Science.gov

Sample records for access hatches driven

  1. 3. VIEW OF WATER TANKS FROM ACCESS ROAD TO HATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF WATER TANKS FROM ACCESS ROAD TO HATCH ADIT. VIEW NORTH. LUCKY TIGER MILL OFFICE (FEATURE B-I) IN DISTANCE. (OCTOBER, 1995) - Nevada Lucky Tiger Mill & Mine, Water Tanks, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  2. Spread of hatch and delayed feed access affect post hatch performance of female broiler chicks up to day 5.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Li, Y; Willems, E; Willemsen, H; Franssens, L; Koppenol, A; Guo, X; Tona, K; Decuypere, E; Buyse, J; Everaert, N

    2014-04-01

    It is not rare that newly hatched chicks remain without feed for about 24 to 48 h before they are placed on farms due to a series of logistic operations. Furthermore, the spread in hatching time can also mount up to 30 to 48 h for late v. early hatchers. In other words, the practice is a complex combination of spread of hatch and delayed feed access. The present study was aimed to investigate the combined effects of hatching time with a delay in feed access of 48 h, starting from their hatch-time (biological age). When chicks had access to feed immediately after hatch, late hatchers had a higher feed intake and relative growth rate up to day 5 compared with their early hatched counterparts. Feed deprivation during the first 48 h resulted in retarded early growth rate, which was further aggravated by an impaired feed intake after refeeding. In addition, the differential effects of hatching time on relative growth rate and feed intake observed in immediately fed chicks were eliminated by the 48 h feed delay. The yolk utilization after hatch was faster for the late hatchers up to biological day 2 regardless of the feeding treatments. Hatching muscle glycogen content was higher in the late hatchers compared with that of their early counterparts at hatch and at biological day 2 independent of feeding treatment. Moreover, the liver glycogen content of the late hatchers was also higher at hatch. For the immediately fed chicks, the proportional breast muscle weight of the late hatchers was higher at biological day 2 and 5. For the starved chicks, on the other hand, this effect was only observed after they had access to feed (biological day 5). The different plasma T3 levels at hatch may have contributed to the different post hatch performance. It is concluded that the spread of hatch influenced post hatch performance, especially appetite and growth at least until day 5. Moreover, the delay in feed access interacted with the hatching time and caused adverse effects on the

  3. Influence of chick hatch time and access to feed on broiler muscle development.

    PubMed

    Powell, D J; Velleman, S G; Cowieson, A J; Singh, M; Muir, W I

    2016-06-01

    The effect of hatch time and the timing of access to feed on growth rate and breast muscle development was assessed in Ross 308 broiler chickens. Chicks were removed from the incubator upon hatching, and classified as early (EH), midterm (MH), or late (LH) hatchers, based on the duration of their incubation. Feed and water were available either immediately at hatch, or 24 h after the conclusion of the hatch period. Hatchling body weight was uniform regardless of hatch time. Subsequently, bodyweight was increased in EH compared to LH birds following immediate access to feed, until 7 d in female, and 14 d in male birds. Relative breast weight was increased until 28 d in birds with immediate access to feed, and also EH and MH birds regardless of access to feed. Pectoralis major muscle morphology and expression of the myogenic regulatory factors myogenic determination factor 1 (MYOD1) and myogenin, and the proteoglycans syndecan-4, glypican-1, and decorin were measured. Myogenin and glypican-1 stimulate satellite cell (SC) differentiation. Glypican-1 expression was unaffected by treatment. A late increase in myogenin expression was observed in MH birds with delayed access to feed, and all LH birds. Syndecan-4 and MYOD1, expressed in proliferating SC, and decorin, which stimulates satellite cell proliferation and differentiation, were variably upregulated in the first wk posthatch in the same birds. These data suggest SC were activated and proliferating, but had reduced differentiation in later hatching and feed deprived birds. Conversely, EH birds with immediate access to feed had maximal myofiber width at 7 d, while fiber width was increased in birds with immediate access to feed compared to those with delayed access to feed through 40 d of age. These results demonstrate that delaying chick access to feed for 24 h upon removal from the incubator will impair muscle growth. Additionally, hatch time influences muscle development, with accelerated muscle growth in EH and

  4. Influence of hatch time and access to feed on intramuscular adipose tissue deposition in broilers.

    PubMed

    Powell, D J; Velleman, S G; Cowieson, A J; Singh, M; Muir, W I

    2016-06-01

    The effect of hatch time and subsequent access to feed on intramuscular adipose tissue deposition was studied in the pectoralis major muscle of male Ross 308 broiler chickens. Based on their hatch time chicks were classified as early (EH), midterm (MH), or late (LH) hatchers, with an average incubation duration of 497.7 h for EH, 508.8 h for MH, and 514.5 h for LH birds. Chicks were provided access to feed either immediately at hatch, or 24 h after the conclusion of the hatch window. Expression of the adipogenic regulatory genes peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), were measured at the time of hatch, and zero, one, 4, 7, 28, and 40 d. Intramuscular adipocyte cell width and visualization of adipose tissue deposition was observed at 28 and 40 d. Expression of PPARγ was increased in the pectoralis major of LH birds at the time of hatch, zero, and one d. The expression of PPARγ at one and 7 d, and SCD at 7 d were increased in all birds that received delayed access to feed. At 28 d, adipocyte cell width was increased in LH birds with delayed access to feed, compared to EH and MH birds with delayed access to feed and LH birds with immediate access to feed. At 40 d, adipocyte cell width was increased in all birds that received delayed access to feed. Also at 40 d, there was a trend (P = 0.078) for more extensive intramuscular adipose tissue deposition in LH than EH birds, and in birds with delayed access to feed (P = 0.075). These data indicate delayed access to feed increases intramuscular adipose tissue deposition in the pectoralis major muscle, and suggest that hatch time influences this regulation. PMID:26976909

  5. 9. Acircuit weather cover in foreground, personnel access hatch, transporter/erector ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. A-circuit weather cover in foreground, personnel access hatch, transporter/erector grounding points at right center - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility D-6, 4 miles north of Badlands National Park Headquarters, 4.5 miles east of Jackson County line on county road, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  6. STS-103 crew is greeted after exiting the Crew Hatch Access Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    As he exits the Crew Hatch Access Vehicle, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. is greeted with a handshake by Joseph Rothenberg, associate administrator, Office of Space Flight. Descending the stairs behind Brown are (left to right) Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Pilot Scott J. Kelly. At right, applauding the astronauts return are Earle Huckins, deputy associate administrator, Office of Space Science, and Roy Bridges, director, Kennedy Space Center. Others in the crew (not shown) are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, and Jean-Francois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who are with the European Space Agency. The crew of seven completed a successful eight-day mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope, spending the Christmas holiday in space in order to accomplish their mission before the end of 1999. During the mission, Discovery's four space-walking astronauts, Smith, Foale, Grunsfeld and Nicollier, spent 24 hours and 33 minutes upgrading and refurbishing Hubble, making it more capable than ever to renew its observations of the universe. Mission objectives included replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Hubble was released from the end of Discovery's robot arm on Christmas Day. Main gear touchdown was at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. Nose gear touchdown occurred at 7:00:58 EST and wheel stop at 7:01:34 EST. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery. The landing was the 20th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 13th night landing in Shuttle program history.

  7. Hatch Cover Slides Through Hatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alton, Charles; Okane, James H.

    1989-01-01

    Hatch cover for pressurized vessel provides tight seal but opened quickly from either side. In opening or closing, cover sweeps out relatively little volume within vessel, so it does not hinder movement of people or objects from vessel to outside or placement of people or objects near hatch. Cover uses internal pressure to create seal when closed. Design of cover eliminates leakage paths, and cover immune to hazards of sudden decompression or jamming when bolts and latches fail.

  8. Unified hatch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, R. J.; Walkover, L. J.; Zosky, E. W.

    1971-01-01

    Special hatch sealing mechanism design increases safety, reliability, and convenience. Adaptations are possible for oceanographic and high-speed aircraft design, or for any system where quick-opening pressure hatch is required. In normal mode, hatching mechanism is manually operated from either side.

  9. Perinatal broiler physiology between hatching and chick collection in 2 hatching systems.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, L J F; van Wagenberg, A V; Decuypere, E; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about physiological responses of early- versus late-hatching chicks to early posthatch conditions in broiler practice. We investigated effects of hatching time on perinatal broiler physiology in 2 hatching systems, differing in conditions: a conventional hatcher, where chicks are deprived of feed and water between hatching and the moment of chick pulling (d E21.5), and a patio system, in which the hatching and brooding phase are combined, and chicks have immediate posthatch feed and water access. Climate conditions in patio also differ with about 3°C lower temperature and 20% lower RH compared with conventional hatchers. At E18, fertile eggs were transferred to either a hatcher or the patio until the end of incubation. From each system, 50 newly hatched chicks were collected at 3 hatching times: at 468 h (early), 483 h (midterm), and 498 h (late) of incubation, of which 25 chicks were decapitated for analyses of physiological parameters. The other 25 chicks were returned to the hatching system for analyses after 515 h of incubation (E21.5). At hatch, weights of the heart, lungs, stomach, and intestine increased with hatching time, concurrent with a decrease in residual yolk weight, regardless of hatching system, and indicating that later hatching chicks are more matured. Weights of the heart, liver, stomach, and intestines were lower in hatcher than in patio chicks. Between hatch and E21.5, residual yolk weight decreased, whereas organ weights increased in both fasted hatcher and fed patio chicks, but at a higher rate in the latter. At E21.5, plasma glucose and triiodothyronine had increased with time after hatch in patio chicks, whereas levels were similar among hatching times and lower in hatcher chicks. Early feed and water access seems to enable early hatching chicks to compensate for their apparent disadvantage in development at hatching, whereas chicks subjected to fasting show metabolic adaptations to preserve nutrients. Chick physiology at

  10. Hatch: Moving towards seamless database protocols for ecological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremier, A. K.; Blair, C.; Smith, S.; Weigel, D.; Newsom, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Data collection and ecological processes do not occur at similar scales. Monitoring our environment, therefore, requires research approaches that integrate data across spatial and temporal scales. Despite the enormous amount of data being collected annually, many government agencies are only now beginning to build coordinated data management systems. With efficient data flows and coded analysis tools, researchers will be better prepared to quickly answer key ecological questions across datasets. In this project, we designed an online platform for seamless data management, called Hatch. Our aim is to improve database protocols and data access to allow timely analysis of existing data, across time and space. Hatch is being developed for ecological monitoring of stream ecosystems in the Methow River basin in Washington State; however, the platform is general enough for managing multiple forms of database types. Hatch currently applies both a schema and schema-less database structure to link data collection events. It applies data standards developed and accepted across the Columbia River Basin. Initial data capture is driven by data needs for a mechanism-based model of ecosystem processes (namely periphyton production). Input data files, both past and current flows, are validated and stored along with metadata. Data search tools are being designed in accordance with data sharing agreements with appropriate security. The goal of Hatch is to defragment the analysis workspace by integrating data capture, search and analysis. Hatch helps researchers capture, search and analyze data in an online, flexible platform while conforming to project a specific schema. With less fragmented database protocols, scientists will be better prepared to efficiently answer scientific questions at relevant ecological scales.

  11. Safety Considerations in Design of Spacecraft Hatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Johnson, Gary W.

    2010-09-01

    Human spaceflight missions have grown longer and more complex as international spaceflight programs have evolved. This has presented additional safety considerations in the design of hatches for habitable spacecraft. One important decision in the design of spacecraft is whether to use pressure-sealing hatches that open inward(i.e., internal cabin pressure keeps the hatch sealed on orbit) or hatches that open outward(i.e., facilitates crew egress during pre-launch and post-landing events). This paper will explore safety considerations that influence that decision, as well as hazards associated with hatches. Safety considerations include mission duration, mission profile(relatively short sorties to ISS versus extended journeys to the Moon or planets), intended usage(e.g., flight and ground crew ingress/egress during ground phases, flight crew ingress/egress during EVA, or inter-spacecraft access during docked operations), reliability/complexity(usually involving mechanisms and/or pyrotechnics), and off-nominal ground ingress/egress(how many crew members must egress within a specified length of time under what circumstances). In addition, this paper will provide a historical survey of hatch designs for manned spacecraft, including a brief list of incidents involving hatches.

  12. Expedition 30 Hatch Opening

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 30 Flight Engineers Don Pettit, Oleg Kononenko and Andre Kuipers are welcomed aboard the International Space Station when the hatches between the station and the Soyuz TMA-03M spacecraft...

  13. Event-Driven Random-Access-Windowing CCD Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve; Portillo, Angel; Ortiz, Gerardo; Alexander, James; Lam, Raymond; Liu, William

    2004-01-01

    A charge-coupled-device (CCD) based high-speed imaging system, called a realtime, event-driven (RARE) camera, is undergoing development. This camera is capable of readout from multiple subwindows [also known as regions of interest (ROIs)] within the CCD field of view. Both the sizes and the locations of the ROIs can be controlled in real time and can be changed at the camera frame rate. The predecessor of this camera was described in High-Frame-Rate CCD Camera Having Subwindow Capability (NPO- 30564) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 12 (December 2002), page 26. The architecture of the prior camera requires tight coupling between camera control logic and an external host computer that provides commands for camera operation and processes pixels from the camera. This tight coupling limits the attainable frame rate and functionality of the camera. The design of the present camera loosens this coupling to increase the achievable frame rate and functionality. From a host computer perspective, the readout operation in the prior camera was defined on a per-line basis; in this camera, it is defined on a per-ROI basis. In addition, the camera includes internal timing circuitry. This combination of features enables real-time, event-driven operation for adaptive control of the camera. Hence, this camera is well suited for applications requiring autonomous control of multiple ROIs to track multiple targets moving throughout the CCD field of view. Additionally, by eliminating the need for control intervention by the host computer during the pixel readout, the present design reduces ROI-readout times to attain higher frame rates. This camera (see figure) includes an imager card consisting of a commercial CCD imager and two signal-processor chips. The imager card converts transistor/ transistor-logic (TTL)-level signals from a field programmable gate array (FPGA) controller card. These signals are transmitted to the imager card via a low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS) cable

  14. Laser driven launch vehicles for continuous access to space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollins, C. J.; Bailey, A.; Gelb, A.; Gauthier, M.; Goldey, C.; Lo, E.; Resendes, D.; Rosen, D.; Weyl, G.

    1990-01-01

    The availability of megawatt laser systems in the next century will make laser launch systems from ground to orbit feasible and useful. Systems studies indicate launch capabilities of 1 ton payload per gigawatt laser power. Recent research in ground to orbit laser propulsion has emphasized laser supported detonation wave thrusters driven by repetitively pulsed infrared lasers. In this propulsion concept each laser repetition cycle consists of two pulses. A lower energy first pulse is used to vaporize a small amount of solid propellant and then after a brief expansion period, a second and higher energy laser pulse is used to drive a detonation wave through the expanded vapor. The results are reported of numerical studies comparing the detonation wave properties of various candidate propellants, and the simulation of thruster performance under realistic conditions. Experimental measurements designed to test the theoretical predictions are also presented. Measurements are discussed of radiance and opacity in absorption waves, and mass loss and momentum transfer. These data are interpreted in terms of specific impulse and energy conversion efficiency.

  15. Hatching Eggs in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    This article provides detailed instructions on how to hatch chicken eggs. Sections include: (1) making the incubator; (2) making the brooder; (3) guidelines for hatching eggs; (4) from incubator to brooder; and (5) recommended readings. (JMK)

  16. 29 CFR 1918.31 - Hatch coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 'tween-decks unless all hatch beams are in place under the hatch covers. (c) Missing, broken, or poorly... covers and hatch beams not of uniform size shall be placed only in the hatch, deck, and section in...

  17. 29 CFR 1918.31 - Hatch coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 'tween-decks unless all hatch beams are in place under the hatch covers. (c) Missing, broken, or poorly... covers and hatch beams not of uniform size shall be placed only in the hatch, deck, and section in...

  18. Effects of feed access after hatch and inclusion of fish oil and medium chain fatty acids in a pre-starter diet on broiler chicken growth performance and humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Lamot, D M; van der Klein, S A S; van de Linde, I B; Wijtten, P J A; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H; Lammers, A

    2016-09-01

    Delayed feed and water access is known to impair growth performance of day old broiler chickens. Although effects of feed access on growth performance and immune function of broilers have been examined before, effects of dietary composition and its potential interaction with feed access are hardly investigated. This experiment aimed to determine whether moment of first feed and water access after hatch and pre-starter composition (0 to 7 days) affect growth rate and humoral immune function in broiler chickens. Direct fed chickens received feed and water directly after placement in the grow-out facility, whilst delayed fed chickens only after 48 h. Direct and delayed fed chickens received a control pre-starter diet, or a diet containing medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) or fish oil. At 21 days, chickens were immunized by injection of sheep red blood cells. The mortality rate depended on an interaction between feed access and pre-starter composition (P=0.014). Chickens with direct feed access fed the control pre-starter diet had a higher risk for mortality than chickens with delayed feed access fed the control pre-starter diet (16.4% v. 4.2%) whereas the other treatment groups were in-between. BW gain and feed intake till 25 days in direct fed chickens were higher compared with delayed fed chickens, whilst gain to feed ratio was lower. Within the direct fed chickens, the control pre-starter diet resulted in the highest BW at 28 days and the MCFA pre-starter diet the lowest (Δ=2.4%), whereas this was opposite for delayed fed chickens (Δ=3.0%; P=0.033). Provision of MCFA resulted in a 4.6% higher BW gain and a higher gain to feed ratio compared with other pre-starter diets, but only during the period it was provided (2 to 7 days). Minor treatment effects were found for humoral immune response by measuring immunoglobulins, agglutination titers, interferon gamma (IFN- γ ), and complement activity. Concluding, current inclusion levels of fish oil (5 g/kg) and MCFA (30 g

  19. Environmentally cued hatching in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Doody, J S

    2011-07-01

    Evidence is accumulating for the widespread occurrence of environmentally cued hatching (ECH) in animals, but its diversity and distribution across taxa are unknown. Herein I review three types of ECH in reptiles: early hatching, delayed hatching, and synchronous hatching. ECH is currently known from 43 species, including turtles, crocodilians, lizards, snakes, tuatara, and possibly worm lizards. Early hatching caused by physical disturbance (e.g., vibrations) is the most commonly reported ECH across all groups; although it apparently serves an antipredator function in some species, its adaptive value is unknown in most. Delayed hatching, characterized by metabolic depression or embryonic aestivation, and sometimes followed by a hypoxic cue (flooding), occurs in some turtles and possibly in monitor lizards and crocodilians; in some of these species delayed hatching serves to defer hatching from the dry season until the more favorable conditions of the wet season. Synchronous hatching, whereby sibling eggs hatch synchronously despite vertical thermal gradients in the nest, occurs in some turtles and crocodilians. Although vibrations and vocalizations in hatching-competent embryos can stimulate synchronous hatching, cues promoting developmentally less advanced embryos to catch up with more advanced embryos have not been confirmed. Synchronous hatching may serve to dilute predation risk by promoting synchronous emergence or reduce the period in which smells associated with hatching can attract predators to unhatched eggs. Within species, advancing our understanding of ECH requires three types of studies: (1) experiments identifying hatching cues and the plastic hatching period, (2) experiments disentangling hypotheses about multiple hatching cues, and (3) investigations into the environmental context in which ECH might evolve in different species (major predators or abiotic influences on the egg, embryo, and hatchling). Among species and groups, surveys for ECH are

  20. Design of an Event-Driven, Random-Access, Windowing CCD-Based Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monacos, S. P.; Lam, R. K.; Portillo, A. A.; Zhu, D. Q.; Ortiz, G. G.

    2003-11-01

    Commercially available cameras are not designed for a combination of single-frame and high-speed streaming digital video with real-time control of size and location of multiple regions-of-interest (ROIs). A message-passing paradigm is defined to achieve low-level camera control with high-level system operation. This functionality is achieved by asynchronously sending messages to the camera for event-driven operation, where an event is defined as image capture or pixel readout of a ROI, without knowledge of detailed in-camera timing. This methodology provides a random access, real-time, event-driven (RARE) camera for adaptive camera control and is well suited for target-tracking applications requiring autonomous control of multiple ROIs. This methodology additionally provides for reduced ROI readout time and higher frame rates as compared to a predecessor architecture [1] by avoiding external control intervention during the ROI readout process.

  1. Secondary Use of Clinical Data to Enable Data-Driven Translational Science with Trustworthy Access Management.

    PubMed

    Mosa, Abu Saleh Mohammad; Yoo, Illhoi; Apathy, Nate C; Ko, Kelly J; Parker, Jerry C

    2015-01-01

    University of Missouri (MU) Health Care produces a large amount of digitized clinical data that can be used in clinical and translational research for cohort identification, retrospective data analysis, feasibility study, and hypothesis generation. In this article, the implementation of an integrated clinical research data repository is discussed. We developed trustworthy access-management protocol for providing access to both clinically relevant data and protected health information. As of September 2014, the database contains approximately 400,000 patients and 82 million observations; and is growing daily. The system will facilitate the secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data at MU to promote data-driven clinical and translational research, in turn enabling better healthcare through research.

  2. Secondary Use of Clinical Data to Enable Data-Driven Translational Science with Trustworthy Access Management.

    PubMed

    Mosa, Abu Saleh Mohammad; Yoo, Illhoi; Apathy, Nate C; Ko, Kelly J; Parker, Jerry C

    2015-01-01

    University of Missouri (MU) Health Care produces a large amount of digitized clinical data that can be used in clinical and translational research for cohort identification, retrospective data analysis, feasibility study, and hypothesis generation. In this article, the implementation of an integrated clinical research data repository is discussed. We developed trustworthy access-management protocol for providing access to both clinically relevant data and protected health information. As of September 2014, the database contains approximately 400,000 patients and 82 million observations; and is growing daily. The system will facilitate the secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data at MU to promote data-driven clinical and translational research, in turn enabling better healthcare through research. PMID:26821445

  3. Station Crew Opens Dragon Hatch

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams and Flight Engineer Aki Hoshide opened the hatch to the SpaceX Dragon cargo ship at 1:40 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Oct. 10, marking a milestone for the first commerc...

  4. Station Crew Opens Dragon's Hatch

    NASA Video Gallery

    The hatch between the newly arrived SpaceX Dragon spacecraft and the Harmony module of the International Space Station was opened by NASA Astronaut Don Pettit at 5:53 am EDT as the station flew 253...

  5. NSA AERI Hatch Correction Data Set

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David

    2012-03-23

    From 2000-2008, the NSA AERI hatch was determined to be indicated as open too frequently. Analysis suggests that the hatch was actually opening and closing properly but that its status was not being correctly reported by the hatch controller to the datastream. An algorithm was written to determine the hatch status from the observed

  6. The Hatch-Smolensk exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Sproles, A.

    1993-03-01

    During summer 1992, the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) sponsored an exchange visit between Georgia Power Company's Edwin I. Hatch nuclear plant, a two-unit boiling water reactor site, and the Smolensk atomic energy station, a three-unit RBMK (graphite-moderated and light-water-cooled) plant located 350 km west of Moscow, in Desnogorsk, Russia. The Plant Hatch team included Glenn Goode, manager of engineering support; Curtis Coggin, manager of training and emergency preparedness; Wayne Kirkley, manager of health physics and chemistry; John Lewis, manager of operations; Ray Baker, coordinator of nuclear fuels and contracts; and Bruce McLeod, manager of nuclear maintenance support. Also traveling with the team was Jerald Towgood, of WANO's Atlanta Centre. The Hatch team visited the Smolensk plant during the week of July 27, 1992.

  7. Lessons learned from a data-driven college access program: The National College Advising Corps.

    PubMed

    Horng, Eileen L; Evans, Brent J; Antonio, Anthony L; Foster, Jesse D; Kalamkarian, Hoori S; Hurd, Nicole F; Bettinger, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the collaboration between a national college access program, the National College Advising Corps (NCAC), and its research and evaluation team at Stanford University. NCAC is currently active in almost four hundred high schools and through the placement of a recent college graduate to serve as a college adviser provides necessary information and support for students who may find it difficult to navigate the complex college admission process. The advisers also conduct outreach to underclassmen in an effort to improve the school-wide college-going culture. Analyses include examination of both quantitative and qualitative data from numerous sources and partners with every level of the organization from the national office to individual high schools. The authors discuss balancing the pursuit of evaluation goals with academic scholarship. In an effort to benefit other programs seeking to form successful data-driven interventions, the authors provide explicit examples of the partnership and present several examples of how the program has benefited from the data gathered by the evaluation team.

  8. Open Core Data: Semantic driven data access and distribution for terrestrial and marine scientific drilling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fils, D.; Noren, A. J.; Lehnert, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Open Core Data (OCD) is a science-driven, innovative, efficient, and scalable infrastructure for data generated by scientific drilling and coring projects across all Earth sciences. It is designed to make make scientific drilling data semantically discoverable, persistent, citable, and approachable to maximize their utility to present and future geoscience researchers. Scientific drilling and coring is crucial for the advancement of the Earth Sciences, unlocking new frontiers in the geologic record. Open Core Data will utilize and link existing data systems, services, and expertise of the JOIDES Resolution Science Operator (JRSO), the Continental Scientific Drilling Coordination Office (CSDCO), the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance (IEDA) data facility, and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (OL). Open Core Data will leverage efforts currently taking place under the EarthCube GeoLink Building Block and other previous efforts in Linked Open Data around ocean drilling data coordinated by OL. The OCD architecture for data distribution blends Linked Data Platform approaches with web services and schema.org use. OCD will further enable integration and tool development by assigning and using vocabularies, provenance, and unique IDs (DOIs, IGSN, URIs) in scientific drilling resources. A significant focus of this effort is to enable large scale automated access to the data by domain specific communities such as MagIC and Neotoma. Providing them a process to integrate the facility data into their data models, workflows and tools. This aspect will encompass methods to maintain awareness of authority information enabling users to trace data back to the originating facility. Initial work on OCD is taking place under a supplemental awarded to IEDA. This talk gives an overview of that work to date and planned future directions for the distribution of scientific drilling data by this effort.

  9. 78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen... Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and Richard Kosiba...

  10. Glassfrog embryos hatch early after parental desertion

    PubMed Central

    Delia, Jesse R. J.; Ramírez-Bautista, Aurelio; Summers, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Both parental care and hatching plasticity can improve embryo survival. Research has found that parents can alter hatching time owing to a direct effect of care on embryogenesis or via forms of care that cue the hatching process. Because parental care alters conditions critical for offspring development, hatching plasticity could allow embryos to exploit variation in parental behaviour. However, this interaction of parental care and hatching plasticity remains largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that embryos hatch early to cope with paternal abandonment in the glassfrog Hyalinobatrachium fleischmanni (Centrolenidae). We conducted male-removal experiments in a wild population, and examined embryos' response to conditions with and without fathers. Embryos hatched early when abandoned, but extended development in the egg stage when fathers continued care. Paternal care had no effect on developmental rate. Rather, hatching plasticity was due to embryos actively hatching at different developmental stages, probably in response to deteriorating conditions without fathers. Our experimental results are supported by a significant correlation between the natural timing of abandonment and hatching in an unmanipulated population. This study demonstrates that embryos can respond to conditions resulting from parental abandonment, and provides insights into how variation in care can affect selection on egg-stage adaptations. PMID:24789892

  11. Worldwide Spacecraft Crew Hatch History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The JSC Flight Safety Office has developed this compilation of historical information on spacecraft crew hatches to assist the Safety Tech Authority in the evaluation and analysis of worldwide spacecraft crew hatch design and performance. The document is prepared by SAIC s Gary Johnson, former NASA JSC S&MA Associate Director for Technical. Mr. Johnson s previous experience brings expert knowledge to assess the relevancy of data presented. He has experience with six (6) of the NASA spacecraft programs that are covered in this document: Apollo; Skylab; Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP), Space Shuttle, ISS and the Shuttle/Mir Program. Mr. Johnson is also intimately familiar with the JSC Design and Procedures Standard, JPR 8080.5, having been one of its original developers. The observations and findings are presented first by country and organized within each country section by program in chronological order of emergence. A host of reference sources used to augment the personal observations and comments of the author are named within the text and/or listed in the reference section of this document. Careful attention to the selection and inclusion of photos, drawings and diagrams is used to give visual association and clarity to the topic areas examined.

  12. Hatching system and time effects on broiler physiology and posthatch growth.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, L J F; van Wagenberg, A V; Debonne, M; Decuypere, E; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2011-06-01

    A multilevel housing system for broilers was developed, named Patio (Vencomatic BV, Eersel, the Netherlands), in which the hatching and brooding phase are combined. In a Patio system, climate conditions differ from those provided in the hatchers currently in use. We compared the physiology of broilers hatched in a hatcher or in a Patio system, and included the effects of hatching time. Eggs from 1 breeder flock were incubated until embryonic d 18 in a setter and subsequently placed in a hatcher or the Patio until the end of incubation. From each hatching system, 154 chicks were collected per hatching time, at 465 h (early), 480 h (midterm), and 493 h (late) of incubation, from which 24 chicks/group were decapitated for analyses of blood plasma and organ weights. The remaining 130 chicks in each group from both systems were individually labeled and placed together in the Patio system. All chicks were given access to feed and water directly after hatch and were housed up to d 45 to monitor growth. From embryonic d 18 until the end of incubation, average ambient temperature and RH were 38.1°C and 50.8% in the hatcher and 35.2°C and 29.7% in the Patio system. Glucose and corticosterone were slightly higher in hatcher chicks, whereas organ weights were not affected by the hatching system. Although hatchling weights were lower in hatchery chicks, growth from d 0 to 45 was not affected by the hatching system. In both systems, glucose increased with hatching time, whereas lactate and triiodothyronine levels decreased. Yolk weights decreased with hatching time, whereas absolute and relative weights of the yolk-free body, intestines, stomach, lungs, and heart increased, indicating more advanced maturation of organs. Growth up to d 21 was depressed in chicks in the late group, which was possibly related to lower thyroid hormone levels at hatching. We conclude that the hatching system had minor effects on hatchling physiology and that posthatch growth and livability were not

  13. 29 CFR 1918.35 - Open hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Open hatches. 1918.35 Section 1918.35 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Working Surfaces § 1918.35 Open hatches. Open weather...

  14. Shuttle Crew Says Farewell, Closes Hatches

    NASA Video Gallery

    At 7:23 a.m. Sunday, hatches were closed between Endeavour and the station 12 days, 22 hours and 27 minutes into the mission. The hatches between the two spacecraft were opened at 7:38 a.m. on May ...

  15. Prosody-assisted head-driven access to spoken German compounds.

    PubMed

    Isel, Frédéric; Gunter, Thomas C; Friederici, Angela D

    2003-03-01

    Auditory processing of German 2-noun compound words was investigated with 328 participants in 4 experiments by monitoring semantic priming effects of the left constituents of the compound words. The authors demonstrated that there is no primacy of the left constituents in accessing auditorily presented German compound words in the mental lexicon. A clear priming effect of left constituents occurred only for compound words with a transparent right constituent that is the head of compound words in Germanic languages. The data suggest that the access to German compounds in the auditory domain involves 2 temporally overlapping routes: direct and decompositional. The prosodic structure (i.e., the duration) of the first morphemes of compound words appears to be a determining factor for activation of the decompositional route.

  16. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene

    PubMed Central

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F.; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical–chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K+ ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches. PMID:27506380

  17. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene.

    PubMed

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical-chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K(+) ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches. PMID:27506380

  18. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F.; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical-chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K+ ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches.

  19. FLOSYS--a web-accessible workflow system for protocol-driven biomolecular sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Badidi, E; Lang, B F; Burger, G

    2004-11-01

    FLOSYS is an interactive web-accessible bioinformatics workflow system designed to assist biologists in multi-step data analyses. FLOSYS allows the user to create complex analysis pathways (protocols) graphically, similar to drawing a flowchart: icons representing particular bioinformatics tools are dragged and dropped onto a canvas and lines connecting those icons are drawn to specify the relationships between the tools. In addition, FLOSYS permits to select input-data, execute the protocol and store the results in a personal workspace. The three-tier architecture of FLOSYS has been implemented in Java and uses a relational database system together with new technologies for distributed and web computing such as CORBA, RMI, JSP and JDBC. The prototype of FLOSYS, which is part of the bioinformatics workbench AnaBench, is accessible on-line at http://malawimonas.bcm.umontreal.ca: 8091/anabench. The entire package is available on request to academic groups who wish to have a customized local analysis environment for research or teaching.

  20. Transparent mediation-based access to multiple yeast data sources using an ontology driven interface

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae is recognized as a model system representing a simple eukaryote whose genome can be easily manipulated. Information solicited by scientists on its biological entities (Proteins, Genes, RNAs...) is scattered within several data sources like SGD, Yeastract, CYGD-MIPS, BioGrid, PhosphoGrid, etc. Because of the heterogeneity of these sources, querying them separately and then manually combining the returned results is a complex and time-consuming task for biologists most of whom are not bioinformatics expert. It also reduces and limits the use that can be made on the available data. Results To provide transparent and simultaneous access to yeast sources, we have developed YeastMed: an XML and mediator-based system. In this paper, we present our approach in developing this system which takes advantage of SB-KOM to perform the query transformation needed and a set of Data Services to reach the integrated data sources. The system is composed of a set of modules that depend heavily on XML and Semantic Web technologies. User queries are expressed in terms of a domain ontology through a simple form-based web interface. Conclusions YeastMed is the first mediation-based system specific for integrating yeast data sources. It was conceived mainly to help biologists to find simultaneously relevant data from multiple data sources. It has a biologist-friendly interface easy to use. The system is available at http://www.khaos.uma.es/yeastmed/. PMID:22372975

  1. ORegAnno: an open-access community-driven resource for regulatory annotation.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Obi L; Montgomery, Stephen B; Bernier, Bridget; Chu, Bryan; Kasaian, Katayoon; Aerts, Stein; Mahony, Shaun; Sleumer, Monica C; Bilenky, Mikhail; Haeussler, Maximilian; Griffith, Malachi; Gallo, Steven M; Giardine, Belinda; Hooghe, Bart; Van Loo, Peter; Blanco, Enrique; Ticoll, Amy; Lithwick, Stuart; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Donaldson, Ian J; Robertson, Gordon; Wadelius, Claes; De Bleser, Pieter; Vlieghe, Dominique; Halfon, Marc S; Wasserman, Wyeth; Hardison, Ross; Bergman, Casey M; Jones, Steven J M

    2008-01-01

    ORegAnno is an open-source, open-access database and literature curation system for community-based annotation of experimentally identified DNA regulatory regions, transcription factor binding sites and regulatory variants. The current release comprises 30 145 records curated from 922 publications and describing regulatory sequences for over 3853 genes and 465 transcription factors from 19 species. A new feature called the 'publication queue' allows users to input relevant papers from scientific literature as targets for annotation. The queue contains 4438 gene regulation papers entered by experts and another 54 351 identified by text-mining methods. Users can enter or 'check out' papers from the queue for manual curation using a series of user-friendly annotation pages. A typical record entry consists of species, sequence type, sequence, target gene, binding factor, experimental outcome and one or more lines of experimental evidence. An evidence ontology was developed to describe and categorize these experiments. Records are cross-referenced to Ensembl or Entrez gene identifiers, PubMed and dbSNP and can be visualized in the Ensembl or UCSC genome browsers. All data are freely available through search pages, XML data dumps or web services at: http://www.oreganno.org.

  2. ORegAnno: an open-access community-driven resource for regulatory annotation

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Obi L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Bernier, Bridget; Chu, Bryan; Kasaian, Katayoon; Aerts, Stein; Mahony, Shaun; Sleumer, Monica C.; Bilenky, Mikhail; Haeussler, Maximilian; Griffith, Malachi; Gallo, Steven M.; Giardine, Belinda; Hooghe, Bart; Van Loo, Peter; Blanco, Enrique; Ticoll, Amy; Lithwick, Stuart; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Donaldson, Ian J.; Robertson, Gordon; Wadelius, Claes; De Bleser, Pieter; Vlieghe, Dominique; Halfon, Marc S.; Wasserman, Wyeth; Hardison, Ross; Bergman, Casey M.; Jones, Steven J.M.

    2008-01-01

    ORegAnno is an open-source, open-access database and literature curation system for community-based annotation of experimentally identified DNA regulatory regions, transcription factor binding sites and regulatory variants. The current release comprises 30 145 records curated from 922 publications and describing regulatory sequences for over 3853 genes and 465 transcription factors from 19 species. A new feature called the ‘publication queue’ allows users to input relevant papers from scientific literature as targets for annotation. The queue contains 4438 gene regulation papers entered by experts and another 54 351 identified by text-mining methods. Users can enter or ‘check out’ papers from the queue for manual curation using a series of user-friendly annotation pages. A typical record entry consists of species, sequence type, sequence, target gene, binding factor, experimental outcome and one or more lines of experimental evidence. An evidence ontology was developed to describe and categorize these experiments. Records are cross-referenced to Ensembl or Entrez gene identifiers, PubMed and dbSNP and can be visualized in the Ensembl or UCSC genome browsers. All data are freely available through search pages, XML data dumps or web services at: http://www.oreganno.org. PMID:18006570

  3. Hatches Open, Expedition 32 Expands to Six

    NASA Video Gallery

    The hatches between the Soyuz and the Rassvet module opened Tuesday at 3:23 a.m. when Flight Engineers Suni Williams, Yuri Malenchenko and Aki Hoshide entered the International Space Station. Exped...

  4. 29 CFR 1918.43 - Handling hatch beams and covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... stable piles not closer to the hatch coaming than three feet (.91 m). Exception: On the working side of... side of the hatch. (2) On seagoing vessels, hatch boards or similar covers removed from the hatch beams... their sides, or stood on an edge close together and lashed. Exception: This paragraph (b) shall...

  5. 9 CFR 147.22 - Hatching egg sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Procedures § 147.22 Hatching egg sanitation. Hatching eggs should be collected from the nests at frequent... collecting the nest eggs for hatching. Egg handlers should thoroughly wash their hands with soap and water... used for hatching purposes and should be collected in a separate container from the nest eggs....

  6. 9 CFR 147.22 - Hatching egg sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Procedures § 147.22 Hatching egg sanitation. Hatching eggs should be collected from the nests at frequent... collecting the nest eggs for hatching. Egg handlers should thoroughly wash their hands with soap and water... used for hatching purposes and should be collected in a separate container from the nest eggs....

  7. 9 CFR 147.22 - Hatching egg sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Procedures § 147.22 Hatching egg sanitation. Hatching eggs should be collected from the nests at frequent... collecting the nest eggs for hatching. Egg handlers should thoroughly wash their hands with soap and water... used for hatching purposes and should be collected in a separate container from the nest eggs....

  8. 9 CFR 147.22 - Hatching egg sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Procedures § 147.22 Hatching egg sanitation. Hatching eggs should be collected from the nests at frequent... collecting the nest eggs for hatching. Egg handlers should thoroughly wash their hands with soap and water... used for hatching purposes and should be collected in a separate container from the nest eggs....

  9. 9 CFR 147.22 - Hatching egg sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures § 147.22 Hatching egg sanitation. Hatching eggs should be collected from the nests at frequent... collecting the nest eggs for hatching. Egg handlers should thoroughly wash their hands with soap and water... used for hatching purposes and should be collected in a separate container from the nest eggs....

  10. 29 CFR 1918.43 - Handling hatch beams and covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... more of the height of the web; and (2) The flange rests flat on the deck when the hatch beam is stood... hatch beam or pontoon left in place next to an open hatch section being worked shall be locked or... adjacent sections, unless securely lashed. (f)(1) The roller hatch beam at the edge of the open section...

  11. 29 CFR 1918.43 - Handling hatch beams and covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... more of the height of the web; and (2) The flange rests flat on the deck when the hatch beam is stood... hatch beam or pontoon left in place next to an open hatch section being worked shall be locked or... adjacent sections, unless securely lashed. (f)(1) The roller hatch beam at the edge of the open section...

  12. 29 CFR 1918.43 - Handling hatch beams and covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... more of the height of the web; and (2) The flange rests flat on the deck when the hatch beam is stood... hatch beam or pontoon left in place next to an open hatch section being worked shall be locked or... adjacent sections, unless securely lashed. (f)(1) The roller hatch beam at the edge of the open section...

  13. 29 CFR 1918.43 - Handling hatch beams and covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... more of the height of the web; and (2) The flange rests flat on the deck when the hatch beam is stood... hatch beam or pontoon left in place next to an open hatch section being worked shall be locked or... adjacent sections, unless securely lashed. (f)(1) The roller hatch beam at the edge of the open section...

  14. Tunable Rare Earth fcu-MOF Platform: Access to Adsorption Kinetics Driven Gas/Vapor Separations via Pore Size Contraction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong-Xu; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shekhah, Osama; Jiang, Hao; Adil, Karim; Cairns, Amy J; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-04-22

    Reticular chemistry approach was successfully employed to deliberately construct new rare-earth (RE, i.e., Eu(3+), Tb(3+), and Y(3+)) fcu metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with restricted window apertures. Controlled and selective access to the resultant contracted fcu-MOF pores permits the achievement of the requisite sorbate cutoff, ideal for selective adsorption kinetics based separation and/or molecular sieving of gases and vapors. Predetermined reaction conditions that permitted the formation in situ of the 12-connected RE hexanuclear molecular building block (MBB) and the establishment of the first RE-fcu-MOF platform, especially in the presence of 2-fluorobenzoic acid (2-FBA) as a modulator and a structure directing agent, were used to synthesize isostructural RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOFs based on a relatively bulkier 2-connected bridging ligand, namely 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate (1,4-NDC). The subsequent RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOF structural features, contracted windows/pores and high concentration of open metal sites combined with exceptional hydrothermal and chemical stabilities, yielded notable gas/solvent separation properties, driven mostly by adsorption kinetics as exemplified in this work for n-butane/methane, butanol/methanol, and butanol/water pair systems. PMID:25825923

  15. Starting with a handicap: effects of asynchronous hatching on growth rate, oxidative stress and telomere dynamics in free-living great tits.

    PubMed

    Stier, Antoine; Massemin, Sylvie; Zahn, Sandrine; Tissier, Mathilde L; Criscuolo, François

    2015-12-01

    A trade-off between resource investment into growth rate and body self-maintenance is likely to occur, but the underlying molecular mediators of such a trade-off remain to be determined. In many altricial birds, hatching asynchrony creates a sibling competitive hierarchy within the brood, with first-hatched nestlings enjoying substantial advantages compared to last-hatched nestlings. We used this opportunity to test for a trade-off between growth and self-maintenance processes (oxidative stress, telomere erosion) in great tit nestlings, since resource availability and allocation are likely to differ between first-hatched and last-hatched nestlings. We found that despite their starting competitive handicap (i.e. being smaller/lighter before day 16), last-hatched nestlings exhibited growth rate and mass/size at fledging similar to first-hatched ones. However, last-hatched nestlings suffered more in terms of oxidative stress, and ended growth with shorter telomeres than first-hatched ones. Interestingly, growth rate was positively related to plasma antioxidant capacity and early life telomere length (i.e. at 7 days old), but among last-hatched nestlings, those exhibiting the faster body size growth were also those exhibiting the greatest telomere erosion. Last-hatched nestlings exhibited elevated levels of plasma testosterone (T), but only at day 7. T levels were positively associated with oxidative damage levels and plasma antioxidant capacity, the latter being only significant for first-hatched nestlings. Our results suggest that last-hatched nestlings present a specific trade-off between growth rate and self-maintenance processes, which is possibly driven by their need to compete with their older siblings and potentially mediated by elevated levels of T.

  16. Killifish Hatching and Orientation experiment MA-161

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheld, H. W.; Boyd, J. F.; Bozarth, G. A.; Conner, J. A.; Eichler, V. B.; Fuller, P. M.; Hoffman, R. B.; Keefe, J. R.; Kuchnow, K. P.; Oppenheimer, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The killifish Fundulus heteroclitus was used as a model system for study of embryonic development and vestibular adaptation in orbital flight. Juvenile fish in a zero gravity environment exhibited looping swimming activity similar to that observed during the Skylab 3 mission. Hatchings from a 336 hour egg stage were also observed to loop. At splashdown, both juveniles and hatchings exhibited a typical diving response suggesting relatively normal vestibular function. Juveniles exhibited swimming patterns suggestive of abnormal swim bladders. The embryos exhibited no abnormalities resulting from development in a zero gravity environment.

  17. Aspects of hatching success and chick survival in Gull-billed Terns in coastal Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eyler, T.B.; Erwin, R.M.; Stotts, D.B.; Hatfield, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Because of a long-term population decline in Gull-billed Terns (Sterna nilotica) nesting along the coast of Virginia, we began a three year study in 1994 to monitor hatching success and survival of Gull-billed Tern chicks at several Virginia colony sites. Colonies were located on either small, storm-deposited shellpiles along marsh fringes or large, sandshell overwash fans of barrier islands. Nests were monitored one to three times a week for hatching success, and enclosures were installed around selected nests to monitor chick survival from hatching to about two weeks of age. Hatching success was lower in marsh colonies than island colonies, and was lower in 1995 than in 1994 and 1996, primarily because of flooding. The average brood size of nests where at least one chick hatched was 1.99 chicks. Survival rates of chicks to 14 days depended on hatch order and year but not brood size (one vs. two or more) or time of season. A-chicks had higher survival rates than B-chicks and third-hatched C-chicks (0.661 compared to 0.442 and 0.357, respectively). The year effect was significant only for A-chicks, with lower survival in 1994 (0.50) than in 1995 (0.765) or 1996 (0.758). Overall, productivity was low (0.53 chick per nest) compared to estimates for colonies in Denmark, and was attributable to nest flooding by spring and storm-driven high tides and chick predation, presumably mostly by Great Horned Owls (Bubo virginianus).

  18. 9 CFR 91.29 - Hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hatches. 91.29 Section 91.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND HANDLING...

  19. 9 CFR 91.29 - Hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hatches. 91.29 Section 91.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND HANDLING...

  20. 9 CFR 91.29 - Hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hatches. 91.29 Section 91.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND HANDLING...

  1. Mechanical Hatching Egg Sanitization: A Fresh Look

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three to four decades ago, hatching egg sanitization was done by immersion of eggs in an egg-gathering basket (plastic-coated metal wire) into a small vat with a heating element and disinfectant solution. This procedure failed miserably for several reasons. First, the eggs were not subjected to the...

  2. 29 CFR 1918.31 - Hatch coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Working Surfaces § 1918.31 Hatch coverings. (a) No cargo... unless the working area available for such employees extends for a distance of 10 feet (3.05 m) or...

  3. 9 CFR 91.29 - Hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hatches. 91.29 Section 91.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND HANDLING...

  4. 9 CFR 91.29 - Hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hatches. 91.29 Section 91.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND HANDLING...

  5. Unity hatch closed in preparation for launch on STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility make final preparations for closing the access hatch to the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, before its launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in December. Unity will now undergo a series of leak checks before a final purge of clean, dry air inside the module to ready it for initial operations in space. Other testing includes the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock and the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. The next time the hatch will be opened it will be by astronauts on orbit. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  6. Unity hatch closed in preparation for launch on STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility close the access hatch to the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, before its launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in December. Unity will now undergo a series of leak checks before a final purge of clean, dry air inside the module to ready it for initial operations in space. Other testing includes the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock and the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. The next time the hatch will be opened it will be by astronauts on orbit. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  7. 1. VIEW OF THE ENTRANCE TO THE HATCH ADIT (FEATURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF THE ENTRANCE TO THE HATCH ADIT (FEATURE B-28), FACING WEST. (OCTOBER, 1995) - Nevada Lucky Tiger Mill & Mine, Hatch Adit, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  8. 46 CFR 174.220 - Hatches and coamings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Offshore Supply Vessels § 174.220 Hatches and... securing-devices; and (2) Be attached to the hatch frame or coaming by hinges, captive chains, or...

  9. 46 CFR 174.220 - Hatches and coamings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Offshore Supply Vessels § 174.220 Hatches and... securing-devices; and (2) Be attached to the hatch frame or coaming by hinges, captive chains, or...

  10. Prebreeding survival of Roseate Terns Sterna dougallii varies with sex, hatching order and hatching date

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nisbet, Ian C.T.; Monticelli, David; Spendelow, Jeffrey A.; Szczys, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Unequal sex ratios can reduce the productivity of animal populations and are especially prevalent among endangered species. A cohort of 333 Roseate Tern Sterna dougallii chicks at a site where the adult sex ratio was skewed towards females was sexed at hatching and followed through fledging and return to the breeding area, and subsequently during adulthood. The entire regional metapopulation was sampled for returning birds. Prebreeding survival (from fledging to age 3 years) was lower in males than in females, but only among B-chicks (second in hatching order). Prebreeding survival also declined with hatching date. The proportion of females in this cohort increased from 54.6% at hatching to 56.2% at fledging and to an estimated 58.0% among survivors at age 3 years. This was more than sufficient to explain the degree of skew in the sex ratio of the adult population, but changes in this degree of skew during the study period make it difficult to identify the influence of a single cohort of recruits. Many studies of prebreeding survival in other bird species have identified effects of sex, hatching order or hatching date, but no previous study has tested for effects of all three factors simultaneously.

  11. Consequences of Hatch Phenology on Stages of Fish Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Bogner, David M.; Wuellner, Melissa R.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how hatch phenology (e.g., the start, peak, and duration of hatching) could influence subsequent recruitment of freshwater fishes into a population. We used two commonly sympatric fish species that exhibit different hatching phenologies to examine recruitment across multiple life stages. Nine yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) annual cohorts were sampled from 2004 through 2013 across larval, age-0, age-1, and age-2 life stages in a Nebraska (U.S.A.) Sandhill lake. Yellow perch hatched earlier in the season and displayed a more truncated hatch duration compared to bluegill. The timing of hatch influenced recruitment dynamics for both species but important hatching metrics were not similar between species across life stages. A longer hatch duration resulted in greater larval yellow perch abundance but greater age-1 bluegill abundance. In contrast, bluegill larval and age-0 abundances were greater during years when hatching duration was shorter and commenced earlier, whereas age-0 yellow perch abundance was greater when hatching occurred earlier. As a result of hatch phenology, yellow perch recruitment variability was minimized sooner (age-0 life stage) than bluegill (age-1 life stage). Collectively, hatch phenology influenced recruitment dynamics across multiple life stages but was unique for each species. Understanding the complexities of when progeny enter an environment and how this influences eventual recruitment into a population will be critical in the face of ongoing climate change. PMID:27764216

  12. Section BB Hatch Coating; Framing Plan on Line C Lodging ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section B-B Hatch Coating; Framing Plan on Line C Lodging Knees at Hatch; Elevation A-A Hull Framing; Section at Hatch Frame 36, Starboard Looking Aft; Midship Section Frame 37, Port Looking Aft - Steam Schooner WAPAMA, Kaiser Shipyard No. 3 (Shoal Point), Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  13. Causes of hatching failure in endangered birds

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, N.; West, M.; Birkhead, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    About 10 per cent of birds' eggs fail to hatch, but the incidence of failure can be much higher in endangered species. Most studies fail to distinguish between infertility (due to a lack of sperm) and embryo mortality as the cause of hatching failure, yet doing so is crucial in order to understand the underlying problem. Using newly validated techniques to visualize sperm and embryonic tissue, we assessed the fertility status of unhatched eggs of five endangered species, including both wild and captive birds. All eggs were classified as ‘infertile’ when collected, but most were actually fertile with numerous sperm on the ovum. Eggs of captive birds had fewer sperm and were more likely to be infertile than those of wild birds. Our findings raise important questions regarding the management of captive breeding programmes. PMID:22977070

  14. Hatching asynchrony in Burrowing Owls is influenced by clutch size and hatching success but not by food.

    PubMed

    Wellicome, Troy I

    2005-01-01

    In most animals, siblings from a given reproductive event emerge over a very short period of time. In contrast, many species of birds hatch their young asynchronously over a period of days or weeks, handicapping last-hatched chicks with an age and size disadvantage. Numerous studies have examined the adaptive significance of this atypical hatching pattern, but few have attempted to explain the considerable intrapopulation variation that exists in hatching asynchrony. I explored proximate determinants of hatching asynchrony by monitoring 112 Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) nests in the grasslands of southern Saskatchewan, Canada, over 4 years. Age disparities between first- and last-hatched siblings (i.e., hatching spans) varied considerably, ranging between 1 and 7 days (mode = 4 days). These hatching spans increased with increased hatching success. Hatching spans also increased with larger clutches, but the increase was less than predicted given the increased time required to lay more eggs. Hatching span was unrelated to number of prey cached in the nest during egg laying (an index of food availability), and was unaltered by a year of super-abundant prey. Furthermore, pairs given extra food during laying had hatching spans equal to those of unsupplemented control pairs. These results were inconsistent with both the energy constraint and facultative manipulation hypotheses, which predict that hatching asynchrony should vary with the level of food during laying, when incubation onset is determined. Burrowing Owls were apparently free of food limitation early in breeding, yet may not have been able to optimize hatching spans because food conditions during laying were largely unrelated to food conditions during brooding. Thus, one of the premises for facultative manipulation of hatching asynchrony-that laying females are able to forecast post-hatch food conditions-may not have been met for this population of Burrowing Owls. PMID:15480800

  15. Hatching asynchrony in Burrowing Owls is influenced by clutch size and hatching success but not by food.

    PubMed

    Wellicome, Troy I

    2005-01-01

    In most animals, siblings from a given reproductive event emerge over a very short period of time. In contrast, many species of birds hatch their young asynchronously over a period of days or weeks, handicapping last-hatched chicks with an age and size disadvantage. Numerous studies have examined the adaptive significance of this atypical hatching pattern, but few have attempted to explain the considerable intrapopulation variation that exists in hatching asynchrony. I explored proximate determinants of hatching asynchrony by monitoring 112 Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) nests in the grasslands of southern Saskatchewan, Canada, over 4 years. Age disparities between first- and last-hatched siblings (i.e., hatching spans) varied considerably, ranging between 1 and 7 days (mode = 4 days). These hatching spans increased with increased hatching success. Hatching spans also increased with larger clutches, but the increase was less than predicted given the increased time required to lay more eggs. Hatching span was unrelated to number of prey cached in the nest during egg laying (an index of food availability), and was unaltered by a year of super-abundant prey. Furthermore, pairs given extra food during laying had hatching spans equal to those of unsupplemented control pairs. These results were inconsistent with both the energy constraint and facultative manipulation hypotheses, which predict that hatching asynchrony should vary with the level of food during laying, when incubation onset is determined. Burrowing Owls were apparently free of food limitation early in breeding, yet may not have been able to optimize hatching spans because food conditions during laying were largely unrelated to food conditions during brooding. Thus, one of the premises for facultative manipulation of hatching asynchrony-that laying females are able to forecast post-hatch food conditions-may not have been met for this population of Burrowing Owls.

  16. STS-96 Astronauts Adjust Unity Hatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), astronauts Rick D. Husband and Tamara E. Jernigan adjust the hatch for the U.S. built Unity node. The task was part of an overall effort of seven crew members to prepare the existing portion of the International Space Station (ISS). Launched on May 27, 1999, aboard the Orbiter Discovery, the STS-96 mission was the second ISS assembly flight and the first shuttle mission to dock with the station.

  17. Armstrong and Scott with Hatches Open

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and David R. Scott sit with their spacecraft hatches open while awaiting the arrival of the recovery ship, the USS Leonard F. Mason after the successful completion of their Gemini VIII mission. They are assisted by U.S. Navy divers. The overhead view shows the Gemini 8 spacecraft with the yellow flotation collar attached to stabilize the spacecraft in choppy seas. The green marker dye is highly visible from the air and is used as a locating aid.

  18. Hatching Behavior of Potato Cyst Nematodes from the Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Phillips, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    The present work investigated early hatching differences in naturally occuring field populations and newly reared populations of potato cyst nematodes from the Canary Islands. Hatching behavior of the two species appears to be distinct, with more juveniles hatched from G. pallida that hatch earlier and over a shorter time than G. rostochiensis. The hatching rate of 3-year-old PCN populations was more than double (mean 44.5% ñ 1) that shown by newly reared populations (mean 19.1% ñ 12.5), and those that could be classified as pathotype Pa 1 (Pa 1 and P 13) were found to hatch particularly poorly. Significant differences were also observed in the juveniles released in tap water between newly reared populations of both species, with mean hatch significantly higher for G. rostochiensis. The results are discussed in relation to the implication that these findings may have for competition between the two species of PCN in the field. PMID:19277163

  19. Effects of hatching time for larval ambystomatid salamanders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Scott, D.E.; Niewiarowski, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    In aquatic communities, the phenology of breeding may influence species interactions. In the early-breeding marbled salamander, Ambystoma opacum, timing of pond filling may determine whether interactions among larvae are competitive or predatory. The objectives of our studies were to determine how time of egg hatching affected size, larval period, and survival to metamorphosis in A. opacum, and if early-hatching in A. opacum influenced the competitive and predator-prey relationships with smaller larvae of the mole salamander, Ambystoma talpoideum. Salamander larvae were reared from hatching through metamorphosis in large, outdoor enclosures located in a natural temporary pond in Aiken County, South Carolina, in two experiments. In study 1, we reared early- and late-hatching A. opacum larvae separately from hatching through metamorphosis. In study 2, we examined how early- versus late-hatching A. opacum affected a syntopic species, A. talpoideum. In general, early-hatching A. opacum were larger and older at metamorphosis, had greater survival, and left the pond earlier than late-hatching larvae. Ambystoma talpoideum reared in the presence of early-hatching A. opacum had lower survival than in controls, suggesting that A. opacum may predate upon A. talpoideum when they gain a growth advantage over later-hatching larvae. Our studies demonstrate that time of pond filling and phenology of breeding may influence population dynamics and alter the nature of relationships that develop among species.

  20. Understanding the Voice of the Customer: Practical, Data-Driven Planning and Decision Making for Access Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff-Eibl, Robyn; Miller-Wells, John; Begay, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the process and role frontline access and public service staff play in needs assessment and evaluation of user services, specifically in understanding the voice of the customer. Information includes how the University of Arizona Libraries have incorporated daily data collection into the strategic planning process, resources…

  1. Ovulation Order Mediates a Trade-Off between Pre-Hatching and Post-Hatching Viability in an Altricial Bird

    PubMed Central

    Sockman, Keith W.

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneously dependent siblings often compete for parentally provided resources. This competition may lead to mortality, the probability of which may be a function, in part, of the individual offspring's production order. In birds, serial ovulation followed by hatching asynchrony of simultaneous dependents leads to differences in post-hatching survival that largely depend on ovulation (laying) order. This has led to the widespread assumption that early-laid eggs are of greater value and therefore should possess different maternally manipulated characteristics than later-laid eggs. However, this perspective ignores the potential effect of laying order on pre-hatching viability, an effect which some studies suggest should offset the effect of laying order on post-hatching viability. I examined the relationship between laying order and hatching and fledging probability in wild, free-living Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii). In broods with complete hatching success, first-laid and therefore first-hatched offspring had the highest probability of fledging, and fledging probability declined with increasing laying order. However, first-laid eggs were less likely than later-laid eggs to hatch. This effect of laying order on pre-hatching viability seemed to offset that on post-hatching viability, and, consistently, maternal investment in egg size varied little if at all with respect to laying order. These results suggest that ovulation order mediates a trade-off between pre-hatching and post-hatching viability and should encourage a re-evaluation of the solitary role post-embryonic survival often plays when researchers make assumptions about the value of propagules based on the order in which they are produced. PMID:18335056

  2. A cicada that ensures its fitness during climate warming by synchronizing its hatching time with the rainy season.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Minoru; Numata, Hideharu

    2011-12-01

    A shift in phenology due to climate change is associated with some recent changes in populations, as it can disrupt the synchrony between organisms' requirements and resource availability. This conceptual framework has been developed mostly in systems of trophic interactions. Many coincidental changes, however, are involved in trophic interactions, preventing us from describing the direct impact of phenological shifts on fitness consequences. Here we address the phenological relationship in a simple non-trophic interaction to document a causal process of a warming-driven fitness change in a cicada, Cryptotympana facialis, whose numbers increased dramatically in Osaka, Japan in the late 20th century. We show that synchrony of the rainy season and hatching time may have a substantial influence on hatching success, by 1) shifting the time of completion of embryonic development, and 2) supplying water at various intervals. We estimate the change in hatching time over the last eleven decades (1901-2009) based on meteorological records and the temperature-dependent rate of C. facialis embryogenesis. Our estimate shows that hatching had initially occurred after the rainy season, and that warming had advanced it into the rainy season in the late 20th century. The probability of hatching success was markedly variable, and often very low before this synchronization occurred, but became stably high thereafter. Our findings suggest that the stabilizing effect of this synchrony on fitness was indispensable to the recent population increase of C. facialis.

  3. 29 CFR 780.211 - Contract production of hatching eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Contract production of hatching eggs. 780.211 Section 780... eggs. It is common practice for hatcherymen to enter into arrangements with farmer poultry raisers for the production of hatching eggs which the hatchery agrees to buy. Ordinarily, the farmer furnishes...

  4. 29 CFR 780.211 - Contract production of hatching eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Contract production of hatching eggs. 780.211 Section 780... eggs. It is common practice for hatcherymen to enter into arrangements with farmer poultry raisers for the production of hatching eggs which the hatchery agrees to buy. Ordinarily, the farmer furnishes...

  5. 29 CFR 780.211 - Contract production of hatching eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Contract production of hatching eggs. 780.211 Section 780... eggs. It is common practice for hatcherymen to enter into arrangements with farmer poultry raisers for the production of hatching eggs which the hatchery agrees to buy. Ordinarily, the farmer furnishes...

  6. 14. VIEW OF NORTHSOUTH ROAD WHICH PARALLELS ROAD TO HATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF NORTH-SOUTH ROAD WHICH PARALLELS ROAD TO HATCH ADIT (FEATURE B-28). NOTE MODERN 'LAY DOWN' FENCE ON ROAD. ROAD LIES TO THE WEST OF THE HATCH ADIT AND PHOTOGRAPH IS VIEW TO THE SOUTH. (OCTOBER, 1995) - Nevada Lucky Tiger Mill & Mine, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  7. 29 CFR 780.211 - Contract production of hatching eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contract production of hatching eggs. 780.211 Section 780... eggs. It is common practice for hatcherymen to enter into arrangements with farmer poultry raisers for the production of hatching eggs which the hatchery agrees to buy. Ordinarily, the farmer furnishes...

  8. 46 CFR 131.893 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.893 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Each watertight door in a bulkhead that must be watertight in compliance with the requirements in... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 131.893...

  9. 46 CFR 131.893 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.893 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Each watertight door in a bulkhead that must be watertight in compliance with the requirements in... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 131.893...

  10. 46 CFR 131.893 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.893 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Each watertight door in a bulkhead that must be watertight in compliance with the requirements in... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 131.893...

  11. 46 CFR 131.893 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.893 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Each watertight door in a bulkhead that must be watertight in compliance with the requirements in... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 131.893...

  12. 46 CFR 131.893 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.893 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Each watertight door in a bulkhead that must be watertight in compliance with the requirements in... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 131.893...

  13. Effect of storage environment on hatching of Globodera ellingtonae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Globodera spp. eggs go through a diapause stage in which development remains dormant until favorable hatching conditions are reached. Because of the regulatory concerns with Globodera spp., it is often only possible to rear eggs for research in the greenhouse. However, hatch is often lower for green...

  14. Wireless access to a pharmaceutical database: A demonstrator for data driven Wireless Application Protocol applications in medical information processing

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Michael Schacht

    2001-01-01

    Background The Wireless Application Protocol technology implemented in newer mobile phones has built-in facilities for handling much of the information processing needed in clinical work. Objectives To test a practical approach we ported a relational database of the Danish pharmaceutical catalogue to Wireless Application Protocol using open source freeware at all steps. Methods We used Apache 1.3 web software on a Linux server. Data containing the Danish pharmaceutical catalogue were imported from an ASCII file into a MySQL 3.22.32 database using a Practical Extraction and Report Language script for easy update of the database. Data were distributed in 35 interrelated tables. Each pharmaceutical brand name was given its own card with links to general information about the drug, active substances, contraindications etc. Access was available through 1) browsing therapeutic groups and 2) searching for a brand name. The database interface was programmed in the server-side scripting language PHP3. Results A free, open source Wireless Application Protocol gateway to a pharmaceutical catalogue was established to allow dial-in access independent of commercial Wireless Application Protocol service providers. The application was tested on the Nokia 7110 and Ericsson R320s cellular phones. Conclusions We have demonstrated that Wireless Application Protocol-based access to a dynamic clinical database can be established using open source freeware. The project opens perspectives for a further integration of Wireless Application Protocol phone functions in clinical information processing: Global System for Mobile communication telephony for bilateral communication, asynchronous unilateral communication via e-mail and Short Message Service, built-in calculator, calendar, personal organizer, phone number catalogue and Dictaphone function via answering machine technology. An independent Wireless Application Protocol gateway may be placed within hospital firewalls, which may be an

  15. Chronic restricted access to food leading to undernutrition affects rat neuroendocrine status and olfactory-driven behaviors.

    PubMed

    Badonnel, Karine; Lacroix, Marie-Christine; Monnerie, Régine; Durieux, Didier; Caillol, Monique; Baly, Christine

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that olfactory-driven behaviors in rats are influenced by short-term caloric restriction, partly through the modulation of olfactory sensitivity by appetite-modulating hormones or peptides such as insulin and leptin. Here, we addressed the issue of a long-term modulation of their neuroendocrine status by evaluating the effect of chronic food restriction in rats following a limitation of the duration of daily food intake to 2 h (SF) instead of 8 h (LF) on the expression of insulin and leptin system in the olfactory mucosa and bulb and on olfactory behaviors. This restriction resulted in a one-third reduction in the daily food intake and a 25% reduction in the body weight of SF rats when compared to controls, and was accompanied by lower levels of triglycerides, glucose, insulin and leptin in SF rats. Under these conditions, we observed a modulation of olfactory-mediated behaviors regarding food odors. In addition, restriction had a differential effect on the expression of insulin receptors, but not that of leptin receptors, in the olfactory mucosa, whereas no transcriptional change was observed at the upper level of the olfactory bulb. Overall, these data demonstrated that long-term changes in nutritional status modulate olfactory-mediated behaviors. Modulation of insulin system expression in the olfactory mucosa of food restricted rats suggests that this hormone could be part of this process.

  16. Advancing Long Tail Data Capture and Access Through Trusted, Community-Driven Data Services at the IEDA Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Hsu, L.; Arko, R. A.; Walker, J. D.; O'hara, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    Substantial volumes of data in the Earth Sciences are collected in small- to medium-size projects by individual investigators or small research teams, known as the 'Long Tail' of science. Traditionally, these data have largely stayed 'in the dark', i.e. they have not been properly archived, and have therefore been inaccessible and underutilized. The primary reason has been the lack of appropriate infrastructure, from adequate repositories to resources and support for investigators to properly manage their data, to community standards and best practices. Lack of credit for data management and for the data themselves has contributed to the reluctance of investigators to share their data. IEDA (Integrated Earth Data Applications), a NSF-funded data facility for solid earth geoscience data, has developed a comprehensive suite of data services that are designed to address the concerns and needs of investigators. IEDA's data publication service registers datasets with DOI and ensures their proper citation and attribution. IEDA is working with publishers on advanced linkages between datasets in the IEDA repository and scientific online articles to facilitate access to the data, enhance their visibility, and augment their use and citation. IEDA's investigator support ranges from individual support for data management to tools, tutorials, and virtual or face-to-face workshops that guide and assist investigators with data management planning, data submission, and data documentation. A critical aspect of IEDA's concept has been the disciplinary expertise within the team and its strong liaison with the science community, as well as a community-based governance. These have been fundamental to gain the trust and support of the community that have lead to significantly improved data preservation and access in the communities served by IEDA.

  17. Can-out hatch assembly and positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Basnar, Paul J.; Frank, Robert C.; Hoh, Joseph C.

    1986-01-01

    A can-out hatch assembly is adapted to engage in a sealed manner the upper end of a covered sealed container around an aperture in a sealed chamber and to remove the cover from the container permitting a contaminant to be transferred between the container and the chamber while isolating internal portions of the container and chamber from the surrounding environment. A swing bracket is coupled at a first end thereof to the inner, lower wall of the sealed container adjacent to the aperture therein. To a second end of the swing bracket is mounted a hatch cover which may be positioned in sealed engagement about the chamber's aperture by rotating the hatch cover in a first direction when the swing bracket is in the full down position. Rotation of the hatch cover in a second direction releases it from sealed engagement with the chamber's aperture. A lid support rod also coupled to the second end of the swing bracket and inserted through an aperture in the center of the hatch cover may be rotated for threadably engaging the container's cover whereupon the cover may be removed from the container and the hatch cover displaced from the aperture by pivoting displacement of the swing bracket. The contaminant may then be either removed from the container and placed within the sealed chamber, or vice versa, followed by positioning of the cover upon the container and the hatch cover over the aperture in a sealed manner.

  18. Can-out hatch assembly and positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Basnar, P.J.; Frank, R.C.; Hoh, J.C.

    1985-07-03

    A can-out hatch assembly is adapted to engage in a sealed manner the upper end of a covered sealed container around an aperture in a sealed chamber and to remove the cover from the container permitting a contaminant to be transferred between the container and the chamber while isolating internal portions of the container and chamber from the surrounding environment. A swing bracket is coupled at a first end thereof to the inner, lower wall of the sealed container adjacent to the aperture therein. To a second end of the swing bracket is mounted a hatch cover which may be positioned in sealed engagement about the chamber's aperture by rotating the hatch cover in a first direction when the swing bracket is in the full down position. Rotation of the hatch cover in a second direction release it from sealed engagement with the chamber's aperture. A lid support rod also coupled to the second end of the swing bracket and inserted through an aperture in the center of the hatch cover may be rotated for theadably engaging the container's cover whereupon the cover may be removed from the container and the hatch cover displaced from the aperture by pivoting displacement of the swing bracket. The contaminant may then be either removed from the container and placed within the sealed chamber, or vice versa, followed by positioning of the cover upon the container and the hatch cover over the aperture in a sealed manner.

  19. Can-out hatch assembly and positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Basnar, Paul J.; Frank, Robert C.; Hoh, Joseph C.

    1986-01-07

    A can-out hatch assembly is adapted to engage in a sealed manner the upper end of a covered sealed container around an aperture in a sealed chamber and to remove the cover from the container permitting a contaminant to be transferred between the container and the chamber while isolating internal portions of the container and chamber from the surrounding environment. A swing bracket is coupled at a first end thereof to the inner, lower wall of the sealed container adjacent to the aperture therein. To a second end of the swing bracket is mounted a hatch cover which may be positioned in sealed engagement about the chamber's aperture by rotating the hatch cover in a first direction when the swing bracket is in the full down position. Rotation of the hatch cover in a second direction releases it from sealed engagement with the chamber's aperture. A lid support rod also coupled to the second end of the swing bracket and inserted through an aperture in the center of the hatch cover may be rotated for threadably engaging the container's cover whereupon the cover may be removed from the container and the hatch cover displaced from the aperture by pivoting displacement of the swing bracket. The contaminant may then be either removed from the container and placed within the sealed chamber, or vice versa, followed by positioning of the cover upon the container and the hatch cover over the aperture in a sealed manner.

  20. Can-out hatch assembly with magnetic retention means

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Robert C.; Hoh, Joseph C.

    1986-01-07

    A can-out hatch assembly may be positioned in sealed engagement about an aperture within a chamber and is adapted to engage a cover on a container positioned over the aperture to allow the transfer of a contaminant from the chamber to the container while maintaining the contaminant as well as internal portions of the chamber and container isolated from the surrounding environment. With the container's cover engaged by the can-out hatch assembly, the hatch assembly as well as the cover may be pivotally displaced from the aperture with the cover maintaining the exterior portion of the hatch assembly isolated from the contaminant. After the contaminant is transferred from the chamber to the container, the hatch assembly and cover are again positioned in sealed engagement about the aperture. The hatch assembly then positions the cover upon the open end of the container in a sealed manner allowing the container to be removed while maintaining the chamber sealed relative to the surrounding environment. The can-out hatch assembly is particularly adapted for operation by remote control means within the sealed chamber.

  1. Can-out hatch assembly with magnetic retention means

    DOEpatents

    Frank, R.C.; Hoh, J.C.

    1985-07-03

    A can-out hatch assembly may be positioned in sealed engagement about aperture within a chamber and is adapted to engage a cover on a container positioned over the aperture to allow the transfer of a contaminant from the chamber to the container while maintaining the contaminant as well as internal portions of the chamber and container isolated from the surrounding environment. With the container's cover engaged by the can-out hatch assembly, the hatch assembly as well as the cover may be pivotally displaced from the aperture with the cover maintaining the exterior portion of the hatch assembly isolated from the contaminant. After the contaminant is transferred from the chamber to the container, the hatch assembly and cover are again positioned in sealed engagement about the aperture. The hatch assembly then positions the cover upon the open end of the container in a sealed manner allowing the container to be removed while maintaining the chamber sealed relative to the surrounding environment. The can-out hatch assembly is particularly adapted for operation by remote control means within the sealed chamber.

  2. Can-out hatch assembly with magnetic retention means

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Robert C.; Hoh, Joseph C.

    1986-01-01

    A can-out hatch assembly may be positioned in sealed engagement about an aperture within a chamber and is adapted to engage a cover on a container positioned over the aperture to allow the transfer of a contaminant from the chamber to the container while maintaining the contaminant as well as internal portions of the chamber and container isolated from the surrounding environment. With the container's cover engaged by the can-out hatch assembly, the hatch assembly as well as the cover may be pivotally displaced from the aperture with the cover maintaining the exterior portion of the hatch assembly isolated from the contaminant. After the contaminant is transferred from the chamber to the container, the hatch assembly and cover are again positioned in sealed engagement about the aperture. The hatch assembly then positions the cover upon the open end of the container in a sealed manner allowing the container to be removed while maintaining the chamber sealed relative to the surrounding environment. The can-out hatch assembly is particularly adapted for operation by remote control means within the sealed chamber.

  3. A novel report of hatching plasticity in the phylum Echinodermata.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, A Frances; Blackburn, Holly N; Allen, Jonathan D

    2013-02-01

    Hatching plasticity occurs in response to a wide range of stimuli across many animal taxa, including annelids, arthropods, mollusks, and chordates. Despite the prominence of echinoderms in developmental biology and more than 100 years of detailed examination of their development under a variety of conditions, environmentally cued hatching plasticity has never been reported in the phylum Echinodermata. Here we report plasticity in the timing and stage of hatching of embryos of the sand dollar Echinarachnius parma in response to reductions in salinity. Embryos of E. parma increased their time to hatching more than twofold in response to ecologically relevant salinity reductions, while maintaining an otherwise normal developmental schedule. Embryos that experienced the greatest delay in hatching time emerged from the fertilization envelope as four-arm pluteus larvae rather than hatching as blastulae or early gastrulae. Salinity manipulations across multiple male-female pairs indicated high variability in hatching time both within and among clutches, suggesting significant intraspecific variation in developmental responses to salinity.

  4. Circadian rhythms of embryonic development and hatching in fish: a comparative study of zebrafish (diurnal), Senegalese sole (nocturnal), and Somalian cavefish (blind).

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Natalia; Blanco-Vives, Borja; Oliveira, Catarina; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Di Rosa, Viviana; Negrini, Pietro; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2013-08-01

    cavefish embryos hatched at 28°C, and 93.1±2.9% of the sole embryos hatched at 21°C). In summary, these results revealed that hatching rhythms in fish are endogenously driven by a time-keeping mechanism, so that the day and time of hatching are determined by the interplay between the developmental state (temperature-sensitive) and the circadian clock (temperature-compensated), with the particular phasing being determined by the diurnal/nocturnal behavior of the species. PMID:23697903

  5. 8. INTERIOR VIEW OF STATION PARLEY LOOKING THROUGH THE HATCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR VIEW OF STATION PARLEY LOOKING THROUGH THE HATCH, SHOWING THE FLOOR AND THE INSTRUMENT PEDESTAL WITH HARDWARE. - White's Point Reservation, Base End Stations, B"6, Bounded by Voyager Circle & Mariner Drive, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 46 CFR 174.220 - Hatches and coamings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... be only weathertight: (1) Each hatch on a watertight trunk that extends at least 430 millimeters (17... coaming at least 380 millimeters (15 inches) high must be installed for each opening in a deckhouse...

  7. 46 CFR 174.220 - Hatches and coamings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... be only weathertight: (1) Each hatch on a watertight trunk that extends at least 430 millimeters (17... coaming at least 380 millimeters (15 inches) high must be installed for each opening in a deckhouse...

  8. Interior below decks in fish hold looking forward. Fish hatch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior below decks in fish hold looking forward. Fish hatch opening is at upper left, ceiling planks and knees at center and right. - Purse Seiner SHENANDOAH, Gig Harbor Peninsula Historical Society and Museum, Gig Harbor, Pierce County, WA

  9. 9. Mispillion Lighthouse, Tower Lantern Floor Hatch Mispillion Lighthouse, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Mispillion Lighthouse, Tower Lantern Floor Hatch - Mispillion Lighthouse, South bank of Mispillion River at its confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  10. 13. VIEW LOOKING EAST, REMAINS OF HATCH COVER AND CHUTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW LOOKING EAST, REMAINS OF HATCH COVER AND CHUTE TO SMALL HOPPER, GRAIN LEGS, AND CONVEYOR DRIVE SHAFT FROM TRACK DECK - West Shore Railroad, Pier 7 Grain Elevator, Hudson River & Pershing Road vicinity, West New York, Hudson County, NJ

  11. 10. VIEW OF SILO DOORS, AIR VENTS, AND ESCAPE HATCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF SILO DOORS, AIR VENTS, AND ESCAPE HATCH, LOOKING EAST. WHITE STRUCTURES BELONG TO CURRENT OCCUPANTS Everett Weinreb, photographer, April 1988 - Los Pinetos Nike Missile Site, Santa Clara Road, Los Angeles National Forest, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 14. View inside Building 802, the "Escape Hatch" at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View inside Building 802, the "Escape Hatch" at the rear of the "Sleeping Quarters", facing south. - Naval Air Station Fallon, 100-man Fallout Shelter, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  13. BLDG 10, INTERIOR DETAIL OF WINDOW AND CEILING FEED HATCHES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 10, INTERIOR DETAIL OF WINDOW AND CEILING FEED HATCHES - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Storage Building, Kolekole Road near Sixty-first Street intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. 52. Patent steering gear, hatch and steering compass binnacle, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Patent steering gear, hatch and steering compass binnacle, view from starboard looking aft. Photograph by Jet Lowe, April 1988. - Ship BALCLUTHA, 2905 Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. Edwin I. Hatch nuclear plant implementation of improved technical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, S.R.; Pendry, D.

    1994-12-31

    Edwin I. Hatch nuclear plant consists of two General Electric boiling water reactor/4 units, with a common control room and a common refueling floor. In March 1993, Hatch began conversion of both units` technical specifications utilizing NUREG 1433. The technical specifications amendment request was submitted February 25, 1994. Issuance is scheduled for October 21, 1994, with implementation on March 15, 1994. The current unit-1 technical specifications are in the {open_quotes}custom{close_quotes} format, and the unit-2 technical specifications are in the old standard format. Hatch previously relocated the fire protection and radiological technical specifications requirements. The Hatch conversion will provide consistency between the two units, to the extent practicable.

  16. Astronaut Richard Gordon returns to hatch of spacecraft following EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., pilot for the Gemini 11 space flight, returns to the hatch of the spacecraft following extravehicular activity (EVA). This picture was taken over the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 160 nautical miles above the earth's surface.

  17. DETAIL OF OPEN HATCH SHOWING INTERIOR OF MISSILE TUBE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF OPEN HATCH SHOWING INTERIOR OF MISSILE TUBE AND OPEN HATCH AND DOOR ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF TUBE (AT THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB). VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. Convair-240 aircraft modified with shuttle hatch for CES testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Shuttle Crew Escape System (CES) hardware includes space shuttle side hatch incorporated into Convair-240 aircraft at Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California. Closeup shows dummy positioned in the Convair-240 escape hatch. Beginning this month, tests will be conducted here to evaluate a tractor rocket system - one of two escape methods being studied by NASA to provide crew egress capability during Space Shuttle controlled gliding flight.

  19. Hatching the Cleidoic Egg: The Role of Thyroid Hormones

    PubMed Central

    De Groef, Bert; Grommen, Sylvia V.H.; Darras, Veerle M.

    2013-01-01

    A major life stage transition in birds and other oviparous sauropsids is the hatching of the cleidoic egg. Not unlike amphibian metamorphosis, hatching in these species can be regarded as a transition from a relatively well-protected “aqueous” environment to a more hazardous and terrestrial life outside the egg, a transition in which thyroid hormones (THs) (often in concert with glucocorticoids) play an important role. In precocial birds such as the chicken, the perihatch period is characterized by peak values of THs. THs are implicated in the control of muscle development, lung maturation and the switch from chorioallantoic to pulmonary respiration, yolk sac retraction, gut development and induction of hepatic genes to accommodate the change in dietary energy source, initiation of thermoregulation, and the final stages of brain maturation as well as early post-hatch imprinting behavior. There is evidence that, at least for some of these processes, THs may have similar roles in non-avian sauropsids. In altricial birds such as passerines on the other hand, THs do not rise significantly until well after hatching and peak values coincide with the development of endothermy. It is not known how hatching-associated processes are regulated by hormones in these animals or how this developmental mode evolved from TH-dependent precocial hatching. PMID:23755041

  20. Consequences of induced hatching plasticity depend on predator community.

    PubMed

    Wojdak, Jeremy M; Touchon, Justin C; Hite, Jessica L; Meyer, Beth; Vonesh, James R

    2014-08-01

    Many prey species face trade-offs in the timing of life history switch points like hatching and metamorphosis. Costs associated with transitioning early depend on the biotic and abiotic conditions found in the subsequent life stage. The red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas, faces risks from predators in multiple, successive life stages, and can hatch early in response to mortality threats at the egg stage. Here we tested how the consequences of life history plasticity, specifically early hatching in response to terrestrial egg predators, depend on the assemblage of aquatic larval predators. We predicted that diverse predator assemblages would impose lower total predation pressure than the most effective single predator species and might thereby reduce the costs of hatching early. We then conducted a mesocosm experiment where we crossed hatchling phenotype (early vs. normal hatching) with five larval-predator environments (no predators, either waterbugs, dragonflies, or mosquitofish singly, or all three predator species together). The consequences of hatching early varied across predator treatments, and tended to disappear through time in some predation treatments, notably the waterbug and diverse predator assemblages. We demonstrate that the fitness costs of life history plasticity in an early life stage depend critically on the predator community composition in the next stage.

  1. Assisted hatching in assisted reproduction: a state of the art.

    PubMed

    Hammadeh, Mohamad Eid; Fischer-Hammadeh, Constanze; Ali, Khaled Refaat

    2011-02-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that one in six couples experience some delay in conception and an increasing number require treatment by the assisted conception (AC) procedures of in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).The implantation rate of embryos resulting from in vitro fertilization cycles is generally less than 20%. The exposure of oocytes and embryos to the artificial conditions of in vitro culture may have negative effects on the embryo's ability to undergo normal hatching, resulting in low rates of implantation following IVF and embryo transfer. Human embryos resulting from superovulation develop more slowly in vitro compared to embryos in vivo, manifest a relatively high degree of cytogenetic abnormalities and undergo cellular fragmentation. Artificially disrupting the zona pellucida is known as assisted hatching (AH) and there is some evidence that embryos that have undergone zona manipulation for assisted hatching tend to implant one day earlier than unhatched embryos. A variety of techniques have since been employed to assist embryo hatching, including partial mechanical zona dissection, zona drilling and zona thinning, making use of acid tyrodes, proteinases, piezon vibrator manipulators and lasers. This review will consider the impact of IVF conditions on zona pellucida physiology, zona hardening, different techniques of assisted hatching, who may benefit from assisted hatching and potential hazards.

  2. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  3. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  4. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  5. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  6. Maternal Vibration: An Important Cue for Embryo Hatching in a Subsocial Shield Bug

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Hiromi; Hironaka, Mantaro; Tojo, Sumio; Nomakuchi, Shintaro

    2014-01-01

    Hatching care has been reported for many taxonomic groups, from invertebrates to vertebrates. The sophisticated care that occurs around hatching time is expected to have an adaptive function supporting the feeble young. However, details of the characteristics of the adaptive function of hatching care remain unclear. This study investigated the hatching care of the subsocial shield bug, Parastrachia japonensis (Heteroptera: Parastrachiidae) to verify its function. Results show that the P. japonensis mothers vibrated the egg mass intermittently while maintaining an egg-guarding posture. Then embryos started to emerge from their shells synchronously. Unlike such behaviors of closely related species, this vibrating behavior was faint, but lasted more than 6 h. To investigate the effect of this behavior on hatching synchrony and hatching success, we observed the hatching pattern and the hatching rate in control, mother-removed, and two artificial vibration groups. Control broods experienced continuous guarding from the mother. Intermittent artificial vibration broods were exposed to vibrations that matched the temporal pattern of maternal vibration produced by a motor. They showed synchronous hatching patterns and high hatching rates. However, for mother-removed broods, which were isolated from the mother, and when we provided continuous artificial vibration that did not match the temporal pattern of the maternal vibration, embryo hatching was not only asynchronous: some embryos failed to emerge from their shells. These results lead us to infer that hatching care in P. japonensis has two functions: hatching regulation and hatching assistance. Nevertheless, several points of observational and circumstantial evidence clearly contraindicate hatching assistance. A reduction in the hatching rate might result from dependence on maternal hatching care as a strong cue in P. japonensis. We conclude that the hatching care of P. japonensis regulates the hatching pattern and serves

  7. Hatching asynchrony in American Goldfinches: an experimental study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, Susan Knight

    1987-01-01

    I examined Lack's (1954, 1968) hypothesis that asynchronous hatching is an adaptive response to food shortage during the breeding season by comparing growth and survival of nestlings in asynchronous and artificially created synchronous broods of American Goldfinches (Carduelis tristis). I also examined the effects of seasonal and environmental factors on nestling growth and survival and on hatching asynchrony. Nestlings in asynchronous broods were more likely to diverge in mass and did so at a faster rate than those in synchronous broods. The lightest nestlings of asynchronous broods grew more slowly than their heavier nestmates and than all nestlings in synchronous broods. Brood reduction occurred more frequently in asynchronous broods. Survival and growth rates decreased throughout the breeding season and during inclement weather. Hatching intervals increased during the season. When brood reduction or differential growth among nestmates occurred in asynchronous broods, suggesting that the energy available for growth was limiting, heavy nestlings in asynchronous broods grew nonsignificantly faster than heavy nestlings in concurrent synchronous broods. This trend implies that when insufficient food is delivered to nestlings, asynchronous hatching may provide a slight advantage for older nestlings. Growth rates of all nestlings, however, were greatest in highly synchronous broods. Explanations other than growth of young must be invoked to explain why extreme synchrony is not more common in goldfinches. I discuss constraints on the normal pattern of hatching asynchrony characteristic of this species. The proximate mechanism for differential feeding and brood reduction is discussed.

  8. Hatch Timing Variations Among Reservoir Gizzard Shad Populations: Implications for Stocked Sander spp. Fingerlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zweifela, Richard D.; Bunnell, David B.; Bremiganc, Mary T.; Hale, R. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Growth and survival of stocked Sander spp. fingerlings can be influenced by timing of stocking in relation to the peak in density of larval gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum. However, coordinating stockings to coincide with peaks in gizzard shad density is difficult due to temporal variation in spawn timing among reservoirs. We used weekly estimates of larval gizzard shad density and length distributions to identify dates of peak hatching and peak total density in Ohio reservoirs and to explore the influence of spring water temperature regimes on timing of peak larval density. Gizzard shad density peaked over 21–32 d among reservoirs but generally varied by 12 d or less among years for any given population. Density peaks were driven by hatching, as larvae smaller than 10 mm accounted for a majority of the gizzard shad collected on the peak date. Peaks in gizzard shad density corresponded to water temperatures of 17–22°C and occurred most frequently when water temperatures had been stable or rising. Reservoirs in the southern portion of the state were 2–5°C warmer than northern reservoirs throughout the spring; thus, gizzard shad spawning and date of peak larval density were earliest in southern reservoirs and became progressively later for populations in more northerly reservoirs. Historical stocking dates for fingerling walleyes S. vitreus and saugeyes (sauger S. canadensis × walleye) in Ohio reservoirs indicated that southern reservoirs were often stocked after the expected peak in gizzard shad density and northern reservoirs were stocked before the peak. A statewide approach to stocking that incorporates latitudinal variations in gizzard shad hatch timing whereby southern reservoirs are stocked earliest would better align stockings with peak gizzard shad density, potentially improving survival of fingerling walleyes and saugeyes.

  9. Heartbeat, embryo communication and hatching synchrony in snake eggs.

    PubMed

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Bignon, Florent; Kok, Philippe J R

    2016-01-01

    Communication is central to life at all levels of complexity, from cells to organs, through to organisms and communities. Turtle eggs were recently shown to communicate with each other in order to synchronise their development and generate beneficial hatching synchrony. Yet the mechanism underlying embryo to embryo communication remains unknown. Here we show that within a clutch, developing snake embryos use heart beats emanating from neighbouring eggs as a clue for their metabolic level, in order to synchronise development and ultimately hatching. Eggs of the water snake Natrix maura increased heart rates and hatched earlier than control eggs in response to being incubated in physical contact with more advanced eggs. The former produced shorter and slower swimming young than their control siblings. Our results suggest potential fitness consequences of embryo to embryo communication and describe a novel driver for the evolution of egg-clustering behaviour in animals. PMID:26988725

  10. Heartbeat, embryo communication and hatching synchrony in snake eggs

    PubMed Central

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Bignon, Florent; Kok, Philippe J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Communication is central to life at all levels of complexity, from cells to organs, through to organisms and communities. Turtle eggs were recently shown to communicate with each other in order to synchronise their development and generate beneficial hatching synchrony. Yet the mechanism underlying embryo to embryo communication remains unknown. Here we show that within a clutch, developing snake embryos use heart beats emanating from neighbouring eggs as a clue for their metabolic level, in order to synchronise development and ultimately hatching. Eggs of the water snake Natrix maura increased heart rates and hatched earlier than control eggs in response to being incubated in physical contact with more advanced eggs. The former produced shorter and slower swimming young than their control siblings. Our results suggest potential fitness consequences of embryo to embryo communication and describe a novel driver for the evolution of egg-clustering behaviour in animals. PMID:26988725

  11. Effects of freshwater petroleum contamination on amphibian hatching and metamorphosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaney, P.A. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1994-02-01

    This study examined the effects of freshwater petroleum contamination on amphibian reproduction. The primary objectives were to assess the potential environmental and physiological impacts of runoff petroleum products on amphibians, using the green tree frog (Hyla cinerea) as a target species and engine crankcase oil as a contaminant. Egg hatching success, tadpole growth, and successful metamorphosis were measured in four concentrations of oil. The effects of oil on food source was also studied. Hatching success was not measurably influenced by the presence of oil. Tadpole and alga growth were negatively associated with the presence of oil. No tadpoles from the high concentration of oil treatments successfully metamorphosed.

  12. DETAIL OF MISSILE TUBE HATCH WITH MILLED FITTINGS AT GROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF MISSILE TUBE HATCH WITH MILLED FITTINGS AT GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. 11. BUOY DECK, NEAR PILOT HOUSE SUPERSTRUCTURE, LOOKING TOWARDS HATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BUOY DECK, NEAR PILOT HOUSE SUPERSTRUCTURE, LOOKING TOWARDS HATCH DOOR INTO WINCH ROOM IN THE SUPERSTRUCTURE (LABELED AT PASSAGE & HYDRAULIC MACHINERY ON PLAN). - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. 6. Detail of forward fuselage showing open cockpit hatch and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of forward fuselage showing open cockpit hatch and ladder. View to southeast. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  15. 46 CFR 78.17-35 - Hatches and other openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... voyage: (1) Watertight doors between cargo spaces prescribed in § 170.275 of this chapter. (2) Portable... spaces appropriated alternately to the carriage of cargo and passengers, when cargo is carried. Dead covers on such port lights shall also be secured. (c) The time of opening and closing of hatches...

  16. PLAN SECTIONS AND DETAILS OF CELL HATCHES MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLAN SECTIONS AND DETAILS OF CELL HATCHES MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0601-00-291-103256. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 542-11-F-302. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Culture, feeding, and growth of alewives hatched in the laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinrich, John W.

    1981-01-01

    Alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) were reared from the egg to the early juvenile life stage. The major obstacle to rearing alewives from the egg- providing an acceptable food that facilitates first feeding- was overcome by presenting a mixture of wild zooplankton to the larvae twice daily, beginning on the day of hatching. Initial feeding by larvae held at 20A?C was observed 2 days after hatching, when the yolk was nearly absorbed. Comparison of stomach contents and the wild zooplankton composition suggested that the diet of larvae during the first 15 days of life shifted with changes in the availability of food but remained within a fairly narrow range of food sizes. Larvae hatched at a mean total length of 3.8 mm and grew at an average rate of 0.62 mm per day, to a mean of 35.5 mm after 50 days. At 50 days most fish had transformed into juveniles. The daily instantaneous mortality coefficient was 0.018. About half of the mortality occurred during the first 13 days after hatching.

  18. HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF PLENUM WITH ATTACHED DRAFT REGULATOR. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  19. 11. BUOY DECK, NEAR PILOT HOUSE SUPERSTRUCTURE, LOOKING TOWARDS HATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BUOY DECK, NEAR PILOT HOUSE SUPERSTRUCTURE, LOOKING TOWARDS HATCH DOOR INTO WINCH ROOM IN THE SUPERSTRUCTURE (LABELED AS FASSAGE & HYDRAULIC MACHINERY ON PLAN), SHOWING UNDERSIDE OF GEARED WHEEL OF BOOM. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  20. 2. WEST REAR, WITH PORTHOLE ESCAPE HATCH ABOVE ENTRY DOOR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST REAR, WITH PORTHOLE ESCAPE HATCH ABOVE ENTRY DOOR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Oxygenation of anoxic sediments triggers hatching of zooplankton eggs.

    PubMed

    Broman, Elias; Brüsin, Martin; Dopson, Mark; Hylander, Samuel

    2015-10-22

    Many coastal marine systems have extensive areas with anoxic sediments and it is not well known how these conditions affect the benthic-pelagic coupling. Zooplankton lay their eggs in the pelagic zone, and some sink and lie dormant in the sediment, before hatched zooplankton return to the water column. In this study, we investigated how oxygenation of long-term anoxic sediments affects the hatching frequency of dormant zooplankton eggs. Anoxic sediments from the brackish Baltic Sea were sampled and incubated for 26 days with constant aeration whereby, the sediment surface and the overlying water were turned oxic. Newly hatched rotifers and copepod nauplii (juveniles) were observed after 5 and 8 days, respectively. Approximately 1.5 × 10(5) nauplii m(-2) emerged from sediment turned oxic compared with 0.02 × 10(5) m(-2) from controls maintained anoxic. This study demonstrated that re-oxygenation of anoxic sediments activated a large pool of buried zooplankton eggs, strengthening the benthic-pelagic coupling of the system. Modelling of the studied anoxic zone suggested that a substantial part of the pelagic copepod population can derive from hatching of dormant eggs. We suggest that this process should be included in future studies to understand population dynamics and carbon flows in marine pelagic systems.

  2. Next-Generation MKIII Lightweight HUT/Hatch Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, Mike; Toscano, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    The MK III (H-1) carbon-graphite/ epoxy Hard Upper Torso (HUT)/Hatch assembly was designed, fabricated, and tested in the early 1990s. The spacesuit represented an 8.3 psi (˜58 kPa) technology demonstrator model of a zero prebreathe suit. The basic torso shell, brief, and hip areas of the suit were composed of a carbon-graphite/epoxy composite lay-up. In its current configuration, the suit weighs approximately 120 lb (˜54 kg). However, since future planetary suits will be designed to operate at 0.26 bar (˜26 kPa), it was felt that the suit's re-designed weight could be reduced to 79 lb (˜35 kg) with the incorporation of lightweight structural materials. Many robust, lightweight structures based on the technologies of advanced honeycomb materials, revolutionary new composite laminates, metal matrix composites, and recent breakthroughs in fullerene fillers and nanotechnology lend themselves well to applications requiring materials that are both light and strong. The major problem involves the reduction in weight of the HUT/ Hatch assembly for use in lunar and/or planetary applications, while at the same time maintaining a robust structural design. The technical objective is to research, design, and develop manufacturing methods that support fa b rica - tion of a lightweight HUT/Hatch assembly using advanced material and geometric redesign as necessary. Additionally, the lightweight HUT/Hatch assembly will interface directly with current MK III hardware. Using the new operating pressure and current MK III (H-1) interfaces as a starting block, it is planned to maximize HUT/Hatch assembly weight reduction through material selection and geometric redesign. A hard upper torso shell structure with rear-entry closure and corresponding hatch will be fabricated. The lightweight HUT/Hatch assembly will retrofit and interface with existing MK III (H-1) hardware elements, providing NASA with immediate "plug-andplay" capability. NASA crewmembers will have a lightweight

  3. How embryos escape from danger: the mechanism of rapid, plastic hatching in red-eyed treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Kristina L; Seid, Marc A; Warkentin, Karen M

    2016-06-15

    Environmentally cued hatching allows embryos to escape dangers and exploit new opportunities. Such adaptive responses require a flexibly regulated hatching mechanism sufficiently fast to meet relevant challenges. Anurans show widespread, diverse cued hatching responses, but their described hatching mechanisms are slow, and regulation of timing is unknown. Arboreal embryos of red-eyed treefrogs, Agalychnis callidryas, escape from snake attacks and other threats by very rapid premature hatching. We used videography, manipulation of hatching embryos and electron microscopy to investigate their hatching mechanism. High-speed video revealed three stages of the hatching process: pre-rupture shaking and gaping, vitelline membrane rupture near the snout, and muscular thrashing to exit through the hole. Hatching took 6.5-49 s. We hypothesized membrane rupture to be enzymatic, with hatching enzyme released from the snout during shaking. To test this, we displaced hatching embryos to move their snout from its location during shaking. The membrane ruptured at the original snout position and embryos became trapped in collapsed capsules; they either moved repeatedly to relocate the hole or shook again and made a second hole to exit. Electron microscopy revealed that hatching glands are densely concentrated on the snout and absent elsewhere. They are full of vesicles in embryos and release most of their contents rapidly at hatching. Agalychnis callidryas' hatching mechanism contrasts with the slow process described in anurans to date and exemplifies one way in which embryos can achieve rapid, flexibly timed hatching to escape from acute threats. Other amphibians with cued hatching may also have novel hatching mechanisms. PMID:27307544

  4. STS-38 Pilot Culbertson rolls through CCT side hatch during egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Pilot Frank L. Culbertson, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), rolls through the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Assisted by technicians, Culbertson practices emergency egress through the side hatch using the crew escape system (CES) pole which extends out the side hatch. The inflated safety cushion breaks Culbertson's fall as he rolls out of the side hatch.

  5. 123. Pre1911. View forward from near mizzen hatch, starboard side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. Pre-1911. View forward from near mizzen hatch, starboard side showing crew standing on a load of lumber. Note main fife rail, small hatch with cover (possibly original 'lime juice hatch') just aft. Fred Heick Collection. - Ship BALCLUTHA, 2905 Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known to be infected with or... eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of the...

  7. Metabolism during delayed hatching in terrestrial eggs of a marine fish, the grunion Leuresthes tenuis.

    PubMed

    Darken, R S; Martin, K L; Fisher, M C

    1998-01-01

    California grunion, Leuresthes tenuis (Osteichthyes: Atherinidae), leave the ocean to spawn in the sand following extreme high tides in summer. Eggs develop out of water and are able to hatch within 9-13 d, the primary hatching period. Eggs hatch on immersion and agitation by waves at the next extreme high-tide series. However, if the waves do not reach them and hatching is not induced, eggs remain viable in the sand for several weeks. During this period, grunion eggs will delay hatching, but will hatch at any time if immersed and agitated in seawater. Egg metabolism during embryonic development was measured by aerial respirometry. Metabolism increased linearly until the first date at which eggs were able to hatch. At that time, metabolic rate stabilized and remained constant for two additional weeks of embryonic incubation. Larvae induced to hatch after different durations of incubation within this period were not significantly different in length; however, the amount of oil contained in the yolk decreased linearly during the delayed hatching period. We suggest that the increase in grunion egg metabolism during the time to primary hatching capability, and the steady, high metabolic rate throughout the delayed hatching period, permit reproduction in the unique niche of these marine eggs. These semiterrestrial anamniotic eggs develop quickly and remain continuously ready to hatch over an extended period in response to an environmentally dependent and somewhat unpredictable embryonic timetable. PMID:9678500

  8. [Assisted hatching for improving embryo implantation. A bibliographical review].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Nieto, Carlos Alberto; Soto-Cossio, Luz Estefhany; Basurto-Díaz, David

    2015-04-01

    Embryo implantation represents the most critical step of the reproductive process in many species, to be successful requires a receptive endometrium, functional embryo at a stage of embryonic development and proper dialogue between embryonic and maternal tissues. Hatching is the process in which the blastocyst gets rid of the zona pellucida to be implemented. The failure in this factor can lead to reproductive problems, even under assisted reproduction techniques. Assisted hatching is a technique used in assisted reproduction laboratories to improve performance in the process of fecundation or in vitro fertilization. This technique is based on impairment or section of the zona pellucida using different techniques. In this review, the most common indications and techniques used to perform this procedure and improve success rates in assisted reproduction techniques are synthesized. PMID:26727756

  9. Hatching and fledging times from grassland passerine nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pietz, P.J.; Granfors, D.A.; Grant, T.A.; Ribic, C.A.; Thompson, F. R.; Pietz, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimates of fledging age are needed in field studies to avoid inducing premature fledging or missing the fledging event. Both may lead to misinterpretation of nest fate. Correctly assessing nest fate and length of the nestling period can be critical for accurate calculation of nest survival rates. For researchers who mark nestlings, knowing the age at which their activities may cause young to leave nests prematurely could prevent introducing bias to their studies. We obtained estimates of fledging age using data from grassland bird nests monitored from hatching through fledging with video-surveillance systems in North Dakota and Minnesota during 1996–2001. We compared these values to those obtained from traditional nest visits and from available literature. Mean and modal fledging ages for video-monitored nests were generally similar to those for visited nests, although Clay-colored Sparrows (Spizella pallida) typically fledged 1 day earlier from visited nests. Average fledging ages from both video and nest visits occurred within ranges reported in the literature, but expanded by 1–2 days the upper age limit for Clay-colored Sparrows and the lower age limit for Bobolinks (Dolichonyx oryzivorus). Video showed that eggs hatched throughout the day whereas most young fledged in the morning (06:30–12:30 CDT). Length of the hatching period for a clutch was usually >1 day and was positively correlated with clutch size. Length of the fledging period for a brood was usually <1 day, and in nearly half the nests, fledging was completed within <2 hr. Video surveillance has proven to be a useful tool for providing new information and for corroborating published statements related to hatching and fledging chronology. Comparison of data collected from video and nest visits showed that carefully conducted nest visits generally can provide reliable data for deriving estimates of survival.

  10. Embryogenesis, hatching and larval development of Artemia during orbital spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Debell, L.; Armbrust, L.; Guikema, J. A.; Metcalf, J.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Developmental biology studies, using gastrula-arrested cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana, were conducted during two flights of the space shuttle Atlantis (missions STS-37 and STS-43) in 1991. Dehydrated cysts were activated, on orbit, by addition of salt water to the cysts, and then development was terminated by the addition of fixative. Development took place in 5 ml syringes, connected by tubing to activation syringes, containing salt water, and termination syringes, containing fixative. Comparison of space results with simultaneous ground control experiments showed that equivalent percentages of naupliar larvae hatched in the syringes (40%). Thus, reactivation of development, completion of embryogenesis, emergence and hatching took place, during spaceflight, without recognizable alteration in numbers of larvae produced. Post-hatching larval development was studied in experiments where development was terminated, by introduction of fixative, 2 days, 4 days, and 8 days after reinitiation of development. During spaceflight, successive larval instars or stages, interrupted by molts, occurred, generating brine shrimp at appropriate larval instars. Naupliar larvae possessed the single naupliar eye, and development of the lateral pair of adult eyes also took place in space. Transmission electron microscopy revealed extensive differentiation, including skeletal muscle and gut endoderm, as well as the eye tissues. These studies demonstrate the potential value of Artemia for developmental biology studies during spa ceflight, and show that extensive degrees of development can take place in this microgravity environment.

  11. Thermal effects in laser-assisted embryo hatching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, Diarmaid H.; Conia, Jerome D.

    2000-08-01

    Diode lasers [(lambda) equals 1480 nm] are used with in-vitro fertilization [IVF] as a promoter of embryo hatching. A focused laser beam is applied in vitro to form a channel in the zona pellucida (shell) of the pre-embryo. After transfer into the uterus, the embryo hatches: it extrudes itself through the channel and implants into the uterine wall. Laser-assisted hatching can result in improving implantation and pregnancy success rates. We present examples of zone pellucida ablation using animal models. In using the laser it is vital not to damage pre-embryo cells, e.g. by overheating. In order to define safe regimes we have derived some thermal side-effects of zona pellucida removal. The temperature profile in the beam and vicinity is predicted as function of laser pulse duration and power. In a crossed-beam experiment a HeNe laser probe detects the temperature-induced change in refractive index. We find that the diode laser beam produces superheated water approaching 200 C on the beam axis. Thermal histories during and following the laser pulse are given for regions in the neighborhood of the beam. We conclude that an optimum regime exists with pulse duration

  12. Embryogenesis, hatching and larval development of Artemia during orbital spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Debell, L.; Armbrust, L.; Guikema, J. A.; Metcalf, J.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-08-01

    Developmental biology studies, using gastrula-arrested cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana, were conducted during two flights of the space shuttle Atlantis (missions STS-37 and STS-43) in 1991. Dehydrated cysts were activated, on orbit, by addition of salt water to the cysts, and then development was terminated by the addition of fixative. Development took place in 5 ml syringes, connected by tubing to activation syringes, containing salt water, and termination syringes, containing fixative. Comparison of space results with simultaneous ground control experiments showed that equivalent percentages of naupliar larvae hatched in the syringes (40%). Thus, reactivation of development, completion of embryogenesis, emergence and hatching took place, during spaceflight, without recognizable alteration in numbers of larvae produced. Post-hatching larval development was studied in experiments where development was terminated, by intrduction of fixative, 2 days, 4 days, and 8 days after reinitiation of development. During spaceflight, successive larval instars or stages, interrupted by molts, occurred, generating brine shrimp at appropriate larval instars. Naupliar larvae possessed the single naupliar eye, and development of the lateral pair of adult eyes also took place in space. Transmission electron microscopy revealed extensive differentiation, including skeletal muscle and gut endoderm, as well as the eye tissues. These studies demonstrate the potential value of Artemia for developmental biology studies during spaceflight, and show that extensive degress of development can take place in this microgravity environment.

  13. Hatching failure increases with severity of population bottlenecks in birds

    PubMed Central

    Briskie, James V.; Mackintosh, Myles

    2004-01-01

    Severe bottlenecks can reduce genetic diversity and increase inbreeding as individuals are forced to mate with close relatives, but it is unknown at what minimum population size the negative fitness consequences of bottlenecks are expressed. The New Zealand avifauna contains a large number of species that have gone through bottlenecks of varying severity, providing an exceptional opportunity to test this question by using the comparative method. Using decreased hatchability as a measure of fitness costs, we found that hatching failure was significantly greater among both native and introduced species that had passed through bottlenecks of <150 individuals. Comparisons between pre- and postbottleneck populations of introduced species suggest that hatching problems arise even in populations founded by <600 individuals. Our study confirms that hatching failure is widespread and persistent among birds passing through severe bottlenecks and that the population sizes at which this fitness cost is expressed are several times greater than the number of individuals currently used to found most new populations of endangered species. We recommend that conservation managers revise the protocols they use for reintroductions or they may unwittingly reduce the long-term viability of the species they are trying to save. PMID:14699045

  14. Adaptive plasticity in hatching age: a response to predation risk trade-offs.

    PubMed Central

    Warkentin, K M

    1995-01-01

    The life histories of many animals are characterized by niche shifts, the timing of which can strongly affect fitness. In the tree frog Agalychnis callidryas, which has arboreal eggs, there is a trade-off between predation risks before and after hatching. When eggs are attacked by snakes, tadpoles escape by hatching rapidly and falling into the water below. Eggs not attacked by snakes hatch later, when newly emerged tadpoles are less vulnerable to aquatic predators. Plasticity in hatching allows embryos to use immediate, local information on risk of mortality to make instantaneous behavioral decisions about hatching and the accompanying shift from arboreal to aquatic habitats. Images Fig. 3 PMID:11607529

  15. Inheritance and World Variation in Thermal Requirements for Egg Hatch in Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Erebidae).

    PubMed

    Keena, M A

    2016-02-01

    Mode of inheritance of hatch traits in Lymantria dispar L. was determined by crossing populations nearly fixed for the phenotypic extremes. The nondiapausing phenotype was inherited via a single recessive gene and the phenotype with reduced low temperature exposure requirements before hatch was inherited via a single dominant gene. There was no evidence for sex-linkage or cytoplasmic effects with either gene. Eggs from 43 geographic populations were evaluated for hatch characteristics after being held for 60 d at 5°C followed by incubation at 25°C. There was considerable variation both within and among the populations in the proportion able to hatch, time to first hatch, and average time to hatch. Egg masses with reduced requirement for low temperatures before the eggs were ready to hatch were present in all subspecies of L. dispar and the phenotype was not fixed in most populations. The populations clustered into three distinct groups, and climatic variables were found to be rough predictors of those groups. Variation in hatch phenotypes between populations is likely an adaptation to local climate and within a population provides a bet-hedging strategy to ensure that at least some hatch synchronizes with host leaf-out. Continued vigilance to prevent movement of populations both within and between countries is warranted, because some of the alleles that confer nondiapause or reduced low temperature requirements before egg hatch are not present in all populations and their introduction would increase variation in egg hatch within a population. PMID:26510608

  16. Inheritance and World Variation in Thermal Requirements for Egg Hatch in Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Erebidae).

    PubMed

    Keena, M A

    2016-02-01

    Mode of inheritance of hatch traits in Lymantria dispar L. was determined by crossing populations nearly fixed for the phenotypic extremes. The nondiapausing phenotype was inherited via a single recessive gene and the phenotype with reduced low temperature exposure requirements before hatch was inherited via a single dominant gene. There was no evidence for sex-linkage or cytoplasmic effects with either gene. Eggs from 43 geographic populations were evaluated for hatch characteristics after being held for 60 d at 5°C followed by incubation at 25°C. There was considerable variation both within and among the populations in the proportion able to hatch, time to first hatch, and average time to hatch. Egg masses with reduced requirement for low temperatures before the eggs were ready to hatch were present in all subspecies of L. dispar and the phenotype was not fixed in most populations. The populations clustered into three distinct groups, and climatic variables were found to be rough predictors of those groups. Variation in hatch phenotypes between populations is likely an adaptation to local climate and within a population provides a bet-hedging strategy to ensure that at least some hatch synchronizes with host leaf-out. Continued vigilance to prevent movement of populations both within and between countries is warranted, because some of the alleles that confer nondiapause or reduced low temperature requirements before egg hatch are not present in all populations and their introduction would increase variation in egg hatch within a population.

  17. Plasticity of hatching in amphibians: evolution, trade-offs, cues and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Karen M

    2011-07-01

    Many species of frogs and salamanders, in at least 12 families, alter their timing of hatching in response to conditions affecting mortality of eggs or larvae. Some terrestrially laid or stranded embryos wait to hatch until they are submerged in water. Some embryos laid above water accelerate hatching if the eggs are dehydrating; others hatch early if flooded. Embryos can hatch early in response to predators and pathogens of eggs or delay hatching in response to predators of larvae; some species do both. The phylogenetic pattern of environmentally cued hatching suggests that similar responses have evolved convergently in multiple amphibian lineages. The use of similar cues, including hypoxia and physical disturbance, in multiple contexts suggests potential shared mechanisms underlying the capacity of embryos to respond to environmental conditions. Shifts in the timing of hatching often have clear benefits, but we know less about the trade-offs that favor plasticity, the mechanisms that enable it, and its evolutionary history. Some potentially important types of cued hatching, such as those involving embryo-parent interactions, are relatively unexplored. I discuss promising directions for research and the opportunities that the hatching of amphibians offers for integrative studies of the mechanisms, ecology and evolution of a critical transition between life-history stages.

  18. Plasticity of hatching and the duration of planktonic development in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Oyarzun, Fernanda X; Strathmann, Richard R

    2011-07-01

    Plasticity in hatching potentially adjusts risks of benthic and planktonic development for benthic marine invertebrates. The proportionate effect of hatching plasticity on duration of larval swimming is greatest for animals that can potentially brood or encapsulate offspring until hatching near metamorphic competence. As an example, early hatching of the nudibranch mollusk Phestilla sibogae is stimulated by scattering of encapsulated offspring, as by a predator feeding on the gelatinous egg ribbon. When egg ribbons are undisturbed, hatching is at or near metamorphic competence. Disturbance of an unguarded benthic egg mass can insert 4 or more days of obligate larval dispersal into the life history. As another example, the spionid annelid Boccardia proboscidea broods capsules, each with both cannibalistic and developmentally arrested planktivorous siblings plus nurse eggs. Early hatching produces mainly planktivorous larvae with a planktonic duration of 15 days. Late hatching produces mainly adelphophages who have eaten their planktivorous siblings and metamorphose with little or no period of swimming. Mothers actively hatch their offspring by tearing the capsules, and appeared to time hatching in response to their environment and not to the stage of development of their offspring. Higher temperature increased the variance of brooding time. Females appeared to hatch capsules at an earlier developmental stage at lower temperatures. Species that release gametes or zygotes directly into the plankton have less scope for plasticity in stage at hatching. Their embryos develop singly with little protection and hatch at early stages, often as blastulae or gastrulae. Time of hatching cannot be greatly advanced, and sensory capabilities of blastulae may be limited. PMID:21576120

  19. Need for higher fuel burnup at the Hatch Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Beckhman, J.T.

    1996-03-01

    Hatch is a BWR 4 and has been in operation for some time. The first unit became commercial about 1975. Obtaining higher burnups, or higher average discharge exposures, is nothing new at Hatch. Since we have started, the discharge exposure of the plant has increased. Now, of course, we are not approaching the numbers currently being discussed but, the average discharge exposure has increased from around 20,000 MWD/MTU in the early to mid-1980s to 34,000 MWD/MTU in 1994, I am talking about batch average values. There are also peak bundle and peak rod values. You will have to make the conversions if you think in one way or the other because I am talking in batch averages. During Hatch`s operating history we have had some problems with fuel failure. Higher burnup fuel raises a concern about how much fuel failure you are going to have. Fuel failure is, of course, an economic issue with us. Back in the early 1980s, we had a problem with crud-induced localized corrosion, known as CILC. We have gotten over that, but we had some times when it was up around 27 fuel failures a year. That is not a pleasant time to live through because it is not what you want from an economic viewpoint or any other. We have gotten that down. We have had some fuel failures recently, but they have not been related to fuel burnup or to corrosion. In fact, the number of failures has decreased from the early 1980s to the 90s even though burnup increased during that time. The fuel failures are more debris-related-type failures. In addition to increasing burnups, utilities are actively evaluating or have already incorporated power uprate and longer fuel cycles (e.g., 2-year cycles). The goal is to balance out the higher power density, longer cycles, higher burnup, and to have no leakers. Why do we as an industry want to have higher burnup fuel? That is what I want to tell you a little bit about.

  20. Astronaut Vance Brand practices operating Docking Module hatch for ASTP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot of the American Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) prime crew, practices operating a Docking Module hatch during ASTP pre-flight training at JSC. The Docking Module is designed to link the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft during their docking in Earth orbit mission. Gary L. Doerre of JSC's Crew Training and Procedures Division is working with Brand. Doerre is wearing a face mask to help prevent possible exposure to Brand of disease prior to the ASTP launch.

  1. Motor racing accidents at Brands Hatch, 1988/9.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M A; Oni, J

    1991-09-01

    Little is known about the incidence of injury to race track motor-cyclists and car drivers. In a 1-year study at Brands Hatch, 70 of 33,184 competitors required hospital treatment. We found this injury rate to be higher than on the public highway. However, the anatomical distribution of injury caused by motor-bike accidents is similar to that found on the public highway. Motor-cyclists are more likely than car drivers to sustain limb trauma requiring outpatient treatment only. The number of participants requiring admission to hospital is broadly similar for car and bike races, being less than 0.1%.

  2. Pre- and post-hatch trophic egg production in the subsocial burrower bug, Canthophorus niveimarginatus (Heteroptera: Cydnidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, Lisa; Baba, Narumi; Inadomi, Koichi; Yanagi, Takao; Hironaka, Mantaro; Nomakuchi, Shintaro

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, three terrestrial bugs, Adomerus triguttulus and Sehirus cinctus (Cydnidae) and the closely related Parastrachia japonensis (Parastrachiidae), have been the focus of several fascinating studies because of the remarkable, extensive parental care they were found to display. This care includes egg and nymph guarding, production of trophic eggs, unfertilized, low cost eggs that are used as food by newly hatched nymphs, and progressive provisioning of the host seed. In this study, we have investigated yet a third related Asian cydnid, Canthophorus niveimarginatus, with regard to the possible occurrence of some or all of these complex traits in order to assess how widespread these maternal investment patterns are in this group of insects and to better understand the implications of their manifestations from an evolutionary context. Manipulative experiments were carried out in the lab to determine whether females provision nests. Observational and egg removal studies were carried out to determine whether trophic eggs are produced, and, if they are, their possible impact on nymphal success. The findings revealed that C. niveimarginatus does, in fact, progressively provision young, and this species also displays all of the other behaviors associated with extended parental care in subsocial insects. Moreover, unlike the other two related species, which place trophic eggs on the surface of the original egg mass, C. niveimarginatus produces both pre- and post-hatch trophic eggs. Nymphs deprived of access to post-hatch trophic eggs had significantly lower body weight and survival rate than those that fed on them. To our knowledge, this is the first time the production of both pre- and post-hatch trophic eggs has been demonstrated in insects outside the Hymenoptera. In this paper, we qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrate the provisioning behavior and patterns of trophic egg production in C. niveimarginatus. When and how trophic eggs are produced and

  3. Unity hatch closed in preparation for launch on STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility prepare the hatch of the Unity connecting module for closure before its launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in December. Unity will now undergo a series of leak checks before a final purge of clean, dry air inside the module to ready it for initial operations in space. Other testing includes the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock and the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. The next time the hatch will be opened it will be by astronauts on orbit. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  4. Unity hatch closed in preparation for launch on STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility hold part of the equipment to close the hatch to the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, before its launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in December. Unity will now undergo a series of leak checks before a final purge of clean, dry air inside the module to ready it for initial operations in space. Other testing includes the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock and the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. The next time the hatch will be opened it will be by astronauts on orbit. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  5. Cosmonaut Gidzenko Near Hatch Between Unity and Destiny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Expedition One Soyuz commander, stands near the hatch leading from the Unity node into the newly-attached Destiny laboratory aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space Station modules. The U.S.-built Unity module was launched aboard the Orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998, and connected to Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Cargo Block (FGB). The U.S. Laboratory (Destiny) module is the centerpiece of the ISS, where science experiments will be performed in the near-zero gravity in space. The Destiny Module was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis (STS-98 mission) on February 7, 2001. The aluminum module is 8.5 meters (28 feet) long and 4.3 meters (14 feet) in diameter. The laboratory consists of three cylindrical sections and two endcones with hatches that will be mated to other station components. A 50.9-centimeter- (20-inch-) diameter window is located on one side of the center module segment. This pressurized module is designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations, and payload racks will occupy 13 locations especially designed to support experiments.

  6. Pesticide contamination and hatching success of waterbirds in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Fleming, W.J.; Ensor, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Waterfowl wintering on the Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) were contaminated (ltoreq 4 ppm wet wt) with dichloro diphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDE), but residues were below levels known to affect waterfowl. Eggs of some nesting waterbirds contained higher than expected levels of DDE, especially those of green-backed herons (Butorides striatus), ranging up to 43 ppm wet weight. Hatching success (P lt 0.05) and eggshell thickness (P lt 0.05) in green-backed herons and anhingas (Anhinga anhinga) were negatively correlated with DDE in the eggs, and shell thinning (P lt 0.05) was evident 12-13 years after DDT was banned in the United States. The threshold level of DDE determined necessary for reduced hatching success in green-backed heron eggs was 5.1-10 ppm wet weight. These results further increase our ability to interpret DDE concentrations in waterbirds and predict their potential effects on productivity.

  7. Asynchronous hatching and food limitation: a test of Lack's hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, Susan Knight

    1988-01-01

    Lack’s (1954, 1968) hypothesis that asynchronous hatching of altricial birds is an adaptive response to unpredictable food shortages during the breeding season was examined in the highly granivorous Zebra Finch (Poephila guttata). I compared growth and survival of nestlings in asynchronous and artificially created synchronous brood reared under food-limited and food-abundant conditions in an aviary. I also examined the role of parental experience on survival and growth of nestlings. There was no differential mortality of Zebra Finch nestlings due to either asynchrony or food abundance. Young in abundant food treatments grew more rapidly, however, than those in food restricted treatments. Heaviest Zebra Finch nestlings in a brood grew more quickly than their lightest siblings when food was limited, supporting Lack’s hypothesis. Further, differential survival of light and heavy siblings occurred when food was abundant, suggesting that asynchronous hatching can be maladaptive under some ecological conditions. Nestlings reared by inexperienced parents suffered greater mortality and slower growth when food was abundant than nestlings raised by experienced parents. Prefledging mass was correlated with size at adulthood.

  8. Hatching of Echinostoma trivolvis miracidia in response to snail host and non-host chemical cues.

    PubMed

    Belden, Lisa K; Widder, Pamela D; Fischer, Lauren R; Carter, Ashlee B; Wojdak, Jeremy M

    2009-09-01

    Environmental cues are used by many organisms to time life history transitions and can be important for trematode host location. However, while much is understood about how larval trematodes locate hosts, much less is known about the potential role of host cues in the timing of trematode egg development and hatching. We addressed the potential role of host chemical cues in mediating hatching of Echinostoma trivolvis miracidia by comparing hatching in response to cues from the first intermediate host (the snail Planorbella trivolvis), a non-host snail (the snail Goniobasis proxima), and a non-host invertebrate (earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris). We hypothesized that in the presence of cues from their first intermediate host, E. trivolvis would hatch sooner and would be more synchronized than when host cues were absent. However, we found that hatching was unaffected by our cue treatments. In all treatments, hatching uniformly began at 13 days and was nearly evenly spread over the next 3 weeks. PMID:19513751

  9. Plant-Induced Hatching of Eggs of the Soybean Cyst Nematode Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Tefft, P M; Bone, L W

    1985-07-01

    Root diffusate from soybean plants caused greater hatching of Heterodera glycines eggs during vegetative growth of the host, but the activity declined with plant senescence. Chelation of the root diffusate with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) significantly increased hatching activity for H. glycines eggs. Diffusate from leafless plants caused little hatching, whereas treatment of intact plants with the growth regulators gibberellin and kinetin had no effect on the hatching activity of root diffusate. Treating H. glycines eggs with zinc chloride and root diffusate reduced egg hatching from zinc chloride alone. Levels of zinc in the root diffusate were insufficient to induce egg hatch, based on analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The enzymatic activity of leucine aminopeptidase in H. glycines eggs was not altered by treatment with chelated or nonchelated root diffusate.

  10. Effects of Hatching Time on Behavior and Weight Development of Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Løtvedt, Pia; Jensen, Per

    2014-01-01

    The length of the embryonic period varies both among and within species and can affect the individual phenotype in many ways, both physiologically and behaviorally. In chickens, the hatch window may last 24–48 hours (up to 10% of the incubation time), and studies have shown that incubation length may affect post-hatch growth and physiology. However, little is known about effects on behavior. We therefore investigated how behavior variation correlates with hatching time in the early life of chickens. We also measured egg weight and egg weight loss in relation to hatching time, as well as post-hatch growth. For females, there was a negative correlation between hatch time and body weight from day 4 and throughout the experiment. For males, such a correlation was only observed when testing all hatched males up until day 10. The birds were exposed to a number of behavioral tests, and a principal components analysis was performed on the variables, resulting in four components. For the largest component, termed “Passivity”, a tendency of a difference was found between early and middle male hatchers. Furthermore, a significant difference between early and middle male hatchers was found in the second component, termed “Response to novelty”. In a spatial learning test, late hatchers tended to learn slower. The behavior of females was not significantly affected by hatching time in any of these tests. This study is among the first to demonstrate a link between time of hatching and early behavior in a precocial species like the chicken, and may help shedding light on the evolutionary trade-offs between incubation length and post-hatch traits. The results may also be relevant from a perspective of stress coping and therefore also for animal welfare and productivity in the chicken industry. The mechanisms linking hatching time with post-hatch phenotype remain to be investigated. PMID:25058654

  11. Effects of hatching time on behavior and weight development of chickens.

    PubMed

    Løtvedt, Pia; Jensen, Per

    2014-01-01

    The length of the embryonic period varies both among and within species and can affect the individual phenotype in many ways, both physiologically and behaviorally. In chickens, the hatch window may last 24-48 hours (up to 10% of the incubation time), and studies have shown that incubation length may affect post-hatch growth and physiology. However, little is known about effects on behavior. We therefore investigated how behavior variation correlates with hatching time in the early life of chickens. We also measured egg weight and egg weight loss in relation to hatching time, as well as post-hatch growth. For females, there was a negative correlation between hatch time and body weight from day 4 and throughout the experiment. For males, such a correlation was only observed when testing all hatched males up until day 10. The birds were exposed to a number of behavioral tests, and a principal components analysis was performed on the variables, resulting in four components. For the largest component, termed "Passivity", a tendency of a difference was found between early and middle male hatchers. Furthermore, a significant difference between early and middle male hatchers was found in the second component, termed "Response to novelty". In a spatial learning test, late hatchers tended to learn slower. The behavior of females was not significantly affected by hatching time in any of these tests. This study is among the first to demonstrate a link between time of hatching and early behavior in a precocial species like the chicken, and may help shedding light on the evolutionary trade-offs between incubation length and post-hatch traits. The results may also be relevant from a perspective of stress coping and therefore also for animal welfare and productivity in the chicken industry. The mechanisms linking hatching time with post-hatch phenotype remain to be investigated.

  12. Hatching success of Caspian terns nesting in the lower Laguna Madre, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, C.A.; Custer, T.W.

    1986-01-01

    The average clutch size of Caspian Terns nesting in a colony in the Lower Laguna Madre near Laguna Vista, Texas, USA in 1984 was 1.9 eggs per nest. Using the Mayfield method for calculating success, one egg hatched in 84.1% of the nests and 69.8% of the eggs laid hatched. These hatching estimates are as high or higher than estimates from colonies in other areas.

  13. STS-38 MS Springer climbs through CCT side hatch prior to egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), climbs through the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Springer will practice emergency egress through the side hatch using the crew escape system (CES) pole (at Springer's left). The inflated safety cushion under Springer will break his fall as he rolls out of the side hatch.

  14. A comparison of artificial incubation and natural incubation hatching success of gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) eggs in southern Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noel, Krista M.; Qualls, Carl P.; Ennen, Joshua R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have found that Gopher Tortoise, Gopherus polyphemus, populations in southern Mississippi exhibit low recruitment, due in part to very low hatching success of their eggs. We sought to determine if the cause(s) of this low hatching success was related to egg quality (intrinsic factors), unsuitability of the nest environment (extrinsic factors), or a combination of the two. In 2003, hatching success was monitored simultaneously for eggs from the same clutches that were incubated in the laboratory and left to incubate in nests. A subset of randomly chosen eggs from each clutch was incubated in the laboratory under physical conditions that were known to be conducive to successful hatching to estimate the proportion of eggs that were capable of hatching in a controlled setting. Hatching success in the laboratory was compared with that of eggs incubated in natural nests to estimate the proportion of eggs that failed to hatch presumably from extrinsic factors. Laboratory hatching success was 58.8%, suggesting that roughly 40% of the eggs were intrinsically incapable of hatching even when incubated under controlled conditions. Hatching success in natural nests, 16.7%, was significantly lower than hatching success in the laboratory, suggesting that approximately 42.1% of eggs were capable of hatching but failed to hatch due to some extrinsic aspect(s) of the nest environment. Thus, the low hatching success of Gopher Tortoise eggs in southern Mississippi appears to be attributable to a combination of intrinsic (egg quality) and extrinsic (nest environment) factors.

  15. Newly hatched chicks solve the visual binding problem.

    PubMed

    Wood, Justin N

    2014-07-01

    For an organism to perceive coherent and unified objects, its visual system must bind color and shape features into integrated color-shape representations in memory. However, the origins of this ability have not yet been established. To examine whether newborns can build an integrated representation of the first object they see, I raised newly hatched chicks (Gallus gallus) in controlled-rearing chambers that contained a single virtual object. This object rotated continuously, revealing a different color and shape combination on each of its two faces. Chicks were able to build an integrated representation of this object. For example, they reliably distinguished an object defined by a purple circle and yellow triangle from an object defined by a purple triangle and yellow circle. This result shows that newborns can begin binding color and shape features into integrated representations at the onset of their experience with visual objects. PMID:24840718

  16. STS-108 and Expedition 4 pose outside Endeavour's hatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-108 and Expedition 4 crews pose outside the hatch to Endeavour. Standing left to right are Daniel W. Bursch, Mission Commander Dominic L. Gorie, Pilot Mark E. Kelly and Expedition 4 Commander Yuri Onufrienko. Gorie and Onufrienko hold the patch for the mission. Kneeling in front are Expedition 4 member Carl E. Walz and Mission Specialists Daniel M. Tani and Linda A. Godwin. Crew members are at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include a simulated launch countdown, plus the emergency exit training from the orbiter and launch pad. STS-108 is a Utilization Flight that will carry the replacement Expedition 4 crew to the International Space Station, as well as the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, filled with supplies and equipment. The l1-day mission is scheduled for launch Nov. 29 on Space Shuttle Endeavour.

  17. Biosimilars: impact of differences with Hatch-Waxman.

    PubMed

    Kowalchyk, Katherine; Crowley-Weber, Cara

    2013-01-01

    A comparison of the Hatch-Waxman Act for approval of small-molecule pharmaceuticals with the Biological Price Competition and Innovation Act for approval of biosimilars provides insight into the market entry and patent litigation for biosimilars. Key differences between the two statutes include a longer period of statutory exclusivity for biosimilars, no 30-month stay for a reference product sponsor upon initiation of litigation, and no 180-day market exclusivity period for the first filer of an application for approval of a biosimilar in the absence of interchangeability. These differences will focus the incentive to settle any patent litigation on the risk of invalidity and/or noninfringement of the reference product sponsor's patents. A biosimilar applicant should develop the best case for invalidity and/or noninfringement of these patents, identify third-party patents and develop a freedom to operate strategy, and file for patents on production, formulation, or use of the biosimilar.

  18. Abundance of specific mRNA transcripts impacts hatching success in European eel, Anguilla anguilla L.

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Christoffer; Butts, Ian A E; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Zambonino-Infante, Jose-Luis; Mazurais, David

    2016-01-01

    Maternal mRNA governs early embryonic development in fish and variation in abundance of maternal transcripts may contribute to variation in embryonic survival and hatch success in European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Previous studies have shown that quantities of the maternal gene products β-tubulin, insulin-like growth factor 2 (igf2), nucleoplasmin (npm2), prohibitin 2 (phb2), phosphatidylinositol glycan biosynthesis class F protein 5 (pigf5), and carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase liver isoform-like 1 (cpt1) are associated with embryonic developmental competence in other teleosts. Here, the relations between relative mRNA abundance of these genes in eggs and/or embryos and egg quality, was studied and analyzed. We compared egg quality of the two groups: i) batches with hatching and ii) batches with no hatching. Results showed no significant differences in relative mRNA abundance between the hatch and no hatching groups for any of the selected genes at 0, 2.5, and 5HPF. However, at 30HPF the hatch group showed significantly higher abundance of cpt1a, cpt1b, β-tubulin, phb2, and pigf5 transcripts than the no hatch group. Therefore, these results indicate that up-regulation of the transcription of these genes in European eel after the mid-blastula transition, may be needed to sustain embryonic development and hatching success.

  19. 2. VIEW OF THE HATCH ADIT (FEATURE B28), FACING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF THE HATCH ADIT (FEATURE B-28), FACING NORTH. ADIT ROAD IS VISIBLE IN THE FOREGROUND AND OFFICE (FEATURE B-1) IN THE BACKGROUND. - Nevada Lucky Tiger Mill & Mine, Hatch Adit, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  20. Asynchronous hatching in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus quadripunctatus, maxmizes parental fitness.

    PubMed

    Takata, M; Hayashi, S; Thomas, C E; Koyama, S; Satoh, T; Fugo, H

    2014-09-01

    Life history theory predicts that natural selection favours parents who balance investment across offspring to maximize fitness. Theoretical studies have shown that the optimal level of parental investment from the offspring's perspective exceeds that of its parents, and the disparity between the two generates evolutionary conflict for the allocation of parental investment. In various species, the offspring hatch asynchronously. The age hierarchy of the offspring usually establishes competitive asymmetries within the brood and determines the allocation of parental investment among offspring. However, it is not clear whether the allocation of parental investment determined by hatching pattern is optimal for parent or offspring. Here, we manipulated the hatching pattern of the burying beetle Nicrophorus quadripunctatus to demonstrate the influence of hatching pattern on the allocation of parental investment. We found that the total weight of a brood was largest in the group that mimicked the natural hatching pattern, with the offspring skewed towards early hatchers. This increases parental fitness. However, hatching patterns with more later hatchers had heavier individual offspring weights, which increases offspring fitness, but this hatching pattern is not observed in the wild. Thus, our study suggests that the natural hatching pattern optimizes parental fitness, rather than offspring fitness.

  1. Age, growth and hatch dates of ingressing larvae and surviving juveniles of Atlantic menhaden Brevoortia tyrannus.

    PubMed

    Lozano, C; Houde, E D; Wingate, R L; Secor, D H

    2012-10-01

    Ages, growth and hatch dates of ingressing Brevoortia tyrannus larvae were determined in a 3 year sampling survey at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A. To determine if otolith-aged cohorts had variable relative survival, hatch dates of summer-caught young-of-the-year (YOY) juveniles collected throughout the Chesapeake Bay were compared with hatch dates of ingressing larvae. Modal total length of ingressing larvae was similar among years: 28 mm in 2005-2006 and 2007-2008, and 30 mm in 2006-2007. Ages of ingressing larvae ranged from 9 to 96 days post hatch (dph); mean ages were similar among years, but significantly older in 2006-2007 (50 dph) than in 2005-2006 (44 dph) and 2007-2008 (46 dph). Larval growth rates differed among years. Earliest growth, when larvae were offshore (0-20 dph), was faster in 2006-2007 (0·62 mm day(-1)), than in 2005-2006 and 2007-2008 (0·55 mm day(-1) in these years). Subsequently, from 30 to 80 dph, growth was slowest in 2006-2007. Hatch dates of ingressing larvae occurred from September to March and 90% (2007-2008) to 98% (2006-2007) had hatched prior to 31 December. In contrast, most surviving YOY juvenile B. tyrannus had hatched in January to February, suggesting selective mortality of early-hatched individuals, apparently during the overwinter, larval to juvenile transition period. PMID:23020567

  2. Hatching timing, oxygen availability, and external gill regression in the tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Karen M

    2002-01-01

    The physiological role of the embryonic external gills in anurans is equivocal. In some species, diffusion alone is clearly sufficient to supply oxygen throughout the embryonic period. In others, morphological elaboration and environmental regulation of the external gills suggest functional importance. Since oxygen stress is a common trigger of hatching, I examined the relationships among hatching timing, oxygen stress, and external gill loss. I worked with the red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas, a species with arboreal eggs and aquatic tadpoles in which gill regression is associated with hatching, and hatching timing affects posthatching survival with aquatic predators. Both exposure to a hypoxic gas mixture and submergence in water, a natural context in which hypoxic stress can occur, induced early hatching. Exposure to hyperoxic gas mixtures induced regression of external gills, and subsequent exposure to air induced early hatching. Prostaglandin-induced external gill regression also induced hatching, and this effect was partially ameliorated by exposure to hyperoxic gas. Together, these results suggest that external gills enhance the oxygen uptake of embryos and are necessary to extend embryonic development past the onset of hatching competence. PMID:12024291

  3. Suspension of Egg Hatching Caused by High Humidity and Submergence in Spider Mites.

    PubMed

    Ubara, Masashi; Osakabe, Masahiro

    2015-08-01

    We tested the effects of high humidity and submergence on egg hatching of spider mites. In both the high humidity and submergence treatments, many Tetranychus and Panonychus eggs did not hatch until after the hatching peak of the lower humidity or unsubmerged controls. However, after humidity decreased or water was drained, many eggs hatched within 1-3 h. This was observed regardless of when high humidity or submergence treatments were implemented: either immediately after oviposition or immediately before hatching was due. Normal eyespot formation was observed in most eggs in the high humidity and submergence treatments, which indicates that spider mite embryos develop even when eggs are underwater. Therefore, delays in hatching are not caused by delayed embryonic development. A delay in hatching was always observed in Panonychus citri (McGregor) but was more variable in Tetranychus urticae Koch and Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida. The high humidity and submergence treatments affected but did not suppress larval development in these species. In contrast, many Oligonychus eggs died following the high humidity treatments. In Tetranychus and Panonychus spider mites, suspension of egg hatching may mitigate the adverse effects of rainfall.

  4. Cyst Distribution and Hatching Pattern of Chirocephalus ruffoi (Crustacea, Anostraca) in an Experimental Undisturbed Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, Graziella

    2005-06-01

    The pattern of cyst distribution in the absence of turbation and their hatching behaviour were studied in an outdoor artificial pool, where just differentiated adults of the anostracan Chirocephalus ruffoi (sex ratio 1:3) lived until it dried up. The horizontal and vertical distributions of cysts in the pool bed were determined. The comparison between cyst bank estimate (Mura, 2004) and the actual number of cysts counted in the pool bed revealed an estimate error of 20.9%. Resting eggs occurred only in the upper 2.5 cm thick soil sections and decreased within this section as depth increased. Peripheral areas of the pool contained significantly larger numbers of cysts than the central area. Multiway analysis on the results recorded in hatching success (nested ANOVA) revealed that the differences were significantly affected by initial soil conditions, treatment and vertical distribution of cysts. Among these factors, vertical distribution (sections nested in cores) was the most influential. Hatching success was significantly inversely related to depth. Differences in the timing of hatching depending on the above considered factors were also noted. A nearly synchronous hatching pattern was observed only for cysts from initially dry sediment of the uppermost layers. In all successively deeper layers, hatching showed multiple peaks and was increasingly delayed and erratic (already mentioned). ANCOVA within each of the experimental conditions revealed significant differences in hatching frequencies (time as covariate) depending on sediment depth. Within any given layer, ANCOVA revealed a significant influence of initial sediment conditions and treatment on the timing of hatching.

  5. Interfacial Electrode-Driven Enhancement of the Switching Parameters of a Copper Oxide-Based Resistive Random-Access Memory Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangani, L. D. Varma; Kumar, Ch. Ravi; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of an Au/Cu x O/Au bipolar resistive random-access memory device are reported. It is demonstrated that switching parameters of this device structure can be enhanced by introducing an interfacial Al layer between the Au top electrode and the Cu x O-based dielectric layer. The set and reset voltages are, respectively, between -2.5 V to -6.0 V and +1.2 V to +3.0 V for the Al-based device. In contrast, the range of values are -0.5 V to -2.5 V and +0.5 V to +1.5 V for the set and reset voltages in the absence of Al. The Al-based device has a higher low resistance state value of 5-6 KΩ as compared to the 0.3-0.5 KΩ for the Au-based device, which leads to a 12 times lower power dissipation factor and lower reset current of 370 μA. Endurance studies carried out over 50 switching cycles show less than 2% variation in both the low resistance and high resistance values. The conduction is ohmic at low values of bias and non-ohmic at higher bias voltage which shows that the enhanced behaviour is a result of the formation of an insulating aluminum oxide layer at the Al-Cu x O interface.

  6. Host Status of Different Potato (Solanum tuberosum) Varieties and Hatching in Root Diffusates of Globodera ellingtonae.

    PubMed

    Zasada, Inga A; Peetz, Amy; Wade, Nadine; Navarre, Roy A; Ingham, Russ E

    2013-09-01

    Globodera ellingtonae was detected in Oregon in 2008. In order to make decisions regarding the regulation of this nematode, knowledge of its biology is required. We determined the host status of a diversity of potato (Solanum tuberosum) varieties in soil-based experiments and identified hatching stimulants in in vitro hatching assays. 'Russet Burbank,' 'Desiree,' 'Modac,' 'Norland,' 'Umatilla,' and 'Yukon Gold' were good hosts (RF > 14) for G. ellingtonae. Potato varieties 'Maris Piper,' 'Atlantic,' and 'Satina,' all which contain the Ro1 gene that confers resistance to G. rostochiensis, were not hosts for G. ellingtonae. In in vitro hatching assays, G. ellingtonae hatched readily in the presence of diffusates from potato (PRD) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum; TRD). Egg hatch occurred in an average of between 87% and 90% of exposed cysts, with an average of between 144 and 164 juveniles emerging per cyst, from PRD- and TRD-treated cysts, respectively. This nematode hatched rapidly in the presence of PRD and TRD, with at least 66% of total hatch occurring by day 3 of exposure. There was no dose-response of egg hatch to concentrations of PRD or TRD ranging from 1:5 to 1:100 diffusate to water. When G. ellingtonae was exposed to root diffusates from 21 different plants, hatch occurred in 0% to 70% of exposed cysts, with an average of between 0 to 27 juveniles emerging per cyst. When root diffusate-exposed cysts were subsequently transferred to PRD to test viability, root diffusates from arugula (Eruca sativa), sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor subsp. drummondii), and common vetch (Vicia sativa) continued to inhibit egg hatch compared with the other root diffusates or water in which hatch occurred readily (60 to 182 juveniles emerging per cyst). Previously known hatching stimulants of G. rostochiensis and G. pallida, sodium metavanadate, sodium orthovanadate, and sodium thiocyanate, stimulated some egg hatch. Although, Globodera ellingtonae hatched readily in PRD and TRD

  7. Hatching rates of resting eggs of 'Cladocera' (Crustacea; Branchiopoda) at a tropical bay, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mugrabe, G; Barros, S; Marazzo, A; Valentin, J L

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the development time of embryos and to estimate the hatching rates of resting eggs of cladocerans found in the sediment of Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, under experimental conditions. Eggs were sorted by species (Penilia avirostris--Sididae; Pleopis polyphemoides and Pseudevadne tergestina--Podonidae) and incubated at a temperature of 25 degrees C, salinity 35 and photoperiod 12 hours light/ 12 hours dark. Hatching rates were about 38% for Pseudevadne tergestina and 28% for Pleopis polyphemoides. Embryos of resting eggs of Penilia avirostris developed comparatively slowly (hatching after 86 days of incubation), with a hatching rate of only 5%. It was observed that development and hatching of resting eggs of marine cladocerans suggest that pulses of recruitment may exist, thus contributing to the rapid appearance and maintenance of planktonic populations of these crustaceans in Guanabara Bay.

  8. Delayed egg hatching of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) pending water agitation.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Babak; Shakibi, Sanam; Foster, Woodbridge A

    2014-05-01

    Mosquito eggs laid on water surfaces typically hatch spontaneously soon after the embryos within them become fully formed first-instar larvae. However, we have found that Anopheles gambiae Giles, an important vector of malaria in Africa, exhibits delayed hatching until the water surface is agitated, a feature overlooked in most laboratory colonies. Agitation within 24 h postoviposition, before embryonation was complete, failed to stimulate delayed postembryonic hatching of isolated eggs on the following day (day 2), when < 1% had hatched spontaneously. However, 5 min of water agitation of these dormant pharate first-instar larvae on day 2 resulted in an almost immediate hatch of 63.3 versus 0% of nonagitated controls, plus another 3.9 versus 0.3%, respectively, during the following 24 h. With daily agitation, installment hatching occurred mainly during 2-6 d postoviposition. The mean cumulative hatch after 7 d of daily agitation was 83.1 versus 1.1% of nonagitated eggs. Experiments with eggs in groups demonstrated that egg density and activity of already-hatched larvae had no stimulatory effect. Eggs stored 1-4 wk at 25.5 or at 15.5 degrees C, and then agitated daily for 6 d at 25.5 degrees C, showed a gradual decline in viability. Viability was sustained longer at the lower temperature. Implications of agitation-induced egg hatching for rainy-season and dry-season ecology of An. gambiae are discussed. Suspended hatching and cool storage already are proving convenient for efficient mass rearing and accurate modeling of weather-based population dynamics.

  9. Unity hatch closed in preparation for launch on STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility prepare the Unity connecting module for closure before its launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in December. Unity will now undergo a series of leak checks before a final purge of clean, dry air inside the module to ready it for initial operations in space. Other testing includes the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock and the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. The next time the hatch will be opened it will be by astronauts on orbit. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  10. Unity hatch closed in preparation for launch on STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility work in the doorway of the Unity connecting module preparing it for closure before its launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in December. Unity will now undergo a series of leak checks before a final purge of clean, dry air inside the module to ready it for initial operations in space. Other testing includes the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock and the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. The next time the hatch will be opened it will be by astronauts on orbit. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  11. Effects of Eight Herbicides on In Vitro Hatching of Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Wong, A. T. S.; Tylka, G. L.; Hartzler, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of selected herbicides on hatching of free eggs of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The herbicides used were Atrazine (atrazine), Basagran (bentazon), Bladex (cyanazine), Blazer (acifluorfen), Command (clomazone), Lasso (alachlor), Sonalan (ethalfluralin), and Treflan (trifluralin). Treatments comprised two concentrations of commercial herbicide formulations and deionized water and 3.14 mM zinc sulfate as negative and positive controls, respectively. Eggs were extracted from females and cysts, surface disinfested, and incubated in herbicide or control solutions at 25 ± 2 C in darkness. Hatched second-stage juveniles were counted every other day for 24 days. Hatching of H. glycines eggs in 50 and 500 μg/ml Blazer was 42 to 67% less than that in deionized water and 6l to 78% less than that in zinc sulfate solution. Zinc sulfate significantly increased hatching activity in 50 μg/ml but not 500 μg/ml Blazer. The other herbicides tested at various concentrations had no significant effect on egg hatching. The specific component of Blazer inhibiting egg hatching is unknown. Suppression of hatching by Blazer indicates that this postemergence soybean herbicide may have a potential role in managing H. glycines. PMID:19279812

  12. Effects of Eight Herbicides on In Vitro Hatching of Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Wong, A T; Tylka, G L; Hartzler, R G

    1993-12-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of selected herbicides on hatching of free eggs of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The herbicides used were Atrazine (atrazine), Basagran (bentazon), Bladex (cyanazine), Blazer (acifluorfen), Command (clomazone), Lasso (alachlor), Sonalan (ethalfluralin), and Treflan (trifluralin). Treatments comprised two concentrations of commercial herbicide formulations and deionized water and 3.14 mM zinc sulfate as negative and positive controls, respectively. Eggs were extracted from females and cysts, surface disinfested, and incubated in herbicide or control solutions at 25 +/- 2 C in darkness. Hatched second-stage juveniles were counted every other day for 24 days. Hatching of H. glycines eggs in 50 and 500 mug/ml Blazer was 42 to 67% less than that in deionized water and 6l to 78% less than that in zinc sulfate solution. Zinc sulfate significantly increased hatching activity in 50 mug/ml but not 500 mug/ml Blazer. The other herbicides tested at various concentrations had no significant effect on egg hatching. The specific component of Blazer inhibiting egg hatching is unknown. Suppression of hatching by Blazer indicates that this postemergence soybean herbicide may have a potential role in managing H. glycines.

  13. Hatching asynchrony aggravates inbreeding depression in a songbird (Serinus canaria): an inbreeding-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Raïssa A; Eens, Marcel; Fransen, Erik; Müller, Wendt

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how the intensity of inbreeding depression is influenced by stressful environmental conditions is an important area of enquiry in various fields of biology. In birds, environmental stress during early development is often related to hatching asynchrony; differences in age, and thus size, impose a gradient in conditions ranging from benign (first hatched chick) to harsh (last hatched chick). Here, we compared the effect of hatching order on growth rate in inbred (parents are full siblings) and outbred (parents are unrelated) canary chicks (Serinus canaria). We found that inbreeding depression was more severe under more stressful conditions, being most evident in later hatched chicks. Thus, consideration of inbreeding-environment interactions is of vital importance for our understanding of the biological significance of inbreeding depression and hatching asynchrony. The latter is particularly relevant given that hatching asynchrony is a widespread phenomenon, occurring in many bird species. The exact causes of the observed inbreeding-environment interaction are as yet unknown, but may be related to a decrease in maternal investment in egg contents with laying position (i.e. prehatching environment), or to performance of the chicks during sibling competition and/or their resilience to food shortage (i.e. posthatching environment). PMID:25689753

  14. Hatching asynchrony aggravates inbreeding depression in a songbird (Serinus canaria): an inbreeding-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Raïssa A; Eens, Marcel; Fransen, Erik; Müller, Wendt

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how the intensity of inbreeding depression is influenced by stressful environmental conditions is an important area of enquiry in various fields of biology. In birds, environmental stress during early development is often related to hatching asynchrony; differences in age, and thus size, impose a gradient in conditions ranging from benign (first hatched chick) to harsh (last hatched chick). Here, we compared the effect of hatching order on growth rate in inbred (parents are full siblings) and outbred (parents are unrelated) canary chicks (Serinus canaria). We found that inbreeding depression was more severe under more stressful conditions, being most evident in later hatched chicks. Thus, consideration of inbreeding-environment interactions is of vital importance for our understanding of the biological significance of inbreeding depression and hatching asynchrony. The latter is particularly relevant given that hatching asynchrony is a widespread phenomenon, occurring in many bird species. The exact causes of the observed inbreeding-environment interaction are as yet unknown, but may be related to a decrease in maternal investment in egg contents with laying position (i.e. prehatching environment), or to performance of the chicks during sibling competition and/or their resilience to food shortage (i.e. posthatching environment).

  15. The effect of various assisted hatching techniques on the mouse early embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Baek; Kim, Hye Jin; Choi, Young Bae; Ahn, Kwang Hwa; Lee, Kee Hwan; Yang, Jung Bo; Yu, Chang Seok

    2014-01-01

    Objective In search of an ideal method of assisted hatching (AH), we compared the effects of conventional micropipette-AH and laser-AH on the blastocyst formation rate (BFR) and blastocyst cell numbers. Methods Four- to five-week-old ICR female mice were paired with male mice after superovulation using Pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and hCG. The two-cell embryos were flushed from the oviducts of female mice. The retrieved two-cell embryos underwent one of five AH procedures: single mechanical assisted hatching (sMAH); cross mechanical assisted hatching (cMAH); single laser assisted hatching (sLAH); quarter laser assisted hatching (qLAH); and quarter laser zona thinning assisted hatching (qLZT-AH). After 72 hours incubation, double immunofluorescence staining was performed. Results Following a 72 hours incubation, a higher hatching BFR was observed in the control, sMAH, cMAH, and sLAH groups, compared to those in the qLAH and qLZT-AH groups (p<0.05). The hatched BFR was significantly higher in the qLAH and qLZT-AH groups than in the others (p<0.05 for each group). The inner cell mass (ICM) was higher in the control and sMAH group (p<0.05). The trophectoderm cell number was higher in the cMAH and qLAH groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Our results showed that the hatched BFR was higher in groups exposed the the qLAH and qLZT-AH methods compared to groups exposed to other AH methods. In the qLAH group, although the total cell number was significantly higher than in controls, the ICM ratio was significantly lower in than controls. PMID:25045630

  16. Factors affecting hatch success of hawksbill sea turtles on Long Island, Antigua, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Ditmer, Mark Allan; Stapleton, Seth Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Current understanding of the factors influencing hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) hatch success is disparate and based on relatively short-term studies or limited sample sizes. Because global populations of hawksbills are heavily depleted, evaluating the parameters that impact hatch success is important to their conservation and recovery. Here, we use data collected by the Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project (JBHP) to investigate hatch success. The JBHP implements saturation tagging protocols to study a hawksbill rookery in Antigua, West Indies. Habitat data, which reflect the varied nesting beaches, are collected at egg deposition, and nest contents are exhumed and categorized post-emergence. We analyzed hatch success using mixed-model analyses with explanatory and predictive datasets. We incorporated a random effect for turtle identity and evaluated environmental, temporal and individual-based reproductive variables. Hatch success averaged 78.6% (SD: 21.2%) during the study period. Highly supported models included multiple covariates, including distance to vegetation, deposition date, individual intra-seasonal nest number, clutch size, organic content, and sand grain size. Nests located in open sand were predicted to produce 10.4 more viable hatchlings per clutch than nests located >1.5 m into vegetation. For an individual first nesting in early July, the fourth nest of the season yielded 13.2 more viable hatchlings than the initial clutch. Generalized beach section and inter-annual variation were also supported in our explanatory dataset, suggesting that gaps remain in our understanding of hatch success. Our findings illustrate that evaluating hatch success is a complex process, involving multiple environmental and individual variables. Although distance to vegetation and hatch success were inversely related, vegetation is an important component of hawksbill nesting habitat, and a more complete assessment of the impacts of specific vegetation types on hatch

  17. Factors Affecting Hatch Success of Hawksbill Sea Turtles on Long Island, Antigua, West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Ditmer, Mark Allan; Stapleton, Seth Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Current understanding of the factors influencing hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) hatch success is disparate and based on relatively short-term studies or limited sample sizes. Because global populations of hawksbills are heavily depleted, evaluating the parameters that impact hatch success is important to their conservation and recovery. Here, we use data collected by the Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project (JBHP) to investigate hatch success. The JBHP implements saturation tagging protocols to study a hawksbill rookery in Antigua, West Indies. Habitat data, which reflect the varied nesting beaches, are collected at egg deposition, and nest contents are exhumed and categorized post-emergence. We analyzed hatch success using mixed-model analyses with explanatory and predictive datasets. We incorporated a random effect for turtle identity and evaluated environmental, temporal and individual-based reproductive variables. Hatch success averaged 78.6% (SD: 21.2%) during the study period. Highly supported models included multiple covariates, including distance to vegetation, deposition date, individual intra-seasonal nest number, clutch size, organic content, and sand grain size. Nests located in open sand were predicted to produce 10.4 more viable hatchlings per clutch than nests located >1.5 m into vegetation. For an individual first nesting in early July, the fourth nest of the season yielded 13.2 more viable hatchlings than the initial clutch. Generalized beach section and inter-annual variation were also supported in our explanatory dataset, suggesting that gaps remain in our understanding of hatch success. Our findings illustrate that evaluating hatch success is a complex process, involving multiple environmental and individual variables. Although distance to vegetation and hatch success were inversely related, vegetation is an important component of hawksbill nesting habitat, and a more complete assessment of the impacts of specific vegetation types on hatch

  18. Effect of Storage Environment on Hatching of the Cyst Nematode Globodera ellingtonae

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Russell E.; Kroese, Duncan; Zasada, Inga A.

    2015-01-01

    Globodera spp. eggs go through a diapause, which remains dormant until favorable hatching conditions are reached. Because of the regulatory concerns with cyst nematodes, it is often only possible to rear eggs for research in the greenhouse. However, hatch is often lower for greenhouse-produced eggs than for eggs obtained from the field. The goal of this research was to determine storage conditions for Globodera ellingtonae eggs produced in the greenhouse that would increase percentage hatch. Over 3 yr, G. ellingtonae greenhouse-produced eggs were stored in different environments (−20°C, 4°C, room temperature, and the field) in either dry or moist soil. Percentage hatch after exposure to the different environments was determined in potato root diffusate. Across two experiments, field-produced eggs had higher hatch rates (65.2%) than greenhouse-produced eggs (10.4%). Temperature did not have an appreciable influence on hatch of eggs stored dry in two experiments (2.8% to 8.4% and 3.8% to 8.6%), but hatch of eggs stored in moist soil was significantly higher than in dry soil at all temperatures except −20°C (26.8% and 28.7%). However, the ability of G. ellingtonae greenhouse-, microplot-, and field-produced eggs to reproduce on potato in field microplots was not different. Although it may not be possible to produce G. ellingtonae eggs in the greenhouse that have the magnitude of hatch as those produced in the field, hatching can be greatly increased by storing eggs in moist soil at either 4°C or room temperature. PMID:25861115

  19. 46 CFR 78.17-35 - Hatches and other openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... accessible during navigation. Dead covers on such port lights shall also be secured. (6) Port lights in spaces appropriated alternately to the carriage of cargo and passengers, when cargo is carried....

  20. 46 CFR 78.17-35 - Hatches and other openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accessible during navigation. Dead covers on such port lights shall also be secured. (6) Port lights in spaces appropriated alternately to the carriage of cargo and passengers, when cargo is carried....

  1. Embryonic Development and Rates of Metabolic Activity in Early and Late Hatching Eggs of the Major Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Maria L.; Duncan, Frances D.; Brooke, Basil D.

    2014-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae eggs generally hatch at the completion of embryo development; two-three days post oviposition. However, staggered or delayed hatching has been observed whereby a single batch of eggs shows marked variation in time-to-hatch, with some eggs hatching 18 days post oviposition or later. The mechanism enabling delayed hatch has not been clearly elucidated but is likely mediated by environmental and genetic factors that either induce diapause or slow embryo development. This study aimed to compare metabolic activity and embryonic development between eggs collected from sub-colonies of the baseline Anopheles gambiae GAH colony previously selected for early or late time-to-hatch. Egg batches from early and late hatch sub-colonies as well as from the baseline colony were monitored for hatching. For both time-to-hatch selected sub-colonies and the baseline colony the majority of eggs hatched on day two post oviposition. Nevertheless, eggs produced by the late hatch sub-colony showed a significantly longer mean time to hatch than those produced by the early hatch sub-colony. The overall proportions that hatched were similar for all egg batches. CO2 output between eggs from early and late hatch sub-colonies showed significant differences only at 3 and 7 days post oviposition where eggs from the early hatch and the late hatch sub-colony were more metabolically active, respectively. No qualitative differences were observed in embryo development between the sub-colonies. It is concluded that all viable embryos develop to maturity at the same rate and that a small proportion then enter a state of diapause enabling them to hatch later. As it has previously been shown that it is possible to at least partially select for late hatch, this characteristic is likely to involve genetic as well as environmental factors. Delayed hatching in An. gambiae is likely an adaptation to maximise reproductive output despite the increased risk of desiccation in an unstable aquatic

  2. Reproduction, hatching success, and early naupliar survival in Centropages typicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianora, A.; Miralto, A.; Halsband-Lenk, C.

    2007-02-01

    The broadcast spawner, Centropages typicus, is a very successful copepod species in many coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean. This review assembles the large amount of information on the reproduction and early life history of C. typicus that has emerged since the 1970s and has made this species one of the best-studied copepods, similar in that regard to species of Acartia and Calanus. Observations on mating behavior and the female gametogenic and oogenic cycles are presented, together with information on seasonal cycles of egg production rates in Mediterranean and Atlantic populations from various regions. These studies indicate a strong latitudinal gradient, with continuous reproduction and the main spawning season occurring earlier (late winter/spring) in warmer waters such as the Mediterranean Sea, compared to northern areas such as the North Sea and in the Kattegat, where C. typicus actively reproduces mainly in late summer and fall with reproduction ceasing altogether in winter in the German Bight. These observations strongly suggest that temperature is the controlling factor for reproductive activity in this species. Egg development times are also temperature dependent but do not vary with latitude, and there is as yet no conclusive evidence that diapause egg production occurs in C. typicus. Laboratory experiments have shown that food quantity and quality both affect fecundity and offspring fitness, but most of these studies have focused on diatom and dinoflagellate diets and non-algal prey have been strongly underrepresented, despite their importance for this omnivorous copepod. Large fluctuations in hatching success and naupliar survival have been reported in field surveys and have subsequently been related to maternal feeding history and food quality or toxicity in laboratory experiments. We identify future lines of research that will help to explain the interannual variability in breeding intensity and recruitment of C. typicus

  3. Post-hatching development of Alligator mississippiensis ovary and testis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brandon C.; Hamlin, Heather J.; Botteri, Nicole L.; Lawler, Ashley N.; Mathavan, Ketan K.; Guillette, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated ovary and testis development of Alligator mississippiensis during the first five months post-hatch. To better describe follicle assembly and seminiferous cord development, we employed histochemical techniques to detect carbohydrate-rich extracellular matrix components in one-week, one-month, three-month, and five-month-old gonads. We found profound morphological changes in both ovary and testis. During this time, oogenesis progressed up to diplotene arrest and meiotic germ cells increasingly interacted with follicular cells. Concomitant with follicles becoming invested with full complements of granulosa cells, a periodic acid Schiff’s (PAS)-positive basement membrane formed. As follicles enlarged and thecal layers were observed, basement membranes and thecal compartments gained periodic acid-methionine silver (PAMS)-reactive fibers. The ovarian medulla increased first PAS- and then PAMS-reactivity as it fragmented into wide lacunae lined with low cuboidal to squamous epithelia. During this same period, testicular germ cells found along the tubule margins were observed progressing from spermatogonia to round spermatids located within the center of tubules. Accompanying this meiotic development, interstitial Leydig cell clusters become more visible and testicular capsules thickened. During the observed testis development, the thickening tunica albuginea and widening interstitial tissues showed increasing PAS- and PAMS-reactivity. We observed putative inter-sex structures in both ovary and testis. On the coelomic aspect of testes were cell clusters with germ cell morphology and at the posterior end of ovaries, we observed “medullary rests” resembling immature testis cords. We hypothesize laboratory conditions accelerated gonad maturation due to optimum conditions, including nutrients and temperature. Laboratory alligators grew more rapidly and with increased body conditions compared to previous measured, field-caught animals. Additionally, we

  4. The relationship between hatching rate and number of embryos of the brood pouch in Littorina saxatilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde-Padín, P.; Carballo, M.; Caballero, A.; Rolán-Alvarez, E.

    2008-10-01

    Littorina saxatilis is an ovoviviparous organism in which shelled embryos can be directly observed in nearly all mature females captured in the wild. This characteristic has been used a number of times as an indirect estimate for fecundity of natural populations. However, there is no experimental corroboration that the number of embryos within a female brood pouch is actually related to the rate of hatching per unit of time, a more realistic estimate of female fecundity. In order to make this corroboration we estimated the correlation between the number of embryos in the brood pouch and the hatching rate of isolated females grown in the laboratory. We also compared the hatching rates of females from two sympatric ecotypes (RB and SU) of this species, which differ significantly in the number of embryos. We found a high agreement between hatching rate and number of embryos, concluding that the latter is a good proxy for fecundity.

  5. Astronaut Virgil Grissom shown through window of open hatch on Gemini craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut Virgil I. Grissom, the command pilot of the Gemini-Titan 3 three orbit mission, is shown through the window of the open hatch on Gemini spacecraft in the white room on the mornining of the launch.

  6. Generation of Collapsed Cross Sections for Hatch 1 Cycles 1-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, Brian J

    2012-11-01

    Under NRC JCN V6361, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked to develop and run SCALE/TRITON models for generation of collapsed few-group cross sections and to convert the cross sections to PMAXS format using the GENPMAXS conversion utility for use in PARCS/PATHS simulations of Hatch Unit 1, cycles 1-3. This letter report documents the final models used to produce the Hatch collapsed cross sections.

  7. Chilling requirements for hatching of a New Zealand isolate of Nematodirus filicollis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, A-M B; Pomroy, W E; Ganesh, S; Leathwick, D M

    2016-08-15

    The eggs of some species of the parasitic nematode Nematodirus require a period of chilling before they can hatch; N. filicollis is one such species. This study investigated this requirement for chilling in a New Zealand strain of this species. Eggs of N. filicollis were extracted from lamb's faeces and incubated at 20°C to allow development to the third stage larvae within the egg. These eggs were then placed into tissue culture plates and incubated at: 2.7°C (±0.99), 3.6°C (±0.90), 4.7°C (±0.35), 6.4°C (±0.37), 8.0°C (±1.54) or 9.9°C (±0.14) for up to 224 days. At 14day intervals until day 84, then every 28 days, one plate was removed from each temperature and placed at 13.1°C (±0.44) for 14 days. Eggs were then assessed for hatching. From this data, chill units were calculated by subtracting the culture temperature from a constant threshold of 11°C and multiplying by the number of days for which the sample was cultured; then the Gompertz model fitted. Even though hatching overall was low, a greater proportion of eggs hatched with chill accumulation. Maximum hatching of eggs required 800-1000 chill units. Consequently in the field, more than one season of chilling would be required before hatching. As such a generation time could take more than one year to complete. This is different to the hatching dynamics of N. spathiger, the other main species found in New Zealand sheep, which does not display this requirement for chilling and hatches immediately once the third stage larvae are developed. PMID:27514876

  8. Comparative hatching success of lake trout eggs in Lake Michigan water and well water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Carol C.; Mac, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the influence of water from southern Lake Michigan on the survival of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) eggs by comparing the hatching success of eggs from the same source incubated in water from Lake Michigan, or from the laboratory well. It is concluded that the observed differences in hatching are probably attributable to chemical constituents of water from the lake (eg, chlorinated hydrocarbons, metals and other industrial and agricultural chemicals).

  9. Chilling requirements for hatching of a New Zealand isolate of Nematodirus filicollis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, A-M B; Pomroy, W E; Ganesh, S; Leathwick, D M

    2016-08-15

    The eggs of some species of the parasitic nematode Nematodirus require a period of chilling before they can hatch; N. filicollis is one such species. This study investigated this requirement for chilling in a New Zealand strain of this species. Eggs of N. filicollis were extracted from lamb's faeces and incubated at 20°C to allow development to the third stage larvae within the egg. These eggs were then placed into tissue culture plates and incubated at: 2.7°C (±0.99), 3.6°C (±0.90), 4.7°C (±0.35), 6.4°C (±0.37), 8.0°C (±1.54) or 9.9°C (±0.14) for up to 224 days. At 14day intervals until day 84, then every 28 days, one plate was removed from each temperature and placed at 13.1°C (±0.44) for 14 days. Eggs were then assessed for hatching. From this data, chill units were calculated by subtracting the culture temperature from a constant threshold of 11°C and multiplying by the number of days for which the sample was cultured; then the Gompertz model fitted. Even though hatching overall was low, a greater proportion of eggs hatched with chill accumulation. Maximum hatching of eggs required 800-1000 chill units. Consequently in the field, more than one season of chilling would be required before hatching. As such a generation time could take more than one year to complete. This is different to the hatching dynamics of N. spathiger, the other main species found in New Zealand sheep, which does not display this requirement for chilling and hatches immediately once the third stage larvae are developed.

  10. External gills and adaptive embryo behavior facilitate synchronous development and hatching plasticity under respiratory constraint.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Jessica R; Warkentin, Karen M

    2008-11-01

    Plasticity in hatching timing allows embryos to balance egg- and larval-stage risks, and depends on the ability of hatching-competent embryos to continue developing in the egg. Hypoxia can slow development, kill embryos and induce premature hatching. For terrestrial eggs of red-eyed treefrogs, the embryonic period can extend approximately 50% longer than development to hatching competence, and development is synchronous across perivitelline oxygen levels (PO2) ranging from 0.5-16.5 kPa. Embryos maintain large external gills until hatching, then gills regress rapidly. We assessed the respiratory value of external gills using gill manipulations and closed-system respirometry. Embryos without external gills were oxygen limited in air and hatched at an external PO2 of 17 kPa, whereas embryos with gills regulated their metabolism and remained in the egg at substantially lower PO2. By contrast, tadpoles gained no respiratory benefit from external gills. We videotaped behavior and manipulated embryos to test if they position gills near the air-exposed portion of the egg surface, where PO2 is highest. Active embryos remained stationary for minutes in gills-at-surface positions. After manipulations and spontaneous movements that positioned gills in the O2-poor region of the egg, however, they returned their gills to the air-exposed surface within seconds. Even neural tube stage embryos, capable only of ciliary rotation, positioned their developing head in the region of highest PO2. Such behavior may be critical both to delay hatching after hatching competence and to obtain sufficient oxygen for normal, synchronous development at earlier stages.

  11. At 1050 Gallery, Block 16, view of access port down ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    At 1050 Gallery, Block 16, view of access port down to top of penstock (this is a service hatch into penstock for turbine-generator unit No. 2), looking north. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  12. Spatial distribution and hatching of overwintered eggs of a fish ectoparasite, Argulus coregoni (Crustacea: Branchiura).

    PubMed

    Mikheev, V N; Pasternak, A F; Valtonen, E T; Lankinen, Y

    2001-09-12

    The habitat distribution of overwintered eggs, which were found to be the only source of spring recruitment of Argulus coregoni Thorell, was studied at a commercial fish farm in Central Finland. The frequency of occurrence of egg clutches in the deep parts of the canals and ponds was 50 to 80% and the percentage cover of the surface of stones with egg clutches was 1.7 to 6.4%, while in the shallow parts these values were 8 to 27% and 0.1 to 0.3%, respectively. A greater proportion of empty egg-shells was observed in shallow water in the mid-May, suggesting an earlier hatching there stimulated by the increased temperature and higher illumination. Under laboratory conditions, only elevated UV illumination, but not diurnally fluctuating temperature, significantly accelerated hatching. Normally overwintered eggs produced a pronounced peak of hatched larvae at the end of May and hatching continued at a much slower rate throughout the summer. Eggs that overwintered twice, first normally and then for a second time buried under sediments, were exposed to the same laboratory conditions simultaneously with normally overwintered eggs, but their hatching was delayed until August. The hatching rate was low, but markedly increased in December. PMID:11678227

  13. Warming affects hatching time and early season survival of eastern tent caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Mariana; Lill, John T

    2015-11-01

    Climate change is disrupting species interactions by altering the timing of phenological events such as budburst for plants and hatching for insects. We combined field observations with laboratory manipulations to investigate the consequences of climate warming on the phenology and performance of the eastern tent caterpillar (Malacosoma americanum). We evaluated the effects of warmer winter and spring regimes on caterpillar hatching patterns and starvation endurance, traits likely to be under selection in populations experiencing phenological asynchrony, using individuals from two different populations (Washington, DC, and Roswell, GA). We also quantified the proximate and extended fitness effects of early food deprivation and recorded spring phenology of local caterpillars and their host plants. In addition, we conducted laboratory assays to determine if caterpillars are using plant chemical cues to fine-tune their hatching times. Warmer winter temperatures induced earlier hatching and caterpillars from GA survived starvation for periods that were 30% longer than caterpillars from DC. Warmer spring regimes reduced the starvation endurance of caterpillars overwintering in the wild but not in the laboratory. Early starvation dramatically reduced hatchling survival; however, surviving caterpillars did not show detrimental effects on pupal mass or development time. In the field, hatching preceded budburst in both 2013 and 2014 and the period of optimal foliage quality was 2 weeks shorter in 2013. Hatching time was unaffected by exposure to plant volatiles. Overall, we found that warmer temperatures can trigger late-season asynchrony by accelerating plant phenology and caterpillars from different populations exhibit differential abilities to cope with environmental unreliability.

  14. Using a Neural Network to Determine the Hatch Status of the AERI at the ARM North Slope of Alaska Site

    SciTech Connect

    Zwink, AB; Turner, DD

    2012-03-19

    The fore-optics of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) are protected by an automated hatch to prevent precipitation from fouling the instrument's scene mirror (Knuteson et al. 2004). Limit switches connected with the hatch controller provide a signal of the hatch state: open, closed, undetermined (typically associated with the hatch being between fully open or fully closed during the instrument's sky view period), or an error condition. The instrument then records the state of the hatch with the radiance data so that samples taken when the hatch is not open can be removed from any subsequent analysis. However, the hatch controller suffered a multi-year failure for the AERI located at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Central Facility in Barrow, Alaska, from July 2006-February 2008. The failure resulted in misreporting the state of the hatch in the 'hatchOpen' field within the AERI data files. With this error there is no simple solution to translate what was reported back to the correct hatch status, thereby making it difficult for an analysis to determine when the AERI was actually viewing the sky. As only the data collected when the hatch is fully open are scientifically useful, an algorithm was developed to determine whether the hatch was open or closed based on spectral radiance data from the AERI. Determining if the hatch is open or closed in a scene with low clouds is non-trivial, as low opaque clouds may look very similar spectrally as the closed hatch. This algorithm used a backpropagation neural network; these types of neural networks have been used with increasing frequency in atmospheric science applications.

  15. Effect of cadmium injected in ovo on hatching results and the activity of plasma hydrolytic enzymes in newly hatched chicks.

    PubMed

    Dżugan, Małgorzata; Lis, Marcin; Droba, Maria; Niedziółka, Jerzy W

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the toxicity of cadmium ions in chick embryos, using plasma hydrolytic enzyme as its biomarker. Hatching eggs (n = 300) from Ross 308 broilers were incubated under standard conditions. On day 4 of incubation, 50 μl of saline solution, containing Cd ions at a concentration from 0 (control group) to 24 μg, was injected in ovo into the egg albumen. The results indicate that the administration of cadmium at doses exceeding 1 μg/egg caused a gradual decrease in hatchability, with an LD50 of 3.9 μg/egg. The greatest differences between the groups in the enzymatic activities studied were found for N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), β-D-mannosidase (β-MAN) and arylsulphatase (ARYL). Compared to the control group, in the blood serum of chicks from the groups receiving 3, 6 and 12 μg Cd/egg the NAG activity increased by 79, 108 and 54% and β-MAN activity by 33, 119 and 108%, respectively. Exposure to cadmium at a dose of 1 to 6 μg per egg caused an about 60% increase in ARYL activity while a dose of 12 μg decreased the activity by about 35% below the level observed in the control group. These findings show that cadmium has a similar toxicity mechanism in mammals and birds, which opens the possibility of using NAG activity as a biomarker of the cytotoxic effect of cadmium in birds.

  16. 49 CFR 231.28 - Box and other house cars with roof hatches built or placed in service after October 1, 1966.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Box and other house cars with roof hatches built... RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.28 Box and other house cars with roof hatches built or placed in... other house cars with roof hatches. Box and other house cars with roof hatches built on or before...

  17. 49 CFR 231.28 - Box and other house cars with roof hatches built or placed in service after October 1, 1966.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Box and other house cars with roof hatches built... RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.28 Box and other house cars with roof hatches built or placed in... other house cars with roof hatches. Box and other house cars with roof hatches built on or before...

  18. Effects of air humidity during incubation and age after hatch on heat tolerance of neonatal male and female chicks.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, A M; Van der Hel, W; Henken, A M; Galal, A G; Abd-Elmoty, A K

    1991-07-01

    Effects of incubation 45 versus 55% relative humidity (RH) and early versus late hatching time on heat tolerance of neonatal male and female chicks were studied. Chicks were exposed for 48 h to temperatures of 35 (Experiment 1), 37 (Experiment 2), or 39 C (Experiment 3). Chicks that hatched from eggs incubated at 45% RH were lighter at hatch than chicks that hatched from eggs incubated at 55% RH. Chicks that hatched from eggs incubated at 55% RH lost more body weight and water during heat exposure than those that hatched from eggs incubated at 45% RH. Body weight and water loss during heat exposure of chicks that hatched early and late was similar. However, chicks that hatched late maintained their initial heat production and respiratory quotient better during heat exposure than chicks that hatched early. Body weight and water loss of male and female chicks was similar. At 37 and 39 C, heat production of chicks fell to lower values during the 2nd day of exposure compared with the 1st day. It was concluded that chicks that hatched late, i.e., with a short holding period in the hatcher, and coming from eggs incubated at 45% RH had increased heat tolerance in comparison with the other chicks.

  19. Eight-Shaped Hatching Increases the Risk of Inner Cell Mass Splitting in Extended Mouse Embryo Culture.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Liang, Hongxing; Deng, Li; Long, Hui; Chen, Hong; Chai, Weiran; Suo, Lun; Xu, Chen; Kuang, Yanping; Wu, Lingqian; Lu, Shengsheng; Lyu, Qifeng

    2015-01-01

    Increased risk of monozygotic twinning (MZT) has been shown to be associated with assisted reproduction techniques, particularly blastocyst culture. Interestingly, inner cell mass (ICM) splitting in human '8'-shaped hatching blastocysts that resulted in MZT was reported. However, the underlying cause of MZT is not known. In this study, we investigated in a mouse model whether in vitro culture leads to ICM splitting and its association with hatching types. Blastocyst hatching was observed in: (i) in vivo developed blastocysts and (ii-iii) in vitro cultured blastocysts following in vivo or in vitro fertilization. We found that '8'-shaped hatching occurred with significantly higher frequency in the two groups of in vitro cultured blastocysts than in the group of in vivo developed blastocysts (24.4% and 20.4% versus 0.8%, respectively; n = 805, P < 0.01). Moreover, Oct4 immunofluorescence staining was performed to identify the ICM in the hatching and hatched blastocysts. Scattered and split distribution of ICM cells was observed around the small zona opening of '8'-shaped hatching blastocysts. This occurred at a high frequency in the in vitro cultured groups. Furthermore, we found more double OCT4-positive masses, suggestive of increased ICM splitting in '8'-shaped hatching and hatched blastocysts than in 'U'-shaped hatching and hatched blastocysts (12.5% versus 1.9%, respectively; n = 838, P < 0.01). Therefore, our results demonstrate that extended in vitro culture can cause high frequencies of '8'-shaped hatching, and '8'-shaped hatching that may disturb ICM herniation leading to increased risk of ICM splitting in mouse blastocysts. These results may provide insights into the increased risk of human MZT after in vitro fertilization and blastocyst transfer.

  20. Developmental imaging: the avian embryo hatches to the challenge.

    PubMed

    Kulesa, Paul M; McKinney, Mary C; McLennan, Rebecca

    2013-06-01

    The avian embryo provides a multifaceted model to study developmental mechanisms because of its accessibility to microsurgery, fluorescence cell labeling, in vivo imaging, and molecular manipulation. Early two-dimensional planar growth of the avian embryo mimics human development and provides unique access to complex cell migration patterns using light microscopy. Later developmental events continue to permit access to both light and other imaging modalities, making the avian embryo an excellent model for developmental imaging. For example, significant insights into cell and tissue behaviors within the primitive streak, craniofacial region, and cardiovascular and peripheral nervous systems have come from avian embryo studies. In this review, we provide an update to recent advances in embryo and tissue slice culture and imaging, fluorescence cell labeling, and gene profiling. We focus on how technical advances in the chick and quail provide a clearer understanding of how embryonic cell dynamics are beautifully choreographed in space and time to sculpt cells into functioning structures. We summarize how these technical advances help us to better understand basic developmental mechanisms that may lead to clinical research into human birth defects and tissue repair.

  1. Zona hardening, zona drilling and assisted hatching: new achievements in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    De Vos, A; Van Steirteghem, A

    2000-01-01

    Prior to fertilization, the zona pellucida surrounding the mammalian oocyte acts as a species-specific sperm barrier and is involved in sperm binding. After fertilization, the zona plays a role in blocking polyspermic fertilization, it protects the integrity of the preimplantation embryo during early embryonic development, and also helps its oviductal transport. Zona hardening occurs naturally after fertilization in order to ensure this threefold function. A combination of lysins produced by the cleaving embryo or the uterus and physical expansion then reduces the zona thickness in preparation for hatching. Zona hardening, although not readily quantifiable, may also be induced by in vitro culture and by in vivo aging. Indeed, prolonged exposure of human oocytes and embryos to artificial culture conditions seems to impair their ability to implant. Implantation rates are also inversely correlated with advanced female age. Recently, failure of the embryonic zona pellucida to rupture following blastocyst expansion has been put forward as a possible contributing factor in implantation failure. In order to help embryos escape from their zonae during blastocyst expansion, different types of assisted hatching have been developed. Zona drilling involves the creation of an opening in the zona with acidified medium, whereas zona slitting is carried out in the same manner as partial zona dissection. In zona thinning, the zona is just made thinner over a certain area without a hole or a slit being created. More recently, laser-assisted hatching has been introduced. In vitro studies with both mouse and human embryos have indicated that an artificial gap in the zona pellucida significantly improves the hatching ability of blastocysts grown in vitro as compared to non-micromanipulated embryos. However, the clinical relevance of assisted hatching within an assisted reproduction program remains controversial and elusive. Very few randomized studies are available. Most reports are of

  2. Early and late maternal effects on hatching phenology of Heterocypris incongruens (Crustacea: Ostracoda).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Valeria; Albini, Dania; Pellegri, Valerio; Menozzi, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    In ephemeral ponds, the hatching asynchrony of resting eggs may be adaptive and the result of a maternal bet-hedging strategy. A mother can influence the progeny phenology through conditions experienced during life cycle even in early development stages. We investigated the consequences of a hatching delay for offspring and compared early and late maternal effects in a clonal lineage of Heterocypris incongruens. We used females from genetically identical, 40 months old, resting eggs that hatched, asynchronically, after a first (FI) or a second (SI) inundation event. Maternal origin (FI or SI) was considered an early effect involving the maternal response to hatching stimuli during the embryological dormant stage. Maternal age at deposition and egg size were considered late effects that account for maternal conditions during active stage. We compared size and development time of eggs produced by FI and SI females under laboratory condition (24°C 12:12 L:D photoperiod). Maternal origin affected development time to adulthood which was later in FI than in SI females, and fecundity that was higher in FI than in SI females. SI eggs were smaller than FI eggs: size was affected by maternal age at deposition and was directly related to the egg development time. Development time varied from 1 to 117 days and was shorter in SI eggs than in FI eggs. Our results showed that maternal response during embryological stage affects the performance in successive active stages and suggested that hatching asynchrony may be considered a risk spread strategy.

  3. Coots use hatch order to learn to recognize and reject conspecific brood parasitic chicks.

    PubMed

    Shizuka, Daizaburo; Lyon, Bruce E

    2010-01-14

    Avian brood parasites and their hosts provide model systems for investigating links between recognition, learning, and their fitness consequences. One major evolutionary puzzle has continued to capture the attention of naturalists for centuries: why do hosts of brood parasites generally fail to recognize parasitic offspring after they have hatched from the egg, even when the host and parasitic chicks differ to almost comic degrees? One prominent theory to explain this pattern proposes that the costs of mistakenly learning to recognize the wrong offspring make recognition maladaptive. Here we show that American coots, Fulica americana, can recognize and reject parasitic chicks in their brood by using learned cues, despite the fact that the hosts and the brood parasites are of the same species. A series of chick cross-fostering experiments confirm that coots use first-hatched chicks in a brood as referents to learn to recognize their own chicks and then discriminate against later-hatched parasitic chicks in the same brood. When experimentally provided with the wrong reference chicks, coots can be induced to discriminate against their own offspring, confirming that the learning errors proposed by theory can exist. However, learning based on hatching order is reliable in naturally parasitized coot nests because host eggs hatch predictably ahead of parasite eggs. Conversely, a lack of reliable information may help to explain why the evolution of chick recognition is not more common in hosts of most interspecific brood parasites. PMID:20016486

  4. Dietary lufenuron reduces egg hatch and influences protein expression in the fruit fly Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiou Ling; Geib, Scott; Cho, Il Kyu; Li, Qing X; Stanley, David

    2014-08-01

    Lufenuron (LFN), a chitin synthase inhibitor, impacts the fertility of Ceratitis capitata, Bactrocera dorsalis, B. cucurbitae, and B. latifrons. We posed the hypothesis that LFN curtails egg hatch in the solanaceous fruit fly, B. latifrons. In this study, newly emerged virgin adults were sexed and fed for 12 days with varying concentrations of LFN-laced agar diets until sexual maturation. Eggs were collected from 12-d-old adults and the egg hatch was assessed. Egg hatch decreased in adults reared on LFN-treated diets. LFN-treated media did not influence fertility after one gender was reared on experimental and the other on control media before mating. Exposure to LFN-treated medium after mating led to reduced egg hatch. We infer that LFN is not a permanent sterilant, and reduced egg hatch depends on continuous exposure to dietary LFN after mating. Proteomic analysis identified two differentially expressed proteins, a pheromone binding protein and a chitin binding protein, between adults maintained on LFN-treated and control diets. Expression of two genes encoding chitin synthase 2, and chitin binding protein, was altered in adults exposed to dietary LFN. LFN treatments also led to increased expression of two odorant binding proteins one in females and one in males. We surmise these data support our hypothesis and provide insight into LFN actions. PMID:24753137

  5. Comparison of hatching mode in pelagic and demersal eggs of two closely related species in the order pleuronectiformes.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Mari; Sano, Kaori; Yoshizaki, Norio; Shimizu, Daisuke; Fujinami, Yuichiro; Noda, Tsutomu; Yasumasu, Shigeki

    2014-11-01

    We compared several characteristics of the pelagic eggs of Verasper variegatus with those of demersal eggs of Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae, both in the order Pleuronectiformes (halibuts or flatfishes). V. variegatus eggs had about twice the diameter of P. yokohamae eggs. However, the total egg protein weight of P. yokohamae was similar to that of V. variegatus. The specific gravity of P. yokohamae eggs was calculated to be 7-fold that of V. variegatus. The difference in size is the main feature distinguishing the two types of egg. The thickness of the egg envelope of P. yokohamae- more than twice that of V. variegatus-must affect the manner of hatching. The amount of hatching enzyme synthesized in pre-hatching embryo was estimated to be larger in P. yokohamae than V. variegatus. The distribution of hatching gland cells differed between the species. In V. variegates embryos, these were located on the yolk sac as a narrow ring-shaped belt, resulting in cleavage of the egg envelope into two parts by digesting a limited region of the egg envelope, called "rim-hatching". The hatching gland cells of P. yokohamae embryos were distributed all over the surface of the yolk sac, forming a hole through which the embryo could escape. Thus, the location of the hatching gland cells in pre-hatching embryos varied during the evolution of the Pleuronectiformes, depending on the egg type and manner of hatching.

  6. Hatch Integration Testing of a NASA TransHab Derivative Woven Inflatable Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgecombe, John; Valle, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Current options for Lunar habitat architecture include inflatable habitats and airlocks. Inflatable structures can have mass and volume advantages over conventional structures. However, inflatable structures are also perceived to carry additional risk because they are at a lower Technical Readiness Level (TRL) than more conventional metallic structures. The use of inflatable structures for habitation will require large penetrations in the inflatable structure to accommodate hatches and/or windows The Hatch Integration Test is designed to study the structural integrity of an expandable structure with an integrated hatch, and to verify mathematical models of the structure. The TransHab project developed an experimental inflatable module at Johnson Space Center in the 1990's. The TransHab design was originally envisioned for use in Mars Transits but was also studied as a potential habitat for the International Space Station (ISS).

  7. Warming affects hatching time and early season survival of eastern tent caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Mariana; Lill, John T

    2015-11-01

    Climate change is disrupting species interactions by altering the timing of phenological events such as budburst for plants and hatching for insects. We combined field observations with laboratory manipulations to investigate the consequences of climate warming on the phenology and performance of the eastern tent caterpillar (Malacosoma americanum). We evaluated the effects of warmer winter and spring regimes on caterpillar hatching patterns and starvation endurance, traits likely to be under selection in populations experiencing phenological asynchrony, using individuals from two different populations (Washington, DC, and Roswell, GA). We also quantified the proximate and extended fitness effects of early food deprivation and recorded spring phenology of local caterpillars and their host plants. In addition, we conducted laboratory assays to determine if caterpillars are using plant chemical cues to fine-tune their hatching times. Warmer winter temperatures induced earlier hatching and caterpillars from GA survived starvation for periods that were 30% longer than caterpillars from DC. Warmer spring regimes reduced the starvation endurance of caterpillars overwintering in the wild but not in the laboratory. Early starvation dramatically reduced hatchling survival; however, surviving caterpillars did not show detrimental effects on pupal mass or development time. In the field, hatching preceded budburst in both 2013 and 2014 and the period of optimal foliage quality was 2 weeks shorter in 2013. Hatching time was unaffected by exposure to plant volatiles. Overall, we found that warmer temperatures can trigger late-season asynchrony by accelerating plant phenology and caterpillars from different populations exhibit differential abilities to cope with environmental unreliability. PMID:26093630

  8. The spread of pathogens through trade in poultry hatching eggs: overview and recent developments.

    PubMed

    Cobb, S P

    2011-04-01

    The international trade in poultry hatching eggs could potentially facilitate the global dissemination of poultry disease. Provided the guidelines of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) on breeding flock hygiene are followed, of those avian diseases currently listed by the OlE, only highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), Newcastle disease (ND), and avian mycoplasmosis (caused by Mycoplasma gallisepticum or M. synoviae) should be considered likely to be spread though trade in this commodity. Furthermore, the impact of HPAI and ND on egg production and hatchability will constrain the potential for these agents to be spread by poultry hatching eggs.

  9. Accessibility Videos.

    PubMed

    Kurppa, Ari; Nordlund, Marika

    2016-01-01

    It can be difficult to understand accessibility, if you do not have the personal experience. The Accessibility Centre ESKE produced short videos which demonstrate the meaning of accessibility in different situations. Videos will raise accessibility awareness of architects, other planners and professionals in the construction field and maintenance. PMID:27534282

  10. Subject Access Points in Electronic Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjorland, Birger; Nielsen, Lykke Kyllesbech

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of subject access points in databases concentrates on the broader theoretical perspective. Topics include technology-driven stages in the development of subject access points; a taxonomy of subject access points; document titles; abstracts; references and citations; full text; and descriptors, identifiers, classification codes, and…

  11. Effect of inoculation and application methods on the performance of chemicals used to disinfect salmonella contaminated broiler hatching eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella can penetrate the shells and shell membranes of hatching eggs and this can critically affect final product contamination levels (processed broiler carcass). There have been numerous published studies on the efficacy of chemical disinfectants for hatching eggs. The objective of this stud...

  12. 76 FR 32188 - Hatch Solar Energy Center 1, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Hatch Solar Energy Center 1, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial... notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Hatch Solar Energy Center 1, LLC's application for...

  13. 76 FR 56791 - Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Tropic To Hatch (Garkane) 138 kV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Tropic To Hatch (Garkane... (ROD) for the Tropic to Hatch (Garkane) 138 kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line Environmental...

  14. Comparison of Spectral and Image Morphological Analysis for Egg Early Hatching Property Detection Based on Hyperspectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Pan, Leiqing; Tu, Kang; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The use of non-destructive methods to detect egg hatching properties could increase efficiency in commercial hatcheries by saving space, reducing costs, and ensuring hatching quality. For this purpose, a hyperspectral imaging system was built to detect embryo development and vitality using spectral and morphological information of hatching eggs. A total of 150 green shell eggs were used, and hyperspectral images were collected for every egg on day 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 of incubation. After imaging, two analysis methods were developed to extract egg hatching characteristic. Firstly, hyperspectral images of samples were evaluated using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and only one optimal band with 822 nm was selected for extracting spectral characteristics of hatching egg. Secondly, an image segmentation algorithm was applied to isolate the image morphologic characteristics of hatching egg. To investigate the applicability of spectral and image morphological analysis for detecting egg early hatching properties, Learning Vector Quantization neural network (LVQNN) was employed. The experimental results demonstrated that model using image morphological characteristics could achieve better accuracy and generalization than using spectral characteristic parameters, and the discrimination accuracy for eggs with embryo development were 97% at day 3, 100% at day 4. In addition, the recognition results for eggs with weak embryo development reached 81% at day 3, and 92% at day 4. This study suggested that image morphological analysis was a novel application of hyperspectral imaging technology to detect egg early hatching properties. PMID:24551130

  15. 75 FR 56504 - Action Affecting Export Privileges; Rigel Optics, Inc. and Donald Wayne Hatch; Order Denying...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... August 12, 2010 (75 FR 50681, August 16, 2010), has continued the Regulations in effect under the... Bureau of Industry and Security Action Affecting Export Privileges; Rigel Optics, Inc. and Donald Wayne Hatch; Order Denying Export Privileges In the Matter of: Rigel Optics, Inc., 477 South 28th...

  16. Benzyl isothiocyanate affects development, hatching and reproduction of the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) applied at micromolar doses decreased Heterodera glycines J2 movement, H. glycines hatching, and reproduction of H. glycines on soybean, Glycine max. Direct exposure of J2 to 30 microM BITC caused an immediate decrease (17%; P < 0.05) in J2 movement relative to 1% methan...

  17. Inflatable O-ring seal would ease closing of hatch cover plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neary, K. J.

    1966-01-01

    Inflatable O-ring seal provides positive sealing means that does not require the manual exertion of a large compressive force during opening or closing of a rotary-type hatch cover plate. The O-ring is deflated during opening and closing and inflated after closure by a gas pressure source.

  18. Factors Affecting Growth of Tengmalm's Owl (Aegolius funereus) Nestlings: Prey Abundance, Sex and Hatching Order.

    PubMed

    Zárybnická, Markéta; Riegert, Jan; Brejšková, Lucie; Šindelář, Jiří; Kouba, Marek; Hanel, Jan; Popelková, Alena; Menclová, Petra; Tomášek, Václav; Šťastný, Karel

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, energy supply during growth is a major predictor of the physical condition and survival prospects of fledglings. A number of experimental studies have shown that nestling body mass and wing length can vary with particular extrinsic factors, but between-year observational data on this topic are scarce. Based on a seven-year observational study in a central European Tengmalm's owl population we examine the effect of year, brood size, hatching order, and sex on nestling body mass and wing length, as well as the effect of prey abundance on parameters of growth curve. We found that nestling body mass varied among years, and parameters of growth curve, i.e. growth rate and inflection point in particular, increased with increasing abundance of the owl's main prey (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles), and pooled prey abundance (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles, and Sorex shrews). Furthermore, nestling body mass varied with hatching order and between sexes being larger for females and for the first-hatched brood mates. Brood size had no effect on nestling body mass. Simultaneously, we found no effect of year, brood size, hatching order, or sex on the wing length of nestlings. Our findings suggest that in this temperate owl population, nestling body mass is more sensitive to prey abundance than is wing length. The latter is probably more limited by the physiology of the species.

  19. Temperature effects on hatching and viability of Juvenile Gill Lice, Salmincola californiensis.

    PubMed

    Vigil, E M; Christianson, K R; Lepak, J M; Williams, P J

    2016-07-01

    Salmonids of the genus Oncorhynchus, distributed throughout the Pacific Rim, can be infected by the gill lice species Salmincola californiensis (Dana, 1852), which makes them one of the most broadly distributed gill lice species. Despite their broad distribution and valuable obligate salmonid hosts, relatively little is known about S. californiensis. We evaluated effects of temperature on timing of S. californiensis hatching and survival of copepodids, and provide information on brood size and variability. Our results suggest that temperature was a primary driver of timing of S. californiensis hatching and post-hatching survival. Prior to this study, the free-swimming stage of S. californiensis was reported to survive approximately 2 days without a suitable host. We observed active copepodids 13 days after hatch with some individuals from most (>90%) viable egg sacs at all temperature treatments surviving ≥5 days. Our findings indicate that warmer temperatures could increase development rates of gill lice at certain life stages, potentially increasing fecundity. This information coupled with predictions that warmer water temperatures could intensify crowding of coldwater fishes, stress, and parasite transmission suggests that climate change could exacerbate negative effects of S. californiensis on ecologically and economically important salmonids. PMID:26538200

  20. MicroRNA-276 promotes egg-hatching synchrony by up-regulating brm in locusts.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Chen, Qianquan; Wei, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Feng; Yang, Meiling; Hao, Shuguang; Guo, Xiaojiao; Chen, Dahua; Kang, Le

    2016-01-19

    Developmental synchrony, the basis of uniform swarming, migration, and sexual maturation, is an important strategy for social animals to adapt to variable environments. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying developmental synchrony are largely unexplored. The migratory locust exhibits polyphenism between gregarious and solitarious individuals, with the former displaying more synchronous sexual maturation and migration than the latter. Here, we found that the egg-hatching time of gregarious locusts was more uniform compared with solitarious locusts and that microRNA-276 (miR-276) was expressed significantly higher in both ovaries and eggs of gregarious locusts than in solitarious locusts. Interestingly, inhibiting miR-276 in gregarious females and overexpressing it in solitarious females, respectively, caused more heterochronic and synchronous hatching of progeny eggs. Moreover, miR-276 directly targeted a transcription coactivator gene, brahma (brm), resulting in its up-regulation. Knockdown of brm not only resulted in asynchronous egg hatching in gregarious locusts but also impaired the miR-276-induced synchronous egg hatching in solitarious locusts. Mechanistically, miR-276 mediated brm activation in a manner that depended on the secondary structure of brm, namely, a stem-loop around the binding site of miR-276. Collectively, our results unravel a mechanism by which miR-276 enhances brm expression to promote developmental synchrony and provide insight into regulation of developmental homeostasis and population sustaining that are closely related to biological synchrony. PMID:26729868

  1. Involvement of Neptune in induction of the hatching gland and neural crest in the Xenopus embryo.

    PubMed

    Kurauchi, Takayuki; Izutsu, Yumi; Maéno, Mitsugu

    2010-01-01

    Neptune, a Krüppel-like transcription factor, is expressed in various regions of the developing Xenopus embryo and it has multiple functions in the process of development in various organs. In situ hybridization analysis showed that Neptune is expressed in the boundary region between neural and non-neural tissues at the neurula stage, but little is known about the function of Neptune in this region. Here, we examined the expression and function of Neptune in the neural plate border (NPB) in the Xenopus embryo. Depletion of Neptune protein in developing embryos by using antisense MO caused loss of the hatching gland and otic vesicle as well as malformation of neural crest-derived cranial cartilages and melanocytes. Neptune MO also suppressed the expression of hatching gland and neural crest markers such as he, snail2, sox9 and msx1 at the neurula stage. Subsequent experiments showed that Neptune is necessary and sufficient for the differentiation of hatching gland cells and that it is located downstream of pax3 in the signal regulating the differentiation of these cells. Thus, Neptune is a new member of hatching gland specifier and plays a physiological role in determination and specification of multiple lineages derived from the NPB region.

  2. WINTER FLOUNDER PSUEDOPLEURONECTES AMERICANUS HATCHING SUCCESS AS A FUNCTION OF BURIAL DEPTH IN THE LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous experiments have shown that viable hatch of winter flounder eggs is reduced when the eggs are buried by as little as one half of one egg diameter (approximately 0.5 mm of sediment). This sensitivity to burial has resulted in seasonal banning of dredging in several north...

  3. The balance between innovation and competition: the Hatch-Waxman Act, the 2003 Amendments, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    In 1984, Congress passed the Hatch-Waxman Act, a landmark statute designed both to encourage innovation by pioneer drug companies and to increase competition by generic drug companies. After its enactment, drug companies attempted to "ga the regulatory regime to their respective economic advantage. In 2003, in an effort to address these issues, FDA promulgated a final rule and Congress passed the Medicare Modernization Act, amending the Hatch-Waxman Act. This article provides a comprehensive look at the 2003 statutory and regulatory changes. First, the article analyzes the history and provisions of the original Hatch-Waxman Act and the issues that arose after its enactment. Second, the article discusses the passage of the 2003 FDA rule and the 2003 Medicare Modernization Act. Next, the article demonstrates that, although the 2003 amendments may have definitively resolved some issues, the amendments did not resolve all interpretive issues and have even led to unintended consequences. In particular, the article discusses several areas of current controversy, including the effect of patent delisting and patent expiration on 180-day exclusivity, the patent delisting counterclaim provision, the declaratory judgment action provision, patent settlement agreements, and authorized generics. Finally, the article assesses the potential for future reform of the Hatch-Waxman Act. The article concludes that maintaining the balance between innovation and competition will likely remain a daunting task for legislators and regulators in the future.

  4. Effects of Injected Methylmercury on the Hatching of Common Loon (Gavia immer) Eggs

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the level of in ovo methylmercury (MeHg) exposure that results in detrimental effects on fitness and survival of loon embryos and hatched chicks, we conducted a field study in which we injected eggs with various doses of MeHg on day 4 of incubation. Eggs were collect...

  5. Enterobacteriaceae and Salmonella recovered from non-sanitized and sanitized broiler hatching eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sanitizing hatching eggs may reduce the chances that a flock will become colonized with Salmonella and reduce the numbers of other microorganisms, such as Enterobacteriaceae, that can depress hatchability. An experiment was conducted to determine if a quaternary-biguanide sanitizer applied as foam ...

  6. MicroRNA-276 promotes egg-hatching synchrony by up-regulating brm in locusts

    PubMed Central

    He, Jing; Chen, Qianquan; Wei, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Feng; Yang, Meiling; Hao, Shuguang; Guo, Xiaojiao; Chen, Dahua; Kang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Developmental synchrony, the basis of uniform swarming, migration, and sexual maturation, is an important strategy for social animals to adapt to variable environments. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying developmental synchrony are largely unexplored. The migratory locust exhibits polyphenism between gregarious and solitarious individuals, with the former displaying more synchronous sexual maturation and migration than the latter. Here, we found that the egg-hatching time of gregarious locusts was more uniform compared with solitarious locusts and that microRNA-276 (miR-276) was expressed significantly higher in both ovaries and eggs of gregarious locusts than in solitarious locusts. Interestingly, inhibiting miR-276 in gregarious females and overexpressing it in solitarious females, respectively, caused more heterochronic and synchronous hatching of progeny eggs. Moreover, miR-276 directly targeted a transcription coactivator gene, brahma (brm), resulting in its up-regulation. Knockdown of brm not only resulted in asynchronous egg hatching in gregarious locusts but also impaired the miR-276–induced synchronous egg hatching in solitarious locusts. Mechanistically, miR-276 mediated brm activation in a manner that depended on the secondary structure of brm, namely, a stem-loop around the binding site of miR-276. Collectively, our results unravel a mechanism by which miR-276 enhances brm expression to promote developmental synchrony and provide insight into regulation of developmental homeostasis and population sustaining that are closely related to biological synchrony. PMID:26729868

  7. Dietary lufenuron reduces egg hatch and influences protein expression in the fruit fly Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newly emerged virgin adults were fed for 12 days with various concentrations of lufenuron incorporated agar diet until sexual maturation. After maturation, pairing tests were conducted. At 12 days old, eggs were collected and egg production and egg hatch were assessed. The results showed that lufenu...

  8. Unweathered and weathered aviation kerosine: Chemical characterization and effects on hatching success of duck eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.; Gay, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of weathered aviation kerosine from a pipeline rupture in northern Virginia on mallard egg hatchability. Artificially-incubated mallard eggs were exposed by eggshell application to several amounts of weathered and unweathered aviation kerosine on day 6 of incubation. Measured hatching success of eggs and characterized the kerosine according to 14 aliphatic and 9 aromatic compounds.

  9. Hatching asynchrony, survival, and the fitness of alternative adult morphs in Ambystoma talpoideum.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Travis J; Plague, Gordon R

    2004-06-01

    The mole salamander, Ambystoma talpoideum, exhibits both aquatic (gilled) and terrestrial (metamorphosed) adult morphologies. Previous studies have shown the existence of body-size advantages associated with the terrestrial morph in A. talpoideum and other polymorphic salamanders (e.g., A. tigrinum). However, aquatic adult A. talpoideum mature at a younger age and often breed earlier than terrestrial adults. We tested the hypothesis that early maturation and reproduction in aquatic adults increase fitness (irrespective of body size). We reared larval A. talpoideum in mesocosms and varied the timing of hatching, with early-hatching larvae representing the offspring from early-breeding aquatic adults, and late-hatching larvae representing the offspring of later-breeding terrestrial adults. Our results demonstrate significantly higher survival rates among early-hatchlings relative to late-hatching conspecifics, supporting the hypothesis that early reproduction may be an important mechanism mediating the polymorphism in A. talpoideum. We discuss our results within the context of size-based models of the fitness of alternative life-cycles. PMID:15127287

  10. Factors Affecting Growth of Tengmalm's Owl (Aegolius funereus) Nestlings: Prey Abundance, Sex and Hatching Order.

    PubMed

    Zárybnická, Markéta; Riegert, Jan; Brejšková, Lucie; Šindelář, Jiří; Kouba, Marek; Hanel, Jan; Popelková, Alena; Menclová, Petra; Tomášek, Václav; Šťastný, Karel

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, energy supply during growth is a major predictor of the physical condition and survival prospects of fledglings. A number of experimental studies have shown that nestling body mass and wing length can vary with particular extrinsic factors, but between-year observational data on this topic are scarce. Based on a seven-year observational study in a central European Tengmalm's owl population we examine the effect of year, brood size, hatching order, and sex on nestling body mass and wing length, as well as the effect of prey abundance on parameters of growth curve. We found that nestling body mass varied among years, and parameters of growth curve, i.e. growth rate and inflection point in particular, increased with increasing abundance of the owl's main prey (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles), and pooled prey abundance (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles, and Sorex shrews). Furthermore, nestling body mass varied with hatching order and between sexes being larger for females and for the first-hatched brood mates. Brood size had no effect on nestling body mass. Simultaneously, we found no effect of year, brood size, hatching order, or sex on the wing length of nestlings. Our findings suggest that in this temperate owl population, nestling body mass is more sensitive to prey abundance than is wing length. The latter is probably more limited by the physiology of the species. PMID:26444564

  11. STS-44 MS Musgrave looks out OV-104's side hatch viewport on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Mission Specialist (MS) F. Story Musgrave, wearing communications kit assembly lightweight headset (HDST), looks out side hatch viewport on Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, middeck. Just behind him is the waste management compartment (WMC). The stainless steel cylinder is the temporary wet trash can.

  12. STS-44 OV-104's airlock hatch with tennis shoes and Presidential Sports Award

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 airlock hatch is decorated with two pairs of tennis shoes and a Presidential Sports Award Jogging patch (insignia) on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. With the crew having a treadmill-like device onboard for exercise and biomedical testing, tennis shoes were in plentiful stock on the eight-day mission.

  13. Hatching of Meloidogyne incognita Eggs in the Neutral Carbohydrate Fraction of Root Exudates of Gnotobiotically Grown Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Hamlen, R. A.; Bloom, J. R.; Lukezic, F. L.

    1973-01-01

    Meloidogyne incognita eggs were hatched in soil sterilized by gamma kradiation and wetted with root exudates from alfalfa plants in different stages of development and subjected to various levels of clipping. Carbohydrate components of the exudates were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Although significant stimulation of hatch was detected in exudates of seedling and flowering plants, the practical importance of the increase is doubtful as hatch in distilled water was always greater than 50%. Hatch did not differ among exudate samples from clipped plants. Incubation of eggs in soil moistened with 10⁻⁷ to 10⁻³ M solutions of glucose did not result in increased hatching over that in distilled water. PMID:19319320

  14. Effects of water hardness on size and hatching success of silver carp eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, Jeff J.; Sass, Greg G.; Luoma, James A.; Gaikowski, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Eggs of silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix absorb water after release from the female, causing them to become turgid and to increase substantially in size. The volume of water that diffuses within an egg is most likely determined by (1) the difference in ionic concentration between the egg and the water that surrounds it and (2) the elasticity of the egg membrane. Prior observations suggest that silver carp eggs may swell and burst in soft waters. If water hardness affects silver carp reproductive success in nonnative ecosystems, this abiotic factor could limit silver carp distribution or abundance. In this study, we tested the effect of water hardness on silver carp egg enlargement and hatching success. Groups of newly fertilized silver carp eggs were placed in water at one of five nominal water hardness levels (50, 100, 150, 200, or 250 mg/L as CaCO3) for 1 h to harden (absorb water after fertilization). Egg groups were then placed in separate incubation vessels housed in two recirculation systems that were supplied with either soft (50 mg/L as CaCO3) or hard (250 mg/L as CaCO3) water to evaluate hatching success. Tests were terminated within 24 h after viable eggs had hatched. Eggs that were initially placed in 50-mg/L water to harden were larger (i.e., swelled more) and had a greater probability of hatch than eggs hardened in other water hardness levels. Unlike the effect of water hardness during egg hardening, the water hardness during incubation appeared to have no effect on egg hatching success. Our research suggests that water hardness may not be a limiting factor in the reproduction, recruitment, and range expansion of silver carp in North America.

  15. Effects of high pressure processing on hatching of eggs of the zoonotic rat tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta.

    PubMed

    Merwad, A M A; Mitchell, S M; Zajac, A M; Flick, G J; Lindsay, D S

    2011-03-10

    High hydrostatic pressure processing (HPP) is an effective non-thermal treatment to remove pathogens from a variety of food and food products. It has been extensively examined using prokaryotic organisms but has had limited study on eukaryotic organisms. Treatment using HPP has been shown to be effective in inactivating nematode larvae in food and Ascaris suum eggs. Nothing is known on the efficacy of HPP on tapeworm cysts or eggs. Eggs of important zoonotic tapeworms including Echinococcus and Taenia spp. can potentially contaminate water and food intended for human consumption. The present study examined the efficacy of HPP on the viability of Hymenolepis diminuta eggs. Efficacy of HPP treatment was measured using an egg hatch assay in two experiments. One thousand unhatched H. diminuta eggs in Hanks balanced salt solution were packaged in sealable bags and exposed to 100-600megapascals (MPa; 1MPa=10atm=147psi) for 60s in a commercial HPP unit. Positive (no HPP) and negative (No HPP but frozen/thawed) controls were examined in each experiment. None of the HPP untreated and frozen eggs (negative controls) were able to hatch or exclude trypan blue when placed in the hatching solution in experiment 1 or 2. HPP untreated and nonfrozen eggs (positive controls) hatched and excluded trypan blue; 75% were positive in experiment 1 and 80% were positive in experiment 2. No hatched eggs were observed when they were exposed to 300-600MPa for 60s. Treatment at 400MPa and above caused rupturing of the oncosphere. Results from this study indicate that HPP is a possible method to inactivate tapeworm eggs and that the susceptibility of tapeworm eggs to HPP is similar to or greater than that of nematode eggs or tissue larvae.

  16. Continuous measurements of instantaneous heart rate and its fluctuations before and after hatching in chickens.

    PubMed

    Moriya, K; Pearson, J T; Burggren, W W; Ar, A; Tazawa, H

    2000-03-01

    There has been considerable interest in heart rate (fh) fluctuations in relation to cardiovascular control systems and foetal conditions during pregnancy in mammals. Prominent fluctuations in fh also occur in avian embryos, which are an important experimental model for studying developmental physiology. The present study determined the instantaneous fh of seven chick embryos continuously from the last stage of prenatal development (day 18), throughout the pipping (perinatal) period (days 19-21) until hatching and, subsequently, of newly hatched chicks (up to day 2). The distinctive patterns of instantaneous fh fluctuations took the form of specific changes within a broad mean fh baseline. Cyclic oscillations (ultradian rhythm) occurred until an early stage of the perinatal period, when the fh baseline started rising. Subsequently, the baseline dropped and respiratory arrhythmia began to appear concomitant with external pipping. During the final stage of external pipping, when the fh baseline rose again prior to hatching, three unique patterns of instantaneous fh fluctuations were evident: relatively long-lasting cyclic small accelerations, irregular intermittent large accelerations and short-term repeated large accelerations. Furthermore, repeated alternate occurrences of the latter two types of acceleration formed an additional oscillating pattern with a period of 10-15 min. During the early period after hatching, when the fh baseline reached its maximum, instantaneous fh changed relatively slowly accompanied by transient rapid decelerations, probably due to augmented vagal tone. Subsequently, the mean fh baseline dropped to its minimum, and a circadian rhythm and three types of previously reported fh fluctuations (types I-III) appeared. Developmental patterns of mean fh and the appearance of distinctive patterns of instantaneous fluctuations in fh and circadian rhythms were not influenced by an ultimate failure of hatching after a normal development. The

  17. Production characteristics of Hy-Line W36 laying hens hatched from white and tinted eggs.

    PubMed

    Kim, E J; Purswell, J L; Evans, J D; Branton, S L

    2014-08-01

    Eggshell color can greatly influence visual appeal of table eggs, and within the United States, table eggs are normally sorted and marked according to eggshell color to maximize consumer appeal. Recently, table egg producers have noted increased incidence of "off-color" or tinted (TT) eggs derived from white egg laying breeder hens. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the production characteristics and resultant eggshell color of laying hens hatched from different colored eggs. Hy-Line W36 eggs were obtained from a commercial breeder operation and eggshell color was assessed with a colorimeter to separate eggs into groups of tinted (TT) and nontinted (NT) eggs before incubation. Treatment groups were placed into separate hatching trays. At hatching, chicks from each treatment group were individually wing-banded. Pullets were randomly allocated into cages according to treatment groups at 18 wk. Birds were placed into individual cages, with 5 consecutive cages representing a treatment replicate. Each treatment was replicated 24 times for a total of 120 birds per treatment and fed a nutritionally complete layer diet. Production performance was evaluated from 18 to 34 wk of age. Average weekly egg production was calculated. Feed intake, egg weights, egg mass, feed conversion ratio, and egg color were analyzed every 2 wk. Birds were weighed every 4 wk until completion of the study. Birds hatched from TT eggs had significantly increased BW throughout the experimental period. Hen-day egg production was significantly different when compared with the NT treatment at 19 and 20 wk of age. Eggshell color was also found to be significantly different for the NT and TT groups with TT eggs being significantly further from true white. Selection of progeny based on eggshell color may be a criterion for selecting white egg layers as layers hatched from TT eggs resulted in more off-color eggs, which may affect consumer acceptance for buying white table eggs.

  18. Bird mercury concentrations change rapidly as chicks age: toxicological risk is highest at hatching and fledging.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herzog, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Toxicological risk of methylmercury exposure to juvenile birds is complex due to the highly transient nature of mercury concentrations as chicks age. We examined total mercury and methylmercury concentrations in blood, liver, kidney, muscle, and feathers of 111 Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri), 69 black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), and 43 American avocet (Recurvirostra americana) chicks as they aged from hatching through postfledging at wetlands that had either low or high mercury contamination in San Francisco Bay, California. For each waterbird species, internal tissue, and wetland, total mercury and methylmercury concentrations changed rapidly as chicks aged and exhibited a quadratic, U-shaped pattern from hatching through postfledging. Mercury concentrations were highest immediately after hatching, due to maternally deposited mercury in eggs, then rapidly declined as chicks aged and diluted their mercury body burden through growth in size and mercury depuration into growing feathers. Mercury concentrations then increased during fledging when mass gain and feather growth slowed, while chicks continued to acquire dietary mercury. In contrast to mercury in internal tissues, mercury concentrations in chick feathers were highly variable and declined linearly with age. For 58 recaptured Forster's tern chicks, the proportional change in blood mercury concentration was negatively related to the proportional change in body mass, but not to the amount of feathers or wing length. Thus, mercury concentrations declined more in chicks that gained more mass between sampling events. The U-shaped pattern of mercury concentrations from hatching to fledging indicates that juvenile birds may be at highest risk to methylmercury toxicity shortly after hatching when maternally deposited mercury concentrations are still high and again after fledging when opportunities for mass dilution and mercury excretion into feathers are limited.

  19. Effects of breeder age and egg weight on morphological changes in the small intestine of chicks during the hatch window.

    PubMed

    Yalçin, S; Izzetoğlu, G T; Aktaş, A

    2013-01-01

    1. The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of breeder age and egg weight on hatching performance and morphological changes in segments of the small intestine of broiler chicks during a 21 h hatch window. 2. Eggs from Ross broiler breeder flocks aged 29 (young) and 48 weeks (old) were classified as light (LE) or heavy (HE) and incubated at the same conditions. At 475 h of incubation, eggs were checked every 3 h to determine time of external pipping and hatching. The first 42 chicks to emerge from each group were weighed and chick length was measured and 14 chicks from each group were sampled to collect residual yolk and intestine segments. The rest of chicks were placed back in the incubator and chick weight and length were measured individually at 9, 15 and 21 h after chicks hatched. At the end of 21 h, 14 chicks from each group were sampled again and the same procedure was followed. 3. The HE chicks pipped and hatched later than LE, regardless of breeder age. From hatch to the end of the hatch window, chick weight, but not yolk-free chick weight, gradually reduced. Relative residual yolk weight of chicks from both egg weights was similar at hatch, however, yolk sac utilisation was higher for LE chicks during the 21 h post-hatch period. At hatch, jejunum and ileum villus development was very similar for HE and LE chicks but greater development was observed for villus area with an increase in the jejunum villus length, width and goblet cell numbers in HE chicks. 4. The longest jejunum villus and the widest duodenum and jejunum villus were obtained for HE chicks from old breeders indicating that HE chicks from old breeders would have a greater surface area for nutrient absorption.

  20. Determination of hatching date for eggs of black-crowned night-herons, snowy egrets and great egrets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Pendleton, G.W.; Roach, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Flotation of eggs in water and specific gravity of eggs of Black-crowned Night-Herons (Nycticorax nycticorax), Snowy Egrets (Egretta thula) and Great Egrets (Casmerodius albus) were evaluated as methods to determine date of hatching. Length of incubation and duration of hatching period were also documented for each species. Although species gravity was a better predictor of hatching date than egg flotation, both techniques were imprecise. The regression between specific gravity and the number of days before hatching differed among clutches, but not among eggs within clutches. Specific gravity of eggs predicted hatching data only to within 3.8 d for Snowy Egrets, adn 4.7 d for Black-crowned Night-Herons and Great Egrets. The mean incubation period was 27.3 d for Great Egrets, 23.7 d for Snowy Egrets and 22.8 d for Black-crowned Night-Herons. For all three species, the A egg (first egg laid) had a longer incubation period than the B or C egg. For all three species, the number of days between hatching of A and B eggs was significantly less (median - 1 d) than between hatching of B and C eggs (median = 2 d).

  1. Abiotic factors influencing embryonic development, egg hatching, and larval orientation in the reindeer warble fly, Hypoderma tarandi.

    PubMed

    Karter, A J; Folstad, I; Anderson, J R

    1992-10-01

    Wild-caught, tethered females of the reindeer warble fly, Hypoderma tarandi (L.) (= Oedemagena tarandi (L.)), (Diptera, Oestridae) were stimulated to oviposit on hairs of a reindeer hide. Newly laid eggs incubated at constant temperatures and relative humidities hatched within 3 days to 2 weeks, depending on the experimental conditions. Over a range of 7-40 degrees C, hatching only occurred between 20 and 37 degrees C. Eggs held at 100% relative humidity had lower hatchability and longer time to hatch relative to eggs held at 77% relative humidity. The average number of degree-days for hatching was 50.35. Between 20 and 33 degrees C there was a temperature-dependent linear trend in developmental rate, and the proportion of eggs hatching was highest, and least variable, at the mid-temperature ranges. The temperature range found in the natural host micro-habitat where H. tarandi commonly affix their eggs (close to the skin at the base of a host hair) was consistent with the experimental temperature treatments that produced the highest hatching rate. Newly emerged larvae displayed positive thermotaxis, while showing no phototaxic or geotaxic behaviour. Results indicate that constraints of the host environment, coupled with temperature-dependent hatching success, may impose a selective pressure on oviposition behaviour. PMID:1463901

  2. Abiotic factors influencing embryonic development, egg hatching, and larval orientation in the reindeer warble fly, Hypoderma tarandi.

    PubMed

    Karter, A J; Folstad, I; Anderson, J R

    1992-10-01

    Wild-caught, tethered females of the reindeer warble fly, Hypoderma tarandi (L.) (= Oedemagena tarandi (L.)), (Diptera, Oestridae) were stimulated to oviposit on hairs of a reindeer hide. Newly laid eggs incubated at constant temperatures and relative humidities hatched within 3 days to 2 weeks, depending on the experimental conditions. Over a range of 7-40 degrees C, hatching only occurred between 20 and 37 degrees C. Eggs held at 100% relative humidity had lower hatchability and longer time to hatch relative to eggs held at 77% relative humidity. The average number of degree-days for hatching was 50.35. Between 20 and 33 degrees C there was a temperature-dependent linear trend in developmental rate, and the proportion of eggs hatching was highest, and least variable, at the mid-temperature ranges. The temperature range found in the natural host micro-habitat where H. tarandi commonly affix their eggs (close to the skin at the base of a host hair) was consistent with the experimental temperature treatments that produced the highest hatching rate. Newly emerged larvae displayed positive thermotaxis, while showing no phototaxic or geotaxic behaviour. Results indicate that constraints of the host environment, coupled with temperature-dependent hatching success, may impose a selective pressure on oviposition behaviour.

  3. Host cues induce egg hatching and pre-parasitic foraging behaviour in the mosquito parasitic nematode, Strelkovimermis spiculatus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Lutfi, Zainal; Dong, Limin; Suman, Devi S; Sanad, Manar; Gaugler, Randy

    2012-09-01

    The responses of eggs in diapause and the infective stage of the nematode, Strelkovimermis spiculatus, to larvae of its host, Culex pipiens pipiens, were investigated in the laboratory. The results indicated that the presence of the host induced the egg hatching. The hatching rate increased when larger numbers of host larvae were present. Second instar mosquito larvae induced significantly higher hatching rates than any other stages. These findings explain how S. spiculatus synchronizes its life cycle with its host life cycle and population dynamics to increase its fitness when the natural habitat is constantly covered by water. Direct exposure of the nematode eggs to host larvae resulted in consumption of as many as 20 eggs per host. The eggs consumed caused 0-70% host mortality depending on the number consumed, which indicated an infection path other than cuticle penetration although it may represent a rare situation in nature. The result of host cue assays showed that the combination of chemical cues and physical vibration induced the highest egg hatching, which may increase the chance of host availability after hatching. However, once hatched, the nematodes ignored vibrations and used only chemical cues for host location. These findings suggest that eggs hatch synchronously with the most susceptible mosquito stage and with peak mosquito larval density.

  4. 49 CFR 231.27 - Box and other house cars without roof hatches or placed in service after October 1, 1966.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Box and other house cars without roof hatches or... SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.27 Box and other house cars without roof hatches or placed in service...) Number. (i) Each box or other house car without roof hatches shall be equipped with an efficient...

  5. Interactions between hatch dates, growth rates, and mortality of Age-0 native Rainbow Smelt and nonnative Alewife in Lake Champlain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrish, Donna; Simonin, Paul W.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Pientka, Bernard; Sullivan, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Timing of hatch in fish populations can be critical for first-year survival and, therefore, year-class strength and subsequent species interactions. We compared hatch timing, growth rates, and subsequent mortality of age-0 Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax and Alewife Alosa pseudoharengus, two common open-water fish species of northern North America. In our study site, Lake Champlain, Rainbow Smelt hatched (beginning May 26) almost a month earlier than Alewives (June 20). Abundance in the sampling area was highest in July for age-0 Rainbow Smelt and August for age-0 Alewives. Late-hatching individuals of both species grew faster than those hatching earlier (0.6 mm/d versus 0.4 for Rainbow Smelt; 0.7 mm/d versus 0.6 for Alewives). Mean mortality rate during the first 45 d of life was 3.4%/d for age-0 Rainbow Smelt and was 5.5%/d for age-0 Alewives. Alewife mortality rates did not differ with hatch timing but daily mortality rates of Rainbow Smelt were highest for early-hatching fish. Cannibalism is probably the primary mortality source for age-0 Rainbow Smelt in this lake. Therefore, hatching earlier may not be advantageous because the overlap of adult and age-0 Rainbow Smelt is highest earlier in the season. However, Alewives, first documented in Lake Champlain in 2003, may increase the mortality of age-0 Rainbow Smelt in the summer, which should favor selection for earlier hatching.

  6. Alterations in the mantle epithelium during transition from hatching gland to adhesive organ of Idiosepius pygmaeus (Mollusca, Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Cyran, Norbert; Klepal, Waltraud; Städler, Yannick; Schönenberger, Jürg; von Byern, Janek

    2015-02-01

    Epithelial gland systems play an important role in marine molluscs in fabricating lubricants, repellents, fragrances, adhesives or enzymes. In cephalopods the typically single layered epithelium provides a highly dynamic variability and affords a rapid rebuilding of gland cells. While the digestive hatching gland (also named Hoyle organ) is obligatory for most cephalopods, only four genera (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions by means of glandular cells in an adhesive area on the mantle or tentacles. In Idiosepius this adhesive organ is restricted to the posterior part of the fin region on the dorsal mantle side and well developed in the adult stage. Two gland cell types could be distinguished, which produce different contents of the adhesive. During the embryonic development the same body area is occupied by the temporary hatching gland. The question arises, in which way the hatching gland degrades and is replaced by the adhesive gland. Ultrastructural analyses as well as computer tomography scans were performed to monitor the successive post hatching transformation in the mantle epithelium from hatching gland degradation to the formation of the adhesive organ. According to our investigations the hatching gland cells degrade within about 1 day after hatching by a type of programmed cell death and leave behind a temporary cellular gap in this area. First glandular cells of the adhesive gland arise 7 days after hatching and proceed evenly over the posterior mantle epithelium. In contrast, the accompanying reduction of a part of the dorsal mantle musculature is already established before hatching. The results demonstrate a distinct independence between the two gland systems and illustrate the early development of the adhesive organ as well as the corresponding modifications within the mantle.

  7. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  8. Hatch-Waxman Turns 30: Do We Need a Re-Designed Approach for the Modern Era?

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Darrow, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    In 1984, Congress passed the Hatch-Waxman Act, which catalyzed the creation of the modem generic drug industry. Generic drugs today account for eighty-four percent of all prescriptions dispensed, but less than twenty percent of drug costs. Despite this success, numerous problems in the generic drug market have emerged. Some involve the deliberate manipulation of the Hatch-Waxman system, while others have arisen more unexpectedly, such as the Supreme Court's 2011 decision in Pliva v. Mensing that could undermine consumer confidence in generic drugs. We discuss these emerging challenges and propose updates to the Hatch-Waxman Act to continue support for the timely emergence of safe generic drugs.

  9. Data-driven batch schuduling

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, John; Denehy, Tim; Arpaci - Dusseau, Remzi; Livny, Miron; Arpaci - Dusseau, Andrea C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop data-driven strategies for batch computing schedulers. Current CPU-centric batch schedulers ignore the data needs within workloads and execute them by linking them transparently and directly to their needed data. When scheduled on remote computational resources, this elegant solution of direct data access can incur an order of magnitude performance penalty for data-intensive workloads. Adding data-awareness to batch schedulers allows a careful coordination of data and CPU allocation thereby reducing the cost of remote execution. We offer here new techniques by which batch schedulers can become data-driven. Such systems can use our analytical predictive models to select one of the four data-driven scheduling policies that we have created. Through simulation, we demonstrate the accuracy of our predictive models and show how they can reduce time to completion for some workloads by as much as 80%.

  10. Effects of Mycoplasma anatis and cold stress on hatching success and growth of mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Goldberg, D.R.; Thomas, C.B.; Sharp, P.

    1995-01-01

    We inoculated game-farm mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs and 1-day-old birds with Mycoplasma anatis to determine its effect on hatching success and growth rates of ducklings. Inoculations of eggs reduced hatching success, hatchling size, and duckling growth rates, compared to controls. Intratracheal inoculations of 1-day-old birds did not affect growth rates. Hatchlings and 1-day-old ducklings grew much slower for the first 7 to 10 days when raised at 17 to 19 C, compared to controls raised at 30 to 35 C. The effect of cold stress on growth was greater than the effect of M. anatis infection; we found no synergistic effects between cold stress and M. anatis infection.

  11. Heart rates increase after hatching in two species of natricine snakes

    PubMed Central

    Aubret, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown heart rates to decrease from embryo to hatchling stage in turtles, remain steady in skinks, and increase in birds. However, no snake species has been studied in this regard. I recorded heart rate evolution trajectories from embryo to juvenile stage in 78 eggs from two species of European Natricine snakes. Unexpectedly, snakes behaved more like birds than turtles or lizards: heart rates increased after hatching in both N. maura and N. natrix, respectively by 43.92 ± 22.84% and 35.92 ± 24.52%. Heart rate shift was not related to an abrupt elevation of metabolism per se (snakes that increased their heart rates the most sharply grew the least after birth), but rather due to a number of smaller eggs that experienced lower than normal heart rates throughout the incubation and recovered a normal heart rate post-birth. This finding is discussed in the light of hatching synchrony benefits. PMID:24287712

  12. Chrysopa septempunctata (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) Vitellogenin Functions Through Effects on Egg Production and Hatching.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Mao, J; Zeng, F

    2015-12-01

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is a precursor of major egg storage protein, vitellin (Vt), and plays primary roles in reproduction of oviparous vertebrates and invertebrates. Chrysopa septempunctata Wesmael is an important and common predator of various insect pests. Here, we first cloned C. septempunctata Vg gene, CsVg. The complete CsVg cDNA was 5664 bp, which encodes an 1810-residues protein with a predicted molecular mass of 206.23 kDa. Expression profile revealed that CsVg mRNA first appeared on day 4 after emergence, maximally accumulated on day 10, and then declined gradually. RNAi mediated by injection of dsRNA depleted CsVg transcripts, significantly reduced egg-laying amount, and decreased egg hatching rate, suggesting that CsVg functions through effects on egg production and hatching in C. septempunctata. PMID:26470375

  13. Development of cross-hatch grid morphology and its effect on ordering growth of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. L.; Xu, B.; Wang, Z. G.; Jin, P.; Zhao, F. A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the development of cross-hatch grid surface morphology in growing mismatched layers and its effect on ordering growth of quantum dots (QDs). For a 60° dislocation (MD), the effective part in strain relaxation is the part with the Burgers vector parallel to the film/substrate interface within its b⇀edge component; so the surface stress over a MD is asymmetric. When the strained layer is relatively thin, the surface morphology is cross-hatch grid with asymmetric ridges and valleys. When the strained layer is relatively thick, the ridges become nearly symmetrical, and the dislocations and the ridges inclined-aligned. In the following growth of InAs, QDs prefer to nucleate on top of the ridges. By selecting ultra-thin In0.15Ga0.85As layer (50 nm) and controlling the QDs layer at just formed QDs, we obtained ordered InAs QDs.

  14. Heart rates increase after hatching in two species of Natricine snakes.

    PubMed

    Aubret, Fabien

    2013-11-29

    Experimental studies have shown heart rates to decrease from embryo to hatchling stage in turtles, remain steady in skinks, and increase in birds. However, no snake species has been studied in this regard. I recorded heart rate evolution trajectories from embryo to juvenile stage in 78 eggs from two species of European Natricine snakes. Unexpectedly, snakes behaved more like birds than turtles or lizards: heart rates increased after hatching in both N. maura and N. natrix, respectively by 43.92 ± 22.84% and 35.92 ± 24.52%. Heart rate shift was not related to an abrupt elevation of metabolism per se (snakes that increased their heart rates the most sharply grew the least after birth), but rather due to a number of smaller eggs that experienced lower than normal heart rates throughout the incubation and recovered a normal heart rate post-birth. This finding is discussed in the light of hatching synchrony benefits.

  15. Chrysopa septempunctata (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) Vitellogenin Functions Through Effects on Egg Production and Hatching.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Mao, J; Zeng, F

    2015-12-01

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is a precursor of major egg storage protein, vitellin (Vt), and plays primary roles in reproduction of oviparous vertebrates and invertebrates. Chrysopa septempunctata Wesmael is an important and common predator of various insect pests. Here, we first cloned C. septempunctata Vg gene, CsVg. The complete CsVg cDNA was 5664 bp, which encodes an 1810-residues protein with a predicted molecular mass of 206.23 kDa. Expression profile revealed that CsVg mRNA first appeared on day 4 after emergence, maximally accumulated on day 10, and then declined gradually. RNAi mediated by injection of dsRNA depleted CsVg transcripts, significantly reduced egg-laying amount, and decreased egg hatching rate, suggesting that CsVg functions through effects on egg production and hatching in C. septempunctata.

  16. The effects of ammonium sulphate and urea upon egg hatching and miracidial survival of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, P B; Englande, A J; Malek, E A; Anderson, A C; Abdelghani, A A

    1991-04-01

    The effects of various concentrations of ammonium sulphate and urea on egg hatching and miracidial survival of S. mansoni were tested in order to determine if the use of these fertilizers in the ricelands of the Republic of Cameroon could affect the transmission of schistosomiasis. Results indicate that hatching of eggs and survival of miracidia varied with concentrations of tested chemicals and times of exposure. Exposure of S. mansoni eggs to 0.20%-1.00% ammonium sulphate or to 0.50%-4.00% urea reduced their ability to hatch and produce miracidia. A chemical concentration of 1.00% ammonium sulphate or 4.00% urea was found to be sufficient to produce complete inhibition of hatching. High concentrations of both chemicals not only inhibited miracidial emergence but also may be ovocidal. Results obtained from miracidial survival tests indicated that LC5, LC50 and LC95 values for ammonium sulphate were 0.07%, 0.80% and 10.61% after 2 hours of exposure; 0.03%, 0.16% and 0.90% after 4 hours of exposure; and 0.30%, 0.20% and 0.40% after 6 hours of exposure respectively. Similar statistical analyses revealed that the LC5, LC50 and LC95 values for urea were 0.22%, 1.90% and 16.25% after 2 hours of exposure; 0.28%, 0.57% and 1.14% after 4 hours of exposure; and 0.13%, 0.27% and 0.57% after 6 hours of exposure respectively. Although the two fertilizers exerted some adverse effects on S. mansoni eggs and miracidia at relatively high concentrations, neither of them was found to be of practical value. Ammonium sulphate and urea concentrations effective in killing S. mansoni eggs and miracidia were about one to two orders of magnitude greater than the actual field application rates.

  17. Unweathered and weathered aviation kerosine: chemical characterization and effects on hatching success of duck eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, P.H.; Gay, M.L.

    1982-04-01

    The results of a study of the effects of unweathered and weathered aviation kerosine on the hatchability of mallard duck eggs are reported. Egg hatching succes of the control group was not significantly different from that of any of the groups treated with unweathered or weathered aviation kerosine. These results mean that the eggs of waterfowl are probably not endangered by plumage transfer of small amounts of partially weathered kerosine to the eggs. (JMT)

  18. Age-Related Degeneration of the Egg-Laying System Promotes Matricidal Hatching in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, Christopher L.; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Summary The identification and characterization of age-related degenerative changes is a critical goal because it can elucidate mechanisms of aging biology and contribute to understanding interventions that promote longevity. Here we document a novel, age-related degenerative change in C. elegans hermaphrodites, an important model system for the genetic analysis of longevity. Matricidal hatching—intra-uterine hatching of progeny that causes maternal death—displayed an age-related increase in frequency and affected ∼70% of mated, wild-type hermaphrodites. The timing and incidence of matricidal hatching were largely independent of the levels of early and total progeny production and the duration of male exposure. Thus, matricidal hatching appears to reflect intrinsic age-related degeneration of the egg-laying system rather than use-dependent damage accumulation. Consistent with this model, mutations that extend longevity by causing dietary restriction significantly delayed matricidal hatching, indicating age-related degeneration of the egg-laying system is controlled by nutrient availability. To identify the underlying tissue defect, we analyzed serotonin signaling that triggers vulval muscle contractions. Mated hermaphrodites displayed an age-related decline in the ability to lay eggs in response to exogenous serotonin, indicating that vulval muscles and/or a further downstream function that is necessary for egg-laying degenerate in an age-related manner. By characterizing a new, age-related degenerative event displayed by C. elegans hermaphrodites, these studies contribute to understanding a frequent cause of death in mated hermaphrodites and establish a model of age-related reproductive complications that may be relevant to the birthing process in other animals such as humans. PMID:23551912

  19. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald at CCT hatch during JSC training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron (right) and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), stand at the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup, prior to entering the mockup. Once inside the CCT, they will don their launch and entry helmets (LEHs) and participate in emergency egress (bailout) procedures. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  20. An evolutionary insight into the hatching strategies of pipefish and seahorse embryos.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Mari; Nakano, Yuko; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Inokuchi, Mayu; Yorifuji, Makiko; Okubo, Ryohei; Nagasawa, Tatsuki; Hiroi, Junya; Kono, Tomohiro; Kaneko, Toyoji

    2016-03-01

    Syngnathiform fishes carry their eggs in a brood structure found in males. The brood structure differs from species to species: seahorses carry eggs within enclosed brood pouch, messmate pipefish carry eggs in the semi-brood pouch, and alligator pipefish carry eggs in the egg compartment on abdomen. These egg protection strategies were established during syngnathiform evolution. In the present study, we compared the hatching mode of protected embryos of three species. Electron microscopic observations revealed that alligator pipefish and messmate pipefish egg envelopes were thicker than those of seahorses, suggesting that the seahorse produces a weaker envelope. Furthermore, molecular genetic analysis revealed that these two pipefishes possessed the egg envelope-digesting enzymes, high choriolytic enzyme (HCE), and low choriolytic enzyme (LCE), as do many euteleosts. In seahorses, however, only HCE gene expression was detected. When searching the entire seahorse genome by high-throughput DNA sequencing, we did not find a functional LCE gene and only a trace of the LCE gene exon was found, confirming that the seahorse LCE gene was pseudogenized during evolution. Finally, we estimated the size and number of hatching gland cells expressing hatching enzyme genes by whole-mount in situ hybridization. The seahorse cells were the smallest of the three species, while they had the greatest number. These results suggest that the isolation of eggs from the external environment by paternal bearing might bring the egg envelope thin, and then, the hatching enzyme genes became pseudogenized. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 9999B:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. AMPK is involved in the differential neonatal performance of chicks hatching at different time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufeng; Buyse, Johan; Song, Zhigang; Decuypere, Eddy; Everaert, Nadia

    2016-03-01

    We have recently reported that the hatching time may be in relation to the distinct neonatal performance of female chicks. The present study was aimed to investigate the potential involvement of AMPK, an energy sensor which plays a pivotal role in energy homeostasis, in the distinct performance of the spread of hatching time model. As a result, hypothalamic AMPKα1 isoform gene expression was significantly higher in the late hatcher as compared to that of their early counterparts, whereas the total and phosphorylated levels of AMPKα subunit did not differ between the three hatchers. The hypothalamic orexigenic NPY and AgRP mRNA levels were higher in the late hatchers as compared to the early, and that of the middle hatchers was at an intermediate level. However, the anorexigenic POMC and CRH was also higher expressed in the late hatchers as compared to the early hatchers. In the liver, AMPKα2 mRNA level and the phosphorylation ratio of AMPKα was significantly lower in the late hatchers, as compared to their early counterparts. The hepatic phosphorylated GS levels of the late and middle hatchers were lower than that of their early counterparts. The expression of hepatic FTO gene of the late hatchers was significantly higher than that of their early and middle counterparts. Taken together, AMPK may play a significant role in the different neonatal performance of the spread of hatching time model. The central and peripheral AMPK in late hatchers exhibited a pattern of higher energy intake and lower energy expenditure, which resulted in a faster post-hatch growth.

  2. Circulatory changes associated with the closure of the ductus arteriosus in hatching emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae).

    PubMed

    Shell, Lauren; Burggren, Warren; Muirhead, David; Nelson, Thomas C; Dzialowski, Edward M

    2016-01-01

    In developing avian embryos, the right and left ductus arteriosi (DA) allow for a shunt of systemic venous return away from the lungs to the body and chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Unlike in mammals where the transition from placental respiration to lung respiration is instantaneous, in birds the transition from embryonic CAM respiration to lung respiration can take over 24h. To understand the physiological consequences of this long transition we examined circulatory changes and DA morphological changes during hatching in the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), a primitive ratite bird. By tracking microspheres injected into a CAM vein, we observed no change in DA blood flow between the pre-pipped to internally pipped stages. Two hours after external pipping, however, a significant decrease in DA blood flow occurred, evident from a decreased systemic blood flow and subsequent increased lung blood flow. Upon hatching, the right-to-left shunt disappeared. These physiological changes in DA blood flow correspond with a large decrease in DA lumen diameter from the pre-pipped stages to Day 1 hatchlings. Upon hatching, the right-to-left shunt disappeared and at the same time apoptosis of smooth muscle cells began remodeling the DA for permanent closure. After the initial smooth muscle contraction, the lumen disappeared as intimal cushioning formed, the internal elastic lamina degenerated, and numerous cells underwent regulated apoptosis. The DA closed rapidly between the initiation of external pipping and hatching, resulting in circulatory patterns similar to the adult. This response is most likely produced by increased DA constriction in response to increased arterial oxygen levels and the initiation of vessel remodeling. PMID:26549875

  3. Locomotor behavior of fish hatched from embryos exposed to flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleerekoper, H.

    1978-01-01

    Embryos of Fundulus heteroclitus in various stages of development were exposed to space flight conditions aboard Apollo spacecraft and Cosmos satellites. The objective of the study was to ascertain whether fish hatched from these embryos displayed locomotor behavior different from that of control fish of the same age. An electronic monitoring technique was used to record behavior. Results indicate no change in locomotor behavior in fish on Apollo Spacecraft, but inexplicable significant changes were noted in fish aboard Cosmos Satellites.

  4. An evolutionary insight into the hatching strategies of pipefish and seahorse embryos.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Mari; Nakano, Yuko; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Inokuchi, Mayu; Yorifuji, Makiko; Okubo, Ryohei; Nagasawa, Tatsuki; Hiroi, Junya; Kono, Tomohiro; Kaneko, Toyoji

    2016-03-01

    Syngnathiform fishes carry their eggs in a brood structure found in males. The brood structure differs from species to species: seahorses carry eggs within enclosed brood pouch, messmate pipefish carry eggs in the semi-brood pouch, and alligator pipefish carry eggs in the egg compartment on abdomen. These egg protection strategies were established during syngnathiform evolution. In the present study, we compared the hatching mode of protected embryos of three species. Electron microscopic observations revealed that alligator pipefish and messmate pipefish egg envelopes were thicker than those of seahorses, suggesting that the seahorse produces a weaker envelope. Furthermore, molecular genetic analysis revealed that these two pipefishes possessed the egg envelope-digesting enzymes, high choriolytic enzyme (HCE), and low choriolytic enzyme (LCE), as do many euteleosts. In seahorses, however, only HCE gene expression was detected. When searching the entire seahorse genome by high-throughput DNA sequencing, we did not find a functional LCE gene and only a trace of the LCE gene exon was found, confirming that the seahorse LCE gene was pseudogenized during evolution. Finally, we estimated the size and number of hatching gland cells expressing hatching enzyme genes by whole-mount in situ hybridization. The seahorse cells were the smallest of the three species, while they had the greatest number. These results suggest that the isolation of eggs from the external environment by paternal bearing might bring the egg envelope thin, and then, the hatching enzyme genes became pseudogenized. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 9999B:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26987447

  5. Transmission and genetic diversity of Enterococcus faecalis among layer chickens during hatch

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies on transmission of Enterococcus faecalis among chickens during hatch have not been carried out so far. Information about vertical transmission and subsequent spreading and colonization of the cloacal mucosa through cloacal 'drinking' during hatch are important to understand the epidemiology of E. faecalis infections. In the present investigation vertical transmission and subsequent spreading and colonization of the cloacal mucosa of chickens by E. faecalis through cloacal 'drinking' were examined. Methods Two different batches of layer chickens originating from 45 weeks old Brown and White Lohmann parents, respectively from the same farm were sampled in the hatcher. Isolates were confirmed to be E. faecalis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and further by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to state their population structure and comparison made to sequence types previously obtained from chicken. Results A total of 480 chickens were swabbed from the cloacae just after hatch and after 24 hours. A total of 101 isolates were confirmed as E. faecalis by a species specific PCR. The prevalence of E. faecalis increased from 14% at 0 h to 97% after 24 h for the Brown Lohmann chickens and from 0.5% to 23% for the White Lohmann flock. The 84 isolates analysed by MLST were distributed on 14 sequence types (ST). Three ST (401, 82 and 249) accounted for 64% of all isolates analysed by MLST after 24 h. ST 82 has previously been reported from amyloid arthropathy and other lesions in poultry. Conclusions The present findings demonstrated a high potential of a few contaminated eggs or embryos to rapidly facilitate the spread of E. faecalis to almost all chickens during hatch. PMID:22017822

  6. Effects of incubation substrates on hatch timing and success of White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsley, Michael J.; Kofoot, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The Kootenai River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act in 1994 because several decades of failed spawning had put the population at risk of extinction. Natural spawning is known to occur at several locations in the Kootenai River, Idaho, but there is little natural recruitment. Microhabitat where embryo incubation occurs is known to be an important factor in white sturgeon reproductive success. This study was conducted to address questions regarding the suitability of different substrates as egg attachment and incubation sites for these fish. A comparative laboratory study using six types of incubation substrates—clean river rocks, periphyton- and algae-covered rocks, waterlogged wood, sand, riparian vegetation, and clean glass plates—tested the hypothesis that survival to hatch of white sturgeon eggs differs among incubation substrates. The results showed that sand was unsuitable as an incubation substrate, as the adhesive embryos were easily dislodged. Periphyton- and algae-covered rocks had the lowest hatch success, and all other substrates had similar hatch success.

  7. Redd dewatering effects on hatching and larval survival of the robust redhorse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisk, J. M.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Heise, R. J.; Sessions, F. W.

    2013-01-01

    Riverine habitats have been altered and fragmented from hydroelectric dams and change spatially and temporally with hydropower flow releases. Hydropeaking flow regimes for electrical power production inundate areas that create temporary suitable habitat for fish that may be rapidly drained. Robust redhorse Moxostoma robustum, an imperiled, rare fish species, uses such temporary habitats to spawn, but when power generation ceases, these areas are dewatered until the next pulse of water is released. We experimentally simulated the effects of dewatering periods on the survival of robust redhorse eggs and larvae in the laboratory. Robust redhorse eggs were placed in gravel in eyeing-hatching jars (three jars per treatment) and subjected to one of four dewatering periods (6, 12, 24 and 48 h), followed by 12 h of inundation for each treatment, and a control treatment was never dewatered. Egg desiccation was observed in some eggs in the 24- and 48-h treatments after one dewatering period. For all treatments except the control, the subsequent dewatering period after eggs hatched was lethal. Larval emergence for the control treatment was observed on day 5 post-hatching and continued until the end of the experiment (day 21). Larval survival was significantly different between the control and all dewatering treatments for individuals in the gravel. These findings support the need for hydropower facilities to set minimum flows to maintain inundation of spawning areas for robust redhorse and other species to reduce dewatering mortality.

  8. Evolutionary response of the egg hatching date of a herbivorous insect under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Asch, Margriet; Salis, Lucia; Holleman, Leonard J. M.; van Lith, Bart; Visser, Marcel E.

    2013-03-01

    Under changing climatic conditions, species need to adapt to their new environment. Genetic adaptation is crucial to prevent population extinction but examples where climate change leads to genetic changes in wild populations have been few. The synchronization between the timing of egg hatching of a herbivorous insect, the winter moth (Operophtera brumata), and the seasonal bud burst of its food plant, oak (Quercus robur), has been disrupted by climate change and a quantitative genetic model predicts that selection will delay the egg hatching date. Here we show, using both long-term observational data and experiments, that the egg hatching date has changed genetically, resulting in closer synchrony with oak bud burst. The observed rate of change matches the predicted rate of change of one day per year. Hence, altered selection pressures, caused by environmental change, result in a rapid adaptive response in insect phenology. These genetic changes in a key life-history trait in this herbivorous insect therefore seem to be fast enough to match the climate-change-induced advancement of their host phenology.

  9. The influence of water and humidity on the hatching of Nematodirus battus eggs.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, J; Morgan, E R

    2012-09-01

    This paper examines the influence of water on the ecology of the eggs of Nematodirus battus, with a view to estimating the importance of including rainfall in mathematical models of parasite abundance. The literature suggests that, under pasture conditions, the availability of moisture is unlikely to be limiting for egg development, while eggs and infective larvae are highly resistant to desiccation. In the presented experiment, eggs that had been kept in salt sludges at 95% and 70% RH and were subsequently put at 15°C produced only a mildly accelerated, but not a mass, hatch, in the first few days after return to water. Eggs kept at higher osmotic pressures died. Mass hatching of infective larvae, described at pasture when spells of rain follow periods of drought, is unlikely to occur as the result of a sudden water influx into eggs. Since water is not necessary for migration of infective larvae from the soil on to grass, such peaks in larval abundance are more likely to arise from the effects of temperature on hatching of eggs.

  10. Tracking living decapod larvae: mass staining of eggs with neutral red prior to hatching.

    PubMed

    Øresland, V; Horobin, R W

    2012-04-01

    Mass staining of decapod females carrying eggs, with subsequent identification of hatched larvae in the environment, is a research tool with great potential for field ecologists wishing to track the movements of larvae. For this to be achieved, however, numerous requirements must be met. These include adequate dye solubility, short staining time, dye penetration through different tissues, dye retention within the organism, absence of toxic and behavioral effects, low visibility to predators of stained larvae, no loss of staining owing to preservatives and low cost. The dye, neutral red, appears to meet most of these requirements. This dye was used in aliquots of 0.7 g/770 ml seawater applied to the females of Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) and European lobster (Homarus gammarus) for 10 min. This procedure stained lobster eggs and embryos so that hatched larvae could be distinguished easily by fluorescence microscopy from larvae that hatched from unstained eggs. Stained larvae that were preserved in 4% formaldehyde in seawater were still stained after 1 year. Larvae should not come in contact with ethanol, because it extracts the dye rapidly.

  11. Tracking living decapod larvae: mass staining of eggs with neutral red prior to hatching.

    PubMed

    Øresland, V; Horobin, R W

    2012-04-01

    Mass staining of decapod females carrying eggs, with subsequent identification of hatched larvae in the environment, is a research tool with great potential for field ecologists wishing to track the movements of larvae. For this to be achieved, however, numerous requirements must be met. These include adequate dye solubility, short staining time, dye penetration through different tissues, dye retention within the organism, absence of toxic and behavioral effects, low visibility to predators of stained larvae, no loss of staining owing to preservatives and low cost. The dye, neutral red, appears to meet most of these requirements. This dye was used in aliquots of 0.7 g/770 ml seawater applied to the females of Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) and European lobster (Homarus gammarus) for 10 min. This procedure stained lobster eggs and embryos so that hatched larvae could be distinguished easily by fluorescence microscopy from larvae that hatched from unstained eggs. Stained larvae that were preserved in 4% formaldehyde in seawater were still stained after 1 year. Larvae should not come in contact with ethanol, because it extracts the dye rapidly. PMID:22149046

  12. Factors Affecting Egg Hatch of Heterodera mediterranea and Differential Responses of Olive Cultivars to Infestation

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, P.; Vovlas, N.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of temperature and olive root exudates on Heterodera mediterranea egg hatch and the effects of H. mediterranea on the growth of two olive cultivars (Arbequina and Picual) were investigated. Egg hatch occurred over a temperature range of 10 to 30°C and was optimal at 20 to 25°C. There were no differences in egg hatch between sterile deionized distilled water or root exudate dilutions (undiluted, diluted 1:1, and 1:2) of Arbequina and Picual at 20°C. Heterodera mediterranea reproduced on both olive cultivars in growth chambers at 25°C. Soil and root final nematode populations, as well as total number of cysts per plant and reproduction rate, were significantly higher in Arbequina than in Picual. Shoot dry and root fresh weights as well as increases of shoot height, trunk diameter, and numbers of nodes were significantly suppressed by infection with 10,000 eggs + second-stage juveniles/pot in Arbequina but not in Picual. PMID:19265924

  13. Embryo malposition as a potential mechanism for mercury-induced hatching failure in bird eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, G.; Ackerman, J.T.; Eagles-Smith, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the prevalence of embryo malpositions and deformities in relation to total mercury (THg) and selenium (Se) concentrations in American avocet (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), and Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) eggs in San Francisco Bay (CA, USA) during 2005 to 2007. Overall, 11% of embryos were malpositioned in eggs ???18 d of age (n=282) and 2% of embryos were deformed in eggs ???13 d of age (n=470). Considering only those eggs that failed to hatch (n=62), malpositions occurred in 24% of eggs ???18 d of age and deformities occurred in 7% of eggs ???13 d of age. The probability of an embryo being malpositioned increased with egg THg concentrations in Forster's terns, but not in avocets or stilts. The probability of embryo deformity was not related to egg THg concentrations in any species. Using a reduced dataset with both Se and THg concentrations measured in eggs (n=87), we found no interaction between Se and THg on the probability of an embryo being malpositioned or deformed. Results of the present study indicate that embryo malpositions were prevalent in waterbird eggs that failed to hatch and the likelihood of an embryo being malpositioned increased with egg THg concentrations in Forster's terns. We hypothesize that malpositioning of avian embryos may be one reason for mercury-related hatching failure that occurs late in incubation, but further research is needed to elucidate this potential mechanism. ?? 2010 SETAC.

  14. Threonine requirement of White Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 d of age.

    PubMed

    Xie, M; Zhang, L; Wen, Z G; Tang, J; Huang, W; Hou, S S

    2014-01-01

    1. A dose-response experiment with 5 dietary threonine concentrations (5.0, 5.8, 6.6, 7.4 and 8.2 g/kg) was conducted to estimate the threonine requirement of White Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 d of age. 2. A total of 240 one-d-old male White Pekin ducks were allotted to 5 experimental treatments and each treatment contained 6 replicate pens with 8 ducks per pen. Ducks were reared in raised wire-floor pens from hatch to 21 d of age. At 21 d of age, growth performance and intestinal morphology were determined. 3. The weight gain and feed intake of Pekin ducks increased and feed/gain of these birds decreased linearly or quadratically as dietary threonine increased from 5.0 to 8.2 g threonine/kg. Compared to ducks fed on diets containing 5.0 g threonine/kg, ducks given diets containing 7.4 g threonine/kg had higher villus height in duodenum, jejunum and ileum. 4. The threonine requirements for weight gain of White Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 d of age was estimated to be 6.72 g/kg when dietary crude protein concentration was 189.8 g/kg and threonine supply was critical for maintaining intestinal structure of these birds.

  15. Salinity tolerance in Daphnia magna: characteristics of genotypes hatching from mixed sediments.

    PubMed

    Ortells, Raquel; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Lampert, Winfried

    2005-05-01

    The hatching of diapausing eggs is a means of temporal dispersal that can provide populations with genotypes adapted to different environments. In a salinity-variable shallow lake, we predicted that the mixing of different age-classes of eggs in the sediment may yield genotypes with different salinity optima. The alternative would be the absence of local adaptation and the presence of a homogenous population of salt-tolerant genotypes with high phenotypic plasticity. We tested these alternatives by isolating Daphnia magna resting eggs from different sediment depths, exposing them to hatching cues at different salinity levels and measuring the performance of hatched individuals. Results revealed a homogeneous sediment with generally broad-tolerance genotypes and some genotypes with low salt tolerance, which supports the second hypothesis. However, the disturbed character of the sediment hampered historical reconstruction. The absence of local adaptation in the diapausing egg bank may be the result of various scenarios in the response of D. magna populations to severe salinity changes in the lake. PMID:15800749

  16. Market Driven Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavert, Raymond B.

    2004-02-01

    Market driven space exploration will have the opportunity to develop to new levels with the coming of space nuclear power and propulsion. NASA's recently established Prometheus program is expected to receive several billion dollars over the next five years for developing nuclear power and propulsion systems for future spacecraft. Not only is nuclear power and propulsion essential for long distance Jupiter type missions, but it also important for providing greater access to planets and bodies nearer to the Earth. NASA has been working with industrial partners since 1987 through its Research Partnerships Centers (RPCs) to utilize the attributes of space in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Plans are now being made to utilize the RPCs and industrial partners in extending the duration and boundaries of human space flight to create new opportunities for exploration and discovery. Private investors are considering setting up shops in LEO for commercial purposes. The trend is for more industrial involvement in space. Nuclear power and propulsion will hasten the progress. The objective of this paper is to show the progression of space market driven research and its potential for supporting space exploration given nuclear power and propulsion capabilities.

  17. Impact of Daily Thermocycles on Hatching Rhythms, Larval Performance and Sex Differentiation of Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Villamizar, Natalia; Ribas, Laia; Piferrer, Francesc; Vera, Luisa M.; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    In the wild, water temperature cycles daily: it warms up after sunrise, and cools rapidly after sunset. Surprisingly, the impact of such daily thermocycles during the early development of fish remains neglected. We investigated the influence of constant vs daily thermocycles in zebrafish, from embryo development to sexual differentiation, by applying four temperature regimens: two constant (24°C and 28°C) and two daily thermocycles: 28:24°C, TC (thermophase coinciding with daytime, and cryophase coinciding with night-time) and 24:28°C, CT (opposite to TC) in a 12:12 h light:dark cycle (LD). Embryo development was temperature-dependent but enhanced at 28°C and TC. Hatching rhythms were diurnal (around 4 h after lights on), but temperature- and cycle-sensitive, since hatching occurred sooner at 28°C (48 hours post fertilization; hpf) while it was delayed at 24°C (96 hpf). Under TC, hatching occurred at 72 hpf, while under CT hatching displayed two peaks (at 70 hpf and 94 hpf). In constant light (LL) or darkness (DD), hatching rhythms persisted with tau close to 24 h, suggesting a clock-controlled “gating” mechanism. Under 28°C or TC, larvae showed the best performance (high growth and survival, and low malformations). The sex ratio was strongly influenced by temperature, as the proportion of females was higher in CT and TC (79 and 83% respectively), contrasting with 28°C and 24°C, which led to more males (83 and 76%). Ovarian aromatase (cyp19a) expression in females was highest in TC and CT (6.5 and 4.6 fold higher than at 28°C, respectively); while anti-müllerian hormone (amh) expression in males increased in testis at 24°C (3.6 fold higher compared to TC) and particularly at 28°C (14.3 fold increase). Taken together, these findings highlight the key role of environmental cycles during early development, which shaped the daily rhythms in fish embryo and larvae, and ultimately influenced sex differentiation. PMID:23284912

  18. Determination of hatching date for eggs of black-crowned night-herons, snowy egrets and great egrets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Pendleton, G.W.; Roach, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Floatation of eggs in water and specific gravity of eggs of Black-crowned Night-Herons (Nycticorax nycticorax ), Snowy Egrets (Egretta thula ) and Great Egrets (Casmerodius albus ) were evaluated as methods to determine date of hatching. Although specific gravity was a better predictor of hatching date than egg flotation, both techniques were imprecise. The regression between specific gravity and the number of days before hatching differed among clutches, but not among eggs within clutches. Specific gravity of eggs predicted hatching date only to within 3.8 d for Snowy Egrets, and 4.7 d for Black-crowned Night-Herons and Great Egrets. The mean incubation period was 27.3 d for Great Egrets, 23.7 d for Snowy Egrets and 22.8 d for Black-crowned Night- Herons. For all three species, the A egg (first egg laid) had a longer incubation period than the B or C egg.

  19. Clutch identity and predator-induced hatching affect behavior and development in a leaf-breeding treefrog.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Megan E; George, M Patricia

    2013-04-01

    For species with complex life cycles, transitions between life stages result in niche shifts that are often associated with evolutionary trade-offs. When conditions across life stages are unpredictable, plasticity in niche shift timing may be adaptive; however, factors associated with clutch identity (e.g., genetic or maternal) may influence the effects of such plasticity. The red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) is an ideal organism for investigating the effects of genetics and life stage switch point timing because embryos exhibit adaptive phenotypic plasticity in hatching time. In this study, we evaluated the effects of experimentally manipulated hatching time and clutch identity on antipredator behavior of tadpoles and on developmental traits of metamorphs, including larval period, mass, SVL, and jumping ability. We found that in the presence of dragonfly nymph predator cues at 21 days post-oviposition, tadpoles reduced both their activity level and height in the water column. Furthermore, early-hatched tadpoles were less active than late-hatched tadpoles of the same age. This difference in behavior patterns of early- and late-hatched tadpoles may represent an adaptive response due to a longer period of susceptibility to odonate predators for early-hatched tadpoles, or it may be a carry-over effect mediated by early exposure to an environmental stressor (i.e., induction of early hatching). We also found that hatching time affected both behavioral traits and developmental traits, but its effect on developmental traits varied significantly among clutches. This study shows that a single early-life event may influence a suite of factors during subsequent life stages and that some of these effects appear to be dependent on clutch identity. This interaction may represent an evolutionary response to a complex life cycle and unpredictable environments, regardless of whether the clutch differences are due to additive genetic variance or maternal effects.

  20. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  1. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  2. Olive ridley sea turtle hatching success as a function of the microbial abundance in nest sand at Ostional, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bézy, Vanessa S; Valverde, Roldán A; Plante, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that significant embryo mortality is caused by microbes, while high microbial loads are generated by the decomposition of eggs broken by later nesting turtles. This occurs commonly when nesting density is high, especially during mass nesting events (arribadas). However, no previous research has directly quantified microbial abundance and the associated effects on sea turtle hatching success at a nesting beach. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the microbial abundance in olive ridley sea turtle nest sand affects the hatching success at Ostional, Costa Rica. We applied experimental treatments to alter the microbial abundance within the sand into which nests were relocated. We monitored temperature, oxygen, and organic matter content throughout the incubation period and quantified the microbial abundance within the nest sand using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) molecular analysis. The most successful treatment in increasing hatching success was the removal and replacement of nest sand. We found a negative correlation between hatching success and fungal abundance (fungal 18S rRNA gene copies g(-1) nest sand). Of secondary importance in determining hatching success was the abundance of bacteria (bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies g(-1) g(-1) nest sand). Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that high microbial activity is responsible for the lower hatching success observed at Ostional beach. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism appears to be the deprivation of oxygen and exposure to higher temperatures resulting from microbial decomposition in the nest.

  3. Entrainment of the Circadian Rhythm in Egg Hatching of the Crab Dyspanopeus sayi by Chemical Cues from Ovigerous Females.

    PubMed

    Forward, Richard B; Sanchez, Kevin G; Riley, Paul P

    2016-02-01

    The subtidal crab Dyspanopeus sayi has a circadian rhythm in larval release with a free-running period of 24.1 h. Under constant conditions, eggs hatch primarily in the 4-h interval after the time of sunset. The study tested the new model for entrainment in subtidal crabs, which proposes that the female perceives the environmental cycles and entrains the endogenous rhythm in the embryos. Results verified the model for D. sayi. Hatching by embryos collected from the field when they had not yet developed eye pigments, and were kept in constant conditions attached to their mother, exhibited the circadian hatching rhythm. Attached embryos could also be entrained to a new photoperiod in the laboratory before they developed eye pigments. Further, mature embryos removed from the female hatched rhythmically, indicating that a circadian rhythm resides in the embryos. However, if mature embryos with eye pigments were removed from the female and exposed to a new light-dark cycle, they could not be entrained to the new cycle; rather, they hatched according to the timing of the original light-dark cycle. Nevertheless, detached, mature embryos would entrain to a new light-dark cycle if they were in chemical, but not physical, contact with the female. Thus, the female perceives the light-dark cycle, and uses chemical cues to entrain the circadian rhythm of hatching by the embryos.

  4. Olive ridley sea turtle hatching success as a function of the microbial abundance in nest sand at Ostional, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bézy, Vanessa S; Valverde, Roldán A; Plante, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that significant embryo mortality is caused by microbes, while high microbial loads are generated by the decomposition of eggs broken by later nesting turtles. This occurs commonly when nesting density is high, especially during mass nesting events (arribadas). However, no previous research has directly quantified microbial abundance and the associated effects on sea turtle hatching success at a nesting beach. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the microbial abundance in olive ridley sea turtle nest sand affects the hatching success at Ostional, Costa Rica. We applied experimental treatments to alter the microbial abundance within the sand into which nests were relocated. We monitored temperature, oxygen, and organic matter content throughout the incubation period and quantified the microbial abundance within the nest sand using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) molecular analysis. The most successful treatment in increasing hatching success was the removal and replacement of nest sand. We found a negative correlation between hatching success and fungal abundance (fungal 18S rRNA gene copies g(-1) nest sand). Of secondary importance in determining hatching success was the abundance of bacteria (bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies g(-1) g(-1) nest sand). Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that high microbial activity is responsible for the lower hatching success observed at Ostional beach. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism appears to be the deprivation of oxygen and exposure to higher temperatures resulting from microbial decomposition in the nest. PMID:25714355

  5. Olive Ridley Sea Turtle Hatching Success as a Function of the Microbial Abundance in Nest Sand at Ostional, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Bézy, Vanessa S.; Valverde, Roldán A.; Plante, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that significant embryo mortality is caused by microbes, while high microbial loads are generated by the decomposition of eggs broken by later nesting turtles. This occurs commonly when nesting density is high, especially during mass nesting events (arribadas). However, no previous research has directly quantified microbial abundance and the associated effects on sea turtle hatching success at a nesting beach. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the microbial abundance in olive ridley sea turtle nest sand affects the hatching success at Ostional, Costa Rica. We applied experimental treatments to alter the microbial abundance within the sand into which nests were relocated. We monitored temperature, oxygen, and organic matter content throughout the incubation period and quantified the microbial abundance within the nest sand using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) molecular analysis. The most successful treatment in increasing hatching success was the removal and replacement of nest sand. We found a negative correlation between hatching success and fungal abundance (fungal 18S rRNA gene copies g-1 nest sand). Of secondary importance in determining hatching success was the abundance of bacteria (bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies g-1 g-1 nest sand). Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that high microbial activity is responsible for the lower hatching success observed at Ostional beach. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism appears to be the deprivation of oxygen and exposure to higher temperatures resulting from microbial decomposition in the nest. PMID:25714355

  6. VisPort: Web-Based Access to Community-Specific Visualization Functionality [Shedding New Light on Exploding Stars: Visualization for TeraScale Simulation of Neutrino-Driven Supernovae (Final Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M Pauline

    2007-06-30

    The VisPort visualization portal is an experiment in providing Web-based access to visualization functionality from any place and at any time. VisPort adopts a service-oriented architecture to encapsulate visualization functionality and to support remote access. Users employ browser-based client applications to choose data and services, set parameters, and launch visualization jobs. Visualization products typically images or movies are viewed in the user's standard Web browser. VisPort emphasizes visualization solutions customized for specific application communities. Finally, VisPort relies heavily on XML, and introduces the notion of visualization informatics - the formalization and specialization of information related to the process and products of visualization.

  7. Heart Rate Responses to Unaided Orion Side Hatch Egress in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Kirk L.; Hwang Emma Y.; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Kelly, Cody; Walker, Thomas; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion capsule as a vehicle for transporting crewmembers to and from the International Space Station (ISS) and for future human space exploration missions. Orion and other commercial vehicles are designed to splash down in the ocean where nominally support personnel will assist crewmembers in egressing the vehicle. However, off-nominal scenarios will require crewmembers to egress the vehicle unaided, deploy survival equipment, and ingress a life raft. PURPOSE: To determine the heart rate (HR) responses to unaided Orion side hatch egress and raft ingress as a part of the NASA Crew Survival Engineering Team's evaluation of the PORT Orion mockup in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL). METHODS: Nineteen test subjects, including four astronauts (N=19, 14 males/5 females, 38.6+/-8.4 y, 174.4+/-9.6 cm, 75.7+/-13.1 kg), completed a graded maximal test on a cycle ergometer to determine VO2peak and HRpeak and were divided into five crews of four members each; one subject served on two crews. Each crew was required to deploy a life raft, egress the Orion vehicle from the side hatch, and ingress the life raft with two 8 kg emergency packs per crew. Each crew performed this activity one to three times; a total of ten full egresses were completed. Subjects wore a suit that was similar in form, mass, and function to the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) including helmet, gloves, boots, supplemental O2 bottles, and a CO2-inflated life preserver (approx.18 kg); subjects began each trial seated supine in the PORT Orion mockup with seat belts and mockup O2 and communication connections and ended each trial with all four crewmembers inside the life raft. RESULTS: VO2peak was 40.8+/-6.8 mL/kg/min (3.1+/-0.7 L/min); HRpeak was 181+/-10 bpm. Total egress time across trials was 5.0+/-1.6 min (range: 2.8-8.0 min); all subjects were able to successfully complete all trials. Average maximum HR at activity start, at the hatch opening, in the water, and in the

  8. The development of the olfactory organs in newly hatched monotremes and neonate marsupials.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Yvette

    2011-08-01

    Olfactory cues are thought to play a crucial role in the detection of the milk source at birth in mammals. It has been shown that a marsupial, the tammar wallaby, can detect olfactory cues from its mother's pouch at birth. This study investigates whether the main olfactory and accessory olfactory system are similarly well developed in other marsupials and monotremes at birth/hatching as in the tammar. Sections of the head of various marsupial and two monotreme species were investigated by light microscopy. Both olfactory systems were less well developed in the kowari and Eastern quoll. No olfactory or vomeronasal or terminal nerves could be observed; the main olfactory bulb (MOB) had only two layers while no accessory olfactory bulb or ganglion terminale were visible. All other investigated marsupials and monotremes showed further developed olfactory systems with olfactory, vomeronasal and terminal nerves, a three-layered MOB, and in the marsupials a prominent ganglion terminale. The main olfactory system was further developed than the accessory olfactory system in all species investigated. The olfactory systems were the least developed in species in which the mother's birth position removed most of the difficulty in reaching the teat, placing the neonate directly in the pouch. In monotremes they were the furthest developed as Bowman glands were found underlying the main olfactory epithelium. This may reflect the need to locate the milk field each time they drink as they cannot permanently attach to it, unlike therian mammals. While it still needs to be determined how an odour signal could be further processed in the brain, this study suggests that marsupials and monotremes possess well enough developed olfactory systems to be able to detect an odour cue from the mammary area at birth/hatching. It is therefore likely that neonate marsupials and newly hatched monotremes find their way to the milk source using olfactory cues, as has been previously suggested for the

  9. Composition of Gut Microbiota Influences Resistance of Newly Hatched Chickens to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection.

    PubMed

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Kubasova, Tereza; Davidova-Gerzova, Lenka; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Sebkova, Alena; Faldynova, Marcela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Since poultry is a very common source of non-typhoid Salmonella for humans, different interventions aimed at decreasing the prevalence of Salmonella in chickens are understood as an effective measure for decreasing the incidence of human salmonellosis. One such intervention is the use of probiotic or competitive exclusion products. In this study we tested whether microbiota from donor hens of different age will equally protect chickens against Salmonella Enteritidis infection. Newly hatched chickens were therefore orally inoculated with cecal extracts from 1-, 3-, 16-, 28-, and 42-week-old donors and 7 days later, the chickens were infected with S. Enteritidis. The experiment was terminated 4 days later. In the second experiment, groups of newly hatched chickens were inoculated with cecal extracts of 35-week-old hens either on day 1 of life followed by S. Enteritidis infection on day 2 or were infected with S. Enteritidis infection on day 1 followed by therapeutic administration of the cecal extract on day 2 or were inoculated on day 1 of life with a mixture of the cecal extract and S. Enteritidis. This experiment was terminated when the chickens were 5 days old. Both Salmonella culture and chicken gene expression confirmed that inoculation of newly hatched chickens with microbiota from 3-week-old or older chickens protected them against S. Enteritidis challenge. On the other hand, microbiota from 1-week-old donors failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis challenge. Microbiota from 35-week-old hens protected chickens even 24 h after administration. However, simultaneous or therapeutic microbiota administration failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis infection. Gut microbiota can be used as a preventive measure against S. Enteritidis infection but its composition and early administration is critical for its efficacy. PMID:27379083

  10. Broiler chicken adipose tissue dynamics during the first two weeks post-hatch.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shiping; Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Shuai; Rice, Brittany Breon; Cline, Mark Andrew; Gilbert, Elizabeth Ruth

    2015-11-01

    Selection of broiler chickens for growth has led to increased adipose tissue accretion. To investigate the post-hatch development of adipose tissue, the abdominal, clavicular, and subcutaneous adipose tissue depots were collected from broiler chicks at 4 and 14 days post-hatch. As a percent of body weight, abdominal fat increased (P<0.001) with age. At day 4, clavicular and subcutaneous fat depots were heavier (P<0.003) than abdominal fat whereas at day 14, abdominal and clavicular weighed more (P<0.003) than subcutaneous fat. Adipocyte area and diameter were greater in clavicular and subcutaneous than abdominal fat at 4 and 14 days post-hatch (P<0.001). Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) activity increased (P<0.001) in all depots from day 4 to 14, and at both ages was greatest in subcutaneous, intermediate in clavicular, and lowest in abdominal fat (P<0.05). In clavicular fat, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (CEBP)α, CEBPβ, fatty acid synthase (FASN), fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and NPY receptor 5 (NPYR5) mRNA increased and NPYR2 mRNA decreased from day 4 to 14 (P<0.001). Thus, there are site-specific differences in broiler chick adipose development, with larger adipocytes and greater G3PDH activity in subcutaneous fat at day 4, more rapid growth of abdominal fat, and clavicular fat intermediate for most traits. Adipose tissue expansion was accompanied by changes in gene expression of adipose-associated factors.

  11. RNA interference targeting leucine aminopeptidase blocks hatching of Schistosoma mansoni eggs.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Gabriel; Morales, Maria E; Alrefaei, Yousef N; Cancela, Martín; Castillo, Estela; Dalton, John P; Tort, José F; Brindley, Paul J

    2009-10-01

    Schistosoma mansoni leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is thought to play a central role in hatching of the miracidium from the schistosome egg. We identified two discrete LAPs genes in the S. mansoni genome, and their orthologs in S. japonicum. The similarities in sequence and exon/intron structure of the two genes, LAP1 and LAP2, suggest that they arose by gene duplication and that this occurred before separation of the mansoni and japonicum lineages. The SmLAP1 and SmLAP2 genes have different expression patterns in diverse stages of the cycle; whereas both are equally expressed in the blood dwelling stages (schistosomules and adult), SmLAP2 expression was higher in free living larval (miracidia) and in parasitic intra-snail (sporocysts) stages. We investigated the role of each enzyme in hatching of schistosome eggs and the early stages of schistosome development by RNA interference (RNAi). Using RNAi, we observed marked and specific reduction of mRNAs, along with a loss of exopeptidase activity in soluble parasite extracts against the diagnostic substrate l-leucine-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin hydroxide. Strikingly, knockdown of either SmLAP1 or SmLAP2, or both together, was accompanied by >or=80% inhibition of hatching of schistosome eggs showing that both enzymes are important to the escape of miracidia from the egg. The methods employed here refine the utility of RNAi for functional genomics studies in helminth parasites and confirm these can be used to identify potential drug targets, in this case schistosome aminopeptidases. PMID:19463860

  12. The development of the olfactory organs in newly hatched monotremes and neonate marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Nanette Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory cues are thought to play a crucial role in the detection of the milk source at birth in mammals. It has been shown that a marsupial, the tammar wallaby, can detect olfactory cues from its mother's pouch at birth. This study investigates whether the main olfactory and accessory olfactory system are similarly well developed in other marsupials and monotremes at birth/hatching as in the tammar. Sections of the head of various marsupial and two monotreme species were investigated by light microscopy. Both olfactory systems were less well developed in the kowari and Eastern quoll. No olfactory or vomeronasal or terminal nerves could be observed; the main olfactory bulb (MOB) had only two layers while no accessory olfactory bulb or ganglion terminale were visible. All other investigated marsupials and monotremes showed further developed olfactory systems with olfactory, vomeronasal and terminal nerves, a three-layered MOB, and in the marsupials a prominent ganglion terminale. The main olfactory system was further developed than the accessory olfactory system in all species investigated. The olfactory systems were the least developed in species in which the mother's birth position removed most of the difficulty in reaching the teat, placing the neonate directly in the pouch. In monotremes they were the furthest developed as Bowman glands were found underlying the main olfactory epithelium. This may reflect the need to locate the milk field each time they drink as they cannot permanently attach to it, unlike therian mammals. While it still needs to be determined how an odour signal could be further processed in the brain, this study suggests that marsupials and monotremes possess well enough developed olfactory systems to be able to detect an odour cue from the mammary area at birth/hatching. It is therefore likely that neonate marsupials and newly hatched monotremes find their way to the milk source using olfactory cues, as has been previously suggested for the

  13. The development of the olfactory organs in newly hatched monotremes and neonate marsupials.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Yvette

    2011-08-01

    Olfactory cues are thought to play a crucial role in the detection of the milk source at birth in mammals. It has been shown that a marsupial, the tammar wallaby, can detect olfactory cues from its mother's pouch at birth. This study investigates whether the main olfactory and accessory olfactory system are similarly well developed in other marsupials and monotremes at birth/hatching as in the tammar. Sections of the head of various marsupial and two monotreme species were investigated by light microscopy. Both olfactory systems were less well developed in the kowari and Eastern quoll. No olfactory or vomeronasal or terminal nerves could be observed; the main olfactory bulb (MOB) had only two layers while no accessory olfactory bulb or ganglion terminale were visible. All other investigated marsupials and monotremes showed further developed olfactory systems with olfactory, vomeronasal and terminal nerves, a three-layered MOB, and in the marsupials a prominent ganglion terminale. The main olfactory system was further developed than the accessory olfactory system in all species investigated. The olfactory systems were the least developed in species in which the mother's birth position removed most of the difficulty in reaching the teat, placing the neonate directly in the pouch. In monotremes they were the furthest developed as Bowman glands were found underlying the main olfactory epithelium. This may reflect the need to locate the milk field each time they drink as they cannot permanently attach to it, unlike therian mammals. While it still needs to be determined how an odour signal could be further processed in the brain, this study suggests that marsupials and monotremes possess well enough developed olfactory systems to be able to detect an odour cue from the mammary area at birth/hatching. It is therefore likely that neonate marsupials and newly hatched monotremes find their way to the milk source using olfactory cues, as has been previously suggested for the

  14. Light-dependent transcriptional events during resting egg hatching of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jin; Suga, Koushirou; Kim, Bo-Mi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong; Hagiwara, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Rotifer resting eggs often have to endure harsh environmental conditions during the diapause phase. They are stimulated by light to hatch. In order to study the hatching mechanism, we observed resting eggs and measured their transcriptional expression under different light exposure periods (total darkness, and after 30 min, and 4h light). By using differential-display reverse transcription PCR (DDRT-PCR), we isolated 80 genes that displayed different expression patterns in response to the three light treatments: 20 genes were expressed in total darkness, 40 different genes were differentially expressed under 30 min light, and 20 further genes were expressed after 4h of light. The resting eggs showed no phenotypic differences in embryonic development during the 4h illumination period. In general, the expression patterns of the analyzed genes in resting eggs were differentially modulated by light exposure time. In total darkness, resting eggs mainly expressed genes encoding cell defense and homeostasis functions. In the 30 min illumination group, we found enriched expression of genes encoding fatty acid metabolism-related components, including Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD). Genes encoding cellular and embryonic developmental functions were highly observed in the 30 min-illuminated group but were not observed in the 4h-illuminated group. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that several transcripts such as encoding V-type H(+)-translocating pyrophosphatase (V-PPase) and Meckelin had prolonged expression levels when exposed to light for 4h. In the 4h illuminated group, the RecQ protein-like 5 (RECQL5) gene was enriched. This RECQL5 gene may be expressed to protect the developing embryo from continuous light exposure. The data presented in this study indicate that DDRT-PCR-aided gene screening can be helpful to isolate candidate genes involved in the hatching process.

  15. Ixodes pacificus ticks maintain embryogenesis and egg hatching after antibiotic treatment of Rickettsia endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Kurlovs, Andre H; Li, Jinze; Cheng, Du; Zhong, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Rickettsia is a genus of intracellular bacteria that causes a variety of diseases in humans and other mammals and associates with a diverse group of arthropods. Although Rickettsia appears to be common in ticks, most Rickettsia-tick relationships remain generally uncharacterized. The most intimate of these associations is Rickettsia species phylotype G021, a maternally and transstadially transmitted endosymbiont that resides in 100% of I. pacificus in California. We investigated the effects of this Rickettsia phylotype on I. pacificus reproductive fitness using selective antibiotic treatment. Ciprofloxacin was 10-fold more effective than tetracycline in eliminating Rickettsia from I. pacificus, and quantitative PCR results showed that eggs from the ciprofloxacin-treated ticks contained an average of 0.02 Rickettsia per egg cell as opposed to the average of 0.2 in the tetracycline-treated ticks. Ampicillin did not significantly affect the number of Rickettsia per tick cell in adults or eggs compared to the water-injected control ticks. We found no relationship between tick embryogenesis and rickettsial density in engorged I. pacificus females. Tetracycline treatment significantly delayed oviposition of I. pacificus ticks, but the antibiotic's effect was unlikely related to Rickettsia. We also demonstrated that Rickettsia-free eggs could successfully develop into larvae without any significant decrease in hatching compared to eggs containing Rickettsia. No significant differences in the incubation period, egg hatching rate, and the number of larvae were found between any of the antibiotic-treated groups and the water-injected tick control. We concluded that Rickettsia species phylotype G021 does not have an apparent effect on embryogenesis, oviposition, and egg hatching of I. pacificus.

  16. Antioxidants in eggs of great tits Parus major from Chernobyl and hatching success.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders Pape; Karadas, Filis; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2008-08-01

    Antioxidants are powerful protectors against the damaging effects of free radicals that constitute the inevitable by-products of aerobic metabolism. Growing embryos are particularly susceptible to the damaging effects of free radicals produced during rapid growth, and mothers of many species provide protection against such damage by allocating antioxidants to their eggs. Birds living in radioactively contaminated areas use dietary antioxidants to cope with the damaging effects of radiation, but females also allocate dietary antioxidants to eggs, potentially enforcing a physiological trade-off between self-maintenance and reproductive investment. Here we tested whether female great tits Parus major breeding in radioactively contaminated study areas near Chernobyl allocated less dietary antioxidants to eggs, and whether such reduced allocation of dietary antioxidants to eggs had fitness consequences. Concentrations of total yolk carotenoids and vitamins A and E were depressed near Chernobyl compared to concentrations in a less contaminated Ukrainian study area and a French control study area, and all antioxidants showed dose-dependent relationships with all three dietary antioxidants decreasing with increasing level of radiation at nest boxes. These effects held even when controlling statistically for potentially confounding habitat variables and covariation among antioxidants. Laying date was advanced and clutch size increased at nest boxes with high dose rates. Hatching success increased with increasing concentration of vitamin E, implying that hatching success decreased at boxes with high levels of radiation, eventually eliminating and even reversing the higher potential reproductive output associated with early reproduction and large clutch size. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that radioactive contamination reduced levels of dietary antioxidants in yolks, with negative consequences for hatching success and reproductive success.

  17. Composition of Gut Microbiota Influences Resistance of Newly Hatched Chickens to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Kubasova, Tereza; Davidova-Gerzova, Lenka; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Sebkova, Alena; Faldynova, Marcela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Since poultry is a very common source of non-typhoid Salmonella for humans, different interventions aimed at decreasing the prevalence of Salmonella in chickens are understood as an effective measure for decreasing the incidence of human salmonellosis. One such intervention is the use of probiotic or competitive exclusion products. In this study we tested whether microbiota from donor hens of different age will equally protect chickens against Salmonella Enteritidis infection. Newly hatched chickens were therefore orally inoculated with cecal extracts from 1-, 3-, 16-, 28-, and 42-week-old donors and 7 days later, the chickens were infected with S. Enteritidis. The experiment was terminated 4 days later. In the second experiment, groups of newly hatched chickens were inoculated with cecal extracts of 35-week-old hens either on day 1 of life followed by S. Enteritidis infection on day 2 or were infected with S. Enteritidis infection on day 1 followed by therapeutic administration of the cecal extract on day 2 or were inoculated on day 1 of life with a mixture of the cecal extract and S. Enteritidis. This experiment was terminated when the chickens were 5 days old. Both Salmonella culture and chicken gene expression confirmed that inoculation of newly hatched chickens with microbiota from 3-week-old or older chickens protected them against S. Enteritidis challenge. On the other hand, microbiota from 1-week-old donors failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis challenge. Microbiota from 35-week-old hens protected chickens even 24 h after administration. However, simultaneous or therapeutic microbiota administration failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis infection. Gut microbiota can be used as a preventive measure against S. Enteritidis infection but its composition and early administration is critical for its efficacy. PMID:27379083

  18. Gaining Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses issues schools and universities have encountered in complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and making their facilities more accessible to the disabled. The ADA's vagueness and the architect's need for understanding the regulations is highlighted. (GR)

  19. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  20. Capital access.

    PubMed

    Towne, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    To maintain their viability, hospitals are being compelled to invest in big capital projects such as information technology and renovation and construction. This gatefold examines the trends in credit and capital, and how they affect hospitals' access to money.

  1. STS-65 PLC Hieb at mockup side hatch prepares to egress via an inflated slide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Mission Specialist and Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), sits at the top of the inflated slide at the crew compartment trainer (CCT) side hatch and listens to a crew training staffer's instructions. Hieb practiced post landing emergency escape procedures along with his six STS-65 crewmates. The CCT is located in the Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE. Hieb will join five NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist for the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, later this year.

  2. Roles of environmental cues for embryonic incubation and hatching in mudskippers.

    PubMed

    Ishimatsu, Atsushi; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2011-07-01

    Reproduction on mudflats requires that eggs are protected from different environmental challenges during development and hatch when environmental conditions are favorable for survival of juveniles. Mudskippers are air-breathing, amphibious gobies of the subfamily Oxudercinae, and one of a few vertebrates that reside on mudflats. They excavate burrows in mudflats and deposit eggs in them. However, these burrows are filled with extremely hypoxic water, in which eggs could not survive. To secure embryonic development within their burrows, the burrow-guarding parental fish (a male or mating pair) store fresh air in an egg chamber, located near the bottom or at mid-depth in a burrow, by transporting mouthfuls of air during each low tide. The Japanese mudskipper, Periophthalmus modestus, is the best-studied species regarding reproductive strategies. The air-supplying behavior appears to be predominantly governed by the oxygen levels within egg chambers, but also by some other factor that is possibly related to the tidal cycle. When embryonic development is complete, the burrow-guarding male P. modestus removes the air from the egg chamber and releases the air outside the burrow on a nocturnal rising tide. Consequently, the tide floods the egg chamber and induces hatching. Because P. modestus eggs only have a 5-6 day window for hatching competence, the male's initial selection of the position for the burrow in the intertidal zone and the timing of spawning relative to the tidal cycle are both important factors in hatching success. This is particularly crucial for those burrows in higher intertidal zones, which may be reached only by spring high tides. Not much is known for other mudskippers, but it is likely that they also employ similar reproductive strategies. The objective of this review is to summarize available information on reproductive strategies of mudskippers, and to discuss future directions to better elucidate mechanisms and adaptive significance for the

  3. Effects of copper, cadmium, and zinc on the hatching success of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana).

    PubMed

    Brix, K V; Gerdes, R M; Adams, W J; Grosell, M

    2006-11-01

    Previous studies indicate that the hatching success of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) cysts is surprisingly sensitive to ambient metal concentrations. These studies estimated median effective concentrations (EC50s) of 7, 5, and 28 microg l-1 for Cd, Cu, and Zn, suggesting that the hatching end point for A. franciscana is the most sensitive tested to date for Cd and Zn in saline environments and comparable in sensitivity with the most sensitive tested to date for Cu. Furthermore, these data suggest that brine shrimp are at significant risk from Cu and Zn in Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT, where ambient concentrations as high as 10 and 14 microg l-1, respectively, have been measured. Given that brine shrimp appear to be successfully reproducing in GSL, we hypothesized that these toxicity values were either biased low as a result of an artifact of the test method used or that site-specific water-quality conditions in the lake had decreased metal bioavailability such that brine shrimp could successfully reproduce. To test these hypotheses, we initiated a step-wise series of experiments. First we investigated the effects of pretreatment of brine shrimp cysts with antibiotics on brine shrimp sensitivity to metals because previous investigators as part of their test methods have used antibiotics. Next we considered the effect of ionic composition of the artificial test media on sensitivity. Finally, we evaluated the effects of the site-specific water quality of the GSL on metal bioavailability and toxicity. Results indicate that pretreatment of cysts with antibiotics had no effect on sensitivity. However, we were unable to repeat the previous values for Cd and Zn, obtaining EC50s of 11,859 and 289 microg l-1 for Cd and Zn, respectively. For Cu, however, we estimated an EC50 of 12 microg l-1, so we conducted further testing on the artificial media, adjusting the media composition to better reflect the Ca2+ and HCO3- concentration of normal seawater. This increased the EC50

  4. The Effect of Chlortetracycline Meditation on the Coliform Microflora of Newly Hatched Chicks.

    PubMed

    Chopra, S L; Blackwood, A C; Dale, D G

    1963-03-01

    Newly hatched chicks were medicated with chlortetracycline at levels of 0, 400, 800 and 1200 mg. per imperial gallon of drinking water, for the first 5 days in the brooders. Coliform microflora of the ceca were counted when the chicks were first removed from the incubator and at 2 and 5 days of age. The numbers of coliforms decreased with increasing levels of the antibiotic and with increasing age. Sixtyfour per cent of the coliforms were E. coli and of these a large proportion were resistant to chlortetracycline and oxytetracycline in vitro. There was a trend towards increasing incidence of isolation of other resistant gram negative rods with increasing levels of chlortetracycline medication.

  5. Vaccination with hatched but non-activated, non-viable oncospheres of Taenia taeniaeformis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Hashimoto, A

    1993-06-01

    The usefulness of hatched but non-activated oncospheres as a candidate vaccine was evaluated using a Taenia taeniaeformis/rat system, since preparation of these oncospheres in vitro is known to be very simple. The findings were: (1) rats vaccinated with non-viable oncospheres became completely resistant to challenge infection; (2) intra-venous injection was the most effective to induce complete resistance; (3) a single oncosphere was sufficient to induce complete resistance in infected rats, whereas approximately 50 and 500 non-viable oncospheres were required to evoke strong and complete resistance, respectively, in vaccinated rats. The usefulness of non-viable oncospheres without adjuvant is discussed.

  6. Hatching rhythms and dispersion of decapod crustacean larvae in a brackish coastal lagoon in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, K.; Spivak, E.; Bas, C.; Ismael, D.; Luppi, T.

    1994-12-01

    Mar Chiquita, a brackish coastal lagoon in central Argentina, is inhabited by dense populations of two intertidal grapsid crab species, Cyrtograpsus angulatus and Chasmagnathus granulata. During a preliminary one-year study and a subsequent intensive sampling programme (November December 1992), the physical properties and the occurrence of decapod crustacean larvae in the surface water of the lagoon were investigated. The lagoon is characterized by highly variable physical conditions, with oligohaline waters frequently predominating over extended periods. The adjacent coastal waters show a complex pattern of semidiurnal tides that often do not influence the lagoon, due to the existence of a sandbar across its entrance. Besides frequently occurring larvae (exclusively freshly hatched zoeae and a few megalopae) of the two dominating crab species, those of three other brachyurans ( Plathyxanthus crenulatus, Uca uruguayensis, Pinnixa patagonica) and of one anomuran (the porcellanid Pachycheles haigae) were also found occasionally. Caridean shrimp ( Palaemonetes argentinus) larvae occurred in a moderate number of samples, with a maximum density of 800·m-3. The highest larval abundance was recorded in C. angulatus, with almost 8000°m-3. Significantly more C. angulatus and C. granulata zoeae occurred at night than during daylight conditions, and more larvae (statistically significant only in the former species) during ebb (outflowing) than during flood (inflowing) tides. In consequence, most crab zoeae were observed during nocturnal ebb, the least with diurnal flood tides. Our data suggest that crab larvae do not develop in the lagoon, where the adult populations live, but exhibit an export strategy, probably based upon exogenously coordinated egg hatching rhythms. Zoeal development must take place in coastal marine waters, from where the megalopa eventually returns for settlement and metamorphosis in the lagoon. Significantly higher larval frequency of C. granulata in

  7. Effect of simultaneous variation in temperature and ammonia concentration on percent fertilization and hatching in Crassostrea ariakensis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Wang; Jiahui, Liu; Hongshuai, Yang; Jin, Liu; Zhigang, Liu

    2014-04-01

    The combined effects of temperature and ammonia concentration on the percent fertilization and percent hatching in Crassostrea ariakensis were examined under laboratory conditions using the central composite design and response surface methodology. The results indicated: (1) The linear effects of temperature and ammonia concentration on the percent fertilization were significant (P<0.05), and the quadratic effects were highly significant (P<0.01). The interactive effect between temperature and ammonia concentration on the percent fertilization was not significant (P>0.05). (2) The linear effect of temperature on the percent hatching was highly significant (P<0.01), and that of ammonia concentration was nonsignificant (P>0.05). The quadratic effects of temperature and ammonia concentration on the percent hatching were highly significant (P<0.01). The interaction on the percent hatching was not significant (P>0.05). Temperature was more important than ammonia in influencing the fertilization and hatching in C. ariakensis. (3) The model equations of the percent fertilization and hatching towards temperature and ammonia concentration were established, with the coefficients of determination R(2)=99.4% and 99.76%, respectively. Through the lack-of-fit test, these models were of great adequacy. The predictive coefficients of determination for the two model equations were as high as 94.6% and 98.03%, respectively, showing that they could be used for practical projection. (4) Via the statistical simultaneous optimization technique, the optimal factor level combination, i.e., 25°C/0.038mgmL(-1), was derived, at which the greatest percent fertilization 95.25% and hatching 83.26% was achieved, with the desirability being 97.81%. Our results may provide advantageous guidelines for the successful reproduction of C. ariakensis.

  8. Ventilation changes associated with hatching and maturation of an endothermic phenotype in the Pekin duck, Anas platyrhynchos domestica.

    PubMed

    Sirsat, Tushar S; Dzialowski, Edward M

    2016-04-15

    Precocial birds begin embryonic life with an ectothermic metabolic phenotype and rapidly develop an endothermic phenotype after hatching. Switching to a high-energy, endothermic phenotype requires high-functioning respiratory and cardiovascular systems to deliver sufficient environmental oxygen to the tissues. We measured tidal volume (VT), breathing frequency (ƒ), minute ventilation (V̇e), and whole-animal oxygen consumption (V̇o2) in response to gradual cooling from 37.5°C (externally pipped paranates, EP) or 35°C (hatchlings) to 20°C along with response to hypercapnia during developmental transition from an ectothermic, EP paranate to endothermic hatchling. To examine potential eggshell constraints on EP ventilation, we repeated these experiments in artificially hatched early and late EP paranates. Hatchlings and artificially hatched late EP paranates were able to increase V̇o2significantly in response to cooling. EP paranates had high ƒ that decreased with cooling, coupled with an unchanging low VT and did not respond to hypercapnia. Hatchlings had significantly lower ƒ and higher VT and V̇e that increased with cooling and hypercapnia. In response to artificial hatching, all ventilation values quickly reached those of hatchlings and responded to hypercapnia. The timing of artificial hatching influenced the temperature response, with only artificially hatched late EP animals, exhibiting the hatchling ventilation response to cooling. We suggest one potential constraint on ventilatory responses of EP paranates is the rigid eggshell, limiting air sac expansion during inhalation and constraining VT Upon natural or artificial hatching, the VT limitation is removed and the animal is able to increase VT, V̇e, and thus V̇o2, and exhibit an endothermic phenotype. PMID:26818053

  9. Egg-hatching synchrony and larval cannibalism in the dock leaf beetle Gastrophysa viridula (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Kutcherov, Dmitry

    2015-12-01

    Females of leaf beetles and many other herbivorous insects lay eggs in coherent batches. Hatchlings emerge more or less simultaneously and often prey on their late-hatching clutchmates. It is not certain, however, whether this synchrony of hatching is a mere by-product of cannibalism or whether an additional synchronizing factor exists. The following simple experiment was aimed at determining the causal relationship between cannibalism and simultaneous larval emergence. Egg clutches of the dock leaf beetle Gastrophysa viridula were split into two halves. These halves were either kept as coherent groups in two separate dishes or, alternatively, only one half remained whole, whereas the other one was divided into single eggs, each of which was incubated in a separate dish. Halving of a clutch into coherent groups only slightly disrupted the synchrony of emergence. The consequence of individual isolation was more dramatic. Half-clutches consisting of disconnected solitary eggs required almost twice as much time for complete emergence of all larvae, which was significantly more than cannibalism as a sole synchronizing factor might explain. Moreover, survival rates were the same in coherent half-clutches (in the presence of cannibalism) and among isolated individuals. This group effect and the small contribution of cannibalism suggest the existence of an additional synchronizing factor. Possible mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon are discussed. PMID:26482400

  10. Sexual differences in post-hatching Saunders's gulls: size, locomotor activity, and foraging skill.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jongmin; Lee, Seung-Hee; Joo, Eun-Jin; Na, Ki-Jeong; Park, Shi-Ryong

    2013-04-01

    Various selection pressures induce the degree and direction of sexual size dimorphism in animals. Selection favors either larger males for contests over mates or resources, or smaller males are favored for maneuverability; whereas larger females are favored for higher fecundity, or smaller females for earlier maturation for reproduction. In the genus of Larus (seagulls), adult males are generally known to be larger in size than adult females. However, the ontogeny of sexual size dimorphism is not well understood, compared to that in adults. The present study investigates the ontogeny of sexual size dimorphism in Saunders's gulls (Larus saundersi) in captivity. We artificially incubated fresh eggs collected in Incheon, South Korea, and measured body size, locomotor activity, and foraging skill in post-hatching chicks in captivity. Our results indicated that the sexual differences in size and locomotor activity occurred with the post-hatching development. Also, larger males exhibited greater foraging skills for food acquisition than smaller females at 200 days of age. Future studies should assess how the adaptive significance of the sexual size dimorphism in juveniles is linked with sexual divergence in survival rates, intrasexual contests, or parental effort in sexes.

  11. Seasonal predator removal relative to hatch rate of duck nests in waterfowl production areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargeant, A.B.; Sovada, M.A.; Shaffer, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    These authors report that hatch rates of duck nests were related to removal of predators from waterfowl production areas. Cost effectiveness of such efforts is questioned. The prairie pothole region (PPR) is the primary breeding ground of several species of North American ducks (Bellrose 1980). Much habitat of breeding ducks in the PPR has been destroyed or degraded by intensive agriculture (e.g., Kiel et al. 1972, Bellrose 1980, Sugden and Beyersbergen 1984, Boyd 1985), resulting in high predation rates on duck nests (Sargeant and Raveling 1992). Because of predation, hatch rate (HR) of duck nests in Waterfowl Production Areas (WPA's) in the PPR is often less than the 15-20% suggested for stability of populations of the 5 most common species of dabbling ducks (e.g., Cowardin et al. 1985, Greenwood 1986, Klett et al. 1988, Greenwood et al. 1990). Managers seek ways to reduce depredations of duck clutches in WPA's, but little information is available concerning effects of predator removal. We evaluated seasonal (spring and early summer) removal of predators from WPA's in Minnesota and North Dakota. Our objectives were to compare HR in uplands of WPA's with and without predators removed and to determine functional aspects of conducting predator removal.

  12. Egg-hatching synchrony and larval cannibalism in the dock leaf beetle Gastrophysa viridula (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Kutcherov, Dmitry

    2015-12-01

    Females of leaf beetles and many other herbivorous insects lay eggs in coherent batches. Hatchlings emerge more or less simultaneously and often prey on their late-hatching clutchmates. It is not certain, however, whether this synchrony of hatching is a mere by-product of cannibalism or whether an additional synchronizing factor exists. The following simple experiment was aimed at determining the causal relationship between cannibalism and simultaneous larval emergence. Egg clutches of the dock leaf beetle Gastrophysa viridula were split into two halves. These halves were either kept as coherent groups in two separate dishes or, alternatively, only one half remained whole, whereas the other one was divided into single eggs, each of which was incubated in a separate dish. Halving of a clutch into coherent groups only slightly disrupted the synchrony of emergence. The consequence of individual isolation was more dramatic. Half-clutches consisting of disconnected solitary eggs required almost twice as much time for complete emergence of all larvae, which was significantly more than cannibalism as a sole synchronizing factor might explain. Moreover, survival rates were the same in coherent half-clutches (in the presence of cannibalism) and among isolated individuals. This group effect and the small contribution of cannibalism suggest the existence of an additional synchronizing factor. Possible mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon are discussed.

  13. Effects of injected methylmercury on the hatching of common loon (Gavia immer) eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenow, Kevin P.; Meyer, Michael W.; Rossmann, Ronald; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Gray, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the level of in ovo methylmercury (MeHg) exposure that results in detrimental effects on fitness and survival of loon embryos and hatched chicks, we conducted a field study in which we injected eggs with various doses of MeHg on day 4 of incubation. Eggs were collected following about 23 days of natural incubation and artificially incubated to observe hatching. Reduced embryo survival was evident in eggs injected at a rate of ≥1.3 μg Hg/g wet-mass. When maternally deposited Hg and injected Hg were considered together, the median lethal concentration of Hg (LC50) was estimated to be 1.78 μg Hg/g wet-mass. Organ mass patterns from eggs of chicks injected at a rate of 2.9 μg Hg/g differed from that of controls and chicks from the 0.5 μg Hg/g treatment, largely related to a negative relation between yolk sac mass and egg mercury concentration. Chicks from eggs in the 2.9 μg Hg/g treatment were also less responsive to a frightening stimulus than controls and chicks from the 0.5 μg Hg/g treatment. We also found that the length of incubation period increased with increasing egg mercury concentration. Tissue Hg concentrations were strongly associated (r2 ≥ 0.80) with egg Hg concentration.

  14. A mixture of environmental organic contaminants in lake sediments affects hatching from Daphnia resting eggs.

    PubMed

    Möst, Markus; Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Frey, Martin P; Hollender, Juliane; Spaak, Piet

    2015-02-01

    Despite the relevance of resting eggs for ecology and evolution of many aquatic organisms and their exposure to contaminants accumulating in sediments, ecotoxicological studies using resting eggs are vastly underrepresented. The authors established a method to perform exposure assays with resting eggs produced by the Daphnia longispina species complex, key species in large lake ecosystems. A mixture of organic contaminants previously detected in sediments of Lake Greifensee was selected to test the potential effect of organic contaminants present in sediments on the hatching process. Resting eggs were exposed to a mix of 10 chemicals, which included corrosion inhibitors, biocides, pesticides, and personal care products, for a period of 15 d. Using an automated counting software, the authors found a significant increase in hatching success in the exposed resting eggs compared with controls. Such an effect has not yet been reported from ecotoxicological assays with resting eggs. Possible mechanistic explanations as well as the potential implications on the ecology and evolution of aquatic species that rely on a resting egg banks are discussed. Observed increased mortality and developmental abnormalities for hatchlings in the exposure treatments can be explained by toxic contaminant concentrations. The results of the present study highlight the need for additional studies assessing the effects of organic contaminants on resting egg banks and aquatic ecosystems.

  15. The effect of the site of laser zona opening on the complete hatching of mouse blastocysts and their cell numbers

    PubMed Central

    Sanmee, Usanee; Piromlertamorn, Waraporn

    2016-01-01

    Objective We studied the effect of the site of laser zona opening on the complete hatching of mouse blastocysts and the cell numbers of the completely hatched blastocysts. Methods Mouse blastocysts were randomly allocated to the inner cell mass (ICM) group (zona opening performed at the site of the ICM, n=125), the trophectoderm (TE) group (zona opening performed opposite to the ICM, n=125) and the control group (no zona opening, n=125). Results The rate of complete hatching of the blastocysts was not significantly different in the ICM and the TE group (84.8% vs 80.8%, respectively; p=0.402), but was significantly lower in the control group (51.2%, p<0.001). The cell numbers in the completely hatched blastocysts were comparable in the control group, the ICM group, and the TE group (69±19.3, 74±15.7, and 71±16.8, respectively; p=0.680). Conclusion These findings indicate that the site of laser zona opening did not influence the rate of complete hatching of mouse blastocysts or their cell numbers. PMID:27689037

  16. Effects of egg size, parental quality and hatch-date on growth and survival of Common Tern Sterna hirundo chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, J.M.; Hatch, J.J.; Nisbet, I.C.T.

    2006-01-01

    We examined the relative contributions of egg size, parental quality and hatch-date to growth and survival of second-hatched chicks (those chicks making the greatest contribution to differences in productivity among pairs) by exchanging clutches among nests of Common Terns Sterna hirundo matched for lay-date (range 13 May to 9 June). The mass of a second-laid egg in an exchanged clutch ranged from 17.70 to 23.80 g. Growth and survival were studied during three periods: early (days 0-3), middle (days 3-12) and late (days 12-25). Both egg mass and hatch-date were important predictors of hatchling mass (positive relationships), although there was no seasonal trend in egg mass. During the middle period, hatch-date was a significant predictor of mass gain and survival (inverse relationships). After controlling for hatch-date, other indices of parental quality made only small contributions to chick mass gain and survival. Our results suggest that although breeding early generally leads to greater overall survival of chicks, several important interactions among egg 'quality', parental quality and early laying may affect breeding success under specific conditions. ?? 2006 British Ornithologists' Union.

  17. Spawning Characteristics and Artificial Hatching of Female Mottled Skate, Beringraja pulchra in the West Coast of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee-Woong; Jo, Yeong-Rok; Kang, Duk-Yong; Jeong, Gyeong-Suk; Jo, Hyun-Su

    2013-01-01

    The gonadsomatic index (GSI) of mottled skate was the highest in April, GSI and HSI showed a reverse phase for its reproductive cycle. The fish had one pair of egg capsules, having 1 to 7 fertilized eggs, and spawned all the year round. When surveying the reproductive characteristics of females over 63 ㎝ in disc width, we found the spawning peak was between April to June, and the appearance ratio of egg capsules was the highest in May (32.1%). The eggs were hatched at 8°C, 13°C, 18°C, water temperature (12.8 to 24.2°C), and the best hatching temperature was 18°C. The number of fish hatched was 4 to 5 fish/egg capsules, and the hatching rate was 100%. The sex ratios of hatching larvae were 45.5% female and 54.5% male. Therefore this study will provide fundamental data and information for artificial reproduction of the mottled skate. PMID:25949140

  18. High temperatures and absence of light affect the hatching of resting eggs of Daphnia in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Paes, Thécia A S V; Rietzler, Arnola C; Pujoni, Diego G F; Maia-Barbosa, Paulina M

    2016-03-01

    Temperature and light are acknowledged as important factors for hatching of resting eggs. The knowledge of how they affect hatching rates of this type of egg is important for the comprehension of the consequences of warming waters in recolonization of aquatic ecosystems dependent on dormant populations. This study aimed at comparing the influence of different temperature and light conditions on hatching rates of Daphnia ambigua andDaphnia laevis resting eggs from tropical environments. The ephippia were collected in the sediment of three aquatic ecosystems, in southeastern Brazil. For each lake, the resting eggs were exposed to temperatures of 20, 24, 28 and 32 °C, under light (12 h photoperiod) and dark conditions. The results showed that the absence of light and high temperatures have a negative influence on the hatching rates. Statistical differences for hatching rates were also found when comparing the studied ecosystems (ranging from 0.6 to 31%), indicating the importance of local environmental factors for diapause and maintenance of active populations.

  19. The effect of the site of laser zona opening on the complete hatching of mouse blastocysts and their cell numbers

    PubMed Central

    Sanmee, Usanee; Piromlertamorn, Waraporn

    2016-01-01

    Objective We studied the effect of the site of laser zona opening on the complete hatching of mouse blastocysts and the cell numbers of the completely hatched blastocysts. Methods Mouse blastocysts were randomly allocated to the inner cell mass (ICM) group (zona opening performed at the site of the ICM, n=125), the trophectoderm (TE) group (zona opening performed opposite to the ICM, n=125) and the control group (no zona opening, n=125). Results The rate of complete hatching of the blastocysts was not significantly different in the ICM and the TE group (84.8% vs 80.8%, respectively; p=0.402), but was significantly lower in the control group (51.2%, p<0.001). The cell numbers in the completely hatched blastocysts were comparable in the control group, the ICM group, and the TE group (69±19.3, 74±15.7, and 71±16.8, respectively; p=0.680). Conclusion These findings indicate that the site of laser zona opening did not influence the rate of complete hatching of mouse blastocysts or their cell numbers.

  20. Chronic playback of boat noise does not impact hatching success or post-hatching larval growth and survival in a cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Andrew N.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic (man-made) noise has been shown to have a negative impact on the behaviour and physiology of a range of terrestrial and aquatic animals. However, direct assessments of fitness consequences are rare. Here we examine the effect of additional noise on early life stages in the model cichlid fish, Neolamprologus pulcher. Many fishes use and produce sounds, they are crucial elements of aquatic ecosystems, and there is mounting evidence that they are vulnerable to anthropogenic noise; adult N. pulcher have recently been shown to change key behaviours during playback of motor boat noise. Using a split-brood design to eliminate potential genetic effects, we exposed half of the eggs and fry from each clutch to four weeks of playbacks of noise originally recorded from small motor boats with the other half acting as a control (receiving no noise playback). There was no significant effect of additional noise on hatching success or fry survival, length or weight at the end of the exposure period. Although care should be taken not to generalize these findings on a single species from a laboratory study, our data suggest that moderate noise increases do not necessarily have direct negative impacts on early-life survival and growth. Further studies on a range of species in natural conditions are urgently needed to inform conservation efforts and policy decisions about the consequences of anthropogenic noise. PMID:25276507

  1. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  2. Sturgeon hatching enzyme and the mechanism of egg envelope digestion: Insight into changes in the mechanism of egg envelope digestion during the evolution of ray-finned fish.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Tatsuki; Kawaguchi, Mari; Sano, Kaori; Yasumasu, Shigeki

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the evolution of the hatching enzyme gene using bester sturgeon (hybrid of Acipencer ruthenus and Huso huso), a basal member of ray-finned fishes. We purified the bester hatching enzyme from hatching liquid, yielding a single band on SDS-PAGE, then isolated its cDNA from embryos by PCR. The sturgeon hatching enzyme consists of an astacin family protease domain and a CUB domain. The CUB domains are present in frog and bird hatching enzymes, but not in teleostei, suggesting that the domain structure of sturgeon hatching enzyme is the tetrapod type. The purified hatching enzyme swelled the egg envelope, and selectively cleaved one of five egg envelope proteins, ZPAX. Xenopus hatching enzyme preferentially digests ZPAX, thus, the egg envelope digestion process is conserved between amphibians and basal ray-finned fish. Teleostei hatching enzymes cleave the repeat sequences at the N-terminal region of ZPB and ZPC, suggesting that the targets of the teleostei hatching enzymes differ from those of amphibians and sturgeons. Such repeat sequences were not found in the N-terminal region of ZPB and ZPC of amphibians and sturgeons. Our results suggest that the change in substrates of the hatching enzymes was accompanied by the mutation of the amino acid sequence of N-terminal regions of ZPB and ZPC. We conclude that the changes in the mechanism of egg envelope digestion, including the change in the domain structure of the hatching enzymes and the switch in substrate, occurred during the evolution of teleostei, likely triggered by the teleost-specific third whole genome duplication. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 720-732, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Mouse Driven Window Graphics for Network Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makinson, G. J.; And Others

    Computer enhanced teaching of computational mathematics on a network system driving graphics terminals is being redeveloped for a mouse-driven, high resolution, windowed environment of a UNIX work station. Preservation of the features of networked access by heterogeneous terminals is provided by the use of the X Window environment. A dmonstrator…

  4. Suppression of cross-hatched polariton disorder in GaAs/AlAs microcavities by strain compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajac, Joanna M.; Clarke, Edmund; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2012-07-01

    Zinc-blende semiconductor heterostructures grown in the [001] direction with a small lattice mismatch accommodate stress by developing a cross-hatch dislocation pattern. In GaAs based planar microcavities grown by molecular beam epitaxy, this pattern creates a potential landscape for exciton-polaritons, causing scattering and localization. We report here on suppressing the cross-hatch by introducing strain-compensating AlP layers into the center of the low index AlAs layers of the distributed Bragg reflectors. We observe a reduction of the cross-hatch dislocation density by at least one order of magnitude for 1.1 nm thick AlP layers, which correspond to an effective AlAs0.985P0.015 low index layer. These compensated structures show a remaining polariton disorder potential in the 10 μeV range.

  5. Hatching success in salamanders and chorus frogs at two sites in Colorado, USA: Effects of acidic deposition and climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Campbell, D.H.; Corn, P.S.

    2003-01-01

    The snowpack in the vicinity of the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area is among the most acidic in the western United States. We analyzed water chemistry and examined hatching success in tiger salamanders and chorus frogs at ponds there and at nearby Rabbit Ears Pass (Dumont) to determine whether acid deposition affects amphibians or their breeding habitats at these potentially sensitive locations. We found a wide range of acid neutralizing capacity among ponds within sites; the minimum pH recorded during the experiment was 5.4 at one of 12 ponds with all others at pH ??? 5.7. At Dumont, hatching success for chorus frogs was greater in ponds with low acid neutralizing capacity; however, lowest pHs were >5.8. At current levels of acid deposition, weather and pond characteristics are likely more important than acidity in influencing hatching success in amphibian larvae at these sites.

  6. Habitat use, survival, and causes of mortality among mallard broods hatched near the James River in North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapu, G.L.; Luna, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Habitat use and survival by nine mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) broods from nests on the James River floodplain and adjacent drift plain were monitored during summer 1987. Radio-marked broods were relocated an average of 22% of the time in the river channel, 22% in oxbow ponds, 43% in a large sewage lagoon complex, and 13% in basin wetlands. Four of the six broods hatched on the floodplain stayed primarily in riverine wetlands throughout the brood-rearing period. Seven of nine broods fledged at least one young; a total of 27 ducklings survived to fledging of the 82 that hatched. The seven hens that fledged young used an average of two wetlands each from hatching to fledging. Mink and raptor predation and adverse weather conditions were the principal identified causes of mortality. Potential effects on waterfowl production of planned downstream irrigation, a part of the Reformulated Garrison Diversion Unit, are discussed and recommendations are made to reduce adverse impacts to wildlife.

  7. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  8. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  9. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  10. Successful hatching from eggs carried by females and naturally removed from incubant males in Belostoma spp. water bugs (Heteroptera: Belostomatidae).

    PubMed

    Estévez, Ana Lía; de Reyes, Cristina Armúa; Schnack, Juan A

    2006-06-01

    Within Belostomatinae water bug species (Heteroptera, Belostomatidae) it has been hitherto believed that the completion of embryonic development is successful only if eggs are incubated on male hemelytra. Nevertheless, we found egg successful hatching from a back-brooding Belostoma elegans (Mayr) and B. micantulum (Stål) females, as well as from fertilized eggs kicked off from four back-brooder B. elegans males. One "encumbered" B. elongatum Montandon female was also recorded, but eggs did not hatch after she removed them.

  11. Seasonal variations in larval biomass and biochemical composition of brown shrimp, Crangon crangon (Decapoda, Caridea), at hatching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzúa, Ángel; Anger, Klaus

    2013-06-01

    The "brown shrimp", Crangon crangon (Linnaeus 1758), is a benthic key species in the North Sea ecosystem, supporting an intense commercial fishery. Its reproductive pattern is characterized by a continuous spawning season from mid-winter to early autumn. During this extended period, C. crangon shows significant seasonal variations in egg size and embryonic biomass, which may influence larval quality at hatching. In the present study, we quantified seasonal changes in dry weight (W) and chemical composition (CHN, protein and lipid) of newly hatched larvae of C. crangon. Our data revealed significant variations, with maximum biomass values at the beginning of the hatching season (February-March), a decrease throughout spring (April-May) and a minimum in summer (June-September). While all absolute values of biomass and biochemical constituents per larva showed highly significant differences between months ( P < 0.001), CHN, protein and lipid concentrations (expressed as percentage values of dry weight) showed only marginally significant differences ( P < 0.05). According to generalized additive models (GAM), key variables of embryonic development exerted significant effects on larval condition at hatching: The larval carbon content (C) was positively correlated with embryonic carbon content shortly after egg-laying ( r 2 = 0.60; P < 0.001) and negatively with the average incubation temperature during the period of embryonic development ( r 2 = 0.35; P < 0.001). Additionally, water temperature ( r 2 = 0.57; P < 0.001) and food availability (phytoplankton C; r 2 = 0.39; P < 0.001) at the time of hatching were negatively correlated with larval C content at hatching. In conclusion, "winter larvae" hatching from larger "winter eggs" showed higher initial values of biomass compared to "summer larvae" originating from smaller "summer eggs". This indicates carry-over effects persisting from the embryonic to the larval phase. Since "winter larvae" are more likely exposed to

  12. Molecular co-evolution of a protease and its substrate elucidated by analysis of the activity of predicted ancestral hatching enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hatching enzyme is a protease that digests the egg envelope, enabling hatching of the embryo. We have comprehensively studied the molecular mechanisms of the enzyme action to its substrate egg envelope, and determined the gene/protein structure and phylogenetic relationships. Because the hatching enzyme must have evolved while maintaining its ability to digest the egg envelope, the hatching enzyme-egg envelope protein pair is a good model for studying molecular co-evolution of a protease and its substrate. Results Hatching enzymes from medaka (Oryzias latipes) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) showed species-specific egg envelope digestion. We found that by introducing four medaka-type residue amino acid substitutions into recombinant killifish hatching enzyme, the mutant killifish hatching enzyme could digest medaka egg envelope. Further, we studied the participation of the cleavage site of the substrate in the species-specificity of hatching enzyme. A P2-site single amino acid substitution was responsible for the species-specificity. Estimation of the activity of the predicted ancestral enzymes towards various types of cleavage sites along with prediction of the evolutionary timing of substitutions allowed prediction of a possible evolutionary pathway, as follows: ancestral hatching enzyme, which had relatively strict substrate specificity, developed broader specificity as a result of four amino acid substitutions in the active site cleft of the enzyme. Subsequently, a single substitution occurred within the cleavage site of the substrate, and the recent feature of species-specificity was established in the hatching enzyme-egg envelope system. Conclusions The present study clearly provides an ideal model for protease-substrate co-evolution. The evolutionary process giving rise to species-specific egg envelope digestion of hatching enzyme was initiated by amino acid substitutions in the enzyme, resulting in altered substrate specificity, which later

  13. Innate sensitivity for self-propelled causal agency in newly hatched chicks

    PubMed Central

    Mascalzoni, Elena; Regolin, Lucia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    The idea that sensitivity to self-produced motion could lie at the foundations of the clear-cut divide that the brain operates between the two basic domains of inanimate and animate objects dates back to Aristotle. Sensitivity to self-propelled objects is apparent in human infants from around the fifth month of age, which leaves undetermined whether it is acquired by experience with animate objects or whether it is innately predisposed in the brain. Here, we report that newly hatched, visually naïve domestic chicks presented with objects exhibiting motion either self-produced or caused by physical contact prefer to associate with self-propelled objects. This finding supports the idea of an evolutionarily ancient, predisposed neural mechanism in the vertebrate brain for the detection of animacy. PMID:20160095

  14. STS-86 Crew Photo outside hatch in LC-39A White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph outside the hatch to the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. Kneeling in front, from left, are Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, David A. Wolf and Wendy B. Lawrence. Standing, from left, are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Commander James D. Wetherbee, and Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  15. Surface-specific flow factors for prediction of friction of cross-hatched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, M.; Rahmani, R.; Rahnejat, H.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a combined numerical and experimental study of generated sliding friction at low sliding speeds and high load intensity, typical of the top compression ring-cylinder liner conjunction at top dead centre in the compression stroke of high performance race engines. Frictional losses in the transition from compression to power stroke represent a significant portion of cyclic cylinder losses. The cylinder liner is cross-hatch honed with non-Gaussian topography, including larger groove features and a fairly smooth plateau roughness. Surface-specific flow factors are derived to closely represent the actual real rough conjunction. The predictions closely agree with the representative reported precision tribometric study of measured friction.

  16. Heart Rate Responses to Unaided Orion Side Hatch Egress in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Kirk L.; Hwang, Emma Y.; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Kelly, Cody; Walker, Thomas; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2016-01-01

    The Orion capsule will be the next NASA-built vehicle used for near and deep space exploration. The nominal landing scenario for Orion involves splashdown in the Pacific Ocean and subsequent aided crew egress conducted by military personnel. Contingency operations, however, require the crew to egress the capsule unaided, deploy an inflatable life raft, and to ingress the raft. Unaided egress is expected to be physiologically demanding, but no data exist to corroborate this. Thus, we evaluated the heart rate response to unaided Orion side hatch egress and raft ingress as par of the NASA crew Survival Engineering Team's evaluation of egress procedures using the Post-landing Orion Recovery Trainer (PORT) article in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL).

  17. Clinically approved iron chelators influence zebrafish mortality, hatching morphology and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jasmine L; Hatef, Azadeh; Imran ul-Haq, Muhammad; Nair, Neelima; Unniappan, Suraj; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2014-01-01

    Iron chelation therapy using iron (III) specific chelators such as desferrioxamine (DFO, Desferal), deferasirox (Exjade or ICL-670), and deferiprone (Ferriprox or L1) are the current standard of care for the treatment of iron overload. Although each chelator is capable of promoting some degree of iron excretion, these chelators are also associated with a wide range of well documented toxicities. However, there is currently very limited data available on their effects in developing embryos. In this study, we took advantage of the rapid development and transparency of the zebrafish embryo, Danio rerio to assess and compare the toxicity of iron chelators. All three iron chelators described above were delivered to zebrafish embryos by direct soaking and their effects on mortality, hatching and developmental morphology were monitored for 96 hpf. To determine whether toxicity was specific to embryos, we examined the effects of chelator exposure via intra peritoneal injection on the cardiac function and gene expression in adult zebrafish. Chelators varied significantly in their effects on embryo mortality, hatching and morphology. While none of the embryos or adults exposed to DFO were negatively affected, ICL -treated embryos and adults differed significantly from controls, and L1 exerted toxic effects in embryos alone. ICL-670 significantly increased the mortality of embryos treated with doses of 0.25 mM or higher and also affected embryo morphology, causing curvature of larvae treated with concentrations above 0.5 mM. ICL-670 exposure (10 µL of 0.1 mM injection) also significantly increased the heart rate and cardiac output of adult zebrafish. While L1 exposure did not cause toxicity in adults, it did cause morphological defects in embryos at 0.5 mM. This study provides first evidence on iron chelator toxicity in early development and will help to guide our approach on better understanding the mechanism of iron chelator toxicity.

  18. Relationships of eggshell, air cell, and cloacal temperatures of embryonated broiler hatching eggs during incubation.

    PubMed

    Olojede, O C; Collins, K E; Womack, S K; Gerard, P D; Peebles, E D

    2016-10-01

    The relationships of eggshell, air cell, and embryo cloacal temperatures in Ross × Ross 708 broiler hatching eggs were determined. Twenty eggs were weighed and set on each of 3 tray levels of a single incubator. Eggshell temperature (EST) of the eggs were recorded once in the morning (AM) and afternoon (PM) between 0 and 19 d of incubation (DOI) using an infrared thermometer (IRT). All eggs were candled and a transponder was implanted in the air cell of eggs containing live embryos (12 per tray level) at 12 DOI. At 19 DOI, transponders were implanted in the cloaca of live embryos from those same eggs. Air cell temperature (ACT) and EST readings were recorded once in the AM and PM between 12 and 19 DOI, and ACT and cloaca temperature (CLT) readings were recorded every 6 h between 19 and 21 DOI. The EST and ACT readings between 13 and 19 DOI were positively correlated. However, their respective mean temperatures between 13 and 19 DOI differed. The EST and ACT were not significantly influenced by tray level. Nevertheless, a main effect due to location (eggshell vs. air cell), and an interaction between DOI and time of day (AM and PM) in the 13 to 19 DOI interval were observed. Furthermore, an interaction was observed between location (air cell and cloaca) and the 6 h sequential time periods in the 19 to 21 DOI interval. However, across the entire 19 to 21 DOI interval, mean ACT and CLT were not significantly different, and were positively correlated. These data suggest that ACT readings are higher than those of EST during the last half of incubation, and that between 13 and 19 DOI, ACT readings may have the potential for use as a minimally invasive method by which to more accurately estimate the true core body temperature of broiler embryos. The effects of this method on hatchability and post-hatch performance need determination to better establish its practicality.

  19. Rotenone Decreases Hatching Success in Brine Shrimp Embryos by Blocking Development: Implications for Zooplankton Egg Banks

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Evan R.; Neumeyer, Courtney H.; Gunderson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    While many zooplankton species recover quickly after the treatment of water resources with the piscicide, rotenone, some fail to reach pretreatment population density or, in rare cases, do not reappear at all. The variable impact of rotenone on zooplankton populations could stem from differences in the capacity of species to switch entirely to anaerobic catabolic pathways in the presence of rotenone, which blocks mitochondrial electron transport. Alternatively, variable responses among species could originate from differences in permeability of dormant life-stages to lipophilic chemicals like rotenone. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of rotenone on development, emergence and hatching of zooplankton embryos that lack both the anaerobic capacity to develop in the presence of rotenone and a permeability barrier to prevent the entry of rotenone during dormancy. Post-diapause embryos of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, were employed as a model system, because they are permeable to lipophilic compounds when dechorionated and require aerobic conditions to support development. Early development in this species is also well characterized in the literature. Brine shrimp embryos were exposed to rotenone while development was either slowed by chilling or suspended by anoxia. Development, emergence and hatching were then observed in rotenone-free artificial seawater. The data presented demonstrate that rotenone freely diffuses across the embryonic cuticle in a matter of hours, and prevents development and emergence after brief exposures to ecologically relevant concentrations (0.025–0.5 mg L-1) of the piscicide. Neither the removal of rotenone from the environment, nor the removal of embryonic water with a hypertonic solution, are sufficient to reverse this block on development and emergence. These data indicate that rotenone could impair recruitment from egg banks for species of zooplankton that lack both an embryonic barrier to the entry

  20. A tool for diagnosis of Dicrocoelium dendriticum infection: hatching eggs and molecular identification of the miracidium.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, H; Manga-González, M Yolanda; Castro, José M

    2013-04-01

    DNA primers were designed from the 18S rRNA sequence from the relevant digenean trematode Dicrocoelium dendriticum to evaluate a polymerase chain reaction-based diagnostic method of this parasite from its eggs in faeces of naturally and experimentally infected sheep. In order to get DNA from D. dendriticum eggs, several hatching mechanisms were studied. Successful results were obtained when the eggs were frozen to -80 °C and/or in liquid nitrogen and then defrosted. This method allowed the opening of the egg operculum and the liberation of the miracidium. DNA from D. dendriticum adults and from hatching egg miracidia was obtained and an amplification single band of 1.95 kb was observed using primers designed for the total 18S rRNA sequence in both cases as well as when the template DNA was from adults of the closely related parasite Fasciola hepatica; in addition, a single and specific 0.8-kb band was obtained when primers based on an internal partial 18S rRNA sequence were used. The method showed to be useful not only in samples coming from adults, but in eggs from gall bladder and faeces as well. F. hepatica internal 18S rRNA primers were also designed and used as a negative control to prove that the eggs in faeces came from D. dendriticum and not from F. hepatica. A molecular tool able to detect a minimum of about 40 D. dendriticum eggs in one of the definitive host faeces has been developed for the first time and could provide a useful molecular tool to improve the conventional coprological diagnosis for detecting D. dendriticum eggs. PMID:23385970

  1. Immunocytochemical studies of chicken somatotrophs and somatotroph granules before and after hatching.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S; Gibney, J A; Cain, L D; Perez, F M; Scanes, C G

    1993-05-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were used to gain information about the embryonic development of chicken somatotrophs before and after hatching. To localize growth hormone, anterior pituitary sections were incubated with growth-hormone antibody, and then an indirect peroxidase method was used for light microscopy and an immunogold method for electron microscopy. The earliest evidence of embryonic somatotrophs was seen at 12 days. At this stage somatotrophs were sparse (0.2% of parenchymal cells) and their granules were pleomorphic with elongated ovoid and lozenge shapes predominating. Few of the immunogold-labeled somatotroph granules of the embryo were spherical until 15 days after fertilization. At 18 days, most of the granules were spherical (their shape in the adult chicken). During the six days between the 15-day-old embryo and the 1-day-old chick, the number of gold particles per granule section approximately doubled suggesting an increase in growth hormone content of the granules. This rise was the result of increases in the size of the granule sections and in the concentration of gold particles in the sections. During the embryonic period of 12-20 days, somatotrophs were not more than 3.6% of the anterior pituitary cell population. During the following two days, between the 20-day-old embryo and the 1-day-old chick, the percentage of somatotrophs in the pituitary parenchymal cell population rose rapidly from 3.6% to 20.7% and then increased slowly to 24.6% during the period of 1-5 days after hatching.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Zinc oxide nanoparticles alter hatching and larval locomotor activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Chen, Te-Hao; Lin, Chia-Chi; Meng, Pei-Jie

    2014-07-30

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NP) are extensively used in various consumer products such as sunscreens and cosmetics, with high potential of being released into aquatic environments. In this study, fertilized zebrafish (Danio rerio) eggs were exposed to various concentrations of ZnO NP suspensions (control, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10mg/L) or their respective centrifuged supernatants (0.03, 0.01, 0.08, 0.17, 0.75, and 1.21mg/L dissolved Zn ions measured) until reaching free swimming stage. Exposure to ZnO NP suspensions and their respective centrifuged supernatants caused similar hatching delay, but did not cause larval mortality or malformation. Larval activity level, mean velocity, and maximum velocity were altered in the groups exposed to high concentrations of ZnO NP (5-10mg/L) but not in the larvae exposed to the supernatants. To evaluate possible mechanism of observed effects caused by ZnO NP, we also manipulated the antioxidant environment by co-exposure to an antioxidant compound (N-acetylcysteine, NAC) or an antioxidant molecule suppressor (buthionine sulfoximine, BSO) with 5mg/L ZnO NP. Co-exposure to NAC did not alter the effects of ZnO NP on hatchability, but co-exposure to BSO caused further hatching delay. For larval locomotor activity, co-exposure to NAC rescued the behavioral effect caused by ZnO NP, but co-exposure to BSO did not exacerbate the effect. Our data indicated that toxicity of ZnO NP cannot be solely explained by dissolved Zn ions, and oxidative stress may involve in ZnO NP toxicity. PMID:24424259

  3. Survival of hatching-year female canvasbacks wintering on Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haramis, G.M.; Jorde, D.G.; Bunck, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Low annual survival of hatching-year (HY) females is a critical management concern for canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria), and may contribute substantially to reduced reproductive potential and the male-biased sex ratio of the species. To evaluate the contribution of mortality on a traditional wintering area to low annual survival, we estimated survival rates of HY female canvasbacks during 3 winters (1987-89) on Chesapeake Bay. We implanted radio transmitters in 204 HY and 44 after-hatching-year (AHY; 1989 only) female canvasbacks and tracked them from mid-December to early March. Ten-week survival rates did not differ (P > 0.05) among years for HY females; estimates ranged from 0.833 to 0.930 and averaged 0.887. Of 17 mortalities recorded for HY females during the 3-year study, 14 of 15 dated deaths occurred during the duck hunting season (first 3 weeks of the study), even though the hunting season on canvasbacks was closed. As a result, survival rates were lower during hunting versus posthunting periods (P 5 0.05 for 2 of 3 yr). Illegal hunting was the single largest source of mortality for HY females. Shot ducks accounted for a loss of 4% and suspected crippling losses (ducks scavenged by shoreline predators) may have increased hunting-associated losses to as high as 7%. In 1989, no deaths were observed for AHY females, and their survival was higher (P = 0.02) than HY females. High winter survival for HY females indicates that substantial mortality occurs at some other time of the annual cycle.

  4. Clinically Approved Iron Chelators Influence Zebrafish Mortality, Hatching Morphology and Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jasmine L.; Hatef, Azadeh; Imran ul-haq, Muhammad; Nair, Neelima; Unniappan, Suraj; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.

    2014-01-01

    Iron chelation therapy using iron (III) specific chelators such as desferrioxamine (DFO, Desferal), deferasirox (Exjade or ICL-670), and deferiprone (Ferriprox or L1) are the current standard of care for the treatment of iron overload. Although each chelator is capable of promoting some degree of iron excretion, these chelators are also associated with a wide range of well documented toxicities. However, there is currently very limited data available on their effects in developing embryos. In this study, we took advantage of the rapid development and transparency of the zebrafish embryo, Danio rerio to assess and compare the toxicity of iron chelators. All three iron chelators described above were delivered to zebrafish embryos by direct soaking and their effects on mortality, hatching and developmental morphology were monitored for 96 hpf. To determine whether toxicity was specific to embryos, we examined the effects of chelator exposure via intra peritoneal injection on the cardiac function and gene expression in adult zebrafish. Chelators varied significantly in their effects on embryo mortality, hatching and morphology. While none of the embryos or adults exposed to DFO were negatively affected, ICL -treated embryos and adults differed significantly from controls, and L1 exerted toxic effects in embryos alone. ICL-670 significantly increased the mortality of embryos treated with doses of 0.25 mM or higher and also affected embryo morphology, causing curvature of larvae treated with concentrations above 0.5 mM. ICL-670 exposure (10 µL of 0.1 mM injection) also significantly increased the heart rate and cardiac output of adult zebrafish. While L1 exposure did not cause toxicity in adults, it did cause morphological defects in embryos at 0.5 mM. This study provides first evidence on iron chelator toxicity in early development and will help to guide our approach on better understanding the mechanism of iron chelator toxicity. PMID:25329065

  5. Relationships of eggshell, air cell, and cloacal temperatures of embryonated broiler hatching eggs during incubation.

    PubMed

    Olojede, O C; Collins, K E; Womack, S K; Gerard, P D; Peebles, E D

    2016-10-01

    The relationships of eggshell, air cell, and embryo cloacal temperatures in Ross × Ross 708 broiler hatching eggs were determined. Twenty eggs were weighed and set on each of 3 tray levels of a single incubator. Eggshell temperature (EST) of the eggs were recorded once in the morning (AM) and afternoon (PM) between 0 and 19 d of incubation (DOI) using an infrared thermometer (IRT). All eggs were candled and a transponder was implanted in the air cell of eggs containing live embryos (12 per tray level) at 12 DOI. At 19 DOI, transponders were implanted in the cloaca of live embryos from those same eggs. Air cell temperature (ACT) and EST readings were recorded once in the AM and PM between 12 and 19 DOI, and ACT and cloaca temperature (CLT) readings were recorded every 6 h between 19 and 21 DOI. The EST and ACT readings between 13 and 19 DOI were positively correlated. However, their respective mean temperatures between 13 and 19 DOI differed. The EST and ACT were not significantly influenced by tray level. Nevertheless, a main effect due to location (eggshell vs. air cell), and an interaction between DOI and time of day (AM and PM) in the 13 to 19 DOI interval were observed. Furthermore, an interaction was observed between location (air cell and cloaca) and the 6 h sequential time periods in the 19 to 21 DOI interval. However, across the entire 19 to 21 DOI interval, mean ACT and CLT were not significantly different, and were positively correlated. These data suggest that ACT readings are higher than those of EST during the last half of incubation, and that between 13 and 19 DOI, ACT readings may have the potential for use as a minimally invasive method by which to more accurately estimate the true core body temperature of broiler embryos. The effects of this method on hatchability and post-hatch performance need determination to better establish its practicality. PMID:27433009

  6. On-site characterisation, re-packaging and transport of luminised, former aircraft escape hatches

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Nigel; John, Gordon; Beadle, Ian; Grundy, Colette; Sutherland, Alex; Shaw, Cath; Green, Lisa

    2007-07-01

    AMEC NNC, under contract to the UK Environment Agency, recovered a number of redundant aircraft hatches from an insecure location in North Wales. The Environment Agency instigated emergency action under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 (RSA93), to recover the hatches. Section 30(1) of RSA93 gives the Environment Agency powers to dispose of radioactive waste where it is unlikely the waste will be lawfully disposed of. Funding for this project was provided by the UK Government, within the Surplus Source Disposal Programme. The Environment Agency worked closely with partner regulatory organisations including the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the Department for Transport (DfT) and the Local Authority to ensure the safe packaging, removal and transport of the material to a part-shielded store pending final disposal. The project comprised a number of technical difficulties that needed to be overcome. These included poor existing characterisation of the waste, insecure premises requiring daily lock-down, construction of a temporary containment facility with associated filtered extract and the inclement weather. AMEC NNC's initial risk assessment identified the likelihood of high levels of loose, airborne radiological material. In order to provide adequate protection for personnel, and to prevent the spread of any radioactive contamination, the decision was made to implement radiological containment and to equip contractors with appropriate RPE (Respiratory Protective Equipment). Accurate characterisation of the radiological nature of the material was a crucial objective within the project. This was in order to correctly identify the Proper Shipping Name for consignment for transport, and to ensure that suitable transport containers were used. The packaged wastes were then transported to a secure location for temporary storage prior to final disposal. An innovative route was identified for processing of this material. Beneficial recycling and re-use within the

  7. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-dialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-dialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency-dialysis access; Chronic kidney failure-dialysis access; Chronic renal failure-dialysis access

  8. 49 CFR 231.28 - Box and other house cars with roof hatches built or placed in service after October 1, 1966.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... handbrake is operated near roof of car a brake step shall be provided as specified by § 231.1 or when... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Box and other house cars with roof hatches built... RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.28 Box and other house cars with roof hatches built or placed...

  9. Effects of catechins and low temperature on embryonic development and hatching in Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mimics of two natural influences, a chemical similar to one present in cyst nematodes and low temperature exposure of nematode eggs, were evaluated for their effects on quantitative and qualitative features of embryonic development and hatching. The polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), an ana...

  10. Colonization of day-of-hatch broiler chicks with antimicrobial resistant strains of salmonella Heidelberg and Kentucky

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a major foodborne pathogen linked to poultry and poultry products. However, limited research regarding the in vivo interactions of non-host adapted Salmonella serotypes in broiler chicks is available. In order to evaluate the effect of two serotypes on colonization, 600 day-of-hatch ...

  11. Factors Affecting Growth of Tengmalm’s Owl (Aegolius funereus) Nestlings: Prey Abundance, Sex and Hatching Order

    PubMed Central

    Zárybnická, Markéta; Riegert, Jan; Brejšková, Lucie; Šindelář, Jiří; Kouba, Marek; Hanel, Jan; Popelková, Alena; Menclová, Petra; Tomášek, Václav; Šťastný, Karel

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, energy supply during growth is a major predictor of the physical condition and survival prospects of fledglings. A number of experimental studies have shown that nestling body mass and wing length can vary with particular extrinsic factors, but between-year observational data on this topic are scarce. Based on a seven-year observational study in a central European Tengmalm’s owl population we examine the effect of year, brood size, hatching order, and sex on nestling body mass and wing length, as well as the effect of prey abundance on parameters of growth curve. We found that nestling body mass varied among years, and parameters of growth curve, i.e. growth rate and inflection point in particular, increased with increasing abundance of the owl’s main prey (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles), and pooled prey abundance (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles, and Sorex shrews). Furthermore, nestling body mass varied with hatching order and between sexes being larger for females and for the first-hatched brood mates. Brood size had no effect on nestling body mass. Simultaneously, we found no effect of year, brood size, hatching order, or sex on the wing length of nestlings. Our findings suggest that in this temperate owl population, nestling body mass is more sensitive to prey abundance than is wing length. The latter is probably more limited by the physiology of the species. PMID:26444564

  12. Predicting the timing of first generation egg hatch for the pest redlegged earth mite Halotydeus destructor (Acari: Penthaleidae).

    PubMed

    McDonald, Garrick; Umina, Paul A; Macfadyen, Sarina; Mangano, Peter; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2015-03-01

    Integrated pest management in Australian winter grain crops is challenging, partly because the timing and severity of pest outbreaks cannot currently be predicted, and this often results in prophylactic applications of broad spectrum pesticides. We developed a simple model to predict the median emergence in autumn of pest populations of the redlegged earth mite, Halotydeus destructor, a major field crop and pasture pest in southern Australia. Previous data and observations suggest that rainfall and temperature are critical for post-diapause egg hatch. We evaluated seven models that combined rainfall and temperature thresholds derived using three approaches against previously recorded hatch dates and 2013 field records. The performance of the models varied between Western Australia and south-eastern Australian States. In Western Australia, the key attributes of the best fitting model were more than 5 mm rain followed by mean day temperatures of below 20.5 °C for 10 days. In south-eastern Australia, the most effective model involved a temperature threshold reduced to 16 °C. These regional differences may reflect adaptation of H. destructor in south-eastern Australia to varied and uncertain temperature and rainfall regimes of late summer and autumn, relative to the hot and dry Mediterranean-type climate in Western Australia. Field sampling in 2013 revealed a spread of early hatch dates in isolated patches of habitat, ahead of predicted paddock scale hatchings. These regional models should assist in monitoring and subsequent management of H. destructor at the paddock scale.

  13. Phenological synchrony between Scaphoideus titanus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) hatchings and grapevine bud break: could this explain the insect's expansion?

    PubMed

    Chuche, J; Desvignes, E; Bonnard, O; Thiéry, D

    2015-02-01

    Scaphoideus titanus is the invasive vector of the phytoplasma causing the Flavescence dorée in European vineyards. This epidemic is a serious threat to viticulture that has been increasing for more than 60 years in Europe. We studied the effect of synchrony with the plant phenology and the effect of plant-sap quality on the individual fitness. Thus, we conducted laboratory experiments to determine if insect hatchings were synchronized with grapevine bud break. We used two natural populations: one from a cold winter vineyard and one from a mild winter vineyard. In both cases, egg hatching was synchronized with bud break and leaf appearance. The phloem quality of the young and old leaves as a food source was analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the effects on S. titanus growth were evaluated. Phloem composition varied with the grapevine cutting's age but also varied between leaves of different ages from the same plant. The older leaves were less nutritious because they had the highest carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and the lowest content of essential amino acids. Despite diverse phloem qualities, no fitness difference was observed. We found that the synchronization of egg hatchings with bud break is well regulated. However, the nymphs are not affected by the phloem-sap quality, suggesting that S. titanus may accept different food qualities and that egg hatching synchrony could contribute to population expansion in vineyards.

  14. 4r2Host status of different potato (Solanum tuberosum) varieties and hatching in root diffusate of Globodera ellingtonae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An atypical Globodera population was detected in Oregon in 2008. As the first step towards understanding the biology of this nematode, cysts were exposed to a range of root diffusates. The Globodera population hatched readily in the presence of diffusates from potato (Solanum tuberosum; PRD) and t...

  15. 75 FR 9620 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc.; Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment (75 FR 3761; dated January 22, 2010... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc.; Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption...

  16. 9 CFR 82.8 - Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Eggs, other than hatching eggs, from birds or poultry from flocks not known to be infected with END may... obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (2) The eggs have been cleaned and sanitized in accordance with 9 CFR... processing and layer facilities, the incoming and outgoing eggs at the establishment, and any flocks that...

  17. 9 CFR 82.8 - Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Eggs, other than hatching eggs, from birds or poultry from flocks not known to be infected with END may... obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (2) The eggs have been cleaned and sanitized in accordance with 9 CFR... processing and layer facilities, the incoming and outgoing eggs at the establishment, and any flocks that...

  18. 9 CFR 82.8 - Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Eggs, other than hatching eggs, from birds or poultry from flocks not known to be infected with END may... obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (2) The eggs have been cleaned and sanitized in accordance with 9 CFR... processing and layer facilities, the incoming and outgoing eggs at the establishment, and any flocks that...

  19. 9 CFR 82.8 - Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area. 82.8 Section 82.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF...

  20. Endogenous and exogenous estrogens during embryonic development affect timing of hatch and growth in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Cruze, Lori; Roark, Alison M; Rolland, Gabrielle; Younas, Mona; Stacy, Nicole; Guillette, Louis J

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can affect length of gestation and body mass and size of offspring. However, the dose, timing, and duration of exposure as well as sex and strain of the experimental animals determine the direction and magnitude of these effects. In this study, we examined the effects of a one-time embryonic exposure to either 17 β-estradiol (E2) or bisphenol A (BPA) on rate of development and growth in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Our results indicate that BPA and E2-treated alligators hatched approximately 1.4 days earlier than vehicle-treated (control) alligators, suggesting that estrogenic chemicals hasten hatching in these animals. We assessed growth rates, growth allometry, and body condition for 21 weeks after hatching and found that BPA-treated alligators grew more quickly shortly after hatching but more slowly thereafter compared to control alligators. Conversely, E2-treated alligators grew more slowly shortly after hatching but more quickly thereafter compared to control alligators. As a result of differences in growth rate, BPA-treated alligators were heavier, longer, and fatter than control alligators at age 5 weeks but were similar in size and leaner than control alligators at age 21 weeks. Biochemical analytes were examined at the end of the 21-week study to assess overall metabolic condition. We found that E2-treated alligators had significantly higher circulating plasma concentrations of cholesterol and triglycerides than control alligators while BPA-treated alligators had blood profiles comparable to control alligators. Our results provide important insights into the effects of exogenous estrogens on morphology and metabolism in an oviparous, semi-aquatic reptile.

  1. Hatching Time and Alevin Growth Prior to the Onset of Exogenous Feeding in Farmed, Wild and Hybrid Norwegian Atlantic Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Monica Favnebøe; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Nilsen, Frank; Glover, Kevin Alan

    2014-01-01

    The onset of exogenous feeding, when juveniles emerge from the gravel, is a critical event for salmonids where early emergence and large size provide a competitive advantage in the wild. Studying 131 farmed, hybrid and wild Norwegian Atlantic salmon families, originating from four wild populations and two commercial strains, we investigated whether approximately 10 generations of selection for faster growth has also resulted in increased somatic growth prior to the onset of exogenous feeding. In addition, we tested whether relaxed selection in farms has allowed for alterations in hatching time between farmed and wild salmon. Across three cohorts, wild salmon families hatched earlier than farmed salmon families, while hybrid families displayed intermediate hatching times. While the observed differences were small, i.e., 1–15 degree-days (0–3 days, as water temperatures were c. 5–6°C), these data suggest additive genetic variation for hatching time. Alevin length prior to exogenous feeding was positively related to egg size. After removal of egg size effects, no systematic differences in alevin length were observed between the wild and farmed salmon families. While these results indicate additive genetic variation for egg development timing, and wild salmon families consistently hatched earlier than farmed salmon families, these differences were so small they are unlikely to significantly influence early life history competition of farmed and wild salmon in the natural environment. This is especially the case given that the timing of spawning among females can vary by several weeks in some rivers. The general lack of difference in size between farmed and wild alevins, strongly suggest that the documented differences in somatic growth rate between wild and farmed Norwegian Atlantic salmon under hatchery conditions are first detectable after the onset of exogenous feeding. PMID:25438050

  2. Hepoxilins and trioxilins in barnacles: an analysis of their potential roles in egg hatching and larval settlement.

    PubMed

    Vogan, Claire L; Maskrey, Ben H; Taylor, Graham W; Henry, Sheelagh; Pace-Asciak, Cecil R; Clare, Anthony S; Rowley, Andrew F

    2003-09-01

    The barnacle life cycle has two key stages at which eicosanoids are believed to be involved in cellular communication pathways, namely the hatching of nauplii and the settlement of cypris larvae. Barnacle egg-hatching activity has previously been reported to reside in a variety of eicosanoids, including 8-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid and a number of tri-hydroxylated polyunsaturated fatty acid derivatives, the trioxilins. The production of the eicosapentaenoic acid metabolite trioxilin A4 (8,11,12-trihydroxy-5,9,14,17-eicosatetraenoic acid) by the barnacles Balanus amphitrite and Elminius modestus was confirmed using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography, both linked to mass spectrometry. In addition, both species also generated trioxilin A3 (8,11,12-trihydroxy-5,9,14-eicosatrienoic acid; an arachidonic acid-derived product), 8,11,12-trihydroxy-9,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid (a omega3 analogue of trioxilin A3; derived from omega3 arachidonic acid) and 10,13,14-trihydroxy-4,7,11,16,19-docosapentaenoic acid (a docosahexaenoic acid-derived product). In contrast to earlier reports, trioxilin A3 had no E. modestus egg-hatching activity at any of the concentrations tested (10(-9)-10(-6) mol l(-1)). The unstable epoxide precursor hepoxilin A3, however, caused significant levels of hatching at 10(-6) mol l(-1). Furthermore, the stable hepoxilin B3 analogue PBT-3 stimulated hatching at 10(-7) mol l(-1). Neither trioxilin A3, hepoxilin A3 or PBT-3 at 0.25-30 micromol l(-1) served as settlement cues for B. amphitrite cypris larvae.

  3. Effects of maternal dietary EPA and DHA supplementation and breeder age on embryonic and post-hatch performance of broiler offspring: age and n-3 pufa affect embryonic and post-hatch performance.

    PubMed

    Koppenol, A; Delezie, E; Wang, Y; Franssens, L; Willems, E; Ampe, B; Buyse, J; Everaert, N

    2015-04-01

    Breeder age and nutrition are amongst the most important factors affecting progeny growth and development. The present experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of n-3 fatty acid (FA), with special emphasis on the ratio of eicosapentaenoic (EPA, 20:5 n-3) and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6 n-3) acid, provided to the diet of ageing broiler breeder hens at different ratios, on the incubation parameters and the performance of the offspring. Four hundred and eighty Ross-308 broiler breeder hens were fed one of four different diets (120/treatment), with an equal fat content. The control diet was a basal diet, rich in n-6 FAs (CON). Blends of fish oil were used to enrich the three other diets in n-3 FA and to obtain different EPA/DHA ratios of 1/1 (EPA=DHA), 1/2 (DHA) or 2/1 (EPA). Every 5 weeks, incubation parameters were assessed. Every 15 weeks, offspring was reared until slaughter age on a standard diet. Breeder age affected almost all incubation and post-hatch parameters, whereas n-3 FA treatment only lowered egg weight (p < 0.0001) and consequently hatched chick weight (p < 0.0001). Supplementation of EPA resulted in a higher proportional liver weight (p = 0.0219) at hatch, a lower body weight up to 28 days post-hatch (p = 0.0418), a lower daily weight gain (p = 0.0498) and a higher feed conversion ratio (p = 0.0395) during the starter period (p = 0.0498), resulting in a higher overall offspring feed conversion ratio (p = 0.0317) compared to the control diet. DHA supplementation, on the other hand, resulted in a lower residual yolk weight (p = 0.0220) and a higher overall offspring mortality (p = 0.0125). In conclusion, supplementation of n-3 FA could not counter the adverse effect of breeder flock age, but did not harm incubation or improve post-hatch performance, either. EPA and DHA affected offspring development differently during early post-hatch life.

  4. Effect of vacuum packing and temperature on survival and hatching of strongyle eggs in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Mita E; Thapa, Sundar; Thamsborg, Stig M; Mejer, Helena

    2016-02-15

    Strongyle eggs of helminths of livestock usually hatch within a few hours or days after deposition with faeces. This poses a problem when faecal sampling is performed in the field. As oxygen is needed for embryonic development, it is recommended to reduce air supply during transport and refrigerate. The present study therefore investigated the combined effect of vacuum packing and temperature on survival of strongyle eggs and their subsequent ability to hatch and develop into L3. Fresh faecal samples were collected from calves infected with Cooperia oncophora, pigs infected with Oesophagostomum dentatum, and horses infected with Strongylus vulgaris and cyathostomins. The samples were allocated into four treatments: vacuum packing and storage at 5 °C or 20 °C (5 V and 20 V); normal packing in plastic gloves closed with a loose knot and storage at 5 °C or 20 °C (5 N and 20 N). The number of eggs per gram faeces (EPG) was estimated every fourth day until day 28 post set up (p.s.) by a concentration McMaster-method. Larval cultures were prepared on day 0, 12 and 28 p.s. and the larval yield determined. For C. oncophora, the EPG was significantly higher in vacuum packed samples after 28 days as compared to normal storage, regardless of temperature. However, O. dentatum EPG was significantly higher in samples kept at 5 °C as compared to 20 °C, irrespective of packing. For the horse strongyles, vacuum packed samples at 5 °C had a significantly higher EPG compared to the other treatments after 28 days. The highest larval yield of O. dentatum and horse strongyles were obtained from fresh faecal samples, however, if storage is necessary prior to setting up larval cultures O. dentatum should be kept at room temperature (aerobic or anaerobic). However, horse strongyle coprocultures should ideally be set up on the day of collection to ensure maximum yield. Eggs of C. oncophora should be kept vacuum packed at room temperature for the highest larval yield.

  5. Development of the egg hatch assay for detection of anthelminthic resistance in human hookworms.

    PubMed

    Albonico, Marco; Wright, Victoria; Ramsan, Mahdi; Haji, Hamadi J; Taylor, Martin; Savioli, Lorenzo; Bickle, Quentin

    2005-06-01

    Evidence of development and rapid spread of anthelminthic resistance in veterinary nematodes raises concern that the increasingly frequent treatments used in chemotherapy-based programmes to control human soil-transmitted helminths may select resistant worms. The aim of this study was to adapt, refine, and evaluate the Egg Hatch Assay (EHA) test, which has been used for veterinary nematodes, for field testing of benzimidazole (BZ) susceptibility/resistance in human hookworms. A second objective was to use this EHA to assess whether a population of worms resistant to mebendazole (MBZ) has built up in a sub-population of frequently treated children in Pemba Island. Stools from 470 school children enrolled in the first (Standard 1) and in the fifth (Standard 5) class were examined at baseline and at 21 days after treatment with 500 mg MBZ or placebo tablets. Standard 1 children had never received any MBZ treatment whilst Standard 5 children had received a total of 13 rounds of treatment. The EHA, involving culture of purified eggs with increasing drug concentrations showed that, for thiabendazole (TBZ), the mean ED(50)s (concentrations required to prevent 50% of the viable eggs from hatching) for all children at baseline were 0.079 microg/ml at 48h and 0.120 microg/ml at 72h (P<0.001). For MBZ, the mean ED(50)s for all children at baseline were 0.895 microg/ml at 48h and 1.50 microg/ml at 72h (P<0.001). For TBZ and for MBZ the ED(50) from Standard 1 were similar to those from Standard 5 children both at 48 and at 72h. At the follow-up for TBZ and for MBZ, there was no significant difference between the ED(50) from children who had received MBZ and children treated with placebo. In Pemba, TBZ ED(50) values of children non-exposed (Standard 1) and of children exposed (Standard 5) to MBZ treatment, and data from children treated with MBZ and placebo indicate that a drug-resistant worm population has not built up within treated individuals, and that periodic treatment has

  6. Nest-site selection and hatching success of waterbirds in coastal Virginia: some results of habitat manipulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rounds, R.A.; Erwin, R.M.; Portera, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    Rising sea levels in the mid-Atlantic region pose a long-term threat to marshes and their avian inhabitants. The Gull-billed Tern (Sterna nilotica), Common Tern (S. hirundo), Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger), and American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus), species of concern in Virginia, nest on low shelly perimeters of salt marsh islands on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Marsh shellpiles are free of mammalian predators, but subject to frequent floods that reduce reproductive success. In an attempt to examine nest-site selection, enhance habitat, and improve hatching success, small (2 ? 2 m) plots on five island shellpiles were experimentally elevated, and nest-site selection and hatching success were monitored from 1 May to 1 August, 2002. In addition, location, elevation, and nesting performance of all other nests in the colonies were also monitored. No species selected the elevated experimental plots preferentially over adjacent control plots at any of the sites. When all nests were considered, Common Tern nests were located significantly lower than were random point elevations at two sites, as they tended to concentrate on low-lying wrack. At two other sites, however, Common Tern nests were significantly higher than were random points. Gull-billed Terns and American Oystercatchers showed a weak preference for higher elevations on bare shell at most sites. Hatching success was not improved on elevated plots, despite the protection they provided from flooding. Because of a 7 June flood, when 47% of all nests flooded, hatching success for all species was low. Nest elevation had the strongest impact on a nest's probability of hatching, followed by nest-initiation date. Predation rates were high at small colonies, and Ruddy Turnstones (Arenaria interpres) depredated 90% of early Gull-billed Tern nests at one shellpile. The importance of nest elevation and flooding on hatching success demonstrates the potential for management of certain waterbird nesting sites

  7. Temperature during the last week of incubation. I. Effects on hatching pattern and broiler chicken embryonic organ development.

    PubMed

    Maatjens, C M; van Roovert-Reijrink, I A M; Engel, B; van der Pol, C W; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the effects of an eggshell temperature (EST) of 35.6, 36.7, 37.8, and 38.9°C applied from d of incubation (E) 15, E17, and E19 on hatching pattern and embryonic organ development. A total of 2,850 first-grade eggs of a 43-week-old Ross 308 broiler breeder flock were incubated at an EST of 37.8°C until E15. From E15, E17, or E19 onward, eggs were incubated at an EST of 35.6, 36.7, 37.8, or 38.9°C. Moment of internal pipping (IP), external pipping (EP), and hatch was determined, and organ development was measured at E15, E17, E19, IP, EP, and hatch. A lower EST extended incubation duration compared to a higher EST. The lower incubation duration was mainly caused by the extended time until IP, whereas time between IP and hatch hardly varied between treatments. Relative heart weight was affected by EST already from 2 d after the start of EST treatment on E15, and effects became more pronounced at longer exposure time to various EST treatments. At hatch, the largest difference in relative heart weight was found between an EST of 35.6 and 38.9°C started at E15 (Δ=64.4%). From E17 onward, EST affected yolk-free body mass (YFBM) and relative stomach weight, where a lower EST resulted in a lower YFBM and relative stomach weight before IP and a higher YFBM and relative stomach weight after IP. From E19 onward, a lower EST resulted in a higher relative liver and spleen weight regardless of start time of treatment. Yolk weight and relative intestine weight were not affected by EST before and at E19, but a higher EST resulted in a higher yolk weight and lower relative intestine weight from IP onward. Based on the higher YFBM and higher relative organ growth found at hatch, we concluded that an EST lower than 37.8°C from E15 onward appears to be beneficial for optimal embryo development. PMID:26787926

  8. Piezoelectric inkjet printing of a cross-hatch immunoassay on a disposable nylon membrane.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Thomas N; Pierson, Bonnie E; Aggarwal, Ravi; Narayan, Roger J

    2009-02-01

    The development of a cost-effective method for manufacturing immunoassays is a key step towards their commercial use. In this study, a piezoelectric inkjet printer and a nylon membrane were used to fabricate a disposable immunoassay. Using a piezoelectric inkjet printer, a cross-hatch pattern of goat anti-mouse antibody (GalphaM) and rabbit anti-horseradish peroxidase (RalphaHRP) antibody were deposited on the nylon membrane. These patterns were subsequently treated with a solution containing rabbit anti-goat antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase (RalphaG-HRP). The effectiveness of the immobilization process was examined using tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), which oxidizes in the presence of HRP to form a visible precipitate. Optical evaluation of the TMB precipitate was used to assess the precision of the features in the inkjet-printed pattern as well as antibody functionality following inkjet printing. Uniform patterns that contained functional antibodies were fabricated using the piezoelectric inkjet printer. These results suggest that piezoelectric inkjet printing may be used to fabricate low-cost disposable immunoassays for biotechnology and healthcare applications. PMID:19226553

  9. Dislocation gliding and cross-hatch morphology formation in AIII-BV epitaxial heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalskiy, V. A. Vergeles, P. S.; Eremenko, V. G.; Fokin, D. A.

    2014-12-08

    An approach for understanding the origin of cross-hatch pattern (CHP) on the surface of lattice mismatched GaMnAs/InGaAs samples grown on GaAs (001) substrates is developed. It is argued that the motion of threading dislocations in the (111) slip planes during the relaxation of InGaAs buffer layer is more complicated process and its features are similar to the ones of dislocation half-loops gliding in plastically deformed crystals. The heterostructures were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron beam induced current (EBIC). Detailed EBIC experiments revealed contrast features, which cannot be accounted for by the electrical activity of misfit dislocations at the buffer/substrate interface. We attribute these features to specific extended defects (EDs) generated by moving threading dislocations in the partially relaxed InGaAs layers. We believe that the core topology, surface reconstruction, and elastic strains from these EDs accommodated in slip planes play an important role in the CHP formation. The study of such electrically active EDs will allow further understanding of degradation and changes in characteristics of quantum devices based on strained heterostructures.

  10. Influence of solar ultraviolet-B on pelagic fish embryos: osmolality, mortality and viable hatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethlefsen, V.; von Westernhagen, H.; Tüg, H.; Hansen, P. D.; Dizer, H.

    2001-03-01

    Eggs of dab ( Limanda limanda) and plaice ( Pleuronectes platessa) were experimentally exposed to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation in a solar radiation simulator. The experimental design tried to simulate present and future conditions with reference to increased UV-B exposure due to northern hemisphere ozone loss, employing mainly two scenarios, a reduction to 270 (S1) and to 180 (S2) Dobson units (DU) in single or repetitive exposures of 2, 4 or 6 h. Depending on the total dose of UV-B irradiation and the developmental stage, exposed eggs displayed loss of buoyancy as a sublethal effect, as well as increased embryo mortality and reduced viable hatch. In the single exposure experiments only under conditions of 180 DU for 6 h were effects apparent. Double exposure under conditions of 270 DU did not lead to lasting effects. At the sublethal effect level, i.e. loss of buoyancy, considerable photorepair was observed. It was concluded, that under the present general weather conditions in spring and at the present levels of environmental ozone, allowing for a reduction to 180 DU, the embryonic development of North Sea spring spawning fish is not endangered by UV-B radiation.

  11. From stillness to motion: 80 years after the first description of Taenia solium oncosphere hatching

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a considered public health problem in many underdeveloped and developing countries. Because of the enormous increase in international tourism and migration, NCC nowadays is also found in some developed countries. Our group was the first to demonstrate that tapeworm carriers in the household are the main risk factor for acquiring cysticercosis in humans and pigs, since the disease results from the ingestion of microscopic tapeworm eggs. Findings We had the opportunity to film the liberation of the embryo from the oncospheral membrane after the hatching of the egg, which is the activation process required for intestinal wall invasion by the onchosphere. Yoshino (J Formosa Med Ass 32:139-142, 1933) described with great detail in diagrams and photographs this process eighty years ago after he infected himself with three living cysticerci in order to study the life cycle of Taenia solium. Other authors further described this process. Nevertheless it has never been filmed before. The purpose of this paper is to shift from stillness to motion since we can now show for the first time a movie of an activated oncosphere and its release from the oncospheral membrane. Conclusion Oncospheral activation is the requisite for T. solium embryos to invade the intestinal mucosa and develop into cysticerci. This process has been amply described but here it is shown for the first time in motion; thus it may be of interest for readers of the journal and useful for educational purposes towards the control of NCC. PMID:24433262

  12. Post-hatch heat warms adult beaks: irreversible physiological plasticity in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Burness, Gary; Huard, Jacqueline R; Malcolm, Emily; Tattersall, Glenn J

    2013-09-22

    Across taxa, the early rearing environment contributes to adult morphological and physiological variation. For example, in birds, environmental temperature plays a key role in shaping bill size and clinal trends across latitudinal/thermal gradients. Such patterns support the role of the bill as a thermal window and in thermal balance. It remains unknown whether bill size and thermal function are reversibly plastic. We raised Japanese quail in warm (30°C) or cold (15°C) environments and then at a common intermediate temperature. We predicted that birds raised in cold temperatures would develop smaller bills than warm-reared individuals, and that regulation of blood flow to the bill in response to changing temperatures would parallel the bill's role in thermal balance. Cold-reared birds developed shorter bills, although bill size exhibited 'catch-up' growth once adults were placed at a common temperature. Despite having lived in a common thermal environment as adults, individuals that were initially reared in the warmth had higher bill surface temperatures than cold-reared individuals, particularly under cold conditions. This suggests that blood vessel density and/or the control over blood flow in the bill retained a memory of early thermal ontogeny. We conclude that post-hatch temperature reversibly affects adult bill morphology but irreversibly influences the thermal physiological role of bills and may play an underappreciated role in avian energetics.

  13. Characterizing the information content of a newly hatched chick's first visual object representation.

    PubMed

    Wood, Justin N

    2015-03-01

    How does object recognition emerge in the newborn brain? To address this question, I examined the information content of the first visual object representation built by newly hatched chicks (Gallus gallus). In their first week of life, chicks were raised in controlled-rearing chambers that contained a single virtual object rotating around a single axis. In their second week of life, I tested whether subjects had encoded information about the identity and viewpoint of the virtual object. The results showed that chicks built object representations that contained both object identity information and view-specific information. However, there was a trade-off between these two types of information: subjects who were more sensitive to identity information were less sensitive to view-specific information, and vice versa. This pattern of results is predicted by iterative, hierarchically organized visual processing machinery, the machinery that supports object recognition in adult primates. More generally, this study shows that invariant object recognition is a core cognitive ability that can be operational at the onset of visual object experience.

  14. In vitro detection of benzimidazole resistance in Haemonchus contortus: egg hatch test versus larval development test.

    PubMed

    Várady, M; Cudeková, P; Corba, J

    2007-10-21

    The present study was designed to compare the egg hatch test (EHT) and the larval development test (LDT) as in vitro tools for detection of benzimidazole (BZ) resistance in Haemonchus contortus, a nematode parasite of small ruminants. Comparisons were made during a course of infection and changes in both EHT and LDT were monitored to measure the correlation between resistance and susceptibility in different parasite stages (eggs and larvae). In addition, mixed doses of known numbers of susceptible and BZ-resistant H. contortus eggs were used to assess the sensitivity of LDT for the detection of low levels of resistance. The degree of resistance for each test was expressed as resistance factor (RF). The LDT showed a greater ability to distinguish between four susceptible and four resistant isolates of H. contortus with higher resistance factors compared to the EHT. For the EHT the RF by using ED(50) criterion ranged from 3.2 to 13.3 and from 7.4 to 25.2 by using LC(99). For LDT the resistant isolates were 4.3-63.1 times more tolerant than the susceptible isolates using the ED(50) criterion and 91.1-1411.0 times more tolerant using the LC(99) criterion. The LDT was also able to clearly indicate the presence of low level (4%) of resistant larvae amongst a susceptible background population.

  15. Dislocation gliding and cross-hatch morphology formation in AIII-BV epitaxial heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalskiy, V. A.; Vergeles, P. S.; Eremenko, V. G.; Fokin, D. A.; Dorokhin, M. V.; Danilov, Yu. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2014-12-01

    An approach for understanding the origin of cross-hatch pattern (CHP) on the surface of lattice mismatched GaMnAs/InGaAs samples grown on GaAs (001) substrates is developed. It is argued that the motion of threading dislocations in the {111} slip planes during the relaxation of InGaAs buffer layer is more complicated process and its features are similar to the ones of dislocation half-loops gliding in plastically deformed crystals. The heterostructures were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron beam induced current (EBIC). Detailed EBIC experiments revealed contrast features, which cannot be accounted for by the electrical activity of misfit dislocations at the buffer/substrate interface. We attribute these features to specific extended defects (EDs) generated by moving threading dislocations in the partially relaxed InGaAs layers. We believe that the core topology, surface reconstruction, and elastic strains from these EDs accommodated in slip planes play an important role in the CHP formation. The study of such electrically active EDs will allow further understanding of degradation and changes in characteristics of quantum devices based on strained heterostructures.

  16. Face recognition in newly hatched chicks at the onset of vision.

    PubMed

    Wood, Samantha M W; Wood, Justin N

    2015-04-01

    How does face recognition emerge in the newborn brain? To address this question, we used an automated controlled-rearing method with a newborn animal model: the domestic chick (Gallus gallus). This automated method allowed us to examine chicks' face recognition abilities at the onset of both face experience and object experience. In the first week of life, newly hatched chicks were raised in controlled-rearing chambers that contained no objects other than a single virtual human face. In the second week of life, we used an automated forced-choice testing procedure to examine whether chicks could distinguish that familiar face from a variety of unfamiliar faces. Chicks successfully distinguished the familiar face from most of the unfamiliar faces-for example, chicks were sensitive to changes in the face's age, gender, and orientation (upright vs. inverted). Thus, chicks can build an accurate representation of the first face they see in their life. These results show that the initial state of face recognition is surprisingly powerful: Newborn visual systems can begin encoding and recognizing faces at the onset of vision.

  17. Development and hatching mechanism of Fasciola eggs, light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Abdel-Nasser A; Hassan, Ismael M; Khalifa, Refaat M A

    2010-07-01

    Both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used in the description. There were variable measurements of eggs from the same fluke and there was no relationship between the size of the fluke and size of eggs. Light microscopy revealed that the operculum has different shapes in Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica. Under normal laboratory conditions of temperature (26 ± 1 °C), miracidia of F. gigantica developed within 12-16 days period, but those of F. hepatica developed within a period of 13-15 days. The miracidia of F. gigantica measured 110 × 70 μm and that of F. hepatica measured 136 × 74 μm. The life span of the miracidium in F. gigantica ranged between 9 and 12 h, while in F. hepatica the life span did not exceed 10 h. Miracidial epidermal plates in miracidium of F. gigantica were found to be 20 plates arranged in four tiers of six, four, six and four. Hatching process was recorded using scanning electron microscope, and it indicated partially opened operculum. PMID:23961086

  18. Piezoelectric inkjet printing of a cross-hatch immunoassay on a disposable nylon membrane.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Thomas N; Pierson, Bonnie E; Aggarwal, Ravi; Narayan, Roger J

    2009-02-01

    The development of a cost-effective method for manufacturing immunoassays is a key step towards their commercial use. In this study, a piezoelectric inkjet printer and a nylon membrane were used to fabricate a disposable immunoassay. Using a piezoelectric inkjet printer, a cross-hatch pattern of goat anti-mouse antibody (GalphaM) and rabbit anti-horseradish peroxidase (RalphaHRP) antibody were deposited on the nylon membrane. These patterns were subsequently treated with a solution containing rabbit anti-goat antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase (RalphaG-HRP). The effectiveness of the immobilization process was examined using tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), which oxidizes in the presence of HRP to form a visible precipitate. Optical evaluation of the TMB precipitate was used to assess the precision of the features in the inkjet-printed pattern as well as antibody functionality following inkjet printing. Uniform patterns that contained functional antibodies were fabricated using the piezoelectric inkjet printer. These results suggest that piezoelectric inkjet printing may be used to fabricate low-cost disposable immunoassays for biotechnology and healthcare applications.

  19. Watching sexy displays improves hatching success and offspring growth through maternal allocation.

    PubMed

    Loyau, Adeline; Lacroix, Frédéric

    2010-11-22

    Male attractiveness can have tremendous effects on the fitness of his offspring via good genes, but also via enhanced maternal allocation of resources. Yet the proximate mechanisms influencing differential maternal allocation in relation to male sexiness are poorly known. Here, we studied the importance of visual stimulation for maternal allocation in the Houbara bustard, a vulnerable bird species bred in captivity to support wild populations. Artificial insemination allowed controlling for potential confounding factors, such as a male's territory quality, social interactions or sperm quality/quantity, probably linked to mate attractiveness. We show that artificially inseminated females stimulated by highly displaying males increased their hatching success, owing to increased fertilization success. The females also increased the allocation of maternal androgens in their eggs, leading to an increase of circulating testosterone and growth rate in chicks. Hence, visual stimulation of the females can promote differential maternal allocation and favour offspring fitness. Our results further suggest that using artificial insemination for species conservation without appropriate stimulation of the breeding females probably has negative impacts on their breeding performance and therefore on population viability.

  20. Egg mass in an asynchronously hatching parrot: does variation offset constraints imposed by laying order?

    PubMed

    Budden, Amber E; Beissinger, Steven R

    2005-06-01

    Life history theory predicts phenotypic trade-offs between the number and quality of offspring produced. Intraspecific variation in egg mass is common in birds and increased egg size can have positive effects on offspring fitness. However, evidence of a trade-off with clutch size is limited. We analyzed variation in mass of 5,743 Green-rumped parrotlet (Forpus passerinus) eggs laid over 15 years to evaluate the potential for facultative adjustment of egg mass and factors governing variation. Heavier eggs had an increased probability of both hatching and fledging but egg mass did not affect postfledging recruitment. Offspring egg mass differed between populations and the potential for seasonal adjustment to egg mass may be related to environmental factors such as seed density. Egg mass was moderately heritable (h2 = 0.42) which accounts for some of the individual variation detected, and these results are likely attributable to strong maternal effects. We found an effect of female age on egg mass, but no effects of previous reproductive experience. Finally, egg mass was strongly governed by position within the laying sequence, independent of clutch size, and such adjustment may facilitate brood reduction under some conditions in this highly asynchronous species.

  1. Demi-embryo production from hatching of zona-drilled bovine and rabbit blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Skrzyszowska, M; Smorag, Z; Katska, L

    1997-09-01

    It is known that the pregnancy rate resulting after transfer of bisected embryos is lower than after transfer of whole embryos. The main reason is the reduced cell number in the demi-embryo which is less than 1 2 of that in the intact embryo, since a number of blastomeres is damaged as a result of the procedure used in conventional embryo splitting. The aim of our experiment was to develop a non-invasive procedure which would limit cell losses during microsurgery. The experiment was carried out on bovine IVM-IVF embryos at middle, late and expanded blastocyst stage and rabbit embryos at late blastocyst stage cultured in vitro from in vivo produced zygotes. The zona pellucida of these embryos was drilled on the line between the inner cell mass and the trophoblast using a glass microneedle (hatched according to the pattern described. The developed procedure could be considered as a non-invasive alternative to conventional embryo splitting.

  2. Post-hatch heat warms adult beaks: irreversible physiological plasticity in Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    Burness, Gary; Huard, Jacqueline R.; Malcolm, Emily; Tattersall, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    Across taxa, the early rearing environment contributes to adult morphological and physiological variation. For example, in birds, environmental temperature plays a key role in shaping bill size and clinal trends across latitudinal/thermal gradients. Such patterns support the role of the bill as a thermal window and in thermal balance. It remains unknown whether bill size and thermal function are reversibly plastic. We raised Japanese quail in warm (30°C) or cold (15°C) environments and then at a common intermediate temperature. We predicted that birds raised in cold temperatures would develop smaller bills than warm-reared individuals, and that regulation of blood flow to the bill in response to changing temperatures would parallel the bill's role in thermal balance. Cold-reared birds developed shorter bills, although bill size exhibited ‘catch-up’ growth once adults were placed at a common temperature. Despite having lived in a common thermal environment as adults, individuals that were initially reared in the warmth had higher bill surface temperatures than cold-reared individuals, particularly under cold conditions. This suggests that blood vessel density and/or the control over blood flow in the bill retained a memory of early thermal ontogeny. We conclude that post-hatch temperature reversibly affects adult bill morphology but irreversibly influences the thermal physiological role of bills and may play an underappreciated role in avian energetics. PMID:23884093

  3. Watching sexy displays improves hatching success and offspring growth through maternal allocation.

    PubMed

    Loyau, Adeline; Lacroix, Frédéric

    2010-11-22

    Male attractiveness can have tremendous effects on the fitness of his offspring via good genes, but also via enhanced maternal allocation of resources. Yet the proximate mechanisms influencing differential maternal allocation in relation to male sexiness are poorly known. Here, we studied the importance of visual stimulation for maternal allocation in the Houbara bustard, a vulnerable bird species bred in captivity to support wild populations. Artificial insemination allowed controlling for potential confounding factors, such as a male's territory quality, social interactions or sperm quality/quantity, probably linked to mate attractiveness. We show that artificially inseminated females stimulated by highly displaying males increased their hatching success, owing to increased fertilization success. The females also increased the allocation of maternal androgens in their eggs, leading to an increase of circulating testosterone and growth rate in chicks. Hence, visual stimulation of the females can promote differential maternal allocation and favour offspring fitness. Our results further suggest that using artificial insemination for species conservation without appropriate stimulation of the breeding females probably has negative impacts on their breeding performance and therefore on population viability. PMID:20538650

  4. Femtosecond scalpel-optical tweezers: efficient tool for assisted hatching and trophectoderm biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnikov, D. S.; Ilina, I. V.; Khramova, Yu V.; Filatov, M. A.; Semenova, M. L.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses have enabled highly precise and delicate processing of biological specimens. We present the results of using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses for dissection of zona pellucida (ZP) in mouse embryos during assisted hatching procedure and for trophectoderm biopsy as well. We studied the effects of application of fs laser radiation in the infrared (1028 nm) and visible (514 nm) wavelength ranges. Laser irradiation parameters were optimized so as not to compromise the viability of the treated embryos. Embryo biopsy was carried out in late-stage mouse preimplantation embryos. Femtosecond laser pulses were applied to detach the desired amount of trophectoderm cells from the blastocyst, while the optical tweezers trapped the cells and moved them out of the embryo. The parameters of laser radiation were optimized so as to efficiently perform embryo biopsy and preserve the viability of the treated embryos. The thermal effects can be significantly lower when fs lasers are used as compared to CW or long-pulse lasers. It is crucial when dealing with living cells or organisms.

  5. Choline requirements of White Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 days of age.

    PubMed

    Wen, Z G; Tang, J; Hou, S S; Guo, Y M; Huang, W; Xie, M

    2014-12-01

    A dose-response experiment with 8 dietary choline levels (302, 496, 778, 990, 1,182, 1,414, 1,625, and 1,832 mg/kg) was conducted with male White Pekin ducks to estimate the choline requirement from hatch to 21 d of age. Three hundred eighty-four 1-d-old male White Pekin ducks were randomly assigned to 8 dietary treatments, each containing 6 replicate pens with 8 birds per pen. At 21 d of age, weight gain, feed intake, and feed/gain from each pen were calculated for feeding period, and 2 ducks selected randomly from each pen were euthanized and the liver was collected to determine total lipids, triglycerides, and phospholipids. In our study, perosis, poor growth, and high liver fat were all observed in choline-deficient ducks and incidence of perosis was zero when dietary choline was 1,182 mg/kg. As dietary choline increased, the weight gain and feed intake increased linearly or quadratically (P < 0.05). On the other hand, as dietary choline increased, the total lipid and triglyceride in liver decreased linearly and liver phospholipid increased linearly (P < 0.05), and the lipotropic activity of choline may be associated with increasing phospholipid at a high dietary choline level. According to broken-line regression, the choline requirements for weight gain and feed intake were 810 and 823 mg/kg, respectively, but higher requirement should be considered to prevent perosis and excess liver lipid deposition completely.

  6. Post-hatching dynamics of plasma biochemistry in free-living European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Juráni, Marián; Výboh, Pavel; Zeman, Michal; Lamosová, Dalma; Kost'ál, L'ubor; Blazícek, Pavol

    2004-05-01

    This is the first study of plasma biochemical parameters in free-living altricial birds during an entire developmental period in a nest, represented by European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Dynamics of postnatal changes from hatching until close to fledging (days 1 to 15) were registered. Parameters of protein metabolism represented by total proteins, albumin and globulin concentrations increased continuously during the observed developmental period. There were two peaks in uric acid concentration on days 5 and 11. To the contrary, the creatinine content did not change throughout the observed period and increased only on day 15. Creatine kinase activity gradually increased until day 11 and then fell before fledging. Parameters of lipid metabolism (concentration of total lipids, triacylglycerols and nonesterified fatty acids) in plasma increased gradually reaching a plateau between days 8 and 11 and then declined on day 15. The cholesterol concentration pattern was similar to maximum value on day 11, then consecutively decreased. Concentration of glucose increased until day 8 and remained unchanged until fledging. Whereas calcium reached the highest concentration during days 8 and 11, phosphorus peaked earlier on day 5. The activity of alkaline phosphatase was similar to the pattern found in calcium concentration. Presented data showed an increase in both protein and lipid metabolism during the phase of rapid growth. A remarkable decrease in parameters of lipid metabolism before fledging may reflect increased physical activity and changes in nutrition. PMID:15165575

  7. Effect of nesting environment on incubation temperature and hatching success of Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) in an urban lake of Southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Luna, Marco A; Hidalgo-Mihart, Mircea G; Aguirre-León, Gustavo; González-Ramón, Mariana Del C; Rangel-Mendoza, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Incubation temperature is an important aspect in terms of biological performance among crocodiles, and several controlled experiments have demonstrated a significant relationship between incubation temperature, success in hatching and survival of hatchlings. However, a few studies have tested these relationships in the wild. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of nest characteristics and environment (hatch year, nest basal area and height, clutch size, distance to shore line, and vegetation cover), to incubation temperature and hatching success among Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii). The study was carried out during the nesting seasons of Morelet's crocodile, from 2007 to 2009 in the Laguna de Las Ilusiones, an urban lake located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico. We physically characterized 18 nests and inserted a temperature data logger in each nest chamber. At the end of the nesting season and prior to hatching, we recovered the crocodile eggs and data loggers and calculated hatching success, under laboratory conditions. We related the environmental variables of the nest with the mean and fluctuation (standard deviation) of nest temperature, using linear models. We also related the environmental variables affecting the nest, to mean nest temperature and fluctuation in incubation temperature and to hatching success, using linear models. Although we found differences in incubation temperature between nests, mean incubation temperature did not differ between years, but there were differences in nest thermal fluctuation between years. The mean incubation temperature for 11 nests (61.1%) was lower than the suggested Female-Male pivotal temperature (producing 50% of each sex) for this species, and all hatchlings obtained were males. There were no differences in clutch size between years, but hatching success varied. Our study indicates that hatching success depends on certain environmental variables and nest conditions to which the

  8. An insight into the heat and mass transfer mechanisms of eggshells hatching broiler chicks and its effects to the hatcher environment.

    PubMed

    Romanini, C E B; Exadaktylos, V; Hong, S W; Tong, Q; McGonnell, I; Demmers, T G M; Bergoug, H; Guinebretière, M; Eterradossi, N; Roulston, N; Verhelst, R; Bahr, C; Berckmans, D

    2015-02-01

    Thermodynamic study of incubated eggs is an important component in the optimisation of incubation processes. However, research on the interaction of heat and moisture transfer mechanisms in eggs is rather limited and does not focus on the hatching stage of incubation. During hatch, both the recently hatched chick and the broken eggshell add extra heat and moisture contents to the hatcher environment. In this study, we have proposed a novel way to estimate thermodynamically the amount of water evaporated from a broken eggshell during hatch. The hypothesis of this study considers that previously reported drops in eggshell temperature during hatching of chicks is the result remaining water content evaporating from the eggshell, released on the inner membrane by the recently hatched wet chick, just before hatch. To reproduce this process, water was sprayed on eggshells to mimic the water-fluid from the wet body of a chick. For each sample of eggshell, the shell geometry and weight, surface area and eggshell temperature were measured. Water evaporation losses and convection coefficient were calculated using a novel model approach considering the simultaneous heat and mass transfer profiles in an eggshell. The calculated average convective coefficient was 23.9 ± 7.5 W/m(2) °C, similar to previously reported coefficients in literature as a function of 0.5-1m/s air speed range. Comparison between measured and calculated values for the water evaporation showed 68% probability accuracy, associated to the use of an experimentally derived single heat transfer coefficient. The results support our proposed modelling approach of heat and mass transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, by estimating the amount of evaporated water in an eggshell post-hatch, air humidity levels inside the hatcher can be optimised to ensure wet chicks dry properly while not dehydrating early hatching chicks.

  9. Effect of nesting environment on incubation temperature and hatching success of Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) in an urban lake of Southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Luna, Marco A; Hidalgo-Mihart, Mircea G; Aguirre-León, Gustavo; González-Ramón, Mariana Del C; Rangel-Mendoza, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Incubation temperature is an important aspect in terms of biological performance among crocodiles, and several controlled experiments have demonstrated a significant relationship between incubation temperature, success in hatching and survival of hatchlings. However, a few studies have tested these relationships in the wild. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of nest characteristics and environment (hatch year, nest basal area and height, clutch size, distance to shore line, and vegetation cover), to incubation temperature and hatching success among Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii). The study was carried out during the nesting seasons of Morelet's crocodile, from 2007 to 2009 in the Laguna de Las Ilusiones, an urban lake located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico. We physically characterized 18 nests and inserted a temperature data logger in each nest chamber. At the end of the nesting season and prior to hatching, we recovered the crocodile eggs and data loggers and calculated hatching success, under laboratory conditions. We related the environmental variables of the nest with the mean and fluctuation (standard deviation) of nest temperature, using linear models. We also related the environmental variables affecting the nest, to mean nest temperature and fluctuation in incubation temperature and to hatching success, using linear models. Although we found differences in incubation temperature between nests, mean incubation temperature did not differ between years, but there were differences in nest thermal fluctuation between years. The mean incubation temperature for 11 nests (61.1%) was lower than the suggested Female-Male pivotal temperature (producing 50% of each sex) for this species, and all hatchlings obtained were males. There were no differences in clutch size between years, but hatching success varied. Our study indicates that hatching success depends on certain environmental variables and nest conditions to which the

  10. Effect of temperature and salinity on egg hatching and description of the life cycle of Lernanthropus latis (Copepoda: Lernanthropidae) infecting barramundi, Lates calcarifer.

    PubMed

    Brazenor, Alexander K; Hutson, Kate S

    2013-10-01

    The parasite Lernanthropus latis (Copepoda: Lernanthropidae) is a major threat to the sustained mariculture of barramundi, Lates calcarifer (Perciformes: Latidae). We investigated the effect of water temperature and salinity on egg hatching success of L. latis and describe the life cycle for the first time. Wild and sea-caged L. calcarifer examined in tropical north Australia exhibited similar parasite prevalence (range: 80-100%) and mean parasite intensity (range: 3-6), whereas land-based maricultured fish were not infected. Hatching success and time to first and last hatch was determined for a range of water temperature (22, 30, 32 and 34°C) and salinity (0, 11, 22, 35 and 40‰) combinations representing current and predicted climate conditions. There was a significant interaction between water temperature and salinity on the hatching success of L. latis nauplii. Eggs hatched in all temperature treatments, with the greatest hatching success at 30°C and 32°C (98 and 92% success, respectively) in 35‰. Hatching did not occur at 0‰ and was severely reduced at 11‰ (1.6% success). Hatching began within 6h at all water temperatures with >95% of eggs hatched within 30h at 30, 32 and 34°C and within 60h at 22°C. Adult parasites differed from the original description by the presence of the parabasal flagellum, small setae on the legs and caudal rami and minor incongruences regarding morphological measurements. The life cycle of L. latis includes three free living stages and five parasitic stages. Although L. latis exhibits broad environmental tolerance, freshwater can be used as an effective management strategy to break the life cycle in aquaculture. PMID:23707229

  11. Freshwater influences on embryos, hatching and larval survival of euryhaline Gulf killifish Fundulus grandis and potential constraints on habitat distribution.

    PubMed

    Ramee, S W; Allen, P J

    2016-08-01

    The influence of fresh water on potential habitat occupancy of early life-history stages of euryhaline Gulf killifish Fundulus grandis was determined by evaluating fertilization of freshwater-spawned eggs and subsequent survival of embryos and larvae in comparison with saline water (salinity 7). Overall per cent fertilization of eggs was low (mean ± s.e. = 20·21 ± 0·03%). Embryo survival was greater in saline water, but hatching rate (mean ± s.e. = 81·6 ± 0·1%) and post-hatch survival of larvae in fresh water (mean ± s.e. = 74·5 ± 0·1%) was relatively high. Therefore, the relative limitation of fresh water on habitat distribution of F. grandis changes with development, stimulating further questions on factors that may constrain habitat distribution of euryhaline fishes. PMID:27238386

  12. Effects of copper on the egg development and hatching of a freshwater pulmonate snail Lymnaea luteola L.

    PubMed

    Khangarot, B S; Das, Sangita

    2010-07-15

    A freshwater invertebrate egg development and hatching toxicity test with an Indian freshwater pulmonate snail, Lymnaea luteola, comprising the following developmental endpoints was described: mortality, development, formation of eyes and foot structure, heart rate, duration of different larval stages, and hatching time. Developmental stages were morula, and at third, fifth, and eighth days; the trochophore, veliger, and hippo larvae, respectively. At the age of about 9th to 11th days after egg laying; more than 95% young snail hatched in control laboratory conditions. To evaluate effects on embryonic development, the pulmonate snail eggs of 24-h old were exposed to a series of nominal copper concentrations. The percentage survival of embryos treated in 10-32 microg l(-1) of Cu after 240 h of exposure drops sharply at veliger and hippo stages. All embryos died at 100-320 microg l(-1) of Cu within 168 h of exposure at trochophore and early veliger stages. The detected abnormalities were malformation of foot, eyes, thinness and incomplete formation of shell, growth retardation, and slow rotation of embryo within the egg capsule as compared to control embryos. Lethal and sublethal effects in terms of mortality and significant delay in hatching could be found in the 3.2, 5.6 and 10 microg l(-1) of Cu concentrations. This species is widely distributed in the Indian subcontinent freshwater reservoirs and more sensitive to Cu than other tested aquatic test organisms; therefore, could be used as a test model of Cu and possibly other pollutants for rapid risk assessment of environmental pollutants. The snail egg embryo bioassay is simple, rapid, highly sensitive, cost-effective, and easy to test under standardized laboratory conditions.

  13. Effects of CO2-driven ocean acidification on early life stages of marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, J.; Jin, F.; Wang, J.; Zheng, N.; Cong, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The potential effects of elevated CO2 level and reduced carbonate saturation state in marine environment on fishes and other non-calcified organisms are still poorly known. In present study, we investigated the effects of ocean acidification on embryogenesis and organogenesis of newly hatched larvae of marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) after 21 d exposure of eggs to different artificially acidified seawater (pH 7.6 and 7.2, respectively), and compared with those in control group (pH 8.2). Results showed that CO2-driven seawater acidification (pH 7.6 and 7.2) had no detectable effect on hatching time, hatching rate, and heart rate of embryos. However, the deformity rate of larvae in pH 7.2 treatment was significantly higher than that in control treatment. The left and right sagitta areas did not differ significantly from each other in each treatment. However, the mean sagitta area of larvae in pH 7.6 treatment was significantly smaller than that in the control (p = 0.024). These results suggest that although marine medaka might be more tolerant of elevated CO2 than some other fishes, the effect of elevated CO2 level on the calcification of otolith is likely to be the most susceptibly physiological process of pH regulation in early life stage of marine medaka.

  14. A role for amontillado, the Drosophila homolog of the neuropeptide precursor processing protease PC2, in triggering hatching behavior.

    PubMed

    Siekhaus, D E; Fuller, R S

    1999-08-15

    Accurate proteolytic processing of neuropeptide and peptide hormone precursors by members of the kexin/furin family of proteases is key to determining both the identities and activities of signaling peptides. Here we identify amontillado (amon), the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of the mammalian neuropeptide processing protease PC2, and show that in contrast to vertebrate PC2, amontillado expression undergoes extensive regulation in the nervous system during development. In situ hybridization reveals that expression of amontillado is restricted to the final stages of embryogenesis when it is found in anterior sensory structures and in only 168 cells in the brain and ventral nerve cord. After larvae hatch from their egg shells, the sensory structures and most cells in the CNS turn off or substantially reduce amontillado expression, suggesting that amontillado plays a specific role late in embryogenesis. Larvae lacking the chromosomal region containing amontillado show no gross anatomical defects and respond to touch. However, such larvae show a greatly reduced frequency of a hatching behavior of wild-type Drosophila in which larvae swing their heads, scraping through the eggshell with their mouth hooks. Ubiquitous expression of amontillado can restore near wild-type levels of this behavior, whereas expression of amontillado with an alanine substitution for the catalytic histidine cannot. These results suggest that amontillado expression is regulated as part of a programmed modulation of neural signaling that controls hatching behavior by producing specific neuropeptides in particular neurons at an appropriate developmental time. PMID:10436051

  15. Hatching, growth, ion accumulation, and skeletal ossification of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) alevins in acidic soft waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steingraeber, M.T.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    Brook trout eyed eggs and subsequent alevins were exposed to pH 5.0, 6.5, and 7.0 in soft reconstituted water and to pH 8.2 in hard well water for up to 72 d. Hatching was delayed and hatching success reduced (p K+ > Cl- during yolk absorption and early exogenous feeding. Whole-body monovalent ion concentrations were reduced for short periods during yolk absorption in alevins exposed to pH 6.5 and throughout most of the experiment for those exposed to pH 5.0. Whole-body Mg2+ concentrations were not affected by treatment pH and remained near their median hatch level throughout the exposure. The whole-body concentration of Ca2+ was reduced in fish exposed to pH 5.0, particularly near the end of the experiment. Calcium accumulation in fish was influenced by the interaction of pH and time at pH 5.0 but not at the other pH levels. Alevins exposed to pH 5.0 experienced delayed ossification of skeletal structures associated with feeding, respiration, and locomotion that usually persisted for up to 10 d. The detection of skeletal abnormalities early in life might aid in identifying fish populations at risk in acidified waters.

  16. Lipid-rich bovine serum albumin improves the viability and hatching ability of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Chie; SAKAGUCHI, Yosuke; HOSHI, Hiroyoshi; YOSHIOKA, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lipid-rich bovine serum albumin (LR-BSA) on the development of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro were examined. Addition of 0.5 to 5 mg/ml LR-BSA to porcine blastocyst medium (PBM) from Day 5 (Day 0 = in vitro fertilization) significantly increased the hatching rates of blastocysts on Day 7 and the total cell numbers in Day-7 blastocysts. When Day-5 blastocysts were cultured with PBM alone, PBM containing LR-BSA, recombinant human serum albumin or fatty acid-free BSA, addition of LR-BSA significantly enhanced hatching rates and the cell number in blastocysts that survived compared with other treatments. The diameter, ATP content and numbers of both inner cell mass and total cells in Day-6 and Day-7 blastocysts cultured with PBM containing LR-BSA were significantly higher than in blastocysts cultured with PBM alone, whereas LR-BSA had no effect on mitochondrial membrane potential. The mRNA levels of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism and β-oxidation (ACSL1, ACSL3, CPT1, CPT2 and KAT) in Day-7 blastocysts were significantly upregulated by the addition of LR-BSA. The results indicated that LR-BSA enhanced hatching ability and quality of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro, as determined by ATP content, blastocyst diameter and expression levels of the specific genes, suggesting that the stimulatory effects of LR-BSA arise from lipids bound to albumin. PMID:26582048

  17. Hatching, dispersal, and bathymetric distribution of age-0 wild lake trout at the Gull Island Shoal complex, Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bronte, Charles R.; Selgeby, James H.; Saylor, James H.; Miller, Gerald S.; Foster, Neal R.

    1995-01-01

    We studied age-0 lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) associated with spawning and nursery areas of the Gull Island Shoal complex in western Lake Superior. Post-emergent age-0 lake trout were captured on rocky spawning substrate with a 3-m beam trawl and at the nursery area with a bottom trawl from June to September 1990 and June to August 1991. Catch data suggested that age-0 lake trout move distances of 7–11 km to the nursery area over a 3-month period. Water currents, measured at Gull Island Shoal, may be a part of the transport mechanism. Examination of daily-growth increments on the sagittae and back-calculation from the date of capture revealed that most fish hatched between 6 June and 19 July in 1990 and between 30 April and 30 May in 1991. The duration of the hatch was 100 days in 1990 and 120 days in 1991, and the estimated incubation period is about 7 months for lake trout eggs at this site. Similar hatch-date distributions of age-0 captured on different sampling dates suggested that natural mortality was low.

  18. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, K.M.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26{degree}C and downshifted 30-26-30{degree}C) and females (constant 30{degree}C and upshifted 26-30-26{degree}C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26{degree}C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30{degree}C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26{degree}C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30{degree}C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25{degree}C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30{degree}C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  19. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, K.M.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26[degree]C and downshifted 30-26-30[degree]C) and females (constant 30[degree]C and upshifted 26-30-26[degree]C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26[degree]C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30[degree]C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26[degree]C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30[degree]C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25[degree]C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30[degree]C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  20. Effects of incubational humidity and hen age on embryo composition in broiler hatching eggs from young breeders.

    PubMed

    Peebles, E D; Burnham, M R; Gardner, C W; Brake, J; Bruzual, J J; Gerard, P D

    2001-09-01

    There is a paucity of information regarding the influence of incubational humidity on the characteristics of broiler embryos from young hens that often produce chicks of marginal quality. Therefore, the effects of broiler breeder age (26, 28, and 30 wk) in young broiler breeders and incubator humidity (43, 53, and 63% RH) on embryonic growth between 16 and 21 d of incubation, hatching chick weight, and embryo and chick body compositions were evaluated. Hatching broiler chick BW at 21 d was lower for 26-wk-old breeders compared to those at 28 and 30 wk, and the lowest RH decreased relative wet embryo weight. Embryonic growth, on wet and DM bases, was increased in eggs from the youngest hens. Embryo moisture content (EM) was lower at 16, 17, and 19 d of incubation in eggs from breeders at 26 wk when compared to those at 28 wk of age. The effects of RH on embryo crude protein and fat composition were not consistent and varied with breeder age and length of incubation. It was demonstrated that broiler breeder age affects embryogenesis and hatching chick BW. Furthermore, EM was influenced by breeder age, and changes in incubational RH between 43 and 63% affected embryogenesis without having associated effects on EM or consistent effects on embryo crude fat and protein content. Nevertheless, a depression in embryogenesis with a reduction in incubational RH to 43% may accentuate poor posthatch performance of chicks from young breeders.

  1. Effects of thymol and isoeugenol feed supplementation on quail adult performance, egg characteristics and hatching success.

    PubMed

    Luna, A; Dambolena, J S; Zygadlo, J A; Marin, R H; Labaque, M C

    2012-01-01

    1. A study was conducted to evaluate whether feed supplementation with thymol or isoeugenol can alter Japanese quail growth rate and final body weight, the female onset of puberty, hen-day egg production and the physical and chemical characteristics of the egg, as well as its potential to alter hatchability. 2. From 4 to 16 weeks of age, birds from each cage (1 male: 3 females) were assigned to 1 of 3 treatments that differed in the supplement added to the feed: control, thymol or isoeugenol (400 mg/kg). The average ages (d) at first egg lay (FIRST), at 25% egg production (A25% EP), at 50% egg production (A50% EP) and weekly and cumulative hen-day egg production (HDEP) were calculated. In addition, physical and chemical characteristics of the eggs, their fertility and hatchability were also evaluated for each group. 3. Feed supplementation did not significantly affect growth rate, final body weight, egg production parameters, fertility and physical characteristics of egg or most of the fatty acid components of the yolk. 4. The group treated with isoeugenol showed an increase in the percentage of palmitoleic fatty acid compared to the control, with thymol group showing intermediates values. 5. Both thymol and isoeugenol supplemented groups showed increased hatchabilities, by 18.8% and 11.8%, respectively, compared to their control counterparts. 6. The improvement in the hatching success of the eggs from the thymol and isoeugenol supplemented groups without a negative impact on their performance may have important economic implications for future breeding programmes, particularly if these effects generalise from quail to other more commercially important poultry species, such as chickens or turkeys. PMID:23281757

  2. Effects of thymol and isoeugenol feed supplementation on quail adult performance, egg characteristics and hatching success.

    PubMed

    Luna, A; Dambolena, J S; Zygadlo, J A; Marin, R H; Labaque, M C

    2012-01-01

    1. A study was conducted to evaluate whether feed supplementation with thymol or isoeugenol can alter Japanese quail growth rate and final body weight, the female onset of puberty, hen-day egg production and the physical and chemical characteristics of the egg, as well as its potential to alter hatchability. 2. From 4 to 16 weeks of age, birds from each cage (1 male: 3 females) were assigned to 1 of 3 treatments that differed in the supplement added to the feed: control, thymol or isoeugenol (400 mg/kg). The average ages (d) at first egg lay (FIRST), at 25% egg production (A25% EP), at 50% egg production (A50% EP) and weekly and cumulative hen-day egg production (HDEP) were calculated. In addition, physical and chemical characteristics of the eggs, their fertility and hatchability were also evaluated for each group. 3. Feed supplementation did not significantly affect growth rate, final body weight, egg production parameters, fertility and physical characteristics of egg or most of the fatty acid components of the yolk. 4. The group treated with isoeugenol showed an increase in the percentage of palmitoleic fatty acid compared to the control, with thymol group showing intermediates values. 5. Both thymol and isoeugenol supplemented groups showed increased hatchabilities, by 18.8% and 11.8%, respectively, compared to their control counterparts. 6. The improvement in the hatching success of the eggs from the thymol and isoeugenol supplemented groups without a negative impact on their performance may have important economic implications for future breeding programmes, particularly if these effects generalise from quail to other more commercially important poultry species, such as chickens or turkeys.

  3. Post-hatching development of bovine embryos in vitro: the effects of tunnel preparation and gender.

    PubMed

    Machado, Grazieli Marinheiro; Caixeta, Ester Siqueira; Lucci, Carolina Madeira; Rumpf, Rodolfo; Franco, Maurício Machaim; Dode, Margot Alves Nunes

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare morphological characteristics, kinetics of development, and gene expression of male and female IVP embryos that were cultured until day (D)15 (fertilization = D0), using either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or Milli-Q water (MQW) to dilute the agarose gel used for tunnel construction. On D11, embryos (n = 286) were placed in agarose gel tunnels diluted in PBS and MQW. Embryos were evaluated for morphology, and embryo size was recorded on D11, D12.5, D14 and D15. Then, embryos were sexed and used for gene expression analyses (G6PD, GLUT1, GLUT3, PGK1, PLAC8, KRT8, HSF1 and IFNT). The percentage of elongated embryos at D15 was higher (p < 0.05) in the PBS (54%) than in the MQW (42%) gel. However, embryos produced in MQW were bigger (p < 0.05) and had a lower expression of GLUT1 (p = 0.08) than those cultured in PBS. There was a higher proportion of male than female embryos at D15 in both treatments, MQW (65% vs. 35%; p < 0.05) and PBS (67% vs. 33%; p < 0.05); however, embryo size was not significantly different between genders. Moreover, D15 female embryos had greater expression of G6PD (p = 0.05) and KRT8 (p = 0.03) than male embryos. In conclusion, the diluent used for tunnel construction affected embryo development in the post-hatching development (PHD) system, and the use of MQW was the most indicative measure for the evaluation of embryo quality. Male and female embryos cultured from D11 to D15, either in an MQW or PBS agarose gel, demonstrated similar development but different gene expression.

  4. A Successful 2 Year Astronomy Program for the Hatch, New Mexico School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K.; Burns, J.

    1994-12-01

    We report on a recently completed two year outreach program to the Hatch, New Mexico middle and elementary school science teachers. Our project was funded in part by a NASA supplemental grant for researchers (CORRECT TITLE?). In August 1992, we organized an intensive 2 day educational workshop with 10 science teachers. During this workshop we mixed hands-on experimentation and demonstrations with lecture sessions on basic astronomical concepts. We provided the teachers with over \\$1000 dollars of educational equipment, including a small telescope. Throughout the following school year, we scheduled night time observing sessions, special lectures and field trips for the teachers' students. The second year we selected 6 of the most motivated teachers and had them participate in a 4 day ``live-in'' astronomical research session at the Apache Point Observatory, near Sunspot, New Mexico. During this session the teachers reduced real astronomical data, ``discovered'' stellar evolution, had tours of both APO and the National Solar Observatory and several lecture sessions on the evolution of stars. The main project of the workshop was construction of H-R diagrams for an open cluster and a globular cluster. The teachers measured magnitudes, calculated colors, constructed the H-R diagrams and compared their diagrams to theoretical cluster diagrams. They were quite surprised to find the significant difference between the two clusters, and happily discovered that the differences could be explained by a difference in age. We then had the teachers develop and write lesson plans appropriate for the grade level they teach. The lesson plans were to deal with the material they had learned during the 4 day workshop and focus on explanation of stellar evolution. We have made these lesson plans available to all science teachers in the southern New Mexico region by depositing them in the NASA Space Grant Consortium's teachers resource center.

  5. Astroviruses associated with stunting and pre-hatching mortality in duck and goose embryos.

    PubMed

    Biđin, M; Lojkić, I; Tišljar, M; Biđin, Z; Majnarić, D

    2012-01-01

    The first detection of avian nephritis virus (ANV) in goose embryos and of turkey astrovirus-1 (TAstV-1) in duck embryos is described. Intestinal samples from duck and goose embryos from five duck and four goose flocks in Croatia were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of ANV, TAstV-1, turkey astrovirus-2, chicken astrovirus, duck astrovirus and also for the presence of avian reovirus, Derzsy's disease virus and duck enteritis virus. The kidneys from duck and goose embryos were also tested for ANV, while liver samples were tested for duck astrovirus. Duck embryos were also tested to detect duck circovirus and goose embryos for the presence of goose circovirus and goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus. All embryos were in the final stage of incubation and were characterized by moderate to markedly retarded growth. ANV was confirmed in the intestines and kidneys of embryos from two duck and two goose flocks and TAstV-1 was found in embryos from two duck flocks. One duck flock was positive for both ANV and TAstV-1. No other viruses were found in tested flocks. Phylogenetic analysis based on the ANV polymerase gene fragment of ANV sequences detected in duck and goose embryos revealed greatest similarity (88.1 to 97.2%) with ANV isolates from chickens. Further, the existence of at least two types of ANV circulating in Croatian duck and goose flocks was confirmed. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the portion of TAstV-1 polymerase gene, two detected TAstV-1 nucleotide sequences were 99.5% similar. Compared with six TAstV-1 sequences, Croatian sequences showed one unique nucleotide change. In addition to other possible causes of stunted growth and late embryonic death, these findings suggest that ANV and/or TAstV-1 infection may be a contributing factor in the pre-hatching mortality of ducklings and goslings.

  6. The impact of laser-assisted hatching on the outcome of frozen human embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Kanyo, Katalin; Zeke, Jozsef; Kriston, Rita; Szücs, Zoltan; Cseh, Sandor; Somoskoi, Bence; Konc, Janos

    2016-10-01

    Biochemical modifications of zona pellucida (ZP) result in zona hardening. Zona hardening (ZH) is induced by several factors such as advancing maternal age, in vitro culture conditions and cryopreservation and adversely effects implantation. The objective of the clinical study was to determine whether or not laser-assisted hatching (LAH) applied on day 3 frozen embryos improves the outcome of frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles in patients with recurrent implantation failure and/or advanced female age. In total, 413 patients of different ages with recurrent implantation failure (maximum three cycles) were involved into the study. Patients were allocated randomly into LAH and control groups. On the day of FET, after thawing and just before FET, the ZP was thinned using a laser system. In the control group no treatment was applied on frozen embryo before transfer. The main outcome measures were clinical pregnancy rate. Overall, the results indicate a tendency that LAH increased (P = 0.08) clinical pregnancy. However, for patients older than 37 years, LAH increased pregnancy rates significantly (P = 0.03). In the LAH and control groups, the age of patients and the number of transferred embryos influenced pregnancy rates (P = 0.01). For patients older than 37 years, no effect of number of transferred embryos was detected (P = 0.14). The incidence of multiple pregnancies also increased in the LAH group (P = 0.01). In conclusion, in older woman, to overcome the negative effect of zona hardening, LAH could be performed on frozen embryos as a routine strategy before FET in frozen cycles in order to increase the possibility of pregnancy formation.

  7. The effects of temperature change on the hatching success and larval survival of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu.

    PubMed

    Landsman, S J; Gingerich, A J; Philipp, D P; Suski, C D

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the effects of abrupt temperature change on the hatching success and larval survival of eggs, yolk-sac larvae (YSL) and larvae above nest (LAN), for both largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu were quantified. Temperature had a significant effect on hatching success and time to 50% mortality, with large heat shocks causing accelerated mortality. The temperature changes shown to influence survival of all life stages, however, were beyond what is typically experienced in the wild. Micropterus salmoides had greater egg hatching success rates and increased survival rates at YSL and LAN stages, relative to M. dolomieu. Additionally, egg hatching success and survival of LAN varied across nests within the study. These findings suggest that temperature alone may not account for variations in year-class strength and may emphasize the need for protection of the nest-guarding male Micropterus spp. to ensure recruitment.

  8. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communications & IT Access to information and communication technology (ICT) is addressed by Board standards and guidelines issued ... Engineer (November 3) Access Board Approves Rules on ICT Refresh and Medical Diagnostic Equipment (September 14) Access ...

  9. Hatching Babies and Stork Deliveries: Risk and Regulation in the Construction of Children's Sexual Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Cristyn; Robinson, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    Children's access to sexual knowledge has always been considered "risky" and controversial due to the fraught relationship between childhood and sexuality. Based on focus groups with children and their parents, the authors explore the relationship between risk and regulation associated with providing children with accurate knowledge about…

  10. Evaluation of minimally invasive indices for predicting ascites susceptibility in three successive hatches of broilers exposed to cool temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Wing, T; Kirby, Y K; Forman, M F; Marson, N; Tackett, C D; Ruiz-Feria, C A

    1998-10-01

    Broilers from three consecutive hatches were exposed to cool temperatures to amplify the incidence of pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites). The largest apparently healthy individuals on Day 42 were evaluated using minimally invasive diagnostic indices [percentage saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen, hematocrit (HCT), heart rate, electrocardiogram (ECG) Lead II, body weight), then they were subjected to the ongoing pressures of fast growth and cool temperatures to determine which of these indices are predictive of the subsequent onset of PHS. Approximately 20% of the males and females evaluated on Day 42 subsequently developed PHS by Day 51. When data for all hatches were pooled and broilers that subsequently developed ascites were compared with those that did not (nonascitic), body weights, heart rates, and percentage saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen were lower on Day 42 for ascitic than for nonascitic males, and HCT was higher in ascitic males and females than in nonascitic males and females, respectively. Comparisons of the ECG Lead II wave amplitudes for all hatches pooled indicated that RS-wave amplitude was larger in ascitic than in nonascitic males, and that S-wave amplitude was more negative in ascitic males and females than in nonascitic males and females. Necropsies conducted on Day 51 revealed higher right:total ventricular weight ratios in ascitic than in nonascitic broilers, whereas normalizing the left ventricle plus septum weight for differences in body weight generated similar values for ascitic and nonascitic males and females, respectively. These results support a primary role for pulmonary hypertension but not cardiomyopathy in the pathogenesis of ascites triggered by cool temperatures. Values obtained for minimally invasive diagnostic indices on Day 42 also establish predictive thresholds that can be used to evaluate the PHS susceptibility of large and apparently healthy male and female broilers.

  11. Latex constituents from Calotropis procera (R. Br.) display toxicity upon egg hatching and larvae of Aedes aegypti (Linn.).

    PubMed

    Ramos, Márcio Viana; Bandeira, Glaís de Paiva; de Freitas, Cléverson Diniz Teixeira; Nogueira, Nádia Accioly Pinto; Alencar, Nylane Maria Nunes; de Sousa, Petrônio Augusto Simão; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2006-08-01

    Calotropis procera R. Br. (Asclepiadaceae) is a well-known medicinal plant with leaves, roots, and bark being exploited by popular medicine to fight many human and animal diseases. This work deals with the fractionation of the crude latex produced by the green parts of the plant and aims to evaluate its toxic effects upon egg hatching and larval development of Aedes aegypti. The whole latex was shown to cause 100% mortality of 3rd instars within 5 min. It was fractionated into water-soluble dialyzable (DF) and non-dialyzable (NDF) rubber-free materials. Both fractions were partially effective to prevent egg hatching and most of individuals growing under experimental conditions died before reaching 2nd instars or stayed in 1st instars. Besides, the fractions were very toxic to 3rd instars causing 100% mortality within 24 h. When both fractions were submitted to heat-treatment the toxic effects were diminished considerably suggesting low thermostability of the toxic compounds. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both fractions and their newly fractionated peaks obtained through ion exchange chromatography or desalting attested the presence of proteins in both materials. When submitted to protease digestion prior to larvicidal assays NDF lost most of its toxicity but DF was still strongly active. It may be possible that the highly toxic effects of the whole latex from C. procera upon egg hatching and larvae development should be at least in part due to its protein content found in NDE However the toxicity seems also to involve non protein molecules present in DF. PMID:17072453

  12. Presence of antimicrobial resistance in coliform bacteria from hatching broiler eggs with emphasis on ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mezhoud, H; Chantziaras, I; Iguer-Ouada, M; Moula, N; Garmyn, A; Martel, A; Touati, A; Smet, A; Haesebrouck, F; Boyen, F

    2016-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is recognized as one of the most important global health challenges. Broilers are an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistant bacteria in general and, more particularly, extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Since contamination of 1-day-old chicks is a potential risk factor for the introduction of antimicrobial resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the broiler production chain, the presence of antimicrobial resistant coliform bacteria in broiler hatching eggs was explored in the present study. Samples from 186 hatching eggs, collected from 11 broiler breeder farms, were inoculated on MacConkey agar with or without ceftiofur and investigated for the presence of antimicrobial resistant lactose-positive Enterobacteriaceae, particularly, ESBL/AmpC-producers. Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae were obtained from the eggshells in 10 out of 11 (10/11) sampled farms. The majority of the isolates were recovered from crushed eggshells after external decontamination suggesting that these bacteria are concealed from the disinfectants in the egg shell pores. Antimicrobial resistance testing revealed that approximately 30% of the isolates showed resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulphonamides, while the majority of isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, nitrofurantoin, aminoglycosides, florfenicol, neomycin and apramycin. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins was detected in eight Enterobacteriaceae isolates from five different broiler breeder farms. The ESBL phenotype was confirmed by the double disk synergy test and blaSHV-12, blaTEM-52 and blaACT-39 resistance genes were detected by PCR. This report is the first to present broiler hatching eggs as carriers and a potential source of ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae for broiler chicks.

  13. The effect of artificial shrinkage and assisted hatching on the development of mouse blastocysts and cell number after vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Ki Hwan; Park, Sung Baek; Choi, Young Bae

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to ascertain optimal assisted hatching (AH) method in frozen embryo transfer. We compared the effect of depending on whether mechanical or laser-AH was performed before or after the vitrification of embryo development rate and blastocyst cell numbers. Methods In order to induce superovulation, pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin followed by human chorionic gonadotropin were injected into 4- to 5-week-old female mice. 2-cell embryos were then collected by flushing out the oviducts. The Expanded blastocysts were recovered after the collected embryos were incubated for 48 hours, and were then subjected to artificial shrinkage (AS) and cross-mechanical AH (cMAH) or quarter-laser zona thinning-AH (qLZT-AH) were carried out using the expanded blastocysts before or after vitrification. After 48 hours of incubation, followed by vitrification and thawing (V-T), and blastocysts were fluorescence stained and observed. Results The rate of formation of hatched blastocysts after 24 and 72 hours of incubation was significantly higher in the AS/qLZT-AH/V-T group than in the other groups (p<0.05). The cell number of the inner cell mass was higher in AS/V-T/non-AH and AS/V-T/cMAH groups than those of others (p<0.05). In the control group, the number of trophectoderm and the total cell number were higher than in the AS-AH group (p<0.05). Conclusion The above results suggest that AS and AH in vitrification of expanded blastocysts lead to the more efficient formation of hatched blastocysts in mice. PMID:26473108

  14. [Thr arteries of the male sex organs of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) and their development after hatching].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T; Vollmerhaus, B; Roos, H; Waibl, H; König, H E

    1992-06-01

    A total of 83 male Japanese quails of the following age groups were used for this study: 11, 18, 25, 32, 35, 37, 39, 41, 43 days, and 7, 9, 17 weeks after hatching. Neoprene-Latex, Tensol-Cement, and the china ink were injected via the aortic arch. In most of male Japanese quails, the testes are supplied by the A. testicularis originated from the Aorta descendens through a common trunk with the A. renalis cranialis. But in only 3 quails had this artery originated directly from the Aorta descendens on either side. In 9 quails had the A. testicularis accessoria originating independently from the Aorta descendens and running cranially or caudally in short distance to the normal A. testicularis. The arteries for the Ductus deferens were divided into 3 categories. The Rami ureterodeferentiales craniales were spread out from A. testicularis or Rami epididymales. The Rami ureterodeferentiales medii came from the A. renalis media and the A. renalis caudalis. The Rami ureterodeferentiales caudales originated from the A. caudae lateralis and A. pudenda. The Receptaculum ductus deferentis, the Corpus vasculare paracloacalis and the Phallus nonprotrudens in the Cloaca were supplied from the thick Ramus cloacalis of the A. pudenda. The Ramus bursalis of this artery supplied the Glandula proctodaealis and the Bursa cloacalis, and was also thick. The arteries to the genital organs were observed in the 11 day old male quail. The A. pudenda began developing at about 30 days after hatching when the quail's body matured. While the A. testicularis began developing at about 40 days after hatching when the male Japanese quail was full of the spermatogenic activity. PMID:1497141

  15. Effects of development and delayed feed access on ghrelin expression in neonatal broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, H H; Tao, H; Ou, C B; Wang, Q X; Guo, F; Ma, J Y

    2016-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of development and delayed feed access on ghrelin expression in neonatal chickens. In experiment 1, ghrelin levels in ad libitum-fed chickens were assessed from hatching (0 h) to 120 h. Ghrelin mRNA expression increased after hatching and reached peak levels at 24 h; levels were 1.8-fold higher compared to those at 0 h. Afterward, ghrelin expression decreased consistently throughout the later experimental period, and at 120 h, it was only 16.0% of 0 h levels. The density of ghrelin immunopositive cells in the proventriculus and plasma ghrelin levels decreased slightly from hatching to 48 h and later increased slowly until the end of the experimental period. In a follow-up study, chickens were assigned randomly into 2 groups after hatching, a control group ( C: , fed ad libitum) and a delayed feeding group ( F+SF: , 72-h fast period, subsequently fed ad libitum). Delayed feed access for 72 h up-regulated ghrelin mRNA expression significantly in the proventriculus (P < 0.05) to 2.1-fold higher levels compared to the control, while the density of ghrelin immunopositive cells and the plasma ghrelin level decreased (P < 0.05) to 28.4% and 64.8% of the control, respectively. After the onset of feeding, the ghrelin mRNA expression in the delayed feeding group was decreased but still higher than that of the control (P < 0.05). The density of ghrelin immunopositive cells and the plasma ghrelin level climbed quickly and all returned to the control level with a supply of food for 48 h. These results suggest that the onset of feeding in neonatal chickens stimulated an increase in ghrelin peptide levels and that ghrelin peptide levels increased with age. Neonatal chickens respond to food deprivation in a different way than do young and adult chickens. PMID:27194732

  16. Effect of post-hatch transportation duration and parental age on broiler chicken quality, welfare, and productivity

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Leonie; Delezie, Evelyne; Duchateau, Luc; Goethals, Klara; Ampe, Bart; Lambrecht, Evelien; Gellynck, Xavier; Tuyttens, Frank A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Broiler chicks are transported to production sites within one to 2 d post-hatch. Possible effects of this transportation are poorly understood and could vary among chicks from breeder flocks of different ages. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of transportation duration and parental flock age on chick welfare, productivity, and quality. After hatch in a commercial hatchery, 1,620 mixed-sex chicks from 29-wk old (young) and 1,620 chicks from 60-wk old (old) breeders were subjected to transportation of 1.5 h or 11 h duration. After transportation, 2,800 chicks were divided among 100 pens, with each pen containing 28 chicks from one transportation crate (2 or 3 pens per crate). From the remaining chicks, on average 6 chicks (min 4, max 8) per crate (n = 228) were randomly selected and assessed for chick quality, weighed, and culled for yolk sac weighing (one d). Chicks that had not been assigned to pens or were not used for post-transportation measurements, were removed from the experiment (n = 212). Mortality, ADG, BW, and feed conversion (FC) of the experimental chicks were recorded until 41 d. Meat quality was measured for breast fillets (n = 47). No interaction effect of parental age and transportation duration was found for any variables. BW and yolk sac weight at one d were lower for chicks transported 11 h than 1.5 h and for chicks from young versus old breeders. The effect of parental flock age on BW persisted until slaughter. Additionally, parental age positively affected ADG until slaughter. Chick quality was lower in chicks from old versus young breeders. Chick quality and productivity were not affected by transportation duration. Mortality and meat quality were not affected by either parental age or transportation duration. To conclude, no long-term detrimental effects were found from long post-hatch transportation in chicks from young or old parent flocks. Based on these results, we suggest that 11 h post-hatch

  17. Effect of post-hatch transportation duration and parental age on broiler chicken quality, welfare, and productivity.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Leonie; Delezie, Evelyne; Duchateau, Luc; Goethals, Klara; Ampe, Bart; Lambrecht, Evelien; Gellynck, Xavier; Tuyttens, Frank A M

    2016-09-01

    Broiler chicks are transported to production sites within one to 2 d post-hatch. Possible effects of this transportation are poorly understood and could vary among chicks from breeder flocks of different ages. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of transportation duration and parental flock age on chick welfare, productivity, and quality. After hatch in a commercial hatchery, 1,620 mixed-sex chicks from 29-wk old (young) and 1,620 chicks from 60-wk old (old) breeders were subjected to transportation of 1.5 h or 11 h duration. After transportation, 2,800 chicks were divided among 100 pens, with each pen containing 28 chicks from one transportation crate (2 or 3 pens per crate). From the remaining chicks, on average 6 chicks (min 4, max 8) per crate (n = 228) were randomly selected and assessed for chick quality, weighed, and culled for yolk sac weighing (one d). Chicks that had not been assigned to pens or were not used for post-transportation measurements, were removed from the experiment (n = 212). Mortality, ADG, BW, and feed conversion ( FC: ) of the experimental chicks were recorded until 41 d. Meat quality was measured for breast fillets (n = 47). No interaction effect of parental age and transportation duration was found for any variables. BW and yolk sac weight at one d were lower for chicks transported 11 h than 1.5 h and for chicks from young versus old breeders. The effect of parental flock age on BW persisted until slaughter. Additionally, parental age positively affected ADG until slaughter. Chick quality was lower in chicks from old versus young breeders. Chick quality and productivity were not affected by transportation duration. Mortality and meat quality were not affected by either parental age or transportation duration. To conclude, no long-term detrimental effects were found from long post-hatch transportation in chicks from young or old parent flocks. Based on these results, we suggest that 11 h post-hatch

  18. [General Brain Structure of Newly Hatched Larva and Neuroblasts in Larval Mushroom Bodies in Pterostichus niger Deg. (Coleoptera: Carabidae)].

    PubMed

    Panov, A A

    2015-01-01

    It is revealed that the larval brain of Pterostichus niger, an active predator with well-developed long-distance sense organs (the set of antennal sensilla and lateral ocelli, or stemmata) at hatching already contains optic lobes, which include two groups of optic neuropils and complex antennal lobes of glomerular neuropil. It is shown that the central complex of the protocerebrum is represented by a bipartite protocerebral bridge and the upper part of the central body and the mushroom bodies include, numerous Kenyon cells, a well-developed calyx, a peduncular apparatus, and numerous neuroblasts. PMID:26638237

  19. Hatching success and pesticide exposures in amphibians living in agricultural habitats of the South Okanagan Valley, British Columbia, Canada (2004-2006).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Christine A; Ashpole, Sara L; Edwards, A Michelle; van Aggelen, Graham; Elliott, John E

    2010-07-01

    In 2004 to 2006, in the Okanagan Valley, British Columbia, Canada, we measured pesticides, water chemistry, and hatching success of Great Basin spadefoot (Spea intermontana), Pacific treefrog (Pseudacris regilla), Western toad (Bufo boreas), and Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris). Predator-proof cages containing Gosner Stage 4 eggs were placed in ponds in nonagricultural reference sites in conventionally sprayed and organic orchards. Seventeen pesticides were detected in ponds in sprayed orchards but occurred at low concentrations (ng/L) except for diazinon (1,410 ng/L). Chloride, sulfate, conductivity, nitrate, and phosphorus showed significant differences among sites. Spadefoot mean hatching success ranged from 0 to 92% among sprayed orchards, whereas the range was 48 to 98.6% among organic orchards and 51 to 95.5% among reference sites. Mean hatching success for Pacific treefrog was 22.1 to 76.1% among sprayed orchards, whereas the range was 83.4 to 97.1% among reference sites. Although sample sizes were small and replication was low, we found that trends in hatching success of eggs of Western toad and Columbia spotted frogs were consistent with the other species. Variables that correlated negatively with amphibian hatching success included 12 pesticides and seven water chemistry parameters. However, stepwise regression found that, in 2005, atrazine accounted for 79% of the variation in spadefoot hatching success and, in 2006, atrazine, total nitrate, and chlorpyrifos accounted for 80%. For Pacific treefrog there were no significant correlations with pesticide concentrations; rather, hatching success correlated with water chemistry parameters. The present study also emphasizes the variability in species sensitivity and importance of incorporating water chemistry into the interpretation of water quality for amphibians.

  20. The driven spinning top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader’s available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few pounds in the one that has been designed, tested and manufactured to a high standard. Either way the unique design of the driven top can provide several hours of interesting experimentation. Our aim here is simply to inform and inspire readers to further investigation and experimentation.

  1. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  2. EARS: Electronic Access to Reference Service.

    PubMed Central

    Weise, F O; Borgendale, M

    1986-01-01

    Electronic Access to Reference Service (EARS) is a front end to the Health Sciences Library's electronic mail system, with links to the online public catalog. EARS, which became operational in September 1984, is accessed by users at remote sites with either a terminal or microcomputer. It is menu-driven, allowing users to request: a computerized literature search, reference information, a photocopy of a journal article, or a book. This paper traces the history of EARS and discusses its use, its impact on library staff and services, and factors that influence the diffusion of new technology. PMID:3779167

  3. Plasma sheath driven targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, J. H.; Freeman, B. L.

    1980-02-01

    Plasma focus driven target implosions are simulated using hydrodynamic-burn codes. Support is given to the idea that the use of a target in a plasma focus should allow 'impedance matching' between the fuel and gun, permitting larger fusion yields from a focus-target geometry than the scaling laws for a conventional plasma focus would predict.

  4. Data Driven Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech & Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Data-driven decision-making (DDDM) is a system of teaching and management practices that gets better information about students into the hands of classroom teachers. This article discusses the five major elements: (1) good baseline data; (2) measurable instructional goals; (3) frequent formative assessment; (4) professional learning communities;…

  5. The Driven Spinning Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader's available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few…

  6. Argument-Driven Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Victor; Grooms, Jonathon; Walker, Joi

    2009-01-01

    Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) is an instructional model that enables science teachers to transform a traditional laboratory activity into a short integrated instructional unit. To illustrate how the ADI instructional model works, this article describes an ADI lesson developed for a 10th-grade chemistry class. This example lesson was designed to…

  7. Data-Driven Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of data-driven decision-making in four school districts: Plainfield Public Schools, Plainfield, New Jersey; Palo Alto Unified School District, Palo Alto, California; Francis Howell School District in eastern Missouri, northwest of St. Louis; and Rio Rancho Public Schools, near Albuquerque, New Mexico. Includes interviews with the…

  8. Second-sound generation in superfluids: Critically driven porous loudspeakers

    SciTech Connect

    Grabinski, M.; Liu, M.

    1985-08-01

    The function of a porous loudspeaker or oscillating superleak transducer driven hard enough to generate critical velocity in its pores, is investigated theoretically. Two distinct regions of critical behavior with a number of experimentally accessible phenomena are predicted and summarized in a graphic exposition. In addition, the recently found discrepancy between theory and experiment is resolved.

  9. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks.

    PubMed

    de Barros Moreira Filho, Alexandre Lemos; de Oliveira, Celso José Bruno; de Oliveira, Heraldo Bezerra; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Guerra, Ricardo Romão; Costa, Fernando Guilherme Perazzo; Givisiez, Patricia Emília Naves

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C), continuous high temperature (38.7°C) and continuous low temperature (36.7°C). After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control). At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry. PMID:26131553

  10. Effect of assisted hatching on pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Da; Yang, Da-Lei; An, Jing; Jiao, Jiao; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Wu, Qi-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that assisted hatching (AH) techniques may improve clinical pregnancy rates, particularly in poor prognosis patients; however, there still remains considerable uncertainty. We conducted a meta-analysis to verify the effect of AH on pregnancy outcomes. We searched for related studies published in PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases from start dates to October 10, 2015. Totally, 36 randomized controlled trials with 6459 participants were included. Summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for whether by AH or not were estimated. We found a significant increase in clinical pregnancy (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.00-1.36, I(2) = 48.3%) and multiple pregnancy rates (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.11-2.01, I(2) = 44.0%) with AH when compared to the control. Numerous subgroup analyses stratified by hatching method, conception mode, extent of AH, embryos transfer status, and previous failure history were also carried out. Interestingly, significant results of clinical pregnancy as well as multiple pregnancy rates were observed among women who received intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and who received AH which the zona were completely removed. In summary, this meta-analysis supports that AH was associated with an increased chance of achieving clinical pregnancy and multiple pregnancy. Whether AH significantly changes live birth and miscarriage rates needs further investigations. PMID:27503701

  11. High atmospheric temperatures and 'ambient incubation' drive embryonic development and lead to earlier hatching in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Simon C; Mainwaring, Mark C; Sorato, Enrico; Beckmann, Christa

    2016-02-01

    Tropical and subtropical species typically experience relatively high atmospheric temperatures during reproduction, and are subject to climate-related challenges that are largely unexplored, relative to more extensive work conducted in temperate regions. We studied the effects of high atmospheric and nest temperatures during reproduction in the zebra finch. We characterized the temperature within nests in a subtropical population of this species in relation to atmospheric temperature. Temperatures within nests frequently exceeded the level at which embryo's develop optimally, even in the absence of parental incubation. We experimentally manipulated internal nest temperature to demonstrate that an average difference of 6°C in the nest temperature during the laying period reduced hatching time by an average of 3% of the total incubation time, owing to 'ambient incubation'. Given the avian constraint of laying a single egg per day, the first eggs of a clutch are subject to prolonged effects of nest temperature relative to later laid eggs, potentially increasing hatching asynchrony. While birds may ameliorate the negative effects of ambient incubation on embryonic development by varying the location and design of their nests, high atmospheric temperatures are likely to constitute an important selective force on avian reproductive behaviour and physiology in subtropical and tropical regions, particularly in the light of predicted climate change that in many areas is leading to a higher frequency of hot days during the periods when birds breed. PMID:26998315

  12. High atmospheric temperatures and 'ambient incubation' drive embryonic development and lead to earlier hatching in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Simon C; Mainwaring, Mark C; Sorato, Enrico; Beckmann, Christa

    2016-02-01

    Tropical and subtropical species typically experience relatively high atmospheric temperatures during reproduction, and are subject to climate-related challenges that are largely unexplored, relative to more extensive work conducted in temperate regions. We studied the effects of high atmospheric and nest temperatures during reproduction in the zebra finch. We characterized the temperature within nests in a subtropical population of this species in relation to atmospheric temperature. Temperatures within nests frequently exceeded the level at which embryo's develop optimally, even in the absence of parental incubation. We experimentally manipulated internal nest temperature to demonstrate that an average difference of 6°C in the nest temperature during the laying period reduced hatching time by an average of 3% of the total incubation time, owing to 'ambient incubation'. Given the avian constraint of laying a single egg per day, the first eggs of a clutch are subject to prolonged effects of nest temperature relative to later laid eggs, potentially increasing hatching asynchrony. While birds may ameliorate the negative effects of ambient incubation on embryonic development by varying the location and design of their nests, high atmospheric temperatures are likely to constitute an important selective force on avian reproductive behaviour and physiology in subtropical and tropical regions, particularly in the light of predicted climate change that in many areas is leading to a higher frequency of hot days during the periods when birds breed.

  13. Laser assisted zona hatching does not improve live birth rate in patients undergoing their first ICSI cycles

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Mohammad Hossein; Halvaei, Iman; Razi, Yasamin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Routine use of assisted hatching (AH) following ICSI is a controversial issue in the literature. There are rare studies regarding the effect of laser assisted hatching (LAH) on live birth rate. Objective: Our main goal was to evaluate the effect of LAH on delivery rate as well as congenital anomaly in patients undergoing their first ICSI cycle. Materials and Methods: A total of 182 patients subjected to ICSI were randomly aliquot into two groups of experiment and control. In experiment group, the embryos were subjected to LAH to open a hole in ZP (about 10-12 µm) while in control group, the transferred embryos were intact with no AH. The patients were followed for clinical pregnancy and delivery rate as well as congenital anomaly. All the patients were infertile due to male factor infertility and LAH and embryo transfer were done on day 2. Results: Laboratory and clinical characteristics of two groups of experiment and control were the same. There were insignificant differences between two groups of experiment and control for clinical pregnancy rate (20% vs. 23.9%, respectively, p=0.3) and live birth rate (11.11% vs. 8.6%, respectively, p=0.6). Also no significant differences were observed between two groups of experiment and control for multiple pregnancy as well as congenital anomaly. Conclusion: Routine use of LAH in first ICSI cycle for male factor patients may have no beneficial effects on clinical pregnancy and live birth rate. PMID:24639729

  14. Accumulation and pharmacokinetics of estrogenic chemicals in the pre- and post-hatch embryos of the frog Rana rugosa.

    PubMed

    Takase, Minoru; Shinto, Hideaki; Takao, Yuji; Iguchi, Taisen

    2012-01-01

    Amphibian eggs spawned in water are exposed immediately to various chemicals present in their water. The present study aimed to investigate the accumulation and pharmacokinetics of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE(2)), bisphenol A (BPA), and nonylphenol (NP), as well as 17β-estradiol (E(2)), in the pre-hatch and post-hatch embryos of the frog Rana rugosa. Fertilized eggs were exposed to chemicals at a final concentration of 500 nM in breeding water for two days, then the embryos with jelly coats were reared in fresh-breeding water without supplementation of the xenoestrogens for six more days. All exogenous chemicals were concentrated in the embryo body at two days after fertilization, whereas their concentrations in the jelly coat were the same as those in the breeding water. The bioconcentration factors for E(2), EE(2), BPA, and NP were 217.9, 170.2, 382.3, and 289.1, respectively, suggesting that the estrogenic chemicals were concentrated in the embryo body through the jelly coat.

  15. Persistent organic pollutant levels in eggs of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) point to a decrease in hatching success.

    PubMed

    De Andrés, Eva; Gómara, Belén; González-Paredes, Daniel; Ruiz-Martín, José; Marco, Adolfo

    2016-03-01

    Sea turtles are susceptible to environmental pollution, since many harmful effects have been reported for different chemicals over the last two decades. In this context, persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are of particular concern due to their endocrine-disrupting nature. The aims of this study were to provide additional baseline data on PCB and PBDE concentrations in eggs of Dermochelys coriacea; and to investigate whether any of the congeners could compromise reproductive success in this species. A total of 18 nests from different females were studied during the nesting season of 2008 at Reserva Pacuare Beach, in the Caribbean side of Costa Rica. Reproductive parameters (viability, fertility and hatching rates) were calculated for all nests and hatchling morphometrics were successfully measured in 8 of them. Two to three fresh eggs per nest were taken for contaminant study. Different congeners of POPs were purified and identified using gas chromatography (GC) coupled to an ion trap detector (GC-ITD MS/MS), as described below. Mean ± SD concentrations were calculated for POP congeners within each nest and clustering was also evaluated. Correlations were performed searching for potential relationships with reproductive parameters. POP levels were similar to those reported in French-Guiana populations and slightly lower than those associated to Florida populations. Sum of PBDEs showed a negative correlation to the hatching success, suggesting potential harmful effects of these contaminants on the reproduction of leatherbacks. PMID:26735737

  16. From facultative to obligatory parental care: Interspecific variation in offspring dependency on post-hatching care in burying beetles

    PubMed Central

    Capodeanu-Nägler, Alexandra; Keppner, Eva M.; Vogel, Heiko; Ayasse, Manfred; Eggert, Anne-Katrin; Sakaluk, Scott K.; Steiger, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the evolution of parental care have focused primarily on the costs and benefits of parental care and the life-history attributes that favour it. However, once care evolves, offspring in some taxa appear to become increasingly dependent on their parents. Although offspring dependency is a central theme in family life, the evolutionary dynamics leading to it are not fully understood. Beetles of the genus Nicrophorus are well known for their elaborate biparental care, including provisioning of their young. By manipulating the occurrence of pre- or post-hatching care, we show that the offspring of three burying beetle species, N. orbicollis, N. pustulatus, and N. vespilloides, show striking variation in their reliance on parental care. Our results demonstrate that this variation within one genus arises through a differential dependency of larvae on parental feeding, but not on pre-hatching care. In N. pustulatus, larvae appear to be nutritionally independent of their parents, but in N. orbicollis, larvae do not survive in the absence of parental feeding. We consider evolutionary scenarios by which nutritional dependency may have evolved, highlighting the role of brood size regulation via infanticide in this genus. PMID:27378180

  17. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Heraldo Bezerra; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Guerra, Ricardo Romão; Costa, Fernando Guilherme Perazzo

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C), continuous high temperature (38.7°C) and continuous low temperature (36.7°C). After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control). At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry. PMID:26131553

  18. Myth busting? Effects of embryo positioning and egg turning on hatching success in the water snake Natrix maura

    PubMed Central

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Kok, Philippe J. R.

    2015-01-01

    It is a common belief that reptile eggs should not be turned after oviposition once the embryo has attached itself to the inner membrane of the shell as it might kill developing embryos. Here, we used 338 eggs from 32 clutches of the water snake Natrix maura to (1) thoroughly describe natural clutch arrangement, (2) experimentally assess the effects of natural embryo positioning and (3) egg turning on embryo metabolism, hatching success, and hatchling phenotype. Clutches contained, on average, 59% of embryos located at the top, 28% at the bottom, and 14% on a side of the egg. Larger females laid larger clutches with higher proportion of top located embryos. Top embryos displayed higher metabolic rates (heart rates), shorter incubation time, and produced lighter and shorter snakes than bottom embryos. Egg turning did not significantly influence egg development, hatching success or hatchling phenotypes. However, post-birth mortality was significantly higher in turned (37.5%) compared to unturned (4.5%) embryos, providing support to the common belief that eggs should not be moved from their natural position. PMID:26294250

  19. River water with high iron concentration and low pH causes mortality of lamprey roe and newly hatched larvae.

    PubMed

    Myllynen, K; Ojutkangas, E; Nikinmaa, M

    1997-02-01

    The effects of prevailing water quality of Perhonjoki River in Western Finland on the hatchability of lamprey roe and survival of newly hatched larvae were investigated. The river flows through sulfide-rich soils, and is characterized by high average total iron (1.5-3 mg liter-1) and aluminum (0.45-0.6 mg liter-1) concentrations and relatively low pH commonly 5.5 to 6.0, with acidification peaks below pH 5. The hatchability of lamprey roe was markedly reduced under these conditions as compared with ground water with low iron (0.002 mg liter-1) and aluminum (0.11 mg liter-1) concentrations but at the same pH. Furthermore, the hatchability of roe and survival of newly hatched larvae was especially affected by an increase in total iron concentration to values that may be observed after heavy rains and during the snow-melt period (4-6 mg liter-1). The results suggest that increases in total iron concentration may play a role in the reproductive failures of lampreys observed in Finnish rivers. PMID:9056399

  20. Persistent organic pollutant levels in eggs of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) point to a decrease in hatching success.

    PubMed

    De Andrés, Eva; Gómara, Belén; González-Paredes, Daniel; Ruiz-Martín, José; Marco, Adolfo

    2016-03-01

    Sea turtles are susceptible to environmental pollution, since many harmful effects have been reported for different chemicals over the last two decades. In this context, persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are of particular concern due to their endocrine-disrupting nature. The aims of this study were to provide additional baseline data on PCB and PBDE concentrations in eggs of Dermochelys coriacea; and to investigate whether any of the congeners could compromise reproductive success in this species. A total of 18 nests from different females were studied during the nesting season of 2008 at Reserva Pacuare Beach, in the Caribbean side of Costa Rica. Reproductive parameters (viability, fertility and hatching rates) were calculated for all nests and hatchling morphometrics were successfully measured in 8 of them. Two to three fresh eggs per nest were taken for contaminant study. Different congeners of POPs were purified and identified using gas chromatography (GC) coupled to an ion trap detector (GC-ITD MS/MS), as described below. Mean ± SD concentrations were calculated for POP congeners within each nest and clustering was also evaluated. Correlations were performed searching for potential relationships with reproductive parameters. POP levels were similar to those reported in French-Guiana populations and slightly lower than those associated to Florida populations. Sum of PBDEs showed a negative correlation to the hatching success, suggesting potential harmful effects of these contaminants on the reproduction of leatherbacks.

  1. High atmospheric temperatures and ‘ambient incubation’ drive embryonic development and lead to earlier hatching in a passerine bird

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Simon C.; Mainwaring, Mark C.; Sorato, Enrico; Beckmann, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Tropical and subtropical species typically experience relatively high atmospheric temperatures during reproduction, and are subject to climate-related challenges that are largely unexplored, relative to more extensive work conducted in temperate regions. We studied the effects of high atmospheric and nest temperatures during reproduction in the zebra finch. We characterized the temperature within nests in a subtropical population of this species in relation to atmospheric temperature. Temperatures within nests frequently exceeded the level at which embryo’s develop optimally, even in the absence of parental incubation. We experimentally manipulated internal nest temperature to demonstrate that an average difference of 6°C in the nest temperature during the laying period reduced hatching time by an average of 3% of the total incubation time, owing to ‘ambient incubation’. Given the avian constraint of laying a single egg per day, the first eggs of a clutch are subject to prolonged effects of nest temperature relative to later laid eggs, potentially increasing hatching asynchrony. While birds may ameliorate the negative effects of ambient incubation on embryonic development by varying the location and design of their nests, high atmospheric temperatures are likely to constitute an important selective force on avian reproductive behaviour and physiology in subtropical and tropical regions, particularly in the light of predicted climate change that in many areas is leading to a higher frequency of hot days during the periods when birds breed. PMID:26998315

  2. Effect of assisted hatching on pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Yang, Da-Lei; An, Jing; Jiao, Jiao; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Wu, Qi-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that assisted hatching (AH) techniques may improve clinical pregnancy rates, particularly in poor prognosis patients; however, there still remains considerable uncertainty. We conducted a meta-analysis to verify the effect of AH on pregnancy outcomes. We searched for related studies published in PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases from start dates to October 10, 2015. Totally, 36 randomized controlled trials with 6459 participants were included. Summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for whether by AH or not were estimated. We found a significant increase in clinical pregnancy (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.00–1.36, I2 = 48.3%) and multiple pregnancy rates (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.11–2.01, I2 = 44.0%) with AH when compared to the control. Numerous subgroup analyses stratified by hatching method, conception mode, extent of AH, embryos transfer status, and previous failure history were also carried out. Interestingly, significant results of clinical pregnancy as well as multiple pregnancy rates were observed among women who received intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and who received AH which the zona were completely removed. In summary, this meta-analysis supports that AH was associated with an increased chance of achieving clinical pregnancy and multiple pregnancy. Whether AH significantly changes live birth and miscarriage rates needs further investigations. PMID:27503701

  3. From facultative to obligatory parental care: Interspecific variation in offspring dependency on post-hatching care in burying beetles.

    PubMed

    Capodeanu-Nägler, Alexandra; Keppner, Eva M; Vogel, Heiko; Ayasse, Manfred; Eggert, Anne-Katrin; Sakaluk, Scott K; Steiger, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the evolution of parental care have focused primarily on the costs and benefits of parental care and the life-history attributes that favour it. However, once care evolves, offspring in some taxa appear to become increasingly dependent on their parents. Although offspring dependency is a central theme in family life, the evolutionary dynamics leading to it are not fully understood. Beetles of the genus Nicrophorus are well known for their elaborate biparental care, including provisioning of their young. By manipulating the occurrence of pre- or post-hatching care, we show that the offspring of three burying beetle species, N. orbicollis, N. pustulatus, and N. vespilloides, show striking variation in their reliance on parental care. Our results demonstrate that this variation within one genus arises through a differential dependency of larvae on parental feeding, but not on pre-hatching care. In N. pustulatus, larvae appear to be nutritionally independent of their parents, but in N. orbicollis, larvae do not survive in the absence of parental feeding. We consider evolutionary scenarios by which nutritional dependency may have evolved, highlighting the role of brood size regulation via infanticide in this genus. PMID:27378180

  4. Myth busting? Effects of embryo positioning and egg turning on hatching success in the water snake Natrix maura.

    PubMed

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Kok, Philippe J R

    2015-08-21

    It is a common belief that reptile eggs should not be turned after oviposition once the embryo has attached itself to the inner membrane of the shell as it might kill developing embryos. Here, we used 338 eggs from 32 clutches of the water snake Natrix maura to (1) thoroughly describe natural clutch arrangement, (2) experimentally assess the effects of natural embryo positioning and (3) egg turning on embryo metabolism, hatching success, and hatchling phenotype. Clutches contained, on average, 59% of embryos located at the top, 28% at the bottom, and 14% on a side of the egg. Larger females laid larger clutches with higher proportion of top located embryos. Top embryos displayed higher metabolic rates (heart rates), shorter incubation time, and produced lighter and shorter snakes than bottom embryos. Egg turning did not significantly influence egg development, hatching success or hatchling phenotypes. However, post-birth mortality was significantly higher in turned (37.5%) compared to unturned (4.5%) embryos, providing support to the common belief that eggs should not be moved from their natural position.

  5. Comparative analysis of hatching rates and clutch sizes of Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) eggs collected on- and off-farm in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Khosa, Patricia; Imbayarwo-Chikosi, Venancio Edward; Hamandishe, Vimbai

    2012-04-01

    The Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) is a large aquatic reptile predominant in the tropics in Africa and Zimbabwe in particular. Clutch sizes and hatching rates of Nile crocodile eggs collected from the wild and on-farm in Lowveld, Highveld and Kariba regions of Zimbabwe were evaluated. A total of 274 egg records for the period 2000 to 2008 from 39 farms were collected from the Crocodile Farmers Association of Zimbabwe. The effect of source of eggs was analysed using the non-parametric one way analysis of variance procedure of SAS Version 9.1.3. Wilcoxon signed rank test for independent samples was used to compare the mean hatching rates and clutch sizes for eggs collected from the different sources by region. The degree of association between clutch sizes and the hatching rates by source and region was determined using the Spearman's rank correlation test. Source of eggs had no effect (P > 0.05) on hatching rates in all the regions but significantly influenced (P < 0.05) clutch sizes in Lowveld and Kariba. In these regions, clutch sizes in the wild were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those on-farm. Correlation estimates between clutch size and hatching rates were weak and non-significant (P > 0.05) for the different sources of eggs in all regions. Full utilization of the wild resource would reduce challenges relating to shortage of captive breeders and high cost of rearing breeders and hence increase productivity.

  6. Use of DNA strand damage (Comet assay) and embryo hatching effects to assess contaminant exposure in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.F.; Steinert, S.A.; Nakayama, K.; Oshima, Y.

    1999-07-01

    After fertilization, blue crab eggs are embedded in a sponge which is attached to the female abdomen during embryo development. Embryos after 9 stages in the egg sac hatch into a swimming zoea stage (stage 10). The authors have developed a bioassay where embryo development is monitored in culture plates with and without toxicants in the water. Toxicant effects are based on determining the percentage of embryos which hatch to zoea. Hatching EC{sub 50} (toxicant concentration at which 50% of the embryos fail to hatch) for a number of pesticides, organometallics and metals were determined. The test takes from 2 to 6 days depending on the embryo stage selected for the study. In addition to embryo development effects the prevalence of DNA single-strand breaks in individual embryo cells were determined using the single cell gel electrophoresis method (Comet assay). A good correlation between DNA strand breakage and embryo defects was found after exposure to genotoxic contaminants. Thus, the bioassay linking DNA damage to embryo hatching effects is rapid, sensitive and mechanistically relevant.

  7. Using Program Theory-Driven Evaluation Science to Crack the Da Vinci Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Stewart I.

    2005-01-01

    Program theory-driven evaluation science uses substantive knowledge, as opposed to method proclivities, to guide program evaluations. It aspires to update, clarify, simplify, and make more accessible the evolving theory of evaluation practice commonly referred to as theory-driven or theory-based evaluation. The evaluator in this chapter provides a…

  8. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  9. Estimation of daily age and timing of hatching of exotic Asian swamp eels Monopterus albus (Zuiew, 1793) in a backwater marsh of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, James M.; Lafleur, C.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths were used to estimate daily age, growth, and hatching date of the exotic Asian swamp eel (Monopterus albus) captured from a backwater marsh of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia, USA. The eels were sampled using leaf litter traps (N = 140) from 17 July to 28 August 2008. The captured (N = 15) Asian swamp eels ranged in total length from 4.9 cm to 12.2 cm, and were estimated to be from 21 to 51 days old (N = 13), and hatched from 13 June to 7 August 2008. Assuming linear growth, these individuals grew an average rate of 0.2 cm per day. To the authors' knowledge, this was the first time otoliths were used to estimate daily age, growth, and hatching date for M. albus, which can be useful for understanding the ecology of this species in the wild.

  10. Estimation of daily age and timing of hatching of exotic Asian swamp eels Monopterus albus (Zuiew, 1793) in a backwater marsh of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, J.M.; Lafleur, C.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths were used to estimate daily age, growth, and hatching date of the exotic Asian swamp eel (Monopterus albus) captured from a backwater marsh of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia, USA. The eels were sampled using leaf litter traps (N=140) from 17 July to 28 August 2008. The captured (N=15) Asian swamp eels ranged in total length from 4.9cm to 12.2cm, and were estimated to be from 21 to 51days old (N=13), and hatched from 13 June to 7 August 2008. Assuming linear growth, these individuals grew an average rate of 0.2cm per day. To the authors' knowledge, this was the first time otoliths were used to estimate daily age, growth, and hatching date for M. albus, which can be useful for understanding the ecology of this species in the wild. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Why are hatching and emergence success low? Mercury and selenium concentrations in nesting leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) and their young in Florida.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Justin; Wyneken, Jeanette; Thompson, Larry J; Johnson, Chris; Miller, Debra L

    2011-08-01

    Leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) have low hatching and emergence success compared to other sea turtle species. Postmortem examinations of hatchlings showed degeneration of heart and skeletal muscle that was similar to that found in other neonates with selenium deficient mothers. Selenium deficiency can result from elevated concentrations of bodily mercury. Ingested mercury is detoxified by the liver through mercury-selenium compound formation. In animals persistently exposed to mercury, the liver's ability to detoxify this element may decrease, especially if dietary selenium is insufficient. We measured mercury and selenium concentrations in nesting female leatherbacks and their hatchlings from Florida and compared the levels to hatching and emergence success. Both liver selenium and the liver selenium-to-mercury ratio positively correlated with leatherback hatching and emergence success. This study provides the first evidence for the roles of mercury and selenium in explaining low reproductive success in a globally imperiled species, the leatherback sea turtle. PMID:21722926

  12. Laser driven radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Sefcik, J.; Cowan, T.

    1997-12-20

    Intense laser (> 1021 W/cm{sup 3}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator Bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and potential cost advantage for multiple axis views. High spatial and temporal resolution is achievable as a result of the very small source size (<100 um) and short-duration of the laser pulse. We have begun a series of experiments with the Petawatt laser at LLNL to determine the photon flux achievable with these sources and assess their potential for Stewardship applications. Additionally, we are developing a conceptual design and cost estimate of a multi-pulse, multi-axis (up to five) radiographic facility utilizing the Contained Firing Facility at site 300 and existing laser hardware.

  13. Test-driven programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, are presented some possibilities concerning the implementation of a test-driven development as a programming method. Here is offered a different point of view for creation of advanced programming techniques (build tests before programming source with all necessary software tools and modules respectively). Therefore, this nontraditional approach for easier programmer's work through building tests at first is preferable way of software development. This approach allows comparatively simple programming (applied with different object-oriented programming languages as for example JAVA, XML, PYTHON etc.). It is predictable way to develop software tools and to provide help about creating better software that is also easier to maintain. Test-driven programming is able to replace more complicated casual paradigms, used by many programmers.

  14. Stochastically driven genetic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimring, L. S.; Volfson, D.; Hasty, J.

    2006-06-01

    Transcriptional regulation in small genetic circuits exhibits large stochastic fluctuations. Recent experiments have shown that a significant fraction of these fluctuations is caused by extrinsic factors. In this paper we review several theoretical and computational approaches to modeling of small genetic circuits driven by extrinsic stochastic processes. We propose a simplified approach to this problem, which can be used in the case when extrinsic fluctuations dominate the stochastic dynamics of the circuit (as appears to be the case in eukaryots). This approach is applied to a model of a single nonregulated gene that is driven by a certain gating process that affects the rate of transcription, and to a simplified version of the galactose utilization circuit in yeast.

  15. Sparsity driven ultrasound imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.; C¸etin, Müjdat; Karl, W. Clem

    2012-01-01

    An image formation framework for ultrasound imaging from synthetic transducer arrays based on sparsity-driven regularization functionals using single-frequency Fourier domain data is proposed. The framework involves the use of a physics-based forward model of the ultrasound observation process, the formulation of image formation as the solution of an associated optimization problem, and the solution of that problem through efficient numerical algorithms. The sparsity-driven, model-based approach estimates a complex-valued reflectivity field and preserves physical features in the scene while suppressing spurious artifacts. It also provides robust reconstructions in the case of sparse and reduced observation apertures. The effectiveness of the proposed imaging strategy is demonstrated using experimental data. PMID:22352501

  16. Gas-driven microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.; McWhorter, P.J.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Miller, W.M.

    1996-06-27

    This paper describes an invention which relates to microtechnology and the fabrication process for developing microelectrical systems. It describes a means for fabricating a gas-driven microturbine capable of providing autonomous propulsion in which the rapidly moving gases are directed through a micromachined turbine to power devices by direct linkage or turbo-electric generators components in a domain ranging from tenths of micrometers to thousands of micrometers.

  17. Affinity driven social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruyú, B.; Kuperman, M. N.

    2007-04-01

    In this work we present a model for evolving networks, where the driven force is related to the social affinity between individuals of a population. In the model, a set of individuals initially arranged on a regular ordered network and thus linked with their closest neighbors are allowed to rearrange their connections according to a dynamics closely related to that of the stable marriage problem. We show that the behavior of some topological properties of the resulting networks follows a non trivial pattern.

  18. Effects of preincubation application of low and high frequency ultrasound on eggshell microbial activity, hatchability, supply organ weights at hatch, and chick performance in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) hatching eggs.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Iskender; Aygun, Ali; Sert, Durmus

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to establish the effects of preincubation application of low and high frequency ultrasound on egg weight loss, hatchability, supply organ weights, chick performance, and eggshell microbial activity in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). A total of 630 fresh eggs were randomly divided into 3 groups. Treatments were no ultrasound but eggs were sprayed with benzalkonium chloride solution (B), 35 kHz ultrasound applied for 30 min (U35), and 130 kHz ultrasound applied for 30 min (U130). At the beginning of the incubation, the eggs in the U130 treatment had lower coliform, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus counts than those in the B group. However, no significant differences were found in coliform, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus counts among treatments at d 14 of incubation. Among treatments, there were no significant differences in egg weight loss, hatchability, embryonic mortality, supply organ weights, spread of hatch, or relative growth.

  19. Data-Driven Objectness.

    PubMed

    Hongwen Kang; Hebert, Martial; Efros, Alexei A; Kanade, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    We propose a data-driven approach to estimate the likelihood that an image segment corresponds to a scene object (its "objectness") by comparing it to a large collection of example object regions. We demonstrate that when the application domain is known, for example, in our case activity of daily living (ADL), we can capture the regularity of the domain specific objects using millions of exemplar object regions. Our approach to estimating the objectness of an image region proceeds in two steps: 1) finding the exemplar regions that are the most similar to the input image segment; 2) calculating the objectness of the image segment by combining segment properties, mutual consistency across the nearest exemplar regions, and the prior probability of each exemplar region. In previous work, parametric objectness models were built from a small number of manually annotated objects regions, instead, our data-driven approach uses 5 million object regions along with their metadata information. Results on multiple data sets demonstrates our data-driven approach compared to the existing model based techniques. We also show the application of our approach in improving the performance of object discovery algorithms. PMID:26353218

  20. Driven superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    Driven nonlinear quantum systems show rich phenomena in various fields of physics. Among them, superconducting quantum circuits have very attractive features such as well-controlled quantum states with design flexibility, strong nonlinearity of Josephson junctions, strong coupling to electromagnetic driving fields, little internal dissipation, and tailored coupling to the electromagnetic environment. We have investigated properties and functionalities of driven superconducting quantum circuits. A transmon qubit coupled to a transmission line shows nearly perfect spatial mode matching between the incident and scattered microwave field in the 1D mode. Dressed states under a driving field are studied there and also in a semi-infinite 1D mode terminated by a resonator containing a flux qubit. An effective Λ-type three-level system is realized under an appropriate driving condition. It allows ``impedance-matched'' perfect absorption of incident probe photons and down conversion into another frequency mode. Finally, the weak signal from the qubit is read out using a Josephson parametric amplifier/oscillator which is another nonlinear circuit driven by a strong pump field. This work was partly supported by the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST), Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, MEXT KAKENHI ``Quantum Cybernetics,'' and the NICT Commissioned Research.

  1. Exposure of eggs to solar UV-B leads to reduced hatching rates in two sparid fishes, red sea bream Pagrus major and black sea bream Acanthopagrus schlegeli.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Y; Masuda, R; Yamashita, Y

    2010-02-01

    Hatching success was examined under exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) using filters to give three different light conditions [C1: UV-B, UV-A and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), C2: UV-A and PAR, C3: PAR] in red Pagrus major and black Acanthopagrus schlegeli sea bream. Hatching rate of both species was reduced by an exposure over a 2 day period to UVR and was not significantly different between two species under the three light conditions. PMID:20666911

  2. Spatial occurrence and hatch of field eggs of the tadpole shrimp Triops newberryi (Notostraca: Triopsidae), a potential biological control agent of immature mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Su, Tianyun; Mulla, Mir S

    2002-06-01

    The tadpole shrimp (TPS), Triops newberryi (Packard) (Notostraca: Triopsidae) is a potential biological control agent for immature mosquitoes breeding in ephemeral habitats. The occurrence of TPS eggs in soil and their hatch were investigated in 11 flood-irrigated date gardens in the Coachella Valley of southern California in 1999. Each garden was sampled several times after the rows were recently irrigated. All these date gardens harbored from very few to a large number of eggs in the soil. Overall, the average density of total eggs on ranches with clay loam soil was significantly higher than that on ranches with silt loam soil. The average densities of total eggs were significantly lower on the ranches that were disked compared to those on the ranches that were undisked before sampling. Two types of eggs were found and designated as "fresh" (yellowish to brownish) and "old" (blackish) eggs. This is the first time that these dimorphic eggs have been reported. The density of fresh eggs was lower than that of old eggs in most soil samples. The date gardens with high egg densities were sampled for determination of vertical occurrence, where soil was sampled up to 38.5 cm deep. Fresh eggs were recovered from soil in depths up to 25.6 cm, but the densities progressively declined with depth. The old eggs, however, were recovered from all soil depths studied, and there was no obvious relationship between soil depth and their density. This pattern of vertical occurrence of TPS eggs is the result of frequent disking for weed control and fruit harvest. Hatch of TPS eggs in surface soil samples ranged from 0 to 7.2 per 100 g dried soil. Hatch of viable eggs had an inverse relationship with soil depth. No TPS hatched out from the soil samples taken deeper than 15.4 cm. Fresh and old eggs distinguished by color were subjected to hatching tests. Fresh eggs exhibited high hatch, with hatching rates of 35.5-45.0% and 40.2-60.3% for the 1st and 1st plus the 2nd hydrations

  3. VINSIA: visual navigator for surgical information access.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lingyun; Rowbottom, James; Craker, John; Xu, Rong; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2013-07-01

    Information access at the point of care presents a different set of requirements than those for traditional search engines. Critical care in remote (e.g., battle field) and rural settings not only requires access to clinical guidelines and medical libraries with surgical precision but also with minimal user effort and time. Our development of a graphical, anatomy-driven navigator called Visual Navigator for Surgical Information Access (VINSIA) fulfills the goal for providing evidence-based clinical decision support, specifically in perioperative and critical care settings, to allow rapid and precise information access through a portable stand-alone system. It comes with a set of unique characteristics: (a) a high precision, interactive visual interface driven by human anatomy; (b) direct linkage of anatomical structures to associated content such as clinical guidelines, literature, and medical libraries; and (c) an administrative content management interface allowing only an accredited, expert-level curator to edit and update the clinical content to ensure accuracy and currency. We believe that the deployment of VINSIA will improve quality, safety, and evidence-based standardization of patient care.

  4. Effect of water hardness and dissolved-solid concentration on hatching success and egg size in bighead carp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Duane C.; Deters, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    Bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis is an Asian species that has been introduced to the United States and is regarded as a highly undesirable invader. Soft water has been said to cause the bursting of Asian carp eggs and thus has been suggested as a factor that would limit the spread of this species. To evaluate this, we subjected fertilized eggs of bighead carp to waters with a wide range of hardness and dissolved-solid concentrations. Hatching rate and egg size were not significantly affected by the different water qualities. These results, combined with the low hardness (28–84 mg/L) of the Yangtze River (the primary natal habitat of Hypophthalmichthys spp.), suggest that managers and those performing risk assessments for the establishment of Hypophthalmichthys spp. should be cautious about treating low hardness and dissolved-solid concentrations as limiting factors.

  5. Chemical Structures of Plant Hydrolyzable Tannins Reveal Their in Vitro Activity against Egg Hatching and Motility of Haemonchus contortus Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Engström, M T; Karonen, M; Ahern, J R; Baert, N; Payré, B; Hoste, H; Salminen, J-P

    2016-02-01

    The use of synthetic drugs against gastrointestinal nematodes of ruminants has led to a situation where resistance to anthelmintics is widespread, and there is an urgent need for alternative solutions for parasite control. One promising approach is to use polyphenol-rich bioactive plants in animal feeds as natural anthelmintics. In the present work, the in vitro activity of a series of 33 hydrolyzable tannins (HTs) and their hydrolysis product, gallic acid, against egg hatching and motility of L1 and L2 stage Haemonchus contortus larvae was studied. The effect of the selected compounds on egg and larval structure was further studied by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated clear relationships between HT structure and anthelmintic activity. While HT size, overall flexibility, the types and numbers of functional groups, together with the linkage types between monomeric HTs affected the activity differently, the optimal structure was found with pentagalloylglucose.

  6. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  7. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  8. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  9. Open Access and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shawn; Schmidt, Christian; Das, Chhaya; Tucker, Philip W

    2006-01-01

    Uncensored exchange of scientific results hastens progress. Open Access does not stop at the removal of price and permission barriers; still, censorship and reading disabilities, to name a few, hamper access to information. Here, we invite the scientific community and the public to discuss new methods to distribute, store and manage literature in order to achieve unfettered access to literature. PMID:16956402

  10. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  11. Influence of mate preference and laying order on maternal allocation in a monogamous parrot species with extreme hatching asynchrony.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Stefanie E P; Eens, Marcel; Iserbyt, Arne; Groothuis, Ton G G; de Vries, Bonnie; Müller, Wendt; Pinxten, Rianne

    2015-05-01

    It is well established that in many avian species, prenatal maternal resource allocation varies both between and within clutches and may affect offspring fitness. Differential allocation of maternal resources, in terms of egg weight and yolk composition, may therefore allow the female to adjust brood reduction and to fine-tune reproductive investment in accordance with the expected fitness returns. The adaptive value of such maternal resource allocation is thought to be context-dependent as well as species-specific. We investigated the effects of female preference for her mate on the allocation of prenatal maternal resources in the budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulatus, a monogamous species of parrot that shows an extreme hatching asynchrony. We assessed mate preferences in a two-way preference test and allowed females two breeding rounds: one with the preferred and one with the non-preferred partner. We found no effect of preference on either latency to lay or clutch size, but females mated with the preferred partner laid eggs that contained significantly more yolk. Their eggs also contained significantly more androstenedione but not testosterone. Our results suggest that in this species, female preference may influence maternal resource allocation, and that the functional roles of each androgen in the yolk should be considered separately. In addition, we found a significant effect of laying order on egg and yolk weight as well as on yolk testosterone and androstenedione levels. These measures, however, did not change linearly with the laying order and render it unlikely that female budgerigars compensate for the extreme hatching asynchrony by adjusting within-clutch allocation of prenatal maternal resources. PMID:25870020

  12. Influence of mate preference and laying order on maternal allocation in a monogamous parrot species with extreme hatching asynchrony.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Stefanie E P; Eens, Marcel; Iserbyt, Arne; Groothuis, Ton G G; de Vries, Bonnie; Müller, Wendt; Pinxten, Rianne

    2015-05-01

    It is well established that in many avian species, prenatal maternal resource allocation varies both between and within clutches and may affect offspring fitness. Differential allocation of maternal resources, in terms of egg weight and yolk composition, may therefore allow the female to adjust brood reduction and to fine-tune reproductive investment in accordance with the expected fitness returns. The adaptive value of such maternal resource allocation is thought to be context-dependent as well as species-specific. We investigated the effects of female preference for her mate on the allocation of prenatal maternal resources in the budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulatus, a monogamous species of parrot that shows an extreme hatching asynchrony. We assessed mate preferences in a two-way preference test and allowed females two breeding rounds: one with the preferred and one with the non-preferred partner. We found no effect of preference on either latency to lay or clutch size, but females mated with the preferred partner laid eggs that contained significantly more yolk. Their eggs also contained significantly more androstenedione but not testosterone. Our results suggest that in this species, female preference may influence maternal resource allocation, and that the functional roles of each androgen in the yolk should be considered separately. In addition, we found a significant effect of laying order on egg and yolk weight as well as on yolk testosterone and androstenedione levels. These measures, however, did not change linearly with the laying order and render it unlikely that female budgerigars compensate for the extreme hatching asynchrony by adjusting within-clutch allocation of prenatal maternal resources.

  13. Intermittent thermal manipulations of broiler embryos during late incubation and their immediate effect on the embryonic development and hatching process.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, H; Li, Y; Willems, E; Franssens, L; Wang, Y; Decuypere, E; Everaert, N

    2011-06-01

    Intermittent high (+3°C) and low (-3°C) temperature treatments for 4 h on embryonic day (E) 16, E17, and E18 showed differential effects on embryonic metabolism, without influencing embryonic growth or hatchability. Embryos in the high-temperature group shifted to a more anaerobic metabolism, as indicated by a lower partial pressure of O(2) and a higher partial pressure of CO(2) in the air cell, lower blood pH, and higher lactic acid production. Three hours after the end of the high-temperature treatment, a decrease in metabolism was observed, as indicated by the lower partial pressure of CO(2) and higher partial pressure of O(2) in the air cell and increased plasma triglyceride levels. The embryos in the low-temperature group responded by temporarily slowing down their metabolism, especially the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, as indicated by altered air cell gases, a higher relative yolk weight, higher plasma triglyceride level, and higher liver glycogen level. Three hours after the end of the temperature treatment, the metabolism of embryos in the low-temperature treatment had increased to the level of the control temperature group. However, for both temperature treatments, during the hatching process, all the shortages and excesses created were restored to control levels, which would explain the lack of change in embryo growth and hatchability and the slight delay in the hatching process. These mild consequences of the intermittent temperature treatment indicate that the different metabolic shifts made by the embryos seem to be efficient in overcoming the challenges of the intermittent high- or low-temperature treatment during late incubation.

  14. Egg Hatch and Survival and Development of Beet Webworm (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Larvae at Different Combinations of Temperature and Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jihong; Cheng, Yunxia; Sappington, Thomas W; Jiang, Xingfu; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Lizhi

    2016-08-01

    To understand the role that temperature and humidity play in the population dynamics of the beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis L. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), egg hatch, survival of first-fifth instars, survival of the full larval stage, survival curves, and larval development rates were investigated at combinations of four temperatures (18, 22, 26, and 30°C) and five relative humidities (RH; 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100%). We found that greatest egg hatch rate, survival rates of the first and second instars, and survival rate of the complete larval stage occurred at 22°C and 60-80% RH; the lowest values for these parameters were observed at 30°C and 20% RH. Survival of first instars was significantly affected by the interaction of temperature and relative humidity. However, survival of third and fourth instars was neither affected by temperature nor relative humidity, and that of fifth instars was significantly affected only by relative humidity level. The survival curve for larvae was well described by a type III Weibull distribution. Duration of larval stage decreased as temperature increased, but was not affected by relative humidity. We therefore conclude that eggs and early instars are the most critical stages for survival to the pupal stage, and 22-26°C and 60-80% RH are the optimum conditions for their survival and development. These findings confirm that temperature and relative humidity are the critical environmental factors affecting the population growth of L. sticticalis, with temperature being more important. PMID:27329620

  15. Methodological aspects of in vitro assessment of bio-accessible risk element pool in urban particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Sysalová, Jiřina; Száková, Jiřina; Tremlová, Jana; Kašparovská, Kateřina; Kotlík, Bohumil; Tlustoš, Pavel; Svoboda, Petr

    2014-11-01

    In vitro tests simulating the elements release from inhaled urban particulate matter (PM) with artificial lung fluids (Gamble's and Hatch's solutions) and simulated gastric and pancreatic solutions were applied for an estimation of hazardous element (As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) bio-accessibility in this material. An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were employed for the element determination in extracted solutions. The effect of the extraction agent used, extraction time, sample-to-extractant ratio, sample particle size and/or individual element properties was evaluated. Different patterns of individual elements were observed, comparing Hatch's solution vs. simulated gastric and pancreatic solutions. For Hatch's solution, a decreasing sample-to-extractant ratio in a PM size fraction of <0.063 mm resulted in increasing leached contents of all investigated elements. As already proved for other operationally defined extraction procedures, the extractable element portions are affected not only by their mobility in the particulate matter itself but also by the sample preparation procedure. Results of simulated in vitro tests can be applied for the reasonable estimation of bio-accessible element portions in the particulate matter as an alternative method, which, consequently, initiates further examinations including potential in vivo assessments.

  16. Methodological aspects of in vitro assessment of bio-accessible risk element pool in urban particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Sysalová, Jiřina; Száková, Jiřina; Tremlová, Jana; Kašparovská, Kateřina; Kotlík, Bohumil; Tlustoš, Pavel; Svoboda, Petr

    2014-11-01

    In vitro tests simulating the elements release from inhaled urban particulate matter (PM) with artificial lung fluids (Gamble's and Hatch's solutions) and simulated gastric and pancreatic solutions were applied for an estimation of hazardous element (As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) bio-accessibility in this material. An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were employed for the element determination in extracted solutions. The effect of the extraction agent used, extraction time, sample-to-extractant ratio, sample particle size and/or individual element properties was evaluated. Different patterns of individual elements were observed, comparing Hatch's solution vs. simulated gastric and pancreatic solutions. For Hatch's solution, a decreasing sample-to-extractant ratio in a PM size fraction of <0.063 mm resulted in increasing leached contents of all investigated elements. As already proved for other operationally defined extraction procedures, the extractable element portions are affected not only by their mobility in the particulate matter itself but also by the sample preparation procedure. Results of simulated in vitro tests can be applied for the reasonable estimation of bio-accessible element portions in the particulate matter as an alternative method, which, consequently, initiates further examinations including potential in vivo assessments. PMID:25123460

  17. Chemically Driven Hydrodynamic Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almarcha, C.; Trevelyan, P. M. J.; Grosfils, P.; de Wit, A.

    2010-01-01

    In the gravity field, density changes triggered by a kinetic scheme as simple as A+B→C can induce or affect buoyancy-driven instabilities at a horizontal interface between two solutions containing initially the scalars A and B. On the basis of a general reaction-diffusion-convection model, we analyze to what extent the reaction can destabilize otherwise buoyantly stable density stratifications. We furthermore show that, even if the underlying nonreactive system is buoyantly unstable, the reaction breaks the symmetry of the developing patterns. This is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally on the specific example of a simple acid-base neutralization reaction.

  18. System Driven Workarounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael Marie

    2013-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) in a partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), participating carriers, and labor organizations. It is designed to improve the National Airspace System by collecting and studying reports detailing unsafe conditions and events in the aviation industry. Employees are able to report safety issues or concerns with confidentiality and without fear of discipline. Safety reports highlighting system driven workarounds for the aviation community highlight the human workaround for the complex aviation system.

  19. A study of the bio-accessibility of welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Berlinger, Balázs; Ellingsen, Dag G; Náray, Miklós; Záray, Gyula; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2008-12-01

    The respiratory bio-accessibility of a substance is the fraction that is soluble in the respiratory environment and is available for absorption. In the case of respiratory exposure the amount of absorbed substance plays a main role in the biological effects. Extensive bio-accessibility studies have always been an essential requirement for a better understanding of the biological effects of different workplace aerosols, such as welding fumes. Fumes generated using three different welding techniques, manual metal arc (MMA) welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding, and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were investigated in the present study. Each technique was used for stainless steel welding. Welding fumes were collected on PVC membrane filters in batches of 114 using a multiport air sampler. Three different fluids were applied for the solubility study: deionised water and two kinds of lung fluid simulants: lung epithelial lining fluid simulant (Gamble's solution) and artificial lung lining fluid simulant (Hatch's solution). In order to obtain sufficient data to study the tendencies in solubility change with time, seven different leaching periods were used (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 h), each of them with three replicates. The effect of dissolution temperature was also studied. The total amounts of selected metals in the three different welding fumes were determined after microwave-assisted digestion with the mixture of aqua regia and hydrofluoric acid. The most obvious observation yielded by the results is that the solubility of individual metals varies greatly depending on the welding technique, the composition of the leaching fluid and leaching time. This study shows that the most reasonable choice as a media for the bio-assessment of solubility might be Hatch's solution by a dissolution time of 24 h. PMID:19037486

  20. A study of the bio-accessibility of welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Berlinger, Balázs; Ellingsen, Dag G; Náray, Miklós; Záray, Gyula; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2008-12-01

    The respiratory bio-accessibility of a substance is the fraction that is soluble in the respiratory environment and is available for absorption. In the case of respiratory exposure the amount of absorbed substance plays a main role in the biological effects. Extensive bio-accessibility studies have always been an essential requirement for a better understanding of the biological effects of different workplace aerosols, such as welding fumes. Fumes generated using three different welding techniques, manual metal arc (MMA) welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding, and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were investigated in the present study. Each technique was used for stainless steel welding. Welding fumes were collected on PVC membrane filters in batches of 114 using a multiport air sampler. Three different fluids were applied for the solubility study: deionised water and two kinds of lung fluid simulants: lung epithelial lining fluid simulant (Gamble's solution) and artificial lung lining fluid simulant (Hatch's solution). In order to obtain sufficient data to study the tendencies in solubility change with time, seven different leaching periods were used (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 h), each of them with three replicates. The effect of dissolution temperature was also studied. The total amounts of selected metals in the three different welding fumes were determined after microwave-assisted digestion with the mixture of aqua regia and hydrofluoric acid. The most obvious observation yielded by the results is that the solubility of individual metals varies greatly depending on the welding technique, the composition of the leaching fluid and leaching time. This study shows that the most reasonable choice as a media for the bio-assessment of solubility might be Hatch's solution by a dissolution time of 24 h.