances: attractive alternatives to PHOs.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D

    1997-04-01

    Physician equity alliances are becoming attractive alternatives to PHOs as integrative models for partnering with physicians, securing managed care contracts and increasing revenue. Unlike many PHOs, these alliances provide mechanisms for asset integration and long-term relationships along with utilization management, sophisticated information systems, access to capital and opportunities for physicians to integrate clinically. There are six major types of physician equity alliances: majority physician-owned, clinic without walls, health system joint venture, publicly held physician practice management company, specialty network, and venture capital. The type of alliance that a physician group practice ultimately develops depends on vision, values, method of capitalization, initial organizer of the alliance, level of involvement of physicians in business issues, corporate structure desired, and characteristics of the managed care market in which the alliance will operate. PMID:10166285

  16. Gender equity in health care in Sweden--minor improvements since the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Pia Maria; Schmidt, Ingrid; Sparring, Vibeke; Tomson, Göran

    2006-06-01

    A report by the Swedish National Committee on Gender Disparities in Patient Care (1996) identified many shortcomings in the ability of the health sector to gear patient management and treatment to the specific needs of men and women. To promote gender equity in health care, the Committee presented several proposals relating to research, education, monitoring, and evaluation of health services and the responsibilities of health authorities. In 2002, the Swedish Government authorised the National Board of Health and Welfare to review and analyse gender equity trends in health care. Data from, e.g. the national quality registers, epidemiological health data registers, population surveys, and Patient Trust Boards were compiled to identify gender disparities in the quality and accessibility of health services. The curricula of medical universities and the policies of major research funds were reviewed, as were developments in major fields of health research. The National Board found that many of the gender disparities identified in the 1990s still exist, e.g. access to advanced evidence-based technologies such as coronary interventions. As previously, women account for around 60%, and men for 40%, of complaints, e.g. to the Patients' Advisory Committees. Many of the proposals of the National Committee have not been fully implemented by the national authorities or the county councils. We conclude that promoting gender equity in health care is an important but difficult task for health authorities. To make health services more gender sensitive a combination of strategies, including enforcement by guidelines and regulations, may be needed. PMID:16154225

  17. How Do Members of Different Stakeholder Groups Balance Concerns for Increasing Access with Improving Quality in the Tanzania Education System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telli, Godfrey

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how education stakeholders in Tanzania express and balance their priorities, perspectives, and concerns regarding the expansion of education access on the one hand, and improving quality of education on the other, as a means to enhance educational achievement. The study also explores how each group of…

  18. Rate Setting Policies: Ensuring Access and Improving Quality. Issues Meeting Proceedings (Washington, D.C., November 28-29, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schock, Lisa; Daugherty, Jane

    In November 2000, the Child Care Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, convened an Issues Meeting focused on Rate-Setting Policies: Ensuring Access and Improving Quality. The meeting brought together state child care administrators and others for discussions on conducting effective market…

  19. FACILITATING ADVANCED URBAN METEOROLOGY AND AIR QUALITY MODELING CAPABILITIES WITH HIGH RESOLUTION URBAN DATABASE AND ACCESS PORTAL TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information of urban morphological features at high resolution is needed to properly model and characterize the meteorological and air quality fields in urban areas. We describe a new project called National Urban Database with Access Portal Tool, (NUDAPT) that addresses this nee...

  20. Fighting for Quality and Equality, Too: How State Policymakers Can Ensure the Drive to Improve Teacher Quality Doesn't Just Trickle down to Poor and Minority Children. K-12 Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerald, Craig D.; Haycock, Kati; Wilkins, Amy

    2009-01-01

    If state leaders invest resources and energy wisely, they don't have to choose between excellence and equity. They can improve overall teacher quality and remedy the shameful inequities in access to the single most valuable resource in education--effective teachers. This paper outlines ten steps state policymakers and school district leaders can…

  1. The ribosome quality control pathway can access nascent polypeptides stalled at the Sec61 translocon.

    PubMed

    von der Malsburg, Karina; Shao, Sichen; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2015-06-15

    Cytosolic ribosomes that stall during translation are split into subunits, and nascent polypeptides trapped in the 60S subunit are ubiquitinated by the ribosome quality control (RQC) pathway. Whether the RQC pathway can also target stalls during cotranslational translocation into the ER is not known. Here we report that listerin and NEMF, core RQC components, are bound to translocon-engaged 60S subunits on native ER membranes. RQC recruitment to the ER in cultured cells is stimulated by translation stalling. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that translocon-targeted nascent polypeptides that subsequently stall are polyubiquitinated in 60S complexes. Ubiquitination at the translocon requires cytosolic exposure of the polypeptide at the ribosome-Sec61 junction. This exposure can result from either failed insertion into the Sec61 channel or partial backsliding of translocating nascent chains. Only Sec61-engaged nascent chains early in their biogenesis were relatively refractory to ubiquitination. Modeling based on recent 60S-RQC and 80S-Sec61 structures suggests that the E3 ligase listerin accesses nascent polypeptides via a gap in the ribosome-translocon junction near the Sec61 lateral gate. Thus the RQC pathway can target stalled translocation intermediates for degradation from the Sec61 channel. PMID:25877867

  2. Developing Agency for Equity-Minded Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felix, Eric R.; Bensimon, Estela Mara; Hanson, Debbie; Gray, James; Klingsmith, Libby

    2015-01-01

    This chapter highlights the use of the Equity Scorecard with the Community College of Aurora. The Equity Scorecard is a theory-based strategy that assists community colleges in embedding equity into their institutional norms, practices, and policies.

  3. The equity lens in the health care performance evaluation system.

    PubMed

    Barsanti, Sara; Nuti, Sabina

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to describe how indicators of the equity of access to health care according to socioeconomic conditions may be included in a performance evaluation system (PES) in the regional context level and in the planning and strategic control system of healthcare organisations. In particular, the paper investigates how the PES adopted, in the experience of the Tuscany region in Italy, indicators of vertical equity over time. Studies that testify inequality of access to health services often remain just a research output and are not used as targets and measurements in planning and control systems. After a brief introduction to the concept of horizontal and vertical equity in health care systems and equity measures in PES, the paper describes the 'equity process' by which selected health indicators declined by socioeconomic conditions were shared and used in the evaluation of health care institutions and in the CEOs' rewarding system, and subsequently analyses the initial results. Results on the maternal and child path and the chronicity care path not only show improvements in addressing health care inequalities, but also verify whether the health system responds appropriately to different population groups. PMID:23722829

  4. Indigenous Higher Education Student Equity: Focusing on What Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    The rates of higher education access, participation and completion for Indigenous students are much lower than those for non-Indigenous students in Australia. This paper argues for a research-led focus on what works in terms of Indigenous student equity in higher education. Undertaking independent evaluation of existing initiatives and leveraging…

  5. Girls, Educational Equity and Mother Tongue-Based Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Mother tongue-based education perpetuates equity in education, especially among girls who are often regarded as disadvantaged in access to education. The Asia and Pacific region is characterized by its rich ethnic, cultural, and linguistic diversity. Such diversity is found missing in many school systems in the region which often leads to gaps in…

  6. Mt. San Jacinto College Student Equity Plan Update, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylard, Dana Reece, Ed.

    The Student Equity Plan developed by California's Mount San Jacinto College (MSJC) is intended to ensure equal access of historically underrepresented and ethnic minority students. This update provides current information on the goals and activities involved in the plan. An executive summary reviews state legislation mandating the development of…

  7. A web server framework for rich interactive access to geologic and water quality data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharling, Peter; Hinsby, Klaus; Brennan, Kelsy

    2014-05-01

    Geodata visualization and analysis is founded on proper access to all available data. Throughout several research projects Earthfx and GEUS managed to gather relevant data from both national and local databases into one platform. The web server platform which is easy accessible on the internet displays all types of spatially distributed geodata ranging from geochemistry, geological and geophysical well logs, surface- and airborne geophysics to any type of temporal measurements like water levels and trends in groundwater chemistry. Geological cross sections are an essential tool for the geoscientist. Moving beyond plan-view web mapping, GEUS and Earthfx have developed a webserver technology that provides the user with the ability to dynamically interact with geologic models developed for various projects in Denmark and in transboundary aquifers across the Danish-German border. The web map interface allows the user to interactively define the location of a multi-point profile, and the selected profile will be quickly drawn and illustrated as a slice through the 3D geologic model. Including all borehole logs within a user defined offset from the profile. A key aspect of the webserver technology is that the profiles are presented through a fully dynamic interface. Web users can select and interact with borehole logs contained in the underlying database, adjust vertical exaggeration, and add or remove off-section boreholes by dynamically adjusting the offset projection distance. In a similar manner to the profile tool, an interactive water level and water chemistry graphing tool has been integrated into the web service interface. Again, the focus is on providing a level of functionality beyond simple data display. Future extensions to the web interface and functionality are possible, as the web server utilizes the same code engine that is used for desktop geologic model construction and water quality data management. In summary, the GEUS/Earthfx web server tools

  8. Access and Quality of HIV-Related Point-of-Care Diagnostic Testing in Global Health Programs.

    PubMed

    Fonjungo, Peter N; Boeras, Debrah I; Zeh, Clement; Alexander, Heather; Parekh, Bharat S; Nkengasong, John N

    2016-02-01

    Access to point-of-care testing (POCT) improves patient care, especially in resource-limited settings where laboratory infrastructure is poor and the bulk of the population lives in rural settings. However, because of challenges in rolling out the technology and weak quality assurance measures, the promise of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related POCT in resource-limited settings has not been fully exploited to improve patient care and impact public health. Because of these challenges, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), in partnership with other organizations, recently launched the Diagnostics Access Initiative. Expanding HIV programs, including the "test and treat" strategies and the newly established UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets, will require increased access to reliable and accurate POCT results. In this review, we examine various components that could improve access and uptake of quality-assured POC tests to ensure coverage and public health impact. These components include evaluation, policy, regulation, and innovative approaches to strengthen the quality of POCT. PMID:26423384

  9. Operationalizing Equity: The Complexities of Equity in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreasson, Ingela; Ohlsson, Lisbeth; Assarson, Inger

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to offer some reflections on the relationship between meanings of equity at the national level and those working with these questions in local schools. We argue that meanings of equity at the national level are in strong contrast to the range complexity identified in local schools. The article draws from case study…

  10. Vocational Equity Resources from the Vocational Equity Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Vocational Studies Center.

    This catalog identifies and describes 767 written and audiovisual resources on equity available on loan from the Vocational Equity Resource and Technical Assistance Center in Madison, Wisconsin. The publication lists materials under 44 headings: affirmative action, aging, apprenticeship, assessment instruments, bias-free communications,…

  11. Creating the Business Case for Achieving Health Equity.

    PubMed

    Chin, Marshall H

    2016-07-01

    Health care organizations have increasingly acknowledged the presence of health care disparities across race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status, but significantly fewer have made health equity for diverse patients a true priority. Lack of financial incentives is a major barrier to achieving health equity. To create a business case for equity, governmental and private payors can: 1) Require health care organizations to report clinical performance data stratified by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. 2) Incentivize preventive care and primary care. Implement more aggressive shared savings plans, update physician relative value unit fee schedules, and encourage partnerships across clinical and non-clinical sectors. 3) Incentivize the reduction of health disparities with equity accountability measures in payment programs. 4) Align equity accountability measures across public and private payors. 5) Assist safety-net organizations. Provide adequate Medicaid reimbursement, risk-adjust clinical performance scores for sociodemographic characteristics of patients, provide support for quality improvement efforts, and calibrate cuts to Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) payments to the pace of health insurance expansion. 6) Conduct demonstration projects to test payment and delivery system reform interventions to reduce disparities. Commitment to social justice is essential to achieve health equity, but insufficient without a strong business case that makes interventions financially feasible. PMID:26883523

  12. Water Quality vs. Sanitation Accessibility: What is the most effective intervention point for preventing cholera in Dhaka, Bangladesh?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, M. S.; Gute, D.; Faruque, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Every year, 3 to 5 million individuals contract cholera, an acute diarrheal infection that is caused by the ingestion of food or water containing the Vibrio cholerae bacterium. Because cholera is a waterborne disease, it can be transmitted quickly in environments with inadequate water and sanitation systems where infected waste can easily pollute drinking water. Today, Bangladesh continues to struggle with endemic cholera. Donor organizations address water and sanitation via localized initiatives, including the installation of community water collection sites (i.e. tubewells; water-boiling points; etc.). At this small-scale level, water quality and sanitation accessibility can be improved independently of one another, and when resources are limited, donors must invest in the most effective disease prevention options. This study used laboratory-confirmed cholera incidence data (2000-2009) collected by the International Centre of Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh at their on-site hospital to compare the efficacy of interventions addressing water quality versus sanitation accessibility in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data regarding use of sanitary latrines and boiling of drinking water were extracted from sequential patient interviews conducted at the Dhaka facility and used as surrogate variables for sanitation accessibility and water quality respectively. Our analysis indicates that boiling water is 10 times more effective at preventing cholera than the use of a sanitary latrine. This finding suggests that regulating water quality is perhaps more critical to cholera prevention than increasing sanitation accessibility in an urban environment like that of Dhaka. At present, WaterAid - one of Bangladesh's most significant water and sanitation donor organizations - invests the majority of its budget on improving sanitation accessibility. The World Health Organization and the United Nations Millennium Development Goals also prioritize sanitation accessibility. However, in

  13. Reducing the distance: equity issues in distance learning in public education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Patricia B.; Storo, Jennifer

    1996-12-01

    Distance learning and educational equity both began with an emphasis on access, on providing underserved students with an increased access to education. Today definitions of equity have gone beyond simple access to include equal or equivalent treatment and outcomes while definitions of underserved students have expanded to include girls, children of color, children with limited English proficiency and children with disabilities. At the same time the definition of distance learning has expanded to include new technologies, new audiences and new roles. Based on these new definitions and roles, the article raises a number of equity challenges for distance learning educators centering around who is taught, what is taught and how the teaching is done. To answer these challenges, a series of recommendations are suggested that educators can implement to make distance learning a leader in increasing educational equity for all students. The time to act is now.

  14. Access, Cost and Quality: Tensions in the Development of Primary Education in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerset, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Throughout Kenya's history, tensions between two goals have characterised the educational policy debate: first, the expansion of access; second, the containment of costs. During the colonial period, cost-containment predominated, leading to severe restrictions on access and massive unmet social demand. Then, during post-Independence years,…

  15. Screening Educational Equity: A Filmography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Susan Morris, Comp.

    The more than 300 films and videos listed in this annotated filmography for use by educators and their students are presented in 14 categories: (1) Biases in Early Childhood Education; (2) Career and Vocational Opportunities; (3) Curriculum Equity; (4) Discrimination in Employment; (5) Equity in Sports; (6) A Legal Context; (7) Male Sex Role…

  16. Leadership, Equity, and School Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptiste, H. Prentice, Jr., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of essays focuses on the intersection between equity and excellence in educational leadership and urges a reconceptualization that gives appropriate consideration to women and ethnic and racial minorities. The book begins with an introductory chapter, entitled "Equity and Excellence in Educational Leadership: A Necessary Nexus," by…

  17. History of Pay Equity Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbezat, Debra A.

    2002-01-01

    Traces the evolution of salary-equity studies over time, and how the findings have changed with regard to pay differences by gender and race/ethnicity. Reviews the literature on salary equity for both faculty and nonfaculty academic employees. (EV)

  18. Flour Quality and Related Molecular Characterization of High Molecular Weight Glutenin Subunit Genes from Wild Emmer Wheat Accession TD-256.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-Le; He, Ting-Ting; Liang, Hui-Hui; Huang, Lu-Yu; Su, Ya-Zhong; Li, Yu-Ge; Li, Suo-Ping

    2016-06-22

    To clarify the effect of high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) from wild emmer wheat on flour quality, which has the same mobility as that from common wheat, the composition and molecular characterization of HMW-GS from wild emmer wheat accession TD-256, as well as its flour quality, were intensively analyzed. It is found that the mobilities of Glu-A1 and Glu-B1 subunits from TD-256 are consistent with those of bread wheat cv. 'XiaoYan 6'. Nevertheless, dough rheological properties of TD-256 reveal its poor flour quality. In the aspect of molecular structure from HMW-GS, only two conserved cysteine residues can be observed in the deduced protein sequence of 1Bx14* from TD-256, while most Glu-1Bx contain four conserved cysteine residues. In addition, as can be predicted from secondary structure, the quantity both of α-helixes and their amino acid residues of the subunits from TD-256 is fewer than those of common wheat. Though low molecular weight glutenin subunit (LMW-GS) and gliadin can also greatly influence flour quality, the protein structure of the HMW-GS revealed in this work can partly explain the poor flour quality of wild emmer accession TD-256. PMID:27243935

  19. An Assessment of Female Prisoners’ Perception of the Accessibility of Quality Healthcare: A Survey in the Kumasi Central Prisons, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Sarpong, AA; Otupiri, E; Yeboah-Awudzi, K; Osei-Yeboah, J; Berchie, GO; Ephraim, RKD

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accessibility of quality healthcare across the globe has generated a lot of attention among public health practitioners. Aim: This study explored the background characteristics of female prisoners and how it influences their assessment of the quality of accessible healthcare in the Kumasi Female Prison. Subjects and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted at the Female section of the Kumasi Central Prisons from June to December 2011. We used pretested questionnaires to obtain quantitative data from all 39 inmates of the female Prisons. An in-depth interview was used to obtain qualitative data from the prison healthcare giver. Data were analyzed with Epi Info Version 3.5.1, (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), Excel, and Graph Pad Prism version 5.00 for Windows (Graph Pad software, San Diego California USA, www.graphpad.com). Results: Using a 12-point scale inventory questionnaire, inmates with no formal education gave the highest mean health provision assessment score (6.0) whereas those with tertiary education gave the lowest (4.5). Females serving prison sentences gave the highest mean health assessment score whereas remand prisoners gave the lowest. Single females’ mean health assessment score was 5.7 whereas that of married inmates was 4.9. Unemployed inmates scored 5.8, informal 5.4 while civil servants scored 5.0. Conclusion: Access to quality healthcare was poor and demographic characteristics, marital status, educational background, and occupation influenced inmates’ perceptions of accessibility to quality healthcare. Inmates should be encouraged to be proactive in seeking healthcare irrespective of their background characteristics. PMID:26097759

  20. The Political Is Personal: Measurement and Application of Nation-Level Indicators of Gender Equity in Psychological Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Else-Quest, Nicole M.; Grabe, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Consistent with the dictum, "the personal is political," feminist scholars have maintained that gender equity in security, access to education, economic opportunity, and property ownership are central to women's well-being. Empirical research evaluating this thesis can include nation-level indicators of gender equity, such as the United Nation…

  1. Manage marketing by the customer equity test.

    PubMed

    Blattberg, R C; Deighton, J

    1996-01-01

    Managers have recently begun to think of good marketing as good conversation, as a process of drawing customers into progressively more satisfying relationships with a company. And just as the art of conversation follows two steps--first striking up a conversation with a likely partner and then maintaining the flow--so the new marketing naturally divides itself into the work of customer acquisition and the work of customer retention. But how can managers determine the optimal balance between spending on acquisition and spending on retention? Robert Blattberg and John Deighton use decision calculus to help managers answer that question. That is, they ask managers to approach the large, complex problem through several smaller, more manageable questions on the same topic. Then they use a formal model to turn those smaller judgments into an answer to the larger question. The ultimate goal, the authors say, is to grow the company's customer equity the sum of all the conversations-to its fullest potential. Recognizing that managers must constantly reassess the spending points determined by the decision-calculus model, the authors also provide a series of guidelines and suggestions to help frame the issues that affect acquisition, retention, and customer equity. When managers strive to grow customer equity rather than a brand's sales or profits, they put a primary indicator of the health of the business at the fore front of their strategic thinking: the quality of customer relationships. PMID:10158473

  2. Building brand equity and customer loyalty

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, G.

    1995-05-01

    Customer satisfaction and customer loyalty are two different concepts, not merely two different phrases measuring a single consumer attitude. Utilities having identical customer satisfaction ratings based on performance in areas like power reliability, pricing, and quality of service differ dramatically in their levels of customer loyalty. As competitive markets establish themselves, discrepancies in customer loyalty will have profound impacts on each utility`s prospects for market retention, profitability, and ultimately, shareholder value. Meeting pre-existing consumer needs, wants and preferences is the foundation of any utility strategy for building customer loyalty and market retention. Utilities meet their underlying customer expectations by performing well in three discrete areas: product, customer service programs, and customer service transactions. Brand equity is an intervening variable standing between performance and the loyalty a utility desires. It is the totality of customer perceptions about the unique extra value the utility provides above and beyond its basic product, customer service programs and customer service transactions; it is the tangible, palpable reality of a branded utility that exists in the minds of consumers. By learning to manage their brand equity as well as they manage their brand performance, utilities gain control over all the major elements in the value-creation process that creates customer loyalty. By integrating brand performance and brand equity, electric utility companies can truly become in their customers` eyes a brand - a unique, very special, value-added energy services provider that can ask for and deserve a premium price in the marketplace.

  3. Equity Gains in Bangladesh Primary Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, A. Mushtaque R.; Nath, Samir R.; Choudhury, Rasheda K.

    2003-11-01

    Although equity is a desirable objective of any form of development intervention, including education, not many studies dwell upon this important area. Information on related trends is even more rare. This essay uses field-level data from Bangladesh to examine equity levels and trends in primary education, including enrolment and quality of learning, focusing on equity for different gender, urban or rural, economic and ethnic groups. The study shows that while some disparity between girls and boys has been eliminated, girls are still far behind boys in terms of learning achievement. Children belonging to poorer families and ethnic minority groups lag behind the respective dominant groups in terms of both enrolment and learning achievement. At the same time, there have been some improvements for hitherto excluded groups such as rural girls and children of the poor. These changes are attributed mainly to 'positive discriminatory' steps taken by the government and non-governmental organizations in favour of such groups. If this trend continues, Bangladesh can look forward to establishing itself as a more equitable society than it is now.

  4. Rethinking Equity--There Are Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picus, Lawrence O.

    1998-01-01

    Defines "equity" in terms of three concepts (horizontal equity, vertical equity, and fiscal neutrality), summarizes school finance litigation history, and presents alternative distribution formats to improve student achievement. Enhancing equity and efficiency requires reallocation of existing resources, incentives for improved performance, a more…

  5. Intergenerational equity and conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R. P.; Walton, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The issue of integenerational equity in the use of natural resources is discussed in the context of coal mining conversion. An attempt to determine if there is a clear-cut benefit to future generations in setting minimum coal extraction efficiency standards in mining is made. It is demonstrated that preserving fossil fuels beyond the economically efficient level is not necessarily beneficial to future generations even in terms of their own preferences. Setting fossil fuel conservation targets for intermediate products (i.e. energy) may increase the quantities of fossil fuels available to future generations and hence lower the costs, but there may be serious disadvantages to future generations as well. The use of relatively inexpensive fossil fuels in this generation may result in more infrastructure development and more knowledge production available to future generations. The value of fossil fuels versus these other endowments in the future depends on many factors which cannot possibly be evaluated at present. Since there is no idea of whether future generations are being helped or harmed, it is recommended that integenerational equity not be used as a factor in setting coal mine extraction efficiency standards, or in establishing requirements.

  6. Horizontal equity and efficiency at primary health care facilities in rural Afghanistan: a seemingly unrelated regression approach.

    PubMed

    Johns, Benjamin; Steinhardt, Laura; Walker, Damian G; Peters, David H; Bishai, David

    2013-07-01

    Producing services efficiently and equitably are important goals for health systems. Many countries pursue horizontal equity - providing people with the same illnesses equal access to health services - by locating facilities in remote areas. Staff are often paid incentives to work at such facilities. However, there is little evidence on how many fewer people are treated at remote facilities than facilities in more densely settled areas. This research explores if there is an association between the efficiency of health centers in Afghanistan and the remoteness of their location. Survey teams collected data on facility level inputs and outputs at a stratified random sample of 579 health centers in 2005. Quality of care was measured by observing staff interact with patients and determining if staff completed a set of normative patient care tasks. We used seemingly unrelated regression to determine if facilities in remote areas have fewer outpatient visits than other rural facilities. In this analysis, one equation compares the number of outpatient visits to facility inputs, while another compares quality of care to determinants of quality. The results indicate remote facilities have about 13% fewer outpatient visits than non-remote facilities, holding inputs constant. Our analysis suggests that facilities in remote areas are realizing horizontal equity since their clients are receiving comparable quality of care to those at non-remote facilities. However, we find the average labor cost for a visit at a remote facility is $1.44, but only $0.97 at other rural facilities, indicating that a visit in a remote facility would have to be 'worth' 1.49 times a visit at a rural facility for there to be no equity - efficiency trade-off. In determining where to build or staff health centers, this loss of efficiency may be offset by progress toward a social policy objective of providing services to disadvantaged rural populations. PMID:23726212

  7. Peer Review Quality and Transparency of the Peer-Review Process in Open Access and Subscription Journals

    PubMed Central

    Wicherts, Jelte M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent controversies highlighting substandard peer review in Open Access (OA) and traditional (subscription) journals have increased the need for authors, funders, publishers, and institutions to assure quality of peer-review in academic journals. I propose that transparency of the peer-review process may be seen as an indicator of the quality of peer-review, and develop and validate a tool enabling different stakeholders to assess transparency of the peer-review process. Methods and Findings Based on editorial guidelines and best practices, I developed a 14-item tool to rate transparency of the peer-review process on the basis of journals’ websites. In Study 1, a random sample of 231 authors of papers in 92 subscription journals in different fields rated transparency of the journals that published their work. Authors’ ratings of the transparency were positively associated with quality of the peer-review process but unrelated to journal’s impact factors. In Study 2, 20 experts on OA publishing assessed the transparency of established (non-OA) journals, OA journals categorized as being published by potential predatory publishers, and journals from the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). Results show high reliability across items (α = .91) and sufficient reliability across raters. Ratings differentiated the three types of journals well. In Study 3, academic librarians rated a random sample of 140 DOAJ journals and another 54 journals that had received a hoax paper written by Bohannon to test peer-review quality. Journals with higher transparency ratings were less likely to accept the flawed paper and showed higher impact as measured by the h5 index from Google Scholar. Conclusions The tool to assess transparency of the peer-review process at academic journals shows promising reliability and validity. The transparency of the peer-review process can be seen as an indicator of peer-review quality allowing the tool to be used to predict academic

  8. The impact of cattle access on ecological water quality in streams: Examples from agricultural catchments within Ireland.

    PubMed

    Conroy, E; Turner, J N; Rymszewicz, A; O'Sullivan, J J; Bruen, M; Lawler, D; Lally, H; Kelly-Quinn, M

    2016-03-15

    Unrestricted cattle access to rivers and streams represent a potentially significant localised pressure on freshwater systems. However there is no consensus in the literature on the occurrence and extent of impact and limited research has examined the effects on aquatic biota in the humid temperate environment examined in the present study. Furthermore, this is one of the first times that research consider the potential for cattle access impacts in streams of varying water quality in Northern Europe. We investigated the effects of cattle access on macroinvertebrate communities and deposited fine sediment levels, in four rivers of high/good and four rivers of moderate water quality status which drain, low gradient, calcareous grassland catchments in Ireland. We assessed the temporal variability in macroinvertebrates communities across two seasons, spring and autumn. Site specific impacts were evident which appeared to be influenced by water quality status and season. All four high/good water status rivers revealed significant downstream changes in community structure and at least two univariate metrics (total richness and EPT richness together with taxon, E and EPT abundance). Two of the four moderate water status rivers showed significant changes in community structure, abundance and richness metrics and functional feeding groups driven in the main by downstream increases in collectors/gatherers, shredders and burrowing taxa. These two moderate water status rivers had high or prolonged livestock activity. In view of these findings, the potential for some of these sites to achieve at least high/good water quality status, as set out in the EU Water Framework Directive, may be compromised. The results presented highlight the need for additional research to further define the site specific factors and livestock management practices, under different discharge conditions, that increase the risk of impact on aquatic ecology due to these cattle-river interactions. PMID

  9. Creating Teacher Incentives for School Excellence and Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Barnett; Eckert, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Ensuring that all students in America's public schools are taught by good teachers is an educational and moral imperative. Teacher incentive proposals are rarely grounded on what high-quality research indicates are the kinds of teacher incentives that lead to school excellence and equity. Few of the current approaches to creating teacher…

  10. Standards, Assessments, and Students: Encouraging Both Equity and Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Jim

    1995-01-01

    We must determine national standards, an acceptable degree of student achievement, and ways to guarantee equity while encouraging excellence. Any school can increase its graduation rate by decree through social promotion and lowered grading scales. The shift to standards means a shift to measurable outcomes, true learning, and a quality product.…

  11. Free open access medical education can help rural clinicians deliver 'quality care, out there'.

    PubMed

    Leeuwenburg, Tim J; Parker, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Rural clinicians require expertise across a broad range of specialties, presenting difficulty in maintaining currency of knowledge and application of best practice. Free open access medical education is a new paradigm in continuing professional education. Use of the internet and social media allows a globally accessible crowd-sourced adjunct, providing inline (contextual) and offline (asynchronous) content to augment traditional educational principles and the availability of relevant resources for life-long learning. This markedly reduces knowledge translation (the delay from inception of a new idea to bedside implementation) and allows rural clinicians to further expertise by engaging in discussion of cutting edge concepts with peers worldwide. PMID:26278340

  12. Housing Quality and Access to Material and Learning Resources within the Home Environment in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Robert H.; Putnick, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined home environment conditions (housing quality, material resources, formal and informal learning materials) and their relations with the Human Development Index (HDI) in 28 developing countries. Home environment conditions in these countries varied widely. The quality of housing and availability of material resources at home were…

  13. [Equity and health].

    PubMed

    Laguna-García, J; Fernández de Castro, J; Cordera, A

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the right to health in Mexico. The authors present some ideas regarding equity and data which shows the existence of a deep inequity in the field of health in the country. The efforts of the social security agencies and of the Ministry of Health aimed at diminishing inequity in health are also described. The authors conclude that it is time to avoid retorical positions and attitudes of administrative solidarity and start to implement actions to improve the health conditions of those living in extreme poverty. These actions should include providing comprehensive health services to all the population, reinforcing specific preventive programs, improving certain basic health indicators and prompting intersectoral collaboration. PMID:1411783

  14. Child Care for Low-Income Children with Disabilities: Access, Quality, and Parental Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Shavaun; Kisker, Ellen E.; Peterson, Carla A.; Carta, Judith J.; Jeon, Hyun-Joo

    2006-01-01

    Using data from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, this study analyzed the similarities and differences of variables associated with child care services for low-income families with young children with disabilities and low-income families with typically developing children. Four major variables were analyzed: access to child…

  15. Structuring Opportunity after Entry: Who Has Access to High Quality Instruction during College?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roksa, Josipa

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: When inequality of opportunity is discussed in higher education, it typically pertains to access to college. Ample research has examined sociodemographic inequalities in transition to higher education and enrollment in particular types of institutions. Although providing valuable insights, social stratification research does…

  16. Access, Quality, and Opportunity: A Case Study of Zambia Open Community Schools (ZOCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwalimu, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Community schools and other approaches to Alternative Primary Education or APE have increased access to primary education for underserved populations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America as a major goal of the Education for All (EFA) movement. In Zambia, a country where an estimated 20 percent of the basic education enrollment now attends community…

  17. Improving Access To, Quality, and the Effectiveness of Digital Tutoring in K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Patricia; Good, Annalee; Heinrich, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable variation in how providers of digital education describe what they do, their services, how students access services, and what is delivered, complicating efforts to accurately assess its impact. We examine program characteristics of digital tutoring providers using rich, longitudinal observational and interview data and then…

  18. Cancer control in developing countries: using health data and health services research to measure and improve access, quality and efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer is a rapidly increasing problem in developing countries. Access, quality and efficiency of cancer services in developing countries must be understood to advance effective cancer control programs. Health services research can provide insights into these areas. Discussion This article provides an overview of oncology health services in developing countries. We use selected examples from peer-reviewed literature in health services research and relevant publicly available documents. In spite of significant limitations in the available data, it is clear there are substantial barriers to access to cancer control in developing countries. This includes prevention, early detection, diagnosis/treatment and palliation. There are also substantial limitations in the quality of cancer control and a great need to improve economic efficiency. We describe how the application of health data may assist in optimizing (1) Structure: strengthening planning, collaboration, transparency, research development, education and capacity building. (2) Process: enabling follow-up, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality assurance. (3) Outcome: facilitating evaluation, monitoring and improvement of national cancer control efforts. There is currently limited data and capacity to use this data in developing countries for these purposes. Summary There is an urgent need to improve health services for cancer control in developing countries. Current resources and much-needed investments must be optimally managed. To achieve this, we would recommend investment in four key priorities: (1) Capacity building in oncology health services research, policy and planning relevant to developing countries. (2) Development of high-quality health data sources. (3) More oncology-related economic evaluations in developing countries. (4) Exploration of high-quality models of cancer control in developing countries. Meeting these needs will require national, regional and international

  19. Data resource profile: Pathways to Health and Social Equity for Children (PATHS Equity for Children).

    PubMed

    Nickel, Nathan C; Chateau, Dan G; Martens, Patricia J; Brownell, Marni D; Katz, Alan; Burland, Elaine M J; Walld, Randy; Hu, Mingming; Taylor, Carole R; Sarkar, Joykrishna; Goh, Chun Yan

    2014-10-01

    The PATHS Data Resource is a unique database comprising data that follow individuals from the prenatal period to adulthood. The PATHS Resource was developed for conducting longitudinal epidemiological research into child health and health equity. It contains individual-level data on health, socioeconomic status, social services and education. Individuals' data are linkable across these domains, allowing researchers to follow children through childhood and across a variety of sectors. PATHS includes nearly all individuals that were born between 1984 and 2012 and registered with Manitoba's universal health insurance programme at some point during childhood. All PATHS data are anonymized. Key concepts, definitions and algorithms necessary to work with the PATHS Resource are freely accessible online and an interactive forum is available to new researchers working with these data. The PATHS Resource is one of the richest and most complete databases assembled for conducting longitudinal epidemiological research, incorporating many variables that address the social determinants of health and health equity. Interested researchers are encouraged to contact [mchp_access@cpe.umanitoba.ca] to obtain access to PATHS to use in their own programmes of research. PMID:25212478

  20. Data Resource Profile: Pathways to Health and Social Equity for Children (PATHS Equity for Children)

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Nathan C; Chateau, Dan G; Martens, Patricia J; Brownell, Marni D; Katz, Alan; Burland, Elaine MJ; Walld, Randy; Hu, Mingming; Taylor, Carole R; Sarkar, Joykrishna; Goh, Chun Yan

    2014-01-01

    The PATHS Data Resource is a unique database comprising data that follow individuals from the prenatal period to adulthood. The PATHS Resource was developed for conducting longitudinal epidemiological research into child health and health equity. It contains individual-level data on health, socioeconomic status, social services and education. Individuals’ data are linkable across these domains, allowing researchers to follow children through childhood and across a variety of sectors. PATHS includes nearly all individuals that were born between 1984 and 2012 and registered with Manitoba’s universal health insurance programme at some point during childhood. All PATHS data are anonymized. Key concepts, definitions and algorithms necessary to work with the PATHS Resource are freely accessible online and an interactive forum is available to new researchers working with these data. The PATHS Resource is one of the richest and most complete databases assembled for conducting longitudinal epidemiological research, incorporating many variables that address the social determinants of health and health equity. Interested researchers are encouraged to contact [mchp_access@cpe.umanitoba.ca] to obtain access to PATHS to use in their own programmes of research. PMID:25212478

  1. Toward scientific equity for the prevention of depression and depressive symptoms in vulnerable youth.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Tatiana; Beardslee, William; Bernal, Guillermo; Brincks, Ahnalee; Cruden, Gracelyn; Howe, George; Murry, Velma; Pantin, Hilda; Prado, Guillermo; Sandler, Irwin; Brown, C Hendricks

    2015-07-01

    Certain subgroups of youth are at high risk for depression and elevated depressive symptoms, and experience limited access to quality mental health care. Examples are socioeconomically disadvantaged, racial/ethnic minority, and sexual minority youth. Research shows that there are efficacious interventions to prevent youth depression and depressive symptoms. These preventive interventions have the potential to play a key role in addressing these mental health disparities by reducing youth risk factors and enhancing protective factors. However, there are comparatively few preventive interventions directed specifically to these vulnerable subgroups, and sample sizes of diverse subgroups in general prevention trials are often too low to assess whether preventive interventions work equally well for vulnerable youth compared to other youth. In this paper, we describe the importance and need for "scientific equity," or equality and fairness in the amount of scientific knowledge produced to understand the potential solutions to such health disparities. We highlight possible strategies for promoting scientific equity, including the following: increasing the number of prevention research participants from vulnerable subgroups, conducting more data synthesis analyses and implementation science research, disseminating preventive interventions that are efficacious for vulnerable youth, and increasing the diversity of the prevention science research workforce. These strategies can increase the availability of research evidence to determine the degree to which preventive interventions can help address mental health disparities. Although this paper utilizes the prevention of youth depression as an illustrative case example, the concepts are applicable to other health outcomes for which there are disparities, such as substance use and obesity. PMID:25349137

  2. Fostering health equity: clinical and research training strategies from nursing education.

    PubMed

    Deatrick, Janet A; Lipman, Terri H; Gennaro, Susan; Sommers, Marilyn; de Leon Siantz, Mary Lou; Mooney-Doyle, Kim; Hollis, Genevieve; Jemmott, Loretta S

    2009-09-01

    Racism, ethnocentrism, segregation, stereotyping, and classism are tightly linked to health equity and social determinants of health. They lead to lack of power, money, resources, and education which may result in poor health care access and outcomes. Health profession faculties must address the complex relationships that exist between individual, interpersonal, institutional, social and political factors that influence health outcomes in both clinical and research training. Thus, the purposes of this paper are to provide examples of training strategies from nursing education that foster cultural sensitivity. First, assumptions about health equity, culture, ethnicity and race are explored. Second, clinical training within an undergraduate and graduate context are explored, including an undergraduate cancer case study and in a graduate pediatric nursing program are described to demonstrate how cultural models can be used to integrate the biomedical and psychosocial content in a course. Third, research training for summer scholars and doctoral and post doctoral fellows (short and long term) is described to demonstrate how to increase the number and quality of scholars prepared to conduct research with vulnerable populations. Research training strategies include a summer research institute, policy fellowship, and a scholars "pipeline" program. A unique perspective is presented through collaboration between a nursing school and a center for health disparities research. PMID:19717366

  3. Equity in Science at South African Schools: A pious platitude or an achievable goal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewnarain Ramnarain, Umesh

    2011-07-01

    The apartheid policies in South Africa had a marked influence on the accessibility and quality of school science experienced by the different race groups. African learners in particular were seriously disadvantaged in this regard. The issues of equity and redress were foremost in transformation of the education system, and the accompanying curriculum reform. This paper reports on equity in terms of equality of outputs and equality of inputs in South African school science, with a particular focus on the implementation of practical science investigations. This was a qualitative case study of two teachers on their implementation of science investigations at two schools, one a township school, previously designated for black children, and the other a former Model C school, previously reserved for white children. My study was guided by the curriculum implementation framework by Rogan and Grayson in trying to understand the practice of these teachers at schools located in contextually diverse communities. The framework helped profile the implementation of science investigations and also enabled me to explore the factors which are able to support or hinder this implementation.

  4. Efficient, quality-assured data capture in operational research through innovative use of open-access technology.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A M V; Naik, B; Guddemane, D K; Bhat, P; Wilson, N; Sreenivas, A N; Lauritsen, J M; Rieder, H L

    2013-03-21

    Ensuring quality of data during electronic data capture has been one of the most neglected components of operational research. Multicentre studies are also challenged with issues about logistics of travel, training, supervision, monitoring and troubleshooting support. Allocating resources to these issues can pose a significant bottleneck for operational research in resource-limited settings. In this article, we describe an innovative and efficient way of coordinating data capture in multicentre operational research using a combination of three open access technologies-EpiData for data capture, Dropbox for sharing files and TeamViewer for providing remote support. PMID:26392997

  5. Gender Equity Matters!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorius, Kathleen King

    2010-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress along many indicators of equitable access, participation, and outcomes of schooling, there are still persistent, pervasive issues that must be addresses, including continued disparities in access to athletics and academic programs, sexual harassment, hate crimes, and discriminatory treatment of girls and women. This…

  6. Contribution of Neighborhood Income and Access to Quality Physical Activity Resources to Physical Activity in Ethnic Minority Women Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rebecca E.; Mama, Scherezade K.; Adamus-Leach, Heather J.; Soltero, Erica G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To create and test an index to indicate both availability and quality of physical activity (PA) resources (PARs), to examine associations between access to quality PARs and changes in PA, and to determine whether this association differed in lower- and higher-income neighborhoods. Design Longitudinal, 6-month intervention. Setting. Houston and Austin, Texas. Subjects African-American and Hispanic or Latina women. Measures Women (N = 410) completed a questionnaire and accelerometry to measure PA. Neighborhoods (N = 163) were classified as lower- or higher-income by median household income at the census-tract level. PARs were audited using the PARA (physical activity resource assessment). Access to quality PARs was determined by a composite index (QPAR) of features, amenities, and incivilities. Analysis Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to examine changes in PA by (1) neighborhood income (lower/higher) and QPAR (lower/higher) groups, and (2) neighborhood income (lower/higher) and number of PARs (lower/higher) groups, adjusting for ethnicity, household income, and body mass index. Results Women in neighborhoods with lower QPAR scores had small increases in self-reported vigorous PA (M Δ = 327.8 metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-min/wk) and decreases in accelerometer PA (M = −3.4 min/d), compared to those with higher QPAR scores who had larger increases in self-reported vigorous PA (M Δ = 709.8 MET-min/wk) and increased accelerometer PA (M = 3.9 min/d). There was a significant interaction between changes in leisure-time PA, QPAR score, and number of PARs (p =.049). Women with both more PARs and higher QPAR scores reported greater increases in leisure-time PA than women with fewer PARs and lower QPAR scores. Conclusion Access to higher-quality PARs can help increase or maintain PA over time regardless of neighborhood income. PAR quality is a separate and distinct, important determinant of PA in ethnic minority women. PMID:24524382

  7. Housing Quality and Access to Material and Learning Resources within the Home Environment in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert H.; Putnick, Diane L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined home environment conditions (housing quality, material resources, formal and informal learning materials) and their relations with the Human Development Index (HDI) in 28 developing countries. Home environment conditions in these countries varied widely. The quality of housing and availability of material resources at home were consistently tied to HDI; the availability of formal and informal learning materials little less so. Gross domestic product (GDP) tended to show a stronger independent relation with housing quality and material resources than life expectancy and education. Formal learning resources were independently related to the GDP and education indices, and informal learning resources were not independently related to any constituent indices of the overall HDI. PMID:22277008

  8. Equity and the Sun Quality Health Private Provider Social Franchise: comparative analysis of patient survey data and a nationally representative TB prevalence survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Since 2004, the Sun Quality Health (SQH) franchise network has provided TB care in Myanmar through a network of established private medical clinics. This study compares the wealth distribution of the TB patients to non-TB patients to determine if TB is most common among the poor, and compares the wealth of all TB patients to SQH TB patients to assess whether the franchise achieves its goal of serving the poor. Methods The study uses data from two sources: 1) Myanmar’s first nationally representative TB prevalence study conducted in 2009, and 2) client exit interviews from TB patients from SQH clinics. In total, 1,114 TB-positive individuals were included in the study, including 739 from the national sample and 375 from the SQH sample. Results TB patients at SQH clinics were poorer than TB-positive individuals in the overall population, though not at a statistically significant level (p > 0.05). After stratification we found that in urban areas, TB patients at SQH clinics were more likely to be in the poorest quartile compared to general TB positive population (16.8% vs. 8.6%, respectively; p < 0.05). In rural areas, there was no statistically significant difference between the wealth distribution of SQH clinic patients and general TB positive individuals (p > 0.05). Conclusion Franchised clinics in Myanmar are reaching poor populations of TB patients in urban areas; more efforts are needed in order to reach the most vulnerable in rural areas. PMID:23305063

  9. Tackling Student Literacy and Numeracy Underpreparedness in Ontario Colleges: Access, Quality and Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dziwak, Kasia

    2014-01-01

    As more students enter postsecondary education without the numeracy and literacy skills necessary for success, Ontario colleges are facing a challenge. While enrolment-based funding drives the colleges to seek growth to ensure financial stability, the quality assurance mechanism leads them to divert millions of dollars from their operating budgets…

  10. Investing in Young Children: A Fact Sheet on Early Care and Education Participation, Access, and Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmit, Stephanie; Matthews, Hannah; Smith, Sheila; Robbins, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Across the U.S., large numbers of young children are affected by one or more risk factors that have been linked to academic failure and poor health. High quality early care and education can play a critical role in promoting young children's early learning and success in life, while also supporting families' economic security. Young…

  11. Expanding Access and Quality in Uganda: The Challenges of Building a Plane while Flying It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutright, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Uganda is among many nations in sub-Saharan Africa that are trying simultaneously to expand higher education opportunities and to enhance the quality of higher-education offerings. These are particularly challenging goals in resource-rich environments and are even more difficulty in environments of more limited resources to include funding,…

  12. Does Access to High Quality Early Education Vary by State Policy Context?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Maia C.; Morris, Pamela A.; Friedman-Krauss, Allison H.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that attending high quality, formal early childhood education (ECE) is associated with stronger cognitive and social-emotional skills, especially for low-income children. Yet at current funding levels, federally-funded programs like Head Start cannot serve all eligible children. Thus, state-level policies governing the…

  13. Access to a High Quality Education for English Language Learners. Information Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Atlantic Equity Center, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Research on teaching and learning indicates that all students should be provided with programs, services, and teachers that engage them in rigorous academic work and promote deep disciplinary knowledge and higher order thinking skills (Walqui, 2006; Sanders & Rivers, 1996). Despite research findings on the importance of high quality teachers and…

  14. Strategic Priorities for Improving Access to Quality Education in the Kurdistan Region--Iraq. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernez, Georges; Culbertson, Shelly; Constant, Louay

    2014-01-01

    The Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) began an ambitious reform of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq's (KRI's) kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12) education system beginning in 2007 in an effort to modernize the curriculum, upgrade school facilities, and raise the quality of instruction. In 2010, RAND was asked to conduct a one-year study to assess…

  15. Protein and quality analyses of accessions from the USDA soybean germplasm collection for tofu production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shi; Chang, Sam; Gillen, Anne M; Zhang, Yan

    2016-12-15

    Food-grade soybeans with large seed size, uniformity, clear hilum and a high 11S/7S ratio are favoured by the food industry for making tofu. In order to search for soybean lines with desirable characteristics for making foods, 22 soybean lines were selected from the USDA-Soybean Germplasm Collection, were grown in Stoneville, MS for biochemical analysis and tofu texture and sensory quality tests. Eight lines were identified, from 22 lines harvested in 2014, to be suitable for tofu making, as judged by chemical composition and sensory quality of pressed tofu. In the filled tofu making and texture analysis study, the correlation between A3 subunit content and filled tofu firmness was significant (N=22, r=0.77, P<0.001). The results indicated that the A3 subunit could be an indicator for predicting the firmness of tofu. The results provided important food quality information for the selection of soybean genotypes for improving food quality. PMID:27451152

  16. Measuring health care access and quality to improve health in populations.

    PubMed

    Kottke, Thomas E; Isham, George J

    2010-07-01

    Poor health status, rapidly escalating health care costs, and seemingly little association between investments in health care and health outcomes have prompted a call for a "pay-for-performance" system to improve population health. We suggest that both health plans and clinical service providers measure and report the rates of 5 behaviors: 1) smoking, 2) physical activity, 3) excessive drinking, 4) nutrition, and 5) condom use by sexually active youth. Because preventive services can improve population health, we suggest that health plans and clinical service providers report delivery rates of preventive services. We also suggest that an independent organization report 8 county-level indicators of health care performance: 1) health care expenditures, 2) insurance coverage, 3) rates of unmet medical, dental, and prescription drug needs, 4) preventive services delivery rates, 5) childhood vaccination rates, 6) rates of preventable hospitalizations, 7) an index of affordability, and 8) disparities in access to health care associated with race and income. To support healthy behaviors, access to work site wellness and health promotion programs should be measured. To promote coordinated care, an indicator should be developed for whether a clinical service provider is a member of an accountable care organization. To encourage clinical service providers and health plans to address the social determinants of health, organizational participation in community-benefit initiatives that address the leading social determinants of health should be assessed. PMID:20550831

  17. Accessibility and Quality of Online Cancer-Related Clinical Trial Information for Naïve Searchers.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gregory A; Cronin, Angel M; Earles, Kristofer; Gray, Stacy W

    2015-10-01

    Although the Internet may help to increase cancer patients' awareness of clinical trials, little is known about the accessibility and quality of online clinical trial information. We simulated the experience of a naïve cancer patient without clinical trial knowledge by searching three popular search engines for treatment information for breast, lung, and prostate cancer, and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two coders independently evaluated website content for accessibility and quality. We screened 120 websites and identified 40 unique sites for analysis. Overall, 85% [95% confidence interval (CI), 70%-94%] of sites mentioned clinical trials on the landing page and 68% (51%-81%) included links to specific trials. Overall readability was poor. Approximately half of websites (36%-68%) included information on the potential benefits and risks of clinical trials and 40% provided information about when the site had been updated (25%-57%). Among sites with links to specific clinical trials, only 44% (25%-65%) provided an interactive interface that would allow patients to customize search results; breast (100%) and prostate (50%) sites were more interactive than lung (25%) and MDS (14%; P = 0.007). Although cancer clinical trial information is widely available on the Internet, its quality is highly variable. Given the fact that many emerging cancer therapeutics are personalized based on disease or genomic characteristics, interactive web-based interfaces could serve as powerful vehicles to help patients locate appropriate clinical trials. Without enhanced efforts to ensure greater interactivity of cancer treatment websites, patient awareness of relevant clinical trials may remain low. PMID:26265204

  18. Assurance of Academic Quality at the Age of Virtually Free Access to Colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Tomohiko

    In the age of open admission to colleges, changes need to be made to the social mission of each college. In order to maintain a high standard of education, the following issues need to be discussed and coped with in each college : the establishment of the social mission of each college ; clarification of educational goals; a system for enforcing educational programs ; evaluation method of the outcome. An activity for academic quality assurance has been introduced in the college of engineering at Shibaura Institute of Technology. The systems for improving core academic competence, including a system of advice on withdrawal, educational content and so on, were introduced into foundation courses. For education in specialized field, an educational program based on JABEE has been utilized. This program fulfills the requirements of academic quality assurance.

  19. Retrieval practice enhances the accessibility but not the quality of memory.

    PubMed

    Sutterer, David W; Awh, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that retrieval from long-term memory (LTM) can enhance subsequent memory performance, a phenomenon labeled the retrieval practice effect. However, the almost exclusive reliance on categorical stimuli in this literature leaves open a basic question about the nature of this improvement in memory performance. It has not yet been determined whether retrieval practice improves the probability of successful memory retrieval or the quality of the retrieved representation. To answer this question, we conducted three experiments using a mixture modeling approach (Zhang & Luck, 2008) that provides a measure of both the probability of recall and the quality of the recalled memories. Subjects attempted to memorize the color of 400 unique shapes. After every 10 images were presented, subjects either recalled the last 10 colors (the retrieval practice condition) by clicking on a color wheel with each shape as a retrieval cue or they participated in a control condition that involved no further presentations (Experiment 1) or restudy of the 10 shape/color associations (Experiments 2 and 3). Performance in a subsequent delayed recall test revealed a robust retrieval practice effect. Subjects recalled a significantly higher proportion of items that they had previously retrieved relative to items that were untested or that they had restudied. Interestingly, retrieval practice did not elicit any improvement in the precision of the retrieved memories. The same empirical pattern also was observed following delays of greater than 24 hours. Thus, retrieval practice increases the probability of successful memory retrieval but does not improve memory quality. PMID:26404635

  20. Mental health nurse practitioners in Australia: improving access to quality mental health care.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jacklin E

    2005-12-01

    Under The Nurses Amendment (Nurse Practitioners) Act 1998, New South Wales became the first state in Australia to legislate for nurse practitioners. Mental health was identified as a priority 'area of practice' for nurse practitioners. Issues surrounding the implementation of the nurse practitioner role in Australia and the potential for the role to address the current crisis in mental health nursing and the mental health sector will be discussed. The potential for partnerships with other health-care providers, in particular medical practitioners, will demonstrate how successful implementation of the role can fulfil consumer demand for primary prevention counselling, improve access to mental health services and early intervention, and provide mental health services that better reflect national priorities. This examination of the Australian context will be contrasted with a review of the overseas literature on mental health nurse practitioners. PMID:16296989

  1. 75 FR 48661 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ...The U.S. Secretary of Education (Secretary) announces the establishment of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Equity Commission or Commission). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended; 5 U.S.C.A., Appendix 2) shall govern the Equity Commission. Purpose: The Secretary is establishing the Commission in order to collect information, analyze issues, and obtain......

  2. An Examination of Charter School Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamba, Nathalis Guy; Ascher, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the implications of charter school choice for equity, discussing three standards of equity (racial balance, resources, and outcome). Reviews the equity provisions of state charter legislation, research on who chooses charter schools for their children and why, and analyses of the demographic characteristics of charter school students.…

  3. Understanding Equity Strategies of Training Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, John; Volkoff, Veronica; Egg, Mez; Solomon, Nicky

    2004-01-01

    Limited research has been undertaken to identify and examine systemic issues associated with the provision of vocational education and training (VET) to equity groups. This report focuses on the institutional relationships and policies that determine equity provision, and proposes three principles for framing equity practices. The principles are:…

  4. Framework for Evaluation of Equity Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bexley, Emmaline; Harris, Kerri-Lee; James, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Framework for Evaluation of Equity Initiatives has been prepared to support the Go8 Equity Strategy. Its purpose is to assist Group of Eight (Go8) universities to evaluate the effectiveness of their equity initiatives and interventions in the context of federal policies and the distinctive missions and responsibilities of the individual Go8…

  5. Perceptions of Equity, Balance of Support Exchange, and Mother-Adult Child Relations.

    PubMed

    Sechrist, Jori; Suitor, J Jill; Howard, Abigail R; Pillemer, Karl

    2014-04-01

    Equity theory suggests that relationships are more harmonious when both members of a dyad believe that their exchanges are fair. However, the level and frequency of exchange, rather than perceptions of equity, have been the focus of most research on support and the quality of intergenerational relations. Using data from 1,426 mother-child dyads nested within 413 families collected as part of the Within-Family Differences Study, the authors explored whether mothers' perceptions of equity are better predictors of closeness and tension than are mothers' reports of balanced exchanges of support. Mixed-model analyses revealed that mothers' perceptions of equity were more consistent predictors of relationship quality than were the balanced exchanges of support, though the results varied somewhat by gender of adult child. These findings contribute to a growing body of research demonstrating that the psychological processes that shape intergenerational relationships mirror those of other ties. PMID:24683270

  6. Ensuring global access to quality medicines: role of the US Pharmacopeia.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Matthew L; Williams, Roger L

    2011-04-01

    In the 5-year cycle that characterizes a continuous improvement of the US Pharmacopeial (USP) Convention, the Council of the Convention's Section on Global Public Health worked with USP's staff to assess USP's international contributions to date and to consider opportunities for expanding activities that help to ensure good healthcare around the globe.1 This article reviews USP's process and product standards that are used worldwide to ensure the quality of medicines and dietary supplements and to help mitigate the burden of counterfeit and substandard ingredients and products. The article also reviews USP's international programs during the past 5-year cycle, along with continuing and planned international activities. PMID:24081465

  7. Achieving effective universal health coverage with equity: evidence from Chile.

    PubMed

    Frenz, Patricia; Delgado, Iris; Kaufman, Jay S; Harper, Sam

    2014-09-01

    Chile's 'health guarantees' approach to providing universal and equitable coverage for quality healthcare in a dual public-private health system has generated global interest. The programme, called AUGE, defines legally enforceable rights to explicit healthcare benefits for priority health conditions, which incrementally covered 56 problems representing 75% of the disease burden between 2005 and 2009. It was accompanied by other health reform measures to increase public financing and public sector planning to secure the guarantees nationwide, as well as the state's stewardship role. We analysed data from household surveys conducted before and after the AUGE reform to estimate changes in levels of unmet health need, defined as the lack of a healthcare visit for a health problem occurring in the last 30 days, by age, sex, income, education, health insurance, residence and ethnicity; fitting logistic regression models and using predictive margins. The overall prevalence of unmet health need was much lower in 2009 (17.6%, 95% CI: 16.5%, 18.6%) than in 2000 (30.0%, 95% CI: 28.3%, 31.7%). Differences by income and education extremes and rural-urban residence disappeared. In 2009, people who had been in treatment for a condition covered by AUGE in the past year had a lower adjusted prevalence of unmet need for their recent problem (11.7%, 95% CI: 10.5%, 13.2%) than who had not (21.0%, 95% CI: 19.6%, 22.4%). Despite limitations including cross-sectional and self-reported data, our findings suggest that the Chilean health system has become more equitable and responsive to need. While these changes cannot be directly attributed to AUGE, they were coincident with the AUGE reforms. However, healthcare equity concerns are still present, relating to quality of care, health system barriers and differential access for health conditions that are not covered by AUGE. PMID:23921988

  8. Interstellar Sweat Equity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. H.; Becker, R. E.; O'Donnell, D. J.; Brody, A. R.

    So, you have just launched aboard the Starship, headed to an exoplanet light years from Earth. You will spend the rest of your natural life on this journey in the expectation and hope that your grandchildren will arrive safely, land, and build a new settlement. You will need to govern the community onboard the Starship. This system of governance must meet unique requirements for participation, representation, and decision-making. On a spaceship that can fly and operate by itself, what will the crewmembers do for their generations in transit? Certainly, they will train and train again to practice the skills they will need upon arrival at a new world. However, this vicarious practice neither suffices to prepare the future pioneers for their destiny at a new star nor will it provide them with the satisfaction in their own work. To hone the crewmembers' inventive and technical skills, to challenge and prepare them for pioneering, the crew would build and expand the interstellar ship in transit. This transstellar ``sweat equity'' gives a stake in the enterprise to all the people, providing meaningful and useful activity to the new generations of crewmembers. They build all the new segments of the vessel from raw materials - including atmosphere - stored on board. Construction of new pressure shell modules would be one option, but they also reconstruct or fill-in existing pressurized volumes. The crew makes new life support system components and develops new agricultural modules in anticipation of their future needs. Upon arrival at the new star or planet, the crew shall apply these robustly developed skills and self-sufficient spirit to their new home.

  9. Equity in development and access to health services in the Wild Coast of South Africa: the community view through four linked cross-sectional studies between 1997 and 2007

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background After election in 1994, the South African government implemented national and regional programmes, such as the Wild Coast Spatial Development Initiative (SDI), to provoke economic growth and to decrease inequities. CIET measured development in the Wild Coast region across four linked cross-sectional surveys (1997-2007). The 2007 survey was an opportunity to look at inequities since the original 1997 baseline, and how such inequities affect access to health care. Methods The 2000, 2004 and 2007 follow-up surveys revisited the communities of the 1997 baseline. Household-level multivariate analysis looked at development indicators and access to health in the context of inequities such as household crowding, access to protected sources of water, house roof construction, main food item purchased, and perception of community empowerment. Individual multivariate models accounted for age, sex, education and income earning opportunities. Results Overall access to protected sources of water increased since the baseline (from 20% in 1997 to 50% in 2007), yet households made of mud and grass, and households who bought basics as their main food item were still less likely to have protected sources of water. The most vulnerable, such as those with less education and less water and food security, were also less likely to have worked for wages leaving them with little chance of improving their standard of living (less education OR 0.59, 95%CI 0.37-0.94; less water security OR 0.67, 95%CI 0.48-0.93; less food security OR 0.43, 95%CI 0.29-0.64). People with less income were more likely to visit government services (among men OR 0.28, 95%CI 0.13-0.59; among women OR 0.33, 95%CI 0.20-0.54), reporting decision factors of cost and distance; users of private clinics sought out better service and medication. Lower food security and poorer house construction was also associated with women visiting government rather than private health services. Women with some formal education

  10. The effect of a Lean quality improvement implementation program on surgical pathology specimen accessioning and gross preparation error frequency.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maxwell L; Wilkerson, Trent; Grzybicki, Dana M; Raab, Stephen S

    2012-09-01

    Few reports have documented the effectiveness of Lean quality improvement in changing anatomic pathology patient safety. We used Lean methods of education; hoshin kanri goal setting and culture change; kaizen events; observation of work activities, hand-offs, and pathways; A3-problem solving, metric development, and measurement; and frontline work redesign in the accessioning and gross examination areas of an anatomic pathology laboratory. We compared the pre- and post-Lean implementation proportion of near-miss events and changes made in specific work processes. In the implementation phase, we documented 29 individual A3-root cause analyses. The pre- and postimplementation proportions of process- and operator-dependent near-miss events were 5.5 and 1.8 (P < .002) and 0.6 and 0.6, respectively. We conclude that through culture change and implementation of specific work process changes, Lean implementation may improve pathology patient safety. PMID:22912352

  11. Improving efficiency or impairing access? Health care consolidation and quality of care: Evidence from emergency hospital closures in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Avdic, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Recent health care consolidation trends raise the important policy question whether improved emergency medical services and enhanced productivity can offset adverse quality effects from decreased access. This paper empirically analyzes how geographical distance from an emergency hospital affects the probability of surviving an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), accounting for health-based spatial sorting and data limitations on out-of-hospital mortality. Exploiting policy-induced variation in hospital distance derived from emergency hospital closures and detailed Swedish mortality data over two decades, results show a drastically decreasing probability of surviving an AMI as residential distance from a hospital increases one year after a closure occurred. The effect disappears in subsequent years, however, suggesting that involved agents quickly adapted to the new environment. PMID:27060525

  12. Making Way for Equity: Elementary Principals' Interpretations of Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    Treating education as a socially transformative and morally conscious enterprise calls for educators to expose and improve social conditions related to oppression. These beliefs herald a different kind of practice for teachers and administrators in public schools, a practice that deals directly with dilemmas of equity and pluralism. Limited…

  13. Shareowners' Equity at Campbell Soup: How Can Equity Be Negative?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrman, Mary Beth; Stuerke, Pamela S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an instructional case based on the 2001 annual report of the Campbell Soup Company (CPB). During that year, CPB's shareowners' equity went from a surplus of USD137 million to a deficit of USD247 million. The analysis will allow students to determine that the change resulted from borrowing to purchase treasury stock. Students…

  14. Locally weighted regression for accessing a database containing wheat grain NIR transmission spectra and grain quality parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Douglas D.; Funk, David B.; Barton, Franklin E., II

    1999-01-01

    Networks of NIR transmission spectrometers operating in the range 850 to 1050 nm are used worldwide to determine wheat grain quality parameters such as protein content. These instrumental system often require maintenance of calibrations for each grain class, and updating of calibrations for each crop year. In order to facilitate annual updates nd eliminate the need for multiple wheat class calibration models, this laboratory is pursuing a modeling strategy that uses locally weighted regression (LWR) to access a spectral database. With LWR, the calibration model defines the procedure to access the database and calculate the prediction, and this model can potentially remain the same for all classes and crop years. Incorporation of new sample variation is accomplished by new additions to the spectral database. Details are presented on development of an NIR model for determination of protein in multiple wheat-classes using the LWR approach with Y- distance weighting. This model is compared with a linear partial least-squares regression model spanning the same diverse set of samples. Initial steps were taken to validate these models with spectra measured on seven instruments at two remote locations.

  15. Pricing foreign equity option with stochastic volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we propose a general foreign equity option pricing framework that unifies the vast foreign equity option pricing literature and incorporates the stochastic volatility into foreign equity option pricing. Under our framework, the time-changed Lévy processes are used to model the underlying assets price of foreign equity option and the closed form pricing formula is obtained through the use of characteristic function methodology. Numerical tests indicate that stochastic volatility has a dramatic effect on the foreign equity option prices.

  16. Quality and Equity in Finnish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahlberg, Pasi

    2012-01-01

    Schools everywhere vary little with regard to the subjects they teach, the classrooms where students learn, and the students' opinions about school. They do differ significantly in one area, however: the way they address the inequalities and diversity their students bring to school. For the small, agrarian, and relatively poor nation of Finland,…

  17. Village health workers in Java, Indonesia: coverage and equity.

    PubMed

    Berman, P A

    1984-01-01

    Village health workers are often the main vehicle for promoting the primary health care approach in developing countries. Services provided by these workers are expected to be more appropriate to the health needs of populations than those of clinic-based services, to be less expensive and to foster self-reliance and local participation. Because village workers are more accessible and acceptable to clients in their communities, they are expected to improve the overall coverage of services as well as equity--increased service use by poorer individuals and households. This paper presents research on coverage and equity from village health worker programs in Java, Indonesia. Rural health and nutrition projects in Java using village-level volunteers with limited training have grown since the early 1970s to include large national programs managed by the government's rural health system. Volunteer village workers are now the most extensive link between the rural population and the formal health service structure. Previous research on coverage and equity of these village worker activities is reviewed and results from the author's own study are presented. Services provided by village health workers achieve significantly higher levels of population coverage than similar clinic-based services. In most cases, village workers show no bias towards better-off clients and they may favor poorer beneficiaries. These findings show that village workers are meeting the coverage and equity objectives of the primary health care approach. However, some of the research reviewed raises questions about the ability of village worker activities to maintain these results over a longer period. The rapid expansion of these programs requires continued research, not only on coverage and equity, but also on health outcomes, costs, and participation. PMID:6484628

  18. Environmental equity as a criterion for water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, M.; Galvão, C.; Miranda, L.; Rufino, I.

    2014-09-01

    Environmental equity is a concept derived from the (un)equal exposure to environmental degradation by different social groups, usually minorities and low-income people exposed to major environmental risks, also known as environmental justice. It is assumed that no group of people, independent of race, ethnicity or socio-economic class, should support, either in concentrated or unevenly distributed form, the negative environmental impacts resulting from industrial, agricultural, commercial and infrastructure activities or government programs and policies. In this paper the concept of environmental equity is explored as a criterion for water management through the analysis of a typical coupled human-natural system: the Epitácio Pessoa Reservoir, located in the semi-arid region of Brazil. Inefficient water resource management has caused unequal access to water by the population, particularly during drought periods. However, census data indicate that population have practically the same access to water, which actually is not able to reflect the actual picture. This study argues that environmental equity can be an additional criterion to improve water management.

  19. Water quality laboratories in Colombia: a GIS-based study of urban and rural accessibility.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jim; Liu, Jing; Bain, Robert; Perez, Andrea; Crocker, Jonny; Bartram, Jamie; Gundry, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify sample transportation times associated with mandated microbiological monitoring of drinking-water in Colombia. World Health Organization Guidelines for Drinking-Water Quality recommend that samples spend no more than 6h between collection and analysis in a laboratory. Census data were used to estimate the minimum number of operational and surveillance samples required from piped water supplies under national regulations. Drive-times were then computed from each supply system to the nearest accredited laboratory and translated into sample holding times based on likely daily monitoring patterns. Of 62,502 surveillance samples required annually, 5694 (9.1%) were found to be more than 6 h from the nearest of 278 accredited laboratories. 612 samples (1.0%) were more than 24 hours' drive from the nearest accredited laboratory, the maximum sample holding time recommended by the World Health Organization. An estimated 30% of required rural samples would have to be stored for more than 6 h before reaching a laboratory. The analysis demonstrates the difficulty of undertaking microbiological monitoring in rural areas and small towns from a fixed laboratory network. Our GIS-based approach could be adapted to optimise monitoring strategies and support planning of testing and transportation infra-structure development. It could also be used to estimate sample transport and holding times in other countries. PMID:24747256

  20. Making equity a value in value-based health care.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Philip M; Bonham, Ann C; Kirch, Darrell G

    2013-11-01

    Equity in health and health care in America continues to be a goal unmet. Certain demographic groups in the United States-including racial and ethnic minorities and individuals with lower socioeconomic status-have poorer health outcomes across a wide array of diseases, and have higher all-cause mortality. Yet despite growing understanding of how social-, structural-, and individual-level factors maintain and create inequities, solutions to reduce or eliminate them have been elusive. In this article, the authors envision how disparities-related provisions in the Affordable Care Act and other recent legislation could be linked with new value-based health care requirements and payment models to create incentives for narrowing health care disparities and move the nation toward equity.Specifically, the authors explore how recent legislative actions regarding payment reform, health information technology, community health needs assessments, and expanding health equity research could be woven together to build an evidence base for solutions to health care inequities. Although policy interventions at the clinical and payer levels alone will not eliminate disparities, given the significant role the social determinants of health play in the etiology and maintenance of inequity, such policies can allow the health care system to better identify and leverage community assets; provide high-quality, more equitable care; and demonstrate that equity is a value in health. PMID:24072123

  1. Equity in Education: Next Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canuel, Ron

    2011-01-01

    In October of 2010, Canadian Education Association (CEA), in conjunction with colleagues from SCOPE (Stanford Centre for Opportunity Policy in Education), hosted an event entitled "Achieving Equity through Innovation: A Canada-United States Colloquium." This two-day event provided an important platform for the exchange of ideas, insights, and…

  2. Using Data to Promote Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shum, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Data plays a starring role in promoting educational equity, and data-driven decision making begins with good state policies. With the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and a proposed federal rule to address racial disproportionality in special education, states will shoulder increased responsibility for eliminating…

  3. Mathematics Equity. A Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyree, Eddy; And Others

    Provided in this document is a brief summary of current research on equity in mathematics, readings on the topic, and lists of selected programs and resource materials. Readings presented include: "Teaching Mathematics in a Multicultural Setting: Some Considerations when Teachers and Students are of Differing Cultural Backgrounds" (Willis N.…

  4. Zoning, equity, and public health.

    PubMed

    Maantay, J

    2001-07-01

    Zoning, the most prevalent land use planning tool in the United States, has substantial implications for equity and public health. Zoning determines where various categories of land use may go, thereby influencing the location of resulting environmental and health impacts. Industrially zoned areas permit noxious land uses and typically carry higher environmental burdens than other areas. Using New York City as a case study, the author shows that industrial zones have large residential populations within them or nearby. Noxious uses tend to be concentrated in poor and minority industrial neighborhoods because more affluent industrial areas and those with lower minority populations are rezoned for other uses, and industrial zones in poorer neighborhoods are expanded. Zoning policies, therefore, can have adverse impacts on public health and equity. The location of noxious uses and the pollution they generate have ramifications for global public health and equity; these uses have been concentrated in the world's poorer places as well as in poorer places within more affluent countries. Planners, policymakers, and public health professionals must collaborate on a worldwide basis to address these equity, health, and land use planning problems. PMID:11441726

  5. Zoning, equity, and public health.

    PubMed Central

    Maantay, J

    2001-01-01

    Zoning, the most prevalent land use planning tool in the United States, has substantial implications for equity and public health. Zoning determines where various categories of land use may go, thereby influencing the location of resulting environmental and health impacts. Industrially zoned areas permit noxious land uses and typically carry higher environmental burdens than other areas. Using New York City as a case study, the author shows that industrial zones have large residential populations within them or nearby. Noxious uses tend to be concentrated in poor and minority industrial neighborhoods because more affluent industrial areas and those with lower minority populations are rezoned for other uses, and industrial zones in poorer neighborhoods are expanded. Zoning policies, therefore, can have adverse impacts on public health and equity. The location of noxious uses and the pollution they generate have ramifications for global public health and equity; these uses have been concentrated in the world's poorer places as well as in poorer places within more affluent countries. Planners, policymakers, and public health professionals must collaborate on a worldwide basis to address these equity, health, and land use planning problems. PMID:11441726

  6. Designing Exhibits for Gender Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dancu, Toni Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Gender equity has been a national and global aim for over half a century (Ceci & Williams, 2007; National Center for Education Statistics, 2003; National Science Board, 2008). While gains have been made, one area where inequity remains is spatial reasoning ability, where a large gender gap in favor of males has persisted over the years…

  7. Employment Equity for Aboriginal Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Teachers' Federation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a letter of understanding between British Columbia Teachers' Federation (BCTF) and British Columbia Public School Employers' Association (BCPSEA) in response to Employment Equity for Aboriginal Teachers. The parties recognize that Aboriginal teachers are under-represented in the public education system. The parties are committed to…

  8. Holding Schools Accountable for Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Laurie

    2001-01-01

    Good reforms can have harmful results if equity effects are ignored. As California implements its accountability system, certain questions must be addressed concerning the system's data use, measurement features (consistency, meaningfulness, achievement growth, achievement gaps among groups), instructional improvement focus, incentives for…

  9. National Equity and School Autonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew C.

    1994-01-01

    Supports William Clune's focus on outputs, rather than inputs and procedures. However, national and state standard setting and systemic reform would foster more school improvement and educational equity than the single-school approach. Focus on outcomes allows considerable local curricular discretion. Schools should be held accountable for student…

  10. Tools for assessing the quality and accessibility of online health information: initial testing among breast cancer websites.

    PubMed

    Whitten, Pamela; Nazione, Samantha; Lauckner, Carolyn

    2013-12-01

    Health websites are used frequently, but there are many concerns about their value as information sources. Additionally, there are numerous personal barriers that prevent individuals from wholly benefitting from them. In order to assess the quality of health websites and their accessibility to users, we created tools based on previous research that examine design aspects, information validity, motivational health content and literacy content. To test these tools, we examined 155 breast cancer websites and created scores for each assessment tool to describe the percent of constructs on the average website. Results demonstrated that websites performed best on the design tool followed by the information validity, motivational health content and literacy assessment tools. The average website contained the majority of the design and information validity constructs, but only about a third of the motivational health or literacy constructs. Multiple items from the motivational health content and literacy assessment tools were not found on any of the websites, and many were only represented on a handful of sites. Overall, the assessment tools were useful in evaluating the quality of websites, and could serve as valuable resources for health website developers in the future. PMID:23957628

  11. Access, quality, and costs of care at physician owned hospitals in the United States: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Orav, E John; Jena, Anupam B; Dudzinski, David M; Le, Sidney T; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare physician owned hospitals (POHs) with non-POHs on metrics around patient populations, quality of care, costs, and payments. Design Observational study. Setting Acute care hospitals in 95 hospital referral regions in the United States, 2010. Participants 2186 US acute care hospitals (219 POHs and 1967 non-POHs). Main outcome measures Proportions of patients using Medicaid and those from ethnic and racial minority groups; hospital performance on patient experience metrics, care processes, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, and readmission rates; costs of care; care payments; and Medicare market share. Results The 219 POHs were more often small (<100 beds), for profit, and in urban areas. 120 of these POHs were general (non-specialty) hospitals. Compared with patients from non-POHs, those from POHs were younger (77.4 v 78.4 years, P<0.001), less likely to be admitted through an emergency department (23.2% v. 29.0%, P<0.001), equally likely to be black (5.1% v 5.5%, P=0.85) or to use Medicaid (14.9% v 15.4%, P=0.75), and had similar numbers of chronic diseases and predicted mortality scores. POHs and non-POHs performed similarly on patient experience scores, processes of care, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, 30 day readmission rates, costs, and payments for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia. Conclusion Although POHs may treat slightly healthier patients, they do not seem to systematically select more profitable or less disadvantaged patients or to provide lower value care. PMID:26333819

  12. Towards ensuring gender equity.

    PubMed

    Basu, A

    1996-01-01

    All people should participate in the development process. Many, however, remain excluded from the benefits of development. For example, women are privy to only a small share of developmental opportunities. The goals of equality, development, and peace were stated during the Fourth World Conference on Women held in Beijing in September 1995. The author considers whether women truly have equitable access to literacy, education, food, nutrition, health, employment, and the political and economic decision making process. She stresses that the goals pronounced at the Fourth World Conference on Women must be backed up with the necessary resources, including institutions established at the local, state, and national levels to ensure that the objectives are implemented and the implementation is monitored. The author further argues that in order for women to achieve equality with men, all girls must have access to primary and secondary schools; basic literacy is inadequate. Moreover, gender stereotyping must be avoided and gender sensitization ensured at all levels. PMID:12347385

  13. Accounting for water quality in monitoring access to safe drinking-water as part of the Millennium Development Goals: lessons from five countries

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Rob ES; Wright, Jim A; Yang, Hong; Pedley, Steve; Bartram, Jamie K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine how data on water source quality affect assessments of progress towards the 2015 Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target on access to safe drinking-water. Methods Data from five countries on whether drinking-water sources complied with World Health Organization water quality guidelines on contamination with thermotolerant coliform bacteria, arsenic, fluoride and nitrates in 2004 and 2005 were obtained from the Rapid Assessment of Drinking-Water Quality project. These data were used to adjust estimates of the proportion of the population with access to safe drinking-water at the MDG baseline in 1990 and in 2008 made by the Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation, which classified all improved sources as safe. Findings Taking account of data on water source quality resulted in substantially lower estimates of the percentage of the population with access to safe drinking-water in 2008 in four of the five study countries: the absolute reduction was 11% in Ethiopia, 16% in Nicaragua, 15% in Nigeria and 7% in Tajikistan. There was only a slight reduction in Jordan. Microbial contamination was more common than chemical contamination. Conclusion The criterion used by the MDG indicator to determine whether a water source is safe can lead to substantial overestimates of the population with access to safe drinking-water and, consequently, also overestimates the progress made towards the 2015 MDG target. Monitoring drinking-water supplies by recording both access to water sources and their safety would be a substantial improvement. PMID:22461718

  14. [Equity issues in health care reform in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Belmartino, Susana

    2002-01-01

    This article analyzes the historical and contemporary development of the Argentine health care system from the viewpoint of equity, a principle which is not explicitly mentioned in the system's founding documents. However, other values can be identified such as universal care, accessibility, and solidarity, which are closely related to equity. Nevertheless, the political dynamics characterizing the development of the country's health care system led to the suppression of more universalistic approaches, with group solidarity the only remaining principle providing structure to the system. The 1980s financial crisis highlighted the relative value of this principle as the basis for an equitable system. The authors illustrate the current situation with data on coverage under the medical social security system. PMID:12118311

  15. Associations between factors affecting access to care and health-related quality of life: results of a statewide HIV/AIDS cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Krause, Denise D; Butler, Kenneth R; May, Warren L

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to describe the relationship between access to care and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Mississippi by administering a statewide survey. A random probability sample of PLWHA was derived from the Mississippi State Department of Health's communicable disease tracking system. Interviews were conducted with 220 PLWHA to collect data on access to care, demographic and social characteristics, and HRQOL. Overall, most participants had access to care and reasonable HRQOL. Multivariate and univariate analyses were performed to measure associations between access to care and HRQOL. Univariate analyses showed that age, income, social networks, severity of disease, having been prescribed medications, and having experienced problems accessing care to be significantly associated with HRQOL scales. Multivariate analysis of variance models further demonstrated low-income level, having experienced problems accessing care, and having been prescribed antiretroviral medications to be significantly associated with HRQOL. Reducing barriers is a major factor in improving quality of life. This study provides needed insight into the relationship between access to care and HRQOL among PLWHA in Mississippi, which could be valuable to public health planners to help them better understand how to make the greatest impact on HRQOL. PMID:22612404

  16. Internet Access in School Library Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhart, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Examines Internet resources available for elementary school children and discusses why Internet access should be provided through school library media centers. Highlights include appropriate Web sites, a case study, equity of access, censorship, integrating Internet resources into the curriculum, Internet usage guidelines, and identification and…

  17. Prioritizing action on health inequities in cities: An evaluation of Urban Health Equity Assessment and Response Tool (Urban HEART) in 15 cities from Asia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Amit; Kano, Megumi; Dagg, Kendra Ann-Masako; Mori, Hanako; Senkoro, Hawa Hamisi; Ardakani, Mohammad Assai; Elfeky, Samar; Good, Suvajee; Engelhardt, Katrin; Ross, Alex; Armada, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Following the recommendations of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health (2008), the World Health Organization (WHO) developed the Urban Health Equity Assessment and Response Tool (HEART) to support local stakeholders in identifying and planning action on health inequities. The objective of this report is to analyze the experiences of cities in implementing Urban HEART in order to inform how the future development of the tool could support local stakeholders better in addressing health inequities. The study method is documentary analysis from independent evaluations and city implementation reports submitted to WHO. Independent evaluations were conducted in 2011-12 on Urban HEART piloting in 15 cities from seven countries in Asia and Africa: Indonesia, Iran, Kenya, Mongolia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam. Local or national health departments led Urban HEART piloting in 12 of the 15 cities. Other stakeholders commonly engaged included the city council, budget and planning departments, education sector, urban planning department, and the Mayor's office. Ten of the 12 core indicators recommended in Urban HEART were collected by at least 10 of the 15 cities. Improving access to safe water and sanitation was a priority equity-oriented intervention in 12 of the 15 cities, while unemployment was addressed in seven cities. Cities who piloted Urban HEART displayed confidence in its potential by sustaining or scaling up its use within their countries. Engagement of a wider group of stakeholders was more likely to lead to actions for improving health equity. Indicators that were collected were more likely to be acted upon. Quality of data for neighbourhoods within cities was one of the major issues. As local governments and stakeholders around the world gain greater control of decisions regarding their health, Urban HEART could prove to be a valuable tool in helping them pursue the goal of health equity. PMID:26456133

  18. Equity Index in the School Systems of Selected OECD Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmusul, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analysis the equity in the school systems of selected OECD countries. For this purpose, the international data for selected OECD countries was analyzed in terms of four dimensions of equity as learning equity, school resource equity, participating in education, and digital equity. When analyzing data, the equity…

  19. Cost-equity considerations in salinity control in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, J.; Kaluarachchi, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Salinity in the Colorado River Basin has been a serious concern for the past few decades and therefore, efforts have been underway to predict salinity generation and develop appropriate mitigation strategies. In addition to the physical processes, establishing the allocation of salinity control responsibilities among watersheds to meet the salinity control targets is important. For salinity control in the Upper Colorado River Basin, there are established water quality standards (given as TDS concentration) at three monitoring stations. Accordingly, total TDS load to be reduced in the basin has been set to meet the standards. In this paper, a practical framework to allocate salinity control responsibilities is developed considering cost-effectiveness, equity, and their trade-offs. Different allocation scenarios of salinity control responsibilities are estimated to meet salinity standards in irrigated lands of the Upper Colorado River Basin. The scenarios consist of simple ratio based on irrigated land area, minimizing total control cost, and maximizing equity among watersheds. Salinity control cost, possible maximum salt reduction of each watershed, irrigated land area, and net agricultural income are used to define equity measures. Simple ratio based on irrigated land area has relatively high total control cost, and even bad equity scores. Cost minimization scenario has definitely the lowest control cost, and relatively good equity. Among the four equity measures, optimization for equity of control costs results in similar allocation to cost minimization. Because the cost function is quadratic, cost minimization and optimization for equity of control costs tend to distribute the allocation of salt reduction equally. On the other hand, other scenarios tend to put high responsibilities into the high yield watersheds. The proposed framework allow decision-makers to allocate salinity control responsibilities based on the allocation method and trade-offs between equity

  20. Measuring equity in disability and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Trani, Jean-Francois; Barbou-des-Courieres, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses equity in health and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan based on a representative national household survey. Equitable access is a cornerstone of the Afghan health policy. We measured socioeconomic-related equity in access to public health care, using disability--because people with disabilities are poorer and more likely to use health care--and a concentration index (CI) and its decomposition. The socioeconomic-related equity in healthcare utilization was measured using a probit model and compared with an OLS model providing the horizontal inequity index (HI). We found a low rate of healthcare facilities utilization (25%). Disabled persons are using more healthcare facilities and have higher medical expenses. Disability is more frequently associated with older age, unemployed heads of household and lower education. The Cl of disability is 0.0221 indicating a pro-rich distribution of health. This pro-rich effect is higher in small households (CI decreases with size of the household, -0.0048) and safe (0.0059) areas. The CI of healthcare utilization is -0.0159 indicating a slightly pro-poor distribution of healthcare utilization but, overall, there is no difference in healthcare utilization by wealth status. Our study does not show major socioeconomic related inequity in disability and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan. This is due to the extreme and pervasive poverty found in Afghanistan. The absence of inequity in health access is explained by the uniform poverty of the population and the difficulty of accessing BPHS facilities (a basic package of health services), despite alarming health indicators. PMID:23189589

  1. Equity in dental care among Canadian households

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Changes in third party financing, whether public or private, are linked to a household's ability to access dental care. By removing costs at point of purchase, changes in financing influence the need to reach into one's pocket, thus facilitating or limiting access. This study asks: How have historical changes in dental care financing influenced household out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care in Canada? Methods This is a mixed methods study, comprised of an historical review of Canada's dental care market and an econometric analysis of household out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care. Results We demonstrate that changes in financing have important implications for out-of-pocket expenditures: with more financing come drops in the amount a household has to spend, and with less financing come increases. Low- and middle-income households appear to be most sensitive to changes in financing. Conclusions Alleviating the price barrier to care is a fundamental part of improving equity in dental care in Canada. How people have historically spent money on dental care highlights important gaps in Canadian dental care policy. PMID:21496297

  2. Access to Services, Quality of Care, and Family Impact for Children with Autism, Other Developmental Disabilities, and Other Mental Health Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohra, Rini; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha; St Peter, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined perceived access to services, quality of care, and family impact reported by caregivers of children aged 3-17 years with autism spectrum disorders, as compared to caregivers of children with other developmental disabilities and other mental health conditions. The 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with…

  3. Access and Quality in Education in Resettlement Schools: The Case Study of Zvivingwi Secondary School in Gutu District, Masvingo Province in Zimbabwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenjekwa, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    In Zimbabwe, the discourse on access and quality in education has been a raging one since the colonial days of bottlenecks and outright discrimination against black Zimbabweans in education. The doors to education were declared open to all at independence in 1980 with the new Zimbabwe government's enunciated policy of education for all. It is an…

  4. Voices of Equity: Beginning Teachers Are Crucial Partners and Emerging Leaders of Equity Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West-Burns, Nicole; Murray, Karen; Watt, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an equity education program established in 2009 by Ontario's (Canada) Ministry of Education to improve outcomes for students at risk and create the conditions needed for student success. Beginning teachers were crucial partners and emerging leaders of equity education. Some of the equity concerns these teachers faced…

  5. Equity and Excellence: The Emergence, Consolidation and Internalization of Education Development at the University of Natal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odendaal, Marie; Deacon, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Education development in South Africa emerged during the transition from apartheid to democracy, in a context especially marked by political and financial pressures. This case study of the University of Natal (now the University of KwaZulu-Natal) demonstrates how a strategy combining equity with excellence aimed to facilitate increased access to…

  6. Equity: The Critical Link in Southern Economic Development. Cross-Cutting Issue Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Growth Policies Board, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    This report presents a general overview of equity issues in the modern South. It discusses access to such needs as jobs and job opportunities, health, housing, education, government benefits, political power, resources, and protection. Six at-risk groups receive special focus: the poor; Blacks; Hispanics; women; older Southerners; and the…

  7. Pricing Policy, Social Equity and Institutional Survival in Tertiary Education in New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alfred M.

    New Jersey aids private institutions but is deficit in low-priced open access to public colleges. Discussed is higher education in New Jersey in light of this historical condition; pricing policy; social equity; decisions, especially regarding institutional support, student aid, and public tuition; and the "free market." While the proportion of…

  8. Improving Climate and Gender Equity in Physics Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennello, Sherry

    2010-02-01

    We need to open the door of science to women and minorities. We need to invite them in and encourage them to succeed. We need to teach them the secret handshake and transfer all the writing on the men's room walls and all-white country clubs into accessible places. We need to promote them to positions of national prominence. We need to do this out of respect to our mothers and the pioneering scientists who have come before us. We need to do this for our daughters and sons, so that our grandchildren may only know this discrimination as a piece of history. We need to do this now -- for the sake of our country, our science, our technical workforce, our economy and because it is the right thing to do. The Committee on the Status of Women in Physics (CSWP) has been helping physics departments improve their climate as a means to enhance gender equity. The CSWP site visit program has been giving departments valuable feedback on their climate for many years. In May 2007, a workshop on ``Gender Equity: Enhancing the Physics Enterprise in Universities and National Laboratories'' was held to address the issue of underrepresentation of women in physics by engaging the stake holders. This fall a new ``Conversation on Gender Equity'' has begun. Successful strategies for improving the climate and increasing the representation of women in physics will be presented. )

  9. Achieving Equity in an Evolving Healthcare System: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joni Strom; Walker, Rebekah J; Egede, Leonard E

    2016-01-01

    For decades, disparities in health have been well documented in the United States and regrettably, remain prevalent despite evidence and appeals for their elimination. Compared with the majority, racial and ethnic minorities continue to have poorer health status and health outcomes for most chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, cancer and end-stage renal disease. Many factors, such as affordability, access and diversity in the healthcare system, influence care and outcomes, creating challenges that make the task of eliminating health disparities and achieving health equity daunting and elusive. Novel strategies are needed to bring about much needed change in the complex and evolving United States healthcare system. Although not exhaustive, opportunities such as (1) developing standardized race measurements across health systems, (2) implementing effective interventions, (3) improving workforce diversity, (4) using technological advances and (5) adopting practices such as personalized medicine may serve as appropriate starting points for moving toward health equity. Over the past several decades, diversity in the U.S. population has increased significantly and is expected to increase exponentially in the near future. As the population becomes more diverse, it is important to recognize the possibilities of new and emerging disparities. It is imperative that steps are taken to eliminate the current gap in care and prevent new disparities from developing. Therefore, we present challenges and offer recommendations for facilitating the process of eliminating health disparities and achieving health equity across diverse populations. PMID:26802756

  10. Solvent and lipid accessibility prediction as a basis for model quality assessment in soluble and membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Phatak, Mukta; Adamczak, Rafał; Cao, Baoqiang; Wagner, Michael; Meller, Jarosław

    2011-09-01

    On-going efforts to improve protein structure prediction stimulate the development of scoring functions and methods for model quality assessment (MQA) that can be used to rank and select the best protein models for further refinement. In this work, sequence-based prediction of relative solvent accessibility (RSA) is employed as a basis for a simple MQA method for soluble proteins, and subsequently extended to the much less explored case of (alpha-helical) membrane proteins. In analogy to soluble proteins, the level of exposure to the lipid of amino acid residues in transmembrane (TM) domains is captured in terms of the relative lipid accessibility (RLA), which is predicted from sequence using low-complexity Support Vector Regression models. On an independent set of 23 TM proteins, the new SVR-based predictor yields correlation coefficient (CC) of 0.56 between the predicted and observed RLA profiles, as opposed to CC of 0.13 for a baseline predictor that utilizes TMLIP2H empirical lipophilicity scale (with standard deviations of about 0.15). A simple MQA approach is then defined by ranking models of membrane proteins in terms of consistency between predicted and observed RLA profiles, as a measure of similarity to the native structure. The new method does not require a set of decoy models to optimize parameters, circumventing current limitations in this regard. Several different sets of models, including those generated by fragment based folding simulations, and decoys obtained by swapping TM helices to mimic errors in template based assignment, are used to assess the new approach. Predicted RLA profiles can be used to successfully discriminate near native models from non-native decoys in most cases, significantly improving the separation of correct and incorrectly folded models compared to a simple baseline approach that utilizes TMLIP2H. As suggested by the robust performance of a simple MQA method for soluble proteins that utilizes more accurate RSA predictions

  11. An Integrated Framework for Gender Equity in Academic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Westring, Alyssa; McDonald, Jennifer M; Carr, Phyllis; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2016-08-01

    In 2008, the National Institutes of Health funded 14 R01 grants to study causal factors that promote and support women's biomedical careers. The Research Partnership on Women in Biomedical Careers, a multi-institutional collaboration of the investigators, is one product of this initiative.A comprehensive framework is needed to address change at many levels-department, institution, academic community, and beyond-and enable gender equity in the development of successful biomedical careers. The authors suggest four distinct but interrelated aspects of culture conducive to gender equity: equal access to resources and opportunities, minimizing unconscious gender bias, enhancing work-life balance, and leadership engagement. They review the collection of eight articles in this issue, which each address one or more of the four dimensions of culture. The articles suggest that improving mentor-mentee fit, coaching grant reviewers on unconscious bias, and providing equal compensation and adequate resources for career development will contribute positively to gender equity in academic medicine.Academic medicine must adopt an integrated perspective on culture for women and acknowledge the multiple facets essential to gender equity. To effect change, culture must be addressed both within and beyond academic health centers (AHCs). Leaders within AHCs must examine their institutions' processes, resources, and assessment for fairness and transparency; mobilize personnel and financial resources to implement evidence-based initiatives; and assign accountability for providing transparent progress assessments. Beyond AHCs, organizations must examine their operations and implement change to ensure parity of funding, research, and leadership opportunities as well as transparency of assessment and accreditation. PMID:27276008

  12. "Chicks and Hunks:" Teenagers and Sex Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novogrodsky, Myra; Wells, Margaret

    1989-01-01

    Looks at issues of gender equity that are important to teenagers, showing how students' thoughts and feelings can be used as reference points in the social studies classroom. Suggests class discussions on work equity, gender communication, and intervention strategies. Reminds teachers that they must act as positive role models. (LS)

  13. 76 FR 41233 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. ACTION... meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the functions of... Center Plaza, 550 12th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20202 in the auditorium (room 10026). FOR...

  14. 77 FR 29621 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ..., in Room 1W105/108. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Guy Johnson, Designated Federal Official, Equity... equitycommission@ed.gov or via U.S. mail to Guy Johnson, Designated Federal Official, Equity and Excellence... contact Guy Johnson at (202) 453-6567 or by email at equitycommission@ed.gov . Individuals who will...

  15. Educational Equity: Challenges for Educator Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Jane; Winslow, Emily

    2015-01-01

    With increasingly diverse student populations, educational equity is a bigger challenge than ever for public schools across the United States. While federal government, states, and school districts work to identify and address the root causes of equity gaps, efforts are often hampered by a limited body of research-based strategies and approaches…

  16. 76 FR 27034 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION... upcoming meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes...

  17. 77 FR 67637 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. ACTION... Federal Official, Equity and Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue...

  18. 77 FR 484 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION..., Equity and Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington,...

  19. 76 FR 62394 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION...-coming meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes...

  20. Elementary Mathematics Teachers' Knowledge of Equity Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Christa

    2013-01-01

    Currently, mathematics instruction in U.S. classrooms is far from achieving equity for African American students. This qualitative study reports the results of eight successful elementary mathematics teachers' knowledge of equity pedagogy, specifically their knowledge of culturally relevant pedagogy, cultural competence, and critical…

  1. Working Together toward Equity for All Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Percy; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This inaugural edition of "Equity Coalition" introduces a new publication from the Programs for Educational Opportunity at the University of Michigan, one of 10 regional centers funded by the Federal Government to provide technical assistance to school districts on issues concerning race, gender, and national origin equity. This issue explores the…

  2. Spotlight on Sex Equity: A Filmography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Susan Morris, Comp.

    This catalog contains a list of films, slide-tape presentations, and filmstrips presented at a 2-day film festival sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic Center for Sex Equity and other resources. The guide represents new media resources in addition to classics that meet the requirements of Title IX provisions on sex equity. The filmography is divided into…

  3. Inclusive Education: Examining Equity on Five Continents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiles, Alfredo J., Ed.; Kozleski, Elizabeth B., Ed.; Waitoller, Federico R., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the impressive growth of inclusive education around the world, questions and considerations about equity have been neglected. This edited volume makes a major contribution to the field of inclusive education by analyzing equity concerns that have emerged from the implementation of inclusive education models in nine nations on five…

  4. Equity, Equal Opportunities, Gender and Organization Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standing, Hilary; Baume, Elaine

    The issues of equity, equal opportunities, gender, and organization performance in the health care sector worldwide was examined. Information was gathered from the available literature and from individuals in 17 countries. The analysis highlighted the facts that employment equity debates and policies refer largely to high-income countries and…

  5. Multicriteria approaches for a private equity fund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammer, Christiane; Tannert, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    We develop a new model for a Private Equity Fund based on stochastic differential equations. In order to find efficient strategies for the fund manager we formulate a multicriteria optimization problem for a Private Equity Fund. Using the e-constraint method we solve this multicriteria optimization problem. Furthermore, a genetic algorithm is applied in order to get an approximation of the efficient frontier.

  6. Toward a Pluralistic Perspective on Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Diane S.; Avery, Maria-Paz Beltran

    1992-01-01

    This digest deals with the challenges of living in a pluralistic society. Comprised of three articles, the first (by Diane S. Pollard) is a discussion of the problems resulting from the fragmented effort of the equity movement, as many different groups working for equity in gender, race, class, and other concerns, have sought independence from…

  7. Gender Equity in Vocational Education. WEEA Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuliffe, Anne, Ed.

    This digest contains three articles on gender equity in vocational education, especially in relation to the provisions of the Vocational Education Act of 1976 and the Carl Perkins Act of 1984. "Gender Equity in Vocational Education" (Debra J. Robbin) describes interviews with students at a New England vocational school, in which they reported a…

  8. Understanding Gender Equity in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunnelley State Technical Coll., Childersburg, AL.

    This document discusses issues of gender equity in the workplace which are pertinent to the high school counselor. The first chapter provides guidelines for helping students to understand gender equity issues. These guidelines include asking the students if they would have the same career goals if they were of the other sex and challenging the…

  9. Orwell and the Politics of Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Richard G.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews three general themes--each related to contemporary situations affecting educational equity--in the works of George Orwell. These include (1) that it is difficult for the weak to preserve their "inner core"; (2) that revolutions for equality can fail; and (3) that all people, including those who work for educational equity, are attracted to…

  10. 28 CFR 548.15 - Equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equity. 548.15 Section 548.15 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT RELIGIOUS PROGRAMS Religious Beliefs and Practices of Committed Offenders § 548.15 Equity. No one may disparage the religious...

  11. Gender Equity for Males. WEEA Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, Craig, Ed.; Bates, Percy, Ed.; Potter, Julia, Ed.

    Traditionally, the term "gender equity" is associated with equalizing the playing field for girls. However, gender equity by definition applies to both genders. This digest states that, in the best possible scenario, gender equitable education provides equal opportunities and enables each student to reach his or her potential, reducing the gender…

  12. Social equity and environmental risk

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R. )

    1993-12-01

    Social equity has become an important concern of the environmental movement over the past decade. The equity issue is analyzed here for practically all of the inactive hazardous waste disposal sites on the National Priorities List (NPL) regulated under the Comprehensive Response Compensation and Liability Act and its 1986 Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (CERCLA/SARA). Two dimensions of equity are emphasized, namely, site location relative to the location of minority population and the distribution of cleanup plans or Records of Decision (ROD) across communities with NPL sites that have different socioeconomic characteristics. With respect to site location, the percentage of Blacks and Hispanics aggregated at the Census Place or MCD level in communities with NPL sites was greater than is typical nationwide (largely attributable to the concentration of minority populations in a few large urban areas with NPL sites). The percentage of the population below the poverty line in communities with NPL sites largely matched that of the nation as a whole. With respect to site cleanup, communities with relatively higher percentages of racial minority population have fewer cleanup plans than other communities with NPL site. Whether a ROD exists is influenced by when the site was designated for the NPL: sites designated earlier are more likely to have RODs and less likely to have high proportions of racial minority populations than sites designated later. This implies that initially the designation process may have resulted in NPL sites being located disproportionately in minority areas, but this pattern seems to be reversing itself in more recently designated sites. Racial and ethnic disproportionalities with respect to inactive hazardous waste site location seem to be concentrated in a relatively few areas. 35 refs., 12 tabs.

  13. Testing the Digital Divide: Does Access to High-Quality Use of Technology in Schools Affect Student Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Gregory Keith

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between access, use of technology and student achievement in public middle schools in Maryland. The objective of this study was to determine whether a digital divide (differences in access and utilization of technology based on student characteristics of race, socioeconomic status, and gender) exists among…

  14. Roadmap for Teacher Access to Student-Level Longitudinal Data: Key Focus Areas to Ensure Quality Implementation. Data for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Teachers have access to information about the students in their classrooms each year, but schools and districts often cannot provide teachers with longitudinal data (or data linked over time). Given resource constraints in schools and districts, states are best positioned to ensure that teachers have secure access to their students' longitudinal…

  15. Moving the Dial to Advance Population Health Equity in New York City Asian American Populations

    PubMed Central

    Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Kwon, Simona C.; Nadkarni, Smiti Kapadia; Islam, Nadia S.

    2015-01-01

    The shift toward a health equity framework for eliminating the health disparities burden of racial/ethnic minority populations has moved away from a disease-focused model to a social determinants framework that aims to achieve the highest attainment of health for all. The New York University Center for the Study of Asian American Health (CSAAH) has identified core themes and strategies for advancing population health equity for Asian American populations in New York City that are rooted in the following: social determinants of health; multisectoral, community-engaged approaches; leveraging community assets; improved disaggregated data collection and access to care; and building sustainability through community leadership and infrastructure-building activities. We describe the strategies CSAAH employed to move the dial on population health equity. PMID:25905858

  16. Moving the dial to advance population health equity in New York City Asian American populations.

    PubMed

    Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Kwon, Simona C; Park, Rebecca; Nadkarni, Smiti Kapadia; Islam, Nadia S

    2015-07-01

    The shift toward a health equity framework for eliminating the health disparities burden of racial/ethnic minority populations has moved away from a disease-focused model to a social determinants framework that aims to achieve the highest attainment of health for all. The New York University Center for the Study of Asian American Health (CSAAH) has identified core themes and strategies for advancing population health equity for Asian American populations in New York City that are rooted in the following: social determinants of health; multisectoral, community-engaged approaches; leveraging community assets; improved disaggregated data collection and access to care; and building sustainability through community leadership and infrastructure-building activities. We describe the strategies CSAAH employed to move the dial on population health equity. PMID:25905858

  17. A Matter of Equity: Preschool in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Each year, about 4 million children enter kindergarten in the United States. All parents hope their child will start school ready for success, and many parents turn that hope into action, seeking out supportive and high-quality early learning opportunities. Unfortunately, not every parent finds those opportunities, and access differs based on…

  18. Increasing Equity in Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RTI International, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The South African government has made significant efforts to overcome the legacy of apartheid education, committing itself to the dual goals of achieving high-quality education with more equitable access for all South Africans. Substantial investments have been made to achieve this vision, however, translating policies into improved school-level…

  19. Quality improvement in healthcare in New Zealand. Part 1: what would a high-quality healthcare system look like?

    PubMed

    Seddon, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This Special Series attempts to define what a high-quality healthcare system would look like for New Zealand. The Series focuses on the dimensions of a quality service - safety, access, equity, effectiveness, efficiency, and patient centeredness - not only elucidating in plain language what these dimensions are, but how they might be measured and improved. The central premise is that clinicians need to become involved in measuring and improving the quality of healthcare provided. To assist clinicians, the Series will cover ways to measure the effectiveness of care they provide with articles on clinical audit and clinical indicators, and also to examine the pros and cons of the measures of efficiency used by the funders - organisational performance indicators, and benchmarking. The Series will wrap up with a vision of how we might continue to improve quality through embedding clinical governance into District Health Boards, so that their performance is measured in both quality and fiscal terms. PMID:16862202

  20. An open-access database of grape harvest dates for climate research: data description and quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daux, V.; Garcia de Cortazar-Atauri, I.; Yiou, P.; Chuine, I.; Garnier, E.; Ladurie, E. Le Roy; Mestre, O.; Tardaguila, J.

    2012-09-01

    We present an open-access dataset of grape harvest dates (GHD) series that has been compiled from international, French and Spanish literature and from unpublished documentary sources from public organizations and from wine-growers. As of June 2011, this GHD dataset comprises 380 series mainly from France (93% of the data) as well as series from Switzerland, Italy, Spain and Luxemburg. The series have variable length (from 1 to 479 data, mean length of 45 data) and contain gaps of variable sizes (mean ratio of observations/series length of 0.74). The longest and most complete ones are from Burgundy, Switzerland, Southern Rhône valley, Jura and Ile-de-France. The most ancient harvest date of the dataset is in 1354 in Burgundy. The GHD series were grouped into 27 regions according to their location, to geomorphological and geological criteria, and to past and present grape varieties. The GHD regional composite series (GHD-RCS) were calculated and compared pairwise to assess their reliability assuming that series close to one another are highly correlated. Most of the pairwise correlations are significant (p-value < 0.001) and strong (mean pairwise correlation coefficient of 0.58). As expected, the correlations tend to be higher when the vineyards are closer. The highest correlation (R = 0.91) is obtained between the High Loire Valley and the Ile-de-France GHD-RCS. The strong dependence of the vine cycle on temperature and, therefore, the strong link between the harvest dates and the temperature of the growing season was also used to test the quality of the GHD series. The strongest correlations are obtained between the GHD-RCS and the temperature series of the nearest weather stations. Moreover, the GHD-RCS/temperature correlation maps show spatial patterns similar to temperature correlation maps. The stability of the correlations over time is explored. The most striking feature is their generalised deterioration at the late 19th-early 20th century. The possible

  1. Did Equity of Reproductive and Maternal Health Service Coverage Increase during the MDG Era? An Analysis of Trends and Determinants across 74 Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Suneeta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite widespread gains toward the 5th Millennium Development Goal (MDG), pro-rich inequalities in reproductive health (RH) and maternal health (MH) are pervasive throughout the world. As countries enter the post-MDG era and strive toward UHC, it will be important to monitor the extent to which countries are achieving equity of RH and MH service coverage. This study explores how equity of service coverage differs across countries, and explores what policy factors are associated with a country’s progress, or lack thereof, toward more equitable RH and MH service coverage. Methods We used RH and MH service coverage data from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) for 74 countries to examine trends in equity between countries and over time from 1990 to 2014. We examined trends in both relative and absolute equity, and measured relative equity using a concentration index of coverage data grouped by wealth quintile. Through multivariate analysis we examined the relative importance of policy factors, such as political commitment to health, governance, and the level of prepayment, in determining countries’ progress toward greater equity in RH and MH service coverage. Results Relative equity for the coverage of RH and MH services has continually increased across all countries over the past quarter century; however, inequities in coverage persist, in some countries more than others. Multivariate analysis shows that higher education and greater political commitment (measured as the share of government spending allocated to health) were significantly associated with higher equity of service coverage. Neither country income, i.e., GDP per capita, nor better governance were significantly associated with equity. Conclusion Equity in RH and MH service coverage has improved but varies considerably across countries and over time. Even among the subset of countries that are close to achieving the MDGs, progress made on equity varies considerably across countries

  2. Access, Equity, and Opportunity. Women in Machining: A Model Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Heather

    The Women in Machining (WIM) program is a Machine Action Project (MAP) initiative that was developed in response to a local skilled metalworking labor shortage, despite a virtual absence of women and people of color from area shops. The project identified post-war stereotypes and other barriers that must be addressed if women are to have an equal…

  3. Assessing Access: Is There Educational Equity within Urban Schooling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Michael A.; Johnson, Erica L.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying sources of variation has been used extensively in educational research as a tool to identify potential drives of variances in student achievement. However, prior research predominantly relied on findings from national- or international-level data, and thus their conclusions remain very broad-based. This study contributes new insight by…

  4. Affirmative Action Plan. Access, Equity, Opportunity. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    The Affirmative Action Plan of the New York State Education Department is described in this document. First, a policy statement is provided by the New York State Education Department, committing the Department to the development of: (1) programmatic approaches to the elimination of all unjust exclusionary employment practices, policies, and…

  5. The AP Lever for Boosting Access, Success, and Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roegman, Rachel; Hatch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Four New Jersey school districts worked together to increase student achievement by applying a number of strategies focused on getting traditionally underrepresented students to take more AP courses. The districts are members of the New Jersey Network of Superintendents (NJNS), comprising 15 superintendents who work together to develop systemwide…

  6. Access, Equity, and Intelligence: Another Look at Tracking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the consequences of tracking students, how one English teacher moved to heterogeneous grouping, and multiple intelligences and tracking. Asks why educators continue to track students when Howard Gardner has shown that there are at least seven distinct ways that humans come to know and learn. (RS)

  7. Equity trees and graphs via information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harré, M.; Bossomaier, T.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the similarities and differences between two measures of the relationship between equities traded in financial markets. Our measures are the correlation coefficients and the mutual information. In the context of financial markets correlation coefficients are well established whereas mutual information has not previously been as well studied despite its theoretically appealing properties. We show that asset trees which are derived from either the correlation coefficients or the mutual information have a mixture of both similarities and differences at the individual equity level and at the macroscopic level. We then extend our consideration from trees to graphs using the "genus 0" condition recently introduced in order to study the networks of equities.

  8. Advancing Efforts to Achieve Health Equity: Equity Metrics for Health Impact Assessment Practice

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Jonathan; Givens, Marjory L.; Yuen, Tina K.; Gould, Solange; Benkhalti Jandu, Maria; Bourcier, Emily; Choi, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Equity is a core value of Health Impact Assessment (HIA). Many compelling moral, economic, and health arguments exist for prioritizing and incorporating equity considerations in HIA practice. Decision-makers, stakeholders, and HIA practitioners see the value of HIAs in uncovering the impacts of policy and planning decisions on various population subgroups, developing and prioritizing specific actions that promote or protect health equity, and using the process to empower marginalized communities. There have been several HIA frameworks developed to guide the inclusion of equity considerations. However, the field lacks clear indicators for measuring whether an HIA advanced equity. This article describes the development of a set of equity metrics that aim to guide and evaluate progress toward equity in HIA practice. These metrics also intend to further push the field to deepen its practice and commitment to equity in each phase of an HIA. Over the course of a year, the Society of Practitioners of Health Impact Assessment (SOPHIA) Equity Working Group took part in a consensus process to develop these process and outcome metrics. The metrics were piloted, reviewed, and refined based on feedback from reviewers. The Equity Metrics are comprised of 23 measures of equity organized into four outcomes: (1) the HIA process and products focused on equity; (2) the HIA process built the capacity and ability of communities facing health inequities to engage in future HIAs and in decision-making more generally; (3) the HIA resulted in a shift in power benefiting communities facing inequities; and (4) the HIA contributed to changes that reduced health inequities and inequities in the social and environmental determinants of health. The metrics are comprised of a measurement scale, examples of high scoring activities, potential data sources, and example interview questions to gather data and guide evaluators on scoring each metric. PMID:25347193

  9. Race, Equity, and Public Schools in Post-Apartheid South Africa: Equal Opportunity for All Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamauchi, F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines dynamic changes in educational quality and equity differences between Black and other population groups in post-Apartheid South African public schools, using the ratio of learners to educators in each school, available from the School Register of Needs, 1996 and 2000. The analysis incorporates school or community-level…

  10. Inseparable Imperatives: Equity in Education and the Future of the American Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBaun, Bill

    2012-01-01

    For most of the last sixty years, the United States has labored to provide a quality education to "all" children, regardless of their skin color or socioeconomic status. This struggle for equity in education has seldom been linked to America's position as the world's economic powerhouse and leading producer of college-educated individuals.…

  11. Equity of Care Is a Part of Everything You Do--and Should Do.

    PubMed

    Raju, Ram

    2016-04-01

    For hospitals, ending disparities in health care should be both a business imperative and a critical means for improving quality. One powerful tool is the #123forEquity Pledge to Act. Here's why--and how you can sign up. PMID:27220162

  12. Infrastructure Supporting Teachers in the Country: Questions of Equity Arising from Downsizing and Restructuring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Australia has long been of interest for its attention to educational equity by the relative quality of its state based provision of schooling in a country with a similar landmass to the 48 mainland states of the USA but a population of only 18 million. The six states and two territories had organised centralised systems of schooling which managed…

  13. Beyond Equity: The New Politics of State Fiscal Constraints. State of the States: Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrington, Carolyn D.; Trimble, Susan

    Public school funding in Florida differs from other states in a number of important ways. First, Florida has a highly equalized resource-distribution formula resulting in a high degree of interdistrict equity. Second, concerns for quality, while constant, have had to compete with the state's phenomenal growth. Third, the state exercises a much…

  14. The Role of Access to Head Start and Quality Ratings for Spanish-Speaking Dual Language Learners’ (DLLs) Participation in Early Childhood Education

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Data from the Head Start Impact Study (N = 4,442) were used to test for differences between Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learners (DLLs) and monolingual English-speaking children in: (1) Head Start attendance rates when randomly assigned admission; and (2) quality ratings of other early childhood education (ECE) programs attended when not randomly assigned admission to Head Start. Logistic regressions showed that Spanish-speaking DLL children randomly assigned a spot in Head Start were more likely than monolingual-English learners to attend. Further, Spanish-speaking DLLs not randomly assigned a spot in Head Start were more likely to attend higher-quality ECE centers than non-DLL children. Policy implications are discussed, suggesting that, if given access, Spanish-speaking DLL families will take advantage of quality ECE programs. PMID:25018585

  15. Access & Equity... Diversity in Higher Education. South Carolina Access & Equity Statewide Program, Fiscal Year 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    From 1981 to 1986 South Carolina implemented a federally mandated desegregation plan designed to: (1) enhance the State's public historically black colleges; (2) desegregate student enrollment at the State's baccalaureate degree granting public colleges and universities; and (3) desegregate faculties, staffs, and governing bodies of all public…

  16. 76 FR 6774 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... finance systems to achieve equity in the distribution of educational resources and further ] student performance, especially for the students at the lower end of the achievement gap. The Commission will...

  17. 76 FR 55059 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... finance systems to achieve equity in the distribution of educational resources and further student performance, especially for the students at the lower end of the achievement gap. The Commission will...

  18. 77 FR 49441 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... finance systems to achieve equity in the distribution of educational resources and further student performance, especially for the students at the lower end of the achievement gap. The Commission will...

  19. Equity Theory Ratios as Causal Schemas

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Alexios; Hantzi, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Equity theory approaches justice evaluations based on ratios of exchange inputs to exchange outcomes. Situations are evaluated as just if ratios are equal and unjust if unequal. We suggest that equity ratios serve a more fundamental cognitive function than the evaluation of justice. More particularly, we propose that they serve as causal schemas for exchange outcomes, that is, they assist in determining whether certain outcomes are caused by inputs of other people in the context of an exchange process. Equality or inequality of ratios in this sense points to an exchange process. Indeed, Study 1 shows that different exchange situations, such as disproportional or balanced proportional situations, create perceptions of give-and-take on the basis of equity ratios. Study 2 shows that perceptions of justice are based more on communicatively accepted rules of interaction than equity-based evaluations, thereby offering a distinction between an attribution and an evaluation cognitive process for exchange outcomes. PMID:27594846

  20. The Alliance for Equity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merisotis, Jamie P.; Goulian, Katherine A.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter describes the organization, operations, and goals of the Alliance for Equity in Higher Education, a national coalition of associations and institutions founded to serve the emerging majority of racially diverse college students.

  1. Equity Theory Ratios as Causal Schemas.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Alexios; Hantzi, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Equity theory approaches justice evaluations based on ratios of exchange inputs to exchange outcomes. Situations are evaluated as just if ratios are equal and unjust if unequal. We suggest that equity ratios serve a more fundamental cognitive function than the evaluation of justice. More particularly, we propose that they serve as causal schemas for exchange outcomes, that is, they assist in determining whether certain outcomes are caused by inputs of other people in the context of an exchange process. Equality or inequality of ratios in this sense points to an exchange process. Indeed, Study 1 shows that different exchange situations, such as disproportional or balanced proportional situations, create perceptions of give-and-take on the basis of equity ratios. Study 2 shows that perceptions of justice are based more on communicatively accepted rules of interaction than equity-based evaluations, thereby offering a distinction between an attribution and an evaluation cognitive process for exchange outcomes. PMID:27594846

  2. The Crisis in Excellence and Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Catherine

    1984-01-01

    Highlights the insufficient explanations and fundamental fallacies in policy and programs for sex equity in educational administration. Examines the lack of incentives for promotion of women to positions of leadership. (SK)

  3. 7 CFR 1980.391 - Equity sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... market value based on the Lender's and RHS approval official's knowledge of the property and the area. (B... the shared equity calculation. In the event a junior lienholder forecloses, the RHS approval...

  4. Equity: A Future Issue in American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Petra E.

    1981-01-01

    Reveals how equity, as the resort to specific strategies or plans of action based on general principles of fairness and justice whenever existing law is inadequate, will determine the future character of educational policy. (Author)

  5. 75 FR 48662 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Secretary for Civil Rights. Nomination Process: Any interested person or organization may nominate one or...: Send to: WhiteHouseLiaison@ed.gov (specify in the e-mail subject line, ``Equity Commission...

  6. Access to What? Creating a Composite Measure of Educational Quantity and Educational Quality for 11 African Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaull, Nicholas; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to create a composite statistic of educational quantity and educational quality by combining household data (Demographic and Health Survey) on grade completion and survey data (Southern and Eastern African Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality) on cognitive outcomes for 11 African countries: Kenya, Lesotho,…

  7. Equitable Access to Educational Resources: An Investigation of the Distribution of Teacher Quality across Secondary Schools in South Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study examined secondary schools across a south Florida school district to determine the relationship between school characteristics and measures of teacher quality with the aim of ascertaining the equitable distribution of the educational resource, teacher quality. Data regarding student population, staff climate survey…

  8. Can a public health care system achieve equity? The Norwegian experience.

    PubMed

    Grytten, J; Rongen, G; Sørensen, R

    1995-09-01

    Equity in health care provision is an important policy goal in Norway. This article addresses equality in the services provided by primary care physicians. These services are the responsibility of local government financed mainly through public funding. Patient fees are low. The local government system results in geographical variation in the number of physicians relative to local health demands. The authors present the hypothesis that this generates inequalities in health care utilization. The system of government finance is based on the assumption that utilization of health services is independent of patient income. Therefore, variation in income is expected to have only a small impact on utilization. The authors estimate a demand model by combining extensive micro data with aggregate data on municipal supply. There is very little relationship between indicators of access and health care utilization. The estimated income elasticities approximate zero, supporting the argument that equality in utilization has been achieved. However, the authors results also raise the question of whether equality has been achieved at the cost of limiting supply of services for people who could afford to consume more, or to pay for services of higher quality. PMID:7666707

  9. Towards Scientific Equity for the Prevention of Depression and Internalizing Symptoms in Vulnerable Youth

    PubMed Central

    Perrino, Tatiana; Beardslee, William; Bernal, Guillermo; Brincks, Ahnalee; Cruden, Gracelyn; Howe, George; Murry, Velma; Pantin, Hilda; Prado, Guillermo; Sandler, Irwin; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2014-01-01

    Certain subgroups of youth are at high risk for depression and elevated depressive symptoms and experience limited access to quality mental healthcare. Examples are socioeconomically disadvantaged, racial/ ethnic minority, and sexual minority youth. Research shows that there are efficacious interventions to prevent youth depression and depressive symptoms. These preventive interventions have the potential to play a key role in addressing these mental health disparities by reducing youth risk factors and enhancing protective factors. However, there are comparatively few preventive interventions directed specifically to these vulnerable subgroups, and sample sizes of diverse subgroups in general prevention trials are often too low to assess whether preventive interventions work equally well for vulnerable youth compared to other youth. In this paper, we describe the importance and need for “scientific equity”, or equality and fairness in the amount of scientific knowledge produced to understand the potential solutions to such health disparities. We highlight possible strategies for promoting scientific equity, including: increasing the number of prevention research participants from vulnerable subgroups, conducting more data synthesis analyses, implementation science research, disseminating preventive interventions that are efficacious for vulnerable youth, and increasing the diversity of the prevention science research workforce. These strategies can increase the availability of research evidence to help determine the degree to which preventive interventions can help address mental health disparities. Although this paper utilizes the prevention of youth depression as an illustrative case example, the concepts are applicable to other health outcomes for which there are disparities, such as substance use and obesity. PMID:25349137

  10. The impact of rural hospital closures on equity of commuting time for haemodialysis patients: simulation analysis using the capacity-distance model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Frequent and long-term commuting is a requirement for dialysis patients. Accessibility thus affects their quality of lives. In this paper, a new model for accessibility measurement is proposed in which both geographic distance and facility capacity are taken into account. Simulation of closure of rural facilities and that of capacity transfer between urban and rural facilities are conducted to evaluate the impacts of these phenomena on equity of accessibility among dialysis patients. Methods Post code information as of August 2011 of all the 7,374 patients certified by municipalities of Hiroshima prefecture as having first or third grade renal disability were collected. Information on post code and the maximum number of outpatients (capacity) of all the 98 dialysis facilities were also collected. Using geographic information systems, patient commuting times were calculated in two models: one that takes into account road distance (distance model), and the other that takes into account both the road distance and facility capacity (capacity-distance model). Simulations of closures of rural and urban facilities were then conducted. Results The median commuting time among rural patients was more than twice as long as that among urban patients (15 versus 7 minutes, p < 0.001). In the capacity-distance model 36.1% of patients commuted to the facilities which were different from the facilities in the distance model, creating a substantial gap of commuting time between the two models. In the simulation, when five rural public facilitiess were closed, Gini coefficient of commuting times among the patients increased by 16%, indicating a substantial worsening of equity, and the number of patients with commuting times longer than 90 minutes increased by 72 times. In contrast, closure of four urban public facilities with similar capacities did not affect these values. Conclusions Closures of dialysis facilities in rural areas have a substantially larger impact on

  11. Low-Skill Workers' Access to Quality Green Jobs. Perspectives on Low-Income Working Families. Brief 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinson, Karin; Stanczyk, Alexandra; Eyster; Lauren

    2010-01-01

    This brief discusses strategies for improving access to green jobs among those with low skill levels, particularly jobs that can help improve workers' economic standing and better support their families. In order to understand where green jobs for low-skill individuals can be found, the first section provides an overview of green industries and…

  12. Legislation should support optimal breastfeeding practices and access to low-cost, high-quality complementary foods: Indonesia provides a case study.

    PubMed

    Soekarjo, Damayanti; Zehner, Elizabeth

    2011-10-01

    It is important to support women to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months and continue breastfeeding for 24 months and beyond. It is also necessary to provide the poor with access to affordable ways to improve the quality of complementary foods. Currently, many countries do not have the legal and policy environment necessary to support exclusive and continued breastfeeding. Legislative and policy changes are also necessary for introducing complementary food supplements, allowing them to be marketed to those who need them, and ensuring that marketing remains appropriate and in full compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes. This paper aims to illustrate the above with examples from Indonesia and to identify legislative requirements for supporting breastfeeding and enabling appropriate access to high-quality complementary food supplements for children 6-24 months of age. Requirements include improved information, training, monitoring and enforcement systems for the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes; implementation and monitoring of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative; establishment of a registration category for complementary food supplements to enhance availability of high-quality, low-cost fortified products to help improve young child feeding; clear identification and marketing of these products as complementary food supplements for 6-24-month-olds so as to promote proper use and not interfere with breastfeeding. PMID:21929639

  13. Equity and the social determinants of health in European cities.

    PubMed

    Ritsatakis, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Equity in health has been the underlying value of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Health for All policy for 30 years. This article examines how cities have translated this principle into action. Using information designed to help evaluate phase IV (2003-2008) of the WHO European Healthy Cities Network (WHO-EHCN) plus documentation from city programs and websites, an attempt is made to assess how far the concept of equity in health is understood, the political will to tackle the issue, and types of action taken. Results show that although cities continue to focus considerable support on vulnerable groups, rather than the full social gradient, most are now making the necessary shift towards more upstream policies to tackle determinants of health such as poverty, unemployment, education, housing, and the environment, without neglecting access to care. Although local level data reflecting inequalities in health is improving, there is still a long way to go in some cities. The Healthy Cities Project is becoming an integral part of structures for long-term planning and intersectoral action for health in cities, and Health Impact Assessment is gradually being developed. Participation in the WHO-EHCN appears to allow new members to leap-frog ahead established cities. However, this evaluation also exposes barriers to effective local policies and processes to reduce health inequalities. Armed with locally generated evidence of critical success factors, the WHO-EHCN has embarked on a more rigorous and determined effort to achieve the prerequisites for equity in health. More attention will be given to evaluating the effectiveness of action taken and to dealing not only with the most vulnerable but a greater part of the gradient in socioeconomic health inequalities. PMID:22971932

  14. 'Issues of equity are also issues of rights': Lessons from experiences in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    London, Leslie

    2007-01-01

    Background Human rights approaches to health have been criticized as antithetical to equity, principally because they are seen to prioritise rights of individuals at the expense of the interests of groups, a core tenet of public health. The objective of this study was to identify how human rights approaches can promote health equity. Methods The Network on Equity in Health in Southern Africa undertook an exploration of three regional case studies – antiretroviral access, patient rights charters and civic organization for health. A combination of archival reviews and stakeholder interviews were complemented with a literature review to provide a theoretical framework for the empirical evidence. Results Critical success factors for equity are the importance of rights approaches addressing the full spectrum from civil and political, through to socio-economic rights, as well as the need to locate rights in a group context. Human rights approaches succeed in achieving health equity when coupled with community engagement in ways that reinforce community capacity, particularly when strengthening the collective agency of its most vulnerable groups. Additionally, human rights approaches provide opportunities for mobilising resources outside the health sector, and must aim to address the public-private divide at local, national and international levels. Conclusion Where it is clear that rights approaches are predicated upon understanding the need to prioritize vulnerable groups and where the way rights are operationalised recognizes the role of agency on the part of those most affected in realising their socio-economic rights, human rights approaches appear to offer powerful tools to support social justice and health equity. PMID:17257421

  15. Detracking for Excellence and Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burris, Carol Corbett; Garrity, Delia T.

    2008-01-01

    While almost any educator would agree that students deserve access to equal educational opportunities, many schools still sort students based on test scores or other criteria. There's a better way: one built on offering all students access to the best curriculum. In this first-ever practical book that shows how educators can make detracking work,…

  16. Test Equity for Individuals Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. PEPNet Test Equity Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEPNet-West, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the highlights of the 2008 Test Equity Summit held in Bloomfield, Colorado last August 6-8, 2008. The 2008 Test Equity Summit convened by the Postsecondary Education Programs Network (PEPNet) identified and examined problems, challenges, and issues that academic and psychoeducational tests pose for individuals who are deaf or…

  17. Curriculum and Research for Equity. A Training Manual for Promoting Sex Equity in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockheed, Marlaine E.; And Others

    The Curriculum And Research for Equity (C-A-R-E) program materials are inservice teacher training modules (workshops, curricula, references, and research data) designed to promote educational equity in elementary school classrooms. The training manual is intended to help elementary education professionals identify, assess, and rectify the problem…

  18. Promoting Educational Equity through School Libraries. Module 5: Educational Equity in the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Tyler, Karen Beyard

    Suggestions offered in the fifth module of a continuing education program for inservice school media specialists are designed to aid in identifying sexism and sex-role stereotyping in instructional materials, and help trainees foster educational equity in their own institutions. The first part is concerned with the promotion of such equity through…

  19. Students as Policy Actors: The TDSB Equity Foundation Statement and Commitments to Equity Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferfolja, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Discrimination on the basis of homophobia/transphobia in many schools is an internationally recognised problem. The Toronto District School Board's (TDSB) Equity Foundation Statement and Commitments to Equity Policy (EFS) provides an explicit mandate to schools in its jurisdiction to address such discrimination and educate about sexual and…

  20. Educational Equity: The Integration of Equity into Preservice Teacher Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Martha E.; And Others

    This volume of papers, written by professors of education, an administrator, and a clinical psychologist, illustrate how the concept of equity can be woven into the professional components of teacher education. In "A Matter of Linkage: Multicultural Education and Educational Equity," Martha E. Dawson maintains that multicultural education is an…

  1. Responding to Equity and Developmental Imperatives: Conceptualizing a Structurally and Epistemically Diverse Undergraduate Curriculum in Post-Apartheid South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckett, Kathy

    2001-01-01

    Examines the relationship between the dual goals of equity and development for public higher education (HE) in post-apartheid South Africa. Without state intervention, globalization of the South African economy and HE provision may result in increased inequality in access to HE, information, and technology (and thus, productivity and income).…

  2. Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Judith L.; Schaeffer, Sheldon

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the Coordinator's Notebook focuses on the quality of Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) programs. The bulk of the issue is devoted to an article "Quality in ECCD: Everyone's Concern" (Judith Evans), which reviews the need for a definition of high quality in ECCD programs and discusses how diverse stakeholders define quality.…

  3. Selecting an appropriate strategy to make quality 7.1 % chlorhexidine digluconate accessible for umbilical cord care.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Mutsumi; Coffey, Patricia S

    2016-01-01

    Achieving increased access to medicines in low- and middle-income countries is a complex issue that requires a holistic approach. Choosing an appropriate manufacturing strategy that can ensure a sustainable supply of these medicines is an essential component of that approach. The Chlorhexidine Working Group, a consortium of more than 25 international organizations, donors, and manufacturers led by PATH, has been working to increase access to 7.1 % chlorhexidine digluconate for umbilical cord care in low- and middle-income countries to reduce neonatal mortality due to infection. The working group initially considered two strategies for manufacture of this commodity: (1) production and global distribution by a multinational company; and (2) production and regional distribution by locally owned companies or subsidiaries of multinational companies based in low- and middle-income countries. Local production may be beneficial to public health and economic development in these countries, yet capability and capacity of pharmaceutical manufacturers, regulatory and legal provisions, and market factors must be carefully assessed and addressed to ensure that local production is the correct strategy and that it contributes to improved access to the medicine. To date, this effort to implement a local production strategy has resulted in successful registration of 7.1 % chlorhexidine digluconate for umbilical cord care by manufacturers in Bangladesh, Kenya, Nepal, and Nigeria. Additionally, the product is now available in domestic and export markets. PMID:27066258

  4. [HIV-AIDS: ethics in healthcare, research, and access to treatments].

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    Violence and gravity cannot be ignored when considering HIV and AIDS challenges. However, coping with this pandemic disease caused us to build up and experience new ways of solidarity that have transformed our views of medical care and public health. The few achievements of these years throw a new light on the figure of the ill person. They brought new references allowing a different understanding of the political stakes of public health. Partnership or even therapeutic alliance are now a framework to the understanding of respect, solidarity and equity. New viewpoints exist on the health care relationship. Our achievements show at first injustice in the access of treatments at the international level. They make clear our moral responsibilities toward every person that require a treatment. This idea should be emphasized when applied on the most vulnerable communities. The most urgent challenges that remain today are extreme precariousness situations, treatment access conditions, information, and quality of life. PMID:12942447

  5. Need for integration of gender equity in family planning services

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Suneela; Singh, Ritesh

    2014-01-01

    The family planning programme of India has shown many significant changes since its inception five decades back. The programme has made the contraceptives easily accessible and affordable to the people. Devices with very low failure rate are provided free of cost to those who need it. Despite these significant improvements in service delivery related to family planning the programme cannot be said to achieve success at all levels. There are many issues with the family planning services available through the public health facilities in India. Failure to adopt the latest technology is one of these. But the most serious drawback of the programme is that it has never been able to bridge the gap between the two genders related to contraceptives. The programme gave emphasis to women-centric contraceptive and thus women were seen as their clients. The choice to adopt a contraceptive though is ‘cafeteria approach’ in family planning lexicon; it is the choice of the husband that is ultimately practiced. There is not enough dialogue between husband and wife and husband and health worker to discuss the use of one contraceptive over another. The male gender needs to be taken in confidence while promoting the family planning practice. The integration of gender equity is to be done carefully so as not to make dominant gender more powerful. Only when there is equity between genders while using family planning services the programme will achieve success. PMID:25673536

  6. The Oregon Quality Education Model Applied to Schools Characterized by Low Student Enrollment, Sparse Distribution of Students, and Remote Settings with Findings Relating to Equity of Services. White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonathan

    The Oregon Quality Education Model (QEM) was developed by the state to identify the fundamental requirements and costs for a quality education that meets Oregon's academic standards. It will determine the funding of Oregon schools. Among the assumptions upon which the QEM is built were that elementary school enrollment is 340 students, middle…

  7. Access to services, quality of care, and family impact for children with autism, other developmental disabilities, and other mental health conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Rini; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha; St Peter, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined perceived access to services, quality of care, and family impact reported by caregivers of children aged 3–17 years with autism spectrum disorders, as compared to caregivers of children with other developmental disabilities and other mental health conditions. The 2009–2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs was utilized to examine the association between child’s special needs condition and three outcomes (N = 18,136): access to services (difficulty using services, difficulty getting referrals, lack of source of care, and inadequate insurance coverage), quality of care (lack of care coordination, lack of shared decision making, and no routine screening), and family impact (financial, employment, and time-related burden). Multivariate logistic regressions were performed to compare caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorders to caregivers of children with developmental disabilities (cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, developmental delay, or intellectual disability), mental health conditions (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, behavioral/conduct problems, or depression), or both developmental disabilities and mental health conditions. Caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorders were significantly more likely to report difficulty using services, lack of source of care, inadequate insurance coverage, lack of shared decision making and care coordination, and adverse family impact as compared to caregivers of children with developmental disabilities, mental health conditions, or both. PMID:24353274

  8. Improving quality and reducing inequities: a challenge in achieving best care

    PubMed Central

    Nicewander, David A.; Qin, Huanying; Ballard, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The health care quality chasm is better described as a gulf for certain segments of the population, such as racial and ethnic minority groups, given the gap between actual care received and ideal or best care quality. The landmark Institute of Medicine report Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century challenges all health care organizations to pursue six major aims of health care improvement: safety, timeliness, effectiveness, efficiency, equity, and patient-centeredness. “Equity” aims to ensure that quality care is available to all and that the quality of care provided does not differ by race, ethnicity, or other personal characteristics unrelated to a patient's reason for seeking care. Baylor Health Care System is in the unique position of being able to examine the current state of equity in a typical health care delivery system and to lead the way in health equity research. Its organizational vision, “culture of quality,” and involved leadership bode well for achieving equitable best care. However, inequities in access, use, and outcomes of health care must be scrutinized; the moral, ethical, and economic issues they raise and the critical injustice they create must be remedied if this goal is to be achieved. Eliminating any observed inequities in health care must be synergistically integrated with quality improvement. Quality performance indicators currently collected and evaluated indicate that Baylor Health Care System often performs better than the national average. However, there are significant variations in care by age, gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status that indicate the many remaining challenges in achieving “best care” for all. PMID:16609733

  9. Results for Learning Report 2012: Fostering Evidence-Based Dialogue to Monitor Access and Quality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortese, Lauren; Crouch, Luis; Pinto, Nancy; Salgado, Vania; Schmidt, Caroline; Soman, Kouassi; Thiam, Mamadou; Chaluda, Ania; Omoeva, Carina

    2012-01-01

    The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) works with low-income countries around the world to help them provide basic education of good quality to all of their children. Countries develop education sector plans that set clear targets and commitments; their partners including donors, multilateral agencies, civil society and the private sector…

  10. Access to High Quality Early Care and Education: Readiness and Opportunity Gaps in America. CEELO Policy Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nores, Milagros; Barnett, W. Steven

    2014-01-01

    A substantial body of research establishes that high quality preschool education can enhance cognitive and social development with long-term benefits for later success in school, the economy, and society more broadly. Such programs have been found to have particularly large benefits for children who are economically disadvantaged. Such children…

  11. Analyzing Accessibility Dimension of Urban Quality of Life: Where Urban Designers Face Duality between Subjective and Objective Reading of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotfi, Sedigheh; Koohsari, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    The subject of urban quality of life and the promotion of its concept in particular, has always been the central focus of urban designers. This term is a multi-conceptual and dimensions. However most of the scholars have agreed that the concept consisted from two main dimensions; objective and subjective which these two approaches are used for its…

  12. Challenges in access to health services and its impact on quality of life: a randomised population-based survey within Turkish speaking immigrants in London

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim There are a significant number of Turkish speaking immigrants living in London. Their special health issues including women's health, mental health, and alcohol and smoking habits has been assessed. The aim of this study was to explore the ongoing challenges in access to health care services and its impact on Quality of Life of immigrants. Material and methods This cross-sectional population-based study was conducted between March and August 2010 with Turkish immigrants (n = 416) living in London. Of these, 308 (74%) were Turkish and 108 (26%) were Turkish Cypriots. All healthy or unhealthy adults of 17-65 years of age were enrolled. A structured questionnaire with 44 items in five subcategories and 26-items WHOQOL BREF were used. Results Mean duration of stay for Turkish Cypriots (26.9 ± 13.9 years) was significantly longer than Turkish immigrants (13.3 ± 7.5) (p < 0.001). Turkish immigrants (n = 108, 36.5%) need interpretation more often when using health services than Turkish Cypriots (n = 16, 15%) (p < 0.001). Multivariate analyses suggested significant effects of older age, non-homeownership, low socioeconomic class, poor access to health services, being ill, poor community integration and being obese on physical well-being and also significant effects of low income and poor community integration on perceived overall Quality of Life (WHOQOL) of the participants. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate how the health and well-being of members of the Turkish speaking community living in London are affected by social aspects of their lives. Providing culturally competent care and interpretation services and advocacy may improve the accessibility of the health care. PMID:22280521

  13. Quality of life and cosmetic result of single-port access endoscopic thyroidectomy via axillary approach in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-kang; Ma, Ling; Song, Wen-hua; Lu, Bang-yu; Huang, Yu-bin; Dong, Hui-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Endoscopic thyroidectomy for minimally invasive thyroid surgery has been widely applied in the past decade. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of single-port access transaxillary totally endoscopic thyroidectomy on the postoperative outcomes and functional parameters, including quality of life and cosmetic result in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Patients and methods Seventy-five patients with PTC who underwent endoscopic thyroidectomy via a single-port access transaxillary approach were included (experimental group). A total of 123 patients with PTC who were subjected to conventional open total thyroidectomy served as the control group. The health-related quality of life and cosmetic and satisfaction outcomes were assessed postoperatively. Results The mean operation time was significantly increased in the experimental group. The physiological functions and social functions in the two groups were remarkably augmented after 6 months of surgery. However, there was no significant difference in the scores of speech and taste between the two groups at the indicated time of 1 month and 6 months. In addition, the scores for appearance, satisfaction with appearance, role-physical, bodily pain, and general health in the experimental group were better than those in the control group at 1 month and 6 months after surgery. Conclusion The single-port access transaxillary totally endoscopic thyroidectomy is safe and feasible for the treatment of patients with PTC. The subjects who underwent this technique have a good perception of their general state of health and are likely to participate in social activities. It is worthy of being clinically used for patients with PTC. PMID:27445496

  14. Pay Equity Act, 17 May 1988.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    This document contains major provisions of the 1988 Pay Equity Act of Prince Edward Island, Canada. (Nova Scotia enacted similar legislation in 1988.) This act defines "female-dominated class" or "male-dominated class" as a class with 60% or more female or male incumbents, respectively. The objective of this act is to achieve pay equity among public sector employers and employees by identifying systemic gender discrimination through a comparison of the relative wages and value of the work performed by female- and male-dominated classes. The value of work is to be determined by considering the skill, effort, and responsibility required by the work as well as the conditions under which it is performed. A difference in wages between a female- and male-dominated class performing work of equal or comparable value can be justified by a formal performance appraisal system or formal seniority system that does not discriminate on the basis of gender or by a skills shortage which requires a temporary inflation in wages to attract workers for a certain position. No wages shall be reduced to implement pay equity. Implementation of pay equity will include the work of bargaining agents to achieve agreement on salient points. Pay equity may be implemented in four stages over a period of 24 months. PMID:12289286

  15. [Gender equity in health sector reform policies in Latin America and the Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Elsa Gómez

    2002-01-01

    Gender equity is increasingly being acknowledged as an essential aspect of sustainable development and more specifically, of health development. The Pan American Health Organization's Program for Women, Health, and Development has been piloting for a year now a project known as Equidad de género en las políticas de reforma del sector de salud, whose objective is to promote gender equity in the health sector reform efforts in the Region. The first stage of the project is being conducted in Chile and Peru, along with some activities throughout the Region. The core of the project is the production and use of information as a tool for introducing changes geared toward achieving greater gender equity in health, particularly in connection with malefemale disparities that are unnecessary, avoidable, and unfair in health status, access to health care, and participation in decision-making within the health system. We expect that in three years the project will have brought about changes in the production of information and knowledge, advocacy, and information dissemination, as well as in the development, appropriation, and identification of intersectoral mechanisms that will make it possible for key figures in government and civil society to work together in setting and surveying policy on gender equity in health. PMID:12162842

  16. What impact do prescription drug charges have on efficiency and equity? Evidence from high-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Gemmill, Marin C; Thomson, Sarah; Mossialos, Elias

    2008-01-01

    As pharmaceutical expenditure continues to rise, third-party payers in most high-income countries have increasingly shifted the burden of payment for prescription drugs to patients. A large body of literature has examined the relationship between prescription charges and outcomes such as expenditure, use, and health, but few reviews explicitly link cost sharing for prescription drugs to efficiency and equity. This article reviews 173 studies from 15 high-income countries and discusses their implications for important issues sometimes ignored in the literature; in particular, the extent to which prescription charges contain health care costs and enhance efficiency without lowering equity of access to care. PMID:18454849

  17. Scientific equity: experiments in laboratory education in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Osseo-Asare, Abena Dove

    2013-12-01

    During the 1960s the Ministry of Education in Ghana created a network of school laboratories to increase scientific literacy among young citizens. The ministry stocked these "Science Centres" with imported beakers, Bunsen burners, and books. Education officials and university scientists worked with teachers to create lesson plans on water, air, plants, and other topics. The government hoped that scientifically minded schoolchildren would be better prepared to staff the industries of the future. The adoption of laboratory norms represented a desire for scientific equity, rather than a condition of cultural mimicry. Interviews with ministry officials and science educators, alongside letters and reports, indicate how students and teachers appropriated the laboratories in the small West African nation. Their experiences in mobilizing resources from across Ghana and around the world provide a metaphor for ongoing efforts to establish access to scientific goods in Africa. PMID:24783491

  18. 17 CFR 190.07 - Calculation of allowed net equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... equity. 190.07 Section 190.07 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION BANKRUPTCY § 190.07 Calculation of allowed net equity. Allowed net equity shall be computed as follows: (a... the most active market. (iii) Special rule for valuing dealer options. A dealer option which is...

  19. 17 CFR 190.07 - Calculation of allowed net equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... equity. 190.07 Section 190.07 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BANKRUPTCY § 190.07 Calculation of allowed net equity. Allowed net equity shall be computed as...) of this section, the trustee should use the most active market. (iii) Special rule for valuing...

  20. 26 CFR 1.809-10 - Computation of equity base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computation of equity base. 1.809-10 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Gain and Loss from Operations § 1.809-10 Computation of equity base. (a) In general. For purposes of section 809, the equity base of a life insurance company includes...

  1. 46 CFR 67.31 - Stock or equity interest requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stock or equity interest requirements. 67.31 Section 67... VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.31 Stock or equity interest requirements. (a) The stock or equity interest requirements for citizenship under this...

  2. 46 CFR 67.31 - Stock or equity interest requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stock or equity interest requirements. 67.31 Section 67... VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.31 Stock or equity interest requirements. (a) The stock or equity interest requirements for citizenship under this...

  3. 31 CFR 29.523 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Equity and good conscience. 29.523... Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 29.523 Equity and good conscience. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when there is substantial evidence that— (a) It would cause financial hardship to...

  4. 5 CFR 831.1403 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equity and good conscience. 831.1403... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1403 Equity and good conscience. (a) Defined. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when— (1) It would cause...

  5. 5 CFR 845.303 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equity and good conscience. 845.303 Section 845.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Overpayments § 845.303 Equity and good conscience. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when— (a)...

  6. 22 CFR 17.4 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Equity and good conscience. 17.4 Section 17.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL OVERPAYMENTS FROM THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND... PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.4 Equity and good conscience. (a) Defined. Recovery is against equity and...

  7. 5 CFR 845.303 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equity and good conscience. 845.303 Section 845.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Overpayments § 845.303 Equity and good conscience. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when— (a)...

  8. 5 CFR 845.303 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equity and good conscience. 845.303 Section 845.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Overpayments § 845.303 Equity and good conscience. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when— (a)...

  9. 22 CFR 17.4 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Equity and good conscience. 17.4 Section 17.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL OVERPAYMENTS FROM THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND... PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.4 Equity and good conscience. (a) Defined. Recovery is against equity and...

  10. 22 CFR 17.4 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Equity and good conscience. 17.4 Section 17.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL OVERPAYMENTS FROM THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND... PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.4 Equity and good conscience. (a) Defined. Recovery is against equity and...

  11. 22 CFR 17.4 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Equity and good conscience. 17.4 Section 17.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL OVERPAYMENTS FROM THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND... PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.4 Equity and good conscience. (a) Defined. Recovery is against equity and...

  12. 22 CFR 17.4 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equity and good conscience. 17.4 Section 17.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL OVERPAYMENTS FROM THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND... PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.4 Equity and good conscience. (a) Defined. Recovery is against equity and...

  13. 31 CFR 29.523 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Equity and good conscience. 29.523... Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 29.523 Equity and good conscience. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when there is substantial evidence that— (a) It would cause financial hardship to...

  14. 31 CFR 29.523 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equity and good conscience. 29.523... Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 29.523 Equity and good conscience. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when there is substantial evidence that— (a) It would cause financial hardship to...

  15. 5 CFR 845.303 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equity and good conscience. 845.303 Section 845.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Overpayments § 845.303 Equity and good conscience. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when— (a)...

  16. 5 CFR 831.1403 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equity and good conscience. 831.1403... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1403 Equity and good conscience. (a) Defined. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when— (1) It would cause...

  17. 5 CFR 831.1403 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equity and good conscience. 831.1403... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1403 Equity and good conscience. (a) Defined. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when— (1) It would cause...

  18. 31 CFR 29.523 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equity and good conscience. 29.523... Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 29.523 Equity and good conscience. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when there is substantial evidence that— (a) It would cause financial hardship to...

  19. 5 CFR 831.1403 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equity and good conscience. 831.1403... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1403 Equity and good conscience. (a) Defined. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when— (1) It would cause...

  20. 5 CFR 845.303 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equity and good conscience. 845.303 Section 845.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Overpayments § 845.303 Equity and good conscience. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when— (a)...

  1. 5 CFR 831.1403 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equity and good conscience. 831.1403... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1403 Equity and good conscience. (a) Defined. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when— (1) It would cause...

  2. 31 CFR 29.523 - Equity and good conscience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equity and good conscience. 29.523... Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 29.523 Equity and good conscience. Recovery is against equity and good conscience when there is substantial evidence that— (a) It would cause financial hardship to...

  3. Conceptions of Equity: How Influential Actors View a Contested Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulkley, Katrina E.

    2013-01-01

    Discussions of educational equity have played an important role in educational policy in the United States over the past 50 years, and advocates with a broad range of perspectives on reform have sought to claim the equity mantle. In this article, I examine aspects of equity, including the distribution of "inputs" to public education, the…

  4. What Is Equity in Education? Reflections from the Capability Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unterhalter, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    While there is a substantial conceptual literature on equality in education, there has been little clarificatory discussion on the term equity, despite its frequent use in policy and planning documents. The article draws out some different ways in which equity can be understood in education. It distinguishes three forms of equity, looking at the…

  5. Pursuing Equity in and through Teacher Education Program Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Ruth A.; Broad, Kathryn; Gallagher-Mackay, Kelly; Sher, Yael; Escayg, Kerry-Ann; McGrath, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This case study investigated equity in teacher education admissions. Through document analysis and structured interviews with ten past or current members of the admissions committee in a large initial teacher education program in Ontario, we developed an understanding of equity in teacher education admissions as encompassing two foci: equity in…

  6. 33 CFR 385.19 - Environmental and economic equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Environmental and economic equity... Implementation Processes § 385.19 Environmental and economic equity. (a) Project Management Plans and Program Management Plans shall include information concerning any environmental and economic equity activities to...

  7. 33 CFR 385.19 - Environmental and economic equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Environmental and economic equity... Implementation Processes § 385.19 Environmental and economic equity. (a) Project Management Plans and Program Management Plans shall include information concerning any environmental and economic equity activities to...

  8. 33 CFR 385.19 - Environmental and economic equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Environmental and economic equity... Implementation Processes § 385.19 Environmental and economic equity. (a) Project Management Plans and Program Management Plans shall include information concerning any environmental and economic equity activities to...

  9. 33 CFR 385.19 - Environmental and economic equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Environmental and economic equity... Implementation Processes § 385.19 Environmental and economic equity. (a) Project Management Plans and Program Management Plans shall include information concerning any environmental and economic equity activities to...

  10. 33 CFR 385.19 - Environmental and economic equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Environmental and economic equity... Implementation Processes § 385.19 Environmental and economic equity. (a) Project Management Plans and Program Management Plans shall include information concerning any environmental and economic equity activities to...

  11. Sex Equity Ideabook for the District of Columbia Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Walteen; And Others

    This publication contains lesson plans and classroom activities to assist K-12 teachers develop sex equity themes. It supplements the "Sex Equity Resource Directory" (SO 013 579) which is a guide to sex equity resources available through the District of Columbia Public Schools. The "Ideabook" has several major sections each containing materials…

  12. Taxpayer Equity in the Financing of Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, J. Richard; Hilley, John L.

    To test whether equity in educational expenditure can include equity for taxpayers, the authors analyze two suggested methods for achieving educational equity. The two methods are district power equalizing (DPE), which grants state aid in inverse proportion to school district wealth, and the wealth neutral system (WNS), which takes account of…

  13. As Endowment Managers Turn to Private Equity, Questions Arise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Andrea; Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    Endowment growth in 2011 came in no small part because universities have increasingly invested in private equity--the same private equity that has become a hot-button issue on the 2012 campaign trail, with some candidates and commentators calling into question its social value. Private equity is "of increasing significance" for endowments. It made…

  14. Reviving Pay Equity: New Strategies for Attacking the Wage Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Peggy; Figart, Deborah M.

    1998-01-01

    Pay equity remains a problem linked to the problem of low pay. Pay equity must be understood as one solution to the problem of securing a living wage for women and men in the restructuring economy as well as a means for challenging gender equity. (JOW)

  15. 17 CFR 49.5 - Equity interest transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... agreement(s) that could result in an equity interest transfer of ten percent or more in the swap data.... (1) Upon a transfer of an equity interest of ten percent or more in a registered swap data repository... of this chapter, following the date on which the equity interest of ten percent or more was...

  16. Cultural Differences in Equity Theory Predictions of Relational Maintenance Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yum, Young-ok; Canary, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether the theoretic role of equity in predicting relational maintenance strategies is modified by participant country and culture. Research on equity theory in relationships has been conducted primarily in the United States and Western Europe. We argue that equity theory predictions regarding relational communication probably…

  17. 12 CFR 1026.40 - Requirements for home equity plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for home equity plans. 1026.40...) Special Rules for Certain Home Mortgage Transactions § 1026.40 Requirements for home equity plans. The... to consumers for home equity plans must provide the brochure required under paragraph (e) of...

  18. Accessing groundwater quality in lower part of Nagapattinam district, Southern India: using hydrogeochemistry and GIS interpolation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanachandrasamy, G.; Ramkumar, T.; Venkatramanan, S.; Vasudevan, S.; Chung, S. Y.; Bagyaraj, M.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this present study was to evaluate groundwater quality in the lower part of Nagapattinam district, Tamil Nadu, Southern India. A detailed geochemical study of groundwater region is described, and the origin of the chemical composition of groundwater has been qualitatively evaluated, using observations over a period of two seasons premonsoon (June) and monsoon (November) in the year of 2010. To attempt this goal, samples were analysed for various physico-chemical parameters such as temperature, pH, salinity, Na+, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, Cl-, HCO3 - and SO4 2-. The abundance of major cations concentration in groundwater is as Na > Ca > Mg > K, while that of anions is Cl > SO4 > HCO3. The Piper trilinear diagram indicates Ca-Cl2 facies, and according to USSL diagram, most of the sample exhibits high salinity hazard (C3S1) type in both seasons. It indicates that high salinity (C3) and low sodium (S1) are moderately suitable for irrigation purposes. Gibbs boomerang exhibits most of the samples mainly controlled by evaporation and weathering process sector in both seasons. Irrigation status of the groundwater samples indicates that it was moderately suitable for agricultural purpose. ArcGIS 9.3 software was used for the generation of various thematic maps and the final groundwater quality map. An interpolation technique inverse distance weighting was used to obtain the spatial distribution of groundwater quality parameters. The final map classified the ground quality in the study area. The results of this research show that the development of the management strategies for the aquifer system is vitally necessary.

  19. South Asian Nomads--A Literature Review. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Anita

    2011-01-01

    This review of literature on South Asian nomads is part of a series of monographs on educational access published by the Consortium for Research on Educational Access Transitions and Equity (CREATE). In the context of India, most recent work has focused on access to the education system for the poor. CREATE research in India has focused on …

  20. Quality and accuracy of publicly accessible cancer-related physical activity information on the Internet: a cross-sectional assessment.

    PubMed

    Buote, R D; Malone, S D; Bélanger, L J; McGowan, E L

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we assessed the quality of publicly available cancer-related physical activity (PA) information appearing on reputable sites from Canada and other English-speaking countries. A cross-sectional Internet search was conducted on select countries (Canada, USA, Australia, New Zealand, UK) using Google to generate top 50 results per country for the keywords "'physical activity' AND 'cancer'". Top results were assessed for quality of PA information based on a coding frame. Additional searches were performed for Canadian-based sites to produce an exhaustive list. Results found that many sites offered cancer-related PA information (94.5%), but rarely defined PA (25.2%). Top 50 results from each country did not differ on any indicator examined. The exhaustive list of Canadian sites found that many sites gave information about PA for survivorship (78.3%) and prevention (70.0%), but rarely defined (6.7%) or referenced PA guidelines (28.3%). Cancer-related PA information is plentiful on the Internet but the quality needs improvement. Sites should do more than mention PA; they should provide definitions, examples and guidelines. With improvements, these websites would enable healthcare providers to effectively educate their patients about PA, and serve as a valuable resource to the general public who may be seeking cancer-related PA information. PMID:27283004