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Sample records for access health information

  1. Facilitating consumer access to health information.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, Anne; Schnarr, Karin; Alessi, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The lead paper from Zelmer and Hagens details the substantive evolution occurring in health information technologies that has the potential to transform the relationship between consumers, health practitioners and health systems. In this commentary, the authors suggest that Canada is experiencing a shift in consumer behaviour toward a desire to actively manage one's health and wellness that is being facilitated through the advent of health applications on mobile and online technologies platforms. The result is that Canadians are now able to create personalized health solutions based on their individual health values and goals. However, before Canadians are able to derive a personal health benefit from these rapid changes in information technology, they require and are increasingly demanding greater real-time access to their own health information to better inform decision-making, as well as interoperability between their personal health tracking systems and those of their health practitioner team.

  2. Negotiating Access to Health Information to Promote Students' Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radis, Molly E.; Updegrove, Stephen C.; Somsel, Anne; Crowley, Angela A.

    2016-01-01

    Access to student health information, such as immunizations, screenings, and care plans for chronic conditions, is essential for school nurses to fulfill their role in promoting students' health. School nurses typically encounter barriers to accessing health records and spend many hours attempting to retrieve health information. As a result,…

  3. Negotiating Access to Health Information to Promote Students' Health.

    PubMed

    Radis, Molly E; Updegrove, Stephen C; Somsel, Anne; Crowley, Angela A

    2016-04-01

    Access to student health information, such as immunizations, screenings, and care plans for chronic conditions, is essential for school nurses to fulfill their role in promoting students' health. School nurses typically encounter barriers to accessing health records and spend many hours attempting to retrieve health information. As a result, nurses' time is poorly utilized and students may suffer adverse outcomes including delayed school entry. In response to this pressing public health issue, a school medical advisor and director of school nurses in a local health department successfully negotiated access for school nurses to three health record systems: a state immunization tracking system, an electronic lead surveillance program, and an electronic health record system. This negotiation process is presented within a framework of the Theory of Diffusion of Innovation and provides a strategy for other school nurses seeking access to student health information.

  4. Seeking health information online: does limited healthcare access matter?

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Neeraj; Shi, Yunfeng; Jung, Kyoungrae

    2014-01-01

    Consumers facing barriers to healthcare access may use online health information seeking and online communication with physicians, but the empirical relationship has not been sufficiently analyzed. Our study examines the association of barriers to healthcare access with consumers' health-related information searching on the internet, use of health chat groups, and email communication with physicians, using data from 27,210 adults from the 2009 National Health Interview Survey. Individuals with financial barriers to healthcare access, difficulty getting timely appointments with doctors, and conflicts in scheduling during clinic hours are more likely to search for general health information online than those without these access barriers. Those unable to get timely appointments with physicians are more likely to participate in health chat groups and email physicians. The internet may offer a low-cost source of health information and could help meet the heightened demand for health-related information among those facing access barriers to care.

  5. Enhancing access to health information in Africa: a librarian's perspective.

    PubMed

    Gathoni, Nasra

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, tremendous progress has been made toward providing health information in Africa, in part because of technological advancements. Nevertheless, ensuring that information is accessible, comprehensible, and usable remains problematic, and there remain needs in many settings to address issues such as computer skills, literacy, and the infrastructure to access information. To determine how librarians might play a more strategic role in meeting information needs of health professionals in Africa, the author reviewed key components of information systems pertinent to knowledge management for the health sector, including access to global online resources, capacity to use computer technology for information retrieval, information literacy, and the potential for professional networks to play a role in improving access to and use of information. The author concluded that, in regions that lack adequate information systems, librarians could apply their knowledge and skills to facilitate access and use by information seekers. Ensuring access to and use of health information can also be achieved by engaging organizations and associations working to enhance access to health information, such as the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa. These groups can provide assistance through training, dissemination, information repackaging, and other approaches known to improve information literacy.

  6. Barriers to information access among county health department employees.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jacqueline; Rockoff, Maxine; Bakken, Suzanne; Caldwell, Michael

    2007-10-11

    As part of a study to explore information use, 137 public health employees responded to the question: What are the main barriers that you face in accessing information you need to do your job? 74% of employees indicated 154 barriers. Of these 65% were related to technology or resources. Fewer barriers related to time (24%) and communication (13%). Efforts to address resource and technology barriers could improve how information is used by public health employees.

  7. [Inequities in access to information and inequities in health].

    PubMed

    Filho, Alberto Pellegrini

    2002-01-01

    This piece presents evidence that inequities in information are an important determinant of health inequities and that eliminating these inequities in access to information, especially by using new information and communication technologies (ICTs), could represent a significant advance in terms of guaranteeing the right to health for all. The piece reviews the most important international scientific research findings on the determinants of the health of populations, emphasizing the role of socioeconomic inequities and of deteriorating social capital as factors that worsen health conditions. It is noteworthy that Latin America has both socioeconomic inequities and major sectors of the population living in poverty. Among the fundamental strategies for overcoming the inequalities and the poverty are greater participation by the poor in civic life and the strengthening of social capital. The contribution that the new ICTs could make to these strategies is analyzed, and the Virtual Health Library (VHL) is discussed. Coordinated by the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information (BIREME), the VHL is a contribution by the Pan American Health Organization that takes advantage of the potential of ICTs to democratize information and knowledge and consequently promote equity in health. The "digital gap" is discussed as something that can produce inequity itself and also increase other inequities, including ones in health. Prospects are discussed for overcoming this gap, emphasizing the role that governments and international organizations should play in order to expand access to the global public good that information for social development is.

  8. The Digital Health Divide: Evaluating Online Health Information Access and Use among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Amanda K.; Bernhardt, Jay M.; Dodd, Virginia; Vollrath, Morgan W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Innovations in health information technology (HIT) provide opportunities to reduce health care spending, improve quality of care, and improve health outcomes for older adults. However, concerns relating to older adults' limited access and use of HIT, including use of the Internet for health information, fuel the digital health divide…

  9. The health periodicals database: full-text access to consumer and technical health information.

    PubMed

    Lingle, V A

    1990-01-01

    The HEALTH PERIODICALS DATABASE, produced by the Information Access Company, is a unique online file which provides full-text access to both general interest health-related literature and key technical resources in the medical field. Available on DIALOG and CompuServe, the database is described as a useful tool for information on the health, fitness, and nutrition industries. Special features of the database are reviewed and comparisons are made with resources of similar scope.

  10. The Western New York Health Resources Project: developing access to local health information.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, S A; O'Shea, R; Petty, M E; Loonsk, J

    1998-01-01

    The Western New York Health Resources Project was created to fill a gap in online access to local health information resources describing the health of a defined geographic area. The project sought to identify and describe information scattered among many institutions, agencies, and individuals, and to create a database that would be widely accessible. The project proceeded in three phases with initial phases supported by grant funding. This paper describes the database development and selection of content, and concludes that a national online network of local health data representing the various geographic regions of the United States would contribute to the quality of health care in general. PMID:9681168

  11. Enhancing Health Literacy through Accessing Health Information, Products, and Services: An Exercise for Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brey, Rebecca A.; Clark, Susan E.; Wantz, Molly S.

    2007-01-01

    The second National Health Education Standard states the importance of student demonstration of the ability to access valid health information and services. The teaching technique presented in this article provides an opportunity for children and adolescents to develop their health literacy and advocacy skills by contributing to a class resource…

  12. Application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Health Information Access and Dissemination in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omona, Walter; Ikoja-Odongo, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a study which assessed the application of information and communication technologies (ICT) in health information access and dissemination in Uganda. The project focused not only on information obtainable through libraries for research, teaching, learning and practice, but also on ICT applications concerned with the…

  13. 45 CFR 164.524 - Access of individuals to protected health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...). (3) Other responsibility. If the covered entity does not maintain the protected health information... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Access of individuals to protected health... Health Information § 164.524 Access of individuals to protected health information. (a) Standard:...

  14. 45 CFR 164.524 - Access of individuals to protected health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...). (3) Other responsibility. If the covered entity does not maintain the protected health information... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access of individuals to protected health... Health Information § 164.524 Access of individuals to protected health information. (a) Standard:...

  15. The Healthy Web--Access to Online Health Information for Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiger, Brian; Evans, R. R.; Cellitti, M. A.; Smith, K. Hogan; O'Neal, Marcia R.; Firsing, S. L., III; Chandan, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Internet can be an invaluable resource for obtaining health information by people with disabilities. Although valid and reliable information is available, previous research revealed barriers to accessing health information online. Health education specialists have the responsibilities to insure that it is accessible to all users.…

  16. 76 FR 56503 - Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records, VA Form 10- 0400. OMB Control Number: 2900... recorded in VHA electronic health records system. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is......

  17. Telecommunications as a Means to Access Health Information: An Exploratory Study of Migrants in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Greenstock, Louise; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Fraser, Catriona; Bingham, Amie; Naccarella, Lucio; Elliott, Kristine; Morris, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Background Health policies increasingly promote e-health developments (e.g., consumers’ access to online health information) to engage patients in their health care. In order to make these developments available for culturally and socially diverse communities, not only do Internet accessibility, literacy and e-health literacy need to be taken into account, but consumers’ preferences and information seeking behaviours for accessing health information have also to be understood. These considerations are crucial when designing major new health policy directions, especially for migration destination countries with culturally diverse populations, such as Australia. The aim of this study was to examine how people from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) community use telecommunications (phone, mobile, Internet) to access health information. Design and Methods A case study was conducted using a questionnaire exploring the use of telecommunications to access health information among CALD people. The study was carried out at a community health centre in a socially and economically disadvantaged area of Melbourne, a city of 4 million people with a large CALD and migrant population. Questionnaires were translated into three languages and interpreters were provided. Fifty-nine questionnaires were completed by users of the community health centre. Results Most of the CALD participants did not have access to the Internet at home and very few reported using telecommunications to access health information. Conclusions The findings of the study suggest that telecommunications are not necessarily perceived to be an important channel for accessing health information by members of the CALD community. PMID:25170467

  18. Rural Health Care Information Access and the Use of the Internet: Opportunity for University Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Biswa R.; Leatherman, John C.; Bressers, Bonnie M.

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has potential for improving health information delivery and strengthening connections between rural populations and local health service providers. An exploratory case study six rural health care markets in Kansas showed that about 70% of adults use the Internet, with substantial use for accessing health information. While there are…

  19. Access and Use: Improving Digital Multimedia Consumer Health Information.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    This project enabled novel organisational insight into the comparative utility of a portfolio of consumer health information content, by measuring patterns of attrition (abandonment) in content use. The project used as a case study the event activity log of a fully automated digital information kiosk, located in a community health facility. Direct measurements of the duration of content use were derived from the user interface activity recorded in the kiosk log, thus avoiding issues in using other approaches to collecting this type of data, such as sampling and observer bias. The distribution patterns of 1,383 durations of observed abandonments of use for twenty-eight discrete modules of health information content were visualised using Kaplan-Meir survival plots. Clear patterns of abandonment of content use were exhibited. The method of analysis is cost-effective, scalable and provides deep insight into the utility of health promotion content. The impact on the content producers, platform operators and service users is to improve organisational learning and thus increase the confidence in stakeholders that the service is continuously delivering high quality health and wellbeing benefits.

  20. Deaf Adolescents' Learning of Cardiovascular Health Information: Sources and Access Challenges.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott R; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-10-01

    Deaf individuals have more cardiovascular risks than the general population that are believed to be related to their cardiovascular health knowledge disparities. This phenomenological study describes where 20 deaf sign language-using adolescents from Rochester, New York, many who possess many positive characteristics to support their health literacy, learn cardiovascular health information and their lived experiences accessing health information. The goal is to ultimately use this information to improve the delivery of cardiovascular health education to this population and other deaf adolescents at a higher risk for weak health literacy. Deaf bilingual researchers interviewed deaf adolescents, transcribed and coded the data, and described the findings. Five major sources of cardiovascular health information were identified including family, health education teachers, healthcare providers, printed materials, and informal sources. Despite possessing advantageous characteristics contributing to stronger health literacy, study participants described significant challenges with accessing health information from each source. They also demonstrated inconsistencies in their cardiovascular health knowledge, especially regarding heart attack, stroke, and cholesterol. These findings suggest a great need for additional public funding to research deaf adolescents' informal health-related learning, develop accessible and culturally appropriate health surveys and health education programming, improve interpreter education, and disseminate information through social media.

  1. Repository on maternal child health: Health portal to improve access to information on maternal child health in India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quality and essential health information is considered one of the most cost-effective interventions to improve health for a developing country. Healthcare portals have revolutionalized access to health information and knowledge using the Internet and related technologies, but their usage is far from satisfactory in India. This article describes a health portal developed in India aimed at providing one-stop access to efficiently search, organize and share maternal child health information relevant from public health perspective in the country. Methods The portal ‘Repository on Maternal Child Health’ was developed using an open source content management system and standardized processes were followed for collection, selection, categorization and presentation of resource materials. Its usage is evaluated using key performance indicators obtained from Google Analytics, and quality assessed using a standardized checklist of knowledge management. The results are discussed in relation to improving quality and access to health information. Results The portal was launched in July 2010 and provides free access to full-text of 900 resource materials categorized under specific topics and themes. During the subsequent 18 months, 52,798 visits were registered from 174 countries across the world, and more than three-fourth visits were from India alone. Nearly 44,000 unique visitors visited the website and spent an average time of 4 minutes 26 seconds. The overall bounce rate was 27.6%. An increase in the number of unique visitors was found to be significantly associated with an increase in the average time on site (p-value 0.01), increase in the web traffic through search engines (p-value 0.00), and decrease in the bounce rate (p-value 0.03). There was a high degree of agreement between the two experts regarding quality assessment carried out under the three domains of knowledge access, knowledge creation and knowledge transfer (Kappa statistic 0.72). Conclusions

  2. 76 FR 40454 - Proposed Information Collection (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Activity; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... to establish computer accounts for Veteran Service Officers (VSO) to access VA's Veterans Health Information Systems Technology Architecture (VistA). DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: VSO Access to VHA Electronic...

  3. Understanding Parent Perspectives Concerning Adolescents’ Online Access to Personal Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, Gregory L.; Bruce, Janine; Anoshiravani, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Background Although today's youth are interested in using the internet to access and manage information related to their health, little information exists about parental attitudes towards the release of health information to adolescents. Methods Structured interviews were conducted with the parents of 83 adolescents detained at a large Northern California juvenile detention facility to examine parental perceptions toward allowing their children online access to their own health information. Results The majority of parents interviewed (70%) wanted their children to have online access to their own health information. Seventy-nine percent of these parents were also comfortable allowing their children to choose with whom they would share this information. Conclusions This study is one of the first to examine parental attitudes towards providing adolescents access to their own health information, and the first among parents of underserved youth. This study demonstrates that parents may be quite supportive of allowing their adolescent children to have secure online access to their own health information. PMID:27595043

  4. Privacy, security and access with sensitive health information.

    PubMed

    Croll, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * Confidentiality issues and the challenges faced; * The fundamental differences between privacy and security; * The different access control mechanisms; * The challenges of Internet security; * How 'safety and quality' relate to all the above.

  5. Greater access to information on how to prevent oral cancer among elderly using primary health care.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; dos Santos-Neto, Pedro Eleutério; de Sá, Maria Aparecida Barbosa; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Haikal, Desireé Sant'Ana; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigenia; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Educative actions are an important component of health promotion in Brazil's primary healthcare program, the Family Health Strategy (FHS). The efficacy of these actions is evidenced by compliance with healthy behaviors and in the reduction of rates of mortality and morbidity. The objective of this study was to identify whether access to information regarding the prevention of oral cancer is greater among elders whose residences are registered with the FHS. SPSS® was utilized to obtain estimates that were corrected for sample design, considering the magnitude of the associations between access to such information with personal determinants, the use and cost of healthcare, health-related behaviors and health outcomes. 58.9% of the 492 participating elders reported having access to such information. We verified that there was a greater chance for access among residents of houses registered by the FHS; those with greater per capita income (2.01/1.183.43); non-smokers (2.00/1.16-3.46); those that realized oral self-examination (6.35/3.46-11.64); and those that did not perceive discomfort in the mouth, head or neck (2.06/1.02-4.17). Access was greater among residents of homes registered by the FHS. Personal determinants of health, health-related behaviors and health outcomes are influenced or influence access to information regarding the prevention and management of oral diseases.

  6. Prevalence of internet usage and access to health information among dental school outpatients.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ulkem; Ozturk, Mustafa; Kirbiyik, Sema

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Internet access and use among dental school outpatients to evaluate the type of information they seek and their views regarding health-related information. A total of 400 consecutive outpatients were surveyed. A questionnaire was used to collect data on demographic characteristics and Internet use. Users were asked about the frequency and location of their Internet access. Access to health-related information and medical and dental topics of interest was recorded. Participants expressed their opinions on the usefulness of the information and the improvements that might be needed. A total of 33.0% of the participants were Internet users. Those in the 15- to 24-year age group were male, unmarried, and at school and were much more likely to use the Internet than their counterparts. Twelve percent of the users were seeking online health information. Dental information was sought by 16.7% (n = 8) of online health seekers. Those in the 25- to 34-year age group were married, employed, and who have a university degree and were much more likely to seek health information on the Internet than their counterparts. Currently, persons seeking online health information in this population in Turkey are a small minority. It is important to respond to the specific health needs of the Internet users to post accurate information.

  7. Accessing Your Health Information: Your Rights and Your Provider's Responsibilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... right to receive them in either electronic or paper form. Depending on your doctor's or hospital's policies, ... Many health care providers — particularly those still using paper-based systems — may not have all of your ...

  8. Overcoming inertia: increasing public health departments' access to evidence-based information and promoting usage to inform practice.

    PubMed

    LaPelle, Nancy R; Dahlen, Karen; Gabella, Barbara A; Juhl, Ashley L; Martin, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the New England Region-National Network of Libraries of Medicine at University of Massachusetts Medical School received funding to improve information access for public health departments in 6 New England states and Colorado. Public health departments were provided with desktop digital access to licensed e-resources available through special pricing. In January through mid-April 2012, we evaluated the effectiveness of providing access to and training for using e-resources to public health department staff to motivate usage in practice. We found that additional strategies are needed to accomplish this.

  9. Informal politics and inequity of access to health care in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Despite the importance of political institutions in shaping the social environment, the causal impact of politics on health care access and inequalities has been understudied. Even when considered, research tends to focus on the effects of formal macro-political institutions such as the welfare state. We investigate how micro-politics and informal institutions affect access to care. Methods This study uses a mixed-methods approach, combining findings from a household survey (n = 1789) and qualitative interviews (n = 310) in Lebanon. Multivariate logistic regression was employed in the analysis of the survey to examine the effect of political activism on access to health care while controlling for age, sex, socioeconomic status, religious commitment and piety. Results We note a significantly positive association between political activism and the probability of receiving health aid (p < .001), with an OR of 4.0 when comparing individuals with the highest political activity to those least active in our sample. Interviews with key informants also reveal that, although a form of “universal coverage” exists in Lebanon whereby any citizen is eligible for coverage of hospitalization fees and treatments, in practice, access to health services is used by political parties and politicians as a deliberate strategy to gain and reward political support from individuals and their families. Conclusions Individuals with higher political activism have better access to health services than others. Informal, micro-level political institutions can have an important impact on health care access and utilization, with potentially detrimental effects on the least politically connected. A truly universal health care system that provides access based on medical need rather than political affiliation is needed to help to alleviate growing health disparities in the Lebanese population. PMID:22571591

  10. Sociotechnical challenges to developing technologies for patient access to health information exchange data

    PubMed Central

    Ancker, Jessica S; Miller, Melissa C; Patel, Vaishali; Kaushal, Rainu

    2014-01-01

    Background Providing patients with access to their medical data is widely expected to help educate and empower them to manage their own health. Health information exchange (HIE) infrastructures could potentially help patients access records across multiple healthcare providers. We studied three HIE organizations as they developed portals to give consumers access to HIE data previously exchanged only among healthcare organizations. Objective To follow the development of new consumer portal technologies, and to identify barriers and facilitators to patient access to HIE data. Methods Semistructured interviews of 15 key informants over a 2-year period spanning the development and early implementation of three new projects, coded according to a sociotechnical framework. Results As the organizations tried to develop functionality that fully served the needs of both providers and patients, plans were altered by technical barriers (primarily related to data standardization) and cultural and legal issues surrounding data access. Organizational changes also played an important role in altering project plans. In all three cases, patient access to data was significantly scaled back from initial plans. Conclusions This prospective study revealed how sociotechnical factors previously identified as important in health information technology success and failure helped to shape the evolution of three novel consumer informatics projects. Barriers to providing patients with seamless access to their HIE data were multifactorial. Remedies will have to address technical, organizational, cultural, and other factors. PMID:24064443

  11. Information access: will make or break consumer-driven health plans.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Bruce; Attridge, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Consumer-driven health plans offer employers potentially significant cost savings. Yet such potential cannot be realized without greater consumer access to price, quality and treatment information. This article describes why consumer-based strategies have taken hold and how consumer-driven plan design and financial incentives are of only limited value in controlling costs. After reviewing the importance and availability of existing health care information, the authors suggest actions employers can take to ensure consumer-driven plans reach their potential.

  12. Patients' access to their health information: a meaningful-use mandate.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marisa L; Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz; Newhouse, Robin P

    2012-11-01

    This department highlights topics in nursing outcomes, research, and evidence-based practice relevant to nurse administrators. In this article, the authors describe patient access to personal health information as it relates to the meaningful-use requirement, technologies that have been used to enhance patient engagement, and the nursing leadership implications.

  13. Path Analysis: Health Promotion Information Access of Parent Caretaking Pattern through Parenting Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunarsih, Tri; Murti, Bhisma; Anantanyu, Sapja; Wijaya, Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    Parents often inhibit learning process organized by education, due to their ignorance about how to educate child well. Incapability of dealing with those changes leads to dysfunctional families, and problematic children. This research aimed: to analyzed the health promotion information access pattern of parent caretaking pattern through parenting…

  14. Progress and challenges: implementation and use of health information technology among critical-access hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Meghan Hufstader; Jones, Emily B; Samy, Leila; King, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    Despite major national investments to support the adoption of health information technology (IT), concerns persist that barriers are inhibiting that adoption and the use of advanced health IT capabilities in rural areas in particular. Using a survey of Medicare-certified critical-access hospitals, we examined electronic health record (EHR) adoption, key EHR functionalities, telehealth, and teleradiology, as well as challenges to EHR adoption. In 2013, 89 percent of critical-access hospitals had implemented a full or partial EHR. Adoption of key EHR capabilities varied. Critical-access hospitals that had certain types of technical assistance and resources available to support health IT were more likely to have adopted health IT capabilities and less likely to report significant challenges to EHR implementation and use, compared to other hospitals in the survey. It is important to ensure that the necessary resources and support are available to critical-access hospitals, especially those that operate independently, to assist them in adopting health IT and becoming able to electronically link to the broader health care system.

  15. Access patterns of a clinic-based health information web site for international travelers.

    PubMed

    Licciardone, John C

    2002-01-01

    A large national telephone survey conducted in 2000 by the Pew Internet & American Life Project estimated that 52 million American adults used the Internet to acquire health information. Based on population estimates, these users comprised 25% of all adults. The growth of online health information coupled with increasing Internet access has led to the emergence of consumer informatics as an outbranching from traditional medical informatics. The ease of international communications afforded by the Internet holds great promise for consumers in the realm of travel medicine. For example, an early study found that a Web site hosted by an international travel medicine clinic was accessed by client computers in more than 100 countries. Nevertheless, relatively little research has been conducted on consumer informatics in travel medicine. An important aspect of consumer informatics involves studying consumers' needs for health information. The purpose of this study was to perform a descriptive analysis of overall use and content-specific access patterns for health information provided on a clinic-based Web site for international travelers.

  16. Using geographic information system tools to improve access to MS specialty care in Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, William J; Cowper-Ripley, Diane; Litt, Eric R; McDowell, Tzu-Yun; Hoffman, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    Access to appropriate and timely healthcare is critical to the overall health and well-being of patients with chronic diseases. In this study, we used geographic information system (GIS) tools to map Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their access to MS specialty care. We created six travel-time bands around VHA facilities with MS specialty care and calculated the number of VHA patients with MS who resided in each time band and the number of patients who lived more than 2 hours from the nearest specialty clinic in fiscal year 2007. We demonstrate the utility of using GIS tools in decision-making by providing three examples of how patients' access to care is affected when additional specialty clinics are added. The mapping technique used in this study provides a powerful and valuable tool for policy and planning personnel who are evaluating how to address underserved populations and areas within the VHA healthcare system.

  17. Racial disparities in health information access: resilience of the Digital Divide.

    PubMed

    Lorence, Daniel P; Park, Heeyoung; Fox, Susannah

    2006-08-01

    Policy initiatives of the late 1990s were believed to have largely eliminated the information "Digital Divide." For healthcare consumers, access to information is an essential part of the consumer-centric framework outlined in the recently proposed national health information initiative. This study sought to examine how racial/ethnic characteristics are associated with Internet use and online health information. Using a cross-sectional nationwide study of reported Internet use and information search in 2000 and 2002, we studied a stratified sample of computer users from the Pew Internet and American Life Project surveys. Adjusted estimates of race/ethnicity and income effects on Internet use and search behaviors were derived from generalized estimating equations. Results show wide gaps in the use of computers between Hispanics and Whites (OR = 0.593 [0.440, 0.798]) and between African-Americans and Whites (OR = 0.554 [0.427, 0.720]) in 2000 significantly narrowed in 2002 (OR of Hispanic to white = 1.250 [0.874, 1.789]; OR of African-American to Whites = (0.793 [0.551, 1.141]). Gaps in access to the Internet, however, remained consistent between 2000-2002. Differences in health information seeking between Hispanics and Whites existed in both 2000 and 2002. 56% of White Internet users at some time searched for online health information, whereas 42% of Hispanic Internet users did so in 2000. By 2002, these percentages had increased to 13.4 and 15.8%, respectively. Data highlight the persistence of "Digitally Underserved Groups," despite recent Divide reduction strategies.

  18. Integrative Literature Review: A Review of Literature Related to Geographical Information Systems, Healthcare Access, and Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Barbara Ann

    2008-01-01

    Differences in access to healthcare services and the resulting adverse health outcomes are major public health priorities. The Institute of Medicine and the Department of Health and Human Services have identified the need for strategies to improve access to healthcare services and to support the improvement of health outcomes. The literature documents health disparities associated with healthcare access and health outcomes from a geographic perspective. Place of residence, location of healthcare services, and geography in general are important factors in the analysis of health. Geographical information systems (GISs) are an emerging technology in the analysis of health from a geographical or location context. As a type of information technology, GISs are potentially powerful assessment tools for the investigation of healthcare access, health outcomes, and the possible resulting health disparities. Their ability to integrate health data with mapping functions allows for visualization, exploration, and modeling of health patterns. Application of GIS technology using health data can help in describing and explaining disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes. The studies reviewed demonstrated the use of GISs to investigate various aspects of healthcare access and health outcomes, including environmental variables of Lyme disease, sociodemographic variables and teen pregnancy, geographical disparities in breast cancer mortality by racial groups, PCP and AIDS prevalence, and factors of a leptospirosis disease outbreak. The literature reviewed shows effective integration and analysis of health data using GIS technology. PMID:18698429

  19. Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    Health risk assessment is based on access to comprehensive information about potentially hazardous agents in question. Relevant information is scattered throughout the literature, and often is not readily accessible. To be useful in assessment efforts, emerging scientific findings, risk assess parameters, and associated data must be compiled and evaluated systemically. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are among the federal agencies heavily involved in this effort. This symposium was a direct response by EPA and ORNL to the expressed needs of individuals involved in assessing risks from chemical exposure. In an effort to examine the state of the risk assessment process, the availability of toxicological information, and the future development and transfer of this information, the symposium provided an excellent cadre of speakers and participants from state and federal agencies, academia and research laboratories to address these topics. This stimulating and productive gathering discussed concerns associated with (1) environmental contamination by chemicals; (2) laws regulating chemicals; (3) information needs and resources; (4) applications; (5) challenges and priorities; and (6)future issues. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  20. Public library computer training for older adults to access high-quality Internet health information

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bo; Bugg, Julie M.

    2010-01-01

    An innovative experiment to develop and evaluate a public library computer training program to teach older adults to access and use high-quality Internet health information involved a productive collaboration among public libraries, the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and a Library and Information Science (LIS) academic program at a state university. One hundred and thirty-one older adults aged 54–89 participated in the study between September 2007 and July 2008. Key findings include: a) participants had overwhelmingly positive perceptions of the training program; b) after learning about two NIH websites (http://nihseniorhealth.gov and http://medlineplus.gov) from the training, many participants started using these online resources to find high quality health and medical information and, further, to guide their decision-making regarding a health- or medically-related matter; and c) computer anxiety significantly decreased (p < .001) while computer interest and efficacy significantly increased (p = .001 and p < .001, respectively) from pre- to post-training, suggesting statistically significant improvements in computer attitudes between pre- and post-training. The findings have implications for public libraries, LIS academic programs, and other organizations interested in providing similar programs in their communities. PMID:20161649

  1. Public library computer training for older adults to access high-quality Internet health information.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Bugg, Julie M

    2009-09-01

    An innovative experiment to develop and evaluate a public library computer training program to teach older adults to access and use high-quality Internet health information involved a productive collaboration among public libraries, the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and a Library and Information Science (LIS) academic program at a state university. One hundred and thirty-one older adults aged 54-89 participated in the study between September 2007 and July 2008. Key findings include: a) participants had overwhelmingly positive perceptions of the training program; b) after learning about two NIH websites (http://nihseniorhealth.gov and http://medlineplus.gov) from the training, many participants started using these online resources to find high quality health and medical information and, further, to guide their decision-making regarding a health- or medically-related matter; and c) computer anxiety significantly decreased (p < .001) while computer interest and efficacy significantly increased (p = .001 and p < .001, respectively) from pre- to post-training, suggesting statistically significant improvements in computer attitudes between pre- and post-training. The findings have implications for public libraries, LIS academic programs, and other organizations interested in providing similar programs in their communities.

  2. Web Content Accessibility of Consumer Health Information Web Sites for People with Disabilities: A Cross Sectional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Parmanto, Bambang

    2004-01-01

    Background The World Wide Web (WWW) has become an increasingly essential resource for health information consumers. The ability to obtain accurate medical information online quickly, conveniently and privately provides health consumers with the opportunity to make informed decisions and participate actively in their personal care. Little is known, however, about whether the content of this online health information is equally accessible to people with disabilities who must rely on special devices or technologies to process online information due to their visual, hearing, mobility, or cognitive limitations. Objective To construct a framework for an automated Web accessibility evaluation; to evaluate the state of accessibility of consumer health information Web sites; and to investigate the possible relationships between accessibility and other features of the Web sites, including function, popularity and importance. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study of the state of accessibility of health information Web sites to people with disabilities. We selected 108 consumer health information Web sites from the directory service of a Web search engine. A measurement framework was constructed to automatically measure the level of Web Accessibility Barriers (WAB) of Web sites following Web accessibility specifications. We investigated whether there was a difference between WAB scores across various functional categories of the Web sites, and also evaluated the correlation between the WAB and Alexa traffic rank and Google Page Rank of the Web sites. Results We found that none of the Web sites we looked at are completely accessible to people with disabilities, i.e., there were no sites that had no violation of Web accessibility rules. However, governmental and educational health information Web sites do exhibit better Web accessibility than the other categories of Web sites (P < 0.001). We also found that the correlation between the WAB score and the popularity of a

  3. Improved Veteran Access to Care through the Veteran Health Information Exchange (VHIE) Retail Immunization Coordination Project

    PubMed Central

    Botts, Nathan; Pan, Eric; Olinger, Lois; Donahue, Margaret; Hsing, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veteran Health Information Exchange (VHIE, formerly Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record, or VLER) Retail Immunization Coordination Project established a partnership between VA and Walgreens to empower Veterans to elect to receive their immunizations at a local Walgreens, which might be located closer to their home than their nearest VA facility. Analysis of Veterans immunized at Walgreens between September 2014 and January 2015 showed that 64% of study Veterans now traveled <5 miles to receive their immunization, 12% of study Veterans traveled between 5 to 10 miles, and 24% of study Veterans traveled more than 10 miles. In addition, we note that 93% of Veterans traveled less than 54 miles, the average distance rural Veterans traveled to the nearest VA facility. We conclude that the VHIE Retail Immunization Coordination Project improved Veteran access to healthcare and discuss future directions of this effort. PMID:28269827

  4. Perceptions of Medicaid Beneficiaries Regarding the Usefulness of Accessing Personal Health Information and Services through a Patient Internet Portal

    PubMed Central

    Lobach, David F.; Willis, Janese M.; Macri, Jennifer M.; Simo, Jessica; Anstrom, Kevin J.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing emphasis is being placed on the importance of information technology to improve the safety and quality of healthcare. However, concern is growing that these potential benefits will not be equally distributed across the population because of a widening digital divide along racial and socioeconomic lines. In this pilot study, we surveyed 31 Medicaid beneficiaries to ascertain their interest in and projected use of a healthcare patient Internet portal. We found that most Medicaid beneficiaries (or their parents/guardians) were very interested in accessing personal health information about themselves (or their dependents) online. Additionally, they were interested in accessing healthcare services online. We also found that many Medicaid beneficiaries have Internet access, including a slight majority with access to high-speed Internet connections. Our study revealed significant concern about the privacy of online health information. PMID:17238393

  5. [Access to health information sources in Spain. how to combat "infoxication"].

    PubMed

    Navas-Martin, Miguel Ángel; Albornos-Muñoz, Laura; Escandell-García, Cintia

    2012-01-01

    Internet has become a priceless source for finding health information for both patients and healthcare professionals. However, the universality and the abundance of information can lead to unfounded conclusions about health issues that can confuse further than clarify the health information. This aspect causes intoxication of information: infoxication. The question lies in knowing how to filter the information that is useful, accurate and relevant for our purposes. In this regard, integrative portals, such as the Biblioteca Virtual de Salud, compile information at different levels (international, national and regional), different types of resources (databases, repositories, bibliographic sources, etc.), becoming a starting point for obtaining quality information.

  6. Improving Access to Online Health Information With Conversational Agents: A Randomized Controlled Experiment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Conventional Web-based search engines may be unusable by individuals with low health literacy for finding health-related information, thus precluding their use by this population. Objective We describe a conversational search engine interface designed to allow individuals with low health and computer literacy identify and learn about clinical trials on the Internet. Methods A randomized trial involving 89 participants compared the conversational search engine interface (n=43) to the existing conventional keyword- and facet-based search engine interface (n=46) for the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials database. Each participant performed 2 tasks: finding a clinical trial for themselves and finding a trial that met prespecified criteria. Results Results indicated that all participants were more satisfied with the conversational interface based on 7-point self-reported satisfaction ratings (task 1: mean 4.9, SD 1.8 vs mean 3.2, SD 1.8, P<.001; task 2: mean 4.8, SD 1.9 vs mean 3.2, SD 1.7, P<.001) compared to the conventional Web form-based interface. All participants also rated the trials they found as better meeting their search criteria, based on 7-point self-reported scales (task 1: mean 3.7, SD 1.6 vs mean 2.7, SD 1.8, P=.01; task 2: mean 4.8, SD 1.7 vs mean 3.4, SD 1.9, P<.01). Participants with low health literacy failed to find any trials that satisfied the prespecified criteria for task 2 using the conventional search engine interface, whereas 36% (5/14) were successful at this task using the conversational interface (P=.05). Conclusions Conversational agents can be used to improve accessibility to Web-based searches in general and clinical trials in particular, and can help decrease recruitment bias against disadvantaged populations. PMID:26728964

  7. [The concepts of health access].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Raquel Maia; Ciconelli, Rozana Mesquita

    2012-03-01

    This article describes four dimensions of health access-availability, acceptability, ability to pay and information-correlating these dimensions to indicators and discussing the complexity of the concept of access. For a study of these four dimensions, searches were conducted using the PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, and World Health Organization Library & Information Networks for Knowledge (WHOLIS) databases. Large-circulation media vehicles, such as The Economist, The Washington Post, and the BBC network were also searched. The concept of health access has become more complex with time. The first analyses, carried out in the 1970s, suggested a strong emphasis on geographical (availability) and financial (ability to pay) aspects. More recently, the literature has focused on less tangible aspects, such as cultural, educational, and socioeconomic issues, incorporating the element of acceptability into the notion of health access. The literature also shows that information provides the starting point for access to health, in association with health empowerment and literacy for health care decision-making. The study concludes that improvements in access to health and the guarantee of equity will not be achieved by initiatives focusing on health care systems alone, but rather will depend on intersectoral actions and social and economic policies aimed at eliminating income and education differences.

  8. Using geographical information systems for defining the accessibility to health care facilities in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Murad, Abdulkader A

    2014-12-01

    Spatial data play an important role in the planning of health care facilities and their allocation. Today, geographical information systems (GIS) provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analysing health care spatial data; indeed health geoinformatics is an emerging discipline that uses innovative geospatial technology to investigate health issues. The purpose of this paper is to define how GIS can be used for assessing the level of accessibility to health care. The paper identifies the advantages of using GIS in health care planning and covers GIS-based international accessibility with a focus on GIS applications for health care facilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A geodatabase that includes location of health services, road networks, health care demand and population districts was created using ArcGIS software. The geodatabase produced is based on collected data and covers issues, such as defining the spatial distribution of health care facilities, evaluating health demand types and modelling health service areas based on analysis of driving-time and straight-line distances.

  9. Gender Differences in South African Men and Women's Access to and Evaluation of Informal Sources of Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Erin; Cooper, Diane; Gibbs, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    While much research has documented unsatisfactory sexual and reproductive health (SRH) awareness among young people in South Africa, understanding of gender differences in access to and evaluation of SRH information is limited. This paper concerned itself with men and women's informal sources and content of SRH, and gendered divergences around…

  10. Direct and Electronic Health Record Access to the Clinical Decision Support for Immunizations in the Minnesota Immunization Information System

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Sripriya; Bieringer, Aaron; Wallerius, Stephanie; Jensen, Daniel; Winden, Tamara; Muscoplat, Miriam Halstead

    2016-01-01

    Immunization information systems (IIS) are population-based and confidential computerized systems maintained by public health agencies containing individual data on immunizations from participating health care providers. IIS hold comprehensive vaccination histories given across providers and over time. An important aspect to IIS is the clinical decision support for immunizations (CDSi), consisting of vaccine forecasting algorithms to determine needed immunizations. The study objective was to analyze the CDSi presentation by IIS in Minnesota (Minnesota Immunization Information Connection [MIIC]) through direct access by IIS interface and by access through electronic health records (EHRs) to outline similarities and differences. The immunization data presented were similar across the three systems examined, but with varying ability to integrate data across MIIC and EHR, which impacts immunization data reconciliation. Study findings will lead to better understanding of immunization data display, clinical decision support, and user functionalities with the ultimate goal of promoting IIS CDSi to improve vaccination rates. PMID:28050128

  11. Examining Health Information Technology Implementation Success Factors in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monkman, Blake D.

    2016-01-01

    As the role of information technology increases throughout the world, healthcare providers in the United States face industry and governmental pressures to implement health information technology (HIT) as a tool to improve healthcare costs, quality, and safety. The problem addressed in this study was the relatively low HIT implementation success…

  12. Nurses’ Use of Mobile Devices to Access Information in Health Care Environments in Australia: A Survey of Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The growth of digital technology has created challenges for safe and appropriate use of mobile or portable devices during work-integrated learning (WIL) in health care environments. Personal and professional use of technology has outpaced the development of policy or codes of practice for guiding its use at the workplace. There is a perceived risk that portable devices may distract from provision of patient or client care if used by health professionals or students during employment or WIL. Objective This study aimed to identify differences in behavior of undergraduate nurses in accessing information, using a portable or mobile device, when undertaking WIL compared to other non-work situations. Methods A validated online survey was administered to students while on placement in a range of health care settings in two Australian states. Results There were 84 respondents, with 56% (n=47) reporting access to a mobile or portable device. Differences in use of a mobile device away from, compared with during WIL, were observed for non-work related activities such as messaging (P<.001), social networking (P<.001), shopping on the Internet (P=.01), conducting personal business online (P=.01), and checking or sending non-work related texts or emails to co-workers (P=.04). Study-related activities were conducted more regularly away from the workplace and included accessing University sites for information (P=.03) and checking or sending study-related text messages or emails to friends or co-workers (P=.01). Students continued to access nursing, medical, professional development, and study-related information away from the workplace. Conclusions Undergraduate nurses limit their access to non-work or non-patient centered information while undertaking WIL. Work-related mobile learning is being undertaken, in situ, by the next generation of nurses who expect easy access to mobile or portable devices at the workplace, to ensure safe and competent care is delivered to

  13. Inventing the Right to Know: Herbert Abrams's Efforts to Democratize Access to Workplace Health Hazard Information in the 1950s.

    PubMed

    Derickson, Alan

    2016-02-01

    In the 1980s, the right-to-know movement won American workers unprecedented access to information about the health hazards they faced on the job. The precursors and origins of these initiatives to extend workplace democracy remain quite obscure. This study brings to light the efforts of one of the early proponents of wider dissemination of information related to hazard recognition and control. Through his work as a state public health official and as an advisor to organized labor in the 1950s, Herbert Abrams was a pioneer in advocating not only broader sharing of knowledge but also more expansive rights of workers and their organizations to act on that knowledge.

  14. Spatial accessibility of the population to urban health centres in Kermanshah, Islamic Republic of Iran: a geographic information systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Reshadat, S; Saedi, S; Zangeneh, A; Ghasemi, S R; Gilan, N R; Karbasi, A; Bavandpoor, E

    2015-09-08

    Geographic information systems (GIS) analysis has not been widely used in underdeveloped countries to ensure that vulnerable populations have accessibility to primary health-care services. This study applied GIS methods to analyse the spatial accessibility to urban primary-care centres of the population in Kermanshah city, Islamic Republic of Iran, by age and sex groups. In a descriptive-analytical study over 3 time periods, network analysis, mean centre and standard distance methods were applied using ArcGIS 9.3. The analysis was based on a standard radius of 750 m distance from health centres, walking speed of 1 m/s and desired access time to health centres of 12.5 mins. The proportion of the population with inadequate geographical access to health centres rose from 47.3% in 1997 to 58.4% in 2012. The mean centre and standard distance mapping showed that the spatial distribution of health centres in Kermanshah needed to be adjusted to changes in population distribution.

  15. Measuring access to urban health services using Geographical Information System (GIS): a case study of health service management in Bandar Abbas, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Masoodi, Mehdi; Rahimzadeh, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The current distribution of and access to health services along with the future health needs of the population have prompted wide application of Geographic Information Systems (GISs). During recent years, GIS has been used in public health management for planning and organization of healthcare services. This study investigates geographical accessibility of residential areas in Bandar Abbas, Iran to healthcare services. Methods: Accessibility was evaluated by using Floating Catchment Area (FCA), minimum distance methods and Response Time (RT) accessibility technique. Results: More accurate measures of distances in Bandar Abbas, illustrated that Euclidean distances were not strongly correlated with network distances. The RT accessibility technique that utilizes shortest network path and time distances, presented detailed information about all the possible positions of the patients with respect to available healthcare services based on optimum and critical response times. Conclusion: Locations of public health services in Bandar Abbas were not related to the sites of populations. The RT accessibility technique provides a reasonably sensitive and robust evaluation of accessibility. PMID:26188808

  16. "La Comunidad Habla": Using Internet Community-Based Information Interventions to Increase Empowerment and Access to Health Care of Low Income Latino/a Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginossar, Tamar; Nelson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    The innovative educational communication interventions described in this paper include the use of bi-lingual, low literacy level websites and training created by low income Latina women to increase access to health care, health information, and the internet. We focus on one grassroots intervention, aimed at increasing access to health care for…

  17. Tools for assessing the quality and accessibility of online health information: initial testing among breast cancer websites.

    PubMed

    Whitten, Pamela; Nazione, Samantha; Lauckner, Carolyn

    2013-12-01

    Health websites are used frequently, but there are many concerns about their value as information sources. Additionally, there are numerous personal barriers that prevent individuals from wholly benefitting from them. In order to assess the quality of health websites and their accessibility to users, we created tools based on previous research that examine design aspects, information validity, motivational health content and literacy content. To test these tools, we examined 155 breast cancer websites and created scores for each assessment tool to describe the percent of constructs on the average website. Results demonstrated that websites performed best on the design tool followed by the information validity, motivational health content and literacy assessment tools. The average website contained the majority of the design and information validity constructs, but only about a third of the motivational health or literacy constructs. Multiple items from the motivational health content and literacy assessment tools were not found on any of the websites, and many were only represented on a handful of sites. Overall, the assessment tools were useful in evaluating the quality of websites, and could serve as valuable resources for health website developers in the future.

  18. Improving access to health information for older migrants by using grounded theory and social network analysis to understand their information behaviour and digital technology use.

    PubMed

    Goodall, K T; Newman, L A; Ward, P R

    2014-11-01

    Migrant well-being can be strongly influenced by the migration experience and subsequent degree of mainstream language acquisition. There is little research on how older Culturally And Linguistically Diverse (CALD) migrants who have 'aged in place' find health information, and the role which digital technology plays in this. Although the research for this paper was not focused on cancer, we draw out implications for providing cancer-related information to this group. We interviewed 54 participants (14 men and 40 women) aged 63-94 years, who were born in Italy or Greece, and who migrated to Australia mostly as young adults after World War II. Constructivist grounded theory and social network analysis were used for data analysis. Participants identified doctors, adult children, local television, spouse, local newspaper and radio as the most important information sources. They did not generally use computers, the Internet or mobile phones to access information. Literacy in their birth language, and the degree of proficiency in understanding and using English, influenced the range of information sources accessed and the means used. The ways in which older CALD migrants seek and access information has important implications for how professionals and policymakers deliver relevant information to them about cancer prevention, screening, support and treatment, particularly as information and resources are moved online as part of e-health.

  19. Access to enforcement and disciplinary data: information practices of state health professional regulatory boards of dentistry, medicine and nursing.

    PubMed

    Strong, Denise E

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a study of public access to enforcement and disciplinary information provided by the websites of health professional regulatory boards. The study explored the current state of transparency by specifically examining the availability of disciplinary data on the websites of state boards of medicine, nursing and dentistry. Web sites were reviewed regarding availability of enforcement and disciplinary data on the aforementioned state boards in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The study found that there is more information about individual practitioners available from the boards than ever before. On the other hand, there has not been a comparable increase in information about the administrative practices and the work of the boards. Increased availability of this information would allow public administration and policy researchers to develop performance indicators of state boards and assist in improving policy decisions and allocation of resources.

  20. Sea-change or change challenge? Health information access in developing countries: The U.S. National Library of Medicine experience.

    PubMed

    Royall, J; Lyon, B

    2011-09-01

    Health professionals in developing countries want access to information to help them make changes in health care and contribute to medical research. However, they face challenges of technology limitations, lack of training, and, on the village level, culture and language. This report focuses on the U.S. National Library of Medicine experience with access: for the international medical/scientific community to health information which has been published by researchers in developing countries; for scientists and clinicians in developing countries to their own literature and to that of their colleagues around the world; for medical librarians who are a critical conduit for students, faculty, researchers, and, increasingly, the general public; and for the front line workers at the health center in the village at the end of the line. The fundamental question of whether or not information communication technology can make a difference in access and subsequently in health is illustrated by an anecdote regarding an early intervention in Africa in 1992. From that point, we examine programs to improve access involving malaria researchers, medical journal editors, librarians, and medical students working with local health center staff in the village. Although access is a reality, the positive change in health that the information technology intervention might produce often remains a mirage. Information and technology are not static elements in the equation for better access. They must function together, creating a dialectic in which they transform and inform one another and those whom their combination touches.

  1. Managing Information Resources for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Computer Accommodation.

    This handbook presents guidance for federal managers and other personnel who are unfamiliar with the policy and practice of information accessibility to accommodate users with disabilities and to provide for their effective access to information resources. It addresses federal requirements for accessibility, adopting accessibility as a sound…

  2. Identifying barriers preventing Latina women from accessing WIC online health information.

    PubMed

    Vehawn, Jennifer; Richards, Rickelle; West, Joshua H; Cougar Hall, P; Crookston, Benjamin T; Neiger, Brad L

    2014-08-01

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is a program for low-income women and children under age five. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to accessing online WIC resources among Latina WIC clients. Five focus groups were conducted with Spanish-speaking participants recruited from a single WIC clinic. Two key themes emerged relating to barriers in accessing WIC's online resources. The first theme, access issues, included three subthemes: lack of computer/Internet resources; family barriers to computer use; and computer literacy. The second theme, perceived value of the website, included three subthemes: limited time savings; preference for on-site education; and knowledge about the website. This is the first study to evaluate barriers to accessing online resources among Latina women in the WIC program. WIC sites attempting to increase utilization of online resources may be more successful if they serve clients with easy access to a computer with Internet access. They may also consider strategies to increase the value of the online resources, as compared to their current services offered to clients in a face-to-face setting.

  3. The Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce: a collaboration to improve and protect the public's health, 1995–2006

    PubMed Central

    Cahn, Marjorie A.; Auston, Ione; Selden, Catherine R.; Cogdill, Keith; Baker, Stacy; Cavanaugh, Debra; Elliott, Sterling; Foster, Allison J.; Leep, Carolyn J.; Perez, Debra Joy; Pomietto, Blakely R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The paper provides a complete accounting of the Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce (Partners) initiative since its inception in 1997, including antecedent activities since 1995. Methods: A descriptive overview is provided that is based on a review of meeting summaries, published reports, Websites, project reports, databases, usage statistics, and personal experiences from offices in the National Library of Medicine (NLM), six organizations that collaborate formally with NLM on the Partners initiative, and one outside funding partner. Results: With ten years of experience, the initiative is an effective and unique public-private collaboration that builds on the strengths and needs of the organizations that are involved and the constituencies that they serve. Partners-supported and sponsored projects include satellite broadcasts or Webcasts, training initiatives, Web resource development, a collection of historical literature, and strategies for workforce enumeration and expansion of public health systems research, which provide excellent examples of the benefits realized from collaboration between the public health community and health sciences libraries. Conclusions: With continued funding, existing and new Partners-sponsored projects will be able to fulfill many public health information needs. This collaboration provides excellent opportunities to strengthen the partnership between library science and public health in the use of health information and tools for purposes of improving and protecting the public's health. PMID:17641765

  4. Improving Post-Hospitalization Transition Outcomes through Accessible Health Information Technology and Caregiver Support: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Piette, John D; Striplin, Dana; Marinec, Nicolle; Chen, Jenny; Gregory, Lynn A; Sumerlin, Denise L; DeSantis, Angela M; Gibson, Carolyn; Crause, Ingrid; Rouse, Marylena; Aikens, James E

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this trial is to evaluate a novel intervention designed to improve post-hospitalization support for older adults with chronic conditions via: (a) direct tailored communication to patients using regular automated calls post discharge, (b) support for informal caregivers outside of the patient’s household via structured automated feedback about the patient’s status plus advice about how caregivers can help, and (c) support for care management including a web-based disease management tool and alerts about potential problems. Methods 846 older adults with common chronic conditions are being identified upon hospital admission. Patients are asked to identify a “CarePartner” (CP) living outside their household, i.e., an adult child or other social network member willing to play an active role in their post-discharge transition support. Patient-CP pairs are randomized to the intervention or usual care. Intervention patients receive automated assessment and behavior change calls, and their CPs receives structured feedback and advice via email and automated calls following each assessment. Clinical teams have access to assessment results via the web and receive automated reports about urgent health problems. Patients complete surveys at baseline, 30 days, and 90 days post discharge; utilization data is obtained from hospital records. CPs, other caregivers, and clinicians are interviewed to evaluate intervention effects on processes of self-care support, caregiver stress and communication, and the intervention’s potential for broader implementation. The primary outcome is 30-day readmission rates; other outcomes measured at 30 days and 90 days include functional status, self-care behaviors, and mortality risk. Conclusion This trial uses accessible health technologies and coordinated communication among informal caregivers and clinicians to fill the growing gap between what discharged patients need and available resources. A unique feature of

  5. Deaf Adolescents' Learning of Cardiovascular Health Information: Sources and Access Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Scott R.; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Hauser, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Deaf individuals have more cardiovascular risks than the general population that are believed to be related to their cardiovascular health knowledge disparities. This phenomenological study describes where 20 deaf sign language-using adolescents from Rochester, New York, many who possess many positive characteristics to support their health…

  6. The North-South information highway: case studies of publication access among health researchers in resource-poor countries

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, Joanna; Fottrell, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Background Less than 2% of scientific publications originate in low-income countries. Transfer of information from South to North and from South to South is grossly limited and hinders understanding of global health, while Northern-generated information fails to adequately address the needs of a Southern readership. Methods A survey of a new generation of health researchers from nine low-income countries was conducted using a combination of email questionnaires and face-to-face interviews. Data were gathered on personal experiences, use and aspirations regarding access and contribution to published research. Results A total of 23 individuals from 9 countries responded. Preference for journal use over textbooks was apparent, however a preference for print over online formats was described among African respondents compared to respondents from other areas. Almost all respondents (96%) described ambition to publish in international journals, but cited English language as a significant barrier. Conclusion The desire to contribute to and utilise contemporary scientific debate appears to be strong among study respondents. However, longstanding barriers remain in place and innovative thinking and new publishing models are required to overcome them. PMID:20027241

  7. Improving Nigerian health policymakers' capacity to access and utilize policy relevant evidence: outcome of information and communication technology training workshop.

    PubMed

    Uneke, Chigozie Jesse; Ezeoha, Abel Ebeh; Uro-Chukwu, Henry; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum Thecla; Ogbu, Ogbonnaya; Onwe, Friday; Edoga, Chima

    2015-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) tools are known to facilitate communication and processing of information and sharing of knowledge by electronic means. In Nigeria, the lack of adequate capacity on the use of ICT by health sector policymakers constitutes a major impediment to the uptake of research evidence into the policymaking process. The objective of this study was to improve the knowledge and capacity of policymakers to access and utilize policy relevant evidence. A modified "before and after" intervention study design was used in which outcomes were measured on the target participants both before the intervention is implemented and after. A 4-point likert scale according to the degree of adequacy; 1 = grossly inadequate, 4 = very adequate was employed. This study was conducted in Ebonyi State, south-eastern Nigeria and the participants were career health policy makers. A two-day intensive ICT training workshop was organized for policymakers who had 52 participants in attendance. Topics covered included: (i). intersectoral partnership/collaboration; (ii). Engaging ICT in evidence-informed policy making; use of ICT for evidence synthesis; (iv) capacity development on the use of computer, internet and other ICT. The pre-workshop mean of knowledge and capacity for use of ICT ranged from 2.19-3.05, while the post-workshop mean ranged from 2.67-3.67 on 4-point scale. The percentage increase in mean of knowledge and capacity at the end of the workshop ranged from 8.3%-39.1%. Findings of this study suggest that policymakers' ICT competence relevant to evidence-informed policymaking can be enhanced through training workshop.

  8. Improving Nigerian health policymakers’ capacity to access and utilize policy relevant evidence: outcome of information and communication technology training workshop

    PubMed Central

    Uneke, Chigozie Jesse; Ezeoha, Abel Ebeh; Uro-Chukwu, Henry; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum Thecla; Ogbu, Ogbonnaya; Onwe, Friday; Edoga, Chima

    2015-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) tools are known to facilitate communication and processing of information and sharing of knowledge by electronic means. In Nigeria, the lack of adequate capacity on the use of ICT by health sector policymakers constitutes a major impediment to the uptake of research evidence into the policymaking process. The objective of this study was to improve the knowledge and capacity of policymakers to access and utilize policy relevant evidence. A modified “before and after” intervention study design was used in which outcomes were measured on the target participants both before the intervention is implemented and after. A 4-point likert scale according to the degree of adequacy; 1 = grossly inadequate, 4 = very adequate was employed. This study was conducted in Ebonyi State, south-eastern Nigeria and the participants were career health policy makers. A two-day intensive ICT training workshop was organized for policymakers who had 52 participants in attendance. Topics covered included: (i). intersectoral partnership/collaboration; (ii). Engaging ICT in evidence-informed policy making; use of ICT for evidence synthesis; (iv) capacity development on the use of computer, internet and other ICT. The pre-workshop mean of knowledge and capacity for use of ICT ranged from 2.19-3.05, while the post-workshop mean ranged from 2.67-3.67 on 4-point scale. The percentage increase in mean of knowledge and capacity at the end of the workshop ranged from 8.3%-39.1%. Findings of this study suggest that policymakers’ ICT competence relevant to evidence-informed policymaking can be enhanced through training workshop. PMID:26448807

  9. Opportunities for engaging low-income, vulnerable populations in health care: a systematic review of homeless persons' access to and use of information technologies.

    PubMed

    McInnes, D Keith; Li, Alice E; Hogan, Timothy P

    2013-12-01

    We systematically reviewed the health and social science literature on access to and use of information technologies by homeless persons by searching 5 bibliographic databases. Articles were included if they were in English, represented original research, appeared in peer-reviewed publications, and addressed our research questions. Sixteen articles met our inclusion criteria. We found that mobile phone ownership ranged from 44% to 62%; computer ownership, from 24% to 40%; computer access and use, from 47% to 55%; and Internet use, from 19% to 84%. Homeless persons used technologies for a range of purposes, some of which were health related. Many homeless persons had access to information technologies, suggesting possible health benefits to developing programs that link homeless persons to health care through mobile phones and the Internet.

  10. Opportunities for Engaging Low-Income, Vulnerable Populations in Health Care: A Systematic Review of Homeless Persons’ Access to and Use of Information Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Alice E.; Hogan, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    We systematically reviewed the health and social science literature on access to and use of information technologies by homeless persons by searching 5 bibliographic databases. Articles were included if they were in English, represented original research, appeared in peer-reviewed publications, and addressed our research questions. Sixteen articles met our inclusion criteria. We found that mobile phone ownership ranged from 44% to 62%; computer ownership, from 24% to 40%; computer access and use, from 47% to 55%; and Internet use, from 19% to 84%. Homeless persons used technologies for a range of purposes, some of which were health related. Many homeless persons had access to information technologies, suggesting possible health benefits to developing programs that link homeless persons to health care through mobile phones and the Internet. PMID:24148036

  11. Electronic Information: Options for Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesch, Oliver

    1994-01-01

    Discusses three electronic information formats: CD-ROM, tape loads, and online hosts; reviews some of the hardware platforms used for accessing information in these formats; and discusses some of the issues involved in interconnecting computer systems to increase access to electronic collections. (Author)

  12. Accessing Sexual and Reproductive Health Information and Services: A Mixed Methods Study of Young Women's Needs and Experiences in Soweto, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Lince-Deroche, Naomi; Hargey, Adila; Holt, Kelsey; Shochet, Tara

    2015-03-01

    Young women and girls in South Africa are at high risk of unintended pregnancy and HIV. Previous studies have reported barriers to contraceptive and other sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services among young women in this context. We aimed to assess young women's SRH knowledge and experiences and to determine how they get SRH information and services in Soweto, South Africa using quantitative and qualitative methods. Young women, aged 18-24, recruited from primary health clinics and a shopping mall, reported that they have access to SRH information and know where to obtain services. However there are challenges to accessing and utilizing information and services including providers' unsupportive attitudes, uneven power dynamics in relationships and communication issues with parents and community members. There is a need to assist young women in understanding the significance of SRH information. They need access to age-appropriate, youth-friendly services in order to have healthy sexual experiences.

  13. HealthyME HealthyU(©2010UCPGB): a collaborative project to enhance access to health information and services for individuals with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Brian F; O'Neal, Marcia R; Firsing, Stephen L; Smith, Kay Hogan; Chandan, Priya; Schmidt, Anne; Jackson, Jeri B

    2010-01-01

    In response to the limited information about health information and training needs among persons with disabilities, a collaborative group of Alabama researchers, educators, and clinicians was formed to implement a statewide needs assessment with support provided by the Alabama Council for Developmental Disabilities and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. Educational and assessment activities were guided by the Systems Model of Clinical Preventive Care and Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) methodology. Four constructs from the 2007 HINTS Annotated Version were identified as relevant to the concepts of local interest. Results of printed and online surveys administered to 251 family and other caregivers, 87 individuals with disabilities, 110 clinical service providers, and 570 health professions students revealed outstanding health communication needs to improve access to reliable consumer information and clinical services. HealthyME HealthyU(©2010UCPGB) developed new educational materials that address issues identified from the needs assessment, specifically (a) accessibility of health care facilities; (b) patient-provider communication; (c) personal health management by consumers and families/caregivers; and (d) sources of trustworthy electronic health information. Six brief digital video training modules were developed for consumers, families, and professionals featuring as speakers health care providers, health professions students, and individuals with cognitive disabilities. Following field testing, video modules were revised and then widely distributed to consumers, family caregivers, and service providers. Preliminary evaluation indicates content is relevant and comprehensible to individuals with disabilities.

  14. Accessibility of Outdated Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Edward J.; Cook, Anne E.; Gueraud, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    In 2 previous studies (O'Brien, Rizzella, Albrecht, & Halleran, 1998; Zwaan & Madden, 2004), researchers have provided conflicting accounts about whether outdated information continues to influence the comprehension of subsequent text. The current set of experiments was designed to explore further the impact of outdated information on…

  15. The Role of the Adult Educator in Helping Learners Access and Select Quality Health Information on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Melissa; Grabowsky, Adelia

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, 45 percent of American adults had used the Internet to search for health information. However, according to a 2009 report, the number had increased to 71 percent of adults ages thirty to forty-nine and 46 percent of those 50 and older who had sought health information online. While the number of adults using the Internet to search for…

  16. Influence of Internet Accessibility and Demographic factors on utilization of Web-based Health Information Resources by Resident Doctors in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ajuwon, GA; Popoola, SO

    2015-01-01

    Background The internet is a huge library with avalanche of information resources including healthcare information. There are numerous studies on use of electronic resources by healthcare providers including medical practitioners however, there is a dearth of information on the patterns of use of web-based health information resource by resident doctors in Nigeria. This study therefore investigates the influence of internet accessibility and demographic factors on utilization of web-based health information resources by resident doctors in tertiary healthcare institutions in Nigeria. Methods Descriptive survey design was adopted for this study. The population of study consisted of medical doctors undergoing residency training in 13 tertiary healthcare institutions in South-West Nigeria. The tertiary healthcare institutions were Federal Medical Centres, University Teaching Hospitals and Specialist Hospitals (Neuropsychiatric and Orthopaedic). A pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used for data analysis. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson Product Moment correlation and multiple regression analysis. Results The mean age of the respondents was 34 years and males were in the majority (69.0%). A total of 96.1% respondents had access to the Internet. E-mail (X̄=5.40, SD=0.91), Google (X̄=5.26, SD=1.38), Yahoo (X̄=5.15, SD=4.44) were used weekly by the respondents. Preparation for Seminar/Grand Round presentation (X̄=8.4, SD=1.92), research (X̄=7.8, SD=2.70) and communication (X̄=7.6, SD=2.60) were ranked high as purposes for use of web-based information resources. There is a strong, positive and significant relationship between internet accessibility and utilization of web-based health information resources (r=0.628, p<0.05). Internet accessibility (B=0.911) and demographic factors: gender (B=−2.027), designation (B=−0.343) educational

  17. Accessible Electronic and Information Technology

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Policy establishes EPA's responsibilities and procedures for making its Electronic and Information Technology (EIT) products accessible to all people, including people with disabilities, in accordance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act.

  18. The Influences of Health Insurance and Access to Information on Prostate Cancer Screening among Men in Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Luginaah, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Although research demonstrates the public health burden of prostate cancer among men in the Caribbean, relatively little is known about the factors that underlie the low levels of testing for the disease among this population. Study Design. A cross-sectional study of prostate cancer testing behaviours among men aged 40–60 years in Dominican Republic using the Demographic and Health Survey (2013). Methods. We use hierarchical binary logit regression models and average treatment effects combined with propensity score matching to explore the determinants of prostate screening as well as the average effect of health insurance coverage on screening. The use of hierarchical binary logit regression enabled us to control for the effect of unobserved heterogeneity at the cluster level that may affect prostate cancer testing behaviours. Results. Screening varied significantly with health insurance coverage, knowledge of cholesterol level, education, and wealth. Insured men were more likely to test for prostate cancer (OR = 1.65, p = 0.01) compared to the uninsured. Conclusions. The expansion and restructuring of Dominican Republic universal health insurance scheme to ensure equity in access may improve health access that would potentially impact positively on prostate cancer screening among men. PMID:27034669

  19. Finding Good Health Information on the Internet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Information Finding Good Health Information on the Internet Past Issues / Fall 2016 Table of Contents Stephanie ... conditions, medications, and wellness issues. Our site provides access to information produced by the National Library of ...

  20. Access for all? A survey of health librarians in the north-west of England on provision of information to patients.

    PubMed

    King, Colette; Hornby, Susan

    2003-12-01

    This study examined the role that health librarians could play in helping patients to find information. A questionnaire survey was sent out to 50 health librarians in the north-west of England. It examined the following: the type of library and users, access to information for patients, librarians' attitudes to provision of information to patients and their knowledge of other sources available to their users. Ninety-seven per cent of librarians said that they could recommend quality information sources to patients, but many suggested that there were practical problems in allowing patients to use health libraries due to lack of appropriate resources, facilities and funding. Advantages of health library involvement in patient information include having a local point of contact for patients and the ability of librarians to find, evaluate and organize good-quality resources. However, health library staff may not have enough time to answer enquiries from the public and may lack training in dealing with patients. Innovation, especially in developing on-line services, could offer a way to provide a service without overloading the physical requirements of a library. Librarians could also collaborate with other staff to improve patient information.

  1. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  2. Testing the importance of family solidarity, community structure, information access, and social capital in predicting nutrition health knowledge and food choices in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Robert L; Jicha, Karl A; Thompson, Gretchen H

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of family solidarity, community structure, information access, social capital, and socioeconomic status on the extent of nutrition and health knowledge (NHK) among primary household meal planners. In turn, we pose the question: does this knowledge influence dietary decision making? Data are taken from a survey determining socioeconomic impacts of vitamin A fortified peanut butter on Philippine households. Questions on the relationships of nutrition to health were selected to construct a knowledge index on which household respondents could be ranked. We then tested hypotheses regarding what types of individual, family-level, and community structural characteristics would predict performance on this index. The results indicate that the strongest predictors of NHK come from sociological theory related to family solidarity and community centrality, in addition to information accessibility and household income. Our findings also indicate that NHK influences dietary choices with regard to the purchase of a vitamin fortified staple food product, which is essential when addressing nutritional deficiency problems in developing countries.

  3. Health websites: accessibility and usability for American sign language users.

    PubMed

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Naturale, Joan; Paludneviciene, Raylene; Smith, Scott R; Werfel, Emily; Doolittle, Richard; Jacobs, Stephen; DeCaro, James

    2015-01-01

    To date, there have been efforts toward creating better health information access for Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users. However, the usability of websites with access to health information in ASL has not been evaluated. Our article focuses on the usability of four health websites that include ASL videos. We seek to obtain ASL users' perspectives on the navigation of these ASL-accessible websites, finding the health information that they needed, and perceived ease of understanding ASL video content. ASL users (n = 32) were instructed to find specific information on four ASL-accessible websites, and answered questions related to (a) navigation to find the task, (b) website usability, and (c) ease of understanding ASL video content for each of the four websites. Participants also gave feedback on what they would like to see in an ASL health library website, including the benefit of added captioning and/or signer model to medical illustration of health videos. Participants who had lower health literacy had greater difficulty in finding information on ASL-accessible health websites. This article also describes the participants' preferences for an ideal ASL-accessible health website, and concludes with a discussion on the role of accessible websites in promoting health literacy in ASL users.

  4. Dial: A New Campus Information Access System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffian, Steven R.

    1973-01-01

    The author describes a new campus communication system known as the Digital Information Access Line (DIAL) that disseminates taped information via telephone to students, staff, and faculty in the University Community. Dial access, a simple concept of educational technology, allows remote access at will to audio or visual material stored in a…

  5. 28 CFR 17.41 - Access to classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sexual orientation in granting access to classified information. However, the Department may investigate... raised solely on the basis of the sexual orientation of the employee or mental health counseling. (d)...

  6. [Access to early breast cancer diagnosis in the Brazilian Unified National Health System: an analysis of data from the Health Information System].

    PubMed

    Azevedo E Silva, Gulnar; Bustamante-Teixeira, Maria Teresa; Aquino, Estela M L; Tomazelli, Jeane Glaucia; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel

    2014-07-01

    The recent reduction in breast cancer mortality in high-income countries resulted from improvements in early detection and treatment. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Brazilian women. Since 2004, the government has recommended annual clinical breast examination for women aged ≥ 40 years and biannual mammograms for those aged 50-69. This article investigates the degree of implementation of these guidelines using data from the Brazilian Unified National Health System for 2010 according to major geographic region and age group. The findings showed low national mammogram coverage in the target population (32% in the 50-59-year group; 25% from 60 to 69 years). The percentage of women with abnormal radiological findings who underwent biopsy was also low (27% for 50-59 years; 63% for 60-69 years). The number of breast cancer surgeries exceeded the number of cases detected by mammography but was well below the estimated number of incident breast cancer cases in 2010. There are striking regional inequalities in access to early detection and surgery, being the lowest access in the North Region and the highest in the South Region.

  7. DOD Common Access Card Information Brief

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    12 July, 2001 DoD Common Access Card Information Brief Smart Card Project Managers Group REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188...statistics of DoD’s Common Access Card. 15. SUBJECT TERMS IATAC COLLECTION; smart card ; common access card; issuance; infrastructure 16. SECURITY...and statistics of DoD’s Common Access Card. 14. SUBJECT TERMS IATAC Collection, smart card , common access card, issuance infrastructure, 15. NUMBER OF

  8. Internet Use for Health Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... options and preventative measures. 2 However, disparities in Internet access persist by age, race and ethnicity, education, and income. 1 In 2009, 45.5 percent of all adults reported having used the Internet to obtain health information in the past year ( ...

  9. Avoiding health information.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Joshua B; Rintamaki, Lance S; Ramsey, Jason A; Brashers, Dale E

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated why and how individuals avoid health information to support the development of models of uncertainty and information management and offer insights for those dealing with the information and uncertainty inherent to health and illness. Participants from student (n = 507) and community (n = 418) samples reported that they avoided health information to (a) maintain hope or deniability, (b) resist overexposure, (c) accept limits of action, (d) manage flawed information, (e) maintain boundaries, and (f) continue with life/activities. They also reported strategies for avoiding information, including removing or ignoring stimuli (e.g., avoiding people who might provide health advice) and controlling conversations (e.g., withholding information, changing the subject). Results suggest a link between previous experience with serious illness and health information avoidance. Building on uncertainty management theory, this study demonstrated that health information avoidance is situational, relatively common, not necessarily unhealthy, and may be used to accomplish multiple communication goals.

  10. Health information exchange and healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R

    2009-06-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) makes previously inaccessible data available to clinicians, resulting in more complete information. This study tested the hypotheses that HIE information access reduced emergency room visits and inpatient hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among medically indigent adults. HIE access was quantified by how frequently system users' accessed patients' data. Encounter counts were modeled using zero inflated binomial regression. HIE was not accessed for 43% of individuals. Patient factors associated with accessed data included: prior utilization, chronic conditions, and age. Higher levels of information access were significantly associated with increased counts of all encounter types. Results indicate system users were more likely to access HIE for patients for whom the information might be considered most beneficial. Ultimately, these results imply that HIE information access did not transform care in the ways many would expect. Expectations in utilization reductions, however logical, may have to be reevaluated or postponed.

  11. Blogging in support of health information outreach.

    PubMed

    Sapp, Lara; Cogdill, Keith

    2010-07-01

    Social media technologies are transforming the way librarians are collaborating, creating, and disseminating information. This article discusses how librarians at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio created a blog to support their health information outreach activities. Launched in 2007, the Staying Well Connected blog was established with the goal of promoting access to biomedical and health information for consumers and health professionals in the South Texas region. Postings highlight relevant health news, conferences, funding opportunities, and outreach events.

  12. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  13. Assessing the health information needs of unaffiliated health professionals and using training on openly available search tools and resources to provide solutions to their information access challenges and barriers.

    PubMed

    Matsoukas, Konstantina

    2014-01-01

    This article will describe a year-long (2010-11) joint project between Columbia University Medical Center's Health Sciences Library and the Institute for Family Health (IFH), a network of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) serving disadvantaged populations in New York State. This National Institutes of Health-funded pilot project aimed to (a) determine the medical literature and training needs of IFH personnel, (b) develop generic licensing agreements with publishers that would enable a health sciences library to provide access to electronic resources for FQHC personnel, and (c) develop reference/education services for IFH personnel. How the reference and education aims were met will be described and discussed here as the lessons learned from this project may be useful to librarians considering doing instructional outreach to unaffiliated health professionals working at FQHCs nationwide.

  14. Health Care Access Among Deaf People.

    PubMed

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health knowledge for deaf people including those with even higher risk of marginalization. Examples of approaches to improve access to health care, such as providing powerful and visually accessible communication through the use of sign language, the implementation of important communication technologies, and cultural awareness trainings for health professionals are discussed. Programs that raise health knowledge in Deaf communities and models of primary health care centers for deaf people are also presented. Published documents can empower deaf people to realize their right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health.

  15. Personalized medicine and access to health care: potential for inequitable access?

    PubMed

    McClellan, Kelly A; Avard, Denise; Simard, Jacques; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2013-02-01

    Personalized medicine promises that an individual's genetic information will be increasingly used to prioritize access to health care. Use of genetic information to inform medical decision making, however, raises questions as to whether such use could be inequitable. Using breast cancer genetic risk prediction models as an example, on the surface clinical use of genetic information is consistent with the tools provided by evidence-based medicine, representing a means to equitably distribute limited health-care resources. However, at present, given limitations inherent to the tools themselves, and the mechanisms surrounding their implementation, it becomes clear that reliance on an individual's genetic information as part of medical decision making could serve as a vehicle through which disparities are perpetuated under public and private health-care delivery models. The potential for inequities arising from using genetic information to determine access to health care has been rarely discussed. Yet, it raises legal and ethical questions distinct from those raised surrounding genetic discrimination in employment or access to private insurance. Given the increasing role personalized medicine is forecast to play in the provision of health care, addressing a broader view of what constitutes genetic discrimination, one that occurs along a continuum and includes inequitable access, will be needed during the implementation of new applications based on individual genetic profiles. Only by anticipating and addressing the potential for inequitable access to health care occurring from using genetic information will we move closer to realizing the goal of personalized medicine: to improve the health of individuals.

  16. Public access computing in health science libraries.

    PubMed

    Kehm, S

    1987-01-01

    Public access computing in health science libraries began with online computer-assisted instruction. Library-based collections and services have expanded with advances in microcomputing hardware and software. This growth presents problems: copyright, quality, instability in the publishing industry, and uncertainty about collection scope; librarians managing the new services require new skills to support their collections. Many find the cooperative efforts of several organizational units are required. Current trends in technology for the purpose of information management indicate that these services will continue to be a significant focus for libraries.

  17. Communicating health information to disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Beacom, Amanda M; Newman, Sandra J

    2010-01-01

    Interest in the communication of health information among disadvantaged populations has increased in recent years with the shift from a model of patient-provider communication to one of a more empowered healthcare consumer; with the use of new communication technologies that increase the number of channels through which health information may be accessed; and with the steadily increasing number of people without health insurance. Three separate research literatures contribute to our current understanding of this issue. In the medicine and public health literature, disparities in health access and outcomes among socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial groups are now well documented. In the information sciences literature, scholars note that on a continuum of health information behaviors, ranging from information avoidance and nonseeking to active seeking, nonseeking behaviors are associated with disadvantaged populations. In the communication literature, enthusiasm over the technology-driven growth of online health information seeking is tempered by evidence supporting the knowledge gap hypothesis, which indicates that as potential access to health information increases, systematic gaps in health knowledge also increase as groups with higher socioeconomic status acquire this information at a faster rate than those with lower socioeconomic status. A number of diverse strategies show promise in reducing information and health disparities, including those that focus on technology, such as programs to increase computer and Internet access, skills, and comprehension; those that focus on interpersonal communication, such as the community health worker model; and those that focus on mass media channels, such as entertainment education.

  18. Effective access to health care in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective access measures are intended to reflect progress toward universal health coverage. This study proposes an operative approach to measuring effective access: in addition to the lack of financial protection, the willingness to make out-of-pocket payments for health care signifies a lack of effective access to pre-paid services. Methods Using data from a nationally representative health survey in Mexico, effective access at the individual level was determined by combining financial protection and effective utilization of pre-paid health services as required. The measure of effective access was estimated overall, by sex, by socioeconomic level, and by federal state for 2006 and 2012. Results In 2012, 48.49% of the Mexican population had no effective access to health services. Though this represents an improvement since 2006, when 65.9% lacked effective access, it still constitutes a major challenge for the health system. Effective access in Mexico presents significant heterogeneity in terms of federal state and socioeconomic level. Conclusions Measuring effective access will contribute to better target strategies toward universal health coverage. The analysis presented here highlights a need to improve quality, availability, and opportuneness (location and time) of health services provision in Mexico. PMID:24758691

  19. 32 CFR 310.17 - Individual access to personal information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mental or physical health of the individual or may result in harm to a third party, the following special... medical information may be harmful to the mental or physical health of the individual or to a third party... deny an individual access to a record or a copy of a record solely because the physical condition...

  20. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health.…

  1. Evaluating Health Information

    MedlinePlus

    Millions of consumers get health information from magazines, TV or the Internet. Some of the information is reliable and up to date; some is not. ... a branch of the government, a university, a health organization, a hospital or a business? Focus on ...

  2. Accelerating global access to plant diversity information.

    PubMed

    Lughadha, Eimear Nic; Miller, Chuck

    2009-11-01

    Botanic gardens play key roles in the development and dissemination of plant information resources. Drivers for change have included progress in information technology, growing public expectations of electronic access and international conservation policy. Great advances have been made in the quantity, quality and accessibility of plant information in digital form and the extent to which information from multiple providers can be accessed through a single portal. However, significant challenges remain to be addressed in making botanic gardens resources maximally accessible and impactful, not least the overwhelming volume of material which still awaits digitisation. The year 2010 represents an opportunity for botanic gardens to showcase their collaborative achievements in delivery of electronic plant information and reinforce their relevance to pressing environmental issues.

  3. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians. PMID:22120207

  4. Regional Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Sherrilynne

    1997-01-01

    Abstract In general, there is agreement that robust integrated information systems are the foundation for building successful regional health care delivery systems. Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) institutions that, over the years, have developed strategies for creating cohesive institutional information systems and services are finding that IAIMS strategies work well in the even more complex regional environment. The key elements of IAIMS planning are described and lessons learned are discussed in the context of regional health information systems developed. The challenges of aligning the various information agencies and agendas in support of a regional health information system are complex ; however, the potential rewards for health care in quality, efficacy, and cost savings are enormous. PMID:9067887

  5. Accessing complexity from genome information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper studies the information content of the chromosomes of 24 species. In a first phase, a scheme inspired in dynamical system state space representation is developed. For each chromosome the state space dynamical evolution is shed into a two dimensional chart. The plots are then analyzed and characterized in the perspective of fractal dimension. This information is integrated in two measures of the species' complexity addressing its average and variability. The results are in close accordance with phylogenetics pointing quantitative aspects of the species' genomic complexity.

  6. Assessment of the experiences and coping strategies of people working in the informal sector in their quest to access health care services: the case of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Munga, Michael A; Gideon, Gilbert M

    2009-02-01

    Addressing inequities in health care provision and financing has been at the center stage of Health Sector Reform (HSR) discussions since the early 1980s. The poor, women, and informal health sector workers in most developing countries are rarely covered by formal health insurance mechanisms that are meant to ensure access to essential health services. They are also sidelined in formal banking and credit systems due to their being predominantly low income earners, with little resources to meet eligibility criteria for borrowing and also to be considered creditworthy. In light of this fact, the present paper analyzes both quantitative and qualitative data in an attempt to explore and discuss the experiences and coping strategies of women and men employed in the informal sector economy in their daily attempts to access health care services. The paper employs Malaria as a tracer disease and gender as a unit of analysis. Analysis indicated the significance, as perceived by interviewees, of both informal credit networks and formal insurance and banking systems as important shock-absorbers for vulnerable populations in their struggle to access basic health services in times of need. The paper further highlights and discusses diverse coping strategies that households employ in dealing with illness-related costs and a greater willingness to be integrated into both formal and informal financial mechanisms. The paper finally concludes that the government must take the following steps: 1) enhance existing formal and communitybased initiatives to make them sustainable, 2) devise ways to reduce the lack of flexibility in membership requirements for insurance schemes/financial institutions, and 3) reduce perverse incentives inherent in the health system that may prevent people from seeking membership in available insurance mechanisms. In addition, deliberate steps must be taken by the government to employ 'targeted measures' to ensure that health care access is improved and

  7. A case study of the Secure Anonymous Information Linkage (SAIL) Gateway: a privacy-protecting remote access system for health-related research and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kerina H; Ford, David V; Jones, Chris; Dsilva, Rohan; Thompson, Simon; Brooks, Caroline J; Heaven, Martin L; Thayer, Daniel S; McNerney, Cynthia L; Lyons, Ronan A

    2014-08-01

    With the current expansion of data linkage research, the challenge is to find the balance between preserving the privacy of person-level data whilst making these data accessible for use to their full potential. We describe a privacy-protecting safe haven and secure remote access system, referred to as the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Gateway. The Gateway provides data users with a familiar Windows interface and their usual toolsets to access approved anonymously-linked datasets for research and evaluation. We outline the principles and operating model of the Gateway, the features provided to users within the secure environment, and how we are approaching the challenges of making data safely accessible to increasing numbers of research users. The Gateway represents a powerful analytical environment and has been designed to be scalable and adaptable to meet the needs of the rapidly growing data linkage community.

  8. Immigrant Health in Rural Maryland: A Qualitative Study of Major Barriers to Health Care Access.

    PubMed

    Sangaramoorthy, Thurka; Guevara, Emilia M

    2016-04-11

    Immigration to rural areas in new receiving communities like Maryland's Eastern Shore is growing. Despite a rapid rise in immigration and diminishing health system resources, little attention has been focused on barriers to health care access in this region for immigrants. A total of 33 in-depth key informant interviews with providers and immigrants were conducted. Qualitative analysis employing a constant comparison approach was used to explore emergent themes related to barriers to health care access for a growing immigrant population. Participants perceived limited health care resources, lack of health insurance coverage, high health expenditures, language barriers, and non-citizenship status as barriers to immigrants' access of health care. Findings imply that immigrants living and working on the rural Eastern Shore face serious barriers to health care access. Additional work on immigrant health in rural areas and the impacts of immigration to rural health systems are needed.

  9. The Language of Information Technology: Accessibility in the Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warmkessel, Marjorie M.

    The language of information technology is discussed, with a focus on accessibility in the information society. The metaphors of information technology as an "information superhighway" or "infobahn" are analyzed; limitations of the "road system" and developments of Internet systems are considered. The concept of…

  10. Health Information Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of health information technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 14 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 6 units specific to the occupation of emergency medical technician. The following…

  11. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  12. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  13. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 21 .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  14. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  15. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  16. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  17. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  18. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  19. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  20. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  1. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service covering published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  2. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  3. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  4. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  5. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  6. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service covering published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  7. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  8. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  9. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  10. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  11. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1,000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  12. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  13. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  14. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  15. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  16. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  17. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  18. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  19. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  20. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  1. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  2. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  3. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service covering published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  4. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  5. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  6. Canadian Librarians and Access to Government Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearder-Moan, Wendy

    1977-01-01

    Canada is considering the need for freedom of information legislation. Current legislation in Sweden and the United States is discussed, and librarians are urged to lobby for their involvement in government information dissemination, access to historical documents, and complete bibliographic control. (JAB)

  7. The Metadata Approach to Accessing Government Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, William E.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the articles in this issue, includes a history of the development of GILS (Government Information Locator Service), and offers perspectives on the importance of metadata for resource description and resource discovery. Presents interoperability as a challenge in integrating access to government information locator services.…

  8. Globalization, global health, and access to healthcare.

    PubMed

    Collins, Téa

    2003-01-01

    It is now commonly realized that the globalization of the world economy is shaping the patterns of global health, and that associated morbidity and mortality is affecting countries' ability to achieve economic growth. The globalization of public health has important implications for access to essential healthcare. The rise of inequalities among and within countries negatively affects access to healthcare. Poor people use healthcare services less frequently when sick than do the rich. The negative impact of globalization on access to healthcare is particularly well demonstrated in countries of transitional economies. No longer protected by a centralized health sector that provided free universal access to services for everyone, large segments of the populations in the transition period found themselves denied even the most basic medical services. Only countries where regulatory institutions are strong, domestic markets are competitive and social safety nets are in place, have a good chance to enjoy the health benefits of globalization.

  9. Equal Access Initiative HIV/AIDS Information Resources from NLM

    SciTech Connect

    Templin-Branner W. and N. Dancy

    2010-09-11

    The Equal Access Initiative: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine training is designed specifically for the National Minority AIDS Council 2010 Equal Access Initiative (EAI) Computer Grants Program awardees to provide valuable health information resources from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources to increase awareness of the wealth of treatment information and educational materials that are available on the Internet and to improve prevention and treatment education for their clients. These resources will also meet the needs of community-based

  10. [The informal economy: an occupational health issue].

    PubMed

    Carretero Ares, José Luis; Cueva Oliver, Begoña; Vidal Martínez, Asunción; Rigo Martínez, María Vicenta; Lobato Cañón, José Rafael

    Informal economy must be differentiated from concepts such as informal employment and the informal sector, each with its own characteristics. There are several types of informal workers that are grouped into several categories according to their work. The families of these workers are grouped into vulnerable job, which is also not beneficial for health coverage. Informal working conditions mean great morbidity resulting in economic losses and a large number of quality-adjusted life year, especially among young populations and women. Health policies are needed to reduce socio-economic inequalities, improve the training of health professionals and the accessibility of health services to these workers.

  11. Approval of information collection requirements for the joint interim rules for health insurance portability for group health plans, and the individual market health insurance reform: portability from group to individual coverage; federal rules for access in the individual market; state alternative mechanisms to federal rules--IRS, DOL, HCFA. Interim rules with request for comments; approval of information collection requirements.

    PubMed

    1997-07-02

    On April 8, 1997, the Department of the Treasury, the Department of Labor, and the Department of Health and Human Services (Departments) published joint interim rules governing the access, portability and renewability requirements for group health plans and issuers offering group health insurance coverage in connection with a group health plan. The rules implemented changes made to certain provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (Code), the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), and the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act) enacted as part of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). In the April 8 publication, the Departments submitted the group market information collection requirements, for, among other things, establishing creditable coverage, notice of special enrollment rights, and notice of pre-existing condition exclusion periods, to be Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for emergency review under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA 95). In addition, on April 8, 1997 the Department of Health and Human Services submitted the HIPAA individual market information collection requirements to OMB for emergency review under the PRA 1995. This document amends the April 8 Federal Register documents to properly display the OMB control numbers.

  12. Semantically Enriched Data Access Policies in eHealth.

    PubMed

    Drozdowicz, Michał; Ganzha, Maria; Paprzycki, Marcin

    2016-11-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) requires novel solutions to facilitate autonomous, though controlled, resource access. Access policies have to facilitate interactions between heterogeneous entities (devices and humans). Here, we focus our attention on access control in eHealth. We propose an approach based on enriching policies, based on well-known and widely-used eXtensible Access Control Markup Language, with semantics. In the paper we describe an implementation of a Policy Information Point integrated with the HL7 Security and Privacy Ontology.

  13. Blue Button use by patients to access and share health record information using the Department of Veterans Affairs’ online patient portal

    PubMed Central

    Turvey, Carolyn; Klein, Dawn; Fix, Gemmae; Hogan, Timothy P; Woods, Susan; Simon, Steven R; Charlton, Mary; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary; Zulman, Donna M; Dindo, Lilian; Wakefield, Bonnie; Graham, Gail; Nazi, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Blue Button feature of online patient portals promotes patient engagement by allowing patients to easily download their personal health information. This study examines the adoption and use of the Blue Button feature in the Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) personal health record portal, My HealtheVet. Materials and methods An online survey presented to a 4% random sample of My HealtheVet users between March and May 2012. Questions were designed to determine characteristics associated with Blue Button use, perceived value of use, and how Veterans with non-VA providers use the Blue Button to share information with their non-VA providers. Results Of the survey participants (N=18 398), 33% were current Blue Button users. The most highly endorsed benefit was that it helped patients understand their health history better because all the information was in one place (73%). Twenty-one percent of Blue Button users with a non-VA provider shared their VA health information, and 87% reported that the non-VA provider found the information somewhat or very helpful. Veterans’ self-rated computer ability was the strongest factor contributing to both Blue Button use and to sharing information with non-VA providers. When comparing Blue Button users and non-users, barriers to adoption were low awareness of the feature and difficulty using the Blue Button. Conclusions This study contributes to the understanding of early Blue Button adoption and use of this feature for patient-initiated sharing of health information. Educational efforts are needed to raise awareness of the Blue Button and to address usability issues that hinder adoption. PMID:24740865

  14. 45 CFR 1326.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Access to information. 1326.17 Section 1326.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  15. 45 CFR 1326.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Access to information. 1326.17 Section 1326.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  16. 45 CFR 1328.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Access to information. 1328.17 Section 1328.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  17. 45 CFR 1328.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to information. 1328.17 Section 1328.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  18. 45 CFR 1326.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Access to information. 1326.17 Section 1326.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  19. 45 CFR 1326.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to information. 1326.17 Section 1326.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  20. 45 CFR 1326.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to information. 1326.17 Section 1326.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  1. 45 CFR 1328.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to information. 1328.17 Section 1328.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  2. 45 CFR 1328.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Access to information. 1328.17 Section 1328.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  3. 45 CFR 1328.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Access to information. 1328.17 Section 1328.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  4. Health Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Artz, David R

    2015-06-01

    This article provides surgical pathologists an overview of health information systems (HISs): what they are, what they do, and how such systems relate to the practice of surgical pathology. Much of this article is dedicated to the electronic medical record. Information, in how it is captured, transmitted, and conveyed, drives the effectiveness of such electronic medical record functionalities. So critical is information from pathology in integrated clinical care that surgical pathologists are becoming gatekeepers of not only tissue but also information. Better understanding of HISs can empower surgical pathologists to become stakeholders who have an impact on the future direction of quality integrated clinical care.

  5. Health Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Artz, David R

    2016-03-01

    This article provides surgical pathologists an overview of health information systems (HISs): what they are, what they do, and how such systems relate to the practice of surgical pathology. Much of this article is dedicated to the electronic medical record. Information, in how it is captured, transmitted, and conveyed, drives the effectiveness of such electronic medical record functionalities. So critical is information from pathology in integrated clinical care that surgical pathologists are becoming gatekeepers of not only tissue but also information. Better understanding of HISs can empower surgical pathologists to become stakeholders who have an impact on the future direction of quality integrated clinical care.

  6. Family Caregivers and Consumer Health Information Technology.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Darer, Jonathan D; Larsen, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Health information technology has been embraced as a strategy to facilitate patients' access to their health information and engagement in care. However, not all patients are able to access, or are capable of using, a computer or mobile device. Although family caregivers assist individuals with some of the most challenging and costly health needs, their role in health information technology is largely undefined and poorly understood. This perspective discusses challenges and opportunities of engaging family caregivers through the use of consumer-oriented health information technology. We compile existing evidence to make the case that involving family caregivers in health information technology as desired by patients is technically feasible and consistent with the principles of patient-centered and family-centered care. We discuss how more explicit and purposeful engagement of family caregivers in health information technology could advance clinical quality and patient safety by increasing the transparency, accuracy, and comprehensiveness of patient health information across settings of care. Finally, we describe how clarifying and executing patients' desires to involve family members or friends through health information technology would provide family caregivers greater legitimacy, convenience, and timeliness in health system interactions, and facilitate stronger partnerships between patients, family caregivers, and health care professionals.

  7. Using personal digital assistants to access drug information.

    PubMed

    McCreadie, Scott R; Stevenson, James G; Sweet, Burgunda V; Kramer, Mike

    2002-07-15

    The use of personal digital assistants (PDAs) to access drug information in a health system is described. Given the widespread use of PDAs at an 872-bed university health system, an opportunity existed to provide current drug information to physicians via these devices. As part of the health system's intranet, extensive online content had been made available through a browser; extension to PDAs was a natural next step. There were two primary requirements: the ability to synchronize information with the database server when a PDA was used and the development of content and applications by using existing staff. Mobile enterprise software was chosen that supports multiple PDA platforms, is easy to use, and does not require programming skills. The software works through customized "channels," or collections of information from a content provider. The customized channel service works over the Internet. Two channels of content were created, an ambulatory care channel and an inpatient care channel. The ambulatory care channel contains a list of preferred ambulatory care agents, poison control information, the locations of outpatient pharmacies, drug information, and safety tips for prescribing. The inpatient channel contains the inpatient formulary, current news and events, information on currrent drug shortages and recalls, pharmacy contact information, and medication safety tips. When a user synchronizes his or her PDA, the software contacts the department's intranet servers and processes the request. The data are compressed and downloaded to the user's PDA. A university health system successfully used PDAs to access drug and other information.

  8. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2016-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children’s health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children’s health. Nonetheless, they find that, on the whole, policies to improve access indeed improve children’s health, with the caveat that context plays a big role—medical care “matters more at some times, or for some children, than others.” Focusing on studies that can plausibly show a causal effect between policies to increase access and better health for children, and starting from an economic framework, they consider both the demand for and the supply of health care. On the demand side, they examine what happens when the government expands public insurance programs (such as Medicaid), or when parents are offered financial incentives to take their children to preventive appointments. On the supply side, they look at what happens when public insurance programs increase the payments that they offer to health-care providers, or when health-care providers are placed directly in schools where children spend their days. They also examine how the Affordable Care Act is likely to affect children’s access to medical care. Leininger and Levy reach three main conclusions. First, despite tremendous progress in recent decades, not all children have insurance coverage, and immigrant children are especially vulnerable. Second, insurance coverage alone doesn’t guarantee access to care, and insured children may still face barriers to getting the care they need. Finally, as this issue of Future of Children demonstrates, access to care is only one of the factors that policy makers should consider as they seek to make the nation’s children healthier. PMID:27516723

  9. Child Health and Access to Medical Care.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health. Nonetheless, they find that, on the whole, policies to improve access indeed improve children's health, with the caveat that context plays a big role-medical care "matters more at some times, or for some children, than others." Focusing on studies that can plausibly show a causal effect between policies to increase access and better health for children, and starting from an economic framework, they consider both the demand for and the supply of health care. On the demand side, they examine what happens when the government expands public insurance programs (such as Medicaid), or when parents are offered financial incentives to take their children to preventive appointments. On the supply side, they look at what happens when public insurance programs increase the payments that they offer to health-care providers, or when health-care providers are placed directly in schools where children spend their days. They also examine how the Affordable Care Act is likely to affect children's access to medical care. Leininger and Levy reach three main conclusions. First, despite tremendous progress in recent decades, not all children have insurance coverage, and immigrant children are especially vulnerable. Second, insurance coverage alone doesn't guarantee access to care, and insured children may still face barriers to getting the care they need. Finally, as this issue of Future of Children demonstrates, access to care is only one of the factors that policy makers should consider as they seek to make the nation's children healthier.

  10. Risk assessment vs. right to privacy: the access to health information on the insurance candidate through questionnaires and the right to privacy.

    PubMed

    Martins, Maria Inês de Oliveira

    2013-03-01

    The need of private insurers for information on the candidate's health risks is recognized by the law, which places pre-contractual duties of disclosure upon the candidates. When the risks are influenced by health factors, e.g. in the case of life- and health insurances, it implies the provision of health information by the candidates, who thus voluntarily limit their right to privacy. This consent, however, often happens in a context of factual coercion to contract. Next to this, from a legal standpoint, the collection of personal information must respond to the principle of proportionality. Against this background, this article assesses the compatibility of questionnaire techniques that rely on open-ended health related questions with the right to privacy, as protected by Portuguese and international law. It then analyses the extent of pre-contractual duties of disclosure as defined by the Portuguese Insurance Act, which requires the candidate to volunteer all the relevant information independently of being asked for it. In doing so, the article also refers to some other European countries. It concludes that the relevant Portuguese legislation is incompatible both with Portuguese constitutional law and with international law.

  11. Access and control of information and intellectual property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Gerald S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper introduces the technology of two pioneering patents for the secure distribution of information and intellectual property. The seminal technology has been used in the control of sensitive material such as medical records and imagery in distributed networks. It lends itself to the implementation of an open architecture access control system that provides local or remote user selective access to digital information stored on any computer system or storage medium, down to the data element, pixel, and sub-pixel levels. Use of this technology is especially suited for electronic publishing, health care records, MIS, and auditing.

  12. Research Investigation of Information Access Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrichs, John H.; Sharkey, Thomas W.; Lim, Jeen-Su

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the satisfaction of library users at Wayne State University who utilize alternative information access methods. The LibQUAL+[TM] desired and perceived that satisfaction ratings are used to determine the user's "superiority gap." By focusing limited library resources to address "superiority gap" issues identified by each…

  13. Viewpoint: The Right to Access Information in an Information Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kenneth B.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a number of initiatives by the U.S. national security community that might restrict or monitor public access to sensitive but unclassified information. The current status of the initiatives, and their possible impact on freedom of information in a democratic society are discussed. (27 references) (Author/CLB)

  14. Contextualizing immigrant access to health resources.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joshua S

    2010-06-01

    A vast majority of our understanding of immigrant health centers around traits of individuals and groups. While useful, current approaches to research on immigrant health decontextualize the experience of immigrants in the United States. This paper uses a historical case study of the Chinese community in San Francisco to develop a contextual framework to understand the levels of influence that impact the availability of health resources in immigrant communities. International, transnational, transcommunity, and enclave contexts have shaped health care access for Chinese immigrants in San Francisco. The conceptual framework provides a basis for future research, programmatic, and policy work that integrates individual and contextual factors in assessing and improving immigrant access to health resources.

  15. Opportunities and limitations for using new media and mobile phones to expand access to sexual and reproductive health information and services for adolescent girls and young women in six Nigerian states.

    PubMed

    Akinfaderin-Agarau, Fadekem; Chirtau, Manre; Ekponimo, Sylvia; Power, Samantha

    2012-06-01

    Reproductive health problems are a challenge affecting young people in Nigeria. Education as a Vaccine (EVA) implements the My Question and Answer Service, using mobile phones to provide sexual and reproductive health (SRH) information and services. Use of the service by adolescent girls and young women is low. Focus group discussions were held with 726 females to assess their access to mobile phones, as well as the barriers and limitations to the use of their phones to seek SRH information and services. Results demonstrate high mobile phone access but limited use of phones to access SRH information and services. Barriers to use of these services include cost of service for young female clients, request for socio-demographic information that could break anonymity, poor marketing and publicity, socio-cultural beliefs and expectations of young girls, individual personality and beliefs, as well as infrastructural/network quality. It is therefore recommended that these barriers be adequately addressed to increase the potential use of mobile phone for providing adolescent and young girls with SRH information and services. In addition, further initiatives and research are needed to explore the potentials of social media in meeting this need.

  16. 48 CFR 352.239-73 - Electronic information and technology accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility (January 2010) (a) Pursuant to Section 508 of the... technology accessibility. 352.239-73 Section 352.239-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND... Clauses 352.239-73 Electronic information and technology accessibility. (a) As prescribed in...

  17. 48 CFR 352.239-73 - Electronic information and technology accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility (January 2010) (a) Pursuant to Section 508 of the... technology accessibility. 352.239-73 Section 352.239-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND... Clauses 352.239-73 Electronic information and technology accessibility. (a) As prescribed in...

  18. 48 CFR 352.239-73 - Electronic information and technology accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility (January 2010) (a) Pursuant to Section 508 of the... technology accessibility. 352.239-73 Section 352.239-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND... Clauses 352.239-73 Electronic information and technology accessibility. (a) As prescribed in...

  19. Access to medicines from a health system perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli, Maryam; Jacobs, Bart; Tomson, Goran; Laing, Richard; Ghaffar, Abdul; Dujardin, Bruno; Van Damme, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Most health system strengthening interventions ignore interconnections between systems components. In particular, complex relationships between medicines and health financing, human resources, health information and service delivery are not given sufficient consideration. As a consequence, populations' access to medicines (ATM) is addressed mainly through fragmented, often vertical approaches usually focusing on supply, unrelated to the wider issue of access to health services and interventions. The objective of this article is to embed ATM in a health system perspective. For this purpose, we perform a structured literature review: we examine existing ATM frameworks, review determinants of ATM and define at which level of the health system they are likely to occur; we analyse to which extent existing ATM frameworks take into account access constraints at different levels of the health system. Our findings suggest that ATM barriers are complex and interconnected as they occur at multiple levels of the health system. Existing ATM frameworks only partially address the full range of ATM barriers. We propose three essential paradigm shifts that take into account complex and dynamic relationships between medicines and other components of the health system. A holistic view of demand-side constraints in tandem with consideration of multiple and dynamic relationships between medicines and other health system resources should be applied; it should be recognized that determinants of ATM are rooted in national, regional and international contexts. These are schematized in a new framework proposing a health system perspective on ATM. PMID:23174879

  20. Cutting Off Access to Government Information: Loopholes in the Access to Information Act Generated by the Information Highway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaulay, Tyson

    1997-01-01

    In Canada, public access to federal government information is ruled by the Access to Information Act. This article explores loopholes in the Act, issues of data format and "tradeable" data (government information with substantial value), that could cause a conflict between its intent and effect. Tradeable data is troublesome because of…

  1. Communications and Information: Cryptographic Access Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    porting Information. SUMMARY OF REVISIONS This interim change (IC) incorporates IC 2000-1 (Attachment 4) and specifies that a final security clear...officer ( CRO ) is also performing duties as the CAP administrator, identifies both appointments in a single letter. 3. Cryptographic Access Eligibility...Communications Security CRO —COMSEC Responsible Officer DoD—Department of Defense DoDD—Department of Defense Directive HQ AFCA—Headquarters, Air Force

  2. Fine-Grained Access Control for Electronic Health Record Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, Pham Thi Bach; Wohlgemuth, Sven; Echizen, Isao; Thuy, Dong Thi Bich; Thuc, Nguyen Dinh

    There needs to be a strategy for securing the privacy of patients when exchanging health records between various entities over the Internet. Despite the fact that health care providers such as Google Health and Microsoft Corp.'s Health Vault comply with the U.S Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the privacy of patients is still at risk. Several encryption schemes and access control mechanisms have been suggested to protect the disclosure of a patient's health record especially from unauthorized entities. However, by implementing these approaches, data owners are not capable of controlling and protecting the disclosure of the individual sensitive attributes of their health records. This raises the need to adopt a secure mechanism to protect personal information against unauthorized disclosure. Therefore, we propose a new Fine-grained Access Control (FGAC) mechanism that is based on subkeys, which would allow a data owner to further control the access to his data at the column-level. We also propose a new mechanism to efficiently reduce the number of keys maintained by a data owner in cases when the users have different access privileges to different columns of the data being shared.

  3. National Health Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... to navigation Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion health.gov healthfinder.gov healthypeople.gov health .gov ... by ODPHP. NHIC supports public health education and promotion by maintaining a calendar of National Health Observances. ...

  4. The Missing Link: Evolving Accessibility To Formulary-Related Information

    PubMed Central

    Van Rossum, Alison; Holsopple, Megan; Karpinski, Julie; Dow, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Background Formulary management is a key component to ensuring the safe, effective, and fiscally responsible use of medications for health systems. One challenge in the formulary management process is making the most relevant formulary information easily accessible to practitioners involved in medication therapy decisions at the point of care. In September 2014, Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin (F&MCW) implemented a commercial formulary management tool (CFMT) to improve accessibility to the recently aligned health-system formulary. The CFMT replaced an internally developed formulary management tool. Objectives The primary objective was to determine pharmacist end-user satisfaction with accessibility to system formulary and formulary-related information through a new CMFT compared with the historical formulary management tool (HFMT). The secondary objective was to measure the use of formulary-related information in the CFMT and HFMT. Methods The primary objective was measured through pharmacist end-user satisfaction surveys before and after integration of formulary-related information into the CFMT. The secondary objective was measured by comparing monthly usage reports for the CFMT with monthly usage reports for the HFMT. Results Survey respondents reported being satisfied (52.5%) or very satisfied (18.8%) more frequently with the CFMT compared with the HFMT (31.7% satisfied and 2.5% very satisfied). Between October 2014 and January 2015 the frequency of access to formulary-related information increased from 92 to 104 requests per day through the CFMT and decreased from 47 to 33 requests per day through the HFMT. Conclusions Initial data suggest incorporating system formulary-related information and related resources into a single platform increases pharmacist end-user satisfaction and overall use of formulary-related information. PMID:27904302

  5. [Effective access to health services: operationalizing universal health coverage].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Dolci, Germán; Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; García-Saisó, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    The right to health and its operational form, as an organized social response to health: the right to health protection, are the mainstay for the global push towards universal health coverage. The path to achieve this goal is particular to each country and relates to the baseline and specific context in relation to what is feasible. In practical terms, universal coverage involves the correlation between demand and supply of services (promotion, prevention, and care), expressed by the ability for each individual to make use of services when these are required. In those terms universal coverage is then effective access. The objective of the paper is to explore the conceptualization of effective access to health services and propose a definition that allows its operationalization thereof. This definition considers key elements of supply and demand of services, including the availability of resources and adequate provision (quality), as well as barriers to use them.

  6. 5 CFR 1312.23 - Access to classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to classified information. 1312.23... Classified Information § 1312.23 Access to classified information. Classified information may be made... “need to know” and the access is essential to the accomplishment of official government duties....

  7. Use of the Internet for Health Information: United States, 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... appointments or accessing personal health records online ( 2 ). Definitions Looked up health information on the Internet in ... the family. The poverty level is based on definitions originally developed by the Social Security Administration. These ...

  8. Speaking up: Teens Voice Their Health Information Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Kathryn A.; Parker, Randy Spreen; Lampert, Joan; Sulo, Suela

    2012-01-01

    School nurses provide an important role in the continuity of health care especially for adolescents who are at high risk for significant health concerns. The purpose of this study was to assess adolescents' health information needs and identify their preferences for accessing health information. Using an inductive qualitative research design, 11…

  9. Structuring Broadcast Audio for Information Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvain, Jean-Luc; Lamel, Lori

    2003-12-01

    One rapidly expanding application area for state-of-the-art speech recognition technology is the automatic processing of broadcast audiovisual data for information access. Since much of the linguistic information is found in the audio channel, speech recognition is a key enabling technology which, when combined with information retrieval techniques, can be used for searching large audiovisual document collections. Audio indexing must take into account the specificities of audio data such as needing to deal with the continuous data stream and an imperfect word transcription. Other important considerations are dealing with language specificities and facilitating language portability. At Laboratoire d'Informatique pour la Mécanique et les Sciences de l'Ingénieur (LIMSI), broadcast news transcription systems have been developed for seven languages: English, French, German, Mandarin, Portuguese, Spanish, and Arabic. The transcription systems have been integrated into prototype demonstrators for several application areas such as audio data mining, structuring audiovisual archives, selective dissemination of information, and topic tracking for media monitoring. As examples, this paper addresses the spoken document retrieval and topic tracking tasks.

  10. Mobile Access to Clinical Information at the Point of Care

    PubMed Central

    Mncube-Barnes, Fatima M.; Lee, Ben; Esuruoso, Olumuyiwa; Gona, Phil N.; Daphnis, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Using library subscriptions and accessible on handheld devices, this study sought to promote authoritative health information apps, and evidence-based point-of-care resources. Methods Three cohorts of internal medicine residents were issued iPads at the beginning of their second year, and were trained to skillfully access resources from the digital library. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were respectively administered at the beginning of the second year and end of the third year of training. The residents' computer experience and computer knowledge was assessed. Additionally, before and after formal introduction to iPads, perceptions on the use of computers to access clinical information were assessed. Survey responses were compared using two sample methods and summarized through descriptive statistics. Results Sixty-eight residents completed the pre-survey questionnaires and 45 completed the post-surveys. There were significant improvements in the residents' level of computer experience, and familiarity with medical apps. Furthermore, there was increased knowledge obtained in accessing clinical information through electronic medical records. Residents positively perceived the potential effects of computers and electronic medical records in medicine. Conclusion Study findings suggested that health science libraries can be instrumental in providing search skills to health professionals, especially residents in training. Participants showed appreciation of iPads and library support that facilitated successful completion of their related tasks. Replicating this study with a larger sample derived from multiple sites is recommended for future studies. Participation of mid-level healthcare professionals, such as Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners is suggested. PMID:28210418

  11. Involving Research Stakeholders in Developing Policy on Sharing Public Health Research Data in Kenya: Views on Fair Process for Informed Consent, Access Oversight, and Community Engagement.

    PubMed

    Jao, Irene; Kombe, Francis; Mwalukore, Salim; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael; Kamuya, Dorcas; Molyneux, Sassy; Marsh, Vicki

    2015-07-01

    Increased global sharing of public health research data has potential to advance scientific progress but may present challenges to the interests of research stakeholders, particularly in low-to-middle income countries. Policies for data sharing should be responsive to public views, but there is little evidence of the systematic study of these from low-income countries. This qualitative study explored views on fair data-sharing processes among 60 stakeholders in Kenya with varying research experience, using a deliberative approach. Stakeholders' attitudes were informed by perceptions of benefit and concerns for research data sharing, including risks of stigmatization, loss of privacy, and undermining scientific careers and validity, reported in detail elsewhere. In this article, we discuss institutional trust-building processes seen as central to perceptions of fairness in sharing research data in this setting, including forms of community involvement, individual prior awareness and agreement to data sharing, independence and accountability of governance mechanisms, and operating under a national framework.

  12. 24 CFR 401.503 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access to information. 401.503... (MARK-TO-MARKET) Restructuring Plan § 401.503 Access to information. (a) PAE responsibilities. The PAE must provide to parties entitled to notice under § 401.501 access to information obtained by the...

  13. Information technology in health promotion.

    PubMed

    Lintonen, T P; Konu, A I; Seedhouse, D

    2008-06-01

    eHealth, the use of information technology to improve or enable health and health care, has recently been high on the health care development agenda. Given the vivid interest in eHealth, little reference has been made to the use of these technologies in the promotion of health. The aim of this present study was to conduct a review on recent uses of information technology in health promotion through looking at research articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Fifteen relevant journals with issues published between 2003 and June 2005 yielded altogether 1352 articles, 56 of which contained content related to the use of information technology in the context of health promotion. As reflected by this rather small proportion, research on the role of information technology is only starting to emerge. Four broad thematic application areas within health promotion were identified: use of information technology as an intervention medium, use of information technology as a research focus, use of information technology as a research instrument and use of information technology for professional development. In line with this rather instrumental focus, the concepts 'ePromotion of Health' or 'Health ePromotion' would come close to describing the role of information technology in health promotion.

  14. The dream of health information for all

    PubMed Central

    Proaño, Alvaro; Ruiz, Eloy F; Porudominsky, Ruben; Tapia, Jose Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In 2004, an influential report in The Lancet suggested that open health information for all could be achieved by 2015. Unfortunately, this goal has not yet been accomplished. Despite progress in obtaining quality scientific articles in Latin America, it remains difficult to reliably access new and cutting-edge research. As graduating Peruvian medical students, we have confronted many obstacles in obtaining access to quality and up-to-date information and a constant tension between accessing "what is available" rather than "what we need". As we have learned, these limitations affect not only our own education but also the choices we make in the management of our patients. In the following article, we state our point of view regarding limitations in access to scientific articles in Peru and Latin America. PMID:27081475

  15. Accessing Genetic Information with Liquid Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuyu; Janku, Filip; Zhan, Qimin; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2015-10-01

    Recent scientific advances in understanding circulating tumor cells, cell-free DNA/RNA, and exosomes in blood have laid a solid foundation for the development of routine molecular 'liquid biopsies'. This approach provides non-invasive access to genetic information--somatic mutations, epigenetic changes, and differential expression--about the physiological conditions of our body and diseases. It opens a valuable avenue for future genetic studies and human disease diagnosis, including prenatal and neurodegenerative disease diagnosis, as well as for cancer screening and monitoring. With the rapid development of highly sensitive and accurate technologies such as next-generation sequencing, molecular 'liquid biopsies' will quickly become a central piece in the future of precision medicine.

  16. 48 CFR 352.239-73 - Electronic information and technology accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... technology accessibility. 352.239-73 Section 352.239-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND... Clauses 352.239-73 Electronic information and technology accessibility. (a) As prescribed in 339.201-70(a), the Contracting Officer shall insert the following provision: Electronic and Information...

  17. 48 CFR 352.239-73 - Electronic information and technology accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... technology accessibility. 352.239-73 Section 352.239-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND... Clauses 352.239-73 Electronic information and technology accessibility. (a) As prescribed in 339.201-70(a), the Contracting Officer shall insert the following provision: Electronic and Information...

  18. Information for health and human development.

    PubMed

    Alleyne, G A

    1996-01-01

    Information is one of the most powerful instruments of change known to man. It can be used to relieve much pain and suffering, because the basic infrastructure of any successful enterprise is based not only on the management of the physical, financial, and human resources but also on information resources. This paper describes the relationship between health and human development and outlines the roles health sciences librarians might consider in managing information to ensure health, to assist not only medical scientists but also the powerful members of the community. No persons should be hampered in their ability to make decisions about health matters because they did not have access to information librarians have at their disposal.

  19. Health Information Needs of Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To understand the views of men and service providers concerning the health information needs of men. Design: A men's health programme was implemented aimed at developing new health information resources designed for use by local organizations with men in socially disadvantaged groups. Research was carried out at the scoping stage to…

  20. Strengthening Rehabilitation in Health Systems Worldwide by Integrating Information on Functioning in National Health Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Stucki, Gerold; Bickenbach, Jerome; Melvin, John

    2016-12-15

    A complete understanding of the experience of health requires information relevant not merely to the health indicators of mortality and morbidity but also to functioning-that is, information about what it means to live in a health state, "the lived experience of health." Not only is functioning information relevant to healthcare and the overall objectives of person-centered healthcare but to the successful operation of all components of health systems.In light of population aging and major epidemiological trends, the health strategy of rehabilitation, whose aim has always been to optimize functioning and minimize disability, will become a key health strategy. The increasing prominence of the rehabilitative strategy within the health system drives the argument for the integration of functioning information as an essential component in national health information systems.Rehabilitation professionals and researchers have long recognized in WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health the best prospect for an internationally recognized, sufficiently complete and powerful information reference for the documentation of functioning information. This paper opens the discussion of the promise of integrating the ICF as an essential component in national health systems to secure access to functioning information for rehabilitation, across health systems and countries.

  1. 32 CFR 505.5 - Individual access to personal information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... judgment is made that access to such records could have an adverse effect on the mental or physical health..., the individual will be asked to provide the name of a personal health care provider, and the records will be provided to that health care provider, along with an explanation of why access without...

  2. Your Health Information Rights

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rader Laura Adams Lee Stevens Pam Crum Stef Woods Your Health Records About Blue Button About the ... Privacy Rule sets a Federal "floor" of privacy protections — a minimum level of privacy that health care ...

  3. The digital divide in public e-health: barriers to accessibility and privacy in state health department websites.

    PubMed

    West, Darrell M; Miller, Edward Alan

    2006-08-01

    State health departments have placed a tremendous amount of information, data, and services online in recent years. With the significant increase in online resources at official health sites, though, have come questions concerning equity of access and the confidentiality of electronic medical materials. This paper reports on an examination of public health department websites maintained by the 50 state governments. Using a content analysis of health department sites undertaken each year from 2000 to 2005, we investigate several dimensions of accessibility and privacy: readability levels, disability access, non-English accessibility, and the presence of privacy and security statements. We argue that although progress has been made at improving the accessibility and confidentiality of health department electronic resources, there remains much work to be done to ensure quality access for all Americans in the area of public e-health.

  4. Speaking up: teens voice their health information needs.

    PubMed

    Smart, Kathryn A; Parker, Randy Spreen; Lampert, Joan; Sulo, Suela

    2012-10-01

    School nurses provide an important role in the continuity of health care especially for adolescents who are at high risk for significant health concerns. The purpose of this study was to assess adolescents' health information needs and identify their preferences for accessing health information. Using an inductive qualitative research design, 11 focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 101 junior high and high school students in suburban northeastern Illinois. The students identified a variety of health concerns and emphasized the need for accessible, high-quality, and personally relevant information. Most students favored taking an active role in learning about their health. They preferred to directly access information from qualified individuals within comfortable, trusting, and respectful relationships or to indirectly retrieve information from reliable resources. Finally, students emphasized the need for privacy and a variety of learning options depending on the specific health topic.

  5. [Access to health care and racial discrimination].

    PubMed

    Carde, Estelle

    2007-01-01

    Discrimination is defined as different, unfavourable and illegitimate treatment. This post-doctoral research was conducted on racial discrimination, specifically with respect to health care access. The authors observed and questioned during the course of semi-directed interviews, 175 health care professionals on-site at their workplaces (administrators, care providers, social workers) in metropolitan France and French Guiana. Based on a qualitative analysis of this material, three types of discriminatory practices were identified. The first two were rooted in the individual professional's perception of the patient's racial origin (illegitimatising and differentiation). The third was ingrained in institutional logic independent of the professionals' intentions (indirect discrimination). The article concludes with a series of recommendations which aim to combat these types of discrimination.

  6. Health Information on the Web: Finding Reliable Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Wellness Staying Healthy Health Information on the Web: Finding Reliable Information Health Information on the Web: Finding Reliable Information Prevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Share ...

  7. AccessMod 3.0: computing geographic coverage and accessibility to health care services using anisotropic movement of patients

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Nicolas; Ebener, Steeve

    2008-01-01

    Background Access to health care can be described along four dimensions: geographic accessibility, availability, financial accessibility and acceptability. Geographic accessibility measures how physically accessible resources are for the population, while availability reflects what resources are available and in what amount. Combining these two types of measure into a single index provides a measure of geographic (or spatial) coverage, which is an important measure for assessing the degree of accessibility of a health care network. Results This paper describes the latest version of AccessMod, an extension to the Geographical Information System ArcView 3.×, and provides an example of application of this tool. AccessMod 3 allows one to compute geographic coverage to health care using terrain information and population distribution. Four major types of analysis are available in AccessMod: (1) modeling the coverage of catchment areas linked to an existing health facility network based on travel time, to provide a measure of physical accessibility to health care; (2) modeling geographic coverage according to the availability of services; (3) projecting the coverage of a scaling-up of an existing network; (4) providing information for cost effectiveness analysis when little information about the existing network is available. In addition to integrating travelling time, population distribution and the population coverage capacity specific to each health facility in the network, AccessMod can incorporate the influence of landscape components (e.g. topography, river and road networks, vegetation) that impact travelling time to and from facilities. Topographical constraints can be taken into account through an anisotropic analysis that considers the direction of movement. We provide an example of the application of AccessMod in the southern part of Malawi that shows the influences of the landscape constraints and of the modes of transportation on geographic coverage

  8. 21 CFR 1401.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Access to information. 1401.4 Section 1401.4 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.4 Access to information. The Office of National Drug Control Policy makes available information pertaining to...

  9. 21 CFR 1401.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Access to information. 1401.4 Section 1401.4 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.4 Access to information. The Office of National Drug Control Policy makes available information pertaining to...

  10. 21 CFR 1401.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Access to information. 1401.4 Section 1401.4 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.4 Access to information. The Office of National Drug Control Policy makes available information pertaining to...

  11. 21 CFR 1401.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Access to information. 1401.4 Section 1401.4 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.4 Access to information. The Office of National Drug Control Policy makes available information pertaining to...

  12. 21 CFR 1401.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access to information. 1401.4 Section 1401.4 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.4 Access to information. The Office of National Drug Control Policy makes available information pertaining to...

  13. Leveraging the cloud for electronic health record access.

    PubMed

    Coats, Brian; Acharya, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers are under increasing pressure to enable widespread access to their electronic health record (EHR) systems for the patients they serve; the meaningful use incentive programs are perhaps the most significant driver encouraging this access. Elsewhere, the cloud has become extremely efficient and successful at establishing digital identities for individuals and making them interoperable across heterogeneous systems. As the healthcare industry contemplates providing patients access to their EHRs, the solution should leverage existing cloud investment, not duplicate it. Through an analysis of industry standards and similar work being performed in other industries, a trust framework has been derived for exchanging identity information. This research lays out a comprehensive structure that healthcare providers can easily use to integrate their EHRs with the cloud for identity validation, while meeting compliance guidelines for security and privacy. Further, this research has been implemented at a large regional hospital, yielding immediate and tangible improvements.

  14. Leveraging the Cloud for Electronic Health Record Access

    PubMed Central

    Coats, Brian; Acharya, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers are under increasing pressure to enable widespread access to their electronic health record (EHR) systems for the patients they serve; the meaningful use incentive programs are perhaps the most significant driver encouraging this access. Elsewhere, the cloud has become extremely efficient and successful at establishing digital identities for individuals and making them interoperable across heterogeneous systems. As the healthcare industry contemplates providing patients access to their EHRs, the solution should leverage existing cloud investment, not duplicate it. Through an analysis of industry standards and similar work being performed in other industries, a trust framework has been derived for exchanging identity information. This research lays out a comprehensive structure that healthcare providers can easily use to integrate their EHRs with the cloud for identity validation, while meeting compliance guidelines for security and privacy. Further, this research has been implemented at a large regional hospital, yielding immediate and tangible improvements. PMID:24808814

  15. Ensuring Rights: Improving Access to Sexual and Reproductive Health Services for Female International Students in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poljski, Carolyn; Quiazon, Regina; Tran, Chau

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the research and advocacy work being conducted by the Multicultural Centre for Women's Health (MCWH), a national community-based organization in Victoria, Australia, the paper analyzes female international students' experiences with accessing sexual and reproductive health information and services. Accessibility of sexual and…

  16. Information Technology for Children's Health and Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Richard N.; Spooner, S. Andrew; Kwiatkowski, Kelly; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2001-01-01

    In September 2000, the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research and the American Academy of Pediatrics Center for Child Health Research sponsored a meeting of experts and knowledgeable stakeholders to identify 1) the special information needs of pediatric care and 2) health service research questions related to the use of information technology in children's health care. Technologies that support the care of children must address issues related to growth and development, children's changing physiology, and the unique diseases of children and interventions of pediatric care. Connectivity and data integration are particular concerns for child health care workers. Consumer health information needs for this population extend beyond the needs of one individual to the needs of the family. Recommendations of the attendees include rapid implementation of features in electronic health information systems that support pediatric care and involvement of child health experts in policy making, standards setting, education, and advocacy. A proposed research agenda should address both effectiveness and costs of information technology, with special consideration for the needs of children, the development and evaluation of clinical decision support in pediatric settings, understanding of the epidemiology of iatrogenic injury in childhood, supplementation of vocabulary standards with pediatrics-specific terminology, and improvement in health care access for children, using telemedicine. PMID:11687562

  17. How Do Qataris Source Health Information?

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Sopna M.; Arora, Teresa; Alebbi, Seham; Ahmed, Lina; Aden, Abdi; Omar, Omar; Taheri, Shahrad

    2016-01-01

    Background Qatar is experiencing rapid population expansion with increasing demands on healthcare services for both acute and chronic conditions. Sourcing accurate information about health conditions is crucial, yet the methods used for sourcing health information in Qatar are currently unknown. Gaining a better understanding of the sources the Qatari population use to recognize and manage health and/or disease will help to develop strategies to educate individuals about existing and emerging health problems. Objective To investigate the methods used by the Qatari population to source health information. We hypothesized that the Internet would be a key service used to access health information by the Qatari population. Methods A researcher-led questionnaire was used to collect information from Qatari adults, aged 18–85 years. Participants were approached in shopping centers and public places in Doha, the capital city of Qatar. The questionnaire was used to ascertain information concerning demographics, health status, and utilization of health care services during the past year as well as sources of health information used. Results Data from a total of 394 eligible participants were included. The Internet was widely used for seeking health information among the Qatari population (71.1%). A greater proportion of Qatari females (78.7%) reported searching for health-related information using the Internet compared to Qatari males (60.8%). Other commonly used sources were family and friends (37.8%) and Primary Health Care Centers (31.2%). Google was the most commonly used search engine (94.8%). Gender, age and education levels were all significant predictors of Internet use for heath information (P<0.001 for all predictors). Females were 2.9 times more likely than males (P<0.001) and people educated to university or college level were 3.03 times more likely (P<0.001) to use the Internet for heath information. Conclusions The Internet is a widely used source to obtain

  18. [Access to health care for undocumented immigrants. Rights and practice].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anne Rytter; Krasnik, Allan; Høg, Erling

    2006-09-04

    The purpose of this article is to illuminate undocumented immigrants' right to access to health care and their access in practice. Undocumented immigrants have a right to equal access to health care. Access to more than emergency health care in Denmark is dependent on immigration status. Medical doctors' duty to treat does not apply to non-emergency health needs, and the options existing in this situation remain ambiguous. In practice, undocumented immigrants in Denmark are able to receive more than emergency health care through unofficial networks of health care providers.

  19. MATCH: Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health Datasets

    DOE Data Explorer

    MATCH is a searchable clearinghouse of publicly available Federal metadata (i.e. data about data) and links to datasets. Most metadata on MATCH pertain to geospatial data sets ranging from local to global scales. The goals of MATCH are to: 1) Provide an easily accessible clearinghouse of relevant Federal metadata on climate and health that will increase efficiency in solving research problems; 2) Promote application of research and information to understand, mitigate, and adapt to the health effects of climate change; 3) Facilitate multidirectional communication among interested stakeholders to inform and shape Federal research directions; 4) Encourage collaboration among traditional and non-traditional partners in development of new initiatives to address emerging climate and health issues. [copied from http://match.globalchange.gov/geoportal/catalog/content/about.page

  20. [Gender, equality, and health services access: an empirical approximation].

    PubMed

    Gómez Gómez, Elsa

    2002-01-01

    This piece describes the conceptual framework and the objectives that guided a research initiative in the Region of the Americas that was called "Gender, Equity, and Access to Health Services" and that was sponsored in 2001 by the Pan American Health Organization. The piece does not summarize the results of the six projects that were carried under the initiative, whose analyses have not all been completed. Instead, the piece discusses some of the foundations of the initiative and provides a general introduction to the country studies that were done. The six studies were done in Barbados/Jamaica, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. The primary objective of the initiative was to stimulate the use of existing quantitative information in the countries, with the goal of starting a process of systematically documenting two things: 1) the unfair, unnecessary, and avoidable inequalities between men and women in their access to health care and 2) the linkages between those inequalities and other socioeconomic factors. The concept of gender equity that guided this examination of health care was not the usual one calling for the equal distribution of resources. Rather, it was the notion that resources should be allocated differentially, according to the particular needs of men and of women, and that persons should pay for health services according to their economic ability rather than their risk level. The starting point for the initiative was the premise that gender inequities in utilizing and paying for health care result from gender differences in the macroeconomic and microeconomic distribution of resources. The piece concludes that achieving equity in health care access will require a better understanding of the gender needs and gender barriers that are linked to social structures and health systems.

  1. From the Director: Surfing the Web for Health Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most accurate and unbiased information on the Internet. Making this health information easier to find is a win-win situation for search engines and Federal agencies. Even more important, the general public will have easier access to trustworthy health information. Take advantage of the ...

  2. Access to health: women's status and utilization of maternal health services in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sharad Kumar; Sawangdee, Yothin; Sirirassamee, Buppha

    2007-09-01

    With the objective of reducing maternal and neonatal mortality, the Safe Motherhood Program was implemented in Nepal in 1997. It was launched as a priority programme during the ninth five-year plan period, 1997-2002, with the aim of increasing women's access to health care and raising their status. This paper examines the association of access to health services and women's status with utilization of prenatal, delivery, and postnatal care during the plan period. The 1996 Nepal Family Health Survey and the 2001 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey data were pooled and the likelihood of women's using maternal health care was examined in 2001 in comparison with 1996. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicates that the utilization of maternal health services increased over the period. Programme interventions such as outreach worker's visits, radio programmes on maternal health, maternal health information disseminated through various mass media sources and raising women's status through education were able to explain the observed change in utilization. Health worker visits and educational status of women showed a large association, but radio programmes and other mass media information were only partially successful in increasing use of maternal health services. Socioeconomic and demographic variables such as household economic status, number of living children and place of residence showed stronger association with use of maternal health services then did intervention programmes.

  3. User-Centered Indexing for Adaptive Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, James R.; Mathe, Nathalie

    1996-01-01

    We are focusing on information access tasks characterized by large volume of hypermedia connected technical documents, a need for rapid and effective access to familiar information, and long-term interaction with evolving information. The problem for technical users is to build and maintain a personalized task-oriented model of the information to quickly access relevant information. We propose a solution which provides user-centered adaptive information retrieval and navigation. This solution supports users in customizing information access over time. It is complementary to information discovery methods which provide access to new information, since it lets users customize future access to previously found information. It relies on a technique, called Adaptive Relevance Network, which creates and maintains a complex indexing structure to represent personal user's information access maps organized by concepts. This technique is integrated within the Adaptive HyperMan system, which helps NASA Space Shuttle flight controllers organize and access large amount of information. It allows users to select and mark any part of a document as interesting, and to index that part with user-defined concepts. Users can then do subsequent retrieval of marked portions of documents. This functionality allows users to define and access personal collections of information, which are dynamically computed. The system also supports collaborative review by letting users share group access maps. The adaptive relevance network provides long-term adaptation based both on usage and on explicit user input. The indexing structure is dynamic and evolves over time. Leading and generalization support flexible retrieval of information under similar concepts. The network is geared towards more recent information access, and automatically manages its size in order to maintain rapid access when scaling up to large hypermedia space. We present results of simulated learning experiments.

  4. Advanced Practice Nursing: A Strategy for Achieving Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health

    PubMed Central

    Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Valaitis, Ruta; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Donald, Faith; Peña, Laura Morán; Brousseau, Linda

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to examine advanced practice nursing (APN) roles internationally to inform role development in Latin America and the Caribbean to support universal health coverage and universal access to health. Method: we examined literature related to APN roles, their global deployment, and APN effectiveness in relation to universal health coverage and access to health. Results: given evidence of their effectiveness in many countries, APN roles are ideally suited as part of a primary health care workforce strategy in Latin America to enhance universal health coverage and access to health. Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Mexico are well positioned to build this workforce. Role implementation barriers include lack of role clarity, legislation/regulation, education, funding, and physician resistance. Strong nursing leadership to align APN roles with policy priorities, and to work in partnership with primary care providers and policy makers is needed for successful role implementation. Conclusions: given the diversity of contexts across nations, it is important to systematically assess country and population health needs to introduce the most appropriate complement and mix of APN roles and inform implementation. Successful APN role introduction in Latin America and the Caribbean could provide a roadmap for similar roles in other low/middle income countries. PMID:28146177

  5. Availability, Access, Authenticity, and Persistence: Creating the Environment for Permanent Public Access to Electronic Government Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnum, George

    2002-01-01

    Discusses efforts by the Federal Depository Library Program to make information accessible more or mostly by electronic means. Topics include Web-based locator tools; collection development; digital archives; bibliographic metadata; and access tools and user interfaces. (Author/LRW)

  6. 15 CFR 905.3 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT PROCEEDINGS OF INFORMATION COLLECTED BY VOLUNTARY FISHERY DATA COLLECTORS § 905.3 Access to information. Information collected by a voluntary fishery data collector: (a) Is subject to disclosure to...

  7. 15 CFR 905.3 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT PROCEEDINGS OF INFORMATION COLLECTED BY VOLUNTARY FISHERY DATA COLLECTORS § 905.3 Access to information. Information collected by a voluntary fishery data collector: (a) Is subject to disclosure to...

  8. 15 CFR 905.3 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT PROCEEDINGS OF INFORMATION COLLECTED BY VOLUNTARY FISHERY DATA COLLECTORS § 905.3 Access to information. Information collected by a voluntary fishery data collector: (a) Is subject to disclosure to...

  9. 15 CFR 905.3 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT PROCEEDINGS OF INFORMATION COLLECTED BY VOLUNTARY FISHERY DATA COLLECTORS § 905.3 Access to information. Information collected by a voluntary fishery data collector: (a) Is subject to disclosure to...

  10. 15 CFR 905.3 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT PROCEEDINGS OF INFORMATION COLLECTED BY VOLUNTARY FISHERY DATA COLLECTORS § 905.3 Access to information. Information collected by a voluntary fishery data collector: (a) Is subject to disclosure to...

  11. Government databases and public health research: facilitating access in the public interest.

    PubMed

    Adams, Carolyn; Allen, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Access to datasets of personal health information held by government agencies is essential to support public health research and to promote evidence-based public health policy development. Privacy legislation in Australia allows the use and disclosure of such information for public health research. However, access is not always forthcoming in a timely manner and the decision-making process undertaken by government data custodians is not always transparent. Given the public benefit in research using these health information datasets, this article suggests that it is time to recognise a right of access for approved research and that the decisions, and decision-making processes, of government data custodians should be subject to increased scrutiny. The article concludes that researchers should have an avenue of external review where access to information has been denied or unduly delayed.

  12. Pathway to Support the Sustainable National Health Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahavechaphan, Naiyana; Phengsuwan, Jedsada; U-Ruekolan, Suriya; Aroonrua, Kamron; Ponhan, Jukrapong; Harnsamut, Nattapon; Vannarat, Sornthep

    Heath information across geographically distributed healthcare centers has been recognized as an essential resource that drives an efficient national health-care plan. There is thus a need for the National Health Information System (NHIS) that provides the transparent and secure access to health information from different healthcare centers both on demand and in a time efficient manner. As healthiness is the ultimate goal of people and nation, we believe that the NHIS should be sustainable by taking the healthcare center and information consumer perspectives into account. Several issues in particular must be resolved altogether: (i) the diversity of health information structures among healthcare centers; (ii) the availability of health information sharing from healthcare centers; (iii) the efficient information access to various healthcare centers; and (iv) the privacy and privilege of heath information. To achieve the sustainable NHIS, this paper details our work which is divided into 3 main phases. Essentially, the first phase focuses on the application of metadata standard to enable the interoperability and usability of health information across healthcare centers. The second phase moves forward to make information sharing possible and to provide an efficient information access to a large number of healthcare centers. Finally, in the third phase, the privacy and privilege of health information is promoted with respect to access rights of information consumers.

  13. Precision with Ease: Refining Thesaurus Support for Quality Health Information Searching on Health"Insite"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jill Buckley; Deacon, Prue

    2009-01-01

    Health"Insite" is the Australian Government's Internet gateway to reliable health information online, providing access to over 15,000 information items on the websites of more than 80 approved information partners. The gateway provides a variety of searching and browsing options to assist users to find information on a wide range of…

  14. Access Control Model for Sharing Composite Electronic Health Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Ahn, Gail-Joon; Covington, Michael J.; Zhang, Xinwen

    The adoption of electronically formatted medical records, so called Electronic Health Records (EHRs), has become extremely important in healthcare systems to enable the exchange of medical information among stakeholders. An EHR generally consists of data with different types and sensitivity degrees which must be selectively shared based on the need-to-know principle. Security mechanisms are required to guarantee that only authorized users have access to specific portions of such critical record for legitimate purposes. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for modelling access control scheme for composite EHRs. Our model formulates the semantics and structural composition of an EHR document, from which we introduce a notion of authorized zones of the composite EHR at different granularity levels, taking into consideration of several important criteria such as data types, intended purposes and information sensitivities.

  15. 42 CFR 495.330 - Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to information. 495.330 Section 495.330 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC...

  16. Health Care Consumers’ Preferences Around Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Dhopeshwarkar, Rina V.; Kern, Lisa M.; O’Donnell, Heather C.; Edwards, Alison M.; Kaushal, Rainu

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Consumer buy-in is important for the success of widespread federal initiatives to promote the use of health information exchange (HIE). Little is known, however, of consumers’ preferences around the storing and sharing of electronic health information. We conducted a study to better understand consumer preferences regarding the privacy and security of HIE. METHODS In 2008 we conducted a cross-sectional, random digit dial telephone survey of residents in the Hudson Valley of New York State, a state where patients must affirmatively consent to having their data accessed through HIE. RESULTS There was an 85% response rate (N = 170) for the survey. Most consumers would prefer that permission be obtained before various parties, including their clinician, could view their health information through HIE. Most consumers wanted any method of sharing their health information to have safeguards in place to protect against unauthorized viewing (86%). They also wanted to be able to see who has viewed their information (86%), to stop electronic storage of their data (84%), to stop all viewing (83%), and to select which parts of their health information are shared (78%). Among the approximately one-third (n = 54) of consumers who were uncomfortable with automatic inclusion of their health information in an electronic database for HIE, 78% wished to approve all information explicitly, and most preferred restricting information by clinician (83%), visit (81%), or information type (88%). CONCLUSION Consumers in a state with an opt-in consent policy are interested in having greater control over the privacy and security of their electronic health information. These preferences should be considered when developing and implementing systems, standards and policies. PMID:22966106

  17. Open Access and Civic Scientific Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuccala, Alesia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: We examine how residents and citizens of The Netherlands perceive open access to acquire preliminary insight into the role it might play in cultivating civic scientific literacy. Open access refers to scientific or scholarly research literature available on the Web to scholars and the general public in free online journals and…

  18. Applications of health information exchange information to public health practice.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R

    2014-01-01

    Increased information availability, timeliness, and comprehensiveness through health information exchange (HIE) can support public health practice. The potential benefits to disease monitoring, disaster response, and other public health activities served as an important justification for the US' investments in HIE. After several years of HIE implementation and funding, we sought to determine if any of the anticipated benefits of exchange participation were accruing to state and local public health practitioners participating in five different exchanges. Using qualitative interviews and template analyses, we identified public health efforts and activities that were improved by participation in HIE. HIE supported public health activities consistent with expectations in the literature. However, no single department realized all the potential benefits of HIE identified. These findings suggest ways to improve HIE usage in public health.

  19. Applications of Health Information Exchange Information to Public Health Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R

    2014-01-01

    Increased information availability, timeliness, and comprehensiveness through health information exchange (HIE) can support public health practice. The potential benefits to disease monitoring, disaster response, and other public health activities served as an important justification for the US’ investments in HIE. After several years of HIE implementation and funding, we sought to determine if any of the anticipated benefits of exchange participation were accruing to state and local public health practitioners participating in five different exchanges. Using qualitative interviews and template analyses, we identified public health efforts and activities that were improved by participation in HIE. HIE supported public health activities consistent with expectations in the literature. However, no single department realized all the potential benefits of HIE identified. These findings suggest ways to improve HIE usage in public health. PMID:25954386

  20. 18 CFR 388.113 - Accessing critical energy infrastructure information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... energy infrastructure information. 388.113 Section 388.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 388.113 Accessing critical energy infrastructure information. (a) Scope. This section governs access...

  1. 18 CFR 388.113 - Accessing critical energy infrastructure information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... energy infrastructure information. 388.113 Section 388.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 388.113 Accessing critical energy infrastructure information. (a) Scope. This section governs access...

  2. 7 CFR 3406.23 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3406.23 Section 3406.23 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH... PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3406.23 Access to peer review information. After final decisions...

  3. 7 CFR 3405.16 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3405.16 Section 3405.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH... Supplementary Information § 3405.16 Access to peer review information. After final decisions have been...

  4. 18 CFR 388.113 - Accessing critical energy infrastructure information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... energy infrastructure information. 388.113 Section 388.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 388.113 Accessing critical energy infrastructure information. (a) Scope. This section governs access...

  5. 18 CFR 388.113 - Accessing critical energy infrastructure information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... energy infrastructure information. 388.113 Section 388.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 388.113 Accessing critical energy infrastructure information. (a) Scope. This section governs access...

  6. 18 CFR 388.113 - Accessing critical energy infrastructure information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... energy infrastructure information. 388.113 Section 388.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 388.113 Accessing critical energy infrastructure information. (a) Scope. This section governs access...

  7. Access to Government-Generated Information: Current Issues and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Linda E.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews both historical and current policies for access to government information, and discusses such current trends in government information as paperwork reduction, commercialization, privatization, and electronic publishing. The possible impact of these trends on the library's ability to provide access to information is briefly considered. (CLB)

  8. 77 FR 70444 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information... Electronic Health Records (EHRs) AGENCY: Health Information Technology (HIT) Policy Committee, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), Department of Health and Human Services...

  9. Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage: identification of nursing research priorities in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Bassalobre-Garcia, Alessandra; Reveiz, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estabilish a regional list for nursing research priorities in health systems and services in the Region of the Americas based on the concepts of Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage. Method: five-stage consensus process: systematic review of literature; appraisal of resulting questions and topics; ranking of the items by graduate program coordinators; discussion and ranking amongst a forum of researchers and public health leaders; and consultation with the Ministries of Health of the Pan American Health Organization's member states. Results: the resulting list of nursing research priorities consists of 276 study questions/ topics, which are sorted into 14 subcategories distributed into six major categories: 1. Policies and education of nursing human resources; 2. Structure, organization and dynamics of health systems and services; 3. Science, technology, innovation, and information systems in public health; 4. Financing of health systems and services; 5. Health policies, governance, and social control; and 6. Social studies in the health field. Conclusion: the list of nursing research priorities is expected to serve as guidance and support for nursing research on health systems and services across Latin America. Not only researchers, but also Ministries of Health, leaders in public health, and research funding agencies are encouraged to use the results of this list to help inform research-funding decisions. PMID:26487014

  10. Health care access disparities among children entering kindergarten in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Fulkerson, Nadia Deashinta; Haff, Darlene R; Chino, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to advance our understanding and appreciation of the health status of young children in the state of Nevada in addition to their discrepancies in accessing health care. This study used the 2008-2009 Nevada Kindergarten Health Survey data of 11,073 children to assess both independent and combined effects of annual household income, race/ethnicity, primary language spoken in the family, rural/urban residence, and existing medical condition on access to health care. Annual household income was a significant predictor of access to health care, with middle and high income respondents having regular access to care compared to low income counterparts. Further, English proficiency was associated with access to health care, with English-speaking Hispanics over 2.5 times more likely to have regular access to care than Spanish-speaking Hispanics. Rural residents had decreased odds of access to preventive care and having a primary care provider, but unexpectedly, had increased odds of having access to dental care compared to urban residents. Finally, parents of children with no medical conditions were more likely to have access to care than those with a medical condition. The consequences for not addressing health care access issues include deteriorating health and well-being for vulnerable socio-demographic groups in the state. Altogether these findings suggest that programs and policies within the state must be sensitive to the specific needs of at risk groups, including minorities, those with low income, and regionally and linguistically isolated residents.

  11. Accessing Information in a Technological Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitson, Donna L.; Amstutz, Donna D.

    This book is designed to help adults overcome information anxiety by developing skills to deal with overload produced by the current information glut. The nine chapters segment the information in logical steps toward information literacy. Chapter 1 discusses information anxiety and technology development and their relationship to lifelong learning…

  12. The Colombian health insurance system and its effect on access to health care.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Luz Stella; Salmon, J Warren; Swartzman, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In 1993, the Colombian government sought to reform its health care system under the guidance of international financial institutions (the World Bank and International Monetary Fund). These institutions maintain that individual private health insurance systems are more appropriate than previously established national public health structures for overcoming inequities in health care in developing countries. The reforms carried out following international financial institution guidelines are known as "neoliberal reforms." This qualitative study explores consumer health choices and associated factors, based on interviews with citizens living in Medellin, Colombia, in 2005-2006. The results show that most study participants belonging to low-income and middle-income strata, even with medical expense subsidies, faced significant barriers to accessing health care. Only upper-income participants reported a selection of different options without barriers, such as complementary and alternative medicines, along with private Western biomedicine. This study is unique in that the informal health system is linked to overall neo-liberal policy change.

  13. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  14. Small accessible quantum information does not imply security.

    PubMed

    König, Robert; Renner, Renato; Bariska, Andor; Maurer, Ueli

    2007-04-06

    The security of quantum key distribution is typically defined in terms of the mutual information between the distributed key S and the outcome of an optimal measurement applied to the adversary's system. We show that even if this so-called accessible information is small, the key S might not be secure enough to be used in applications such as one-time pad encryption. This flaw is due to a locking property of the accessible information: one additional (physical) bit of information can increase the accessible information by more than one bit.

  15. 32 CFR 505.5 - Individual access to personal information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS ARMY PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM § 505.5 Individual access to personal information... individuals under this section is not considered a “public release” of information. (c) Verification...

  16. Health Information Economy: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Kamal; Roudbari, Masoud; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Health Information Economy (HIE) is one of the broader, more complex, and challenging and yet important topics in the field of health science that requires the identification of its dimensions for planning and policy making. The aim of this study was to determine HIE concept dimensions. Methods: This paper presents a systematic methodology for analyzing the trends of HIE. For this purpose, the main keywords of this area were identified and searched in the databases and from among 4775 retrieved sources, 12 sources were studied in the field of HIE. Results: Information Economy (IE) in the world has passed behind four paradigms that involve the information evaluation perspective, the information technology perspective, the asymmetric information perspective and information value perspective. In this research, the fourth perspective in the HIE was analyzed. The main findings of this research were categorized in three major groups, including the flow of information process in the field of health (production. collection, processing and dissemination), and information applications in the same field (education, research, health industry, policy, legislation, and decision-making) and the underlying fields. Conclusion: According to the findings, HIE has already developed a theoretical and conceptual gap that due to its importance in the next decade would be one of the research approaches to health science. PMID:26153182

  17. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  18. The Knowledge-Behavior Gap in Use of Health Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sligo, F. X.; Jameson, Anna M.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of access to and use of health information focuses on a study that reported perceived barriers among New Zealand Pacific Island immigrant women to the use of cervical screening. Considers cultural topic avoidance, modesty, religion, information sources, education, ethnicity, implications for health professionals, and future research…

  19. High School Student Information Access and Engineering Design Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Developing solutions to engineering design problems requires access to information. Research has shown that appropriately accessing and using information in the design process improves solution quality. This quasi-experimental study provides two groups of high school students with a design problem in a three hour design experience. One group has…

  20. 7 CFR 2903.18 - Access to review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Access to review information. 2903.18 Section 2903.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 2903.18 Access...

  1. 7 CFR 2903.18 - Access to review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Access to review information. 2903.18 Section 2903.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 2903.18 Access...

  2. 7 CFR 2903.18 - Access to review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Access to review information. 2903.18 Section 2903.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 2903.18 Access...

  3. 7 CFR 2903.18 - Access to review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to review information. 2903.18 Section 2903.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 2903.18 Access...

  4. Accessing Engineering Global Information for Engineers: Phase Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercegovac, Zorana

    2001-01-01

    To assist engineering students to "view" and access online engineering information sources in a layered manner, Engineering Information Sources and Access (EISA) was developed. Discussed are design features of EISA's front-end, ATEIS. The level of interoperability was compared across four controlled vocabularies on selected terms for targeted user…

  5. 7 CFR 2903.18 - Access to review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to review information. 2903.18 Section 2903.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 2903.18 Access...

  6. 78 FR 31800 - Accessible Emergency Information, and Apparatus Requirements for Emergency Information and Video...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... subscribers to access linear video programming that contains emergency information via tablets, laptops..., laptops, personal computers, smartphones, or similar devices; Explores whether the Commission should... to access linear video programming that contains emergency information via tablets, laptops,...

  7. An Ecological Perspective on U.S. Latinos' Health Communication Behaviors, Access, and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Vikki S.; Ang, Alfonso; Suro, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    U.S. Latinos experience constrained access to formal health care resources, contributing to higher incidence of preventable diseases and chronic health conditions than the general population. The authors explore whether a rich set of informal health communication connections--to friends, family, radio, television, Internet, newspapers, magazines,…

  8. A Conceptual Framework of Mapping Access to Health Care across EU Countries: The Patient Access Initiative.

    PubMed

    Souliotis, Kyriakos; Hasardzhiev, Stanimir; Agapidaki, Eirini

    Research evidence suggests that access to health care is the key influential factor for improved population health outcomes and health care system sustainability. Although the importance of addressing barriers in access to health care across European countries is well documented, little has been done to improve the situation. This is due to different definitions, approaches and policies, and partly due to persisting disparities in access within and between European countries. To bridge this gap, the Patient Access Partnership (PACT) developed (a) the '5As' definition of access, which details the five critical elements (adequacy, accessibility, affordability, appropriateness, and availability) of access to health care, (b) a multi-stakeholders' approach for mapping access, and (c) a 13-item questionnaire based on the 5As definition in an effort to address these obstacles and to identify best practices. These tools are expected to contribute effectively to addressing access barriers in practice, by suggesting a common framework and facilitating the exchange of knowledge and expertise, in order to improve access to health care between and within European countries.

  9. Complementarity of quantum discord and classically accessible information

    SciTech Connect

    Zwolak, Michael P.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2013-05-20

    The sum of the Holevo quantity (that bounds the capacity of quantum channels to transmit classical information about an observable) and the quantum discord (a measure of the quantumness of correlations of that observable) yields an observable-independent total given by the quantum mutual information. This split naturally delineates information about quantum systems accessible to observers – information that is redundantly transmitted by the environment – while showing that it is maximized for the quasi-classical pointer observable. Other observables are accessible only via correlations with the pointer observable. In addition, we prove an anti-symmetry property relating accessible information and discord. It shows that information becomes objective – accessible to many observers – only as quantum information is relegated to correlations with the global environment, and, therefore, locally inaccessible. Lastly, the resulting complementarity explains why, in a quantum Universe, we perceive objective classical reality while flagrantly quantum superpositions are out of reach.

  10. Complementarity of quantum discord and classically accessible information

    DOE PAGES

    Zwolak, Michael P.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2013-05-20

    The sum of the Holevo quantity (that bounds the capacity of quantum channels to transmit classical information about an observable) and the quantum discord (a measure of the quantumness of correlations of that observable) yields an observable-independent total given by the quantum mutual information. This split naturally delineates information about quantum systems accessible to observers – information that is redundantly transmitted by the environment – while showing that it is maximized for the quasi-classical pointer observable. Other observables are accessible only via correlations with the pointer observable. In addition, we prove an anti-symmetry property relating accessible information and discord. Itmore » shows that information becomes objective – accessible to many observers – only as quantum information is relegated to correlations with the global environment, and, therefore, locally inaccessible. Lastly, the resulting complementarity explains why, in a quantum Universe, we perceive objective classical reality while flagrantly quantum superpositions are out of reach.« less

  11. Formative Evaluation to Assess Communication Technology Access and Health Communication Preferences of Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Renee F.; Dillard, Denise A.; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y.; Smith, Julia J.; Tierney, Steve; Avey, Jaedon P.; Buchwald, Dedra S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Information technology can improve the quality, safety, and efficiency of healthcare delivery by improving provider and patient access to health information. We conducted a nonrandomized, cross-sectional, self-report survey to determine whether Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people have access to the health communication technologies available through a patient-centered medical home. Methods In 2011, we administered a self-report survey in an urban, tribally owned and operated primary care center serving AN/AI adults. Patients in the center’s waiting rooms completed the survey on paper; center staff completed it electronically. Results Approximately 98% (n = 654) of respondents reported computer access, 97% (n = 650) email access, and 94% (n = 631) mobile phone use. Among mobile phone users, 60% had Internet access through their phones. Rates of computer access (p = .011) and email use (p = .005) were higher among women than men, but we found no significant gender difference in mobile phone access to the Internet or text messaging. Respondents in the oldest age category (65–80 years of age) were significantly less likely to anticipate using the Internet to schedule appointments, refill medications, or communicate with their health care providers (all p < .001). Conclusion Information on use of health communication technologies enables administrators to deploy these technologies more efficiently to address health concerns in AN/AI communities. Our results will drive future research on health communication for chronic disease screening and health management. PMID:27169131

  12. American Health Information Management Association. Position statement. Issue: patient cards.

    PubMed

    1993-11-01

    In its simplest form, a patient card is a credit card sized record made of paper or plastic that contains identification information. A card may contain additional information, such as insurance or limited health information. Of the many technologies available, chip cards and optical cards are best suited for use in healthcare. If their expense can be justified and nation-wide standards established, cards could help improve timely access to basic health information such as demographic, insurance, and basic medical information needed for emergency treatment. Technology may permit a patient's entire longitudinal (lifetime) health history to be maintained on a card, but this should not be the only source of the longitudinal record. To assure its accessibility to legitimate users throughout the healthcare system, the longitudinal health record must be a computer-based patient record maintained on a controlled access network.

  13. Health and the National Information Infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don E.

    1998-01-01

    Only information technology offers society the opportunity to reinvent health care into a more value-driven, knowledge-based, cost-effective industry. The author urges the health informatics community to assume greater leadership for defining and securing a robust health information infrastructure (HII). A blueprint for the future tied to a coalition of advocates pushing for change would enable the step-interval improvements in health care needed by the nation. Our nation and its people are fortunate. We are blessed with a system of government that offers ordinary citizens the opportunity to shape the future, leadership that seeks to anticipate and create a better society, and at present a robust economy. Moreover, like many other countries, we are benefiting from astounding advances in medical knowledge and technologies. Finally, the increasing power and affordability of information technology is transforming the work of many industries and incrementally changing the lives of many citizens. At the same time this is true, there is much about which to be concerned with respect to health care. Tens of millions lack financial access to care; quality is very uneven and not receiving serious attention from health professionals; and costs are once again rising. Our people are unhappy with their care; providers are unhappy with the system; payers will soon become more unhappy about costs; and government reacts by enacting regulations that will fail to create substantial change. There will never be sufficient funds to do all we would like to do. Better knowledge and treatments will come from biomedical research, but the progress will be gradual and likely offset by increased demand by an aging society. While improved health care system management will result from health services research, only the information technology revolution and better policy offer promise of dramatic help. Yet there is little evidence of movement to harness this opportunity. One of the great

  14. Exploring digital divides: an examination of eHealth technology use in health information seeking, communication and personal health information management in the USA.

    PubMed

    Lustria, Mia Liza A; Smith, Scott Alan; Hinnant, Charles C

    2011-09-01

    Recent government initiatives to deploy health information technology in the USA, coupled with a growing body of scholarly evidence linking online heath information and positive health-related behaviors, indicate a widespread belief that access to health information and health information technologies can help reduce healthcare inequalities. However, it is less clear whether the benefits of greater access to online health information and health information technologies is equitably distributed across population groups, particularly to those who are underserved. To examine this issue, this article employs the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to investigate relationships between a variety of socio-economic variables and the use of the web-based technologies for health information seeking, personal health information management and patient-provider communication within the context of the USA. This study reveals interesting patterns in technology adoption, some of which are in line with previous studies, while others are less clear. Whether these patterns indicate early evidence of a narrowing divide in eHealth technology use across population groups as a result of the narrowing divide in Internet access and computer ownership warrants further exploration. In particular, the findings emphasize the need to explore differences in the use of eHealth tools by medically underserved and disadvantaged groups. In so doing, it will be important to explore other psychosocial variables, such as health literacy, that may be better predictors of health consumers' eHealth technology adoption.

  15. Long-Term Information Preservation and Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    An unprecedented amount of information encompassing almost every facet of human activities across the world is generated daily in the form of zeros and ones, and that is often the only form in which such information is recorded. A good fraction of this information needs to be preserved for periods of time ranging from a few years to centuries.…

  16. Using law to fight a silent epidemic: the role of health literacy in health care access, quality, & cost.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brietta

    2011-01-01

    The dominant rhetoric in the health care policy debate about cost has assumed an inherent tension between access and quality on the one hand, and cost effectiveness on the other; but an emerging discourse has challenged this narrative by presenting a more nuanced relationship between access, quality, and cost. This is reflected in the discourse surrounding health literacy, which is viewed as an important tool for achieving all three goals. Health literacy refers to one's ability to obtain, understand and use health information to make appropriate health decisions. Research shows that improving patients' health literacy can help overcome access barriers and empower patients to be better health care partners, which should lead to better health outcomes. Promoting health literacy can also reduce expenditures for unnecessary or inappropriate treatment. This explains why, as a policy matter, improving health literacy is an objective that has been embraced by almost every sector of the health care system. As a legal matter, however, the role of health literacy in ensuring quality and access is not as prominent. Although the health literacy movement is relatively young, it has roots in longstanding bioethical principles of patient autonomy, beneficence, and justice as well as the corresponding legal principles of informed consent, the right to quality care, and antidiscrimination. Assumptions and concerns about health literacy seem to do important, yet subtle work in these legal doctrines--influencing conclusions about patient understanding in informed consent cases, animating decisions about patient responsibility in malpractice cases, and underlying regulatory guidance concerning the quality of language assistance services that are necessary for meaningful access to care. Nonetheless, health literacy is not explicitly treated as a legally relevant factor in these doctrines. Moreover, there is no coherent legal framework for incorporating health literacy research that

  17. Promoting Ecological Health Resilience for Minority Youth: Enhancing Health Care Access through the School Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clauss-Ehlers, Caroline C. C.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the demographic realities of children of color in the U.S., with a focus on health care needs and access issues that have an enormous influence on health status. An ecologic model is presented that incorporates cultural values and community structures into the school health center. (Contains 50 references.) (GCP)

  18. How could health information be improved? Recommended actions from the Victorian Consultation on Health Literacy.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sophie J; Sofra, Tanya A

    2017-03-07

    Objective Health literacy is on the policy agenda. Accessible, high-quality health information is a major component of health literacy. Health information materials include print, electronic or other media-based information enabling people to understand health and make health-related decisions. The aim of the present study was to present the findings and recommended actions as they relate to health information of the Victorian Consultation on Health Literacy.Methods Notes and submissions from the 2014 Victorian Consultation workshops and submissions were analysed thematically and a report prepared with input from an advisory committee.Results Health information needs to improve and recommendations are grouped into two overarching themes. First, the quality of information needs to be increased and this can be done by developing a principle-based framework to inform updating guidance for information production, formulating standards to raise quality and improving the systems for delivering information to people. Second, there needs to be a focus on users of health information. Recommendation actions were for information that promoted active participation in health encounters, resources to encourage critical users of health information and increased availability of information tailored to population diversity.Conclusion A framework to improve health information would underpin the efforts to meet literacy needs in a more consistent way, improving standards and ultimately increasing the participation by consumers and carers in health decision making and self-management.What is known about the topic? Health information is a critical component of the concept of health literacy. Poorer health literacy is associated with poorer health outcomes across a range of measures. Improving access to and the use of quality sources of health information is an important strategy for meeting the health literacy needs of the population. In recent years, health services and governments

  19. Access to Comprehensive School-Based Health Services for Children and Youth, 1995-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Access, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of 11 consecutive issues of the newsletter "Access," published across a four-year period. "Access" presents information on public policy and research of interest to school-based health programs (SBHC) for children and youth. The major topics covered by the newsletters are as follows: (1) a conference,…

  20. Understanding the Developing Role of Global Health Partnerships on Access to Medication: An STS Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngoasong, Michael Zisuh

    2010-01-01

    A conceptual framework for studying the role of global health partnerships (GHPs) in determining policy practices on access to medication is presented. Although GHPs are of a practical nature, they are implicitly theory informed. The narratives used by GHP partners in relating to access to medication have theoretical origins. Building on the…

  1. Questioning reliability assessments of health information on social media

    PubMed Central

    Dalmer, Nicole K.

    2017-01-01

    This narrative review examines assessments of the reliability of online health information retrieved through social media to ascertain whether health information accessed or disseminated through social media should be evaluated differently than other online health information. Several medical, library and information science, and interdisciplinary databases were searched using terms relating to social media, reliability, and health information. While social media’s increasing role in health information consumption is recognized, studies are dominated by investigations of traditional (i.e., non-social media) sites. To more richly assess constructions of reliability when using social media for health information, future research must focus on health consumers’ unique contexts, virtual relationships, and degrees of trust within their social networks. PMID:28096748

  2. Questioning reliability assessments of health information on social media.

    PubMed

    Dalmer, Nicole K

    2017-01-01

    This narrative review examines assessments of the reliability of online health information retrieved through social media to ascertain whether health information accessed or disseminated through social media should be evaluated differently than other online health information. Several medical, library and information science, and interdisciplinary databases were searched using terms relating to social media, reliability, and health information. While social media's increasing role in health information consumption is recognized, studies are dominated by investigations of traditional (i.e., non-social media) sites. To more richly assess constructions of reliability when using social media for health information, future research must focus on health consumers' unique contexts, virtual relationships, and degrees of trust within their social networks.

  3. Information Technology Outside Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-health-care uses of information technology (IT) provide important lessons for health care informatics that are often overlooked because of the focus on the ways in which health care is different from other domains. Eight examples of IT use outside health care provide a context in which to examine the content and potential relevance of these lessons. Drawn from personal experience, five books, and two interviews, the examples deal with the role of leadership, academia, the private sector, the government, and individuals working in large organizations. The interviews focus on the need to manage technologic change. The lessons shed light on how to manage complexity, create and deploy standards, empower individuals, and overcome the occasional “wrongness” of conventional wisdom. One conclusion is that any health care informatics self-examination should be outward-looking and focus on the role of health care IT in the larger context of the evolving uses of IT in all domains. PMID:10495095

  4. Access to safe legal abortion in Malaysia: women's insights and health sector response.

    PubMed

    Low, Wah-Yun; Tong, Wen-Ting; Wong, Yut-Lin; Jegasothy, Ravindran; Choong, Sim-Poey

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia has an abortion law, which permits termination of pregnancy to save a woman's life and to preserve her physical and mental health (Penal Code Section 312, amended in 1989). However, lack of clear interpretation and understanding of the law results in women facing difficulties in accessing abortion information and services. Some health care providers were unaware of the legalities of abortion in Malaysia and influenced by their personal beliefs with regard to provision of abortion services. Accessibility to safer abortion techniques is also an issue. The development of the 2012 Guidelines on Termination of Pregnancy and Guidelines for Management of Sexual and Reproductive Health among Adolescents in Health Clinics by the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, is a step forward toward increasing women's accessibility to safe abortion services in Malaysia. This article provides an account of women's accessibility to abortion in Malaysia and the health sector response in addressing the barriers.

  5. Science information systems: Archive, access, and retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop technology for the automated characterization and interactive retrieval and visualization of very large, complex scientific data sets. Technologies will be developed for the following specific areas: (1) rapidly archiving data sets; (2) automatically characterizing and labeling data in near real-time; (3) providing users with the ability to browse contents of databases efficiently and effectively; (4) providing users with the ability to access and retrieve system independent data sets electronically; and (5) automatically alerting scientists to anomalies detected in data.

  6. Assessment of technology access and preference for health education of a rural Hispanic community.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Trina; Wilhelm, Susan; Joshi, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, Hispanic populations tend to have higher incidences of chronic disease such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, obesity and hyperlipidemias [1]. They are also more likely to be underinsured or uninsured than other populations [2]. The purpose of this descriptive technology assessment survey study was to determine computer and internet access, skill level and health education information preferences of a rural Hispanic (primarily Mexican-American) population in the United States. Among the sample, 81% of individuals who answered the survey had a computer and internet access in their home. Nineteen percent did not have computers or internet access in their homes. Compared to the average 54% home internet access found by the Pew Hispanic Research Center the rural convenience sample in this study had a high percentage of technology access. Recommendations include using multimedia to improve the health information accessability among Hispanic persons.

  7. Access to F.D.A. Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinovic, Dianna

    Prior to the enactment of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), little of the data collected by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was made public or could be obtained from the agency. Although the FDA files are now open, information is considered exempt from public disclosure when it involves regulatory procedures, program guidelines, work…

  8. Access to Information in Rural Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboyade, B. Olabimpe

    1985-01-01

    This paper focuses on intensified information transfer activities in rural areas of Nigeria: community development work, agricultural extension service, mass media (newspapers, television, radio, problems of communication), and the role of the library (reinforcing messages, repackaging information, acquiring specialized materials, coordinating…

  9. Online health information - what can you trust?

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you have found. Things to Keep in Mind While searching for health information online, use common ... help you manage your health. But keep in mind that online health information can never replace a ...

  10. SW Architecture for Access to Medical Information for Knowledge Execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suntae; Shim, Bingu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Cho, Insook

    Recently, many approaches have been studied to author medical knowledge and verify doctor's diagnosis based on the specified knowledge. During the verification, intensive access to medical information is unavoidable. Also, the access approach should consider modifiability in order to cover diverse medical information from the variety of hospitals. This paper presents an approach to generating query language from medical knowledge, and shows software architecture for accessing medical information from hospitals by executing generated query languages. Implementation of this architecture has been deployed in a hospital of South Korea so that it shows the feasibility of the architecture.

  11. The Open Access Availability of Library and Information Science Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Doug

    2010-01-01

    To examine the open access availability of Library and Information Science (LIS) research, a study was conducted using Google Scholar to search for articles from 20 top LIS journals. The study examined whether Google Scholar was able to find any links to full text, if open access versions of the articles were available and where these articles…

  12. 19 CFR 351.604 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access to information. 351.604 Section 351.604 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Subsidy Determinations Regarding Cheese Subject to an In-Quota Rate of Duty § 351.604 Access...

  13. Enhancing Access to NTIS Information through Libraries: A Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shill, Harold B.

    1993-01-01

    Considers current and potential uses of libraries as National Technical Information Service (NTIS) access points, describes the library community's strengths and weaknesses, and suggests future trends. A proposal for using libraries as vehicles for broader access for current and potential NTIS users is outlined. (Contains 32 references.) (EAM)

  14. 77 FR 55217 - Health Information Technology Implementation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Information Technology Implementation AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services...

  15. Access to Information Technology: A Statewide Vision for Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingle, James R.; And Others

    Access to information technology is rapidly becoming the benchmark by which quality in higher education is judged. The use of information technology for both on-campus instruction and distance learning is nowhere near reaching its full potential in Colorado. This report provides a statewide vision for the incorporation of information technology…

  16. 7 CFR 1789.160 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Access to information. 1789.160 Section 1789.160 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... not restrict release of information by RUS pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C....

  17. 36 CFR 404.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 404.4 Access to information. (a) The American... file a request under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) should address their request in writing to..., certified to be true and correct to the best of that person's knowledge and belief, explaining in detail...

  18. 36 CFR 404.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 404.4 Access to information. (a) The American... file a request under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) should address their request in writing to..., certified to be true and correct to the best of that person's knowledge and belief, explaining in detail...

  19. Issues of Access in the New Information Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Dan

    This paper suggests that library and information systems provide access to claims to knowledge rather than to knowledge or information and that such claims to knowledge are in fact claims to truth. The stated purpose of the paper is to explain why the library and information community should adhere to at least soft, if not hard, skepticism with…

  20. 49 CFR 633.15 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.15 Access to information. A recipient of FTA funds for a major capital project shall provide...

  1. 49 CFR 633.15 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.15 Access to information. A recipient of FTA funds for a major capital project shall provide...

  2. 49 CFR 633.15 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.15 Access to information. A recipient of FTA funds for a major capital project shall provide...

  3. 49 CFR 633.15 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.15 Access to information. A recipient of FTA funds for a major capital project shall provide...

  4. 49 CFR 633.15 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.15 Access to information. A recipient of FTA funds for a major capital project shall provide...

  5. Access to Government Information in a Digital Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernon, Peter; Relyea, Harold C.; Dugan, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses factors that scholars, teachers, and students need to understand in order to take advantage of electronic and online availability of government information and data, including technical issues and right to access. (EV)

  6. Accessible Electronic and Information Technology: Standards, Procedures, and Guidance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Defines electronic and information technology (EIT), and the technical and functional performance criteria for EIT to comply with Section 508 accessibility standards. Includes EPA procedures for EIT approval, 508 complaints, and undue burden justification.

  7. A geographical perspective on access to sexual and reproductive health care for women in rural Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Murray, Alan T.; Agadjanian, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services can significantly impact health outcomes, such as pregnancy and birth, prenatal and neonatal mortality, maternal morbidity and mortality, and vertical transmission of infectious diseases like HIV/AIDS. It has long been recognized that access to SRH services is essential to positive health outcomes, especially in rural areas of developing countries, where long distances as well as poor transportation conditions, can be potential barriers to health care acquisition. Improving accessibility of health services for target populations is therefore critical for specialized healthcare programs. Thus, understanding and evaluation of current access to health care is crucial. Combining spatial information using geographical information system (GIS) with population survey data, this study details a gravity model-based method to measure and evaluate access to SRH services in rural Mozambique, and analyzes potential geographic access to such services, using family planning as an example. Access is found to be a significant factor in reported behavior, superior to traditional distance-based indicators. Spatial disparities in geographic access among different population groups also appear to exist, likely affecting overall program success. PMID:24034952

  8. Information needs of rural health care practitioners in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Lundeen, G W; Tenopir, C; Wermager, P

    1994-04-01

    Rural health care workers need a wide range of specialized information but have difficulties locating and accessing information resources. The information needs of Hawaii's rural health care practitioners and their methods of accessing information were studied through interviews and mailed questionnaires. The following barriers to information access were identified: lack of funds, inadequate hardware, infrastructure problems, and insufficient knowledge about information sources and how to use them. Although many (85%) reported having computers, only a minority (30%) have modems, and even fewer use online resources or the free electronic databases at public and university libraries. Most reported that journal articles were the information source that best met their needs and that personal files or a colleague's collection were the most common places for accessing needed materials. Recommendations for solving some of the information problems include development of a State of Hawaii rural health information clearinghouse; better identification, training, and use of available services; and, most importantly, the establishment of rural health care information agents (modeled on agriculture extension agents) on each major island.

  9. The role of health anxiety in online health information search.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Susanne E; Hartmann, Tilo

    2011-10-01

    This article is one of the first to empirically explore the relationship between health anxiety and online health information search. Two studies investigate how health anxiety influences the use of the Internet for health information and how health anxious individuals respond to online health information. An exploratory survey study with 104 Dutch participants indicates that health anxiety is related to an increase in online health information search. Moreover, results suggest that health anxious individuals experience more negative consequences from online health information search. Findings from an experimental study (n=120) indicate that online health information results in greater worries among health anxious individuals compared to nonhealth anxious individuals only if the information stems from a trustworthy governmental Web site. Information from a less trustworthy online forum does not lead to greater worries among health anxious individuals. In sum, the Internet appears to play a pivotal role in the lives of health anxious individuals.

  10. Health Care Access, Use, and Satisfaction Among Disabled Medicaid Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Teresa A.; Long, Sharon K.; Kendall, Stephanie

    2002-01-01

    Despite being a vulnerable and costly population, little is known about disabled Medicaid beneficiaries. Using data from a 1999-2000 survey, we describe the population and their health care experiences in terms of access, use, and satisfaction with care. Results indicate that disabled beneficiaries are a unique population with wide-ranging circumstances and health conditions. Our results on access to care were indeterminate: by some measures, they had good access, but by others they did not. Beneficiaries' assessments of their health care were more clear: The bulk of the sample rated one or more area of care as being fair or poor. PMID:12690698

  11. Management of Information Technology Access Controls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    stealing, it is mostly considered innocent "borrowing" by the thieves. Even less tangible is theft of computer services . Use of a firm’s computer by...manipulation, misuse, denial of use, or deliberate disclosure of corporate information. Figure 3.1 portrays this threat categorization, including examples...SABOTAGEDISCLOSURE DENIAL OF USE (Employees) DESTRUCTION MANIPULATION DISCLOSURE FRAUD COMPUTER VIRUS EXTERNAL READING E-MAIL UNUATHORIZED USE SNOOPING SABOTAGE

  12. Access of primary and secondary literature by health personnel in an academic health center: implications for open access*

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ryan M.; Moorhead, Laura; O'Brien, Bridget; Willinsky, John

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The research sought to ascertain the types and quantity of research evidence accessed by health personnel through PubMed and UpToDate in a university medical center over the course of a year in order to better estimate the impact that increasing levels of open access to biomedical research can be expected to have on clinical practice in the years ahead. Methods: Web log data were gathered from the 5,042 health personnel working in the Stanford University Hospitals (SUH) during 2011. Data were analyzed for access to the primary literature (abstracts and full-text) through PubMed and UpToDate and to the secondary literature, represented by UpToDate (research summaries), to establish the frequency and nature of literature consulted. Results: In 2011, SUH health personnel accessed 81,851 primary literature articles and visited UpToDate 110,336 times. Almost a third of the articles (24,529) accessed were reviews. Twenty percent (16,187) of the articles viewed were published in 2011. Conclusion: When it is available, health personnel in a clinical care setting frequently access the primary literature. While further studies are needed, this preliminary finding speaks to the value of the National Institutes of Health public access policy and the need for medical librarians and educators to prepare health personnel for increasing public access to medical research. PMID:23930091

  13. Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records: Exploring Recommendations for Successful Implementation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Urowitz, Sara; Apatu, Emma; DeLenardo, Claudette; Eysenbach, Gunther; Harth, Tamara; Pai, Howard; Leonard, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Background Providing patients with access to their electronic health records offers great promise to improve patient health and satisfaction with their care, as well to improve professional and organizational approaches to health care. Although many benefits have been identified, there are many questions about best practices for the implementation of patient accessible Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Objectives To develop recommendations to assist health care organizations in providing patients with access to EHRs in a meaningful, responsible, and responsive manner. Methods A Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record (PAEHR) Workshop was held with nationally and internationally renowned experts to explore issues related to providing patient access to the EHR and managing institutional change. Results The PAEHR Workshop was attended by 45 participants who discussed recommendations for the implementation of patient accessible EHRs. Recommendations were discussed under four subject domains: (1) providing patient access to the EHR, (2) maintaining privacy and confidentiality related to the PAEHR, (3) patient education and navigation of the PAEHR, and (4) strategies for managing institutional change. The discussion focused on the need for national infrastructure, clear definitions for privacy, security and confidentiality, flexible, interoperable solutions, and patient and professional education. In addition, there was a strong call for research into all domains of patient accessible EHRs to ensure the adoption of evidence-based practices. Conclusions Patient access to personal health information is a fundamental issue for patient engagement and empowerment. Health care professionals and organizations should consider the potential benefits and risks of patient access when developing EHR strategies. Flexible, standardized, and interoperable solutions must be integrated with outcomes-based research to activate effectively patients as partners in their health care

  14. Measurement-based management of mental health quality and access in VHA: SAIL mental health domain.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Sonne; Boden, Matthew Tyler; Kearney, Lisa K; Krahn, Dean D; Neuman, Matthew J; Schmidt, Eric M; Trafton, Jodie A

    2017-02-01

    We outline the development of a Mental Health Domain to track accessibility and quality of mental health care in the United States Veterans Health Administration (VHA) as part of a broad-based performance measurement system. This domain adds an important element to national performance improvement efforts by targeting regional and facility leadership and providing them a concise yet comprehensive measure to identify facilities facing challenges in their mental health programs. We present the conceptual framework and rationale behind measure selection and development. The Mental Health Domain covers three important aspects of mental health treatment: Population Coverage, Continuity of Care, and Experience of Care. Each component is a composite of existing and newly adapted measures with moderate to high internal consistency; components are statistically independent or moderately related. Development and dissemination of the Mental Health Domain involved a variety of approaches and benefited from close collaboration between local, regional, and national leadership and from coordination with existing quality-improvement initiatives. During the first year of use, facilities varied in the direction and extent of change. These patterns of change were generally consistent with qualitative information, providing support for the validity of the domain and its component measures. Measure maintenance remains an iterative process as the VHA mental health system and potential data resources continue to evolve. Lessons learned may be helpful to the broader mental health-provider community as mental health care consolidates and becomes increasingly integrated within healthcare systems. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Health, sport and nutritional information: tailoring your approach.

    PubMed

    Grant, Maria J

    2012-06-01

    One of the intended legacies of the London 2012 Olympics is to increase the level of physical activity amongst the general population. Health information on the positive health benefits of sport and nutrition can assist in this goal and its positive benefit can been seen in communities within and beyond the United Kingdom, particularly within an educational context. In the United States, young people view their teachers as a valuable source of health information, and in Taiwan, teachers have been key collaborators in the development of a national Health e-Learning Network providing multimedia-learning modules for use in the classroom. However, classrooms are not the only source of health information and, with the reported inaccuracies in the translation of health information from academic papers to the popular press, school librarians have a role to play in facilitating students' ability to assess the quality of the health information they access, whatever the source.

  16. Equal access for all? Access to medical information for European psychiatric trainees.

    PubMed

    Marques, João Gama; Stefanovic, Maja Pantovic; Mitkovic-Voncina, Marija; Riese, Florian; Guloksuz, Sinan; Holmes, Kevin; Kilic, Ozge; Banjac, Visnja; Palumbo, Claudia; Nawka, Alexander; Jauhar, Sameer; Andlauer, Olivier; Krupchanka, Dzmitry; da Costa, Mariana Pinto

    2016-04-30

    Access to medical information is important as lifelong scientific learning is in close relation with a better career satisfaction in psychiatry. This survey aimed to investigate how medical information sources are being used among members of the European Federation of Psychiatric Trainees. Eighty-three psychiatric trainees completed our questionnaire. A significant variation was found, and information availability levels were associated with training duration and average income. The most available sources were books and websites, but the most preferred ones were scientific journals. Our findings suggest that further steps should be taken to provide an equal access to medical information across Europe.

  17. Information technologies to improve public health: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Melissa; Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review examines a total of eighteen studies on the use of health information technologies to improve public health. Health information technologies are tools that allow for the management of health information in computerized systems. Health information technology, including electronic health records, computers/emails, social media, and cellphones/text messaging are becoming widespread and readily accessible to populations around the globe. In this review, the use of these technologies and interventions are discussed and evaluated for their potential to improve public health. This review found some good-quality evidence on the use of electronic health records and little good-quality evidence on the use of email, social media, cell phones and text messaging to improve healthcare, illustrating the need for further study in these areas.

  18. NASA Access Mechanism - Graphical user interface information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy F.; Generous, Curtis; Duncan, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Access to online information sources of aerospace, scientific, and engineering data, a mission focus for NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program, has always been limited by factors such as telecommunications, query language syntax, lack of standardization in the information, and the lack of adequate tools to assist in searching. Today, the NASA STI Program's NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype offers a solution to these problems by providing the user with a set of tools that provide a graphical interface to remote, heterogeneous, and distributed information in a manner adaptable to both casual and expert users. Additionally, the NAM provides access to many Internet-based services such as Electronic Mail, the Wide Area Information Servers system, Peer Locating tools, and electronic bulletin boards.

  19. NASA access mechanism: Graphical user interface information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy; Generous, Curtis; Duncan, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Access to online information sources of aerospace, scientific, and engineering data, a mission focus for NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program, has always been limited to factors such as telecommunications, query language syntax, lack of standardization in the information, and the lack of adequate tools to assist in searching. Today, the NASA STI Program's NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype offers a solution to these problems by providing the user with a set of tools that provide a graphical interface to remote, heterogeneous, and distributed information in a manner adaptable to both casual and expert users. Additionally, the NAM provides access to many Internet-based services such as Electronic Mail, the Wide Area Information Servers system, Peer Locating tools, and electronic bulletin boards.

  20. ISAIA: Interoperable Systems for Archival Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisch, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    The ISAIA project was originally proposed in 1999 as a successor to the informal AstroBrowse project. AstroBrowse, which provided a data location service for astronomical archives and catalogs, was a first step toward data system integration and interoperability. The goals of ISAIA were ambitious: '...To develop an interdisciplinary data location and integration service for space science. Building upon existing data services and communications protocols, this service will allow users to transparently query hundreds or thousands of WWW-based resources (catalogs, data, computational resources, bibliographic references, etc.) from a single interface. The service will collect responses from various resources and integrate them in a seamless fashion for display and manipulation by the user.' Funding was approved only for a one-year pilot study, a decision that in retrospect was wise given the rapid changes in information technology in the past few years and the emergence of the Virtual Observatory initiatives in the US and worldwide. Indeed, the ISAIA pilot study was influential in shaping the science goals, system design, metadata standards, and technology choices for the virtual observatory. The ISAIA pilot project also helped to cement working relationships among the NASA data centers, US ground-based observatories, and international data centers. The ISAIA project was formed as a collaborative effort between thirteen institutions that provided data to astronomers, space physicists, and planetary scientists. Among the fruits we ultimately hoped would come from this project would be a central site on the Web that any space scientist could use to efficiently locate existing data relevant to a particular scientific question. Furthermore, we hoped that the needed technology would be general enough to allow smaller, more-focused community within space science could use the same technologies and standards to provide more specialized services. A major challenge to searching

  1. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  2. Determinants of Consumer eHealth Information Seeking Behavior.

    PubMed

    Sandefer, Ryan H; Westra, Bonnie L; Khairat, Saif S; Pieczkiewicz, David S; Speedie, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    Patients are increasingly using the Internet and other technologies to engage in their own healthcare, but little research has focused on the determinants of consumer eHealth behaviors related to Internet use. This study uses data from 115,089 respondents to four years of the National Health Interview Series to identify the associations between one consumer eHealth behavior (information seeking) and demographics, health measures, and Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) (messaging, scheduling, refills, and chat). Individuals who use PHIM are 7.5 times more likely to search the internet for health related information. Just as health has social determinants, the results of this study indicate there are potential social determinants of consumer eHealth behaviors including personal demographics, health status, and healthcare access.

  3. CHID: a unique health information and education database.

    PubMed

    Lunin, L F; Stein, R S

    1987-04-01

    The public's growing interest in health information and the health professions' increasing need to locate health education materials can be answered in part by the new Combined Health Information Database (CHID). This unique database focuses on materials and programs in professional and patient education, general health education, and community risk reduction. Accessible through BRS, CHID suggests sources for procuring brochures, pamphlets, articles, and films on community services, programs at HMOs and hospitals, aspects of coping, and more. CHID is a joint project of six federally funded agencies in the Public Health Service. CHID provides citations with abstracts to major health journals, books, reports, pamphlets, hard-to-find information resources, and to health education programs under way in state and local health departments and other locations.

  4. Determinants of Consumer eHealth Information Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sandefer, Ryan H.; Westra, Bonnie L.; Khairat, Saif S.; Pieczkiewicz, David S.; Speedie, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    Patients are increasingly using the Internet and other technologies to engage in their own healthcare, but little research has focused on the determinants of consumer eHealth behaviors related to Internet use. This study uses data from 115,089 respondents to four years of the National Health Interview Series to identify the associations between one consumer eHealth behavior (information seeking) and demographics, health measures, and Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) (messaging, scheduling, refills, and chat). Individuals who use PHIM are 7.5 times more likely to search the internet for health related information. Just as health has social determinants, the results of this study indicate there are potential social determinants of consumer eHealth behaviors including personal demographics, health status, and healthcare access. PMID:26958251

  5. Health information systems - past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Haux, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    ) HIS architectural styles, third the need for education in health informatics and/or biomedical informatics, including appropriate knowledge and skills on HIS. As these new HIS are urgently needed for reorganizing health care in an aging society, as last consequence the need for research around HIS is seen. Research should include the development and investigation of appropriate transinstitutional information system architectures, of adequate methods for strategic information management, of methods for modeling and evaluating HIS, the development and investigation of comprehensive electronic patient records, providing appropriate access for health care professionals as well as for patients, in the broad sense as described here, e.g. including home care and health monitoring facilities. Comparing the world in 1984 and in 2004, we have to recognize that we imperceptibly, stepwise arrived at a new world. HIS have become one of the most challenging and promising fields of research, education and practice for medical informatics, with significant benefits to medicine and health care in general.

  6. 78 FR 12051 - Access by EPA Contractors to Information Claimed as Confidential Business Information (CBI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ...EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) plans to authorize various contractors to access information which was submitted to EPA under Title II of the Clean Air Act that may be claimed as, or may be determined to be, confidential business information (CBI). Access to this information, which is related to the Nonroad Diesel Engine Program will begin on February 22,...

  7. Health Care Access and Health Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: The Cost of Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKirnan, David J.; Du Bois, Steve N.; Alvy, Lisa M.; Jones, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) appear to experience barriers to health care compared with general population men. This report examines individual differences in health care access within a diverse sample of urban MSM ("N" = 871). The authors examined demographic differences in health care access and the relation between access and…

  8. Access to and value of information to support good practice for staff in Kenyan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Muinga, Naomi; Sen, Barbara; Ayieko, Philip; Todd, Jim; English, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies have sought to define information needs of health workers within very specific settings or projects. Lacking in the literature is how hospitals in low-income settings are able to meet the information needs of their staff and the use of information communication technologies (ICT) in day-to-day information searching. Objective The study aimed to explore where professionals in Kenyan hospitals turn to for work-related information in their day-to-day work. Additionally, it examined what existing solutions are provided by hospitals with regard to provision of best practice care. Lastly, the study explored the use of ICT in information searching. Design Data for this study were collected in July 2012. Self-administered questionnaires (SAQs) were distributed across 22 study hospitals with an aim to get a response from 34 health workers per hospital. Results SAQs were collected from 657 health workers. The most popular sources of information to guide work were fellow health workers and printed guidelines while the least popular were scientific journals. Of value to health workers were: national treatment policies, new research findings, regular reports from surveillance data, information on costs of services and information on their performance of routine clinical tasks; however, hospitals only partially met these needs. Barriers to accessing information sources included: ‘not available/difficult to get’ and ‘difficult to understand’. ICT use for information seeking was reported and with demographic specific differences noted from the multivariate logistic regression model; nurses compared to medical doctors and older workers were less likely to use ICT for health information searching. Barriers to accessing Internet were identified as: high costs and the lack of the service at home or at work. Conclusions Hospitals need to provide appropriate information by improving information dissemination efforts and providing an enabling environment that

  9. Residential accessibility to information technology retailers and self reported computer use among patients attending community clinics

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Paul; Shaheen, Madga; Smith, James; Ryan, Daniel; Baker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The actual mechanisms that maintain the individual disparities in home computer use and internet access that are collectively termed “the digital divide” remain unclear. We hypothesized that geographic accessibility to IT retailers would independently influence community clinic patients self reported use of computers at home thus limiting their ability to access health related information via the internet. To test this we obtained information on the locations of IT retailers in Los Angeles County, California and generated accessibility scores for the patient’s home residence. Geographic measures of accessibility to IT retailers independently predicted clinic patient’s self reported use of computers at home, and this effect was driven by low income individuals. Our results indicate that the causes of the digital divide are influenced by less commonly considered factors such as local IT retailer availability. PMID:20351914

  10. Access to antiretroviral treatment, issues of well-being and public health governance in Chad: what justifies the limited success of the universal access policy?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Universal access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Chad was officially declared in December 2006. This presidential initiative was and is still funded 100% by the country’s budget and external donors’ financial support. Many factors have triggered the spread of AIDS. Some of these factors include the existence of norms and beliefs that create or increase exposure, the low-level education that precludes access to health information, social unrest, and population migration to areas of high economic opportunities and gender-based discrimination. Social forces that influence the distribution of dimensions of well-being and shape risks for infection also determine the persistence of access barriers to ART. The universal access policy is quite revolutionary but should be informed by the systemic barriers to access so as to promote equity. It is not enough to distribute ARVs and provide health services when health systems are poorly organized and managed. Comprehensive access to ART raises many organizational, ethical and policy problems that need to be solved to achieve equity in access. This paper argues that the persistence of access barriers is due to weak health systems and a poor public health leadership. AIDS has challenged health systems in a manner that is essentially different from other health problems. PMID:23902732

  11. Access to antiretroviral treatment, issues of well-being and public health governance in Chad: what justifies the limited success of the universal access policy?

    PubMed

    Azétsop, Jacquineau; Diop, Blondin A

    2013-08-01

    Universal access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Chad was officially declared in December 2006. This presidential initiative was and is still funded 100% by the country's budget and external donors' financial support. Many factors have triggered the spread of AIDS. Some of these factors include the existence of norms and beliefs that create or increase exposure, the low-level education that precludes access to health information, social unrest, and population migration to areas of high economic opportunities and gender-based discrimination. Social forces that influence the distribution of dimensions of well-being and shape risks for infection also determine the persistence of access barriers to ART. The universal access policy is quite revolutionary but should be informed by the systemic barriers to access so as to promote equity. It is not enough to distribute ARVs and provide health services when health systems are poorly organized and managed. Comprehensive access to ART raises many organizational, ethical and policy problems that need to be solved to achieve equity in access. This paper argues that the persistence of access barriers is due to weak health systems and a poor public health leadership. AIDS has challenged health systems in a manner that is essentially different from other health problems.

  12. Internet access and online cancer information seeking among Latino immigrants from safety net clinics.

    PubMed

    Selsky, Claire; Luta, George; Noone, Anne-Michelle; Huerta, Elmer E; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2013-01-01

    Internet use is widespread, but little is known about Internet use for cancer information among Latinos, especially those who rely on safety net clinics. The authors investigated access to and intended use of the Internet for cancer information among low income, immigrant Latinos predominately from Central and South America. A cross-sectional study of 1,273 Latinos 21 years and older attending safety net clinics or health fairs was conducted from June 2007 to November 2008. The authors used logistic regression models to evaluate associations of age, acculturation, psychosocial factors and other covariates with Internet access and intended use of the Internet for cancer information among those with access. Of the sample, 44% reported Internet access. Higher information self-efficacy and greater trust in the Internet were independently associated with Internet access (p = .05 and p < .001, respectively). Among those with access, 53.8% reported they intended to seek cancer help online if they needed information. Those with younger age and higher acculturation, education and self-efficacy had higher odds of intended Internet use for cancer information, considering covariates. In addition, those with high (vs. low) perceived risk of cancer (OR = 1.76; 95% CI [1.14, 2.73]; p = .01) and higher levels of trust in online health information (OR = 1.47 per one-point increase; 95% [CI 1.19, 1.82]; p = .0004) were more likely to intend to seek cancer information online. These findings that Internet access is fairly high in the immigrant Latino population and that the Internet is a trusted source of cancer information suggest that the Internet may be a channel for cancer control interventions.

  13. Information Access of Approach Navigation for Nonlinear Autonomous Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    superresolution "* 3D-2D "* nonregular sampling - motion detection - new gaze-based representations - collision avoidance 3 Technical Information...the implementation of such a system. Information Access of Approach Navigation Page 4 3.1.3 Superresolution A better understanding of shape

  14. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Numbers 15 and 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  15. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Numbers 11 and 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  16. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Numbers 13 and 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  17. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Numbers 13 and 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  18. 48 CFR 1852.237-72 - Access to Sensitive Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Access to Sensitive Information. 1852.237-72 Section 1852.237-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND... has generated that qualifies for an exception to the Freedom of Information Act, which is...

  19. Distance Learning: Information Access and Services for Virtual Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Hemalata, Ed.

    This volume centers broadly on information support services for distance education. The articles in this book can be categorized into two areas: access to information resources for distance learners, and studies of distance learning programs. Contents include: "The Challenges and Benefits of Asynchronous Learning Networks" (Daphne…

  20. Open Access: A User Information System. Professional Paper Series, #6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Bernard W.

    Focusing on the need for information systems that provide faculty, staff, and students with open access to all necessary information resources, this paper begins by discussing the issues involved in developing such systems. A review of the traditional environment looks at the traditional centralized resources versus the current trend toward…

  1. Public Access to Government Electronic Information. Policy Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This policy framework provides guidelines for federal agencies on public access to government electronic information. Highlights include reasons for disseminating information; defining user groups; which technology to use; pricing flexibility; security and privacy issues; and the private sector and state and local government roles. (LRW)

  2. The End of Access? The Government's New Information Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Thomas James

    2002-01-01

    Examines examples of "information lockdown" by the federal government, including Executive Order 13233 issued by President George W. Bush. Considers the underlying rationale for the lockdown, its policy implications for academics and others who seek regular access to public-sector information, and its threat to democratic society. Includes a…

  3. Location-aware access to hospital information and services.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Marcela D; Favela, Jesus; Martínez, Edgar A; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2004-12-01

    Hospital workers are highly mobile; they are constantly changing location to perform their daily work, which includes visiting patients, locating resources, such as medical records, or consulting with other specialists. The information required by these specialists is highly dependent on their location. Access to a patient's laboratory results might be more relevant when the physician is near the patient's bed and not elsewhere. We describe a location-aware medical information system that was developed to provide access to resources such as patient's records or the location of a medical specialist, based on the user's location. The system is based on a handheld computer which includes a trained backpropagation neural-network used to estimate the user's location and a client to access information from the hospital information system that is relevant to the user's current location.

  4. 75 FR 76986 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information Technology; Request for Information Regarding the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) Report Entitled ``Realizing the Full Potential of Health Information Technology To...

  5. Immigrants' access to health insurance: no equality without awareness.

    PubMed

    Dzúrová, Dagmar; Winkler, Petr; Drbohlav, Dušan

    2014-07-14

    The Czech government has identified commercial health insurance as one of the major problems for migrants' access to health care. Non-EU immigrants are eligible for public health insurance only if they have employee status or permanent residency. The present study examined migrants' access to the public health insurance system in Czechia. A cross-sectional survey of 909 immigrants from Ukraine and Vietnam was conducted in March and May 2013, and binary logistic regression was applied in data analysis. Among immigrants entitled to Czech public health insurance due to permanent residency/asylum, 30% were out of the public health insurance system, and of those entitled by their employment status, 50% were out of the system. Migrants with a poor knowledge of the Czech language are more likely to remain excluded from the system of public health insurance. Instead, they either remain in the commercial health insurance system or they simultaneously pay for both commercial and public health insurance, which is highly disadvantageous. Since there are no reasonable grounds to stay outside the public health insurance, it is concluded that it is lack of awareness that keeps eligible immigrants from entering the system. It is suggested that no equal access to health care exists without sufficient awareness about health care system.

  6. Immigrants’ Access to Health Insurance: No Equality without Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Dzúrová, Dagmar; Winkler, Petr; Drbohlav, Dušan

    2014-01-01

    The Czech government has identified commercial health insurance as one of the major problems for migrants’ access to health care. Non-EU immigrants are eligible for public health insurance only if they have employee status or permanent residency. The present study examined migrants’ access to the public health insurance system in Czechia. A cross-sectional survey of 909 immigrants from Ukraine and Vietnam was conducted in March and May 2013, and binary logistic regression was applied in data analysis. Among immigrants entitled to Czech public health insurance due to permanent residency/asylum, 30% were out of the public health insurance system, and of those entitled by their employment status, 50% were out of the system. Migrants with a poor knowledge of the Czech language are more likely to remain excluded from the system of public health insurance. Instead, they either remain in the commercial health insurance system or they simultaneously pay for both commercial and public health insurance, which is highly disadvantageous. Since there are no reasonable grounds to stay outside the public health insurance, it is concluded that it is lack of awareness that keeps eligible immigrants from entering the system. It is suggested that no equal access to health care exists without sufficient awareness about health care system. PMID:25026082

  7. 77 FR 2734 - Health Information Technology Implementation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Information Technology Implementation AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive...

  8. Defining core issues in utilizing information technology to improve access: evaluation and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Jackson, George L; Krein, Sarah L; Alverson, Dale C; Darkins, Adam W; Gunnar, William; Harada, Nancy D; Helfrich, Christian D; Houston, Thomas K; Klobucar, Thomas F; Nazi, Kim M; Poropatich, Ronald K; Ralston, James D; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2011-11-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has been at the vanguard of information technology (IT) and use of comprehensive electronic health records. Despite the widespread use of health IT in the VA, there are still a variety of key questions that need to be answered in order to maximize the utility of IT to improve patient access to quality services. This paper summarizes the potential of IT to enhance healthcare access, key gaps in current evidence linking IT and access, and methodologic challenges for related research. We also highlight four key issues to be addressed when implementing and evaluating the impact of IT interventions on improving access to quality care: 1) Understanding broader needs/perceptions of the Veteran population and their caregivers regarding use of IT to access healthcare services and related information. 2) Understanding individual provider/clinician needs/perceptions regarding use of IT for patient access to healthcare. 3) System/Organizational issues within the VA and other organizations related to the use of IT to improve access. 4) IT integration and information flow with non-VA entities. While the VA is used as an example, the issues are salient for healthcare systems that are beginning to take advantage of IT solutions.

  9. Health Information Technology as a Universal Donor to Bioethics Education.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Kenneth W

    2017-04-01

    Health information technology, sometimes called biomedical informatics, is the use of computers and networks in the health professions. This technology has become widespread, from electronic health records to decision support tools to patient access through personal health records. These computational and information-based tools have engendered their own ethics literature and now present an opportunity to shape the standard medical and nursing ethics curricula. It is suggested that each of four core components in the professional education of clinicians-privacy, end-of-life care, access to healthcare and valid consent, and clinician-patient communication-offers an opportunity to leverage health information technology for curricular improvement. Using informatics in ethics education freshens ethics pedagogy and increases its utility, and does so without additional demands on overburdened curricula.

  10. Telehealth and the national health information technology strategic framework.

    PubMed

    Speedie, Stuart M; Davies, Diane

    2006-01-01

    Telehealth has a role in the federally sponsored plan for health information technology (HIT) that encompasses electronic health records (EHRs) and the National Health Information Network (NHIN). The goals of telehealth and the national plan are complementary. One focuses on improving access to high quality health-care services and the other on the information systems to support those services. Telehealth needs the fully realized EHR to provide the best possible care when patients are geographically and chronologically separated from their providers. Some current telehealth projects are natural examples of how a distributed, accessible EHR such as that envisaged by the plan can be used to provide better care. The experiences of telehealth in organizing large networks of heterogeneous health-care entities can provide useful lessons as the process of implementing HIT moves forward.

  11. Technology-Assisted Patient Access to Clinical Information: An Evaluation Framework for Blue Button

    PubMed Central

    Nazi, Kim M; Luger, Tana M; Amante, Daniel J; Smith, Bridget M; Barker, Anna; Shimada, Stephanie L; Volkman, Julie E; Garvin, Lynn; Simon, Steven R; Houston, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient access to clinical information represents a means to improve the transparency and delivery of health care as well as interactions between patients and health care providers. We examine the movement toward augmenting patient access to clinical information using technology. Our analysis focuses on “Blue Button,” a tool that many health care organizations are implementing as part of their Web-based patient portals. Objective We present a framework for evaluating the effects that technology-assisted access to clinical information may have on stakeholder experiences, processes of care, and health outcomes. Methods A case study of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) efforts to make increasing amounts of clinical information available to patients through Blue Button. Drawing on established collaborative relationships with researchers, clinicians, and operational partners who are engaged in the VA’s ongoing implementation and evaluation efforts related to Blue Button, we assessed existing evidence and organizational practices through key informant interviews, review of documents and other available materials, and an environmental scan of published literature and the websites of other health care organizations. Results Technology-assisted access to clinical information represents a significant advance for VA patients and marks a significant change for the VA as an organization. Evaluations of Blue Button should (1) consider both processes of care and outcomes, (2) clearly define constructs of focus, (3) examine influencing factors related to the patient population and clinical context, and (4) identify potential unintended consequences. Conclusions The proposed framework can serve as a roadmap to guide subsequent research and evaluation of technology-assisted patient access to clinical information. To that end, we offer a series of related recommendations. PMID:24675395

  12. Gathering Occupational Health Data from Informal Workers: The Brazilian Experience.

    PubMed

    Santana, Vilma Sousa; Ferrite, Silvia; Galdino, Adriana; Peres Moura, Maria Cláudia; Machado, Jorge Mesquita Huet

    2016-08-01

    This study describes how occupational health data have been gathered by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) to provide morbidity and mortality estimates for formal and informal workers. In 2007, data on work-related diseases and injuries was incorporated into the compulsory notification system (SINAN) and analyzed by the SUS occupational health service network, which covers all Brazilian states. However, this work has not been fully implemented, resulting in the large-scale undercounting and underreporting of cases, particularly in relation to informal workers. This is suggestive of barriers that prevent access to services and good quality health care. The inclusion of work-related diseases and injuries in SINANs appears to be a feasible strategy for the collection of useful data for the surveillance of the entire universe of workers, particularly in countries where informal workers prevail within the labor force. Attention needs to be paid to the disparities in access and quality that affect low-paid, informal workers.

  13. Preservation of and Permanent Access to Electronic Information Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    up in this attitude as well. Electronic information includes a variety of object types such as electronic journals, e-books, databases , data sets...firewalls, require passwords to access, are hidden within Web-accessible databases , or require payment. The major lesson from efforts to develop selection...pages or those that are created out of a database , portal system, or content management system. The American Astronomical Society (AAS) has perhaps

  14. The Latest Information on Fort Detrick Gate Access Procedures | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    As of Jan. 5, all visitors to Fort Detrick are required to undergo a National Crime Information Center background check prior to entering base. The background checks are conducted at Old Farm Gate. The new access procedures may cause delays at all Fort Detrick gates, but especially at Old Farm Gate. Access requirements have not changed for employees and personnel with a federal/NIH PIV card. Other types of identification badges are no longer acceptable.

  15. Scientific Coolections: Informational - Navigational Portal for Scientific Publications Access.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatencov, Petru; Kozlenco, Ludmila; Ginculova, Silvia; Keradi, Natalia

    At present there is the tendency of uniting efforts of scientific establishments and libraries for using information - communication medium with the purpose of information support of research and pedagogical activity in Moldova. The efficient access to the scientific and technical literature and, first of all, to the new publications, is necessary practically for all scientists and experts irrespective of a field of knowledge, in which they work. Research institutions, knowing how to receive access to the electron information and to use it intellectually, realize that it effects positively the quality and outcomes of the research process. It is obvious, that to ensure maximum utilization of the new information stream by habitual methods is impossible. New non-traditional approaches are necessary for the increase of the level of information provision of scientists and experts. Creation of electron libraries, realizing qualitatively other level of production, storage, organization and distribution of various information is the most effective way to gin this object. The access to the electron versions of scientific journals allows to reduce the acuteness of shortage of scientific literature, the electron information becomes accessible before the publication of paper version of a journal, and taking into account the delivery time of foreign issues into Moldova, this outstripping can reach several months.

  16. Health InfoNet of Jefferson County: collaboration in consumer health information service.

    PubMed

    Smith, K H

    2001-01-01

    Health InfoNet of Jefferson County is a new collaborative consumer health information service of the Jefferson County public libraries and the UAB Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences. Working with the input and cooperation of local voluntary health agencies, health care professionals and other health information providers, the intent is to improve the efficiency with which consumers might access such information while avoiding duplication of effort on the part of the information providers. Various considerations in InfoNet's mission include providing service not only to established library and Internet users, but also those on the other side of the "digital divide" as well as those with low literacy skills or English as a second language. The role of health care professionals in guiding their patients to the best consumer health information resources is emphasized.

  17. In or out? Barriers and facilitators to refugee-background young people accessing mental health services.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Erminia; Minas, Harry; Szwarc, Josef; Guerra, Carmel; Paxton, Georgia

    2015-12-01

    Refugee young people have been identified as a group with high risk for mental health problems, due to their experience of trauma, forced migration, and stressors associated with settlement. A high prevalence of mental health problems is reported in this group, however some research suggests refugee young people have low rates of mental health service access. There is little information available on barriers and facilitators to mental service delivery for this group. Using data from 15 focus groups and five key informant interviews with a total of 115 service providers from 12 agencies in Melbourne, Australia, this paper explores barriers and facilitators to engaging young people from refugee backgrounds with mental health services. Eight key themes emerged: cultural concepts of mental health, illness, and treatment; service accessibility; trust; working with interpreters; engaging family and community; the style and approach of mental health providers; advocacy; and continuity of care.

  18. 76 FR 77738 - Telecommunications Act Accessibility Guidelines; Electronic and Information Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... Accessibility Guidelines; Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility Standards AGENCY: Architectural... Guidelines and its Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility Standards. DATES: The hearings will be... information technology covered by Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998. 76 FR...

  19. Electronic health records access during a disaster.

    PubMed

    Morchel, Herman; Raheem, Murad; Stevens, Lee

    2014-01-01

    As has been demonstrated previously, medical care providers that employ an electronic health records (EHR) system provide more appropriate, cost effective care. Those providers are also better positioned than those who rely on paper records to recover if their facility is damaged as a result of severe storms, fires, or other events. The events surrounding Superstorm Sandy in 2012 made it apparent that, with relatively little additional effort and investment, health care providers with EHR systems may be able to use those systems for patient care purposes even during disasters that result in damage to buildings and facilities, widespread power outages, or both.

  20. Electronic Health Records Access During a Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Morchel, Herman; Raheem, Murad; Stevens, Lee

    2014-01-01

    As has been demonstrated previously, medical care providers that employ an electronic health records (EHR) system provide more appropriate, cost effective care. Those providers are also better positioned than those who rely on paper records to recover if their facility is damaged as a result of severe storms, fires, or other events. The events surrounding Superstorm Sandy in 2012 made it apparent that, with relatively little additional effort and investment, health care providers with EHR systems may be able to use those systems for patient care purposes even during disasters that result in damage to buildings and facilities, widespread power outages, or both. PMID:24683443

  1. 45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for health information technology to... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION... FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Standards and Implementation Specifications for Health...

  2. 45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for health information technology to... Welfare Department of Health and Human Services HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION... FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Standards and Implementation Specifications for Health...

  3. 45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for health information technology to... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION... FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Standards and Implementation Specifications for Health...

  4. Informativity renders a referent more accessible: Evidence from eyetracking.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hossein; Ferreira, Fernanda

    2016-04-01

    The amount of information attached to a noun phrase (henceforth, NP) has been shown to enhance accessibility and increase pronominal reference in language production. However, both the effect of information quantity on the comprehension of ambiguous pronouns and the time course of any informativity effect have been left unexplored. In two eyetracking experiments, we investigated how additional information on the part of NP referents influenced the resolution of following ambiguous pronouns. The results of the first experiment revealed an informativity effect, with more looks to the informationally richer referent than to the competitor. However, the effect of additional information emerged late in time when the referent was the object of the verb. The second experiment replicated the results of the first and also showed that, consistent with the online results, an ambiguous pronoun is interpreted as referring to the informationally richer NP in an offline, explicit pronoun resolution task. The results lend support to theories of language processing that assume that explicit information increases the accessibility of the associated concept, in contrast to approaches that assume that accessibility is associated with givenness.

  5. Role of Information in Consumer Selection of Health Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sainfort, François; Booske, Bridget C.

    1996-01-01

    Considerable efforts are underway in the public and private sectors to increase the amount of information available to consumers when making health plan choices. The objective of this study was to examine the role of information in consumer health plan decisionmaking. A computer system was developed which provides different plan descriptions with the option of accessing varying types and levels of information. The system tracked the information search processes and recorded the hypothetical plan choices of 202 subjects. Results are reported showing the relationship between information and problem perception, preference structure, choice of plan, and attitude towards the decision. PMID:10165036

  6. Particle data management--turning data into accessible information.

    PubMed

    Bonniface, J; Coppins, G J

    2007-09-01

    The UKAEA has assigned significant resources to the monitoring and retrieval of particles from the vicinity of its site at Dounreay in the north of Scotland. The monitoring, retrieval and analytical processes each generate information that is required for interpretative and record purposes. As significant resources are made available for studying and retrieving particles, the information collected must be managed in a logical, stable and accessible manner to protect the investment in information. If suitable data management procedures are not in place there is a high risk of data loss and duplication, and stakeholders may be unable to discover what information is already available or be unable to access the existing information. UKAEA Dounreay operates a geographic information system (GIS) that interfaces with a data management system known as IMAGES. These systems are used to securely store and access a wide range of environmental data including those relating to particles. A case study is presented illustrating the processes and systems involved with the collection, storage, analysis and distribution of particle data. The advantages gained through use of the GIS system are considered in relation to alternative types of record management system such as paper, and electronic non-spatial systems. It is considered that the GIS system offers very significant benefits in terms of standardisation of data capture, security of storage and increased accessibility of data compared with other systems.

  7. 76 FR 24862 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Protocol for Access to Tissue Specimen Samples...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... unusual mortality events through two projects, the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program... for Access to Tissue Specimen Samples From the National Marine Mammal Tissue Bank AGENCY: National... Patricia.Lawson@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract In 1989, the National Marine...

  8. A security architecture for interconnecting health information systems.

    PubMed

    Gritzalis, Dimitris; Lambrinoudakis, Costas

    2004-03-31

    Several hereditary and other chronic diseases necessitate continuous and complicated health care procedures, typically offered in different, often distant, health care units. Inevitably, the medical records of patients suffering from such diseases become complex, grow in size very fast and are scattered all over the units involved in the care process, hindering communication of information between health care professionals. Web-based electronic medical records have been recently proposed as the solution to the above problem, facilitating the interconnection of the health care units in the sense that health care professionals can now access the complete medical record of the patient, even if it is distributed in several remote units. However, by allowing users to access information from virtually anywhere, the universe of ineligible people who may attempt to harm the system is dramatically expanded, thus severely complicating the design and implementation of a secure environment. This paper presents a security architecture that has been mainly designed for providing authentication and authorization services in web-based distributed systems. The architecture has been based on a role-based access scheme and on the implementation of an intelligent security agent per site (i.e. health care unit). This intelligent security agent: (a). authenticates the users, local or remote, that can access the local resources; (b). assigns, through temporary certificates, access privileges to the authenticated users in accordance to their role; and (c). communicates to other sites (through the respective security agents) information about the local users that may need to access information stored in other sites, as well as about local resources that can be accessed remotely.

  9. 77 FR 75404 - Accessible Emergency Information, and Apparatus Requirements for Emergency Information and Video...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 79 Accessible Emergency Information, and Apparatus Requirements for Emergency Information and Video Description: Implementation of the Twenty-First Century Communications and...

  10. Family Health Care Accessibility Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Murphy, Tim [R-PA-18

    2009-03-26

    09/24/2010 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Information Access in Complex, Poorly Structured Information Spaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    distributed and made available through News creates a serious information overload. The conceptual framework behind this research effort explores (a...is willing to generate it, whose structure is it?). The innovative system building effort (instantiating the conceptual framework as well as

  12. Health Information Technology Adoption in California Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Katherine K.; Rudin, Robert S.; Wilson, Machelle D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives National and state initiatives to spur adoption of electronic health record (EHR) use and health information exchange (HIE) among providers in rural and underserved communities have been in place for 15 years. Our goal was to systematically assess the impact of these initiatives by quantifying the level of adoption and key factors associated with adoption among community health centers (CHCs) in California. Study Design Cross-sectional statewide survey. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of all California primary care CHCs from August to September 2013. Multiple logistic regressions were fit to test for associations between various practice characteristics and adoption of EHRs, Meaningful Use (MU)–certified EHRs, and HIE. For the multivariable model, we included those variables which were significant at the P = .10 level in the univariate tests. Results We received responses from 194 CHCs (73.5% response rate). Adoption of any EHRs (80.3%) and MU–certified EHRs (94.6% of those with an EHR) was very high. Adoption of HIE is substantial (48.7%) and took place within a few years (mean = 2.61 years; SD = 2.01). More than half (54.7%) of CHCs are able to receive data into the EHR, indicating some level of interoperability. Patient engagement capacity is moderate, with 21.6% offering a personal health record, and 55.2% electronic visit summaries. Rural location and belonging to a multi-site clinic organization both increase the odds of adoption of EHRs, HIE, and electronic visit summary, with odds ratios ranging from 0.63 to 3.28 (all P values <.05). Conclusions Greater adoption of health information technology (IT) in rural areas may be the result of both federal and state investments. As CHCs lack access to capital for investments, continued support of technology infrastructure may be needed for them to further leverage health IT to improve healthcare. PMID:26760431

  13. Towards Web-based representation and processing of health information

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Sheng; Mioc, Darka; Yi, Xiaolun; Anton, Francois; Oldfield, Eddie; Coleman, David J

    2009-01-01

    Background There is great concern within health surveillance, on how to grapple with environmental degradation, rapid urbanization, population mobility and growth. The Internet has emerged as an efficient way to share health information, enabling users to access and understand data at their fingertips. Increasingly complex problems in the health field require increasingly sophisticated computer software, distributed computing power, and standardized data sharing. To address this need, Web-based mapping is now emerging as an important tool to enable health practitioners, policy makers, and the public to understand spatial health risks, population health trends and vulnerabilities. Today several web-based health applications generate dynamic maps; however, for people to fully interpret the maps they need data source description and the method used in the data analysis or statistical modeling. For the representation of health information through Web-mapping applications, there still lacks a standard format to accommodate all fixed (such as location) and variable (such as age, gender, health outcome, etc) indicators in the representation of health information. Furthermore, net-centric computing has not been adequately applied to support flexible health data processing and mapping online. Results The authors of this study designed a HEalth Representation XML (HERXML) schema that consists of the semantic (e.g., health activity description, the data sources description, the statistical methodology used for analysis), geometric, and cartographical representations of health data. A case study has been carried on the development of web application and services within the Canadian Geospatial Data Infrastructure (CGDI) framework for community health programs of the New Brunswick Lung Association. This study facilitated the online processing, mapping and sharing of health information, with the use of HERXML and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) services. It brought a new

  14. College Students' Health Information Activities on Facebook: Investigating the Impacts of Health Topic Sensitivity, Information Sources, and Demographics.

    PubMed

    Syn, Sue Yeon; Kim, Sung Un

    2016-07-01

    College students tend to lack access to health information. Because social networking sites (SNSs) are popularly adopted by college students, SNSs are considered to be good media channels for college students to obtain health-related information. This study examines the factors that influence college students' health information-seeking and -sharing activities on Facebook. An online survey was distributed to college students between the ages of 18 and 29 to determine intentions pertaining to health information activities according to the factors identified for the study. The factors included both contextual factors (such as health topic sensitivity and health information sources) as well as user factors (such as demographics). Our findings showed that college students are willing to read and post health-related information on Facebook when the health topic is not sensitive. In addition, there are clear differences in preferences between professional sources and personal sources as health information sources. It was found that most user factors, except gender, have no influence on health information activities. The impacts of SNS contexts, awareness of information sources, types of interlocutors, and privacy concerns are further discussed.

  15. Information support for health information management in regional Sri Lanka: health managers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Kaduruwane Indika; Chan, Taizan; Yaralagadda, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Good management, supported by accurate, timely and reliable health information, is vital for increasing the effectiveness of Health Information Systems (HIS). When it comes to managing the under-resourced health systems of developing countries, information-based decision making is particularly important. This paper reports findings of a self-report survey that investigated perceptions of local health managers (HMs) of their own regional HIS in Sri Lanka. Data were collected through a validated, pre-tested postal questionnaire, and distributed among a selected group of HMs to elicit their perceptions of the current HIS in relation to information generation, acquisition and use, required reforms to the information system and application of information and communication technology (ICT). Results based on descriptive statistics indicated that the regional HIS was poorly organised and in need of reform; that management support for the system was unsatisfactory in terms of relevance, accuracy, timeliness and accessibility; that political pressure and community and donor requests took precedence over vital health information when management decisions were made; and use of ICT was unsatisfactory. HIS strengths included user-friendly paper formats, a centralised planning system and an efficient disease notification system; weaknesses were lack of comprehensiveness, inaccuracy, and lack of a feedback system. Responses of participants indicated that HIS would be improved by adopting an internationally accepted framework and introducing ICT applications. Perceived barriers to such improvements were high initial cost of educating staff to improve computer literacy, introduction of ICTs, and HIS restructure. We concluded that the regional HIS of Central Province, Sri Lanka had failed to provide much-needed information support to HMs. These findings are consistent with similar research in other developing countries and reinforce the need for further research to verify causes of

  16. Information Systems; Modern Health Care and Medical Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandejs, J. F., And Others

    1975-01-01

    To effectively handle changes in health policy and health information, new designs and applications of automation are explored. Increased use of computer-based information systems in health care could serve as a means of control over the costs of developing more comprehensive health service, with applications increasing not only the automation of…

  17. Rural Health Care Access and Policy in Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Roger; Kam, Sophia M; Regalado, Sophie M

    2016-01-01

    Compared to their urban counterparts, rural and remote inhabitants experience lower life expectancy and poorer health status. Nowhere is the worldwide shortage of health professionals more pronounced than in rural areas of developing countries. Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) includes a disproportionately large number of developing countries; therefore, this article explores SSA in depth as an example. Using the conceptual framework of access to primary health care, sustainable rural health service models, rural health workforce supply, and policy implications, this article presents a review of the academic and gray literature as the basis for recommendations designed to achieve greater health equity. An alternative international standard for health professional education is recommended. Decision makers should draw upon the expertise of communities to identify community-specific health priorities and should build capacity to enable the recruitment and training of local students from underserviced areas to deliver quality health care in rural community settings.

  18. Ethical considerations in internet use of electronic protected health information.

    PubMed

    Polito, Jacquelyn M

    2012-03-01

    Caregivers, patients, and their family members are increasingly reliant on social network websites for storing, communicating, and referencing medical information. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule seeks balance by protecting the privacy of patients' health information and assuring that this information is available to those who need it to provide health care. Though federal and state governments have created laws and policies to safeguard patient privacy and confidentiality, the laws are inadequate against the rapid and innovative use of electronic health websites. As Internet use broadens access to information, health professionals must be aware that this information is not always secure. We must identify and reflect on medical ethics issues and be accountable for maintaining privacy for the patient.

  19. [Health and social information systems in support of local health planning: issues and challenges].

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Louise; Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Casteigts, Arnaud; Chartier, Mariette; Trugeon, Alain; Warnke, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Health information is indispensable for monitoring the progress that has been made in improving and maintaining population health and health system functions. In the context of health reforms aiming to bring health systems closer to populations and with the objective of consistent health services planning at the community level, access to reliable social and health data has become a major issue. The need to develop specific treatment tools and the appropriation of results by the various actors involved (decision makers, planners, researchers and consumers) are central to the presentations and exchanges in this symposium.

  20. Effects of Individual Health Topic Familiarity on Activity Patterns During Health Information Searches

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Koichi; Fukui, Ken–ichi; Numao, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    results of a perplexity evaluation, the health information search patterns were best represented as a 5-gram sequence pattern. The most common patterns in group L1 were frequent query modifications, with relatively low search efficiency, and accessing and evaluating selected results from a health website. Group L2 performed frequent query modifications, but with better search efficiency, and accessed and evaluated selected results from a health website. Finally, the members of group L3 successfully discovered relevant results from the first query submission, performed verification by accessing several health websites after they discovered relevant results, and directly accessed consumer health information websites. Conclusions Familiarity with health topics affects health information search behaviors. Our analysis of state transitions in search activities detected unique behaviors and common search activity patterns in each familiarity group during health information searches. PMID:25783222

  1. A scoping review on the experiences and preferences in accessing diabetes-related healthcare information and services by British Bangladeshis.

    PubMed

    Alam, Rahul; Speed, Shaun; Beaver, Kinta

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes is a chronic condition requiring lifelong self-management. Patients are encouraged to access appropriate services to facilitate optimum management of diabetes. Although equitable access to healthcare in the United Kingdom is a legal right, not all groups and individuals in the community experience equity. Despite various equality laws and numerous efforts to minimise health inequalities related to access, particular community groups are more likely to experience inequitable access than others. The Bangladeshi community are one such community who experience some of the worst diabetes-related health outcomes in the United Kingdom. Little is known about their experiences and preferences in accessing diabetes healthcare information and services. Consequently, we undertook a scoping review of the literature by following the York Scoping Reviews Framework to identify the experiences and preferences of Bangladeshi patients and carers when gaining access to diabetes-related healthcare information and services. We identified eight articles and reported our results in relation to four domains of access: health service availability, health service utilisation, health service outcomes and the notion of equity. The review identified that language and literacy issues were the most common barriers hindering access to information and services. Patient knowledge regarding diabetes and its management was generally low, and friends and family were frequently being used as information sources and as informal interpreters. Additionally, there were feelings of isolation from mainstream information and services possibly resulting in the high prevalence of depression in the Bangladeshi community with women more affected than men. Social networks combined with religious and cultural beliefs as well as wider societal duties played a crucial role in accessing information and services for this population, and the identification of these issues merit further research and are possible

  2. Supporting cancer patients’ unanchored health information management with mobile technology

    PubMed Central

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hartzler, Andrea; Powell, Christopher; Pratt, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients often need to manage care-related information when they are away from home, when they are experiencing pain or treatment side effects, or when their abilities to deal with information effectively are otherwise impaired. In this paper, we describe the results from a four-week evaluation of HealthWeaver Mobile, a mobile phone application that we developed to support such “unanchored” patient information activities. Based on experiences from nine cancer patients, our results indicate that HealthWeaver Mobile can help patients to access care-related information from anywhere, to capture information whenever a need arises, and to share information with clinicians during clinic visits. The enhanced ability to manage information, in turn, helps patients to manage their care and to feel more confident in their ability to stay in control of their information and their health. PMID:22195130

  3. Access of Roma to sexual and reproductive health services: qualitative findings from Albania, Bulgaria and Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Colombini, Manuela; Rechel, Bernd; Mayhew, Susannah H

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore access of Roma in South-Eastern Europe to sexual and reproductive health services. We conducted 7 focus group discussions with a total of 58 participants from Roma communities in Albania, Bulgaria and Macedonia. Our study revealed a number of barriers for Roma when accessing sexual and reproductive health services. Among the most important were the overall lack of financial resources, requests by health care providers for informal payments, lack of health insurance and geographical barriers. Health systems in the region seem to have failed to provide financial protection and equitable services to one of the most vulnerable groups of society. There is also a need for overcoming racial discrimination, improving awareness and information and addressing gender inequalities.

  4. Improving children's access to health care: the role of decategorization.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, D. C.; Halfon, N.; Brindis, C. D.; Newacheck, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    Far too many children in this country are unable to obtain the health care they need because of barriers that prohibit easy access. Among the most significant obstacles are financial barriers, including lack of adequate health insurance and inadequate funding of programs for low-income children and those with special health-care needs. Another set of "non-financial" barriers are related to the categorical nature of addressing children's health-care needs, which impedes access by increasing the complexity and burden of seeking care and discourages providers from providing care. Decategorization represents an appealing partial remedy to these problems because it can lead to fundamental and lasting changes in financing and delivering health services. The greatest appeal of decategorization is its potential to improve access to care with the expenditure of little or no new funds. Decategorization also holds considerable risk. Depending on how it is designed and implemented, decategorization may lead to diminished access to care by serving as a foil for budget cuts or by undermining essential standards of care. However, these risks do not negate the value of exploring decategorization as an approach that can be taken today to better organize services and ensure that existing resources adequately meet children's needs. In this report we examine the role of decategorization as a mechanism for removing the barriers to care that are created by categorical funding of health programs. PMID:8982519

  5. 7 CFR 3402.22 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3402.22 Section 3402.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL...

  6. Online Information Retrieval. Teaching Electronic Access in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Elaine; And Others

    The electronic information access skills outlined in this guide for teachers and library media specialists expand the online searching skills discussed in the previous Wisconsin Educational Media Association handbook, and further delineate skill development in this crucial area. This publication is designed to serve as a broad planning and…

  7. 7 CFR 3402.22 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3402.22 Section 3402.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE...

  8. Transfer Students: Information Accessibility, Services, and Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fugard, Anne Sheridan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore to what degree Florida public, 4-year universities are supporting transfer students. This included a focus on accessibility of information for transfer students, the transfer services provided by institutions, and student engagement. This mixed-methods study included three parts. Together, the findings from…

  9. 7 CFR 3402.22 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3402.22 Section 3402.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE...

  10. 7 CFR 3402.22 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3402.22 Section 3402.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE...

  11. 7 CFR 3402.22 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3402.22 Section 3402.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE...

  12. Poverty, out-of-pocket payments and access to health care: evidence from Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Falkingham, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Most countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have either initiated or are contemplating reform of the health sector. With negative real income growth and falling government revenues, a key concern of many governments is to secure additional finance through non-budgetary sources such as hypothecated payroll taxes, voluntary insurance, and increased private finance through patient cost-sharing. However, before such reforms can be considered, information is needed both on the current levels and distribution of household expenditures on health care, and the extent to which increased charges may affect access to health services, especially amongst the poor. This paper uses the Tajikistan Livings Standard Survey to investigate the level and distribution of out-of-pocket payments for health care in Tajikistan and to examine the extent to which such payments act as barriers to health-care access. The data show that there are significant differences in health-care utilisation rates across socio-economic groups and that these differences are related to ability to pay. Official and informal payments are acting both to deter people from seeking medical assistance and once advice has been sought, from receiving the most appropriate treatment. Despite informal exemptions, out-of-pocket payments for health care are exacting a high toll on household welfare with households being forced to sell assets or go into debt to meet the costs of care. Urgent action is needed to ensure equity in access to health care.

  13. Emergency contraception: Sources of information and perceptions of access among young adults.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Kyla P; Widman, Laura; Francis, Diane B; Noar, Seth M

    2016-01-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) can prevent pregnancy for up to 5 days after unprotected sex. Although EC has become increasingly available, little is known about perceptions of young adults regarding access to EC or whether information sources about EC relate to perceived access among young adults. Over a 1-week period in November 2013, a self-report survey was administered to 352 college students (67% women) at the student union of a large, public university in the southeastern United States. The survey assessed three aspects of EC: perceived access, information sources, and prior use. Twenty-one percent of participants had used EC. Participants reported relatively high perceptions of access to EC, with females reporting higher perceptions of access than males. Prior to the study, 7.4% of students had never heard of EC; the remaining students had heard of EC from an average of four sources. Among women, hearing of EC from media, interpersonal, or health education sources was significantly associated with greater perceived access (ps < .05). Among men, no specific information sources were associated with perceived access (ps > .10). Future EC awareness efforts for women should leverage all three of these sources, while future research should examine specific sources to focus on the content, quality, and frequency of messages.

  14. Appraisal Skills, Health Literacy and the Patient-Provider Relationship: Considerations as the Health Care Consumer Turns to the Internet to Inform their Care

    PubMed Central

    O’Dell, Rosann

    2012-01-01

    Health care consumers increasingly obtain health information from the Internet to inform their health care; the health care consumer, who also has the role of patient, maintains the right to access information from sources of their choosing for this purpose. However, noteworthy considerations exist including information appraisal skills, health literacy and the patient-provider relationship. Awareness and education are warranted to assist the health care consumer in achieving proficiency as they turn to the Internet for health information. PMID:23569625

  15. Women's access to health care: the legal framework.

    PubMed

    Cook, R J; Ngwena, C G

    2006-09-01

    The Millennium Development Goals set ambitious targets for women's health, including reductions in maternal and child mortality and combating the spread of HIV/AIDS. The law, which historically has often obstructed women's access to the health care they require, has a dynamic potential to ensure women's access that is being progressively realized. This paper identifies three legal principles that are key to advancing women's reproductive and sexual health. First, law should require that care be evidence-based, reflecting medical and social science rather than, for instance, religious ideology or morality. Second, legal guidance should be clear and transparent, so that service providers and patients know their responsibilities and entitlements without litigation to resolve uncertainties. Third, law should provide applicable measures to ensure fairness in women's access to services, both general services and those only women require. Legal developments are addressed that illustrate how law can advance women's equality, and social justice.

  16. Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... or medical librarian? What do they do? Health sciences librarians are information professionals, librarians, or informaticists who have special knowledge in quality health information resources. They have a direct impact on the quality of patient care, helping ...

  17. Traveling towards disease: transportation barriers to health care access.

    PubMed

    Syed, Samina T; Gerber, Ben S; Sharp, Lisa K

    2013-10-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes.

  18. Traveling Towards Disease: Transportation Barriers to Health Care Access

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Ben S.; Sharp, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes. PMID:23543372

  19. Improving access to electronic health records for people with intellectual disability: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    van Dooren, Kate; Lennox, Nick; Stewart, Madeline

    2013-01-01

    People with intellectual disability represent ~2-3% of the Australian population and experience elevated rates of mortality and morbidity compared with the general population. People with intellectual disability, and their families and carers, must keep track of extensive medical information while also managing turnover of paid staff, general practitioners and other health professionals, making them beneficiaries of Australia's new eHealth record system. Although they are key users, there is a lack of knowledge about the accessibility of the system for individuals with intellectual disability, or those responsible for managing their health information. This is a missed opportunity to improve the lives of an already overlooked group. This study aimed to identify the facilitators and barriers to registering for an eHealth record network for people with intellectual disability and those supporting them to manage their health information. We interviewed potential users of eHealth records, including four people with intellectual disability, three family members and two residential support workers. Our findings suggest that decision-makers involved in the roll-out of the eHealth record networks should incorporate 'reasonable accommodations' to improve accessibility for people with intellectual disability and those who support them to manage their health information. This includes identifying and eliminating the barriers to accessibility of eHealth records and taking appropriate measures to promote access to individuals with intellectual disability. People with intellectual disability and the people who support them are a diverse group with a range of abilities. The translation of their views into practice will help to improve the eHealth system for this and other vulnerable population groups.

  20. Competition, gatekeeping, and health care access.

    PubMed

    Godager, Geir; Iversen, Tor; Ma, Ching-to Albert

    2015-01-01

    We study gatekeeping physicians' referrals of patients to specialty care. We derive theoretical results when competition in the physician market intensifies. First, due to competitive pressure, physicians refer patients to specialty care more often. Second, physicians earn more by treating patients themselves, so refer patients to specialty care less often. We assess empirically the overall effect of competition with data from a 2008-2009 Norwegian survey, National Health Insurance Administration, and Statistics Norway. From the data we construct three measures of competition: the number of open primary physician practices with and without population adjustment, and the Herfindahl-Hirschman index. The empirical results suggest that competition has negligible or small positive effects on referrals overall. Our results do not support the policy claim that increasing the number of primary care physicians reduces secondary care.

  1. Medical Records and Health Information Technicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... work. Although health information technicians do not provide direct patient care, they work regularly with registered nurses ... health-related occupations in which there is no direct hands-on patient care. Medical records and health ...

  2. 15 CFR 784.1 - Complementary access: General information on the purpose of complementary access, affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... information on the purpose of complementary access, affected locations, and the role of BIS. 784.1 Section 784... locations, and the role of BIS. (a) Overview. The Additional Protocol requires that the United States... will: (1) Serve as the official U.S. Government host to the IAEA inspection team; (2) Provide...

  3. 15 CFR 784.1 - Complementary access: General information on the purpose of complementary access, affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... information on the purpose of complementary access, affected locations, and the role of BIS. 784.1 Section 784... locations, and the role of BIS. (a) Overview. The Additional Protocol requires that the United States... will: (1) Serve as the official U.S. Government host to the IAEA inspection team; (2) Provide...

  4. Empowering Minority Communities with Health Information - WSSU

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, L. and W. Templin-Branner

    2010-11-10

    Environmental health focus with training conducted as part of the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation/National Library of Medicine HBCU ACCESS Project at Winston-Salem State University, NC on November 10, 2010.

  5. High-quality Health Information Provision for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hong-Sheng; Ma, Jing-Jian; Li, Mu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: High-quality information provision can allow stroke patients to effectively participate in healthcare decision-making, better manage the stroke, and make a good recovery. In this study, we reviewed information needs of stroke patients, methods for providing information to patients, and considerations needed by the information providers. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including information provision for patients with stroke in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on information provision for stroke patients in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Stroke is a major public health concern worldwide. High-quality and effective health information provision plays an essential role in helping patients to actively take part in decision-making and healthcare, and empowering them to effectively self-manage their long-standing chronic conditions. Different methods for providing information to patients have their relative merits and suitability, and as a result, the effective strategies taken by health professionals may include providing high-quality information, meeting patients’ individual needs, using suitable methods in providing information, and maintaining active involvement of patients. Conclusions: It is suggested that to enable stroke patients to access high-quality health information, greater efforts need to be made to ensure patients to receive accurate and current evidence-based information which meets their individual needs. Health professionals should use suitable information delivery methods, and actively involve stroke patients in information provision. PMID:27569241

  6. Access control and privilege management in electronic health record: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Jayabalan, Manoj; O'Daniel, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    This study presents a systematic literature review of access control for electronic health record systems to protect patient's privacy. Articles from 2006 to 2016 were extracted from the ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore Digital Library, Science Direct, MEDLINE, and MetaPress using broad eligibility criteria, and chosen for inclusion based on analysis of ISO22600. Cryptographic standards and methods were left outside the scope of this review. Three broad classes of models are being actively investigated and developed: access control for electronic health records, access control for interoperability, and access control for risk analysis. Traditional role-based access control models are extended with spatial, temporal, probabilistic, dynamic, and semantic aspects to capture contextual information and provide granular access control. Maintenance of audit trails and facilities for overriding normal roles to allow full access in emergency cases are common features. Access privilege frameworks utilizing ontology-based knowledge representation for defining the rules have attracted considerable interest, due to the higher level of abstraction that makes it possible to model domain knowledge and validate access requests efficiently.

  7. Digital divide and stability of access in African American women visiting urban public health centers.

    PubMed

    Haughton, Lorna Tanya; Kreuter, Matthew; Hall, Jasmine; Holt, Cheryl L; Wheetley, Eric

    2005-05-01

    This exploratory study examines access to communication technologies, its association with health-related variables and study attrition, and its stability over time in a study of lower income African American women visiting urban public health centers. Participants (n = 1,227) provided information about cancer-related behaviors in a baseline questionnaire that also assessed their e-mail and cell phone/pager access. Interviews conducted at 1-, 6-, and 18-month follow up determined attrition, and an e-mail message sent to participants at 6-month follow up determined stability of access. Fewer than 10% of women reported e-mail access; 26% reported cell/phone pager access. At 6-month follow up, 45% of e-mail accounts were inactive; accounts from pay access providers were more likely to be inactive than work- or school-based accounts (58% versus 25%). Cell phone/pager access was positively associated with mammography knowledge. Attrition rates were lower among women with access than among those without access. Priorities for future research based on these preliminary findings are discussed.

  8. Geographic information systems (GIS) for Health Promotion and Public Health: a review.

    PubMed

    Nykiforuk, Candace I J; Flaman, Laura M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to identify how geographic information system (GIS) applications have been used in health-related research and to critically examine the issues, strengths, and challenges inherent to those approaches from the lenses of health promotion and public health. Through the review process, conducted in 2007, it is evident that health promotion and public health applications of GIS can be generally categorized into four predominant themes: disease surveillance (n = 227), risk analysis (n = 189), health access and planning (n = 138), and community health profiling (n = 115). This review explores how GIS approaches have been used to inform decision making and discusses the extent to which GIS can be applied to address health promotion and public health questions. The contribution of this literature review will be to generate a broader understanding of how GIS-related methodological techniques and tools developed in other disciplines can be meaningfully applied to applications in public health policy, promotion, and practice.

  9. Improving awareness, accountability, and access through health coaching

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Johnston, Sharon; Irving, Hannah; Nash, Kate; Ward, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess patients’ experiences with and perceptions of health coaching as part of their ongoing care. Design A qualitative research design using semistructured interviews that were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Setting Ottawa, Ont. Participants Eleven patients (> 18 years of age) enrolled in a health coaching pilot program who were at risk of or diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients’ perspectives were assessed with semistructured interviews. Interviews were conducted with 11 patients at the end of the pilot program, using a stratified sampling approach to ensure maximum variation. Main findings All patients found the overall experience with the health coaching program to be positive. Patients believed the health coaching program was effective in increasing awareness of how diabetes affected their bodies and health, in building accountability for their health-related actions, and in improving access to care and other health resources. Conclusion Patients perceive one-on-one health coaching as an acceptable intervention in their ongoing care. Patients enrolled in the health coaching pilot program believed that there was an improvement in access to care, health literacy, and accountability, all factors considered to be precursors to behavioural change. PMID:25932483

  10. HIV/AIDS Community Health Information System.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Christopher L; Kaukinen, Catherine E

    2003-01-01

    Given changes in the faces of AIDS over the last decade, it is crucial that disparities in health and access to healthcare are addressed. An Internet-based GIS was developed using ESRI's Arc Internet Map Server (Arc IMS) to provide users with a suite of tools to interact with geographic data and conduct spatial analyses related to the characteristics that promote or impede the provision of HIV-related services. Internet Mapping allows those engaged in local decision-making to: (1) geographically visualize information via the Internet; (2) Assess the relationship between the distribution of HIV services and spatially referenced socio-economic data; and (3) generate "what if" scenarios" that may direct the allocation of healthcare resources.

  11. The Influences of Immigration on Health Information Seeking Behaviors among Korean Americans and Native Koreans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Kyeung Mi; Zhou, Qiuping; Kreps, Gary; Kim, Wonsun

    2014-01-01

    Korean Americans (KAs) have low screening rates for cancer and are often not well informed about their chronic diseases. Reduced access to health-related information is one reason for gaps in knowledge and the widening health disparities among minority populations. However, little research exists about KAs' health information seeking behaviors.…

  12. An Informal Online Learning Community for Student Mental Health at University: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Derek; Tangney, Brendan

    2008-01-01

    As a potential solution to increasing demands on mental health services at universities, this project seeks to develop an informal online learning community for mental health support and education. Students' use of the Internet and Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), especially to access health information, provides a supporting…

  13. Using a health information exchange system for imaging information: patterns and predictors.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R; Grinspan, Zachary M; Kern, Lisa M; Campion, Thomas R; Kaushal, Rainu

    2013-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) systems may address the challenges that prevent easy access to patients' existing radiological information at the point of care. However, little is known about the factors associated with usage of HIE for radiology reports, nor about how reports are shared with an exchange network. We analyzed the system log files from a regional health information organization in upstate New York matched with insurance claims files using network analysis and regression modeling. The exchange network was dominated by a few key information sources. Outpatient users overall accessed 17 times more radiology reports than inpatient and ED users combined. Additionally, as the number of exchange partners increased per organization, the average number of reports exchanged by that organization also increased. Radiology reports were most likely to be accessed by physicians and other clinical users. These findings have implications for those operating and fostering exchange activity.

  14. Can free open access resources strengthen knowledge-based emerging public health priorities, policies and programs in Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Tambo, Ernest; Madjou, Ghislaine; Khayeka-Wandabwa, Christopher; Tekwu, Emmanuel N.; Olalubi, Oluwasogo A.; Midzi, Nicolas; Bengyella, Louis; Adedeji, Ahmed A.; Ngogang, Jeanne Y.

    2016-01-01

    Tackling emerging epidemics and infectious diseases burden in Africa requires increasing unrestricted open access and free use or reuse of regional and global policies reforms as well as timely communication capabilities and strategies. Promoting, scaling up data and information sharing between African researchers and international partners are of vital importance in accelerating open access at no cost. Free Open Access (FOA) health data and information acceptability, uptake tactics and sustainable mechanisms are urgently needed. These are critical in establishing real time and effective knowledge or evidence-based translation, proven and validated approaches, strategies and tools to strengthen and revamp health systems.  As such, early and timely access to needed emerging public health information is meant to be instrumental and valuable for policy-makers, implementers, care providers, researchers, health-related institutions and stakeholders including populations when guiding health financing, and planning contextual programs. PMID:27508058

  15. Can free open access resources strengthen knowledge-based emerging public health priorities, policies and programs in Africa?

    PubMed

    Tambo, Ernest; Madjou, Ghislaine; Khayeka-Wandabwa, Christopher; Tekwu, Emmanuel N; Olalubi, Oluwasogo A; Midzi, Nicolas; Bengyella, Louis; Adedeji, Ahmed A; Ngogang, Jeanne Y

    2016-01-01

    Tackling emerging epidemics and infectious diseases burden in Africa requires increasing unrestricted open access and free use or reuse of regional and global policies reforms as well as timely communication capabilities and strategies. Promoting, scaling up data and information sharing between African researchers and international partners are of vital importance in accelerating open access at no cost. Free Open Access (FOA) health data and information acceptability, uptake tactics and sustainable mechanisms are urgently needed. These are critical in establishing real time and effective knowledge or evidence-based translation, proven and validated approaches, strategies and tools to strengthen and revamp health systems.  As such, early and timely access to needed emerging public health information is meant to be instrumental and valuable for policy-makers, implementers, care providers, researchers, health-related institutions and stakeholders including populations when guiding health financing, and planning contextual programs.

  16. Investigating impacts of positional error on potential health care accessibility.

    PubMed

    Bell, Scott; Wilson, Kathi; Shah, Tayyab Ikram; Gersher, Sarina; Elliott, Tina

    2012-04-01

    Accessibility to health services at the local or community level is an effective approach to measuring health care delivery in various constituencies in Canada and the United States. GIS and spatial methods play an important role in measuring potential access to health services. The Three-Step Floating Catchment Area (3SFCA) method is a GIS based procedure developed to calculate potential (spatial) accessibility as a ratio of primary health care (PHC) providers to the surrounding population in urban settings. This method uses PHC provider locations in textual/address format supplied by local, regional, or national health authorities. An automated geocoding procedure is normally used to convert such addresses to a pair of geographic coordinates. The accuracy of geocoding depends on the type of reference data and the amount of value-added effort applied. This research investigates the success and accuracy of six geocoding methods as well as how geocoding error affects the 3SFCA method. ArcGIS software is used for geocoding and spatial accessibility estimation. Results will focus on two implications of geocoding: (1) the success and accuracy of different automated and value-added geocoding; and (2) the implications of these geocoding methods for GIS-based methods that generalise results based on location data.

  17. Patient Matching within a Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Godlove, Tim; Ball, Adrian W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the patient matching problems resulting from the Nationwide Health Information Network's automated patient discovery specification and propose a more effective and secure approach for patient matching between health information organizations participating in a health information exchange. This proposed approach would allow the patient to match his or her identity between a health information organization's electronic health records (EHRs) at the same time the patient identifies which EHR data he or she consents to share between organizations. The patient's EHR username/password combination would be the credential used to establish and maintain health information exchange identity and consent data. The software developed to support this approach (e.g., an EHR health information exchange module) could also allow a patient to see what health information was shared when and with whom. PMID:26755901

  18. Patient Matching within a Health Information Exchange.

    PubMed

    Godlove, Tim; Ball, Adrian W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the patient matching problems resulting from the Nationwide Health Information Network's automated patient discovery specification and propose a more effective and secure approach for patient matching between health information organizations participating in a health information exchange. This proposed approach would allow the patient to match his or her identity between a health information organization's electronic health records (EHRs) at the same time the patient identifies which EHR data he or she consents to share between organizations. The patient's EHR username/password combination would be the credential used to establish and maintain health information exchange identity and consent data. The software developed to support this approach (e.g., an EHR health information exchange module) could also allow a patient to see what health information was shared when and with whom.

  19. An end-to-end secure patient information access card system.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, A; Singer, H; Yakami, M; Takahashi, T

    2000-03-01

    The rapid development of the Internet and the increasing interest in Internet-based solutions has promoted the idea of creating Internet-based health information applications. This will force a change in the role of IC cards in healthcare card systems from a data carrier to an access key medium. At the Medical Informatics Department of Kyoto University Hospital we are developing a smart card patient information project where patient databases are accessed via the Internet. Strong end-to-end data encryption is performed via Secure Socket Layers, transparent to transmit patient information. The smart card is playing the crucial role of access key to the database: user authentication is performed internally without ever revealing the actual key. For easy acceptance by healthcare professionals, the user interface is integrated as a plug-in for two familiar Web browsers, Netscape Navigator and MS Internet Explorer.

  20. Evaluation research studies essential to ensuring health information systems meet the needs of users, including patients.

    PubMed

    Callen, Joanne

    2016-04-12

    Electronic health records and the Internet will continue to transform how information is accessed and shared. Users of health data such as health professionals, governments, policymakers, researchers and patients themselves need to be able to access the right information at the right time and be confident in the quality of that information, whether personal, aggregated or knowledge based. It is essential to evaluate information systems and applications that claim to improve information quality and access in order to provide evidence that they support healthcare delivery and improve patient outcomes.

  1. OPHTHALMOLOGY AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN TUZLA CANTON HEALTH CARE SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Zvornicanin, Jasmin; Zvornicanin, Edita; Sabanovic, Zekerijah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze organization of ophthalmology health care in Tuzla canton and use of information technologies(IT). Introduction: IT in ophthalmology is the technology required for the data processing and other information important for patient and essential for building an electronic health record(EHR). IT in ophthalmology should include the study, science, and solution sets for all aspects of data, information and knowledge management in health information processing. Material and methods: We have analyzed organization of ophthalmology health care in Tuzla canton. Data relevant for this research were acquired from annual reports of Tuzla Canton health ministry. All institutions and ambulances were visited and all health care professionals interviewed. A questionnaire was made which included questions for health care professionals about knowledge and use of computers, internet and information technology. Results: Ophthalmology health care in Tuzla canton has paper based medical record. There is no information system with any possibility to exchange data electronically. None of the medical devices is directly connected to the Internet and all data are typed, printed and delivered directly to the patient. All interviewed health care professionals agree that implementation of IT and EHR would contribute and improve work quality. Conclusion: Computer use and easy information access will make a qualitative difference in eye-care delivery in Tuzla canton. Implementation phase will be difficult because it will likely impact present style of practice. Strategy for implementation of IT in medicine in general must be made at the country level. PMID:23322959

  2. Meaningful Use of Health Information Technology by Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Jeffrey; Casey, Michelle; Moscovice, Ira; Burlew, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the current status of meaningful use of health information technology (IT) in Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs), other rural, and urban US hospitals, and it discusses the potential role of Medicare payment incentives and disincentives in encouraging CAHs and other rural hospitals to achieve meaningful use. Methods: Data…

  3. Access Barriers to Dental Health Care in Children with Disability. A Questionnaire Study of Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerreth, Karolina; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: A patient's with disability everyday life is rife with many limitations such as architectural, transport, information as well as medical, psychological, legal, economic and social barriers. The aim of this study was to evaluate access to dental health care of special-care schoolchildren with intellectual disability on the basis of…

  4. Measuring access to primary medical care: some examples of the use of geographical information systems.

    PubMed

    Parker, E B; Campbell, J L

    1998-06-01

    This paper explores the potential for geographical information system technology in defining some variables influencing the use of primary care medical services. Eighteen general practices in Scotland contributed to a study examining the accessibility of their services and their patients' use of the local Accident and Emergency Department. Geo-referencing of information was carried out through analysis of postcode data relating to practices and patients. This information was analyzed using ARC/INFO GIS software in conjunction with the ORACLE relational database and 1991 census information. The results demonstrate that GIS technology has an important role in defining and analyzing the use of health services by the population.

  5. Accessing Wind Tunnels From NASA's Information Power Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Jeff; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames wind tunnel customers are one of the first users of the Information Power Grid (IPG) storage system at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division. We wanted to be able to store their data on the IPG so that it could be accessed remotely in a secure but timely fashion. In addition, incorporation into the IPG allows future use of grid computational resources, e.g., for post-processing of data, or to do side-by-side CFD validation. In this paper, we describe the integration of grid data access mechanisms with the existing DARWIN web-based system that is used to access wind tunnel test data. We also show that the combined system has reasonable performance: wind tunnel data may be retrieved at 50Mbits/s over a 100 base T network connected to the IPG storage server.

  6. Progressive segmented health insurance: Colombian health reform and access to health services.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Fernando; Amaya, Liliana; Venegas, Stella

    2007-01-01

    Equal access for poor populations to health services is a comprehensive objective for any health reform. The Colombian health reform addressed this issue through a segmented progressive social health insurance approach. The strategy was to assure universal coverage expanding the population covered through payroll linked insurance, and implementing a subsidized insurance program for the poorest populations, those not affiliated through formal employment. A prospective study was performed to follow-up health service utilization and out-of-pocket expenses using a cohort design. It was representative of four Colombian cities (Cendex Health Services Use and Expenditure Study, 2001). A four part econometric model was applied. The model related medical service utilization and medication with different socioeconomic, geographic, and risk associated variables. Results showed that subsidized health insurance improves health service utilization and reduces the financial burden for the poorest, as compared to those non-insured. Other social health insurance schemes preserved high utilization with variable out-of-pocket expenditures. Family and age conditions have significant effect on medical service utilization. Geographic variables play a significant role in hospital inpatient service utilization. Both, geographic and income variables also have significant impact on out-of-pocket expenses. Projected utilization rates and a simulation favor a dual policy for two-stage income segmented insurance to progress towards the universal insurance goal.

  7. Improving the accessibility of condoms in South Africa: the role of informal distribution.

    PubMed

    Myer, L; Mathews, C; Little, F

    2002-12-01

    Lack of access to condoms presents a fundamental barrier to HIV prevention across most of sub-Saharan Africa. One strategy to enhance the accessibility of condoms is to promote their informal distribution outside of health facilities through existing social networks. To investigate the prevalence and practices of informal condom distribution, we administered a questionnaire to individuals procuring condoms at 12 public health facilities in four regions of South Africa. Of the 554 individuals interviewed, 269 (48%) reported either giving or receiving condoms informally in the month before the study. In multivariate analysis, reporting informal condom distribution was associated with increased education, male gender, multiple sex partners and recent condom use. The specific practices involved in giving or receiving condoms differed between males and females, with women more likely to involve family members and men more likely to involve friends. These results indicate that informal condom distribution is surprisingly common among individuals procuring public sector condoms in South Africa, and begin to suggest the gendered nature of informal condom distribution networks. While these findings require confirmation in other populations, the practices of informal condom distribution described here provide an excellent opportunity for enhancing condom accessibility and delivering other interventions for HIV prevention.

  8. 42 CFR 433.127 - Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to claims processing and information retrieval...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... claims processing and information retrieval systems. 433.127 Section 433.127 Public Health CENTERS FOR... PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.127 Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to claims processing and information...

  9. 42 CFR 433.127 - Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to claims processing and information retrieval...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... claims processing and information retrieval systems. 433.127 Section 433.127 Public Health CENTERS FOR... PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.127 Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to claims processing and information...

  10. 42 CFR 433.127 - Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to claims processing and information retrieval...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... claims processing and information retrieval systems. 433.127 Section 433.127 Public Health CENTERS FOR... PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.127 Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to claims processing and information...

  11. 42 CFR 433.127 - Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to claims processing and information retrieval...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... claims processing and information retrieval systems. 433.127 Section 433.127 Public Health CENTERS FOR... PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.127 Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to claims processing and information...

  12. 42 CFR 433.127 - Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to claims processing and information retrieval...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... claims processing and information retrieval systems. 433.127 Section 433.127 Public Health CENTERS FOR... PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.127 Termination of FFP for failure to provide access to claims processing and information...

  13. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access1

    PubMed Central

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  14. Web Security for Access of Private Information via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lynn; Rauscher, Richard; Lee, H.

    2001-01-01

    Authentication, authorization, accounting, and encryption are goals of security strategies for web information being accessed that is private. The definition of these terms is as follows: • Authentication - validation that the individual (or system) is who they say they are • Authorization - validation that the individual (or system) accessing information is authorized to do so • Accounting - records are kept of what is accessed • Encryption - use of a ‘scrambling’ algorithm such that the information can pass securely across the public Internet without being intelligible; information is specifically ‘unscrambled’ or deencrypted at the receiving end Many tools can be used to meet these goals. The degree to which the goals are met is determined by how we use these tools. Methodologies similar to TSEC[1] and ITSEC[2] can be used to determine the appropriate level of protection for a particular web application. This poster describes a set of effective strategies for web application security and the level of protection each strategy provides.

  15. Using Health Information Exchange to Improve Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Mostashari, Farzad; Hripcsak, George; Soulakis, Nicholas; Kuperman, Gilad

    2011-01-01

    Public health relies on data reported by health care partners, and information technology makes such reporting easier than ever. However, data are often structured according to a variety of different terminologies and formats, making data interfaces complex and costly. As one strategy to address these challenges, health information organizations (HIOs) have been established to allow secure, integrated sharing of clinical information among numerous stakeholders, including clinical partners and public health, through health information exchange (HIE). We give detailed descriptions of 11 typical cases in which HIOs can be used for public health purposes. We believe that HIOs, and HIE in general, can improve the efficiency and quality of public health reporting, facilitate public health investigation, improve emergency response, and enable public health to communicate information to the clinical community. PMID:21330598

  16. 76 FR 7559 - Access in Litigation to Confidential Business Information; Transfer of Information Claimed as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... AGENCY Access in Litigation to Confidential Business Information; Transfer of Information Claimed as Confidential Business Information to the United States Department of Justice and Parties to Certain Litigation... States Department of Justice (``DOJ'') to disclose, in response to discovery requests received by...

  17. An Unequal Information Society: How Information Access Initiatives Contribute to the Construction of Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanfilippo, Madelyn Rose

    2016-01-01

    Unequal access to information has significant social and political consequences, and is itself a consequence of sociotechnical systems born of social, cultural, economic, and institutional context. Information is unequally distributed both within and between communities. While many factors that shape information inequality shift subtly over time,…

  18. Spatial Accessibility to Health Care Services: Identifying under-Serviced Neighbourhoods in Canadian Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Tayyab Ikram; Bell, Scott; Wilson, Kathi

    2016-01-01

    Background Urban environments can influence many aspects of health and well-being and access to health care is one of them. Access to primary health care (PHC) in urban settings is a pressing research and policy issue in Canada. Most research on access to healthcare is focused on national and provincial levels in Canada; there is a need to advance current understanding to local scales such as neighbourhoods. Methods This study examines spatial accessibility to family physicians using the Three-Step Floating Catchment Area (3SFCA) method to identify neighbourhoods with poor geographical access to PHC services and their spatial patterning across 14 Canadian urban settings. An index of spatial access to PHC services, representing an accessibility score (physicians-per-1000 population), was calculated for neighborhoods using a 3km road network distance. Information about primary health care providers (this definition does not include mobile services such as health buses or nurse practitioners or less distributed services such as emergency rooms) used in this research was gathered from publicly available and routinely updated sources (i.e. provincial colleges of physicians and surgeons). An integrated geocoding approach was used to establish PHC locations. Results The results found that the three methods, Simple Ratio, Neighbourhood Simple Ratio, and 3SFCA that produce City level access scores are positively correlated with each other. Comparative analyses were performed both within and across urban settings to examine disparities in distributions of PHC services. It is found that neighbourhoods with poor accessibility scores in the main urban settings across Canada have further disadvantages in relation to population high health care needs. Conclusions The results of this study show substantial variations in geographical accessibility to PHC services both within and among urban areas. This research enhances our understanding of spatial accessibility to health care

  19. Overcoming barriers to health service access: influencing the demand side.

    PubMed

    Ensor, Tim; Cooper, Stephanie

    2004-03-01

    Evidence suggests that demand-side barriers may be as important as supply factors in deterring patients from obtaining treatment. Yet relatively little attention is given, either by policy makers or researchers, to ways of minimizing their effect. These barriers are likely to be more important for the poor and other vulnerable groups, where the costs of access, lack of information and cultural barriers impede them from benefiting from public spending. Demand barriers present in low- and middle-income countries and evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to overcome these obstacles are reviewed. Demand barriers are also shown to be important in richer countries, particularly among vulnerable groups. This suggests that while barriers are plentiful, there is a dearth of evidence on ways to reduce them. Where evidence does exist, the data and methodology for evaluating effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is insufficient. An increased focus on obtaining robust evidence on effective interventions could yield high returns. The likely nature of the interventions means that pragmatic policy routes that go beyond the traditional boundaries of the public health sector are required for implementing the findings.

  20. Deported Mexican migrants: health status and access to care

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Niño, Julián Alfredo; Ramírez-Valdés, Carlos Jacobo; Cerecero-Garcia, Diego; Bojorquez-Chapela, Ietza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the health status and access to care of forced-return Mexican migrants deported through the Mexico-United States border and to compare it with the situation of voluntary-return migrants. METHODS Secondary data analysis from the Survey on Migration in Mexico’s Northern Border from 2012. This is a continuous survey, designed to describe migration flows between Mexico and the United States, with a mobile-population sampling design. We analyzed indicators of health and access to care among deported migrants, and compare them with voluntary-return migrants. Our analysis sample included 2,680 voluntary-return migrants, and 6,862 deportees. We employ an ordinal multiple logistic regression model, to compare the adjusted odds of having worst self-reported health between the studied groups. RESULTS As compared to voluntary-return migrants, deportees were less likely to have medical insurance in the United States (OR = 0.05; 95%CI 0.04;0.06). In the regression model a poorer self-perceived health was found to be associated with having been deported (OR = 1.71, 95%CI 1.52;1.92), as well as age (OR = 1.03, 95%CI 1.02;1.03) and years of education (OR = 0.94 95%CI 0.93;0.95). CONCLUSIONS According to our results, deportees had less access to care while in the United States, as compared with voluntary-return migrants. Our results also showed an independent and statistically significant association between deportation and having poorer self-perceived health. To promote the health and access to care of deported Mexican migrants coming back from the United States, new health and social policies are required. PMID:25119943

  1. Latinos and Cancer Information: Perspectives of Patients, Health Professionals and Telephone Cancer Information Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Celia P.; Nápoles, Anna; Davis, Sharon; Lopez, Monica; Pasick, Rena J.; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 Latino cancer patients diagnosed in California; 10 health professionals from the San Francisco Bay Area and Fresno, California; and 10 Cancer Information Services (CIS) information specialists from the regional offices handling calls from Spanish-speakers. Interview guides were designed by the investigators to answer three main research questions: 1) How do Latinos obtain information about cancer and what types of information do they access?; 2) What sources of cancer information do they seek out and find credible?; and 3) What are the barriers and facilitators to Latinos obtaining cancer information? Stakeholders generally viewed health professionals as the most credible source of cancer information. All groups regarded family and friends as important sources of information. Patients and health professionals tended to differ on the value of print materials. Although patients found them generally useful, health professionals tended to view them as inadequate for meeting the informational needs of their Latino patients due to the challenge of low health literacy. Health professionals also tended to undervalue Internet resources compared to patients and CIS specialists. All stakeholders viewed language, ethnic discordance and the impact on patients of the initial diagnosis as barriers to effective communication of cancer information. Health professionals and CIS specialists, but not patients, mentioned low literacy as a barrier. Our findings underscore the importance of the physician-patient relationship as a point of intervention to address the unmet informational and psychosocial needs of Latino cancer patients. PMID:27642542

  2. Section 508 Electronic Information Accessibility Requirements for Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Section 508 Subpart B 1194.21 outlines requirements for operating system and software development in order to create a product that is accessible to users with various disabilities. This portion of Section 508 contains a variety of standards to enable those using assistive technology and with visual, hearing, cognitive and motor difficulties to access all information provided in software. The focus on requirements was limited to the Microsoft Windows® operating system as it is the predominant operating system used at this center. Compliance with this portion of the requirements can be obtained by integrating the requirements into the software development cycle early and by remediating issues in legacy software if possible. There are certain circumstances with software that may arise necessitating an exemption from these requirements, such as design or engineering software using dynamically changing graphics or numbers to convey information. These exceptions can be discussed with the Section 508 Coordinator and another method of accommodation used.

  3. [Factors affecting access to health care institutions by the internally displaced population in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; Vázquez, María Luisa

    2008-04-01

    In Colombia, the on-going armed conflict causes displacement of thousands of persons that suffer its economic, social, and health consequences. Despite government regulatory efforts, displaced people still experience serious problems in securing access to health care. In order to analyze the institutional factors that affect access to health care by the internally displaced population, a qualitative, exploratory, and descriptive study was carried out by means of semi-structured individual interviews with a criterion sample of stakeholders (81). A narrative content analysis was performed, with mixed generation of categories and segmentation of data by themes and informants. Inadequate funding, providers' problems with reimbursement by insurers, and lack of clear definition as to coverage under the Social Security System in Health pose barriers to access to health care by the internally displaced population. Bureaucratic procedures, limited inter- and intra-sector coordination, and scarce available resources for public health service providers also affect access. Effective government action is required to ensure the right to health care for this population.

  4. Patients’ Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems. PMID:26690225

  5. Patients' Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice.

    PubMed

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-12-04

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems.

  6. State Data Centers: improving access to census information.

    PubMed

    Redmond, M

    1986-01-01

    "The U.S. Bureau of the Census created the State Data Center program in 1978 to improve public access to census information. This article discusses the background, structure, and services of that program; the role of libraries in the program; and future directions in State Data Center/library relationships. The appendix lists contact person names, as well as addresses and telephone numbers for State Data Center lead agencies."

  7. Mobility and health information searches - a Swedish perspective.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Ann-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Today the first point of contact between a patient and health care is often an internet health portal - not a human. There is also a trend towards increased use of mobile devices for internet searching. We present a study of the use of mobile vs non-mobile devices when accessing the main Swedish official health portal. Our findings indicate that there is a difference in not only when people search for health information, but also the type of information searched for using different devices. We conclude that further analysis is needed to understand these differences, and consequently that the same portal solution may not suit both mobile and non-mobile health information seekers.

  8. Beyond Culture and Language: Access to Diabetes Preventive Health Services among Somali Women in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Gele, Abdi A.; Torheim, Liv Elin; Pettersen, Kjell Sverre; Kumar, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes in some immigrant and refugee communities in Norway, there is very little information available on their utilization of diabetes prevention interventions, particularly for women from Somali immigrant communities. A qualitative study of 30 Somali immigrant women aged 25 years and over was carried out in the Oslo area. Unstructured interviews were used to explore women's knowledge of diabetes, their access to preventive health facilities, and factors impeding their reception of preventive health programs targeted for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. The study participants were found to have a good knowledge of diabetes. They knew that a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy diet are among the risk factors for diabetes. Regardless of their knowledge, participants reported a sedentary lifestyle accompanied with the consumption of an unhealthy diet. This was attributed to a lack of access to tailored physical activity services and poor access to health information. Considering gender-exclusive training facilities for Somali immigrant women and others with similar needs, in addition to access to tailored health information on diet, may encourage Somali women to adopt a healthy lifestyle, and it will definitely contribute to a national strategy for the prevention of diabetes. PMID:26266267

  9. Beyond Culture and Language: Access to Diabetes Preventive Health Services among Somali Women in Norway.

    PubMed

    Gele, Abdi A; Torheim, Liv Elin; Pettersen, Kjell Sverre; Kumar, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes in some immigrant and refugee communities in Norway, there is very little information available on their utilization of diabetes prevention interventions, particularly for women from Somali immigrant communities. A qualitative study of 30 Somali immigrant women aged 25 years and over was carried out in the Oslo area. Unstructured interviews were used to explore women's knowledge of diabetes, their access to preventive health facilities, and factors impeding their reception of preventive health programs targeted for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. The study participants were found to have a good knowledge of diabetes. They knew that a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy diet are among the risk factors for diabetes. Regardless of their knowledge, participants reported a sedentary lifestyle accompanied with the consumption of an unhealthy diet. This was attributed to a lack of access to tailored physical activity services and poor access to health information. Considering gender-exclusive training facilities for Somali immigrant women and others with similar needs, in addition to access to tailored health information on diet, may encourage Somali women to adopt a healthy lifestyle, and it will definitely contribute to a national strategy for the prevention of diabetes.

  10. Health information-seeking behavior and older African American women.

    PubMed

    Gollop, C J

    1997-04-01

    This study explored the ways in which urban, older, African American women obtain health information and some of the factors that influence such activity. Among the possible determinants examined were self-perceived literacy, access to health information, and mobility. The findings suggest that respondents receive health information from their physicians, the mass media, and members of their social networks. The results of this research also indicated that members of this population have a highly positive perception of the public library, although only a small segment use the library regularly, and that it may be in the interest of the library to investigate the role it could play in providing health information to older adults.

  11. Correlating web usage of health information with patient medical data.

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Bradley A.

    2002-01-01

    The number of online websites providing health-related information to the general public increases daily. Yet, it is relatively unknown as to how individuals in the general population access information with respect to their own medical status. In this study, clickstream data from an online health information website is analyzed with respect to the user's health insurance claims. The relationships are assessed through the construction and study of intersecting sets of ICD-9 codes in visited web pages and claims made. Results demonstrate that approximately 15% of patients use health information on the web in exact agreement with their medical status. In addition, almost 40 codes were found to be indicative of temporal aspects in user behavior with respect to physician visits. PMID:12463871

  12. Occupational Safety and Health Administration--Access to employee exposure and medical records. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1980-05-23

    This final occupational safety and health standard, promulgated today as a revised 29 CFR 1910.20, provides for employee, designated representative, and OSHA access to employer-maintained exposure and medical records relevant to employees exposed to toxic substances and harmful physical agents. Access is also assured to employer analyses using exposure and medical records. The final standard requires long term preservation of these records, contains provisions concerning informing employees of their rights under the standard, and includes provisions protective of trade secret information.

  13. Finding Reliable Health Information Online

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/projects/linkout Provides access to full-text articles at journal Web sites and other related ... NIH) PubMed documents, plus many more (often in full text). It also has account features such as portfolios ...

  14. Accessing Queensland's soil information - an open data revolution!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Kelly; O'Brien, Lauren; Brough, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The Queensland government is the custodian of soil and land resource information with an estimated value of 75 million. The Soil and Land Information (SALI) system houses this data from over 600 distinct studies with some 96,000 soil observations dating back to the 1940s. This data is now not only used by government but by universities, councils, landowners, consultants and schools. Providing this information to the public in an easy and accessible way, with a focus towards online delivery is crucial. Previous issues with distribution of online soils information in Queensland have stemmed not only from limits to technology but also, changing departmental structures and multiple websites. The department which manages soils information in Queensland has undergone nine name changes in the last 12 years due to Machinery of Government (MoG) restructures. This constantly changing web presence and branding is as confusing for people sourcing soils information as it is for those providing it. The Queensland government has now moved to a whole of government online environment. This is a single website with no reference to the convoluted structures within government or department names. The aim is to prevent impacts from future MoG changes on the provision of data and information to the public. Queensland government soils now has a single dedicated website (qld.gov.au/environment/land/soil) which has allowed us to start to build a repository for soils information and is a single portal for people to access soils data. It has been demonstrated that this consistent approach to websites improves trust and confidence of users [1] and from this, confidence in using Queensland soils information and data and ultimately better land management decisions.

  15. [Consumer health-care information technology].

    PubMed

    Sunyaev, A

    2013-06-01

    Consumer health-care information technology is intended to improve patients' opportunities to gather information about their own health. Ideally, this will be achieved through an improved involvement of existing data bases and an improved communication of information to patients and to care providers, if desired by patients. Additionally, further interconnection of existing and new systems and pervasive system design may be used. All consumer health-care information technology services are optional and leave patients in control of their medical data at all times. This article reflects the current status of consumer health-care information technology research and suggests further research areas that should be addressed.

  16. Predicting Health Care Utilization among Latinos: Health Locus of Control Beliefs or Access Factors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jesus, Maria; Xiao, Chenyang

    2014-01-01

    There are two competing research explanations to account for Latinos' underutilization of health services relative to non-Latino Whites in the United States. One hypothesis examines the impact of health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs, while the other focuses on the role of access factors on health care use. To date, the relative strength of…

  17. Equity in Access to Health Promotion and Risk Reduction Services: Implications for Elder Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nancy H.; Howze, Elizabeth Harper

    Although there is a national emphasis on health promotion and preventive practices, questions remain regarding the equity of access to these services by low income and minority groups, and the implications of inequities for elder health. Data from a systematic survey of 500 public and private providers of health promotion services in northern…

  18. eHealth Literacy: Extending the Digital Divide to the Realm of Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Brainin, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Background eHealth literacy is defined as the ability of people to use emerging information and communications technologies to improve or enable health and health care. Objective The goal of this study was to explore whether literacy disparities are diminished or enhanced in the search for health information on the Internet. The study focused on (1) traditional digital divide variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics, digital access, and digital literacy, (2) information search processes, and (3) the outcomes of Internet use for health information purposes. Methods We used a countrywide representative random-digital-dial telephone household survey of the Israeli adult population (18 years and older, N = 4286). We measured eHealth literacy; Internet access; digital literacy; sociodemographic factors; perceived health; presence of chronic diseases; as well as health information sources, content, search strategies, and evaluation criteria used by consumers. Results Respondents who were highly eHealth literate tended to be younger and more educated than their less eHealth-literate counterparts. They were also more active consumers of all types of information on the Internet, used more search strategies, and scrutinized information more carefully than did the less eHealth-literate respondents. Finally, respondents who were highly eHealth literate gained more positive outcomes from the information search in terms of cognitive, instrumental (self-management of health care needs, health behaviors, and better use of health insurance), and interpersonal (interacting with their physician) gains. Conclusions The present study documented differences between respondents high and low in eHealth literacy in terms of background attributes, information consumption, and outcomes of the information search. The association of eHealth literacy with background attributes indicates that the Internet reinforces existing social differences. The more comprehensive and sophisticated

  19. Public Trust in Health Information Sharing: Implications for Biobanking and Electronic Health Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jodyn; Kardia, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon’s MTurk system (n = 447). We found that seeing one’s primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public’s trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making. PMID:25654300

  20. [Access to care, access to rights, and health education: stakes of the global management fo patients].

    PubMed

    Moutel, G; Hervé, C

    2001-04-21

    Together with primary care physicians, the public health clinic of the Max Fourestier Hospital (Nanterre, France) initiated a pilot experience within the framework of its access to health care network (ADES). In addition to full access to traditional health care, patients who agree to participate in this unique network benefit from a medical and social risk screening and prevention program. This program is proposed to all patients who, by definition, have one or more medical or social risk factors. At each visit, targeted history taking and the physical exam can lead to individualized propositions for a global approach to screening and prevention, whatever the initial reason for consulting. In addition, patients who require permanent care benefit from the dose link between the medical care and social care teams. Over the last year, this experience has involved 3430 consultations in a polyvalent clinic that has provided global care including health education and screening for health risks. Our analysis of the medical and ethical issues involved points out the importance of a global approach to health care.

  1. 76 FR 10360 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Guident Technologies Inc. and Its Identified...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... AGENCY Access to Confidential Business Information by Guident Technologies Inc. and Its Identified... contractor, Guident Technologies, Inc. of Herndon, VA and Its Identified Subcontractors, to access...). Some of the information may be claimed or determined to be Confidential Business Information...

  2. The Teen Health Information Network (THINK).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzel, Judith; Erickson, Su

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the Teen Health Information Network (THINK), a grant-funded partnership of Aurora, Illinois, public libraries, schools, and community agencies to provide materials, information, and programming on issues related to teen health. Seven appendixes provide detailed information on survey results, collection evaluation and development,…

  3. Agency, access, and Anopheles: neighborhood health perceptions and the implications for community health interventions in Accra, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska, Marta M.; Stoler, Justin; Ofiesh, Caetlin; Rain, David; Weeks, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Social and environmental factors are increasingly recognized for their ability to influence health outcomes at both individual and neighborhood scales in the developing urban world. Yet issues of spatial heterogeneity in these complex environments may obscure unique elements of neighborhood life that may be protective or harmful to human health. Resident perceptions of neighborhood effects on health may help to fill gaps in our interpretation of household survey results and better inform how to plan and execute neighborhood-level health interventions. Objective We evaluate differences in housing and socioeconomic indicators and health, environment, and neighborhood perceptions derived from the analysis of a household survey and a series of focus groups in Accra, Ghana. We then explore how neighborhood perceptions can inform survey results and ultimately neighborhood-level health interventions. Design Eleven focus groups were conducted across a socioeconomically stratified sample of neighborhoods in Accra, Ghana. General inductive themes from the focus groups were analyzed in tandem with data collected in a 2009 household survey of 2,814 women. In-depth vignettes expand upon the three most salient emergent themes. Results Household and socioeconomic characteristics derived from the focus groups corroborated findings from the survey data. Focus group and survey results diverged for three complex health issues: malaria, health-care access, and sense of personal agency in promoting good health. Conclusion Three vignettes reflecting community views about malaria, health-care access, and sense of personal agency in promoting good health highlight the challenges facing community health interventions in Accra and exemplify how qualitatively derived neighborhood-level health effects can help shape health interventions. PMID:25997424

  4. Health & Nutrition Information for Pregnant & Breastfeeding Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Moms/ Moms-to-Be Print Share Health & Nutrition Information When you are pregnant or breastfeeding, you ... Story Last Updated: Feb 9, 2017 RESOURCES FOR NUTRITION AND HEALTH MYPLATE What Is MyPlate? Fruits Vegetables ...

  5. Characterizing Health Information for Different Target Audiences.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yueping; Hou, Zhen; Hou, Li; Li, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of audiences in health care: health professionals and health consumers, each have different information needs. Health monographs targeting different audiences are created by leveraging readers' background knowledge. The NCI's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries provide parallel cancer information and education resources with different target audiences. In this paper, we used targeted audience-specific cancer information PDQs to measure characteristic differences on the element level between audiences. In addition, we compared vocabulary coverage. Results show a significant difference between the professional and patient version of cancer monographs in both content organization and vocabulary. This study provides a new view to assess targeted audience-specific health information, and helps editors to improve the quality and readability of health information.

  6. Understanding dementia: effective information access from the Deaf community's perspective.

    PubMed

    Young, Alys; Ferguson-Coleman, Emma; Keady, John

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns older Deaf sign language users in the UK. Its aim was to explore how to enable effective information access and promote awareness and understanding of dementia from a culturally Deaf perspective. A purposive sample of 26 Deaf people without dementia participated in one of three focus groups facilitated directly in British Sign Language (BSL) without an intermediate interpreter. The sample was differentiated by age, role in the Deaf community, and diversity of educational attainment and professional experience. A phenomenological approach underpinned the thematic analysis of data. The findings demonstrate: (i) translation into (BSL) is a necessary but not sufficient condition to support understanding. Attention to culturally preferred means of engagement with information is vital; (ii) the content of information is best presented utilising structures and formats which cohere with Deaf people's visual cognitive strengths; and (iii) the importance of cultural values and cultural practices in raising awareness and building understanding of dementia. These include collective rather than individual responsibility for knowledge transfer and the pan-national nature of knowledge transfer among Deaf people(s). The discussion demonstrates how these specific features of effective information access and awareness building have universal implications relevant to public engagement and the promotion of general knowledge consistent with the National Dementia Strategy (England).

  7. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  8. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  9. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  10. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  11. Understanding Health Information Seeking from an Actor-Centric Perspective.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Simon; Waldman, Linda; Bloom, Gerry; Rasheed, Sabrina; Scott, Nigel; Ahmed, Tanvir; Khan, Nazib Uz Zaman; Sharmin, Tamanna

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a conceptual approach for discussing health information seeking among poor households in Africa and Asia. This approach is part of a larger research endeavor aimed at understanding how health systems are adapting; with possibilities and constraints emerging. These health systems can be found in a context of the changing relationships between states, markets and civil society in low and middle income countries. The paper starts from an understanding of the health sector as a "health knowledge economy", organized to provide people with access to knowledge and advice. The use of the term "health knowledge economy" draws attention to the ways the health sector is part of a broader knowledge economy changing the way individuals and households obtain and use specialist information. The paper integrates an actor centric approach with the theory of planned behavior. It seeks to identify the actors engaged in the health knowledge economy as a precursor to longer term studies on the uptake of innovations integrating health services with mobile phones, commonly designated as mHealth, contributing to an understanding of the potential vulnerabilities of poor people, and highlighting possible dangers if providers of health information and advice are strongly influenced by interest groups.

  12. Understanding Health Information Seeking from an Actor-Centric Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Simon; Waldman, Linda; Bloom, Gerry; Rasheed, Sabrina; Scott, Nigel; Ahmed, Tanvir; Uz Zaman Khan, Nazib; Sharmin, Tamanna

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual approach for discussing health information seeking among poor households in Africa and Asia. This approach is part of a larger research endeavor aimed at understanding how health systems are adapting; with possibilities and constraints emerging. These health systems can be found in a context of the changing relationships between states, markets and civil society in low and middle income countries. The paper starts from an understanding of the health sector as a “health knowledge economy”, organized to provide people with access to knowledge and advice. The use of the term “health knowledge economy” draws attention to the ways the health sector is part of a broader knowledge economy changing the way individuals and households obtain and use specialist information. The paper integrates an actor centric approach with the theory of planned behavior. It seeks to identify the actors engaged in the health knowledge economy as a precursor to longer term studies on the uptake of innovations integrating health services with mobile phones, commonly designated as mHealth, contributing to an understanding of the potential vulnerabilities of poor people, and highlighting possible dangers if providers of health information and advice are strongly influenced by interest groups. PMID:26184275

  13. Using Google Maps to Access USGS Volcano Hazards Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venezky, D. Y.; Snedigar, S.; Guffanti, M.; Bailey, J. E.; Wall, B. G.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazard Program (VHP) is revising the information architecture of our website to provide data within a geospatial context for emergency managers, educators, landowners in volcanic areas, researchers, and the general public. Using a map-based interface for displaying hazard information provides a synoptic view of volcanic activity along with the ability to quickly ascertain where hazards are in relation to major population and infrastructure centers. At the same time, the map interface provides a gateway for educators and the public to find information about volcanoes in their geographic context. A plethora of data visualization solutions are available that are flexible, customizable, and can be run on individual websites. We are currently using a Google map interface because it can be accessed immediately from a website (a downloadable viewer is not required), and it provides simple features for moving around and zooming within the large map area that encompasses U.S. volcanism. A text interface will also be available. The new VHP website will serve as a portal to information for each volcano the USGS monitors with icons for alert levels and aviation color codes. When a volcano is clicked, a window will provide additional information including links to maps, images, and real-time data, thereby connecting information from individual observatories, the Smithsonian Institution, and our partner universities. In addition to the VHP home page, many observatories and partners have detailed graphical interfaces to data and images that include the activity pages for the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the Smithsonian Google Earth files, and Yellowstone Volcano Observatory pictures and data. Users with varied requests such as raw data, scientific papers, images, or brief overviews expect to be able to quickly access information for their specialized needs. Over the next few years we will be gathering, cleansing, reorganizing, and posting

  14. Access to Specialist Care in Rural Saskatchewan: The Saskatchewan Rural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Karunanayake, Chandima P.; Rennie, Donna C.; Hagel, Louise; Lawson, Joshua; Janzen, Bonnie; Pickett, William; Dosman, James A.; Pahwa, Punam

    2015-01-01

    The role of place has emerged as an important factor in determining people’s health experiences. Rural populations experience an excess in mortality and morbidity compared to those in urban settings. One of the factors thought to contribute to this rural-urban health disparity is access to healthcare. The objective of this analysis was to examine access to specialized medical care services and several possible determinants of access to services in a distinctly rural population in Canada. In winter 2010, we conducted a baseline mail survey of 11,982 households located in rural Saskatchewan, Canada. We obtained 4620 completed household surveys. A key informant for each household responded to questions about access to medical specialists and the exact distance traveled to these services. Correlates of interest included the location of the residence within the province and within each household, socioeconomic status, household smoking status, median age of household residents, number of non-respiratory chronic conditions and number of current respiratory conditions. Analyses were conducted using log binomial regression for the outcome of interest. The overall response rate was 52%. Of households who required a visit to a medical specialist in the past 12 months, 23% reported having difficulty accessing specialist care. The magnitude of risk for encountering difficulty accessing medical specialist care services increased with the greatest distance categories. Accessing specialist care professionals by rural residents was particularly difficult for persons with current respiratory conditions. PMID:27417750

  15. Health status indices and access to medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, R

    1978-01-01

    This paper examines the uses of some health status indices in measuring equity of access to medical care. Empirical examples are provided using data from national surveys of the U.S. population conducted from 1964 through 1976. A simple indicator, mean number of physician visits, suggests that between 1963 and 1976 the poor improved their position relative to the rest of the population and, indeed, currently enjoy the highest level of access. However, a second measure, the use-disability ratio indicates that the poor may still receive less care relative to their need. A third measure, the symptoms-response ratio suggests how norms of appropriate behavior might be incorporated into an access measure. PMID:645994

  16. Access Disparity and Health Inequality of the Elderly: Unmet Needs and Delayed Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tetsuji; Chen, Chia-Ching; Murata, Chiyoe; Hirai, Hiroshi; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Katsunori; Harris, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate healthcare access disparity that will cause delayed and unmet healthcare needs for the elderly, and to examine health inequality and healthcare cost burden for the elderly. To produce clear policy applications, this study adapts a modified PRECEDE-PROCEED model for framing theoretical and experimental approaches. Data were collected from a large collection of the Community Tracking Study Household Survey 2003–2004 of the USA. Reliability and construct validity are examined for internal consistency and estimation of disparity and inequality are analyzed by using probit/ols regressions. The results show that predisposing factors (e.g., attitude, beliefs, and perception by socio-demographic differences) are negatively associated with delayed healthcare. A 10% increase in enabling factors (e.g., availability of health insurance coverage, and usual sources of healthcare providers) are significantly associated with a 1% increase in healthcare financing factors. In addition, information through a socio-economic network and support system has a 5% impact on an access disparity. Income, health status, and health inequality are exogenously determined. Designing and implementing easy healthcare accessibility (healthcare system) and healthcare financing methods, and developing a socio-economic support network (including public health information) are essential in reducing delayed healthcare and health inequality. PMID:25654774

  17. Attacking the information access problem with expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragusa, James M.; Orwig, Gary W.

    1991-01-01

    The results of applications research directed at finding an improved method of storing and accessing information are presented. Twelve microcomputer-based expert systems shells and five laser-optical formats have been studied, and the general and specific methods of interfacing these technologies are being tested in prototype systems. Shell features and interfacing capabilities are discussed, and results from the study of five laser-optical formats are recounted including the video laser, compact, and WORM disks, and laser cards and film. Interfacing, including laser disk device driver interfacing, is discussed and it is pointed out that in order to control the laser device from within the expert systems application, the expert systems shell must be able to access the device driver software. Potential integrated applications are investigated and an initial list is provided including consumer services, travel, law enforcement, human resources, marketing, and education and training.

  18. Communication and information barriers to health assistance for deaf patients.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia Cristina Andrade; Fortes, Paulo Antonio de Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    In Brazil, recent regulations require changes in private and public health systems to make special services available to deaf patients. In the present article, the researchers analyze the perceptions of 25 sign language-using patients regarding this assistance. The researchers found communication difficulties between these patients and health services staff, as well as a culture clash and a harmful inability among the service providers to distinguish among the roles of companions, caretakers, and professional translator/interpreters. Thus, it became common for the patients to experience prejudice in the course of treatment and information exchange, damage to their autonomy, limits on their access to services, and reduced efficacy of therapy. The researchers conclude that many issues must be dealt with if such barriers to health access are to be overcome, in particular the worrying degree of exclusion of deaf patients from health care systems.

  19. Right to health, essential medicines, and lawsuits for access to medicines--a scoping study.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Peláez, Claudia Marcela; Rover, Marina Raijche Mattozo; Leite, Silvana Nair; Rossi Buenaventura, Francisco; Farias, Mareni Rocha

    2014-11-01

    Despite countries' efforts to ensure access to essential medicines, some people do not have their needs met, and often resort to the Judiciary to get access to the medicines they need. This phenomenon, known as "judicialization of access to medicines", has aroused the academia's interest in law, health and social fields. In this context, this scoping study investigates, through qualitative thematic analysis, the approach to judicialization of access to medicines (normative or social) and its possible impacts (positive or negative) described in articles published in scientific journals indexed in the main health databases prior to July 2012. 65 of 384 papers met the inclusion criteria of focusing on lawsuits for access to medicines or judicialization of access to medicines as a phenomenon; empiric studies, review articles or theoretical discussions, written in English, Portuguese or Spanish; most of them were about Brazil, Colombia and England. Results show that judicialization is a complex phenomenon that involves technical-scientific, legal and social aspects. The judicialization impacts mentioned have changed over time. In the late 1990s and early 2000s the emphasis of positive impacts predominated both on the normative and social approaches, having as main reference the movements that claimed from the States the guarantee of access to HIV/AIDS treatment. In the mid-2000s, however, there was an emphasis of the negative effects of judicial intervention, when lawsuits for access to medicines became a problem in some countries. Few studies used the social approach to judicialization. For this reason, there is not enough information about whether lawsuits for access to medicines are related to a real recognition of the right to health as an exercise of citizenship. Such aspects need to be further studied.

  20. Are Personal Health Records Safe? A Review of Free Web-Accessible Personal Health Record Privacy Policies

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio

    2012-01-01

    Background Several obstacles prevent the adoption and use of personal health record (PHR) systems, including users’ concerns regarding the privacy and security of their personal health information. Objective To analyze the privacy and security characteristics of PHR privacy policies. It is hoped that identification of the strengths and weaknesses of the PHR systems will be useful for PHR users, health care professionals, decision makers, and designers. Methods We conducted a systematic review using the principal databases related to health and computer science to discover the Web-based and free PHR systems mentioned in published articles. The privacy policy of each PHR system selected was reviewed to extract its main privacy and security characteristics. Results The search of databases and the myPHR website provided a total of 52 PHR systems, of which 24 met our inclusion criteria. Of these, 17 (71%) allowed users to manage their data and to control access to their health care information. Only 9 (38%) PHR systems permitted users to check who had accessed their data. The majority of PHR systems used information related to the users’ accesses to monitor and analyze system use, 12 (50%) of them aggregated user information to publish trends, and 20 (83%) used diverse types of security measures. Finally, 15 (63%) PHR systems were based on regulations or principles such as the US Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Health on the Net Foundation Code of Conduct (HONcode). Conclusions Most privacy policies of PHR systems do not provide an in-depth description of the security measures that they use. Moreover, compliance with standards and regulations in PHR systems is still low. PMID:22917868

  1. Access to Essential Medicines in Pakistan: Policy and Health Systems Research Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Shehla; Bigdeli, Maryam; Aleem, Noureen; Rashidian, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate access to essential medicines is a common issue within developing countries. Policy response is constrained, amongst other factors, by a dearth of in-depth country level evidence. We share here i) gaps related to access to essential medicine in Pakistan; and ii) prioritization of emerging policy and research concerns. Methods An exploratory research was carried out using a health systems perspective and applying the WHO Framework for Equitable Access to Essential Medicine. Methods involved key informant interviews with policy makers, providers, industry, NGOs, experts and development partners, review of published and grey literature, and consultative prioritization in stakeholder’s Roundtable. Findings A synthesis of evidence found major gaps in essential medicine access in Pakistan driven by weaknesses in the health care system as well as weak pharmaceutical regulation. 7 major policy concerns and 11 emerging research concerns were identified through consultative Roundtable. These related to weaknesses in medicine registration and quality assurance systems, unclear and counterproductive pricing policies, irrational prescribing and sub-optimal drug availability. Available research, both locally and globally, fails to target most of the identified policy concerns, tending to concentrate on irrational prescriptions. It overlooks trans-disciplinary areas of policy effectiveness surveillance, consumer behavior, operational pilots and pricing interventions review. Conclusion Experience from Pakistan shows that policy concerns related to essential medicine access need integrated responses across various components of the health systems, are poorly addressed by existing evidence, and require an expanded health systems research agenda. PMID:23717442

  2. Creating Electronic Access to Newspaper Information in Nigeria: The Information Aid Network (IFAnet) Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ola, Christopher O.; Ojo, Reuben A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper highlights the value of newspaper information and the methods adopted in organizing, preserving and disseminating it. The paper dwells on the traditional ways of managing newspaper resources and the need to device a new medium of accessing the information contents of the resource. It enumerates the steps taken in conserving newspaper…

  3. Welcome to health information science and systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanchun

    2013-01-01

    Health Information Science and Systems is an exciting, new, multidisciplinary journal that aims to use technologies in computer science to assist in disease diagnoses, treatment, prediction and monitoring through the modeling, design, development, visualization, integration and management of health related information. These computer-science technologies include such as information systems, web technologies, data mining, image processing, user interaction and interface, sensors and wireless networking and are applicable to a wide range of health related information including medical data, biomedical data, bioinformatics data, public health data.

  4. mHealth: A Mechanism to Deliver More Accessible, More Effective Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Price, Matthew; Yuen, Erica K.; Goetter, Elizabeth M.; Herbert, James D.; Forman, Evan M.; Acierno, Ron; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    The increased popularity and functionality of mobile devices has a number of implications for the delivery of mental health services. Effective use of mobile applications has the potential to (a) increase access to evidence-based care; (b) better inform consumers of care and more actively engage them in treatment; (c) increase the use of evidence-based practices; and (d) enhance care after formal treatment has concluded. The current paper presents an overview of the many potential uses of mobile applications as a means to facilitate ongoing care at various stages of treatment. Examples of current mobile applications in behavioural treatment and research are described, and the implications of such uses are discussed. Finally, we provide recommendations for methods to include mobile applications into current treatment and outline future directions for evaluation. PMID:23918764

  5. Design of an Oral Health Information Brochure for At-Risk Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgaine, Kate C.; Carter, Angharad S.; Meldrum, Alison M.; Cullinan, Mary P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to develop written resource material for use in the "Oral Health Information through Community Pharmacists" project. Poor oral health is associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Many people do not access dental services on a regular basis; however, they may access community pharmacies for help and…

  6. Access and use of information resources by Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.R.

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes the way in which the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection uses risk assessment to implement the state`s environmental laws. It focuses on the Office of Research and Standards, which was created to provide information on adverse health effects of environmental contaminants, to recommend exposure levels, and to direct and manage research programs.

  7. Examining health information-seeking behaviors of older adults.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Shomir; Le, Thai; White, Cathy; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to examine which resources older adults utilize for their health information needs, how trustworthy and reliable they find these resources, and the difficulties they face in obtaining health-related information. A 41-item survey designed to understand the information-seeking characteristics of older adults was developed and distributed to retirement communities. Some items were taken from the Health Information National Trends Survey. Of 1520 surveys, 403 were returned completed (26.6%). Respondents' mean age was 77.65 years. Average scores indicated respondents trusted particular sources of health information in the following order (highest to lowest): health care providers, pharmacists, friends and relatives, retirement community staff, newspapers, the Internet, television, and the radio. In conclusion, older adults have a greater amount of trust in a person with whom they are able to actively discuss their health as opposed to a nonliving source, which they have to access or manipulate, such as the Internet. Efforts must be made to help older adults better navigate and utilize the Internet and recognize dependable online sources so that they may increase their trust in its use, thereby increasing satisfaction with their own ability to seek and use sources of health information.

  8. Basic Information about Health Disparities in Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes of Death Among American Indians and Alaska Natives African American Women and Mass Media Campaign Partners Related Links Stay Informed Cancer Home Basic Information About Health Disparities in Cancer Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  9. The Consumer Health Information System Adoption Model.

    PubMed

    Monkman, Helen; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2015-01-01

    Derived from overlapping concepts in consumer health, a consumer health information system refers to any of the broad range of applications, tools, and educational resources developed to empower consumers with knowledge, techniques, and strategies, to manage their own health. As consumer health information systems become increasingly popular, it is important to explore the factors that impact their adoption and success. Accumulating evidence indicates a relationship between usability and consumers' eHealth Literacy skills and the demands consumer HISs place on their skills. Here, we present a new model called the Consumer Health Information System Adoption Model, which depicts both consumer eHealth literacy skills and system demands on eHealth literacy as moderators with the potential to affect the strength of relationship between usefulness and usability (predictors of usage) and adoption, value, and successful use (actual usage outcomes). Strategies for aligning these two moderating factors are described.

  10. Health Manpower Information System (HMIS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-10

    Pathology/Diagnosis 3107 Oral Maxillofacial Surgery 3108 Orthodontics 3109 Pedodontics 3110 Periodontics 3111 Public Health Dentistry 3112 Prosthodontics...Maxillofacial Surgery 3108 Orthodontics 3109 Pedodontics 3110 Periodontics 3111 Public Health Dentistry 3112 Prosthodontics 3113 Comprehensive...Executive Dentistry 3103 Endodontics 3102 Oral Pathology/Diagnosis 3107 Oral Maxillofacial Surgery 3108 Orthodontics 3109 Pedodontics 3110 Periodontics 3111

  11. Literacy Disparities in Patient Access and Health-Related Use of Internet and Mobile Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; O’Conor, Rachel; Bojarski, Elizabeth A.; Mullen, Rebecca; Patzer, Rachel E.; Vicencio, Daniel; Jacobson, Kara L.; Parker, Ruth M.; Wolf, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Age and race-related disparities in technology use have been well documented, but less is known about how health literacy influences technology access and use. Objective To assess the association between patients’ literacy skills and mobile phone ownership, use of text messaging, internet access, and use of the internet for health-related purposes. Methods A secondary analysis utilizing data from 1,077 primary care patients enrolled in two, multi-site studies from 2011–2013. Patients were administered an in-person, structured interview. Results Patients with adequate health literacy were more likely to own a mobile phone or smartphone in comparison to patients with low or marginal literacy (mobile phone ownership: 96.8% vs. 95.2% vs. 90.1%, respectively, p<.001; smartphone ownership: 70.6% vs. 62.5% vs. 40.1%, p<.001) and to report text messaging (78.6% vs. 75.2% vs. 53.1%, p<.001). They were also more likely to have access to the internet from their home (92.1% vs. 74.7% vs. 44.9%, p<.001) and to report using the internet for email (93.0% vs. 75.7% vs. 38.5%, p<.001), browsing the web (93.9% vs. 80.2% vs. 44.5%, p<.001), accessing health information (86.3% vs. 75.5% vs. 40.8%, p<.001), and communicating with providers (54.2% vs. 29.8% vs. 13.0%, p<.001). Relationships remained significant in multivariable analyses controlling for relevant covariates. Conclusions Results reveal that literacy-related disparities in technology access and use are widespread, with lower literate patients being less likely to own smartphones or to access and use the internet, particularly for health reasons. Future interventions should consider these disparities and ensure that health promotion activities do not further exacerbate disparities. PMID:25363660

  12. Health Information Seeking Among Rural African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics: It Is Built, Did They Come?

    PubMed

    Powe, Barbara D

    2015-09-01

    This cross-sectional study examines health information-seeking behaviors and access to and use of technology among rural African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics. There was a low level of health information seeking across the sample. Few used smartphones or tablets and did not endorse receiving health information from their health care provider by e-mail. Printed materials remained a source of health information as did friends and family. Information should be shared using multiple platforms including more passive methods such as television and radio. More research is needed to ensure the health literacy, numeracy, and ability to navigate the online environment.

  13. [From library to clinical decision support systems: access of general practitioner to quality information].

    PubMed

    Fauquert, B

    2012-09-01

    Since 2003, the following tools have been implemented in Belgium for improving the access of general practioners to the EBM literature: the Digital Library for Health and the evidence-linker of the CEBAM, the portal EBMPracticeNet.be and the multidimensional electronic clinical decision support EBMeDS. The aim of this article is to show the progress achieved in the information dissemination toward the belgian general practioners, particularly the access from the electronic health record. From the literature published these last years, the opportunities cited by the users are for using EBM and the strong willingness for using these literature access in the future; the limits are the medical data coding, the irrelevance of the search results, the alerts fatigue induced by EBMeDS. The achievements done and planned for the new EBMPracticeNet guidelines portal and the EBMeDS system are explained in the aim of informing belgian healthcare professionals. These projects are claiming for lauching a participatory process in the production and dissemination of EBM information. The discussion is focused on the belgian healthcare system advantages, the solutions for a reasonable implementation of these projects and for increasing the place of an evidence-based information in the healthcare decision process. Finally the input of these projects to the continuing medical education and to the healthcare quality are discussed, in a context of multifactorial interaction healthcare design (complexity design).

  14. Integrating child health information systems in public health agencies.

    PubMed

    Bara, Debra; McPhillips-Tangum, Carol; Wild, Ellen L; Mann, Marie Y

    2009-01-01

    Public health agencies at state and local levels are integrating information systems to improve health outcomes for children. An assessment was conducted to describe the extent to which public health agencies are currently integrating child health information systems (CHIS). Using online technology information was collected, to assess completed and planned activities related to integration of CHIS, maturity of these systems, and factors that influence decisions by public health agencies to pursue integration activities. Of the 39 public health agencies that participated, 18 (46%) reported already integrating some or all of their CHIS, and 13 (33%) reported to be planning to integrate during the next 3 years. Information systems most commonly integrated include Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI), immunization, vital records, and Newborn Dried Bloodspot Screening (NDBS). Given the high priority that has been placed on using technology to improve health status in the United States, the emphasis on expanding the capability for the electronic exchange of health information, and federal support for electronic health records by 2014, public health agencies should be encouraged and supported in their efforts to develop, implement, and maintain integrated CHIS to facilitate the electronic exchange of health information with the clinical healthcare sector.

  15. Access to Max '91 information via computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1989-01-01

    Various types of flare information, activity, active region reports, x ray plots and daily Campaign Action notices are now available on SPAN, and INTERNET. Although this system was developed for use by Max '91 participants during campaigns, it is updated daily and maintained at times outside of campaigns. Thus it is available for general use outside of campaigns. The Space Environment Laboratory maintains VAX and Apollo systems, both of which are on INTERNET. The VAX is also on the SPAN network as node SELVAX or 9555. Details of access to files on the VAX are given.

  16. How well are health information websites displayed on mobile phones? Implications for the readability of health information.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Christina; Dunn, Matthew

    2016-06-02

    Issue addressed: More than 87% of Australians own a mobile phone with Internet access and 82% of phone owners use their smartphones to search for health information, indicating that mobile phones may be a powerful tool for building health literacy. Yet, online health information has been found to be above the reading ability of the general population. As reading on a smaller screen may further complicate the readability of information, this study aimed to examine how health information is displayed on mobile phones and its implications for readability.Methods: Using a cross-sectional design with convenience sampling, a sample of 270 mobile webpages with information on 12 common health conditions was generated for analysis, they were categorised based on design and position of information display.Results: The results showed that 71.48% of webpages were mobile-friendly but only 15.93% were mobile-friendly webpages designed in a way to optimise readability, with a paging format and queried information displayed for immediate viewing.Conclusion: With inadequate evidence and lack of consensus on how webpage design can best promote reading and comprehension, it is difficult to draw a conclusion on the effect of current mobile health information presentation on readability.So what?: Building mobile-responsive websites should be a priority for health information providers and policy-makers. Research efforts are urgently required to identify how best to enhance readability of mobile health information and fully capture the capabilities of mobile phones as a useful device to increase health literacy.

  17. Advances in health informatics education: educating students at the intersection of health care and information technology.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth; Armstrong, Brian; Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the authors' work in the area of health informatics (HI) education involving emerging health information technologies. A range of information technologies promise to modernize health care. Foremost among these are electronic health records (EHRs), which are expected to significantly improve and streamline health care practice. Major national and international efforts are currently underway to increase EHR adoption. However, there have been numerous issues affecting the widespread use of such information technology, ranging from a complex array of technical problems to social issues. This paper describes work in the integration of information technologies directly into the education and training of HI students at both the undergraduate and graduate level. This has included work in (a) the development of Web-based computer tools and platforms to allow students to have hands-on access to the latest technologies and (b) development of interdisciplinary educational models that can be used to guide integrating information technologies into HI education. The paper describes approaches that allow for remote hands-on access by HI students to a range of EHRs and related technology. To date, this work has been applied in HI education in a variety of ways. Several approaches for integration of this essential technology into HI education and training are discussed, along with future directions for the integration of EHR technology into improving and informing the education of future health and HI professionals.

  18. Health and medication information resources on the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Sara; Zerilli, Tina

    2013-04-01

    Health care practitioners have increasingly used the Internet to obtain health and medication information. The vast number of Internet Web sites providing such information and concerns with their reliability makes it essential for users to carefully select and evaluate Web sites prior to use. To this end, this article reviews the general principles to consider in this process. Moreover, as cost may limit access to subscription-based health and medication information resources with established reputability, freely accessible online resources that may serve as an invaluable addition to one's reference collection are highlighted. These include government- and organization-sponsored resources (eg, US Food and Drug Administration Web site and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Drug Shortage Resource Center Web site, respectively) as well as commercial Web sites (eg, Medscape, Google Scholar). Familiarity with such online resources can assist health care professionals in their ability to efficiently navigate the Web and may potentially expedite the information gathering and decision-making process, thereby improving patient care.

  19. 4 CFR 28.161 - Denial of access to information-Appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Denial of access to information-Appeals. 28.161 Section... ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Access to Records § 28.161 Denial of access to information—Appeals. (a) If a request for access to information under § 28.160 is denied, the General Counsel shall give the requester...

  20. Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts…