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Sample records for access medical care

  1. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health.…

  2. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2016-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children’s health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children’s health. Nonetheless, they find that, on the whole, policies to improve access indeed improve children’s health, with the caveat that context plays a big role—medical care “matters more at some times, or for some children, than others.” Focusing on studies that can plausibly show a causal effect between policies to increase access and better health for children, and starting from an economic framework, they consider both the demand for and the supply of health care. On the demand side, they examine what happens when the government expands public insurance programs (such as Medicaid), or when parents are offered financial incentives to take their children to preventive appointments. On the supply side, they look at what happens when public insurance programs increase the payments that they offer to health-care providers, or when health-care providers are placed directly in schools where children spend their days. They also examine how the Affordable Care Act is likely to affect children’s access to medical care. Leininger and Levy reach three main conclusions. First, despite tremendous progress in recent decades, not all children have insurance coverage, and immigrant children are especially vulnerable. Second, insurance coverage alone doesn’t guarantee access to care, and insured children may still face barriers to getting the care they need. Finally, as this issue of Future of Children demonstrates, access to care is only one of the factors that policy makers should consider as they seek to make the nation’s children healthier. PMID:27516723

  3. Child Health and Access to Medical Care.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health. Nonetheless, they find that, on the whole, policies to improve access indeed improve children's health, with the caveat that context plays a big role-medical care "matters more at some times, or for some children, than others." Focusing on studies that can plausibly show a causal effect between policies to increase access and better health for children, and starting from an economic framework, they consider both the demand for and the supply of health care. On the demand side, they examine what happens when the government expands public insurance programs (such as Medicaid), or when parents are offered financial incentives to take their children to preventive appointments. On the supply side, they look at what happens when public insurance programs increase the payments that they offer to health-care providers, or when health-care providers are placed directly in schools where children spend their days. They also examine how the Affordable Care Act is likely to affect children's access to medical care. Leininger and Levy reach three main conclusions. First, despite tremendous progress in recent decades, not all children have insurance coverage, and immigrant children are especially vulnerable. Second, insurance coverage alone doesn't guarantee access to care, and insured children may still face barriers to getting the care they need. Finally, as this issue of Future of Children demonstrates, access to care is only one of the factors that policy makers should consider as they seek to make the nation's children healthier.

  4. Medical smart cards: health care access in your pocket.

    PubMed

    Krohn, R W

    2000-01-01

    The wallet-sized medical smart card, embedded with a programmable computer chip, stores and transmits a cardholder's clinical, insurance coverage and biographical information. When fully deployed, smart cards will conduct many functions at the point of care, from claims submission to medical records updates in real time. Ultimately, the smart card will make the individual patient record and all clinical and economic transactions within that patient log as portable, accessible and secure as an ATM account.

  5. Health status indices and access to medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, R

    1978-01-01

    This paper examines the uses of some health status indices in measuring equity of access to medical care. Empirical examples are provided using data from national surveys of the U.S. population conducted from 1964 through 1976. A simple indicator, mean number of physician visits, suggests that between 1963 and 1976 the poor improved their position relative to the rest of the population and, indeed, currently enjoy the highest level of access. However, a second measure, the use-disability ratio indicates that the poor may still receive less care relative to their need. A third measure, the symptoms-response ratio suggests how norms of appropriate behavior might be incorporated into an access measure. PMID:645994

  6. How Medical Tourism Enables Preferential Access to Care: Four Patterns from the Canadian Context.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jeremy; Johnston, Rory; Crooks, Valorie A; Morgan, Jeff; Adams, Krystyna

    2016-01-02

    Medical tourism is the practice of traveling across international borders with the intention of accessing medical care, paid for out-of-pocket. This practice has implications for preferential access to medical care for Canadians both through inbound and outbound medical tourism. In this paper, we identify four patterns of medical tourism with implications for preferential access to care by Canadians: (1) Inbound medical tourism to Canada's public hospitals; (2) Inbound medical tourism to a First Nations reserve; (3) Canadian patients opting to go abroad for medical tourism; and (4) Canadian patients traveling abroad with a Canadian surgeon. These patterns of medical tourism affect preferential access to health care by Canadians by circumventing domestic regulation of care, creating jurisdictional tensions over the provision of health care, and undermining solidarity with the Canadian health system.

  7. Retail medical clinics: increasing access to low cost medical care amongst a developing legal environment.

    PubMed

    Schleiter, Kristin E

    2010-01-01

    Retail medical clinics are an innovation in health care with the potential to increase access to low-cost basic health care services while changing the delivery model for routine, non-urgent medical care. However, the few states that attempted to directly regulate retail medical clinics have been met with criticism by the FTC due to the proposed legislations' anticompetitive undertones. The relationship between retail medical clinics and the host stores or pharmacies that house them has the potential to spark fraud and abuse concerns. Retail medical clinics must abide by state-specific regulation on scope of practice of the various mid-level practitioners who work for the clinics, particularly to minimize exposure to litigation and keep within the clinics' intended purpose of a supplement to primary care physician offices. The author concludes that the consumer benefits of cost and convenience, combined with the potential for growth and expanded consumer base from a retailers' perspective, make the legal challenge inherent in running a retail medical clinic well worth the effort.

  8. Racial and ethnic differences in access to medical care in managed care plans.

    PubMed Central

    Hargraves, J L; Cunningham, P J; Hughes, R G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the extent to which access differences between racial/ethnic minorities and whites in managed care plans are greater than such differences in other types of health plans. DATA SOURCE: A nationally representative sample of 4,811 African American, 3,379 Hispanic, and 33,737 white nonelderly persons with public or private health insurance. STUDY DESIGN/DATA COLLECTION: A cross-sectional survey of households was conducted during 1996 and 1997. Commonly used measures of access to and utilization of medical care were constructed for individuals: (1) percentage of visits with a usual provider, (2) percentage with a regular provider, (3) visit with a physician in the past year, (4) hospital ER use, (5) last visit was to a specialist. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fewer than 74 percent of Hispanics and African Americans had a regular provider compared to more than 78 percent of white Americans. Hispanics were least likely to have had their last doctor visit with a specialist (22 percent) compared to African Americans (26 percent) and whites (28 percent). Differences between ethnic/racial minorities and whites in managed care plans are similar to differences observed in non-managed care plans. Americans of all racial and ethnic backgrounds in managed care plans with gatekeeping are more likely to have a usual source of care, a regular provider, and lower use of specialists compared to persons in plans without gatekeeping. CONCLUSION: Although greater access to primary care was shown among African Americans and Hispanics in managed care plans, the extent of the disparities between racial/ethnic minorities and whites in managed care is similar to disparities in other types of health plans. PMID:11666107

  9. Access to patient-centered medical home among Ohio's Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Conrey, Elizabeth J; Seidu, Dazar; Ryan, Norma J; Chapman, Dj Sam

    2013-06-01

    Medical homes deliver primary care that is accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family centered, coordinated, compassionate and culturally effective. Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) require a wide range of support to maintain health, making medical home access particularly important. We sought to understand independent risk factors for lacking access. We analyzed Ohio, USA data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (2005-2006). Among CSHCN, 55.6% had medical home access. The proportion achieving each medical home component was highest for having a personal doctor/nurse and lowest for receiving coordinated care, family-centered care and referrals. Specific subsets of CSHCN were significantly and independently more likely to lack medical home access: Hispanic (AOR=3.08), moderate/high severity of difficulty (AOR=2.84), and any public insurance (AOR=1.60). Efforts to advance medical home access must give special attention to these CSHCN populations and improvements must be made to referral access, family-centered care, and care coordination.

  10. Addressing the access problem for patients with serious mental illness who require tertiary medical care.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Jennifer M; Flint, Alastair J

    2015-02-01

    There is evidence to suggest that people with serious mental illness (SMI) have lower access to tertiary care than patients without SMI, particularly when care is complex. Barriers are present at the level of the individual, providers, and the health care system. High levels of co-morbidity and the associated health care costs, along with a growing focus on facilitating equal access to quality care for all, urges health care systems to address existing gaps. Some interventions have been successful at improving access to primary care for patients with SMI, but relatively little research has focused on access to complex interventions. This paper summarizes the scope of the problem regarding access to complex tertiary medical care among people with SMI. Barriers are discussed and potential solutions are proposed. Policies and programs must be developed, implemented, and evaluated to determine cost-effectiveness and impact on outcomes.

  11. The Impact of the Medical Home on Access to Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheak-Zamora, Nancy C.; Farmer, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience difficulty accessing health care services. Using parent-reported data from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, we examined whether having a medical home reduces unmet need for specialty care services for children with ASD (n = 3,055). Descriptive…

  12. Access to medical care for documented and undocumented Latinos in a southern California county.

    PubMed Central

    Hubbell, F. A.; Waitzkin, H.; Mishra, S. I.; Dombrink, J.; Chavez, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    To determine local access to medical care among Latinos, we conducted telephone interviews with residents of Orange County, California. The survey replicated on a local level the national access surveys sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. We compared access among Latino citizens of the United States (including permanent legal residents), undocumented Latinos, and Anglos, and analyzed predictors of access. Among the sample of 958 respondents were 137 Latino citizens, 54 undocumented Latinos, and 680 Anglos. Compared with Anglos, Latino citizens and undocumented immigrants had less access to medical care by all measures used in the survey. Although undocumented Latinos were less likely than Latino citizens to have health insurance, by most other measures their access did not differ significantly. By multivariate analysis, health insurance status and not ethnicity was the most important predictor of access. Because access to medical care is limited for both Latino citizens and undocumented immigrants, policy proposals to improve access for Latinos should consider current barriers faced by these groups and local differences in access to medical care. PMID:1877182

  13. Hispanic-Asian Immigrant Inequality in Perceived Medical Need and Access to Regular Physician Care.

    PubMed

    Howe Hasanali, Stephanie; De Jong, Gordon F; Roempke Graefe, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    In the face of continuing large immigrant streams, Hispanic and Asian immigrants' human and social capital inequalities will heighten U.S. race/ethnic health and health care disparities. Using data from the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this study assessed Hispanic-Asian immigrant disparity in access to health care, measured by perceived medical need and regular access to a physician. Logistic regression results indicated that Hispanics had lower perceived met medical need and were less likely to see a doctor regularly. These disparities were significantly attenuated by education and health insurance. Assimilation-related characteristics were significantly associated with a regular doctor visit and were not fully mediated by socioeconomic variables. Findings indicate the importance of education above and beyond insurance coverage for access to health care and suggest the potential for public health efforts to improve preventive care among immigrants.

  14. Hispanic-Asian Immigrant Inequality in Perceived Medical Need and Access to Regular Physician Care

    PubMed Central

    De Jong, Gordon F.; Graefe, Deborah Roempke

    2014-01-01

    In the face of continuing large immigrant streams, Hispanic and Asian immigrants’ human and social capital inequalities will heighten U.S. race/ethnic health and health care disparities. Using data from the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this study assessed Hispanic-Asian immigrant disparity in access to health care, measured by perceived medical need and regular access to a physician. Logistic regression results indicated that Hispanics had lower perceived met medical need and were less likely to see a doctor regularly. These disparities were significantly attenuated by education and health insurance. Assimilation-related characteristics were significantly associated with a regular doctor visit and were not fully mediated by socioeconomic variables. Findings indicate the importance of education above and beyond insurance coverage for access to health care and suggest the potential for public health efforts to improve preventive care among immigrants. PMID:25420782

  15. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher

  16. Decomposing differences in medical care access among cancer survivors by race and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    King, Christopher J; Chen, Jie; Dagher, Rada K; Holt, Cheryl L; Thomas, Stephen B

    2015-01-01

    More research is needed to identify factors that explain why minority cancer survivors ages 18 to 64 are more likely to delay or forgo care when compared with whites. Data were merged from the 2000-2011 National Health Interview Survey to identify 12 125 adult survivors who delayed medical care. The Fairlie decomposition technique was applied to explore contributing factors that explain the differences. Compared with whites, Hispanics were more likely to delay care because of organizational barriers (odds ratio = 1.38; P < .05), and African Americans were more likely to delay medical care or treatment because of transportation barriers (odds ratio = 1.54; P < .001). The predicted probability of not receiving timely care because of each barrier was lowest among minorities. Age, insurance, perceived health, comorbidity, nativity, and year were significant factors that contributed to the disparities. Although expanded insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act is expected to increase access, organizational factors and transportation play a major role.

  17. [Intraosseous access for in-hospital emergencies. Intensive medical care case study].

    PubMed

    Werner, M; Daniel, H-P; Hoitz, J

    2010-07-01

    Since the release of the 2005 resuscitation guidelines intraosseous infusion has been recognized as the favorite alternative vascular access in emergency patients. It is no longer restricted to paediatric emergencies but is also considered the vascular access of choice for adult patients with difficult venous access. Intraosseous access has been used in an increasing proportion of patients especially in an out-of-hospital emergency care setting while only limited experience exists for in-hospital usage of this technique. This article reports on a case of intraosseous access performed in a critically ill patient directly after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to difficult peripheral venous access. Despite the extensive medical resources available in the ICU (i.e. central venous catheterization) less invasive means were used to render appropriate care. Based on this case different strategies of critical care and possible improvements will be discussed. Intraosseous infusion should be regarded as an infrequently needed but potentially life-saving procedure that is still too often considered as an option at later stages during in-hospital emergency care.

  18. An Analysis of Medication Adherence of Sooner Health Access Network SoonerCare Choice Patients

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nicholas A.; Kendrick, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Medication adherence is a desirable but rarely available metric in patient care, providing key insights into patient behavior that has a direct effect on a patient’s health. In this research, we determine the medication adherence characteristics of over 46,000 patients enrolled in the Sooner Health Access Network (HAN), based on Medicaid claims data from the Oklahoma Health Care Authority. We introduce a new measure called Specific Medication PDC (smPDC), based on the popular Proportion of Days Covered (PDC) method, using the last fill date for the end date of the measurement duration. The smPDC method is demonstrated by calculating medication adherence across the eligible patient population, for relevant subpopulations over a two-year period spanning 2012 – 2013. We leverage a clinical analytics platform to disseminate adherence measurements to providers. Aggregate results demonstrate that the smPDC method is relevant and indicates potential opportunities for health improvement for certain population segments. PMID:25954350

  19. Australian health policy on access to medical care for refugees and asylum seekers

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Velez, Ignacio; Gifford, Sandra M; Bice, Sara J

    2005-01-01

    Since the tightening of Australian policy for protection visa applicants began in the 1990s, access to health care has been increasingly restricted to asylum seekers on a range of different visa types. This paper summarises those legislative changes and discusses their implications for health policy relating to refugees and asylum seekers in Australia. Of particular concern are asylum seekers on Bridging Visas with no work rights and no access to Medicare. The paper examines several key questions: What is the current state of play, in terms of health screening and medical care policies, for asylum seekers and refugees? Relatedly, how has current policy changed from that of the past? How does Australia compare with other countries in relation to health policy for asylum seekers and refugees? These questions are addressed with the aim of providing a clear description of the current situation concerning Australian health policy on access to medical care for asylum seekers and refugees. Issues concerning lack of access to appropriate health care and related services are raised, ethical and practical issues are explored, and current policy gaps are investigated. PMID:16212674

  20. Distress syndromes, illness behavior, access to care and medical utilization in a defined population.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, D; Cleary, P D; Greenley, J R

    1982-04-01

    This article examines the use of general medical services in a representative sample from a defined geographic area and in a sample of persons seeking psychiatric care from the same area. Psychiatric patients made 100 per cent more general medical care visits in the retrospective period and 83 per cent more in the prospective period than persons who did not seek mental health care. The analysis focuses on the determinants in general medical care use between those who sought mental health care and those who did not. The first hypothesis is that physical symptoms and dysfunction concomitant with psychologic disorder explain the difference. The second argues that the association is a product of help-seeking orientations and illness behavior. The third focuses on variations due to differences in access. The first two types of factors are the most important. Using sex, physical symptoms and illness behavior measures, we explain 50 per cent of the differences in retrospective utilization and 40 per cent of the differences in prospective data.

  1. Limitations in access to dental and medical specialty care for publicly insured children.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Karin V; Bisgaier, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Medicaid and the state-run Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) cover about 42 million children, many of whom would not have access to care without public insurance. Federal law requires that this access be equivalent to that of privately insured children for covered services, and many states have implemented policies to improve longstanding disparities in primary and preventive care. Reimbursement rates are up, but significant disparities remain, especially for dental and specialty services. It is important to understand the distinct effect of provider-related barriers, because they are potentially more modifiable through health policy than patient-related ones. This Issue Brief summarizes research that directly measures the willingness of dental and medical providers to see publicly-insured children, using research assistants posing as mothers calling for an urgent appointment for their child.

  2. [The accessibility of high-tech medical care of newborns with surgical pathology in conditions of Far North].

    PubMed

    Polunina, n V; Razumovskiĭ, A Iu; Savvina, V A; Varfolomeev, A R; Nikolaev, V N

    2014-01-01

    The actual stage of development of public health rendering of specialized medical care is based on principles of generality, accessibility, addressness, qualitativeness, and effectiveness. However, the problem of rendering specialized medical care to population is one of most critical targets in district centers and requires immediate solution. The main mean of resolving this problem is re-hospitalization of patient in more large-scale medical institutions. The rendering of high-tech medical care, surgery care included, to newborns in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) is possible only in conditions of metropolitan health institutions i.e. medical institutions of third level. Annually, almost half of newborns with surgical pathology is transported from central district hospital. The organization of reanimation counseling center, maintenance of remote monitoring of newborns and development of telemedicine and means of sanitary aviation play main role in supporting accessibility of high-tech medical care in conditions of this region.

  3. Inviting patients and care partners to read doctors' notes: OpenNotes and shared access to electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Darer, Jonathan D; Berger, Andrea; Clarke, Deserae; Green, Jamie A; Stametz, Rebecca A; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan

    2016-08-07

    We examined the acceptability and effects of delivering doctors' visit notes electronically (via OpenNotes) to patients and care partners with authorized access to patients' electronic medical records. Adult patients and care partners at Geisinger Health System were surveyed at baseline and after 12 months of exposure to OpenNotes. Reporting on care partner access to OpenNotes, patients and care partners stated that they had better agreement about patient treatment plans and more productive discussions about their care. At follow-up, patients were more confident in their ability to manage their health, felt better prepared for office visits, and reported understanding their care better than at baseline. Care partners were more likely to access and use patient portal functionality and reported improved communication with patients' providers at follow-up. Our findings suggest that offering patients and care partners access to doctors' notes is acceptable and improves communication and patients' confidence in managing their care.

  4. Measuring access to primary medical care: some examples of the use of geographical information systems.

    PubMed

    Parker, E B; Campbell, J L

    1998-06-01

    This paper explores the potential for geographical information system technology in defining some variables influencing the use of primary care medical services. Eighteen general practices in Scotland contributed to a study examining the accessibility of their services and their patients' use of the local Accident and Emergency Department. Geo-referencing of information was carried out through analysis of postcode data relating to practices and patients. This information was analyzed using ARC/INFO GIS software in conjunction with the ORACLE relational database and 1991 census information. The results demonstrate that GIS technology has an important role in defining and analyzing the use of health services by the population.

  5. The expanding medical and behavioral resources with access to care for everyone health plan.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Gilead I; O'Connell, Ryan; Katz, David L; Manson, JoAnn E; Hutchison, William R; Landau, Charles; Yonkers, Kimberly A

    2009-04-07

    Healthcare Professionals for Healthcare Reform is a group of physicians and others interested in health care reform who, recognizing the urgent need for change, convened to propose a universal health care plan that builds on the strengths of the U.S. health care system and improves on its coverage, efficiency, and capacity for patient choice. The group proposes a tiered plan, the core of which (Tier 1) would be lifetime, basic, publicly funded coverage for the entire population on the basis of the best evidence about which therapies are considered life saving, life-sustaining, or preventive. Optional coverage (Tier 2) would be funded by private insurance and cover all therapies considered to help with quality of life and functional impairment. Items considered to be luxury or cosmetic (Tier 3) would generally not be covered, as is the case under the current system. The entire system would be overseen by a quasi-governmental, largely independent organization known as "The Board," which would resemble the Federal Reserve and interact with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agencies to oversee implementation and coverage. By building on the current health care system while introducing other features and efficiencies, the Expanding Medical and Behavioral Resources with Access to Care for Everyone (EMBRACE) plan for universal health insurance coverage offers several advantages over alternative plans that have been proposed.

  6. Creating a mobile subject guide to improve access to point-of-care resources for medical students: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Boruff, Jill T; Bilodeau, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Question: Can a mobile optimized subject guide facilitate medical student access to mobile point-of-care tools? Setting: The guide was created at a library at a research-intensive university with six teaching hospital sites. Objectives: The team created a guide facilitating medical student access to point-of-care tools directly on mobile devices to provide information allowing them to access and set up resources with little assistance. Methods: Two librarians designed a mobile optimized subject guide for medicine and conducted a survey to test its usefulness. Results: Web analytics and survey results demonstrate that the guide is used and the students are satisfied. Conclusion: The library will continue to use the subject guide as its primary means of supporting mobile devices. It remains to be seen if the mobile guide facilitates access for those who do not need assistance and want direct access to the resources. Internet access in the hospitals remains an issue. PMID:22272160

  7. Health-related beliefs and decisions about accessing HIV medical care among HIV-infected persons who are not receiving care.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Fagan, Jennifer L; Valverde, Eduardo; Bertolli, Jeanne

    2009-09-01

    In the United States, the publically supported national HIV medical care system is designed to provide HIV medical care to those who would otherwise not receive such care. Nevertheless, many HIV-infected persons are not receiving medical care. Limited information is available from HIV-infected persons not currently in care about the reasons they are not receiving care. From November 2006 to February 2007, we conducted five focus groups at community-based organizations and health departments in five U.S. cities to elicit qualitative information about barriers to entering HIV care. The 37 participants were mostly male (n = 29), over the age of 30 (n = 34), and all but one had not received HIV medical care in the previous 6 months. The focus group discussions revealed health belief-related barriers that have often been overlooked by studies of access to care. Three key themes emerged: avoidance and disbelief of HIV serostatus, conceptions of illness and appropriate health care, and negative experiences with, and distrust of, health care. Our findings point to the potentially important influence of these health-related beliefs on individual decisions about whether to access HIV medical care. We also discuss the implications of these beliefs for provider-patient communication, and suggest that providers frame their communications with patients such that they are attentive to the issues identified by our respondents, to better engage patients as partners in the treatment process.

  8. China’s new cooperative medical scheme and equity in access to health care: evidence from a longitudinal household survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction China's New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) was brought to life in 2003 in response to the deterioration in access to health services in rural areas. Despite its fast expansion, the scheme’s impacts on access to health care have raised growing concerns, in particular regarding whether and to what extent the scheme has reduced inequity in access to health care in rural China. Methods This study examines income-related inequity in access to health care from 2004 (before the national rollout of NCMS) to 2009 (after the expansion of NCMS across the rural China) by estimating Concentration Indices over both formal health care (outpatient care, prevention care) and informal health care use (folk doctor care). Data were drawn from a longitudinal household survey dataset - China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS). Results The study suggested that the level of inequity remained the same for outpatient care, and an increased favouring-poor gap in terms of folk doctor care was observed. In terms of preventive care, a favouring-rich inequity was observed both in 2004 and 2009, but the effects of inequity were narrowed. The NCMS had some effects in reducing income-related health inequity in folk doctor care and preventive care, but the contribution was rather small. The study also found that the rural better-off had started to seek for commercial insurance to cover possible financial risks from the burden of diseases. Conclusion The study concludes that the impacts of the NCMS on improving access to formal care for the poor are limited. Without a more comprehensive insurance package that effectively targets the rural poor, the intended equity goals expected from the scheme will be difficult to realize. PMID:23522336

  9. A framework for improving access and customer service times in health care: application and analysis at the UCLA Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Duda, Catherine; Rajaram, Kumar; Barz, Christiane; Rosenthal, J Thomas

    2013-01-01

    There has been an increasing emphasis on health care efficiency and costs and on improving quality in health care settings such as hospitals or clinics. However, there has not been sufficient work on methods of improving access and customer service times in health care settings. The study develops a framework for improving access and customer service time for health care settings. In the framework, the operational concept of the bottleneck is synthesized with queuing theory to improve access and reduce customer service times without reduction in clinical quality. The framework is applied at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center to determine the drivers for access and customer service times and then provides guidelines on how to improve these drivers. Validation using simulation techniques shows significant potential for reducing customer service times and increasing access at this institution. Finally, the study provides several practice implications that could be used to improve access and customer service times without reduction in clinical quality across a range of health care settings from large hospitals to small community clinics.

  10. Remote access to medical specialists: home care interactive patient management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter J.; Draghic, Nicole; Wiesmann, William P.

    1999-07-01

    Diabetes management involves constant care and rigorous compliance. Glucose control is often difficult to maintain and onset of complications further compound health care needs. Status can be further hampered by geographic isolation from immediate medical infrastructures. The Home Care Interactive Patient Management System is an experimental telemedicine program that could improve chronic illness management through Internet-based applications. The goal of the system is to provide a customized, integrated approach to diabetes management to supplement and coordinate physician protocol while supporting routine patient activity, by supplying a set of customized automated services including health data collection, transmission, analysis and decision support.

  11. Perceptions of emergency care in Kenyan communities lacking access to formalised emergency medical systems: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Broccoli, Morgan C; Calvello, Emilie J B; Skog, Alexander P; Wachira, Benjamin; Wallis, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We undertook this study in Kenya to understand the community's emergency care needs and barriers they face when trying to access care, and to seek community members’ thoughts regarding high impact solutions to expand access to essential emergency services. Design We used a qualitative research methodology to conduct 59 focus groups with 528 total Kenyan community member participants. Data were coded, aggregated and analysed using the content analysis approach. Setting Participants were uniformly selected from all eight of the historical Kenyan provinces (Central, Coast, Eastern, Nairobi, North Eastern, Nyanza, Rift Valley and Western), with equal rural and urban community representation. Results Socioeconomic and cultural factors play a major role both in seeking and reaching emergency care. Community members in Kenya experience a wide range of medical emergencies, and seem to understand their time-critical nature. They rely on one another for assistance in the face of substantial barriers to care—a lack of: system structure, resources, transportation, trained healthcare providers and initial care at the scene. Conclusions Access to emergency care in Kenya can be improved by encouraging recognition and initial treatment of emergent illness in the community, strengthening the pre-hospital care system, improving emergency care delivery at health facilities and creating new policies at a national level. These community-generated solutions likely have a wider applicability in the region. PMID:26586324

  12. Insurance Coverage, Access to Care, and Medical Debt Since the ACA: a Look at California, Florida, New York, and Texas.

    PubMed

    Gunja, Munira Z; Collins, Sara R; Doty, Michelle McEvoy; Beutel, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    ISSUE: The Affordable Care Act has significantly increased health insurance coverage and access to care among U.S. adults nationwide. However, the law gives states flexibility in implementing certain provisions, leading to wide variations between states in consumers’ experiences. GOAL: To examine the differences in insurance coverage, access to care, and medical bill problems in the four largest states—California, Florida, New York, and Texas—all of which have made different choices in implementing the law. METHODS: Analysis of the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2016. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: In 2016, uninsured rates among adults ages 19 to 64 across the four states varied from 7 percent in New York and 10 percent in California to 16 percent in Florida and 25 percent in Texas. This variation was also apparent in the proportions of residents reporting problems getting needed care because of the cost—significantly lower in California and New York than in Florida and Texas. Lower percentages of Californians and New Yorkers reported having a medical bill problem in the past 12 months or having accrued medical debt compared to Floridians and Texans. These variations might be explained by several factors: whether the state expanded Medicaid eligibility; whether it ran its own health insurance marketplace; what the uninsured rate was prior to the Affordable Care Act; differences in the cost protections provided by private health plans; and demographic differences.

  13. Medical professionals convicted of accessing child pornography--presumptive lifetime prohibition on paediatric practice? Health Care Complaints Commission v Wingate.

    PubMed

    Shats, Kathy; Faunce, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    Health Care Complaints Commission v Wingate [2007] NSWCA 326 concerns an appeal from the New South Wales Medical Tribunal regarding its findings on professional misconduct outside the practice of medicine in relation to a doctor convicted of possessing child pornography. The latest in a number of cases on this issue in Australia, it highlights the complexity of such decisions before medical tribunals and boards, as well as the diversity of approaches taken. Considering both this case and the recent Medical Practitioners Board of Victoria case of Re Stephanopoulos [2006] MPBV 12, this column argues that Australian tribunals and medical boards may not yet have achieved the right balance here in terms of protecting public safety and the reputation of the profession as a whole. It makes the case for a position statement from Australian professional bodies to create a presumption of a lifetime prohibition on paediatric practice after a medical professional has been convicted of accessing child pornography.

  14. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers.

    PubMed

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-09-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted. First, interviews were performed with nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 9) and rheumatologists (n = 13). Subsequently, collected responses were quantified, using a questionnaire among the interviewees. The following advantages of patient home access to the EMR were reported: (1) enhancement of patient participation in treatment, (2) increased knowledge and self-management, (3) improved patient-provider interaction, (4) increased patient safety, and (5) better communication with others. Foreseen disadvantages of the service included: (1) problems with interpretation of data, (2) extra workload, (3) a change in consultation content, and (4) disturbing the patient-provider interaction. Also, the following preconditions emerged from the data: (1) optimal security, (2) no extra record, but a patient-accessible section, (3) no access to clinical notes, and (4) a lag time on the release of lab data. Most respondents reported that data on diagnosis, medication, treatment plan and consultations could be released to patients. On releasing more complex data, such as bodily examinations, lab results and radiological images the opinions differed considerably. Providing patients home access to their medical record might be a valuable next step into patient empowerment and in service towards the patient, provided that security is optimal and content and presentation of data are carefully considered.

  15. Continuing medical education as a national strategy to improve access to primary care in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of an educational program in family medicine for general practitioners in Saudi Arabia from 2009 to 2011. A continuing medical education program called Family Medicine Education (FAME) was developed with 7 modules each consisting of 12-14 hours of teaching to be delivered in 3 day blocks, over 45 days. Twenty percent (2,761) of all general practitioners participated in the FAME program. Initial assessment of the program showed significant improvement of knowledge from scores of 49% on a pre-test to 89% on post-tests. FAME program in Saudi Arabia facilitated primary care physicians’ knowledge. PMID:24250833

  16. Dependents’ Medical Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1962-04-25

    Mental Disorders ------------- 3 (7) Dental Care as a Necessary Adjunct to Medical or Surgical Treatment -------- 4 8’ Adjuncts to Medical Care...acute Medical Conditions ------------------ 27 e. Domiciliary Care ------------------------------ 28 f. Treatment -Procedures/Outpatient Care... treatment of complications of pregnancy. (4) Diciliary Care. Care which is normally given in a nursing home, convalescent home, or similar institution

  17. Emergency medical dispatching: rapid identification and treatment of acute myocardial infarction. National Heart Attack Alert Program Coordinating Committee Access to Care Subcommittee.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Emergency medical telephone calls (ie, those made to 9-1-1 or 7-digit emergency numbers) are directed to emergency medical dispatchers (EMDs) who are responsible for quickly obtaining critical pieces of information from the caller, then activating an appropriate level of emergency medical services (EMS) response and providing the caller with patient care instructions until medical help arrives. The impact of well-trained, medically managed EMDs on the early care of potential acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients is believed to be beneficial. However, standards for emergency medical dispatching vary widely across the nation. To improve emergency medical dispatching for AMI patients in the United States, this article by the Access to Care Subcommittee on behalf of the National Heart Attack Alert Program makes a number of recommendations regarding the use of medical dispatch protocols, provision of dispatch life support, EMD training, EMD certification, and emergency medical dispatch quality control and improvement processes.

  18. Economic and public health consequences of delayed access to medical care for migrants living with HIV in France.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Marlène; Celse, Michel; Geoffard, Pierre-Yves

    2017-03-25

    In 2013, migrants accounted for 46% of newly diagnosed cases of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection in France. These populations meet with specific obstacles leading to late diagnosis and access to medical care. Delayed access to care (ATC) for HIV-infected migrants reduces their life expectancy and quality of life. Given the reduction of infectivity under antiretroviral (ARV) treatment, delayed ATC for HIV-infected migrants may also hinder the control of the HIV epidemic. The objective of this study is to measure the public health and economic consequences of delayed ATC for migrants living with HIV in France. Using a healthcare payer perspective, our model compares the lifetime averted infections and costs of early vs. late ATC for migrants living with HIV in France. Early and late ATC are defined by an entry into care with a CD4 cell count of 350 and 100/mm(3), respectively. Our results show that an early ATC is dominant, even in the worst-case scenario. In the most favorable scenario, early ATC generates an average net saving of €198,000 per patient, and prevents 0.542 secondary infection. In the worst-case scenario, early ATC generates an average net saving of €32,000 per patient, and prevents 0.299 secondary infection. These results are robust to various adverse changes in key parameters and to a definition of late ATC as an access to care at a CD4 level of 200/mm(3). In addition to individual health benefits, improving ATC for migrants living with HIV proves efficient in terms of public health and economics. These results stress the benefit of ensuring early ATC for all individuals living with HIV in France.

  19. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care During ... médica durante el embarazo The Importance of Prenatal Care Millions of American women give birth every year, ...

  20. Telemedicine for Access to Quality Care on Medical Practice and Continuing Medical Education in a Global Arena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafiq, Azhar; Merrell, Ronald C.

    2005-01-01

    Health care practices continue to evolve with technological advances integrating computer applications and patient information management into telemedicine systems. Telemedicine can be broadly defined as the use of information technology to provide patient care and share clinical information from one geographic location to another. Telemedicine…

  1. The Affordable Care Act and the Burden of High Cost Sharing and Utilization Management Restrictions on Access to HIV Medications for People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Hank, Yasamean

    2016-08-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a critical public health issue in the United States, where an estimated 1.2 million individuals live with HIV infection. Viral suppression is one of the primary public health goals for People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). A crucial component of this goal involves adequate access to health care, specifically anti-retroviral HIV medications. The enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010 raised hopes for millions of PLWHA without access to health care coverage. High cost-sharing requirements enacted by health plans place a financial burden on PLWHA who need ongoing access to these life-saving medications. Plighted with poverty, Detroit, Michigan, is a center of attention for examining the financial burden of HIV medications on PLWHA under the new health plans. From November 2014 to January 2015, monthly out-of-pocket costs and medication utilization requirements for 31 HIV medications were examined for the top 12 insurance carriers offering Qualified Health Plans on Michigan's Health Insurance Marketplace Exchange. The percentage of medications requiring quantity limits and prior authorization were calculated. The average monthly out-of-pocket cost per person ranged from $12 to $667 per medication. Three insurance carriers placed all 31 HIV medications on the highest cost-sharing tier, charging 50% coinsurance. High out-of-pocket costs and medication utilization restrictions discourage PLWHA from enrolling in health plans and threaten interrupted medication adherence, drug resistance, and increased risk of viral transmission. Health plans inflicting high costs and medication restrictions violate provisions of the ACA and undermine health care quality for PLWHA. (Population Health Management 2016;19:272-278).

  2. Geographic disparities in access to cancer care: do patients in outlying areas talk about their access problems to their general practitioners and medical oncologists and how does that impact on the choice of chemotherapy?

    PubMed

    Groux, P; Szucs, T

    2013-11-01

    Geographic disparities in access to cancer care have been reported for several countries. The distance between the place of residence and the cancer care centre can be one cause of these disparities. Solutions to surmount the barriers can be found if patients talk about this to their care professionals. We investigated whether patients in Valais talk with their physicians about difficulties to access cancer care. We interviewed five general practitioners and five medical oncologists in Valais with semi-structured interviews to identify difficulties patients are talking about. Medical oncologists were also interviewed on their habits to adapt chemotherapy to access problems of their patients. Cancer patients in Valais do talk about their access problems. Medical oncologists in Valais do take access problems into account when discussing therapeutic options with the patients and use the scope they have within their therapeutic options. In Valais the family of cancer patients play an important role in access to cancer care. Special offers are in place when social support is insufficient. Whether some socio-economic minorities do not use the solutions in place cannot be answered and should be investigated in further studies.

  3. Frequency and Risk of Marijuana Use among Substance-Using Health Care Patients in Colorado with and without Access to State Legalized Medical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Melissa K; Pampel, Fred C; Rivera, Laura S; Broderick, Kerryann B; Reimann, Brie; Fischer, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    With increasing use of state legalized medical marijuana across the country, health care providers need accurate information on patterns of marijuana and other substance use for patients with access to medical marijuana. This study compared frequency and severity of marijuana use, and use of other substances, for patients with and without state legal access to medical marijuana. Data were collected from 2,030 patients who screened positive for marijuana use when seeking health care services in a large, urban safety-net medical center. Patients were screened as part of a federally funded screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) initiative. Patients were asked at screening whether they had a state-issued medical marijuana card and about risky use of tobacco, alcohol, and other illicit substances. A total of 17.4% of marijuana users had a medical marijuana card. Patients with cards had higher frequency of marijuana use and were more likely to screen at moderate than low or high risk from marijuana use. Patients with cards also had lower use of other substances than patients without cards. Findings can inform health care providers of both the specific risks of frequent, long-term use and the more limited risks of other substance use faced by legal medical marijuana users.

  4. Medical records and access thereto.

    PubMed

    McQuoid-Mason, D

    1996-01-01

    Medical records are essential tools in the practice of medicine. They are important in the planning and monitoring of patient care and for the protection of the legal interests of patients, hospitals and doctors. There is a legal duty on doctors to maintain confidentiality and failure to do so may result in an action for invasion of privacy, defamation or even breach of contract. There are, however, exceptions to this rule. There are procedural remedies available to obtain access to medical records where they are relevant to civil or criminal proceedings. There are also constitutional provisions under the Interim and Working Draft Constitutions which may allow such access. The former only applies to records held by the state while the latter applies to both state and privately held records. Ownership of medical records usually vests in the doctor or institution treating the patient, but such ownership is custodial rather than absolute. Patient records should be accurate, objective and contemporaneous. The international trend is to allow patients to inspect their records and to allow them to make copies thereof. It is submitted that given the provisions of the Interim and Working Draft Constitutions the same should apply in South Africa.

  5. Potential Impact of Increased Numbers of Physicians upon Physician Behavior, Access to, and Cost of, Medical Care. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrave, Gerald L.

    A study that forecast the consequences of the projected growth in the number of practicing U.S. physicians during the 1980s and beyond is summarized. Attention was directed to the potential impact of the increasing supply of physicians on physician behavior, the cost of medical services, and access to services. Econometric modeling and analysis of…

  6. Potential Impact of Increased Numbers of Physicians upon Physician Behavior, Access to, and Cost of, Medical Care. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrave, Gerald L.

    The potential impact of the increasing supply of physicians on physician behavior, the cost of medical services, and access to services is addressed in detail in this final research report. Econometric modeling and analyses of economic activity within the health sector were undertaken. An eight equation model of the hospital and physician sectors…

  7. [Patients' access to their medical records].

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Liliana; Neves, Ana Luisa; Villanueva, Tiago; Cruz, Jorge; Brito de Sá, Armando; Sakellarides, Constantitno

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, the medical record was seen exclusively as being the property of health institutions and doctors. Its great technical and scientific components, as well as the personal characteristics attributed by each doctor, have been the reasons appointed for that control. However, nowadays throughout the world that paradigm has been changing. In Portugal, since 2007 patients are allowed full and direct access to their medical records. Nevertheless, the Deontological Code of the Portuguese Medical Association (2009) explicitly states that patients' access to their medical records should have a doctor as intermediary and that the records are each physician's intellectual property. Furthermore, several doctors and health institutions, receiving requests from patients to access their medical records, end up requesting the legal opinion of the Commission for access to administrative documents. Each and every time, that opinion goes in line with the notion of full and direct patient access. Sharing medical records with patients seems crucial and inevitable in the current patient-centred care model, having the potential to improve patient empowerment, health literacy, autonomy, self-efficacy and satisfaction with care. With the recent technological developments and the fast dissemination of Personal Health Records, it is foreseeable that a growing number of patients will want to access their medical records. Therefore, promoting awareness on this topic is essential, in order to allow an informed debate between all the stakeholders.

  8. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis ...

  9. Ensuring safe access to medication for palliative care while preventing prescription drug abuse: innovations for American inner cities, rural areas, and communities overwhelmed by addiction.

    PubMed

    Francoeur, Richard B

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes and develops novel components of community-oriented programs for creating and affording access to safe medication dispensing centers in existing retail pharmacies and in permanent or travelling pharmacy clinics that are guarded by assigned or off-duty police officers. Pharmacists at these centers would work with police, medical providers, social workers, hospital administrators, and other professionals in: planning and overseeing the safe storage of controlled substance medications in off-site community safe-deposit boxes; strengthening communication and cooperation with the prescribing medical provider; assisting the prescribing medical provider in patient monitoring (checking the state prescription registry, providing pill counts and urine samples); expanding access to lower-cost, and in some cases, abuse-resistant formulations of controlled substance medications; improving transportation access for underserved patients and caregivers to obtain prescriptions; and integrating community agencies and social networks as resources for patient support and monitoring. Novel components of two related community-oriented programs, which may be hosted outside of safe medication dispensing centers, are also suggested and described: (1) developing medication purchasing cooperatives (ie, to help patients, families, and health institutions afford the costs of medications, including tamper-or abuse-resistant/deterrent drug formulations); and (2) expanding the role of inner-city methadone maintenance treatment programs in palliative care (ie, to provide additional patient monitoring from a second treatment team focusing on narcotics addiction, and potentially, to serve as an untapped source of opioid medication for pain that is less subject to abuse, misuse, or diversion).

  10. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  11. Access to Medical Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy

    Although confidentiality with regard to medical records is supposedly protected by the American Medical Associaton's principles of Ethics and the physician-patient privilege, there are a number of laws that require a physician to release patient information to public authorities without the patient's consent. These exceptions include birth and…

  12. "You're in a world of chaos": experiences accessing HIV care and adhering to medications after incarceration.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Alexis C; Barrington, Clare; Hino, Sayaka; Gould, Michele; Wohl, David; Golin, Carol E

    2015-01-01

    Most HIV-infected inmates leave prison with a suppressed viral load; many, however, become disconnected from care and nonadherent to medications during reentry to community life. In this secondary data analysis of focus groups (n = 6) and in-depth interviews (n = 9) with 46 formerly incarcerated HIV-infected people during reentry, we used an inductive analytic approach to explore the interplay between individual, interpersonal, community, and structural factors and HIV management. Participants described barriers and facilitators to care engagement and adherence at each of these four levels, as well as a milieu of HIV and incarceration-related stigma and discrimination. The constellation of barriers and facilitators created competing demands and a sense of chaos in participants' lives, which led them to address reentry-related basic needs (e.g., housing, food) before health care needs. Interventions that simultaneously address multiple levels, including augmenting employment and housing opportunities, enhancing social support, and reducing stigma, are needed.

  13. RF-Medisys: a radio frequency identification-based electronic medical record system for improving medical information accessibility and services at point of care.

    PubMed

    Ting, Jacky S L; Tsang, Albert H C; Ip, Andrew W H; Ho, George T S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative electronic medical records (EMR) system, RF-MediSys, which can perform medical information sharing and retrieval effectively and which is accessible via a 'smart' medical card. With such a system, medical diagnoses and treatment decisions can be significantly improved when compared with the conventional practice of using paper medical records systems. Furthermore, the entire healthcare delivery process, from registration to the dispensing or administration of medicines, can be visualised holistically to facilitate performance review. To examine the feasibility of implementing RF-MediSys and to determine its usefulness to users of the system, a survey was conducted within a multi-disciplinary medical service organisation that operates a network of medical clinics and paramedical service centres throughout Hong Kong Island, the Kowloon Peninsula and the New Territories. Questionnaires were distributed to 300 system users, including nurses, physicians and patients, to collect feedback on the operation and performance of RF-MediSys in comparison with conventional paper-based medical record systems. The response rate to the survey was 67%. Results showed a medium to high level of user satisfaction with the radiofrequency identification (RFID)-based EMR system. In particular, respondents provided high ratings on both 'user-friendliness' and 'system performance'. Findings of the survey highlight the potential of RF-MediSys as a tool to enhance quality of medical services and patient safety.

  14. Access to Care, Treatment Ambivalence, Medication Nonadherence, and Long-Term Mortality Among Severely Hypertensive African Americans: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Young, J Hunter; Ng, Derek; Ibe, Chidinma; Weeks, Kristina; Brotman, Daniel J; Dy, Sydney Morss; Brancati, Frederick L; Levine, David M; Klag, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    African Americans living in poor neighborhoods bear a high burden of illness and early mortality. Nonadherence may contribute to this burden. In a prospective cohort study of urban African Americans with poorly controlled hypertension, mortality was 47.6% over a median follow-up of 6.1 years. Patients with pill-taking nonadherence were more likely to die (hazard ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.76) after adjustment for potential confounders. With regard to factors related to nonadherence, poor access to care such as difficulty paying for medications was associated with prescription refill nonadherence (odds ratio [OR], 4.12; 95% CI, 1.88-9.03). Pill-taking nonadherence was not associated with poor access to care; however, it was associated with factors related to treatment ambivalence including lower hypertension knowledge (OR, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.39-6.32), side effects (OR, 3.44; 95% CI, 1.47-8.03), forgetfulness (OR, 3.62; 95% CI, 1.78-7.34), and feeling that the medications do not help (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.09-7.09). These data suggest that greater access to care is a necessary but insufficient remedy to the disparities experienced by urban African Americans with hypertension. To achieve its full promise, health reform must also address treatment ambivalence.

  15. Patient access to medical records.

    PubMed

    Mair, J L

    1996-01-01

    The issue of, and access to, medical records has been a contentious matter for some years in Australia. The recent High Court decision of Breen v Williams has clarified the law nationwide. The High Court confirmed that the ownership of medical records is vested in the creator of the records. The High Court further held that a patient has no right at law to access his or her medical records in the absence of any statute granting such a right, or other legal process.

  16. 28 CFR 115.182 - Access to emergency medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Access to emergency medical services. 115... to emergency medical treatment. (b) Treatment services shall be provided to the victim without... ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Medical and Mental Care § 115.182 Access to...

  17. 28 CFR 115.182 - Access to emergency medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Access to emergency medical services. 115... to emergency medical treatment. (b) Treatment services shall be provided to the victim without... ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Medical and Mental Care § 115.182 Access to...

  18. 28 CFR 115.182 - Access to emergency medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Access to emergency medical services. 115... to emergency medical treatment. (b) Treatment services shall be provided to the victim without... ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Medical and Mental Care § 115.182 Access to...

  19. Restructuring Military Medical Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-01

    indicates that Tricare stops short of making most of the changes needed to remedy the inefficiencies that have plagued DoD’s management and delivery of health...In short , those findings show that peacetime medical care provides some training for wartime, but most of the care provided during peacetime is not...officers the opportunity to take several other short courses throughout their careers to prepare them for their wartime roles. One such course offered by

  20. Access to Health Care: Does Neighborhood Residential Instability Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, James B.; Kaneda, Toshiko

    2006-01-01

    Many Americans do not have access to adequate medical care. Previous research on this problem focuses primarily on individual-level determinants of access such as income and insurance coverage. The role of community-level factors in helping or hindering individuals in obtaining needed medical care, however, has not received much attention. We…

  1. Echelons of medical care.

    PubMed

    HACON, W S

    1962-12-01

    The mortality rate of wounded soldiers who survived long enough to leave the Crimean battlefields was nearly 20%. A similar rate can be expected in Canada among casualties evacuated from target cities if no preparations are made.From their considerable experience over the last 100 years the military medical services have developed effective techniques for caring for large numbers of casualties under adverse conditions, thereby reducing the mortality rate to 3.6%. The Emergency Health Services in Canada are employing these same techniques.The basic planning technique is the establishment of echelons or levels of medical care. It evolved from the fact that casualties usually occur at places remote from hospitals and have to be given sustaining care and shelter at staging points on the evacuation route. The opportunity was taken to institute a system of progressive care at these points, and four echelons of care became recognized. The productivity of available treatment personnel was increased by dividing the labour and by standardizing the treatment. Minor casualties should be diverted elsewhere so that serious casualties may receive better attention. The problem of the proper transportation of casualties is still unsolved in Canada.

  2. Health care access disparities among children entering kindergarten in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Fulkerson, Nadia Deashinta; Haff, Darlene R; Chino, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to advance our understanding and appreciation of the health status of young children in the state of Nevada in addition to their discrepancies in accessing health care. This study used the 2008-2009 Nevada Kindergarten Health Survey data of 11,073 children to assess both independent and combined effects of annual household income, race/ethnicity, primary language spoken in the family, rural/urban residence, and existing medical condition on access to health care. Annual household income was a significant predictor of access to health care, with middle and high income respondents having regular access to care compared to low income counterparts. Further, English proficiency was associated with access to health care, with English-speaking Hispanics over 2.5 times more likely to have regular access to care than Spanish-speaking Hispanics. Rural residents had decreased odds of access to preventive care and having a primary care provider, but unexpectedly, had increased odds of having access to dental care compared to urban residents. Finally, parents of children with no medical conditions were more likely to have access to care than those with a medical condition. The consequences for not addressing health care access issues include deteriorating health and well-being for vulnerable socio-demographic groups in the state. Altogether these findings suggest that programs and policies within the state must be sensitive to the specific needs of at risk groups, including minorities, those with low income, and regionally and linguistically isolated residents.

  3. Medical marijuana: Irresponsible medical care?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nayvin

    2017-03-01

    Illness should continue to be treated by health professionals employing scientific evidence. This is responsible policy. It is not appropriate or medically justified for family physicians to refer patients to medical marijuana clinics; instead, they should inform their patients that medical treatment must be based on scientific evidence.

  4. Can the Medical-nursing Combined Care Promote the Accessibility of Health Services for the Elderly in Nursing Home? A Study Protocol of Analysis of the Effectiveness Regarding Health Service Utilization, Health Status and Satisfaction with Care

    PubMed Central

    Bao, J; Wang, X-J; Yang, Y; Dong, R-Q; Mao, Z-F

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Currently, segmentation of healthcare and daily care for the elderly living in nursing homes usually results in the elderly not getting medical treatment timely and effectively. The medical-nursing combined care, which has been put into practice in several areas in China, is developed to enhance the accessibility of healthcare for the elderly. The aim of the study is to explore the effectiveness of the new care service, based on Andersen model, regarding health service utilization, health status and service satisfaction. Methods: The effectiveness of medical-nursing combined care will be measured in a cross-sectional study in nine nursing homes in Jianghan District, Wuhan, China, with 1067 old residents expected to participate. The questionnaire containing items of demographics, health service use, service satisfaction and instrument of SF-36 V2 is developed based on the conceptual framework of Andersen behaviour model of health service utilization. Descriptive analysis, variance analysis, multiple factors analysis, and correlation analysis will be performed to compare the sociological characteristics, health service use, health status and service satisfaction of the elderly living in different modes of nursing homes, to explore the influence factors of care effectiveness, as well as to study the relationship between health behaviour and health outcomes. Conclusion: The study design of analysing the effects of medical-nursing combined care and performing the horizontal comparison among the nursing homes under the framework of Andersen model is blazing new trails. Recruitment and design of questionnaire are important issues. Successful data collection and quality control are also necessary. Taking these into account, this study is estimated to provide evidence for the effectiveness of medical-nursing combined care service in China. PMID:27398940

  5. Adolf Hitler's medical care.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D

    2005-02-01

    For the last nine years of his life Adolf Hitler, a lifelong hypochondriac had as his physician Dr Theodor Morell. Hitler's mood swings, Parkinson's disease, gastro-intestinal symptoms, skin problems and steady decline until his suicide in 1945 are documented by reliable observers and historians, and in Morell's diaries. The bizarre and unorthodox medications given to Hitler, often for undisclosed reasons, include topical cocaine, injected amphetamines, glucose, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosteroids. In addition, he was given a preparation made from a gun cleaner, a compound of strychnine and atropine, an extract of seminal vesicles, and numerous vitamins and 'tonics'. It seems possible that some of Hitler's behaviour, illnesses and suffering can be attributed to his medical care. Whether he blindly accepted such unorthodox medications or demanded them is unclear.

  6. 77 FR 6915 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ...The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) is proposing accessibility standards for medical diagnostic equipment. The proposed standards contain minimum technical criteria to ensure that medical diagnostic equipment, including examination tables, examination chairs, weight scales, mammography equipment, and other imaging equipment used by health care......

  7. [Medical journals and open access].

    PubMed

    Sember, Marijan

    2008-01-01

    The open access (OA) or the idea of a free access to scholarly literature published in electronic form has been already well established in the field of medicine. Medline has already been free for a decade, PubMed Central has been growing steadily. The global crisis of the scientific publishing, becoming increasingly dominated by multinational companies and constant increase of journal prices have moved to action not only individuals and institutions but governments and research charities too. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the main open access initiatives and resources in biomedicine (PubMed, PubMed Central, BioMed Central, PLoS). The OA pros and cons are briefly discussed emphasizing the benefits of OA to medical research and practice.

  8. [Access to health care for undocumented immigrants. Rights and practice].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anne Rytter; Krasnik, Allan; Høg, Erling

    2006-09-04

    The purpose of this article is to illuminate undocumented immigrants' right to access to health care and their access in practice. Undocumented immigrants have a right to equal access to health care. Access to more than emergency health care in Denmark is dependent on immigration status. Medical doctors' duty to treat does not apply to non-emergency health needs, and the options existing in this situation remain ambiguous. In practice, undocumented immigrants in Denmark are able to receive more than emergency health care through unofficial networks of health care providers.

  9. 32 CFR 564.37 - Medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Medical care. 564.37 Section 564.37 National... REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.37 Medical care. (a) General. The definitions of medical care... medical care is obtained are enumerated in AR 40-3. (b) Elective care. Elective care in civilian...

  10. 32 CFR 564.37 - Medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Medical care. 564.37 Section 564.37 National... REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.37 Medical care. (a) General. The definitions of medical care... medical care is obtained are enumerated in AR 40-3. (b) Elective care. Elective care in civilian...

  11. Trends in racial/ethnic disparities in medical and oral health, access to care, and use of services in US children: has anything changed over the years?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The 2010 Census revealed the population of Latino and Asian children grew by 5.5 million, while the population of white children declined by 4.3 million from 2000-2010, and minority children will outnumber white children by 2020. No prior analyses, however, have examined time trends in racial/ethnic disparities in children’s health and healthcare. The study objectives were to identify racial/ethnic disparities in medical and oral health, access to care, and use of services in US children, and determine whether these disparities have changed over time. Methods The 2003 and 2007 National Surveys of Children’s Health were nationally representative telephone surveys of parents of 193,995 children 0-17 years old (N = 102,353 in 2003 and N = 91,642 in 2007). Thirty-four disparities indicators were examined for white, African-American, Latino, Asian/Pacific-Islander, American Indian/Alaskan Native, and multiracial children. Multivariable analyses were performed to adjust for nine relevant covariates, and Z-scores to examine time trends. Results Eighteen disparities occurred in 2007 for ≥1 minority group. The number of indicators for which at least one racial/ethnic group experienced disparities did not significantly change between 2003-2007, nor did the total number of specific disparities (46 in 2007). The disparities for one subcategory (use of services), however, did decrease (by 82%). Although 15 disparities decreased over time, two worsened, and 10 new disparities arose. Conclusions Minority children continue to experience multiple disparities in medical and oral health and healthcare. Most disparities persisted over time. Although disparities in use of services decreased, 10 new disparities arose in 2007. Study findings suggest that urgent policy solutions are needed to eliminate these disparities, including collecting racial/ethnic and language data on all patients, monitoring and publicly disclosing disparities data annually, providing

  12. Secondary Surge Capacity: A Framework for Understanding Long-Term Access to Primary Care for Medically Vulnerable Populations in Disaster Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Brock-Martin, Amy; Karmaus, Wilfried; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2012-01-01

    Disasters create a secondary surge in casualties because of the sudden increased need for long-term health care. Surging demands for medical care after a disaster place excess strain on an overtaxed health care system operating at maximum or reduced capacity. We have applied a health services use model to identify areas of vulnerability that perpetuate health disparities for at-risk populations seeking care after a disaster. We have proposed a framework to understand the role of the medical system in modifying the health impact of the secondary surge on vulnerable populations. Baseline assessment of existing needs and the anticipation of ballooning chronic health care needs following the acute response for at-risk populations are overlooked vulnerability gaps in national surge capacity plans. PMID:23078479

  13. The functions of medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, A W

    1975-01-01

    Medical care has several important functions other than restoring or maintaining health. These other functions are assessment and certification of health status, prognostication, segregation of the ill to limit communication of illness, and helping to cope with the problems of illness--the caring function. Medical care serving these "paracurative" functions may legitimately be given indepedently, without associated curing or preventive intent of the provider of care. Although such services do not result in benefits to health, such as extension of life or reduction of disability, they do have other valued outcomes, outcomes not measurable as a gain in personal health status. For example, caring activities may result in satisfaction, comfort, or desirable affective states, even while the patient's health status deteriorates during an incurable illness. The physician's approach to patients, the economist's analysis of the benefits of health services, the planner's decisions about health programs, the evaluator's judgments about the quality of care, or the patient's expectations about treatment are strongly influenced by his assumptions about the purpose of medical care or the proper outcome of the process. When the health worker assumes that the only useful outcome is health, he may consider the paracurative services to be ineffective, inefficient, or undesirable. In contrast, when he recognizes and understands the paracurative functions of medical care, he may better perform his function in the medical care system. PMID:803689

  14. Are Patents Impeding Medical Care and Innovation?

    PubMed Central

    Gold, E. Richard; Kaplan, Warren; Orbinski, James; Harland-Logan, Sarah; N-Marandi, Sevil

    2010-01-01

    Background to the debate: Pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers argue that the current patent system is crucial for stimulating research and development (R&D), leading to new products that improve medical care. The financial return on their investments that is afforded by patent protection, they claim, is an incentive toward innovation and reinvestment into further R&D. But this view has been challenged in recent years. Many commentators argue that patents are stifling biomedical research, for example by preventing researchers from accessing patented materials or methods they need for their studies. Patents have also been blamed for impeding medical care by raising prices of essential medicines, such as antiretroviral drugs, in poor countries. This debate examines whether and how patents are impeding health care and innovation. PMID:20052274

  15. Resources for inflight medical care.

    PubMed

    Rayman, Russell B; Zanick, David; Korsgard, Trina

    2004-03-01

    With the anticipated growth of air travel, inflight illness and injury are expected to increase as well. This is because more elderly people and people with preexisting disease are taking to the air. Although inflight medical events and deaths are uncommon, physician passengers are occasionally called upon to render care. Resources for the physician may include emergency medical kits, automatic external defibrillators (AEDs), ECG monitors, portable oxygen bottles, and first-aid kits. Most airlines provide around-the-clock air-to-ground radio consultation either with their own medical department personnel or contracted medical consultants. Furthermore, some flight attendants are trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, first-aid, and operation of AEDs. This paper describes those inflight resources available to a physician who is called upon to treat an ill or injured passenger. In a broader sense, it is also providing advice to physicians who administer inflight medical care. The Aviation Medical Assistance Act of 1998 ("Good Samaritan act") is also discussed.

  16. University Medical Care Programs: Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densen, Paul M.; And Others

    The increasing number of medical centers involved in collaborative and innovative health services in the community is but one reflection of social concerns and pressures for change in the health care system. Medical schools and their affiliated teaching hospitals are trying in various ways to adapt their teaching, research, and service functions…

  17. [THE ACCESSIBILITY OF ORGANIZATION OF PRIMARY MEDICAL SANITARY CARE DURING THE PERIOD OF REFORMING OF AMBULATORY POLYCLINIC INSTITUTIONS OF METROPOLITAN REGION].

    PubMed

    Gridnev, O V; Zagoruichenko, A A

    2015-01-01

    The article presents materials of sociological evaluation of organization of primary medical sanitary care within the framework of implementation of three-level system. The technique of non-formalized sociological interview was applied. The positive and negative aspects are presented exemplified by ambulatory centers and their subdivisions providing health services to adult population of the North East administrative okrug of Moscow.

  18. Debt and Foregone Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalousova, Lucie; Burgard, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Most American households carry debt, yet we have little understanding of how debt influences health behavior, especially health care seeking. We examined associations between foregone medical care and debt using a population-based sample of 914 southeastern Michigan residents surveyed in the wake of the late-2000s recession. Overall debt and…

  19. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... en español Atención médica durante el embarazo The Importance of Prenatal Care Millions of American women give ... screening tests are done. This is called an integrated screening test. It's important to keep in mind ...

  20. Open access in the critical care environment.

    PubMed

    South, Tabitha; Adair, Brigette

    2014-12-01

    Open access has become an important topic in critical care over the last 3 years. In the past, critical care had restricted access and set visitation guidelines to protect patients. This article provides a review of the literature related to open access in the critical care environment, including the impact on patients, families, and health care providers. The ultimate goal is to provide care centered on patients and families and to create a healing environment to ensure safe passage of patients through their hospital stays. This outcome could lead to increased patient/family satisfaction.

  1. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  2. The right to medical care.

    PubMed

    van der Vyver, J D

    1989-01-01

    The right to medical care, as a category of human rights, falls under the heading of Leistungsrechte; that is, rights of the individual that require of the state that it do something--in this instance to provide the services concerned. In South Africa the government's health care policy contemplated involves (a) differentiation based on race in the provision of health care services; and (b) privatization of such services. It is submitted that in developing societies, where private initiative cannot cope with the demands in respect of health care, privatization would be premature and existing inequalities in health care services provided for the different racial groups require greater government involvement, with a view to eliminating racial discrimination through programmes of affirmative action. Privatization, furthermore, requires government-sponsored incentives, such as tax concessions, that would inspire private persons to contribute financially towards health care services.

  3. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  4. Autonomous Medical Care for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Polk, J. D.; Hines, John W.; Nall, Marsha M.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of Autonomous Medical Care (AMC) is to ensure a healthy, well-performing crew which is a primary need for exploration. The end result of this effort will be the requirements and design for medical systems for the CEV, lunar operations, and Martian operations as well as a ground-based crew health optimization plan. Without such systems, we increase the risk of medical events occurring during a mission and we risk being unable to deal with contingencies of illness and injury, potentially threatening mission success. AMC has two major components: 1) pre-flight crew health optimization and 2) in-flight medical care. The goal of pre-flight crew health optimization is to reduce the risk of illness occurring during a mission by primary prevention and prophylactic measures. In-flight autonomous medical care is the capability to provide medical care during a mission with little or no real-time support from Earth. Crew medical officers or other crew members provide routine medical care as well as medical care to ill or injured crew members using resources available in their location. Ground support becomes telemedical consultation on-board systems/people collect relevant data for ground support to review. The AMC system provides capabilities to incorporate new procedures and training and advice as required. The on-board resources in an autonomous system should be as intelligent and integrated as is feasible, but autonomous does not mean that no human will be involved. The medical field is changing rapidly, and so a challenge is to determine which items to pursue now, which to leverage other efforts (e.g. military), and which to wait for commercial forces to mature. Given that what is used for the CEV or the Moon will likely be updated before going to Mars, a critical piece of the system design will be an architecture that provides for easy incorporation of new technologies into the system. Another challenge is to determine the level of care to provide for each

  5. Medical Care and Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old ... > For Parents > Medical Care and Your Newborn Print A A ...

  6. Medical conditions requiring intensive care.

    PubMed

    Porter, D; Johnston, A McD; Henning, J

    2009-06-01

    Patients who require critical care for internal medical conditions make up a small but significant proportion of those requiring evacuation to the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine in Birmingham, UK. Infectious, autoimmune, neurologic, cardiac and respiratory conditions are all represented. Conditions which preclude military service and which one would not necessarily expect to see in a military hospital are still prevalent in civilian contractors and host nation personnel. With some 250,000 British military personnel based in the UK and overseas individual presentations of rare conditions occur regularly. This article discusses the ITU management of some key conditions. Whilst trauma makes up the majority of the workload in a field Intensive Care Unit, medical admissions happen not infrequently. This article describes some of the most common medical causes for admission and treatment is considered.

  7. The linked medical data access control framework.

    PubMed

    Kamateri, Eleni; Kalampokis, Evangelos; Tambouris, Efthimios; Tarabanis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    The integration of medical data coming from multiple sources is important in clinical research. Amongst others, it enables the discovery of appropriate subjects in patient-oriented research and the identification of innovative results in epidemiological studies. At the same time, the integration of medical data faces significant ethical and legal challenges that impose access constraints. Some of these issues can be addressed by making available aggregated instead of raw record-level data. In many cases however, there is still a need for controlling access even to the resulting aggregated data, e.g., due to data provider's policies. In this paper we present the Linked Medical Data Access Control (LiMDAC) framework that capitalizes on Linked Data technologies to enable controlling access to medical data across distributed sources with diverse access constraints. The LiMDAC framework consists of three Linked Data models, namely the LiMDAC metadata model, the LiMDAC user profile model, and the LiMDAC access policy model. It also includes an architecture that exploits these models. Based on the framework, a proof-of-concept platform is developed and its performance and functionality are evaluated by employing two usage scenarios.

  8. Access to Care: Overcoming the Rural Physician Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes three state-initiated programs that address the challenge of providing access to health care for Appalachia's rural residents: a traveling pediatric diabetes clinic serving eastern Kentucky; a telemedicine program operated out of Knoxville, Tennessee; and a new medical school in Kentucky dedicated to training doctors from Appalachia for…

  9. [Access to care, access to rights, and health education: stakes of the global management fo patients].

    PubMed

    Moutel, G; Hervé, C

    2001-04-21

    Together with primary care physicians, the public health clinic of the Max Fourestier Hospital (Nanterre, France) initiated a pilot experience within the framework of its access to health care network (ADES). In addition to full access to traditional health care, patients who agree to participate in this unique network benefit from a medical and social risk screening and prevention program. This program is proposed to all patients who, by definition, have one or more medical or social risk factors. At each visit, targeted history taking and the physical exam can lead to individualized propositions for a global approach to screening and prevention, whatever the initial reason for consulting. In addition, patients who require permanent care benefit from the dose link between the medical care and social care teams. Over the last year, this experience has involved 3430 consultations in a polyvalent clinic that has provided global care including health education and screening for health risks. Our analysis of the medical and ethical issues involved points out the importance of a global approach to health care.

  10. Principles and practice of medical audit (medical care evaluation).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, M; Sharma, D K

    1992-01-01

    1. Medical audit is a philosophy in the field of medical science which has reached to an advanced stage of practice in Western World, but yet to reach and percolate into Indian medical community. 2. Of late, community is getting increasingly aware of its health rights, gradually community participation in health matters including quantum and quality of case, has started increasing. Thus community leaders have started demanding for quality of medical care and accountability of those, responsible for delivery of medical care at various levels. 3. Medical audit or Evaluation of medical care is an answer to ensure the quality of care. But there are misgivings and distrust about medical audit due to its terminology. 4. There is need to education the medical, nursing and paramedical staff regarding medical audit and its sole purpose of self education and improvement of patient care activity. The present paper spells out fundamentals of medical audit, its scope and limitations.

  11. Personalized medicine and access to health care: potential for inequitable access?

    PubMed

    McClellan, Kelly A; Avard, Denise; Simard, Jacques; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2013-02-01

    Personalized medicine promises that an individual's genetic information will be increasingly used to prioritize access to health care. Use of genetic information to inform medical decision making, however, raises questions as to whether such use could be inequitable. Using breast cancer genetic risk prediction models as an example, on the surface clinical use of genetic information is consistent with the tools provided by evidence-based medicine, representing a means to equitably distribute limited health-care resources. However, at present, given limitations inherent to the tools themselves, and the mechanisms surrounding their implementation, it becomes clear that reliance on an individual's genetic information as part of medical decision making could serve as a vehicle through which disparities are perpetuated under public and private health-care delivery models. The potential for inequities arising from using genetic information to determine access to health care has been rarely discussed. Yet, it raises legal and ethical questions distinct from those raised surrounding genetic discrimination in employment or access to private insurance. Given the increasing role personalized medicine is forecast to play in the provision of health care, addressing a broader view of what constitutes genetic discrimination, one that occurs along a continuum and includes inequitable access, will be needed during the implementation of new applications based on individual genetic profiles. Only by anticipating and addressing the potential for inequitable access to health care occurring from using genetic information will we move closer to realizing the goal of personalized medicine: to improve the health of individuals.

  12. Health Care Access Among Deaf People.

    PubMed

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health knowledge for deaf people including those with even higher risk of marginalization. Examples of approaches to improve access to health care, such as providing powerful and visually accessible communication through the use of sign language, the implementation of important communication technologies, and cultural awareness trainings for health professionals are discussed. Programs that raise health knowledge in Deaf communities and models of primary health care centers for deaf people are also presented. Published documents can empower deaf people to realize their right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health.

  13. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access.

  14. 75 FR 35439 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards AGENCY... equipment to ensure that such equipment is accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities to... accessibility needs of individuals with disabilities with respect to medical diagnostic equipment and...

  15. Medication Information Flow in Home Care.

    PubMed

    Norri-Sederholm, Teija; Saranto, Kaija; Paakkonen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Critical success factors in medication care involve communication and information sharing. Knowing the information needs of each actor in medication process in home care, is the first step to ensure that the right type of information is available, when needed. The aim of the study was to describe the needed and delivered information in home care in order to perform medication care successfully. A total of 15 nurses from primary home care participated a workshop focusing on medication treatment. The qualitative data was collected by focus group technique. Data was analyzed according to content analysis. Three medication information themes were formulated: Client-related information, medication, and medication error. The critical medication information were generic drug information, validity of the list of medication and client's clinical status. As a conclusion findings, show the diversity of the medication information in home care.

  16. 77 FR 67595 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility... Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. DATES: The Committee will meet...

  17. [Continuity of medical care. Evaluation of a collaborative program between hospital and Primary Care].

    PubMed

    Fernández Moyano, A; García Garmendia, J L; Palmero Palmero, C; García Vargas-Machuca, B; Páez Pinto, J M; Alvarez Alcina, M; Aparicio Santos, R; Benticuaga Martines, M; Delgado de la Cuesta, J; de la Rosa Morales, R; Escorial Moya, C; Espinosa Calleja, R; Fernández Rivera, J; González-Becerra, C; López Herrero, E; Marín Fernández, Y; Mata Martín, A M; Ramos Guerrero, A; Romero Rivero, M J; Sánchez-Dalp, M; Vallejo Maroto, I

    2007-11-01

    The patients being treated in our health care system are becoming increasingly older and have a greater prevalence of chronic diseases. Due to these factors, these patients require greater and easier accessibility to the system as well as continuity of medical care. Collaboration between the different levels of health care has been instrumental in the success of the system and has produced changes in the hospital medical care protocol. Our hospital has developed a care model oriented towards the patient's needs, resulting in a higher grade of satisfaction among the medical professionals. In this paper, we have given a detailed description of part of our medical model, illustrating its different components and indicating several parameters of its evaluation. We have also reviewed the current state of the various models published on this topic. In summary, we believe that this medical care model presents a different approach to management that benefits patients, medical professionals and the health system alike.

  18. Bringing patient centricity to diabetes medication access in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Glennie, Judith L; Kovacs Burns, Katharina; Oh, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Canada must become proactive in addressing type 2 diabetes. With the second highest rate of diabetes prevalence in the developed world, the number of Canadians living with diabetes will soon reach epidemic levels. Against international comparisons, Canada also performs poorly with respect to diabetes-related hospitalizations, mortality rates, and access to medications. Diabetes and its comorbidities pose a significant burden on people with diabetes (PWD) and their families, through out-of-pocket expenses for medications, devices, supplies, and the support needed to manage their illness. Rising direct and indirect costs of diabetes will become a drain on Canada’s economy and undermine the financial stability of our health care system. Canada’s approach to diabetes medication assessment and funding has created a patchwork of medication access across provinces. Access to treatments for those who rely on public programs is highly restricted compared to Canadians with private drug plans, as well in contrast with public payers in other countries. Each person living with diabetes has different needs, so a “patient-centric” approach ensures treatment focused on individual circumstances. Such tailoring is difficult to achieve, with the linear approach required by public payers. We may be undermining optimal care for PWD because of access policies that are not aligned with individualized approaches – and increasing overall health care costs in the process. The scope of Canada’s diabetes challenge demands holistic and proactive solutions. Canada needs to get out from “behind the eight ball” and get “ahead of the curve” when it comes to diabetes care. Improving access to medications is one of the tools for getting there. Canada’s “call to action” for diabetes starts with effective implementation of existing best practices. A personalized approach to medication access, to meet individual needs and optimize outcomes, is also a key enabler. PWD and

  19. Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Chief, Accession Medical Standards Analysis & Research Activity Li Yuanzhang, PhD Senior Statistician Department of Epidemiology David N...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AMSARA, Department of Epidemiology , Division of Preventive Medicine Walter Reed Army Institute of Research 503... Epidemiology of Injury form the Assessment of Recruit Strength and Motivation study ARMS) and Program

  20. Medical use of marijuana in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Johannigman, Suzanne; Eschiti, Valerie

    2013-08-01

    Marijuana has been documented to provide relief to patients in palliative care. However, healthcare providers should use caution when discussing medical marijuana use with patients. This article features a case study that reveals the complexity of medical marijuana use. For oncology nurses to offer high-quality care, examining the pros and cons of medical marijuana use in the palliative care setting is important.

  1. Traveling towards disease: transportation barriers to health care access.

    PubMed

    Syed, Samina T; Gerber, Ben S; Sharp, Lisa K

    2013-10-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes.

  2. Traveling Towards Disease: Transportation Barriers to Health Care Access

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Ben S.; Sharp, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes. PMID:23543372

  3. 32 CFR 564.37 - Medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Medical care. 564.37 Section 564.37 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES NATIONAL GUARD REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.37 Medical care. (a) General. The definitions of medical...

  4. 32 CFR 564.37 - Medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical care. 564.37 Section 564.37 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES NATIONAL GUARD REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.37 Medical care. (a) General. The definitions of medical...

  5. 32 CFR 564.37 - Medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical care. 564.37 Section 564.37 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES NATIONAL GUARD REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.37 Medical care. (a) General. The definitions of medical...

  6. UK organisation of access care.

    PubMed

    Wilmink, Teun; Powers, Sarah; Baharani, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    National UK audits show that 73% of patients start renal replacement therapy (RRT) with haemodialysis (HD). However, 59% of those start HD on non-permanent access in the form of a tunnelled line (TL) or a non-tunnelled line (NTL), 40% on an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and 1% on an arteriovenous graft (AVG). After 3 months, the number of patients dialysing on AVF was only 41%. Late referrals, within 90 days of starting dialysis to the renal service, occur in one-fifth of all incident HD patients. Referral to a surgeon was an important determinant of mode of access at first dialysis. However, referral to a surgeon occurred in 67% of patients who were known to the nephrologist for over a year and in 46% of patients who were known to nephrology less than a year but more than 90 days. Best practice tariffs of the National Health Service (NHS) payment by results program have set a target of 75% of prevalent HD occurring via an AVF or AVG in 2011/2012, rising to 85% in 2013/2014. We suggest that this target is best achieved by increasing timely referral to a surgeon for creation of access before HD is needed.

  7. [Accessing medical records for research purposes].

    PubMed

    Alcalde Bezhold, Guillermo; Alfonso Farnós, Iciar

    2013-01-01

    The Organic Law 15/1999 of 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data and the Law 41/2002 of 14 November regulating patient autonomy and rights and obligations of information and clinical documentation are the basic rules which govern the medical history in Spain. However, the lack of development of these laws regarding data protection in clinical research, particularly in terms of access to the medical history, repeatedly causes doubts about its construction by the Research Ethics Committees. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to analyze the rules which govern the access to the medical history for research purposes, with particular emphasis on the common problems that arise in the Committees for the ethical evaluation of these projects and finally setting a series of recommendations. The use for research purpose of genetic personal data contained in the medical history is also addressed in this paper. In this sense, a key contribution of the Law on Biomedical Research is relating to the specific regulation of the genetic personal data, both with respect to their production and access to the data as a support and regarding to its use for research purpose.

  8. 5 CFR 297.205 - Access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to medical records. 297.205... PROCEDURES FOR PERSONNEL RECORDS Request for Access § 297.205 Access to medical records. When a request for access involves medical or psychological records that the system manager believes requires...

  9. 5 CFR 297.205 - Access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to medical records. 297.205... PROCEDURES FOR PERSONNEL RECORDS Request for Access § 297.205 Access to medical records. When a request for access involves medical or psychological records that the system manager believes requires...

  10. Inequities In Health Care Needs For Children With Medical Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Dennis; Goudie, Anthony; Cohen, Eyal; Houtrow, Amy; Agrawal, Rishi; Carle, Adam C.; Wells, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Children with special health care needs are believed to be susceptible to inequities in health and health care access. Within the group with special needs, there is a smaller group of children with medical complexity: children who require medical services beyond what is typically required by children with special health care needs. We describe health care inequities for the children with medical complexity compared to children with special health care needs but without medical complexity, based on a secondary analysis of the 2005–06 and 2009–10 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. The survey examines the prevalence, health care service use, and needs of children and youth with special care needs, as reported by their families. The inequities we examined were those based on race or ethnicity, primary language in the household, insurance type, and poverty status. We found that children with medical complexity were twice as likely to have at least one unmet need, compared to children without medical complexity. Among the children with medical complexity, uninsured status was associated with more unmet needs than privately insured status. We conclude that medical complexity itself can be a primary determinant of unmet needs. PMID:25489038

  11. Inequities in health care needs for children with medical complexity.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Dennis Z; Goudie, Anthony; Cohen, Eyal; Houtrow, Amy; Agrawal, Rishi; Carle, Adam C; Wells, Nora

    2014-12-01

    Children with special health care needs are believed to be susceptible to inequities in health and health care access. Within the group with special needs, there is a smaller group of children with medical complexity: children who require medical services beyond what is typically required by children with special health care needs. We describe health care inequities for the children with medical complexity compared to children with special health care needs but without medical complexity, based on a secondary analysis of data from the 2005-06 and 2009-10 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. The survey examines the prevalence, health care service use, and needs of children and youth with special care needs, as reported by their families. The inequities we examined were those based on race/ethnicity, primary language in the household, insurance type, and poverty status. We found that children with medical complexity were twice as likely to have at least one unmet need, compared to children without medical complexity. Among the children with medical complexity, unmet need was not associated with primary language, income level, or having Medicaid. We conclude that medical complexity itself can be a primary determinant of unmet needs.

  12. 20 CFR 401.55 - Access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access to medical records. 401.55 Section 401... INFORMATION The Privacy Act § 401.55 Access to medical records. (a) General. You have a right to access your medical records, including any psychological information that we maintain. (b) Medical records...

  13. [Towards universal access to health care: incorporation of advanced practice nurses in primary care].

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Achondo, Bernardita

    2016-10-01

    To move towards universal access to health, the Pan American Health Organization recommends strengthening primary health care (PHC). One of the strategies is to increase the number qualified professionals, both medical and non-medical, working in PHC. In Chile there is a lack of professionals in this level of care, hampering the provision of health. Physicians still prefer secondary and tertiary levels of health. International experience has shown that advanced practice nurses (APN), specialists in PHC are cost-effective professionals able to deliver a complete and quality care to patients. Strong evidence demonstrates the benefits that APN could provide to the population, delivering nursing care that incorporates medical tasks, for example in patients with chronic diseases, allowing greater availability of medical hours for patients requiring more complex management. The success in the implementation of this new role requires the support of the health team, especially PHC physicians, endorsing and promoting the benefits of the APN for the population.

  14. Access to Medical and Exposure Records

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Access to Medical and Exposure Records U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA 3110 2001 (Revised) U.S...Department of Labor Elaine L. Chao, Secretary Occupational Safety and Health Administration John L. Henshaw, Assistant Secretary This booklet provides a...standards and the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Because interpretations and enforcement policy may change over time, the best sources for

  15. Taking care of your vascular access for hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood through the access. This is called stenosis. Day-to-day Care of Your Vascular Access Following these guidelines ... pulse (also called thrill) in your access every day. Your health care provider will show you how. ...

  16. Effective access to health care in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective access measures are intended to reflect progress toward universal health coverage. This study proposes an operative approach to measuring effective access: in addition to the lack of financial protection, the willingness to make out-of-pocket payments for health care signifies a lack of effective access to pre-paid services. Methods Using data from a nationally representative health survey in Mexico, effective access at the individual level was determined by combining financial protection and effective utilization of pre-paid health services as required. The measure of effective access was estimated overall, by sex, by socioeconomic level, and by federal state for 2006 and 2012. Results In 2012, 48.49% of the Mexican population had no effective access to health services. Though this represents an improvement since 2006, when 65.9% lacked effective access, it still constitutes a major challenge for the health system. Effective access in Mexico presents significant heterogeneity in terms of federal state and socioeconomic level. Conclusions Measuring effective access will contribute to better target strategies toward universal health coverage. The analysis presented here highlights a need to improve quality, availability, and opportuneness (location and time) of health services provision in Mexico. PMID:24758691

  17. 28 CFR 115.282 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mental Care § 115.282 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Resident victims of... intervention services, the nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are...

  18. 28 CFR 115.282 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mental Care § 115.282 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Resident victims of... intervention services, the nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are...

  19. 28 CFR 115.282 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mental Care § 115.282 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Resident victims of... intervention services, the nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are...

  20. A WOUND CARE AND INTRAVENOUS ACCESS SUMMIT FOR ON-ORBIT CARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, R.; Paul, B.; Gillis, D.; Bacal, K.; McCulley, P.; Polk, J.; Johnson-Throop, K.

    2005-01-01

    Wound care issues and the ability to establish intravenous (IV) access among injured or ill crew members are a source of concern for NASA flight surgeons. Indeed, the microgravity environment and the remote nature of the International Space Station (ISS) pose unique challenges in diagnosing and treating an injured astronaut. Therefore, it is necessary to identify and adapt the best evidence based terrestrial practices regarding wound care, hemostasis, and IV access for use on the ISS. Methods: A panel of consultants was convened to evaluate the adequacy of the current ISS in-flight medical system for diagnosis and treatment of wounds and establishing IV access by a nonclinician crew medical officer. Participants were acknowledged experts in terrestrial wound care and/or operational medicine. Prior to the meeting, each panelist was encouraged to participate in a pre-summit online forum. Results: Eight external experts participated in a face-to-face meeting held at NASA-Johnson Space Center. Recommendations were made to augment the space station pharmacopoeia, as well as current wound care diagnostic, therapeutic, and deorbit criteria protocols. Additionally, suggestions were offered regarding IV access techniques and devices for use in the microgravity environment. Discussion: The results of the expert panel provide an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and care of wounds in an injured astronaut on aboard the ISS. The results of the panel underscored the need for further research in wound therapy and IV access devices.

  1. Women's access to health care: the legal framework.

    PubMed

    Cook, R J; Ngwena, C G

    2006-09-01

    The Millennium Development Goals set ambitious targets for women's health, including reductions in maternal and child mortality and combating the spread of HIV/AIDS. The law, which historically has often obstructed women's access to the health care they require, has a dynamic potential to ensure women's access that is being progressively realized. This paper identifies three legal principles that are key to advancing women's reproductive and sexual health. First, law should require that care be evidence-based, reflecting medical and social science rather than, for instance, religious ideology or morality. Second, legal guidance should be clear and transparent, so that service providers and patients know their responsibilities and entitlements without litigation to resolve uncertainties. Third, law should provide applicable measures to ensure fairness in women's access to services, both general services and those only women require. Legal developments are addressed that illustrate how law can advance women's equality, and social justice.

  2. Medical care and health under state socialism.

    PubMed

    Deacon, B

    1984-01-01

    This paper derives a conception of ideal socialist and communist medical care and health policy. This model is based on a review of Marxist and allied critiques of capitalist medical care policy and on theoretical work on socialist social policy. The ideal conception, operationalized in terms of 16 criteria, is then applied to a review of medical care and health policy in the Soviet Union. Hungary, and Poland. It is concluded that medical care policy in all three countries exhibits very few characteristics of socialist medical care. The possibility (for the moment repressed) provided by the Solidarity movement in Poland of a new development toward a more genuine socialist medical care and health policy is also described.

  3. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-20

    Order Code RL33537 Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers Updated May 20, 2008 Richard A. Best Jr. Specialist in National Defense Foreign...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 20 MAY 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Medical Care : Questions and...8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers Summary The primary mission of the military health system, which

  4. Affordable access to care for the undocumented.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    How do you tell a sick kid that nobody cares if he gets better? That's an exaggeration, of course, but it is the fundamental message our society sends when we tell him that, because he and his family are undocumented immigrants, we are unwilling to extend them access to affordable and reliable health insurance. One major shortcoming of the Affordable Care Act is its specific exclusion of the almost twelve million undocumented immigrants-including millions of children-in this country from access to the state and federal insurance exchanges where coverage can be purchased. It is true that providing undocumented immigrants access to the exchanges and subsidies mandated by the ACA would require additional funding. However, a recent analysis in California has found that the costs of expanding state-supported care to include undocumented immigrants would largely be offset by the increased state sales tax revenue paid by managed care organizations and by reduced spending at the county level on emergency-room and hospital care of the uninsured.

  5. A Program to Improve Access to Health Care Among Mexican Immigrants in Rural Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Perez, Maria de Jesus; Farley, Tillman; Cabanis, Clara Martin

    2004-01-01

    Migration to the United States from Mexico is increasing every year. Mexican immigrants tend to be poor, uninsured, monolingual Spanish speakers without adequate access to appropriate medical care. As a further barrier, many are also undocumented. This article describes a program developed to improve access to health care among Mexican immigrants…

  6. 77 FR 39656 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... CFR Part 1195 [Docket No. ATBCB-2012-0003] RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility... Proposed Rulemaking on Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. DATES: The first meeting of... Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 14706...

  7. The Costs and Risks of Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    McPhee, Stephen J.; Myers, Lois P.; Schroeder, Steven A.

    1982-01-01

    Understanding the costs and risks of medical care, as well as the benefits, is essential to good medical practice. The literature on this topic transcends disciplines, making it a challenge for clinicians and medical educators to compile information on costs and risks for use in patient care. This annotated bibliography presents summaries of pertinent references on (1) financial costs of care, (2) excessive use of medical services, (3) clinical risks of care, (4) decision analysis, (5) cost-benefit analyses, (6) factors affecting physician use of services and (7) strategies to improve physician ordering patterns. PMID:6814071

  8. [Ethics in pediatric emergencies: Care access, communication, and confidentiality].

    PubMed

    Benoit, J; Berdah, L; Carlier-Gonod, A; Guillou, T; Kouche, C; Patte, M; Schneider, M; Talcone, S; Chappuy, H

    2015-05-01

    Children suffer most from today's increasing precariousness. In France, access to care is available for all children through various structures and existing measures. The support for foreign children is overseen by specific legislation often unfamiliar to caregivers. Pediatric emergencies, their location, organization, actors, and patient flow are a particular environment that is not always suitable to communication and may lead to situations of abuse. Communication should not be forgotten because of the urgency of the situation. The place of the child in the dialogue is often forgotten. Considering the triangular relationship, listening to the child and involving the parents in care are the basis for a good therapeutic alliance. Privacy and medical confidentiality in pediatric emergencies are governed by law. However, changes in treatments and medical practices along with the variety of actors involved imply both individual and collective limitations, to the detriment of medical confidentiality.

  9. Developments in medical care costs: an update.

    PubMed

    Vincenzino, J V

    1993-01-01

    The nation spent roughly $830 billion on all categories of medical care in 1992. Available data for personal health care expenditures and prices indicate that their increases slightly slowed last year, but the burden placed on the economy by the total health care sector continues to mount. Although the uncertainty of the Presidential election is over, the debate on health care reform will continue.

  10. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-29

    COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...deliver health care during wartime. The military health system also provides health care services through either Department of Defense (DOD...medical facilities, known as “military treatment facilities” or “MTFs” as space is available, or, through private health care providers. Known as “Tricare

  11. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-14

    providers, subject to regulations. Certain types of care , such as most dentistry and chiropractic services, are excluded. In addition to Tricare...COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...deliver health care during wartime. The military health system also provides health care services through either Department of Defense (DOD) medical

  12. VA Health Care: Actions Needed to Improve Newly Enrolled Veterans Access to Primary Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    medical centers provide veterans with timely access to outpatient primary and specialty care, as well as mental health care. (See app. I for the...D.C.: Oct. 8, 2015); and GAO, VA Mental Health: Clearer Guidance on Access Policies and Wait- Time Data Needed, GAO-16-24 (Washington, D.C.: Oct. 28...21We recently reported that VA similarly focuses on only a portion of the overall time veterans wait to see mental health providers. See GAO-16-24

  13. [Access to dental care during prenatal assistance].

    PubMed

    dos Santos Neto, Edson Theodoro; Oliveira, Adauto Emmerich; Zandonade, Eliana; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2012-11-01

    This study sought to evaluate the self-perceived response to dental care during prenatal assistance in the Unified Health System (SUS) in the Metropolitan Region of Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brazil. 1032 postpartum women were interviewed and 1006 prenatal records copied. Postpartum women's self-perceived response was measured by the Oral Health Index Profile-14. When an impact was identified, dental care rendered in educational, preventive and curative terms was considered adequate. When there was no impact, assistance was considered adequate in educational and preventive terms. The Chi-square test revealed an association between prenatal care and dental care. Oral health impact on quality of life was 14.7%. Dental care received by mothers in educational terms was rated at 41.3%, while in preventive terms it was 21% and in curative terms it was 16.6%. Six or more prenatal appointments coupled with educational activities was closely associated with adequate dental care (p < 0.05). Access to dental care is facilitated when pregnant women attend health services and become involved in educational activities during the prenatal period. Consequently, educational measures appear to indicate an improvement in prenatal care in the SUS.

  14. Perceived access in a managed care environment: determinants of satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Akinci, F; Sinay, T

    2003-05-01

    With increasing competition in the local and regional healthcare markets, and growing interest in assessing the effectiveness of services and patient outcomes, satisfaction measures are becoming prominent in evaluating the performance of the healthcare system. This study examines the independent effect of predisposing, enabling and medical need factors on perceived access to care with particular focus on insurance plans. A survey questionnaire is developed to investigate access limitations at three levels: (1) the health plan, (2) the individual provider(s) and (3) the healthcare organization. In addition, shortage of providers, residents' perceptions of their health status, satisfaction with access to care and socio-demographic indicators are incorporated into the analysis. Multivariate logistic regression is used to assess the independent effects of the above factors on a dichotomous dependent variable--residents' overall satisfaction with access to healthcare services. The most salient determinants of overall satisfaction with access to care were the type of health insurance plan, cost of insurance premiums, co-payments, difficulty with obtaining referrals, self-rated general health, the opportunity cost of taking time to see a provider (measured by the loss of hourly wages), marital status and the age factor over 80 years.

  15. 78 FR 32612 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility... previously published Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment...

  16. 78 FR 16448 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility... previously published Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment...

  17. 78 FR 23872 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility... previously published Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment...

  18. 78 FR 1166 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility... previously published Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment...

  19. 78 FR 10582 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility... previously published Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment...

  20. The history of open access medical publishing: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Sukhov, Andrea; Burrall, Barbara; Maverakis, Emanual

    2016-09-15

    Dermatology Online Journal became the first medical open access journal in the early 1990's. Today, thousands of open access medical journals are available on the Internet. Despite criticisms surrounding open access, these journals have allowed research to be rapidly available to the public. In addition, open access journal policies allow public health research to reach developing countries where this research has the potential to make a substantial impact. In the future, open access medical journals will likely continue to evolve with technology, changing how medical research is accessed and presented.

  1. [Involvement of medical representatives in team medical care].

    PubMed

    Hirotsu, Misaki; Sohma, Michiro; Takagi, Hidehiko

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, chemotherapies have been further advanced because of successive launch of new drugs, introduction of molecular targeting, etc., and the concept of so-called Team Medical Care ,the idea of sharing interdisciplinary expertise for collaborative treatment, has steadily penetrated in the Japanese medical society. Dr. Naoto Ueno is a medical oncologist at US MD Anderson Cancer Center, the birthplace of the Team Medical Care. He has advocated the concept of ABC of Team Oncology by positioning pharmaceutical companies as Team C. Under such team practice, we believe that medical representatives of a pharmaceutical company should also play a role as a member of the Team Medical Care by providing appropriate drug use information to healthcare professionals, supporting post-marketing surveillance of treated patients, facilitating drug information sharing among healthcare professionals at medical institutions, etc.

  2. Medical Services: Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Form 7397-R will be locally reproduced on 8 1/2- by 11-inch paper unless available electronically. A copy for reproduction purposes is located at the...Antihistamines c. Narcotic analgesics 2. a. Hypnotics and sedatives Avoid taking alcohol with this medication unless advised by physician. b. Oral hypoglycemic

  3. Medication use during neonatal and pediatric critical care transport.

    PubMed

    Sumpton, J E; Kronick, J B

    1991-06-01

    The Pediatric Critical Care Unit (PCCU) at the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario provides a transport service and team (critical care physician, critical care nurse, respiratory therapist) which transports critically ill newborns, infants, and children. The purpose of this study was to identify the medications used during transport and to determine age-related differences. Results of a prospective study of all drugs administered by the transport team to 174 patients during their stabilization and transport from November 1, 1987 through October 31, 1988 are presented. One hundred and twenty-one (69.5%) patients received at least one medication. The most frequently administered medications were antibiotics (38.5% of patients), followed by morphine (27.0%), anticonvulsants (23.6%), neuromuscular blockers (14.4%), respiratory drugs (11.5%), inotropes (10.9%), and sedatives (7.5%). Miscellaneous medications were administered to 48.8% of patients. The use of different classes of drugs varied with age; anticonvulsants were most frequently administered to children, sedatives and respiratory medications to infants, and antibiotics and miscellaneous medications to newborns. The wide range of medications used may reflect the diversity of diseases causing critical illness which reinforces that transport teams must have access to and knowledge of a variety of medications. The formulary of medications taken by the critical care transport team is included.

  4. Access to patient-centered medical homes in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Liem, Robert I; O'Suoji, Chibuzo; Kingsberry, Paris S; Pelligra, Stephanie A; Kwon, Soyang; Mason, Maryann; Thompson, Alexis A

    2014-10-01

    To determine the proportion of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) followed in a subspecialty clinic with access to a primary care provider (PCP) exhibiting practice-level qualities of a patient-centered medical home (PCMH). We surveyed 200 parents/guardians of children with SCD using a 44-item tool addressing PCP access, caregiver attitudes toward PCPs, barriers to healthcare utilization, perceived disease severity, and satisfaction with care received in the PCP versus SCD clinic settings. Individual PCMH criteria measured were a personal provider relationship and medical care characterized as accessible, comprehensive and coordinated. Although 94 % of respondents reported a PCP for their child, there was greater variation in the proportion of PCPs who met other individual PCMH criteria. A higher proportion of PCPs met criteria for coordinated care when compared to accessible or comprehensive care. In multivariate models, transportation availability, lower ER visit frequency and greater PCP visit frequency were associated favorably with having a PCP meeting criteria for accessible and coordinated care. Child and respondent demographics and disease severity had no impact on PCMH designation. Average respondent satisfaction scores for the SCD clinic was higher, when compared to satisfaction scores for the PCP. For children with SCD, access to a PCP is not synonymous with access to a medical home. While specific factors associated with PCMH access may be identified in children with SCD, their cause and effect relationships need further study.

  5. Accessing primary care: a simulated patient study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, John L; Carter, Mary; Davey, Antoinette; Roberts, Martin J; Elliott, Marc N; Roland, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulated patient, or so-called ‘mystery-shopper’, studies are a controversial, but potentially useful, approach to take when conducting health services research. Aim To investigate the construct validity of survey questions relating to access to primary care included in the English GP Patient Survey. Design and setting Observational study in 41 general practices in rural, urban, and inner-city settings in the UK. Method Between May 2010 and March 2011, researchers telephoned practices at monthly intervals, simulating patients requesting routine, but prompt, appointments. Seven measures of access and appointment availability, measured from the mystery-shopper contacts, were related to seven measures of practice performance from the GP Patient Survey. Results Practices with lower access scores in the GP Patient Survey had poorer access and appointment availability for five out of seven items measured directly, when compared with practices that had higher scores. Scores on items from the national survey that related to appointment availability were significantly associated with direct measures of appointment availability. Patient-satisfaction levels and the likelihood that patients would recommend their practice were related to the availability of appointments. Patients’ reports of ease of telephone access in the national survey were unrelated to three out of four measures of practice call handling, but were related to the time taken to resolve an appointment request, suggesting responders’ possible confusion in answering this question. Conclusion Items relating to the accessibility of care in a the English GP patient survey have construct validity. Patients’ satisfaction with their practice is not related to practice call handling, but is related to appointment availability. PMID:23561783

  6. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-04

    providers, subject to regulations. Certain types of care , such as most dentistry and chiropractic services, are excluded. In addition to Tricare Standard...Order Code RL33537 Military Medical Care : Questions and Answers Updated August 4, 2008 Richard A. Best Jr. Specialist in National Defense Foreign...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 04 AUG 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Medical Care : Questions and

  7. [Access to health care and racial discrimination].

    PubMed

    Carde, Estelle

    2007-01-01

    Discrimination is defined as different, unfavourable and illegitimate treatment. This post-doctoral research was conducted on racial discrimination, specifically with respect to health care access. The authors observed and questioned during the course of semi-directed interviews, 175 health care professionals on-site at their workplaces (administrators, care providers, social workers) in metropolitan France and French Guiana. Based on a qualitative analysis of this material, three types of discriminatory practices were identified. The first two were rooted in the individual professional's perception of the patient's racial origin (illegitimatising and differentiation). The third was ingrained in institutional logic independent of the professionals' intentions (indirect discrimination). The article concludes with a series of recommendations which aim to combat these types of discrimination.

  8. The Ecology of Medical Care in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Soo; Choi, Yong Jun

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to describe the ecology of medical care in Korea. Using the yearly data of 2012 derived from the Korea Health Panel, we estimated the numbers of people per 1,000 residents aged 18 and over who had any health problem and/or any medical care at a variety of care settings, such as clinics, hospitals, and tertiary hospitals, in an average month. There was a total of 11,518 persons in the study population. While the number of those who had any health problem in an average month was estimated to be 939 per 1,000 persons, the estimated numbers of ambulatory care users were 333 at clinics, 101 at hospital outpatient departments, 35 at tertiary hospital outpatient departments, and 38 for Korean Oriental medical providers. The number of people who used emergency care at least once was 7 per 1,000 persons in an average month. The numbers of people hospitalized in clinics and hospitals were 3 and 8, respectively, while 3 persons were admitted to tertiary hospitals. There was a gap between the number of people experiencing any health problem and that of those having any medical care, and primary care comprised a large share of people's medical care experiences. It was noteworthy that more patients received ambulatory care at tertiary hospitals in Korea than in other countries. We hope that discussion about care delivery system reform and further studies will be encouraged.

  9. Health insurance and access to care among welfare leavers.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Sheldon; Davis, Matthew M; Orzol, Sean; Pollack, Harold A

    2008-01-01

    This analysis explores the effects of the 1996 welfare reform on health insurance coverage and access to care among former recipients of cash aid. Using panel data from the Women's Employment Study, which conducted five interviews between 1997 and 2003 in one Michigan county, we find that 25% of welfare leavers lacked health insurance coverage in fall 2003. Uninsured adults were significantly more likely than others to report that they could not afford a medical or dental visit during the year prior to the 2003 interview. Fixed-effect logistic regression analysis indicates that women who had been off the welfare rolls for at least 12 months (the duration of transitional Medicaid) were significantly more likely to be uninsured than women who had made more recent welfare exits, and were significantly more likely to report financial obstacles to the receipt of medical and dental care.

  10. Economics of health care access and delivery projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanenhaus, Robert

    1995-10-01

    This article updates and quantifies the costs and net government savings of two of three new technological projects introduced in last year's proceedings ('Use of Technology to Reduce Health Costs,' pp. 196-7). The projects are microcomputer video for medical outreach and ride tracking. The projects focus on maintaining or improving the delivery of and access to health care, while reducing cost significantly, by enabling more efficient or effective practices. As calculated to date, IMI currently estimates the two projects can save federal and state governments up to 180 million net per year, i.e., 20 million from microcomputer video for medical outreach and $160 million from ride tracking. (IMI is currently calculating the cost and savings of the third project, health care card system.) The article begins with a summary of each project, includes new accomplishments and participating organizations and lists the costs, savings categories and calculated savings.

  11. 77 FR 53163 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility...) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 6916 (February 9, 2012). The...

  12. 76 FR 12080 - TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project AGENCY: Department of Defense. ACTION..., entitled Department of Defense TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project. The demonstration project is intended to improve access to urgent care including minor illness or injury for Coast Guard...

  13. [Ethical "flashes" of medical care management].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    This document demonstrates in a simple way the depth and variety of ethical topics in medical care management, which are subjects not often addressed. Every medical administrator should be aware that all actions and decisions have ethical dimensions. Ethics applies to management of medical services according to honesty, transparency and decency. The behavior of those persons administering medical services is based on ethical values, principles and theories.

  14. The urban transition and the evolution of the medical care delivery system in America.

    PubMed

    Knox, P L; Bohland, J; Shumsky, N L

    1983-01-01

    This essay traces the evolution of the American urban medical care delivery system and examines the implications in terms of social and spatial variations in accessibility to medical care. It is suggested that the foundations of the present medical care delivery system were laid during the urban transformation which took place in the latter part of the nineteenth century, when changes in the division of labor, specialization, the role of the family, urban transportation technology and attitudes to social protectionism interacted with changes in science, medical technology and professional organization to produce radical changes in both the settings used to provide medical care and their relative accessibility to different sub-groups of the population. The medical care delivery system is thus interpreted largely as a product of the overall dynamic of urbanization rather than of scientific discovery, medical technology and the influence of key medical practitioners and professional organizations.

  15. Transitional care issues influencing access to health care: employability and insurability.

    PubMed

    Hellstedt, Linda F

    2004-12-01

    needed to obtain adequate medical and financial security, with facilitated access to appropriate, high quality, and affordable health care.

  16. Access to care: leveraging dental education.

    PubMed

    Bertolami, Charles N; Berne, Robert

    2014-11-01

    If it is not a naïve expectation for dentists who have been beneficiaries of public generosity to share their good fortune with the public that made it possible, there may be a rational basis for enhancing the role of dental education in improving access to oral health care by promoting-but not requiring-a voluntary service commitment after graduation commensurate with the magnitude of the subsidy received. Such an approach would be in accordance with the Institute of Medicine's report Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations, but without the governmental coercion explicit in the report. A sustainable alternative proposal is made here, offering both greater options to students in the financing of their dental education and greater obligations for those students who accept state subsidies: providing tuition discounts for students of state-supported dental schools based not on past residency status but rather on a future commitment to public service. This arrangement could be good public policy that might also help to create a culture in which dental students are given authentic options as part of a profession-wide ideology of public service. The result could well contribute to improved oral health care for the underserved.

  17. Impact of service delivery model on health care access among HIV-positive women in New York City.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Nandini V; Kupprat, Sandra A; Halkitis, Perry N

    2009-01-01

    As the New York City HIV=AIDS epidemic began generalizing beyond traditionally high-risk groups in the early 1990s, AIDS Service Organizations (ASO) sought to increase access to medical care and broaden service offerings to incorporate the needs of low-income women and their families. Strategies to achieve entry into and retention in medical care included the development of integrated care facilities, case management, and a myriad of supportive service offerings. This study examines a nonrandom sample of 60 HIV-positive women receiving case management and supportive services at New York City ASOs. Over 55% of the women interviewed reported high access to care, 43% reported the ability to access urgent care all of the time and 94% reported high satisfaction with obstetrics=gynecology (OB=GYN) care. This held true across race=ethnicity, income level, medical coverage, and service delivery model.Women who accessed services at integrated care facilities offering onsite medical care and case management=supportive services perceived lower access to medical specialists as compared to those who received services at nonintegrated sites. Data from this analysis indicate that supportive services increase access to and satisfaction with both HIV and non-HIV-related health care. Additionally, women who received services at a medical model agency were more likely to report accessing non-HIV care at a clinic compared to those receiving services at a nonmedical model agencies, these women were more likely to report receiving non-HIV care at a hospital.

  18. The state of transgender health care: policy, law, and medical frameworks.

    PubMed

    Stroumsa, Daphna

    2014-03-01

    I review the current status of transgender people's access to health care in the United States and analyze federal policies regarding health care services for transgender people and the limitations thereof. I suggest a preliminary outline to enhance health care services and recommend the formulation of explicit federal policies regarding the provision of health care services to transgender people in accordance with recently issued medical care guidelines, allocation of research funding, education of health care workers, and implementation of existing nondiscrimination policies. Current policies denying medical coverage for sex reassignment surgery contradict standards of medical care and must be amended.

  19. The State of Transgender Health Care: Policy, Law, and Medical Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I review the current status of transgender people’s access to health care in the United States and analyze federal policies regarding health care services for transgender people and the limitations thereof. I suggest a preliminary outline to enhance health care services and recommend the formulation of explicit federal policies regarding the provision of health care services to transgender people in accordance with recently issued medical care guidelines, allocation of research funding, education of health care workers, and implementation of existing nondiscrimination policies. Current policies denying medical coverage for sex reassignment surgery contradict standards of medical care and must be amended. PMID:24432926

  20. The Motivation-Facilitation Theory of Prenatal Care Access.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Roman, Marian W

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of services, accessing health care remains a problem in the United States and other developed countries. Prenatal care has the potential to improve perinatal outcomes and decrease health disparities, yet many women struggle with access to care. Current theories addressing access to prenatal care focus on barriers, although such knowledge is minimally useful for clinicians. We propose a middle-range theory, the motivation-facilitation theory of prenatal care access, which condenses the prenatal care access process into 2 interacting components: motivation and facilitation. Maternal motivation is the mother's desire to begin and maintain care. Facilitation represents the goal of the clinic to create easy, open access to person-centered beneficial care. This simple model directs the focus of research and change to the interface of the woman and the clinic and encourages practice-level interventions that facilitate women entering and maintaining prenatal care.

  1. 77 FR 62479 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board... and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) established an advisory committee to...

  2. The value of medical care for health promotion.

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, M I

    1984-01-01

    A "rediscovery" of the value of prevention in the 1970s has led to the denigration of medical care, which had been occurring also for other reasons--aversion to high technology, demonstrable abuses, spiraling medical costs, etc. The achievements of prevention in conquering infectious diseases had long been recognized, and preventive strategies in the 1970s and 1980s were beginning to show reductions in mortality from the non-communicable chronic diseases as well. Yet the benefits of medical care in extending life expectancy over recent decades have often been overlooked. The quality of life in the later years has also been substantially improved by effective medical care. Most important, access to medical care has definite value in facilitating the prevention of disease and the promotion of health, both in developing and developed countries. It is too often forgotten that prevention embodies a range of activities, merging from general health promotion through specific disease prevention and early case-detection to rehabilitation and prevention of disability. Medical care, in other words, should not be counterposed to prevention, but rather should be integrated with it for the benefit of both health strategies. PMID:6696154

  3. Emergency medical care in developing countries: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed Central

    Razzak, Junaid A.; Kellermann, Arthur L.

    2002-01-01

    Prevention is a core value of any health system. Nonetheless, many health problems will continue to occur despite preventive services. A significant burden of diseases in developing countries is caused by time-sensitive illnesses and injuries, such as severe infections, hypoxia caused by respiratory infections, dehydration caused by diarrhoea, intentional and unintentional injuries, postpartum bleeding, and acute myocardial infarction. The provision of timely treatment during life-threatening emergencies is not a priority for many health systems in developing countries. This paper reviews evidence indicating the need to develop and/or strengthen emergency medical care systems in these countries. An argument is made for the role of emergency medical care in improving the health of populations and meeting expectations for access to emergency care. We consider emergency medical care in the community, during transportation, and at first-contact and regional referral facilities. Obstacles to developing effective emergency medical care include a lack of structural models, inappropriate training foci, concerns about cost, and sustainability in the face of a high demand for services. A basic but effective level of emergency medical care responds to perceived and actual community needs and improves the health of populations. PMID:12481213

  4. Emergency medical care in developing countries: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Razzak, Junaid A; Kellermann, Arthur L

    2002-01-01

    Prevention is a core value of any health system. Nonetheless, many health problems will continue to occur despite preventive services. A significant burden of diseases in developing countries is caused by time-sensitive illnesses and injuries, such as severe infections, hypoxia caused by respiratory infections, dehydration caused by diarrhoea, intentional and unintentional injuries, postpartum bleeding, and acute myocardial infarction. The provision of timely treatment during life-threatening emergencies is not a priority for many health systems in developing countries. This paper reviews evidence indicating the need to develop and/or strengthen emergency medical care systems in these countries. An argument is made for the role of emergency medical care in improving the health of populations and meeting expectations for access to emergency care. We consider emergency medical care in the community, during transportation, and at first-contact and regional referral facilities. Obstacles to developing effective emergency medical care include a lack of structural models, inappropriate training foci, concerns about cost, and sustainability in the face of a high demand for services. A basic but effective level of emergency medical care responds to perceived and actual community needs and improves the health of populations.

  5. The Changing Medical Care System: Some Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Spencer

    1986-01-01

    The medical care system is undergoing widespread and significant changes. Individual hospitals may be disappearing as mergers, acquisitions, and a variety of multi-institutional arrangements become the dominant form and as a host of free-standing medical enterprises spread out into the community. (MLW)

  6. The space of access to primary mental health care: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Kovandžić, Marija; Funnell, Emma; Hammond, Jonathan; Ahmed, Abdi; Edwards, Suzanne; Clarke, Pam; Hibbert, Derek; Bristow, Katie; Dowrick, Christopher

    2012-05-01

    Guided by theoretical perspectives of relational social science, this paper draws on reanalyses of multiple qualitative datasets related to a multi-ethnic, economically disadvantaged area in Liverpool, UK, with the aim to advance general understanding of access to primary mental health care while using local Somali minority as an instrumental focus. The findings generate a novel concept: the space of access. The shape and dynamics of the space of access are determined by at least four fields of tensions: understandings of area and community; cognitive mapping of mental well-being, illness and care; positioning of primary care services; and dynamics of resources beyond the 'medical zone' of care. The conclusions indicate a need for de-centring and re-connecting the role of medical professionals within primary care which itself needs to be transformed by endorsement of multiple avenues of access to diverse support and intrepid communication among all involved actors.

  7. Access to Care in Rural America: Impact of Hospital Closures

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbach, Margo L.; Dayhoff, Debra A.

    1995-01-01

    This article employs a quasi-experimental, pre/post comparison group design to determine whether rural hospital closures (n=11) have had a detrimental impact on access to inpatient and outpatient care for the Medicare population. Closure areas experienced a significant decrease in medical admissions, although admission rates remained higher than in comparison areas. Physician services were not found to substitute for inpatient services following a closure. No adverse impacts on mortality were observed. Patients in closure areas were more likely to be admitted to urban teaching hospitals following the closure of their local hospital. PMID:10153469

  8. Access to multilingual medication instructions at New York City pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Linda; Gany, Francesca; Rosenfeld, Peri; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Sharif, Iman; Behar, Elana; Ambizas, Emily; Patel, Priti; Schwartz, Lauren; Mangione, Robert

    2007-11-01

    An essential component of quality care for limited English proficient (LEP) patients is language access. Linguistically accessible medication instructions are particularly important, given the serious consequences of error and patient responsibility for managing often complex medication regimens on their own. Approximately 21 million people in the U.S. were LEP at the time of the 2000 census, representing a 50% increase since 1990. Little information is available on their access to comprehensible medication instructions. In an effort to address this knowledge gap, we conducted a telephone survey of 200 randomly selected NYC pharmacies. The primary focus of the survey was translation need, capacity, and practice. The majority of pharmacists reported that they had LEP patients daily (88.0%) and had the capacity to translate prescription labels (79.5%). Among pharmacies serving LEP patients on a daily basis, just 38.6% translated labels daily; 22.7% never translated. In multivariate analysis, pharmacy type (OR = 4.08, 95%CI = 1.55-10.74, independent versus chain pharmacies) and proportion of Spanish-speaking LEP persons in the pharmacy's census tract (OR = 1.09, 95%CI = 1.05-1.13 for each 1% increase in Spanish LEP population) were associated with increased label translation. Although 88.5% of the pharmacies had bilingual staff, less than half were pharmacists or pharmacy interns and thus qualified to provide medication counseling. More than 80% of the pharmacies surveyed lacked systematic methods for identifying linguistic needs and for informing patients of translation capabilities. Consistent with efforts to improve language access in other health care settings, the critical gap in language appropriate pharmacy services must be addressed to meet the needs of the nation's large and ever-growing immigrant communities. Pharmacists may require supplemental training on the need and resources for meeting the verbal and written language requirements of their LEP patients

  9. Local Access to Care Programs (LACPs): New Developments in the Access to Care for the Uninsured

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Lynn A; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette; Davern, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Context New, locally based health care access programs are emerging in response to the growing number of uninsured, providing an alternative to health insurance and traditional safety net providers. Although these programs have been largely overlooked in health services research and health policy, they are becoming an important local supplement to the historically overburdened safety net. Methods This article is based on a literature review, Internet search, and key actor interviews to document programs in the United States, using a typology to classify the programs and document key characteristics. Findings Local access to care programs (LACPs) fall outside traditional private and publicly subsidized insurance programs. They have a formal enrollment process, eligibility determination, and enrollment fees that give enrollees access to a network of providers that have agreed to offer free or reduced-price health care services. The forty-seven LACPs documented in this article were categorized into four general models: three-share programs, national-provider networks, county-based indigent care, and local provider–based programs. Conclusions New, locally based health access programs are being developed to meet the health care needs of the growing number of uninsured adults. These programs offer an alternative to traditional health insurance and build on the tradition of county-based care for the indigent. It is important that these locally based, alternative paths to health care services be documented and monitored, as the number of uninsured adults is continuing to grow and these programs are becoming a larger component of the U.S. health care safety net. PMID:18798886

  10. Facilitators of HIV Medical Care Engagement among Former Prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Natalie; Hilliard, Charles; McCuller, William J.; Harawa, Nina T.

    2016-01-01

    Linkage to and retention in medical care is a concern for HIV-positive individuals leaving custody settings in the United States. The minimal existing research points to low rates of entry into care in the months following release and lapsed viral control among releasees who are subsequently reincarcerated. We conducted seven small focus group discussions with 27 HIV-positive individuals who were recently incarceration in a California State prison to understand those factors that facilitated linkage to and retention in HIV care following their release. We used a consensual approach to code and analyze the focus group transcripts. Four main themes emerged from the analysis: 1) interpersonal relationships, 2) professional relationships, 3) coping strategies and resources, and 4) individual attitudes. Improving HIV-related outcomes among individuals after their release from prison requires strengthening supportive relationships, fostering the appropriate attitudes and skills, and ensuring access to resources that stabilize daily living and facilitate the process of accessing care. PMID:26595268

  11. Integrating Primary Medical Care With Addiction Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Weisner, Constance; Mertens, Jennifer; Parthasarathy, Sujaya; Moore, Charles; Lu, Yun

    2010-01-01

    Context The prevalence of medical disorders is high among substance abuse patients, yet medical services are seldom provided in coordination with substance abuse treatment. Objective To examine differences in treatment outcomes and costs between integrated and independent models of medical and substance abuse care as well as the effect of integrated care in a subgroup of patients with substance abuse–related medical conditions (SAMCs). Design Randomized controlled trial conducted between April 1997 and December 1998. Setting and Patients Adult men and women (n=592) who were admitted to a large health maintenance organization chemical dependency program in Sacramento, Calif. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned to receive treatment through an integrated model, in which primary health care was included within the addiction treatment program (n=285), or an independent treatment-as-usual model, in which primary care and substance abuse treatment were provided separately (n=307). Both programs were group based and lasted 8 weeks, with 10 months of aftercare available. Main Outcome Measures Abstinence outcomes, treatment utilization, and costs 6 months after randomization. Results Both groups showed improvement on all drug and alcohol measures. Overall, there were no differences in total abstinence rates between the integrated care and independent care groups (68% vs 63%, P=.18). For patients without SAMCs, there were also no differences in abstinence rates (integrated care, 66% vs independent care, 73%; P=.23) and there was a slight but nonsignificant trend of higher costs for the integrated care group ($367.96 vs $324.09, P=.19). However, patients with SAMCs (n=341) were more likely to be abstinent in the integrated care group than the independent care group (69% vs 55%, P=.006; odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-2.97). This was true for both those with medical (OR, 3.38; 95% CI, 1.68-6.80) and psychiatric (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1

  12. SW Architecture for Access to Medical Information for Knowledge Execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suntae; Shim, Bingu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Cho, Insook

    Recently, many approaches have been studied to author medical knowledge and verify doctor's diagnosis based on the specified knowledge. During the verification, intensive access to medical information is unavoidable. Also, the access approach should consider modifiability in order to cover diverse medical information from the variety of hospitals. This paper presents an approach to generating query language from medical knowledge, and shows software architecture for accessing medical information from hospitals by executing generated query languages. Implementation of this architecture has been deployed in a hospital of South Korea so that it shows the feasibility of the architecture.

  13. Access to care: the physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alan; Ruckle, Janessa E; Sultan, Omar S; Kemble, Stephen

    2011-02-01

    Private practice physicians in Hawaii were surveyed to better understand their impressions of different insurance plans and their willingness to care for patients with those plans. Physician experiences and perspectives were investigated in regard to reimbursement, formulary limitations, pre-authorizations, specialty referrals, responsiveness to problems, and patient knowledge of their plans. The willingness of physicians to accept new patients from specific insurance company programs clearly correlated with the difficulties and limitations physicians perceive in working with the companies (p<0.0012). Survey results indicate that providers in private practice were much more likely to accept University Health Alliance (UHA) and Hawaii Medical Services Association (HMSA) Commercial insurance than Aloha Care Advantage and Aloha Quest. This was likely related to the more favorable impressions of the services, payments, and lower administrative burden offered by those companies compared with others.

  14. [Access to care, precariousness and misery conditions].

    PubMed

    Malicier, D; Feuglet, P

    1996-10-01

    Fraternity among humans is a social trait as old as the world. Among primitive men and in antiquity the most favoured came to the aid of the least favoured. Through the ages, this assistance has taken on various forms: food, money, and free medical care. With the Christian era, such aid became a charitable duty. The throne also came to the assistance of the poor, but here such actions alternated with those of the police, for poverty, engendered delinquency. The French Revolution opened a new era. Thereafter, the poor had certain rights upon society. This immense change led to our present social legislation.

  15. Pioneers in trauma care at Harborview Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Eileen; Hecker, Cynthia J; Butler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Harborview Medical Center in Seattle has been home to the pioneering work of University of Washington (UW) Medicine physicians and staff who have led innovations to improve trauma care for more than 40 years. As the only level I adult and pediatric trauma center and regional burn center for Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho, Harborview provides cares for more than 6500 critically injured trauma and burn patients per year. Our physicians, researchers and staff are recognized as national experts and as collaborative partners with nursing in the delivery of outstanding clinical care, research, and education. Beginning with the establishment of Seattle Medic One in the late 1960s, a groundbreaking program to train firefighters as paramedics, Harborview and the work of UW Medicine has been recognized locally and globally as a leader in every component of the ideal trauma system, as defined by the American College of Surgeons: prevention, access, acute hospital care, rehabilitation, education, and research activities.

  16. [Role of pediatric medical home care].

    PubMed

    Garrec, N; Patte, R

    2004-02-01

    According to the decree of 1992, the Paris hospitals (AP-HP) pediatric medical home care network offers care for all children irrespective of their pathology within the framework of a medico-psycho-social therapeutic project provided as an in alternative to traditional hospitalization. 30% of the admissions occur during the neonatal period. We studied the files of 249 newborn or preterm infants given in medical home care between January and September 2003. 71% were preterm infants. 46.4% of the children had been admitted at least once in an intensive care unit. At their admission in the pediatric medical home care unit, the median corrected gestational age was 39 weeks 6 days; 43% weighed less than 2500g, 9% less than 2000g, 22.5% of the preterm infants had a corrected gestational age less than 37 weeks, 65% of the infants presented gastrointestinal and/or feeding disorders. The average duration of stay in the pediatric medical home care unit was 20.5 days. The competence of pediatric nurses working in an integrated multidisciplinary team including psychologists and social workers is the key to success of pediatric medical home care.

  17. 20 CFR 702.401 - Medical care defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical care defined. 702.401 Section 702.401... WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Medical Care and Supervision § 702.401 Medical care defined. (a) Medical care shall include medical, surgical, and other...

  18. Effect of health insurance type on access to care.

    PubMed

    Froelich, John M; Beck, Ryan; Novicoff, Wendy M; Saleh, K J

    2013-10-01

    Growing orthopedic and nonorthopedic literature illustrates the point that having health insurance does not equal having access to care. The goal of this study was to evaluate the burden placed on patients to gain access to outpatient orthopedic care. For this study, burden was quantified as the distance traveled by the patient to be seen in clinic. This study was a retrospective review of all new patient encounters at an adult orthopedic outpatient clinic in an academic tertiary referral center over 1 calendar year. All patients were stratified into 4 categories: commercial/private insurance, Medic-aid, Medicare, and uninsured/private pay. The average distance traveled by each patient to the center was then calculated based on the patient's billing zip code. Patient visits were further stratified based on whether the patients were seen by 1 of 3 different categories of providers: general orthopedics/adult reconstruction, spine, and sports/upper extremity. The study group comprised 774 (31.1%) Medicaid patients, 653 (26.2%) Medicare patients, 917 (36.8%) commercial/private insurance patients, and 146 (5.9%) uninsured/private pay patients. The average 1-way distance traveled was 36.2 miles for Medicaid patients, 21.3 miles for Medicare patients, 24.1 miles for commercial/private insurance patients, and 25.3 miles for uninsured/private pay patients (P<.00). Subgroup analysis noted a statistical difference in distance traveled for the general orthopedics/adult reconstruction and sports/upper extremity groups. The study's findings suggest that having insurance does not equal access to outpatient orthopedic care at a single institution. The specific burdens that each group faces to gain access to care are unclear.

  19. Deported Mexican migrants: health status and access to care

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Niño, Julián Alfredo; Ramírez-Valdés, Carlos Jacobo; Cerecero-Garcia, Diego; Bojorquez-Chapela, Ietza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the health status and access to care of forced-return Mexican migrants deported through the Mexico-United States border and to compare it with the situation of voluntary-return migrants. METHODS Secondary data analysis from the Survey on Migration in Mexico’s Northern Border from 2012. This is a continuous survey, designed to describe migration flows between Mexico and the United States, with a mobile-population sampling design. We analyzed indicators of health and access to care among deported migrants, and compare them with voluntary-return migrants. Our analysis sample included 2,680 voluntary-return migrants, and 6,862 deportees. We employ an ordinal multiple logistic regression model, to compare the adjusted odds of having worst self-reported health between the studied groups. RESULTS As compared to voluntary-return migrants, deportees were less likely to have medical insurance in the United States (OR = 0.05; 95%CI 0.04;0.06). In the regression model a poorer self-perceived health was found to be associated with having been deported (OR = 1.71, 95%CI 1.52;1.92), as well as age (OR = 1.03, 95%CI 1.02;1.03) and years of education (OR = 0.94 95%CI 0.93;0.95). CONCLUSIONS According to our results, deportees had less access to care while in the United States, as compared with voluntary-return migrants. Our results also showed an independent and statistically significant association between deportation and having poorer self-perceived health. To promote the health and access to care of deported Mexican migrants coming back from the United States, new health and social policies are required. PMID:25119943

  20. Primary medical care in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, J T

    1990-01-01

    The extremely complex and rapidly but unevenly developing system of primary care in Spain is described. The health centre movement in Spain merits close attention, and could be a useful model for our own service. PMID:2117951

  1. Medical care evaluation studies in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, J G

    1979-02-01

    This report describes the selection, design, conduct, analysis, and application of medical care evaluation studies in long-term care facilities (skilled nursing homes) in a regional program in the Rochester region of upstate New York. Eight examples are presented to highlight methodologic approaches and problems. They are classified under four general headings: Administration Audits, Diagnosis-specific Studies, Care Modality-specific Studies, and General Outcome Indicators. The implementation of results and recommendations from the studies is discussed and an application of "tracer" methodology for assessing the components of care activities in long-term facilities is described. Problems and challenges in long-term quality care are outlined.

  2. Gender and care: access to HIV testing, care, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Remien, Robert H; Chowdhury, Jenifar; Mokhbat, Jacques E; Soliman, Cherif; Adawy, Maha El; El-Sadr, Wafaa

    2009-07-01

    HIV transmission and occurrence of AIDS in the Middle East and North Africa region (MENA) is increasing, while access to ART in the region lags behind most low to middle-income countries. Like in other parts of the world, there is a growing feminization of the epidemic, and men and women each confront unique barriers to adequate HIV prevention and treatment services, while sharing some common obstacles as well. This paper focuses on important gender dimensions of access to HIV testing, care and treatment in the MENA region, including issues related to stigma, religion and morality, gender power imbalances, work status, and migration. Culturally specific policy and programmatic recommendations for improving HIV prevention and treatment in the MENA region are offered.

  3. Access Barriers to Dental Health Care in Children with Disability. A Questionnaire Study of Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerreth, Karolina; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: A patient's with disability everyday life is rife with many limitations such as architectural, transport, information as well as medical, psychological, legal, economic and social barriers. The aim of this study was to evaluate access to dental health care of special-care schoolchildren with intellectual disability on the basis of…

  4. 77 FR 14706 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment... the Federal Register, 77 FR 6916, on accessibility standards for medical diagnostic equipment and... equipment, in consultation with the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. The Access...

  5. Widening Access by Changing the Criteria for Selecting Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powis, David; Hamilton, John; McManus, I. C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review the principles underlying medical student selection from the perspective of the imperatives of widening access policies. Setting: A recent government initiative has increased the number of medical school places in Great Britain. A priority is to widen access to sections of the community hitherto inadequately represented in…

  6. Intraosseous access in trauma by air medical retrieval teams.

    PubMed

    Sheils, Mark; Ross, Mark; Eatough, Noel; Caputo, Nicholas D

    2014-01-01

    Trauma accounts for a significant portion of overall mortality globally. Hemorrhage is the second major cause of mortality in the prehospital environment. Air medical retrieval services throughout the world have been developed to help improve the outcomes of patients suffering from a broad range of medical conditions, including trauma. These services often utilize intraosseous (IO) devices as an alternative means for access of both medically ill and traumatically injured patients in austere environments. However, studies have suggested that IO access cannot reach acceptable rates for massive transfusion. We review the subject to find the answer of whether IO access should be performed by air medical teams in the prehospital setting, or would central venous (CVC) access be more appropriate? We decided to assess the literature for capacity of IO access to meet resuscitation requirements in the prehospital management of trauma. We also decided to compare the insertion and complication characteristics of IO and CVC access.

  7. 78 FR 22527 - TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project AGENCY: Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice of Extension of the TRICARE South Region United States Coast Guard Access to Care Demonstration... fiscal year to TRICARE authorized Urgent Care Centers without obtaining an authorization from...

  8. Medical care evaluation: an old new idea.

    PubMed

    Christoffel, T

    1976-02-01

    The recent implementation of medical care evaluation (medical audit) systems in the nation's hospitals is a phenomenon of major consequence. The systematic measurement of the quality of patient care based on outcome data is becoming a part of the delivery of that care. Sixty years ago Dr. E. A. Codman developed and crusaded for a similar idea that seemed at one point to be on the threshold of widespread acceptance in U. S. hospitals, but for reasons other than lack of conceptual soundness the effort failed. In this article the author reviews the history of this early approach to the evaluation of patient care quality and suggests some lessons this historical episode holds for today's health care professionals.

  9. Mobile Access to Clinical Information at the Point of Care

    PubMed Central

    Mncube-Barnes, Fatima M.; Lee, Ben; Esuruoso, Olumuyiwa; Gona, Phil N.; Daphnis, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Using library subscriptions and accessible on handheld devices, this study sought to promote authoritative health information apps, and evidence-based point-of-care resources. Methods Three cohorts of internal medicine residents were issued iPads at the beginning of their second year, and were trained to skillfully access resources from the digital library. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were respectively administered at the beginning of the second year and end of the third year of training. The residents' computer experience and computer knowledge was assessed. Additionally, before and after formal introduction to iPads, perceptions on the use of computers to access clinical information were assessed. Survey responses were compared using two sample methods and summarized through descriptive statistics. Results Sixty-eight residents completed the pre-survey questionnaires and 45 completed the post-surveys. There were significant improvements in the residents' level of computer experience, and familiarity with medical apps. Furthermore, there was increased knowledge obtained in accessing clinical information through electronic medical records. Residents positively perceived the potential effects of computers and electronic medical records in medicine. Conclusion Study findings suggested that health science libraries can be instrumental in providing search skills to health professionals, especially residents in training. Participants showed appreciation of iPads and library support that facilitated successful completion of their related tasks. Replicating this study with a larger sample derived from multiple sites is recommended for future studies. Participation of mid-level healthcare professionals, such as Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners is suggested. PMID:28210418

  10. Access to Specialist Care in Rural Saskatchewan: The Saskatchewan Rural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Karunanayake, Chandima P.; Rennie, Donna C.; Hagel, Louise; Lawson, Joshua; Janzen, Bonnie; Pickett, William; Dosman, James A.; Pahwa, Punam

    2015-01-01

    The role of place has emerged as an important factor in determining people’s health experiences. Rural populations experience an excess in mortality and morbidity compared to those in urban settings. One of the factors thought to contribute to this rural-urban health disparity is access to healthcare. The objective of this analysis was to examine access to specialized medical care services and several possible determinants of access to services in a distinctly rural population in Canada. In winter 2010, we conducted a baseline mail survey of 11,982 households located in rural Saskatchewan, Canada. We obtained 4620 completed household surveys. A key informant for each household responded to questions about access to medical specialists and the exact distance traveled to these services. Correlates of interest included the location of the residence within the province and within each household, socioeconomic status, household smoking status, median age of household residents, number of non-respiratory chronic conditions and number of current respiratory conditions. Analyses were conducted using log binomial regression for the outcome of interest. The overall response rate was 52%. Of households who required a visit to a medical specialist in the past 12 months, 23% reported having difficulty accessing specialist care. The magnitude of risk for encountering difficulty accessing medical specialist care services increased with the greatest distance categories. Accessing specialist care professionals by rural residents was particularly difficult for persons with current respiratory conditions. PMID:27417750

  11. Appropriate medical care for persons in detention.

    PubMed

    Idris, I

    2003-03-01

    The people who are in detention are screened by the Medical Officer of the Prison and if they are found to be unwell, these prisoners will be accommodated in the sickbay and medical treatment will be provided. If their sickness needs further investigations and management, they will be sent to the Government Hospital. If the prisoners are found to have infectious or contagious diseases, steps will be taken to prevent the spread of these diseases to other prisoners in the prison. Prisoners are given time to exercise to maintain good health and their clothing are regularly washed to make sure that they will not contract skin diseases, e.g. scabies, ringworm, etc. The Prison Department since 1989 has increasing numbers of HIV positive prisoners. The Department complies with this problem by sending staff for courses, lectures and seminars so that they will be able to handle these prisoners more efficiently in the prison. When these HIV/AIDS prisoners' condition turns bad, they are usually transferred to a Government Hospital. Another of the Prison Department's prominent medical problem among the prisoners is drug addiction. Staff trained with skill and techniques are counselors for the drug related prisoners. Realizing and in anticipation that the sickbays in the prisons are going to be full of HIV/AIDS prisoners and drug related prisoners, special attention will be given to more allocation to upgrade the sickbays in the prison. White attires will be provided to the sick prisoners in the sickbays so that they will look neat and clean. More doctors, medical assistants and nurses will be employed so that appropriate medical care or rather more appropriate medical care can be provided to the sick prisoners in the prisons. The Prison Department is in the process of privatizing medical care for prisoners in the prison and the Department is also trying to convert some prisons to be medical prisons so that adequate medical care can be given to the sick prisoners.

  12. Lessons Learned from an Advanced Access Trial Within a Canadian Armed Forces Primary Care Clinic.

    PubMed

    Singh, P Tony

    2017-01-01

    Accessibility is a key element of an effective primary care system. Literature has outlined that primary care practices have successfully employed an advanced access scheduler to improve accessibility to booked appointments and consequently enhance patient experience and outcomes. In 2015, a Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) primary care facility in Ottawa trialed an advanced access scheduler. Based on the unique characteristics of a CAF medical clinic and the patient population, this trial produced six critical lessons, which include maintenance of a stable base of clinicians, correcting rostering mismatches, eliminating appointment backlogs, acquiring required information systems, improved understanding of patient demand and communicating changes effectively. These lessons may be utilized by similar organizations to successfully integrate an advanced access scheduler within their primary care facilities.

  13. Medical education and indigent patient care.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Deborah S

    2003-12-01

    The 20th century model of medical education has focused on a network of urban medical centers serving primarily indigent patients in an unspoken contract of medical services in exchange for student and resident education. The improvement in federal and state reimbursement for indigent care services, along with the decline in reimbursement rates from the private sector, has led to competition for these patients from nonacademic providers. As numbers of patients seeking care at urban teaching centers have steadily declined, concerns about adequate teaching volume and revenue generation have led to very creative problem-solving. Bringing marketing concerns into the indigent care environment is not a straightforward undertaking, but the rewards might far exceed the simple goal of "getting our numbers back up."

  14. Access to health care and religion among young American men.

    PubMed

    Gillum, R Frank; Jarrett, Nicole; Obisesan, Thomas O

    2009-12-01

    In order to elucidate cultural correlates of utilization of primary health services by young adult men, we investigated religion in which one was raised and service utilization. Using data from a national survey we tested the hypothesis that religion raised predicts access to and utilization of a regular medical care provider, examinations, HIV and other STD testing and counseling at ages 18-44 years in men born between 1958 and 1984. We also hypothesized that religion raised would be more predictive of utilization for Hispanic Americans and non-Hispanic Black Americans than for non-Hispanic White Americans. The study included a national sample of 4276 men aged 18-44 years. Descriptive and multivariate statistics were used to assess the hypotheses using data on religion raised and responses to 14 items assessing health care access and utilization. Compared to those raised in no religion, those raised mainline Protestant were more likely (p < 0.01) to report a usual source of care (67% vs. 79%), health insurance coverage (66% vs. 80%) and physical examination (43% vs. 48%). Religion raised was not associated with testicular exams, STD counseling or HIV testing. In multivariate analyses controlling for confounders, significant associations of religion raised with insurance coverage, a physician as usual source of care and physical examination remained which varied by race/ethnicity. In conclusion, although religion is a core aspect of culture that deserves further study as a possible determinant of health care utilization, we were not able to document any consistent pattern of significant association even in a population with high rates of religious participation.

  15. Access Barriers to Prenatal Care in Emerging Adult Latinas.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosamar

    2016-03-01

    Despite efforts to improve access to prenatal care, emerging adult Latinas in the United States continue to enter care late in their pregnancies and/or underutilize these services. Since little is known about emerging adult Latinas and their prenatal care experiences, the purpose of this study was to identify actual and perceived prenatal care barriers in a sample of 54 emerging adult Latinas between 18 and 21 years of age. More than 95% of the sample experienced personal and institutional barriers when attempting to access prenatal care. Results from this study lend support for policy changes for time away from school or work to attend prenatal care and for group prenatal care.

  16. 75 FR 49507 - Recovery Policy, RP9525.4, Emergency Medical Care and Medical Evacuations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Recovery Policy, RP9525.4, Emergency Medical Care and Medical..., Emergency Medical Care and Medical Evacuations. This is an existing policy that is scheduled for review to... policy identifies the extraordinary emergency medical care and medical evacuation expenses that...

  17. Medical Care Evaluation: An Experience in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandlow, L. J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The educational contribution of medical care evaluation (MCE) has been portrayed as the identification of physicians' educational needs. A study of 13 MCE committees was undertaken to document the learning that occurs in these committees and to discover the conditions affecting their educational value. (Author/MLW)

  18. Medical ethics in pediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    Orioles, Alberto; Morrison, Wynne E

    2013-04-01

    Ethically charged situations are common in pediatric critical care. Most situations can be managed with minimal controversy within the medical team or between the team and patients/families. Familiarity with institutional resources, such as hospital ethics committees, and national guidelines, such as publications from the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Medical Association, or Society of Critical Care Medicine, are an essential part of the toolkit of any intensivist. Open discussion with colleagues and within the multidisciplinary team can also ensure that when difficult situations arise, they are addressed in a proactive, evidence-based, and collegial manner.

  19. [Availability and quality of hi-tech medical care: the multilevel analysis in the system "doctor-patient"].

    PubMed

    Belostotskiĭ, A V; Grishina, N K

    2010-01-01

    The feature contains the results of public opinion research on accessibility and quality of high-tech medical attendance. The received data, covering a wide range of issues of organization, accessibility, quality and effectiveness of cardiac care, interaction of estimates from the positions of different groups of respondents, which may serve as basis for targeted management decisions to improve the medical care of the population by high-tech medical care in modern conditions and in the near future.

  20. Caring to Care: Applying Noddings' Philosophy to Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Dorene F; Hirsh, David A; Monie, Daphne; Weil, Henry; Richards, Boyd F

    2016-04-26

    The authors argue that Nel Noddings' philosophy, "an ethic of caring," may illuminate how students learn to be caring physicians from their experience of being in a caring, reciprocal relationship with teaching faculty. In her philosophy, Noddings acknowledges two important contextual continuities: duration and space, which the authors speculate exist within longitudinal integrated clerkships. In this Perspective, the authors highlight core features of Noddings' philosophy and explore its applicability to medical education. They apply Noddings' philosophy to a subset of data from a previously published longitudinal case study to explore its "goodness of fit" with the experience of eight students in the 2012 cohort of the Columbia-Bassett longitudinal integrated clerkship. In line with Noddings' philosophy, the authors' supplementary analysis suggests that students (1) recognized caring when they talked about "being known" by teaching faculty who "cared for" and "trusted" them; (2) responded to caring by demonstrating enthusiasm, action, and responsibility toward patients; and (3) acknowledged that duration and space facilitated caring relations with teaching faculty. The authors discuss how Noddings' philosophy provides a useful conceptual framework to apply to medical education design and to future research on caring-oriented clinical training, such as longitudinal integrated clerkships.

  1. Health Care Access, Use, and Satisfaction Among Disabled Medicaid Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Teresa A.; Long, Sharon K.; Kendall, Stephanie

    2002-01-01

    Despite being a vulnerable and costly population, little is known about disabled Medicaid beneficiaries. Using data from a 1999-2000 survey, we describe the population and their health care experiences in terms of access, use, and satisfaction with care. Results indicate that disabled beneficiaries are a unique population with wide-ranging circumstances and health conditions. Our results on access to care were indeterminate: by some measures, they had good access, but by others they did not. Beneficiaries' assessments of their health care were more clear: The bulk of the sample rated one or more area of care as being fair or poor. PMID:12690698

  2. Spatial analysis of elderly access to primary care services

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Lee R; Root, Elisabeth; Anselin, Luc; Lozano-Gracia, Nancy; Koschinsky, Julia

    2006-01-01

    Background Admissions for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs) are considered preventable admissions, because they are unlikely to occur when good preventive health care is received. Thus, high rates of admissions for ACSCs among the elderly (persons aged 65 or above who qualify for Medicare health insurance) are signals of poor preventive care utilization. The relevant geographic market to use in studying these admission rates is the primary care physician market. Our conceptual model assumes that local market conditions serving as interventions along the pathways to preventive care services utilization can impact ACSC admission rates. Results We examine the relationships between market-level supply and demand factors on market-level rates of ACSC admissions among the elderly residing in the U.S. in the late 1990s. Using 6,475 natural markets in the mainland U.S. defined by The Health Resources and Services Administration's Primary Care Service Area Project, spatial regression is used to estimate the model, controlling for disease severity using detailed information from Medicare claims files. Our evidence suggests that elderly living in impoverished rural areas or in sprawling suburban places are about equally more likely to be admitted for ACSCs. Greater availability of physicians does not seem to matter, but greater prevalence of non-physician clinicians and international medical graduates, relative to U.S. medical graduates, does seem to reduce ACSC admissions, especially in poor rural areas. Conclusion The relative importance of non-physician clinicians and international medical graduates in providing primary care to the elderly in geographic areas of greatest need can inform the ongoing debate regarding whether there is an impending shortage of physicians in the United States. These findings support other authors who claim that the existing supply of physicians is perhaps adequate, however the distribution of them across the landscape may not be

  3. Streamlining medical image sharing for continuity of care.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Ken H

    2013-01-01

    Sharing patient medical history can be inconvenient and unreliable. Massive strides have been made to address the wasteful aspects of healthcare today, but hospitals and healthcare providers are still searching for ways to improve the efficiency of medical image sharing. To ensure that a patient's historical medical images can be promptly accessed by all caregivers, a solution architecture is needed that anticipates and supports the need for images to be available along with the rest of the patient's required medical history. Healthcare facilities can quickly and affordably use existing technologies, combined with a unified approach for sharing images to greatly improve transitions of care for their patients. Images would no longer need to be burned on to CDs and transported.

  4. Primary Care Provider Perspectives on Electronic Medication Refill History.

    PubMed

    Comer, Dominique; Mearns, Elizabeth; Olivere, Lindsey; Elliott, Daniel J

    Improvements in health information technology have made aggregate multipayer pharmacy claims data increasingly available through the electronic health record (EHR). The objective of this study was to assess the current awareness, utilization, and impact of pharmacy history data available in the EHR on primary care provider (PCP) decision making. A 14-question survey was distributed to all PCPs in a large medical practice. Of the 55/72 responding PCPs, 47 (85.5%) were aware of the EHR medication history function, and 36 (65.5%) had used it previously. Respondents indicated the medication history could be most useful when considering prescribing a narcotic (33/36, 92%) and when addressing nonadherence concerns (28/35, 80%). Barriers included delays in data loading and the time pressures of clinical practice. Access to aggregate multipayer pharmacy history data has the potential to affect medication reconciliation, yet future implementation should focus on making these data complete and easily available in routine practice.

  5. Computers, Health Care, and Medical Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Thomas L.; Korpman, Ralph A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the new discipline of medical information science (MIS) and examines some problem-solving approaches used in its application in the clinical laboratory, emphasizing automation by computer technology. The health care field is viewed as one having overlapping domains of clinical medicine, health management and statistics, and fundamental…

  6. Military Medical Revolution: Prehospital Combat Casualty Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Military medical revolution: Prehospital combat casualty care Lorne H. Blackbourne, MD, David G. Baer, PhD, Brian J. Eastridge, MD, Bijan Kheirabadi...sur- vival for patients with combat-related traumatic injuries. J Trauma. 2009;66(suppl 4):S69 S76. 33. Eastridge BJ, Hardin M, Cantrell J, Oetjen

  7. Telehealth: Increasing Access to High Quality Care by Expanding the Role of Technology in Correctional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jeremy D.; Badowski, Melissa E.

    2017-01-01

    The United States (US) has a large correctional population. However, many incarcerated persons lack access to evidence-based, up-to-date medical care, particularly by subspecialty providers, due to limitations of geography, travel, cost and other resources. The use of telehealth technologies can remove these barriers, increasing access to high quality, multidisciplinary care. Studies have shown that, with telemedicine, timely triage and medical management can be provided across many disciplines, which may lead to improved clinical outcomes and significant cost savings. PMID:28208807

  8. Knowledge translation in international emergency medical care.

    PubMed

    Arnold, L Kristian; Alomran, Hisham; Anantharaman, V; Halpern, Pinchas; Hauswald, Mark; Malmquist, Pia; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Rajapakse, Bishan; Ranney, Megan; Razzak, Junaid

    2007-11-01

    More than 90% of the world population receives emergency medical care from different types of practitioners with little or no specific training in the field and with variable guidance and oversight. Emergency medical care is being recognized by actively practicing physicians around the world as an increasingly important domain in the overall health services package for a community. The know-do gap is well recognized as a major impediment to high-quality health care in much of the world. Knowledge translation principles for application in this highly varied young domain will require investigation of numerous aspects of the knowledge synthesis, exchange, and application domains in order to bring the greatest benefit of both explicit and tacit knowledge to increasing numbers of the world's population. This article reviews some of the issues particular to knowledge development and transfer in the international domain. The authors present a set of research proposals developed from a several-month online discussion among practitioners and teachers of emergency medical care in 16 countries from around the globe and from all economic strata, aimed at improving the flow of knowledge from developers and repositories of knowledge to the front lines of clinical care.

  9. The Role of International Medical Graduates in America?s Small Rural Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagopian, Amy; Thompson, Matthew J.; Kaltenbach, Emily; Hart, L. Gary

    2004-01-01

    Critical access hospitals (CAHs) are a federal Medicare category for isolated rural facilities with 15 or fewer acute care beds that receive cost-based reimbursement from Medicare. Purpose: This study examines the role of foreign-born international medical graduates (IMGs) in the staffing of CAHs. Methods: Chief executive officers (CEOs) of CAH…

  10. Adolescent health care: improving access by school-based service.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, C; Mulligan, D; Kaufman, A; Davis, S; Hunt, K; Kalishman, N; Wallerstein, N

    1985-10-01

    Participants in this discussion of the potential of school-based health care services for adolescents included family medicine physicians, school health coordinators, a school nurse, and a community worker. It was noted that health care for adolescents tends to be either inaccessible or underutilized, largely because of a lack of sensitivity to adolescent culture and values. An ideal service for adolescents would offer immediate services for crises, strict confidentiality, ready access to prescribed medications, a sliding-scale scheme, and a staff that is tolerant of divergent values and life-styles. School-based pilot adolescent clinics have been established by the University of New Mexico's Department of Family, Community, and Emergency Medicine to test the community-oriented health care model. On-site clinics provide urgent medical care, family planning, pregnancy testing, psychological counseling, alcohol and drug counseling, and classroom health education. Experience with these programs has demonstrated the necessity for an alliance among the health team and the school administration, parents, and students. Financial, ethical, and political factors can serve as constraints to school-based programs. In some cases, school administrators have been resistant to the provision of contraception to students on school grounds and parents have been unwilling to accept the adolescent's right to confidentiality. These problems in part stem from having 2 separate systems, each with its own values, orientation, and responsibilities, housed in 1 facility. In addition, there have been problems generating awareness of the school-based clinic among students. Health education theater groups, peer counseling, and student-run community services have been effective, however, in increasing student participation. It has been helpful to mold clinic services to meet the needs identified by teenagers themselves. There is an interest not only in curative services, but in services focused

  11. 32 CFR 564.39 - Medical care benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Medical care benefits. 564.39 Section 564.39... REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.39 Medical care benefits. (a) A member of the ARNG who incurs a disease or injury under the conditions enumerated herein is entitled to medical care, in...

  12. Access to continued-use medication among older adults, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Karynna Pimentel; Brito, Alexandre dos Santos; Rodrigues, Claudia Soares; Luiz, Ronir Raggio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence and associated access factors for all continued-use prescription drugs and the ways in which they can be obtained. METHODS Data was obtained from the 2008 Household National Survey. The sample comprised 27,333 individuals above 60 years who reported that they used continued-use prescription drugs. A descriptive analysis and binary and multiple multinomial logistic regressions were performed. RESULTS 86.0% of the older adults had access to all the medication they needed, and among them, 50.7% purchased said medication. Those who obtained medication from the public health system were younger (60-64 years), did not have health insurance plans, and belonged to the lower income groups. It is remarkable that 14.0% of the subjects still had no access to any continued-use medication, and for those with more than four chronic diseases, this amount reached 22.0%. Those with a greater number of chronic diseases ran a higher risk of not having access to all the medication they needed. CONCLUSIONS There are some groups of older adults with an increased risk of not obtaining all the medication they need and of purchasing it. The results of this study are expected to contribute to guide programs and plans for access to medication in Brazil. PMID:25741646

  13. Young adults with spina bifida transitioned to a medical home: a survey of medical care in Jacksonville, Florida.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Antonio M; Wood, David L; Keeley, Cortney; James, Hector E; Aldana, Philipp R

    2015-10-23

    OBJECT The transition of the young adult with spina bifida (YASB) from pediatric to adult health care is considered a priority by organized pediatrics. There is a paucity of transition programs and related studies. Jacksonville Health and Transition Services (JaxHATS) is one such transition program in Jacksonville, Florida. This study's purpose was to evaluate the health care access, utilization, and quality of life (QOL) of a group of YASBs who have transitioned from pediatric care. METHODS A survey tool addressing access to health care and quality of health and life was developed based on an established survey. Records of the Spinal Defects Clinic held at Wolfson Children's Hospital and JaxHATS Clinic were reviewed and YASBs (> 18 and < 30 years old) were identified. RESULTS Ten of the 12 invited YASBs in the Jacksonville area completed the surveys. The mean age of respondents was 25.1 years. All reported regular medical home visits, 8 with JaxHATS and 2 with other family care groups. All reported easy access to medical care and routine visits to spina bifida (SB) specialists; none reported difficulty or delays in obtaining health care. Only 2 patients required emergent care in the last year for an SB-related medical problem. Seven respondents reported very good to excellent QOL. Family, lifestyle, and environmental factors were also examined. CONCLUSIONS In this small group of YASBs with a medical home, easy access to care for medical conditions was the norm, with few individuals having recent emergency visits and almost all reporting at least a good overall QOL. Larger studies of YASBs are needed to evaluate the positive effects of medical homes on health and QOL in this population.

  14. Expanding patient access to quality medication-related information: the potential of medication hotlines to improve patient adherence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Amy R; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-05-01

    Medication nonadherence is a widespread problem that compromises treatment outcomes, particularly in schizophrenia. Weersink et al. (Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol, 2015) describe telephone calls to a national medicines information line, with a focus on queries related to antipsychotic medications. Their analysis of callers' questions and concerns offers a valuable window into patient and caregiver perspectives. Given that many callers reported that they had not shared these concerns with a health care provider, this study also highlights the capacity of medication hotlines to address unmet needs. Establishing and maintaining long-term treatment regimens is a complex task, and truly patient-centered care requires a variety of creative and accessible support resources. Medication lines have the potential to serve as a resource and to provide proactive and timely adherence support.

  15. Open Access Publishing in the Field of Medical Informatics.

    PubMed

    Kuballa, Stefanie

    2017-05-01

    The open access paradigm has become an important approach in today's information and communication society. Funders and governments in different countries stipulate open access publications of funded research results. Medical informatics as part of the science, technology and medicine disciplines benefits from many research funds, such as National Institutes of Health in the US, Wellcome Trust in UK, German Research Foundation in Germany and many more. In this study an overview of the current open access programs and conditions of major journals in the field of medical informatics is presented. It was investigated whether there are suitable options and how they are shaped. Therefore all journals in Thomson Reuters Web of Science that were listed in the subject category "Medical Informatics" in 2014 were examined. An Internet research was conducted by investigating the journals' websites. It was reviewed whether journals offer an open access option with a subsequent check of conditions as for example the type of open access, the fees and the licensing. As a result all journals in the field of medical informatics that had an impact factor in 2014 offer an open access option. A predominantly consistent pricing range was determined with an average fee of 2.248 € and a median fee of 2.207 €. The height of a journals' open access fee did not correlate with the height of its Impact Factor. Hence, medical informatics journals have recognized the trend of open access publishing, though the vast majority of them are working with the hybrid method. Hybrid open access may however lead to problems in questions of double dipping and the often stipulated gold open access.

  16. Justice and the moral acceptability of rationing medical care: the Oregon experiment.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R M; Drought, T

    1992-02-01

    The Oregon Basic Health Services Act of 1989 seeks to establish universal access to basic medical care for all currently uninsured Oregon residents. To control the increasing cost of medical care, the Oregon plan will restrict funding according to a priority list of medical interventions. The basic level of medical care provided to residents with incomes below the federal poverty line will vary according to the funds made available by the Oregon legislature. A rationing plan such as Oregon's which potentially excludes medically necessary procedures from the basic level of health care may be just, for the right to publically-sponsored medical care is restricted by opposing rights of private property. However, the moral acceptability of the Oregon plan cannot be determined in the absence of knowing the level of resources to be provided. Finally, Oregon to date has failed to include the individuals being rationed in discussions as to how the scarce resources are to be distributed.

  17. Medical imaging techniques: implications for nursing care.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Alison

    The four basic techniques of medical imaging are X-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance and radionuclide. This article describes imaging techniques that display anatomical structure and those that are better at showing the physiological function of organs and tissues. Safety and preparation relating to nursing practice are discussed. Understanding the purpose and limitations of the different imaging techniques is important for providing best patient care.

  18. Inflation in DoD Medical Care.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    and adjust for in the CPI. Not only is it Elaine Cardenas , "The CPI for Hospital Services: Concepts and Procedures," Monthly Labor Review July 1996...the Medical Care Services Component," Monthly Labor Review, May 1988, p. 24. These issues are discussed by Elaine Cardenas , "The CPI for Hospital...the following algebraic identity: CMI,+1 -CMIt=±[(bu+] -bit)xXu+

  19. International differences in medical care practices

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Klim

    1989-01-01

    An overview of several aspects of international comparisons of medical care utilization is presented with a discussion of the usefulness of such comparisons in identifying geographic variations in utilization and in elucidating the nature of clinical decisionmaking regarding various procedures. The discussion includes the purposes of conducting international studies as well as the methodological and policy issues involved. Brief descriptions of some of the studies that have been conducted are also provided. PMID:10318366

  20. Prioritizing health disparities in medical education to improve care

    PubMed Central

    Awosogba, Temitope; Betancourt, Joseph R.; Conyers, F. Garrett; Estapé, Estela S.; Francois, Fritz; Gard, Sabrina J.; Kaufman, Arthur; Lunn, Mitchell R.; Nivet, Marc A.; Oppenheim, Joel D.; Pomeroy, Claire; Yeung, Howa

    2015-01-01

    Despite yearly advances in life-saving and preventive medicine, as well as strategic approaches by governmental and social agencies and groups, significant disparities remain in health, health quality, and access to health care within the United States. The determinants of these disparities include baseline health status, race and ethnicity, culture, gender identity and expression, socioeconomic status, region or geography, sexual orientation, and age. In order to renew the commitment of the medical community to address health disparities, particularly at the medical school level, we must remind ourselves of the roles of doctors and medical schools as the gatekeepers and the value setters for medicine. Within those roles are responsibilities toward the social mission of working to eliminate health disparities. This effort will require partnerships with communities as well as with academic centers to actively develop and to implement diversity and inclusion strategies. Besides improving the diversity of trainees in the pipeline, access to health care can be improved, and awareness can be raised regarding population-based health inequalities. PMID:23659676

  1. MIMIC-III, a freely accessible critical care database

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alistair E.W.; Pollard, Tom J.; Shen, Lu; Lehman, Li-wei H.; Feng, Mengling; Ghassemi, Mohammad; Moody, Benjamin; Szolovits, Peter; Anthony Celi, Leo; Mark, Roger G.

    2016-01-01

    MIMIC-III (‘Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care’) is a large, single-center database comprising information relating to patients admitted to critical care units at a large tertiary care hospital. Data includes vital signs, medications, laboratory measurements, observations and notes charted by care providers, fluid balance, procedure codes, diagnostic codes, imaging reports, hospital length of stay, survival data, and more. The database supports applications including academic and industrial research, quality improvement initiatives, and higher education coursework. PMID:27219127

  2. Access to inpatient dermatology care in Pennsylvania hospitals.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Elizabeth; Kovarik, Carrie L; Lipoff, Jules B

    2016-01-01

    Access to care is a known issue in dermatology, and many patients may experience long waiting periods to see a physician. In this study, an anonymous online survey was sent to all 274 Pennsylvania hospitals licensed by the US Department of Health in order to evaluate current levels of access to inpatient dermatology services. Although the response rate to this survey was limited, the data suggest that access to inpatient dermatology services is limited and may be problematic in hospitals across the United States. Innovation efforts and further studies are needed to address this gap in access to care.

  3. A Conceptual Framework of Mapping Access to Health Care across EU Countries: The Patient Access Initiative.

    PubMed

    Souliotis, Kyriakos; Hasardzhiev, Stanimir; Agapidaki, Eirini

    Research evidence suggests that access to health care is the key influential factor for improved population health outcomes and health care system sustainability. Although the importance of addressing barriers in access to health care across European countries is well documented, little has been done to improve the situation. This is due to different definitions, approaches and policies, and partly due to persisting disparities in access within and between European countries. To bridge this gap, the Patient Access Partnership (PACT) developed (a) the '5As' definition of access, which details the five critical elements (adequacy, accessibility, affordability, appropriateness, and availability) of access to health care, (b) a multi-stakeholders' approach for mapping access, and (c) a 13-item questionnaire based on the 5As definition in an effort to address these obstacles and to identify best practices. These tools are expected to contribute effectively to addressing access barriers in practice, by suggesting a common framework and facilitating the exchange of knowledge and expertise, in order to improve access to health care between and within European countries.

  4. A Marxist view of medical care.

    PubMed

    Waitzkin, H

    1978-08-01

    Marxist studies of medical care emphasize political power and economic dominance in capitalist society. Although historically the Marxist paradigm went into eclipse during the early twentieth century, the field has developed rapidly during recent years. The health system mirrors the society's class structure through control over health institutions, stratification of health workers, and limited occupational mobility into health professions. Monopoly capital is manifest in the growth of medical centers, financial penetration by large corporations, and the "medical-industrial complex." Health policy recommendations reflect different interest groups' political and economic goals. The state's intervention in health care generally protects the capitalist economic system and the private sector. Medical ideology helps maintain class structure and patterns of domination. Comparative international research analyzes the effects of imperialism, changes under socialism, and contradictions of health reform in capitalist societies. Historical materialist epidemiology focuses on economic cycles, social stress, illness-generating conditions of work, and sexism. Health praxis, the disciplined uniting of study and action, involves advocacy of "nonreformist reforms" and concrete types of political struggle.

  5. Access to Emergency Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brendan G.; Branas, Charles C.; Metlay, Joshua P.; Sullivan, Ashley F.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Rapid access to emergency services is essential for emergency care sensitive conditions such as acute myocardial infarction, stroke, sepsis, and major trauma. We sought to determine US population access to an emergency department (ED). Methods The National Emergency Department Inventories (NEDI) – USA was used to identify the location, annual visit volume, and teaching status of all EDs in the US. EDs were categorized as 1) any ED, 2) by patient volume, and 3) by teaching status. Driving distances, driving speeds, and prehospital times were estimated using validated models and adjusted for population density. Access was determined by summing the population that could reach an ED within the specified time intervals. Results Overall, 71% of the US population has access to an ED within 30 minutes, and 98% has access within 60 minutes. Access to teaching hospitals was more limited, with 16% having access within 30 minutes and 44% within 60 minutes. Rural states had lower access to all types of EDs. Conclusions Although the majority of the US population has access to an ED, there are regional disparities in ED access, especially by rurality. Future efforts should measure the relationship between access to emergency services and outcomes for emergency care sensitive conditions. The development of a regionalized emergency care delivery system should be explored. PMID:19201059

  6. Mental health consumers' with medical co‐morbidity experience of the transition through tertiary medical services to primary care

    PubMed Central

    Cranwell, Kate; Polacsek, Meg

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Medical comorbidity in people with long‐term mental illness is common and often undetected; however, these consumers frequently experience problems accessing and receiving appropriate treatment in public health‐care services. The aim of the present study was to understand the lived experience of mental health consumers with medical comorbidity and their carers transitioning through tertiary medical to primary care services. An interpretative, phenomenological analysis approach was used, and semistructured, video‐recorded, qualitative interviews were used with 12 consumers and four primary caregivers. Four main themes and related subthemes were abstracted from the data, highlighting consumer's and carers’ experience of transition through tertiary medical to primary care services: (i) accessing tertiary services is difficult and time consuming; (ii) contrasting experiences of clinician engagement and support; (iii) lack of continuity between tertiary medical and primary care services; and (iv) Mental Health Hospital Admission Reduction Programme (MH HARP) clinicians facilitating transition. Our findings have implications for organisational change, expanding the role of MH HARP clinicians (whose primary role is to provide consumers with intensive support and care coordination to prevent avoidable tertiary medical hospital use), and the employment of consumer and carer consultants in tertiary medical settings, especially emergency departments. PMID:26735771

  7. Depression and suicide ideation among students accessing campus health care.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Sara; Wiegel, Jennifer R; Mundt, Marlon; Brown, David; Saewyc, Elizabeth; Heiligenstein, Eric; Harahan, Brian; Fleming, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Depression and suicide are of increasing concern on college campuses. This article presents data from the College Health Intervention Projects on the frequency of depression and suicide ideation among 1,622 college students who accessed primary care services in 4 university clinics in the Midwest, Northwest, and Canada. Students completed the Beck Depression Inventory and other measures related to exercise patterns, alcohol use, sensation seeking, and violence. The frequency of depression was similar for men (25%) and women (26%). Thought of suicide was higher for men (13%) than women (10%). Tobacco use, emotional abuse, and unwanted sexual encounters were all associated with screening positive for depression. "Days of exercise per week" was inversely associated with screening positive for depression. Because the majority of students access campus-based student health centers, medical providers can serve a key role in early identification and intervention. With every 4th student reporting symptoms of depression and every 10th student having suicidal thoughts, such interventions are needed.

  8. Implications for informatics given expanding access to care for Veterans and other populations.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian E; Haggstrom, David A; Weiner, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Recent investigations into appointment scheduling within facilities operated by the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) illuminate systemic challenges in meeting its goal of providing timely access to care for all Veterans. In the wake of these investigations, new policies have been enacted to expand access to care at VA facilities as well as non-VA facilities if the VA is unable to provide access within a reasonable timeframe or a Veteran lives more than 40 miles from a VA medical facility. These policies are similar to broader health reform efforts that seek to expand access to care for other vulnerable populations. In this perspective, we discuss the informatics implications of expanded access within the VA and its wider applicability across the US health system. Health systems will require robust health information exchange, to maintain coordination while access to care is expanded. Existing informatics research can guide short-term implementation; furthermore, new research is needed to generate evidence about how best to achieve the long-term aim of expanded access to care.

  9. Large Independent Primary Care Medical Groups

    PubMed Central

    Casalino, Lawrence P.; Chen, Melinda A.; Staub, C. Todd; Press, Matthew J.; Mendelsohn, Jayme L.; Lynch, John T.; Miranda, Yesenia

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE In the turbulent US health care environment, many primary care physicians seek hospital employment. Large physician-owned primary care groups are an alternative, but few physicians or policy makers realize that such groups exist. We wanted to describe these groups, their advantages, and their challenges. METHODS We identified 21 groups and studied 5 that varied in size and location. We conducted interviews with group leaders, surveyed randomly selected group physicians, and interviewed external observers—leaders of a health plan, hospital, and specialty medical group that shared patients with the group. We triangulated responses from group leaders, group physicians, and external observers to identify key themes. RESULTS The groups’ physicians work in small practices, with the group providing economies of scale necessary to develop laboratory and imaging services, health information technology, and quality improvement infrastructure. The groups differ in their size and the extent to which they engage in value-based contracting, though all are moving to increase the amount of financial risk they take for their quality and cost performance. Unlike hospital-employed and multispecialty groups, independent primary care groups can aim to reduce health care costs without conflicting incentives to fill hospital beds and keep specialist incomes high. Each group was positively regarded by external observers. The groups are under pressure, however, to sell to organizations that can provide capital for additional infrastructure to engage in value-based contracting, as well as provide substantial income to physicians from the sale. CONCLUSIONS Large, independent primary care groups have the potential to make primary care attractive to physicians and to improve patient care by combining human scale advantages of physician autonomy and the small practice setting with resources that are important to succeed in value-based contracting. PMID:26755779

  10. 32 CFR 732.22 - Recovery of medical care payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recovery of medical care payments. 732.22 Section 732.22 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NONNAVAL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE Medical and Dental Care From Nonnaval Sources § 732.22 Recovery of...

  11. 32 CFR 732.22 - Recovery of medical care payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recovery of medical care payments. 732.22 Section 732.22 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NONNAVAL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE Medical and Dental Care From Nonnaval Sources § 732.22 Recovery of...

  12. 32 CFR 1656.20 - Expenses for emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expenses for emergency medical care. 1656.20... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.20 Expenses for emergency medical care. (a) Claims for payment of actual and reasonable expenses for emergency medical care, including hospitalization, of ASWs who suffer illness...

  13. Competition, gatekeeping, and health care access.

    PubMed

    Godager, Geir; Iversen, Tor; Ma, Ching-to Albert

    2015-01-01

    We study gatekeeping physicians' referrals of patients to specialty care. We derive theoretical results when competition in the physician market intensifies. First, due to competitive pressure, physicians refer patients to specialty care more often. Second, physicians earn more by treating patients themselves, so refer patients to specialty care less often. We assess empirically the overall effect of competition with data from a 2008-2009 Norwegian survey, National Health Insurance Administration, and Statistics Norway. From the data we construct three measures of competition: the number of open primary physician practices with and without population adjustment, and the Herfindahl-Hirschman index. The empirical results suggest that competition has negligible or small positive effects on referrals overall. Our results do not support the policy claim that increasing the number of primary care physicians reduces secondary care.

  14. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  15. Considering Governance for Patient Access to E-Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Day, Karen; Wells, Susan

    2015-01-01

    People having access to their medical records could have a transformative improvement effect on healthcare delivery and use. Our research aimed to explore the concerns and attitudes of giving people electronic access to their medical records through patient portals. We conducted 28 semi-structured interviews with 30 people, asking questions about portal design, organisational implications and governance. We report the findings of the governance considerations raised during the interviews. These revealed that (1) there is uncertainty about the possible design and extent of giving people access to their medical records to view/use, (2) existing policies about patient authentication, proxy, and privacy require modification, and (3) existing governance structures and functions require further examination and adjustment. Future research should include more input from patients and health informaticians.

  16. Expanded Medical Home Model Works for Children in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Champagne, Vince; Harden, Allen; Masterson, James; Bilaver, Lucy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Welfare Department implemented a statewide health care system to ensure that children in foster care obtain quality health care by providing each child with a medical home. This study demonstrates that the Medical Home model works for children in foster care providing better health outcomes in higher immunization rates. These…

  17. Equal access for all? Access to medical information for European psychiatric trainees.

    PubMed

    Marques, João Gama; Stefanovic, Maja Pantovic; Mitkovic-Voncina, Marija; Riese, Florian; Guloksuz, Sinan; Holmes, Kevin; Kilic, Ozge; Banjac, Visnja; Palumbo, Claudia; Nawka, Alexander; Jauhar, Sameer; Andlauer, Olivier; Krupchanka, Dzmitry; da Costa, Mariana Pinto

    2016-04-30

    Access to medical information is important as lifelong scientific learning is in close relation with a better career satisfaction in psychiatry. This survey aimed to investigate how medical information sources are being used among members of the European Federation of Psychiatric Trainees. Eighty-three psychiatric trainees completed our questionnaire. A significant variation was found, and information availability levels were associated with training duration and average income. The most available sources were books and websites, but the most preferred ones were scientific journals. Our findings suggest that further steps should be taken to provide an equal access to medical information across Europe.

  18. Improving children's access to health care: the role of decategorization.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, D. C.; Halfon, N.; Brindis, C. D.; Newacheck, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    Far too many children in this country are unable to obtain the health care they need because of barriers that prohibit easy access. Among the most significant obstacles are financial barriers, including lack of adequate health insurance and inadequate funding of programs for low-income children and those with special health-care needs. Another set of "non-financial" barriers are related to the categorical nature of addressing children's health-care needs, which impedes access by increasing the complexity and burden of seeking care and discourages providers from providing care. Decategorization represents an appealing partial remedy to these problems because it can lead to fundamental and lasting changes in financing and delivering health services. The greatest appeal of decategorization is its potential to improve access to care with the expenditure of little or no new funds. Decategorization also holds considerable risk. Depending on how it is designed and implemented, decategorization may lead to diminished access to care by serving as a foil for budget cuts or by undermining essential standards of care. However, these risks do not negate the value of exploring decategorization as an approach that can be taken today to better organize services and ensure that existing resources adequately meet children's needs. In this report we examine the role of decategorization as a mechanism for removing the barriers to care that are created by categorical funding of health programs. PMID:8982519

  19. Access to medication and pharmacy services for resettled refugees: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, Kim; Ostini, Remo; Martini, Nataly; Kairuz, Therese

    2015-01-01

    The difficulties that resettled refugees experience in accessing primary health-care services have been widely documented. In most developed countries, pharmacists are often the first health-care professional contacted by consumers; however, the ability of refugees to access community pharmacies and medication may be limited. This review systematically reviewed the literature and synthesised findings of research that explored barriers and/or facilitators of access to medication and pharmacy services for resettled refugees. This review adhered to guidelines for systematic reviews by PRISMA (preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses). Databases were searched during March 2014 and included Scopus, ProQuest Sociological Abstracts, PubMed, Embase and APAIS Health. The Australian and International grey literature was also explored. Nine studies met the quality and inclusion criteria. The research reported in seven of the nine studies was conducted in the US, one was conducted in Australia and the other in the UK. The majority of studies focussed on South-east Asian refugees. Themes identified across the studies included language and the use of interpreters; navigating the Western health-care system; culture and illness beliefs; medication non-adherence; use of traditional medicine; and family, peer and community support. There is a significant paucity of published research exploring barriers to medication and pharmacy services among resettled refugees. This systematic review highlights the need for appropriate interpreting and translation services, as well as pharmacy staff demonstrating effective cross-cultural communication skills.

  20. [Organisation of medical care delivery to citizens, enjoying a right to get medical care at military-medical organisations of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ya; Kuvshinov, K Ye; Pastukhov, A G; Zemlyakov, S V

    2015-09-01

    One of the main priorities of the medical service of the armed forces of the Russian federation is a realization of rights for military retirees and members of their families to free medical care. For this purpose was founded a system of organization of medical care delivery at military-medical subdivisions, units and organizations of the ministry of defence of the Russian federation, based on territorial principle of medical support. In order to improve availability and quality of medical care was determined the order of free medical care delivery to military servicemen and military retirees in medical organizations of state and municipal systems of the health care.

  1. Introduction to the Special Issue: Precarious Solidarity-Preferential Access in Canadian Health Care.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lynette

    2017-01-10

    Systems of universal health coverage may aspire to provide care based on need and not ability to pay; the complexities of this aspiration (conceptual, practical, and ethical) call for normative analysis. This special issue arises in the wake of a judicial inquiry into preferential access in the Canadian province of Alberta, the Vertes Commission. I describe this inquiry and set out a taxonomy of forms of differential and preferential access. Papers in this special issue focus on the conceptual specification of health system boundaries (the concept of medical need) and on the normative questions raised by complex models of funding and delivery of care, where patients, providers, and services cross system boundaries.

  2. Asklepios: ancient hero of medical caring.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J E

    1996-01-15

    Western culture's demands of integrity, sacrifice, and compassion from its physician healers have roots in the mythic traditions of ancient Greece. By understanding these traditions, modern physicians can better understand their patients' expectations and the high expectations physicians often have for themselves. The mythic figure Asklepios was the focus of Greek and Roman medical tradition from approximately 1500 BC to 500 AD. As a physician-hero, Asklepios exemplified the ideal physician and the pitfalls he or she may face. With the progressive deification of Asklepios and the spread of his worship first in Greece and then in the Roman empire, Asklepios became generally recognized as the god of healing and served as an object of supplication, particularly for the poor and disregarded. Asklepian traditions for medical service provide historical insight into the role of modern physicians and their obligations to care for the underserved.

  3. Injury mortality and accessibility to emergency care in Japan: an observational epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takashi; Okayama, Masanobu; Aihara, Masakazu; Kajii, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Background Unintentional injury is a major cause of death across the globe. The accessibility to emergency medical services may affect the rate of preventable trauma deaths. The purpose of this study was to analyze the accessibility to emergency medical hospitals in municipalities in Japan and to clarify whether accessibility was associated with the mortality rate attributed to unintentional injuries. Methods An observational epidemiological study was conducted in all 1,742 municipalities in Japan. Measurements assessed were population size, accessibility to emergency hospitals, and mortality rates attributed to unintentional injuries. Accessibility of each municipality to their nearest emergency hospital was calculated with a computer simulation using a geographic information system. After calculating demographic statistics and the Gini coefficient of accessibility, multivariate analyses were used to examine the correlation between accessibility time and mortality. Municipalities were divided into six groups according to accessibility time, and we then performed a correlation analysis between accessibility time and mortality using analysis of covariance. Results The median time of accessibility to emergency hospitals was 34.5 minutes. The Gini coefficient of accessibility time was 0.410. A total of 385 municipalities (23.4%) had an accessibility time of over 60 minutes. Accessibility was significantly related to mortality (beta coefficient =0.006; P<0.001). The mortality rate in municipalities with an accessibility time of <15 minutes was lower than that in all other groups. The mortality rate in municipalities with an accessibility time of 15–30 minutes was lower than that in municipalities with an accessibility time of >30 minutes, and the mortality rate in municipalities with an accessibility time of 30–45 minutes was lower than that in municipalities with an accessibility time of 60–90 minutes (P<0.001). Conclusion The geographical disparities for

  4. Undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care: A nationwide survey at German medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Stefan K; Timmermann, Arnd; Müller, Michael P; Angstwurm, Matthias; Walcher, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Background Since June 2002, revised regulations in Germany have required "Emergency Medical Care" as an interdisciplinary subject, and state that emergency treatment should be of increasing importance within the curriculum. A survey of the current status of undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care establishes the basis for further committee work. Methods Using a standardized questionnaire, all medical faculties in Germany were asked to answer questions concerning the structure of their curriculum, representation of disciplines, instructors' qualifications, teaching and assessment methods, as well as evaluation procedures. Results Data from 35 of the 38 medical schools in Germany were analysed. In 32 of 35 medical faculties, the local Department of Anaesthesiology is responsible for the teaching of emergency medical care; in two faculties, emergency medicine is taught mainly by the Department of Surgery and in another by Internal Medicine. Lectures, seminars and practical training units are scheduled in varying composition at 97% of the locations. Simulation technology is integrated at 60% (n = 21); problem-based learning at 29% (n = 10), e-learning at 3% (n = 1), and internship in ambulance service is mandatory at 11% (n = 4). In terms of assessment methods, multiple-choice exams (15 to 70 questions) are favoured (89%, n = 31), partially supplemented by open questions (31%, n = 11). Some faculties also perform single practical tests (43%, n = 15), objective structured clinical examination (OSCE; 29%, n = 10) or oral examinations (17%, n = 6). Conclusion Emergency Medical Care in undergraduate medical education in Germany has a practical orientation, but is very inconsistently structured. The innovative options of simulation technology or state-of-the-art assessment methods are not consistently utilized. Therefore, an exchange of experiences and concepts between faculties and disciplines should be promoted to guarantee a standard level of education

  5. Nurses' satisfaction with medication administration point-of-care technology.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Ann C; Bane, Anne; Fotakis, Sofronia; Duffy, Mary E; Sevigny, Amanda; Poon, Eric G; Gandhi, Tejal K

    2007-01-01

    Efforts to promote safe care prompted the development point-of-care technology, but successful adoption requires acceptance by nursing staff. To assess the satisfaction of nurses who use point-of-care technology that integrates nurse scanning of bar-coded medications with the patient's electronic medication administration record, the authors examined nurses' satisfaction with barcode/electronic medication administration record before and after introduction in an academic medical center.

  6. Determinants of access to pediatric hospice care: A conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Lisa C

    2015-04-01

    One of the many difficult moments for families of children with life-limiting illnesses is to make the decision to access pediatric hospice care. Although determinants that influence families' decisions to access pediatric hospice care have been recently identified, the relationship between these determinants and access to pediatric hospice care have not been explicated or grounded in accepted healthcare theories or models. Using the Andersen Behavioral Healthcare Utilization Model, this article presents a conceptual model describing the determinants of hospice access. Predisposing (demographic; social support; and knowledge, beliefs, and values), enabling (family and community resources) and need (perceived and evaluated needs) factors were identified through the use of hospice literature. The relationships among these factors are described and implications of the model for future study and practice are discussed.

  7. [Reaching migrants for preventive care: optimization of access and utilization].

    PubMed

    Walter, Ulla; Salman, Ramazan; Krauth, Christian; Machleidt, Wielant

    2007-10-01

    Migrants belong to the hard-to-reach group in health and preventive care. Essential criteria for the sustainable effectiveness of preventive and health promotion consist in the proper selection of target groups and successfully approaching them. The knowledge of possible barriers that make the access to preventive care and health promotion more difficult, e. g. low health literacy, that means the difficulties of linguistic understanding or the low acceptance regarding the provider, is necessary in order to select adequate access possibilities to the defined target groups. Up to now, for this and particularly for the ethno-specific health behaviour of migrants in Germany information hardly exist. So far, there are only a few preventive offers which are target group focussed. The use of native speaking preventive consultants is an attempt to improve the access to preventive care for migrants by low threshold come and access-structures.

  8. Do primary care providers who speak Chinese improve access to mental health care of Chinese immigrants?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alice W; Kazanjian, Arminée

    2009-01-01

    (OR = 0.54; 95% CI 0.51–0.57), adjustment reaction (OR = 0.36; 95% CI 0.33– 0.39), depressive disorder not elsewhere classified (OR = 0.30; 95% CI 0.29–0.32) and anxiety/depression (OR = 0.83; 95% CI 0.80–0.86), and with lower rates of mental health service utilization (RR = 0.32; 95% CI 0.30–0.33). Conclusions Although Chinese-speaking primary care physicians may facilitate Chinese immigrants’ access to medical care, these physicians may not optimize diagnosis and treatment of mental health problems. Our findings have implications for access to mental health care by minority populations in metropolitan centres in Canada and North America, where immigrants rely heavily on health care practitioners who speak their native language for their primary care.

  9. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    PubMed

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting.

  10. 1997 Accession Medical Standards Analysis & Research Activity (AMSARA) Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    Attention - Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder Armed Forces Qualifying Test Academic Skills Defect Accession Medical Standards Analysis and...Academic Skills Defect: 1995 and 1996: Preliminary Results Attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder is not directly addressed in the DOD Directive for...Genetic Influences in Childhood-Onset Psychiatric Disorders: Autism and Attention - Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder . Am J Hum Genet

  11. Racial Disparities in Health Literacy and Access to Care among Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sarwat I.; Herrin, Jeph; Phillips, Christopher; Butler, Javed; Mukerjhee, Sandip; Murillo, Jaime; Onwuanyi, Anekwe; Seto, Todd B.; Spertus, John; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous work has shown that there is a higher frequency of hospitalizations among black heart failure patients relative to white heart failure patients. We sought to determine whether racial differences exist in health literacy and access to outpatient medical care, and to identify factors associated with these differences. Methods We evaluated data from 1464 heart failure patients (644 black and 820 white). Health literacy was assessed using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Revised (REALM-R), and access to care was assessed through participants’ self-report. Results Black race was strongly associated with worse health literacy and all measures of poor access to care in unadjusted analyses. After adjusting for demographics, non-cardiac comorbidity, social support, insurance status, and socio-economic status (income and education), the strongest associations were seen between race and: health literacy (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.46-3.10), absence of a medical home (OR 1.76, 1.19-2.61), and cost as a deterrent to seeking health care (OR 1.55, 1.07-2.23). Conclusions Our findings highlight that important racial differences in health literacy and access to care exist among patients with heart failure. These differences persist even after adjustment for a broad range of potential mediators, including educational attainment, income, and insurance status. PMID:21300301

  12. Accessing to electronic medical history using a mobility intra hospital system.

    PubMed

    Guillén, Sergio; Traver, Vicente; Monton, Eduardo; Castellano, Elena; Valdivieso, Bernardo; Valero, Manuel Regaña

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the solution that has been developed in Valencia Region (Spain) to provide health professionals (physicians and nurses) access to all the functionalities of a Hospital Information System (HIS) already available at fixed clients workstations. These functionalities are adapted to the care process carried out at patient bedside. In this way, professionals will have access to treatment and administration, recording of vital signs, nursing assessment, scales, care plan, extractions, medical records, progress notes so that they have all necessary information at the bedside, and record swiftly changes that occur in-situ. In addition, clinical safety is reinforced, including RFID patient identification mechanisms and barcode readers for blood samples or unidosis medication.

  13. Luxury primary care, academic medical centers, and the erosion of science and professional ethics.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Medical schools and teaching hospitals have been hit particularly hard by the financial crisis affecting health care in the United States. To compete financially, many academic medical centers have recruited wealthy foreign patients and established luxury primary care clinics. At these clinics, patients are offered tests supported by little evidence of their clinical and/or cost effectiveness, which erodes the scientific underpinnings of medical practice. Given widespread disparities in health, wealth, and access to care, as well as growing cynicism and dissatisfaction with medicine among trainees, the promotion by these institutions of an overt, two-tiered system of care, which exacerbates inequities and injustice, erodes professional ethics. Academic medical centers should divert their intellectual and financial resources away from luxury primary care and toward more equitable and just programs designed to promote individual, community, and global health. The public and its legislators should, in turn, provide adequate funds to enable this. Ways for academic medicine to facilitate this largesse are discussed.

  14. Geographic Access to Health Care for Rural Medicare Beneficiaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Leighton; Hart, L. Gary; Goodman, David C.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Patients in rural areas may use less medical care than those living in urban areas. This could be due to differences in travel distance and time and a utilization of a different mix of generalists and specialists for their care. Purpose: To compare the travel times, distances, and physician specialty mix of all Medicare patients living in…

  15. [Vulnerable populations and access to care].

    PubMed

    Castello, Christine; Michard-Lenoir, Anne-Pascale; Allemand, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Precariousness is a very complex concept that brings together a diverse and fragmented population. The interest in comparing views and opinions is clear for understanding of this phenomenon. A physician in the paediatric emergency unit of a hospital and the head of a "Medecins du Monde" branch evoke the different faces of precariousness. A difficult and sometimes poignant reality, which health care providers must try to cope with.

  16. Emerging trends in the outsourcing of medical and surgical care.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jennifer B; McGrath, Mary H; Maa, John

    2011-01-01

    As total health care expenditures are expected to constitute an increasing portion of the US gross domestic product during the coming years, the US health care system is anticipating a historic spike in the need for care. Outsourcing medical and surgical care to other nations has expanded rapidly, and several ethical, legal, and financial considerations require careful evaluation. Ultimately, the balance between cost savings, quality, and patient satisfaction will be the key determinant in the future of medical outsourcing.

  17. 32 CFR 564.39 - Medical care benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Medical care benefits. 564.39 Section 564.39 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES NATIONAL GUARD REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.39 Medical care benefits. (a) A member of the ARNG who...

  18. 32 CFR 564.39 - Medical care benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Medical care benefits. 564.39 Section 564.39 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES NATIONAL GUARD REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.39 Medical care benefits. (a) A member of the ARNG who...

  19. 32 CFR 564.39 - Medical care benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical care benefits. 564.39 Section 564.39 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES NATIONAL GUARD REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.39 Medical care benefits. (a) A member of the ARNG who...

  20. 32 CFR 564.39 - Medical care benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical care benefits. 564.39 Section 564.39 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES NATIONAL GUARD REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.39 Medical care benefits. (a) A member of the ARNG who...

  1. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  2. 42 CFR 431.12 - Medical care advisory committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical care advisory committee. 431.12 Section 431... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Single State Agency § 431.12 Medical care advisory committee. (a) Basis and purpose. This section, based on section...

  3. 42 CFR 431.12 - Medical care advisory committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical care advisory committee. 431.12 Section 431... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Single State Agency § 431.12 Medical care advisory committee. (a) Basis and purpose. This section, based on section...

  4. 20 CFR 702.407 - Supervision of medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... furnished or to be furnished the employee, including whether the charges made by any medical care provider... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supervision of medical care. 702.407 Section... AND HARBOR WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Medical...

  5. 20 CFR 725.705 - Arrangements for medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrangements for medical care. 725.705... Arrangements for medical care. (a) Operator liability. If an operator has been determined liable for the..., and telephone numbers of the authorized providers of medical benefits chosen by an entitled miner,...

  6. 76 FR 37201 - Reimbursement Offsets for Medical Care or Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Care or Services; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 122 / Friday, June 24, 2011 / Rules... Offsets for Medical Care or Services AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... reimbursement of medical care and services delivered to veterans for nonservice-connected conditions. This...

  7. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facilities utilized: Estimated cost and duration of treatment: Summary of incident: (32 U.S.C. 318-320 and... benefits. (b) Authorization for care in civilian facility. (1) An individual who desires medical or dental care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care...

  8. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facilities utilized: Estimated cost and duration of treatment: Summary of incident: (32 U.S.C. 318-320 and... benefits. (b) Authorization for care in civilian facility. (1) An individual who desires medical or dental care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care...

  9. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facilities utilized: Estimated cost and duration of treatment: Summary of incident: (32 U.S.C. 318-320 and... benefits. (b) Authorization for care in civilian facility. (1) An individual who desires medical or dental care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care...

  10. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facilities utilized: Estimated cost and duration of treatment: Summary of incident: (32 U.S.C. 318-320 and... benefits. (b) Authorization for care in civilian facility. (1) An individual who desires medical or dental care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care...

  11. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facilities utilized: Estimated cost and duration of treatment: Summary of incident: (32 U.S.C. 318-320 and... benefits. (b) Authorization for care in civilian facility. (1) An individual who desires medical or dental care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care...

  12. Improving care planning and coordination for service users with medical co-morbidity transitioning between tertiary medical and primary care services.

    PubMed

    Cranwell, K; Polacsek, M; McCann, T V

    2016-08-08

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Mental health service users with medical co-morbidity frequently experience difficulties accessing and receiving appropriate treatment in emergency departments. Service users frequently experience fragmented care planning and coordinating between tertiary medical and primary care services. Little is known about mental health nurses' perspectives about how to address these problems. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Emergency department clinicians' poor communication and negative attitudes have adverse effects on service users and the quality of care they receive. The findings contribute to the international evidence about mental health nurses' perspectives of service users feeling confused and frustrated in this situation, and improving coordination and continuity of care, facilitating transitions and increasing family and caregiver participation. Intervention studies are needed to evaluate if adoption of these measures leads to sustainable improvements in care planning and coordination, and how service users with medical co-morbidity are treated in emergency departments in particular. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Effective planning and coordination of care are essential to enable smooth transitions between tertiary medical (emergency departments in particular) and primary care services for service users with medical co-morbidity. Ongoing professional development education and support is needed for emergency department clinicians. There is also a need to develop an organized and systemic approach to improving service users' experience in emergency departments.

  13. Ghana--medical care amid economic problems.

    PubMed

    Bacon, L

    1980-07-01

    Describing the pattern of disease encountered in primary health care (PHC) in Ghana and the facilities available to treat it, this discussion provides an account of the rapidly deteriorating economic situation and its effects on the inhabitants and on medical practice. During the 1977-79 period Ghana suffered severe economic and political difficulties, affecting work at the University Hospital in Legon, Ghana. The workload differs from that in developed countries in several ways: tropical diseases are common; the diseases of proverty are rife; diseases due to poor public health and an absence of some diseases, e.g., myocardial infarct and multiple sclerosis. There is no equivalent of the British general practioner, but there are 4 main sources of care: 54 government hospitals with 137 health centrs and health posts distributed around the country; 57 private but relatively low cost hospitals and clinics; exclusive, high cost private clinics; and traditional healers and herbalists practicing their art. Between 1976-79 the economy of Ghana went into a steep decline. Exact figures for inflation are difficult to come by; 15% per year was popularly quoted. The cedi (the Ghanaian unit of currency) was officially devalued. Goods became very scarce as well as expensive. Basic food items, spare parts for vehicles and other machinery, petroleum products, soap, and all medical supplies were hard to obtain. There was public unrest during this period. Strikes became frequent. Notable from the health perspective was a strike of all professionals, including doctors, in June 1977, strikes of government employed nurses in April 1978 and May 1979. The main events were 3 changes of government. Although exact data are not easy to obtain, the diseases of poverty appeared to be on the increase. Lack of money tended to keep those not entitled to free treatment away from private hospitals, but the deteriorating situation at the clinics seemed to more than compensate for this. Shortages

  14. Secure, obligated and coordinated collaboration in health care for the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Berhe, Solomon; Demurjian, Steve; Saripalle, Rishi; Agresta, Thomas; Liu, Jing; Cusano, Antonio; Fequiere, Andal; Gedarovich, Jim

    2010-11-13

    In the patient-centered medical home, PCMH, patient care is overseen by a primary care physician leading a team of health care providers, who collaborate to optimize treatment. To facilitate interactions in PCMH, secure collaboration will be needed to: control access to information; dictate who can do what when; and promote sharing and concurrent access. This contrasts approaches such as the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) role-based access control (RBAC), where the emphasis is on controlling access and separating responsibilities. This paper investigates secure collaboration within an application such as PCMH, through: a futuristic scenario for patient care; proposed collaboration extensions to the NIST RBAC standard with a fine-grained obligated mechanism and workflow; and a prototype of PCMH via the Google Wave real-time collaboration platform.

  15. Patient Centered Medical Home Care Among Near-Old and Older Race/Ethnic Minorities in the US: Findings from the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey.

    PubMed

    Tarraf, Wassim; Jensen, Gail; González, Hector M

    2016-09-21

    Access to Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) care has not been explored among older racial/ethnic minorities. We used data on adults 55-years and older from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2008-2013). We account for five features of PCMH experiences and focus on respondents self-identifying as Non-Latino White, Black, and Latino. We used regression models to examine associations between PCMH care and its domains and race/ethnicity and decomposition techniques to assess contribution to differences by predisposing, enabling and health need factors. We found low overall access and significant racial/ethnic variations in experiences of PCMH. Our results indicated strong deficiencies in access to a personal primary care physician provided healthcare. Factors contributing to differences in reported PCMH experiences relative to Whites differed by racial/ethnic grouping. Policy initiatives aimed at addressing accessibility to personal physician directed healthcare could potentially reduce racial/ethnic differences while increasing national access to PCMH care.

  16. Conformity of pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics to the patient-centered medical home care model.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Agwu, Allison L; Schranz, Asher; Korthuis, P Todd; Gaur, Aditya H; Rutstein, Richard; Sharp, Victoria; Spector, Stephen A; Berry, Stephen A; Gebo, Kelly A

    2013-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has been introduced as a model for providing high-quality, comprehensive, patient-centered care that is both accessible and coordinated, and may provide a framework for optimizing the care of youth living with HIV (YLH). We surveyed six pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics caring for 578 patients (median age 19 years, 51% male, and 82% black) in July 2011 to assess conformity to the PCMH. Clinics completed a 50-item survey covering the six domains of the PCMH: (1) comprehensive care, (2) patient-centered care, (3) coordinated care, (4) accessible services, (5) quality and safety, and (6) health information technology. To determine conformity to the PCMH, a novel point-based scoring system was devised. Points were tabulated across clinics by domain to obtain an aggregate assessment of PCMH conformity. All six clinics responded. Overall, clinics attained a mean 75.8% [95% CI, 63.3-88.3%] on PCMH measures-scoring highest on patient-centered care (94.7%), coordinated care (83.3%), and quality and safety measures (76.7%), and lowest on health information technology (70.0%), accessible services (69.1%), and comprehensive care (61.1%). Clinics moderately conformed to the PCMH model. Areas for improvement include access to care, comprehensive care, and health information technology. Future studies are warranted to determine whether greater clinic PCMH conformity improves clinical outcomes and cost savings for YLH.

  17. Women's perceptions of access to prenatal care in the United States: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C

    2009-01-01

    Women report many barriers to accessing prenatal care. This article reviews the literature from 1990 to the present on women's perceptions of access to prenatal care within the United States. Barriers can be classified into societal, maternal, and structural dimensions. Women may not be motivated to seek care, especially for unintended pregnancies. Societal and maternal reasons cited for poor motivation include a fear of medical procedures or disclosing the pregnancy to others, depression, and a belief that prenatal care is unnecessary. Structural barriers include long wait times, the location and hours of the clinic, language and attitude of the clinic staff and provider, the cost of services, and a lack of child-friendly facilities. Knowledge of women's views of access can help in development of policies to decrease barriers. Structural barriers could be reduced through changes in clinic policy and prenatal care format, and the creation of child-friendly waiting and examination rooms. Maternal and societal barriers can be addressed through community education. A focus in future research on facilitators of access can assist in creating open pathways to perinatal care for all women.

  18. A public hospital closes. Impact on patients' access to care and health status.

    PubMed

    Bindman, A B; Keane, D; Lurie, N

    1990-12-12

    We studied the impact of the closing of a public hospital on patients' access to care and health status. We surveyed individuals who had been medical inpatients at Shasta General Hospital, Redding, Calif, in the year prior to its closing and compared them with those in a second county, San Luis Obispo, whose public hospital did not close. Surveys were administered after the closing of Shasta General Hospital and 1 year later. We assessed outcomes using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form and a series of transition questions that asked about changes in health over time. Data were available for 88% of patients at 1 year: 219 from Shasta County and 195 from San Luis Obispo County. At follow-up, the percentage of patients from Shasta County who reported no regular provider increased from 14.0 to 27.7 and the percentage who reported they were denied care rose from 10.8 to 16.9. Meanwhile, patients in San Luis Obispo County reported improved access to a regular provider and the level of denied care was unchanged. Patients in Shasta County had significant declines on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form in health perception, social and role function, and increases in pain as compared with those patients in San Luis Obispo County. The closing of a public hospital had a significant effect on access to health care and was associated with a decline in health status.

  19. 32 CFR 324.13 - Access to medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to medical and psychological records. 324... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DFAS PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Individual Access to Records § 324.13 Access to medical and psychological records. Individual access to medical and psychological records...

  20. Access to Care and Children's Primary Care Experiences: Results from a Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Seid, Michael; Stevens, Gregory D

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine whether and how different kinds of access to care (financial, potential, and realized) predict parent-report child primary care experiences in an urban community sample. Data Sources/Study Setting A prospective cohort study was performed. Baseline survey data were collected (67 percent response rate) from 3,406 parents of kindergarten through sixth grade students in a large urban school district in California during the 1999–2000 school year. A 1-year survey (80.4 percent response rate) resulted in a final sample of 2,738. Study Design Data were analyzed using multiple regression models with robust estimation. The dependent variable was Time 2 parent reports of primary care experiences, assessed via the Parents' Perceptions of Primary Care (P3C) measure. The independent variables were financial access (insurance status), potential access (presence of a regular source of care), and realized access (foregone care), controlling for child and family characteristics (race/ethnicity, parent's language, mother's education level, and child chronic health condition status) and baseline P3C scores. Data Collection Data were collected by mail, telephone, and in person in English, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Tagalog. Principal Findings Controlling for baseline P3C scores and child and family characteristics, having no health insurance at both baseline and Time 2 was associated with a 6.2-point lower Time 2 P3C score, relative to having had health insurance at both time points. Having a regular provider at Time 2 (either always having had one or gaining one during the year) was associated with, on average, a 10-point higher Time 2 P3C score, compared to children without a regular provider (either never having had one or losing one during the year). Episodes of foregone care during the year were associated with 10.7 points lower Time 2 P3C scores, relative to children whose parents did not report foregone care. Similar relationships were found between all

  1. Expanded medical home model works for children in foster care.

    PubMed

    Jaudes, Kienberger Paula; Champagne, Vince; Harden, Allen; Masterson, James; Bilaver, Lucy A

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Welfare Department implemented a statewide health care system to ensure that children in foster care obtain quality health care by providing each child with a medical home. This study demonstrates that the Medical Home model works for children in foster care providing better health outcomes in higher immunization rates.These children used the health care system more effectively and cost-effective as reflected in the higher utilization rates of primary care and well-child visits and lower utilization of emergency room care for children with chronic conditions.

  2. 42 CFR 34.7 - Medical and other care; death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical and other care; death. 34.7 Section 34.7... EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF ALIENS § 34.7 Medical and other care; death. (a) An alien detained by or in... further care. (b) In case of the death of an alien, the body shall be delivered to the consular...

  3. 42 CFR 34.7 - Medical and other care; death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical and other care; death. 34.7 Section 34.7... EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF ALIENS § 34.7 Medical and other care; death. (a) An alien detained by or in... further care. (b) In case of the death of an alien, the body shall be delivered to the consular...

  4. 42 CFR 34.7 - Medical and other care; death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical and other care; death. 34.7 Section 34.7... EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF ALIENS § 34.7 Medical and other care; death. (a) An alien detained by or in... further care. (b) In case of the death of an alien, the body shall be delivered to the consular...

  5. 42 CFR 34.7 - Medical and other care; death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical and other care; death. 34.7 Section 34.7... EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF ALIENS § 34.7 Medical and other care; death. (a) An alien detained by or in... further care. (b) In case of the death of an alien, the body shall be delivered to the consular...

  6. 42 CFR 34.7 - Medical and other care; death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical and other care; death. 34.7 Section 34.7... EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF ALIENS § 34.7 Medical and other care; death. (a) An alien detained by or in... further care. (b) In case of the death of an alien, the body shall be delivered to the consular...

  7. Poverty, out-of-pocket payments and access to health care: evidence from Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Falkingham, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Most countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have either initiated or are contemplating reform of the health sector. With negative real income growth and falling government revenues, a key concern of many governments is to secure additional finance through non-budgetary sources such as hypothecated payroll taxes, voluntary insurance, and increased private finance through patient cost-sharing. However, before such reforms can be considered, information is needed both on the current levels and distribution of household expenditures on health care, and the extent to which increased charges may affect access to health services, especially amongst the poor. This paper uses the Tajikistan Livings Standard Survey to investigate the level and distribution of out-of-pocket payments for health care in Tajikistan and to examine the extent to which such payments act as barriers to health-care access. The data show that there are significant differences in health-care utilisation rates across socio-economic groups and that these differences are related to ability to pay. Official and informal payments are acting both to deter people from seeking medical assistance and once advice has been sought, from receiving the most appropriate treatment. Despite informal exemptions, out-of-pocket payments for health care are exacting a high toll on household welfare with households being forced to sell assets or go into debt to meet the costs of care. Urgent action is needed to ensure equity in access to health care.

  8. The Fresenius Medical Care home hemodialysis system.

    PubMed

    Schlaeper, Christian; Diaz-Buxo, Jose A

    2004-01-01

    The Fresenius Medical Care home dialysis system consists of a newly designed machine, a central monitoring system, a state-of-the-art reverse osmosis module, ultrapure water, and all the services associated with a successful implementation. The 2008K@home hemodialysis machine has the flexibility to accommodate the changing needs of the home hemodialysis patient and is well suited to deliver short daily or prolonged nocturnal dialysis using a broad range of dialysate flows and concentrates. The intuitive design, large graphic illustrations, and step-by-step tutorial make this equipment very user friendly. Patient safety is assured by the use of hydraulic systems with a long history of reliability, smart alarm algorithms, and advanced electronic monitoring. To further patient comfort with their safety at home, the 2008K@home is enabled to communicate with the newly designed iCare remote monitoring system. The Aquaboss Smart reverse osmosis (RO) system is compact, quiet, highly efficient, and offers an improved hygienic design. The RO module reduces water consumption by monitoring the water flow of the dialysis system and adjusting water production accordingly. The Diasafe Plus filter provides ultrapure water, known for its long-term benefits. This comprehensive approach includes planning, installation, technical and clinical support, and customer service.

  9. Metadata - National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect information on the services provided in hospital emergency and outpatient departments and in ambulatory surgery centers.

  10. Primary care access to computed tomography for chronic headache

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ralph; Cook, Alan; Main, Gavin; Taylor, Tom; Caruana, Elizabeth Galizia; Swingler, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in chronic headache is low, but can reduce the use of health services. Aim To determine whether primary care access to brain computed tomography (CT) referral for chronic headache reduces referral to secondary care. Design of study Prospective observational analysis of GP referrals to an open access CT brain scanning service. Setting Primary care, and outpatient radiology and neurology departments. Method GPs in Tayside and North East Fife, Scotland were given access to brain CT for patients with chronic headache. All referrals were analysed prospectively over 1 year, and questionnaires were sent to referrers to establish whether imaging had resulted in or stopped a referral to secondary care. The Tayside outpatient clinic database identified scanned patients referred to the neurology clinic for headache from the start of the study period to at least 1 year after their scan. Results There were 232 referrals (55.1/100 000/year, 95% confidence interval = 50.4 to 59.9) from GPs in 59 (82%) of 72 primary care practices. CT was performed on 215 patients. Significant abnormalities were noted in 3 (1.4%) patients; there were 22 (10.2%) non-significant findings, and 190 (88.4%) normal scans. Questionnaires of the referring GPs reported that 167 (88%) scans stopped a referral to secondary care. GPs referred 30 (14%) scanned patients to a neurologist because of headache. It is estimated that imaging reduced referrals to secondary care by 86% in the follow-up period. Conclusion An open access brain CT service for patients with chronic headache was used by most GP practices in Tayside, and reduced the number of referrals to secondary care. PMID:20529496

  11. Medical care of asylum seekers: a descriptive study of the appropriateness of nurse practitioners' care compared to traditional physician-based care in a gatekeeping system

    PubMed Central

    Bodenmann, Patrick; Althaus, Fabrice; Burnand, Bernard; Vaucher, Paul; Pécoud, Alain; Genton, Blaise

    2007-01-01

    Background Medical care for asylum seekers is a complex and critical issue worldwide. It is influenced by social, political, and economic pressures, as well as premigration conditions, the process of migration, and postmigration conditions in the host country. Increasing needs and healthcare costs have led public health authorities to put nurse practitioners in charge of the management of a gatekeeping system for asylum seekers. The quality of this system has never been evaluated. We assessed the competencies of nurses and physicians in identifying the medical needs of asylum seekers and providing them with appropriate treatment that reflects good clinical practice. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study evaluated the appropriateness of care provided to asylum seekers by trained nurse practitioners in nursing healthcare centers and by physicians in private practices, an academic medical outpatient clinic, and the emergency unit of the university hospital in Lausanne, Switzerland. From 1687 asylum seeking patients who had consulted each setting between June and December 2003, 450 were randomly selected to participate. A panel of experts reviewed their medical records and assessed the appropriateness of medical care received according to three parameters: 1) use of appropriate procedures to identify medical needs (medical history, clinical examination, complementary investigations, and referral), 2) provision of access to treatment meeting medical needs, and 3) absence of unnecessary medical procedures. Results In the nurse practitioner group, the procedures used to identify medical needs were less often appropriate (79% of reports vs. 92.4% of reports; p < 0.001). Nevertheless, access to treatment was judged satisfactory and was similar (p = 0.264) between nurse practitioners and physicians (99% and 97.6% of patients, respectively, received adequate care). Excessive care was observed in only 2 physician reports (0.8%) and 3 nurse reports (1.5%) (p = 0

  12. Public policy and medical tourism: ethical implications for the Egyptian health care system.

    PubMed

    Haley, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Egypt's medical tourism industry has been experiencing tremendous growth. However, Egypt continues to lack the necessary investment in its public health system to effectively care for its population. Current policy and the emergence of medical tourism have led to unequal health care access, resulting in high a prevalence of infectious diseases and lack of resources for its most vulnerable populations. As a new Egyptian government emerges, it is important for policymakers to understand the critical issues and ethical concerns of existing health policy. This understanding may be used to propose new policy that more effectively allocates to care for Egypt's population.

  13. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists’ perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. Results According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants’ desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. Conclusions The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet

  14. Medical care epidemiology and unwarranted variation: the Israeli case.

    PubMed

    Goodman, David C; Goodman, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    In an article in this Journal, Mendlovic and colleagues report on regional variation in medical care across Israeli regions. This study joins a growing literature demonstrating generally high variation in the provision of health care services within developed countries. This commentary summarizes the status of medical care epidemiology and its studies of unwarranted variation in health care, and provides a conceptual framework to guide future studies. Recommendations are offered for advancing studies in Israel that could guide policy development and clinical improvement.

  15. The Palliative Care Information Act and Access to Palliative Care in Terminally ill Patients: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Victoria, Kitty; Patel, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that over 50% of end-of-life discussions take place for the first time in the hospital and that terminally ill patients often have unrealistic views regarding the possible scope of treatment. The Palliative Care information Act (PCIA) was passed in an attempt to address the lack of access for terminally ill patients to palliative care services. A multi-database systematic review was performed on published studies from 2010 to present, and there were none found measuring the effectiveness of the PCIA. Objectives: We aimed to study the effect of the PCIA on access to palliative care services. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of all terminally ill patients who died at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center from January 2010 to August 2013 in relation to passing of the PCIA. Results: Prelaw (prior to the law passing), 12.3% of the terminal patients received palliative care consults, 25% during the transition period (time between passing of law and when it came into effect) and 37.7% postlaw (after coming into effect) (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Legislation can have a significant effect on terminally ill patient's access to palliative care services and can change the culture of a hospital to be more pro-palliative for the appropriate populations. PMID:27803564

  16. Primary care access barriers as reported by nonurgent emergency department users: implications for the US primary care infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Hefner, Jennifer L; Wexler, Randy; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to explore variation by insurance status in patient-reported barriers to accessing primary care. The authors fielded a brief, anonymous, voluntary survey of nonurgent emergency department (ED) visits at a large academic medical center and conducted descriptive analysis and thematic coding of 349 open-ended survey responses. The privately insured predominantly reported primary care infrastructure barriers-wait time in clinic and for an appointment, constraints related to conventional business hours, and difficulty finding a primary care provider (because of geography or lack of new patient openings). Half of those insured by Medicaid and/or Medicare also reported these infrastructure barriers. In contrast, the uninsured predominantly reported insurance, income, and transportation barriers. Given that insured nonurgent ED users frequently report infrastructure barriers, these should be the focus of patient-level interventions to reduce nonurgent ED use and of health system-level policies to enhance the capacity of the US primary care infrastructure.

  17. Mind the gap: access to ARV medication, rights and the politics of scale in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peris Sean

    2012-01-01

    Global access to anti-retroviral medication (ARVs) has increased exponentially in recent years. As a relatively recent phenomenon for the global South, much knowledge is being added, but analysis of 'access' to ARVs remains partial. The main research objective of this article is to gain a fuller picture of the range of forces constituting 'access' to ARVs by providing a local community case study from Hammanskraal, South Africa. A qualitative and relational approach situates specific points of 'local' access to ARVs within relations stretched over space. Spatial awareness enables us to consider the reinforcing effects of local geographies upon access to health care but also simultaneously sees this in relation to non-local geographies. The concept of scale is pivotal to creating linkages across space and reveals a number of 'gaps' in access that otherwise might not be shown. Elaborating on the meaning of "access" to treatment produces a more rounded picture of the context that people-living-with-AIDS encounter. A multi-scale and multi-disciplinary analysis of 'access' is therefore also highly informative in a related sense, namely, for closing the gap between human rights standards and actual implementation. A geographical imagination is useful not only to 'mind' but also to close the 'gap' in both senses.

  18. Linguistic acculturation and perceptions of quality, access, and discrimination in health care among Latinos in the United States.

    PubMed

    Becerra, David; Androff, David; Messing, Jill T; Castillo, Jason; Cimino, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between acculturation and Latinos' perceptions of health care treatment quality, discrimination, and access to health information. The results of this study indicated that participants who had lower levels of acculturation perceived: 1) greater discrimination in health care treatment; 2) a lower quality of health care treatment; 3) less confidence filling out health related forms; and 4) greater challenges understanding written information about their medical conditions. Participants who identified as immigrants also perceived that their poor quality of medical care was due to their inability to pay and to their race/ethnicity.

  19. Food insecure families: description of access and barriers to food from one pediatric primary care center.

    PubMed

    DeMartini, Tori L; Beck, Andrew F; Kahn, Robert S; Klein, Melissa D

    2013-12-01

    Despite evidence that food insecurity negatively impacts child health, health care providers play little role in addressing the issue. To inform potential primary care interventions, we sought to assess a range of challenges faced by food insecure (FI) families coming to an urban, pediatric primary care setting. A cross-sectional study was performed at a hospital-based, urban, academic pediatric primary care clinic that serves as a medical home for approximately 15,000 patients with 35,000 annual visits. Subjects included a convenience sample of caregivers of children presenting for either well child or ill care over a 4 months period in 2012. A self-administered survey assessed household food security status, shopping habits, transportation access, budgeting priorities, and perceptions about nutrition access in one's community. Bivariate analyses between food security status and these characteristics were performed using Chi square statistics or Fisher's exact test. The survey was completed by 199 caregivers. Approximately 33% of families were FI; 93% received food-related governmental assistance. FI families were more likely to obtain food from a corner/convenience store, utilize food banks, require transportation other than a household car, and prioritize paying bills before purchasing food. FI families perceived less access to healthy, affordable foods within their community. Thus, FI families may face unique barriers to accessing food. Knowledge of these barriers could allow clinicians to tailor in-clinic screening and create family-centered interventions.

  20. Using a Mystery-Caller Approach to Examine Access to Prostate Cancer Care in Philadelphia

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Craig Evan; Ross, Michelle E.; Armstrong, Katrina; Branas, Charles C.; Rhodes, Karin V.; Bekelman, Justin E.; Wentz, Alicia; Stillson, Christian; Radhakrishnan, Archana; Oyeniran, Enny; Grande, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prior work suggests that access to health care may influence the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Mystery-caller methods have been used previously to measure access to care for health services such as primary care, where patients’ self-initiate requests for care. We used a mystery-caller survey for specialized prostate cancer care to assess dimensions of access to prostate cancer care. Materials and Methods We created an inventory of urology and radiation oncology practices in southeastern Pennsylvania. Using a ‘mystery caller’ approach, a research assistant posing as a medical office scheduler in a primary care office, attempted to make a new patient appointment on behalf of a referred patient. Linear regression was used to determine the association between time to next available appointment with practice and census tract characteristics. Results We successfully obtained information on new patient appointments from 198 practices out of the 223 in the region (88.8%). Radiation oncology practices were more likely to accept Medicaid compared to urology practices (91.3% vs 36.4%) and had shorter mean wait times for new patient appointments (9.0 vs 12.8 days). We did not observe significant differences in wait times according to census tract characteristics including neighborhood socioeconomic status and the proportion of male African American residents. Conclusions Mystery-caller methods that reflect real-world referral processes from primary care offices can be used to measure access to specialized cancer care. We observed significant differences in wait times and insurance acceptance between radiation oncology and urology practices. PMID:27723780

  1. Access To Care And Affordability Have Improved Following Affordable Care Act Implementation; Problems Remain.

    PubMed

    Shartzer, Adele; Long, Sharon K; Anderson, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that millions of adults have gained insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act, but less is known about how access to and affordability of care may be changing. This study used data from the Health Reform Monitoring Survey to describe changes in access and affordability for nonelderly adults from September 2013, just prior to the first open enrollment period in the Marketplace, to March 2015, after the end of the second open enrollment period. Overall, we found strong improvements in access to care for all nonelderly adults and across income and state Medicaid expansion groups. We also found improvements in the affordability of care for all adults and for low- and moderate-income adults. Despite this progress, there were still large gaps in access and affordability in March 2015, particularly for low-income adults.

  2. Access to cancer medications in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Gilberto de Lima; de Souza, Jonas A; Barrios, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Major breakthroughs have been realized in controlling cancer in the past five decades. However, for patients in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), many of these advances are nothing but an aspiration and hope for the future. Indeed, the greatest challenge we face in oncology today is how to reconcile small, incremental and significant improvements in the management of cancer with the exponentially increasing costs of new treatments. Emerging economies are attempting to address this important issue of access to cancer medications. In this Review, we examine how LMICs are using generic and biosimilar drugs, expanding participation in clinical trials, implementing universal health-care schemes to pool resources, and using compulsory licensing schemes as well as increasing multiple-stakeholder public-private partnerships to increase access to cancer medications for their citizens. Any truly effective programme will require multiple stakeholder involvement-including governments, industry and civil society-to address the issue of access to medication. Only with the creation of a global entity to fight cancer that is supported by a global fund-for example, in the mould of the GAVI alliance and the International Finance Facility for Immunization-will we truly be able to improve cancer care in LMICs and drive down the high mortality rates in these regions.

  3. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 7--Medical Emergencies. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This training manual for emergency medical technicians, one of 14 modules that comprise the Emergency Victim Care textbook, covers medical emergencies. The objectives for the chapter are for students to be able to describe the causes, signs, and symptoms for specified medical emergencies and to describe emergency care for them. Informative…

  4. Informal politics and inequity of access to health care in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Despite the importance of political institutions in shaping the social environment, the causal impact of politics on health care access and inequalities has been understudied. Even when considered, research tends to focus on the effects of formal macro-political institutions such as the welfare state. We investigate how micro-politics and informal institutions affect access to care. Methods This study uses a mixed-methods approach, combining findings from a household survey (n = 1789) and qualitative interviews (n = 310) in Lebanon. Multivariate logistic regression was employed in the analysis of the survey to examine the effect of political activism on access to health care while controlling for age, sex, socioeconomic status, religious commitment and piety. Results We note a significantly positive association between political activism and the probability of receiving health aid (p < .001), with an OR of 4.0 when comparing individuals with the highest political activity to those least active in our sample. Interviews with key informants also reveal that, although a form of “universal coverage” exists in Lebanon whereby any citizen is eligible for coverage of hospitalization fees and treatments, in practice, access to health services is used by political parties and politicians as a deliberate strategy to gain and reward political support from individuals and their families. Conclusions Individuals with higher political activism have better access to health services than others. Informal, micro-level political institutions can have an important impact on health care access and utilization, with potentially detrimental effects on the least politically connected. A truly universal health care system that provides access based on medical need rather than political affiliation is needed to help to alleviate growing health disparities in the Lebanese population. PMID:22571591

  5. Traveling for medical care in a global world.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Beth

    2010-10-01

    The international medical travel of Yemenis provides insight on terminology and models to use for the growing global phenomenon. Terminology for medical travelers ranges from "medical tourists" to "medical exiles." Differing models prioritize the global arena in which transnational medical travel occurs as (1) a global medical marketplace, (2) a global medical commons, (3) interlinked nation-states, and (4) national or global citizens. Medical anthropology has a specific role in uncovering the lived experiences of patients who travel to often unfamiliar destinations to pursue care believed capable of alleviating suffering.

  6. Trends to access internet among medical students of a government medical college in West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Indranil; Biswas, Supreeti; Biswas, Ashish; De, Mausumi; Begum, Sabnam Ara; Haldar, Swaraj

    2011-07-01

    The use of computer and information technology is on an escalation. The internet, one of the key developments in this field, provides instant access to latest medical information. The present study was conducted (i) to estimate the extent and purpose of internet usage among undergraduate (UG) and postgraduate (PG) medical students, (ii) to identify factors that encourage the students to use internet for medical information, (iii) to assess the need for incorporating computer education in medical curriculum. A prospective, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted on 150 students of Burdwan Medical College and Hospital between June 2009 and December 2009. Majority of the students accessed internet from their home PC (42% UGs and 52% PGs).Common search engines browsed commonly by both UGs and PGs include Google and yahoo. Regarding principles of telemedicine and evidence-based medicine, majority of the PGs are well versed while UGs are not (p-value 0.0001). Almost all students agreed to incorporate computer education in medical curriculum. Primary source of medical information was textbook for UGs (62%) and internet for the PGs (48%). Majority of UGs (48%) used internet as a ready source of information thus saving time while PGs (68%) primarily relied on internet for recent advances in their disciplines. The primary purposes of internet use are educational for both UGs and PGs. The data obtained indicates that majority of the medical students participating in the present study embrace and use internet to access medical information. It also justifies the need to incorporate internet and associated information technology into existing medical curriculum.

  7. Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Inpatient Care: Effects of Trust, Medical Insurance and Perceived Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Jiao, Mingli; Hao, Yanhua; Han, Yuzhen; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Jiejing; Wang, Lan; Xu, Weilan; Ren, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Deteriorations in the patient-provider relationship in China have attracted increasing attention in the international community. This study aims to explore the role of trust in patient satisfaction with hospital inpatient care, and how patient-provider trust is shaped from the perspectives of both patients and providers. Methods We adopted a mixed methods approach comprising a multivariate logistic regression model using secondary data (1200 people with inpatient experiences over the past year) from the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS, 2013) in Heilongjiang Province to determine the associations between patient satisfaction and trust, financial burden and perceived quality of care, followed by in-depth interviews with 62 conveniently selected key informants (27 from health and 35 from non-health sectors). A thematic analysis established a conceptual framework to explain deteriorating patient-provider relationships. Findings About 24% of respondents reported being dissatisfied with hospital inpatient care. The logistic regression model indicated that patient satisfaction was positively associated with higher level of trust (OR = 14.995), lower levels of hospital medical expenditure (OR = 5.736–1.829 as compared with the highest quintile of hospital expenditure), good staff attitude (OR = 3.155) as well as good ward environment (OR = 2.361). But patient satisfaction was negatively associated with medical insurance for urban residents and other insurance status (OR = 0.215–0.357 as compared with medical insurance for urban employees). The qualitative analysis showed that patient trust—the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction—is shaped by perceived high quality of service delivery, empathic and caring interpersonal interactions, and a better designed medical insurance that provides stronger financial protection and enables more equitable access to health care. Conclusion At the core of high levels of patient dissatisfaction

  8. Medical Spanish Training Program for the Education of Health Care Providers: Communicative Needs and Cultural Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonsson-Devillers, Edith

    It is important to give medical personnel being trained in second languages and cultures access to information necessary to their specific immediate needs. The University of California, San Diego, is used as an example of a communicative approach to helping health care providers establish an appropriate relationship with their Latino patients and…

  9. The Future of Medical Schools and Teaching Hospitals in the Era of Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardes, Herbert

    1997-01-01

    Academic medical centers, threatened by erosion of infrastructure, declining academic workforce, marketplace forces diminishing quality and access, and shrinking funds, must not rely on managed care, the pharmaceutical industry, or foundations to provide necessary support. They must communicate the dangers they face and persuade government to…

  10. Medical foster care: what happens when children with medical complexity cannot be cared for by their families?

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Rebecca R; Henderson, Carrie M; Boss, Renee D

    2016-01-01

    Medical interventions for life-threatening pediatric conditions often oblige ongoing and complex medical care for survivors. For some children with medical complexity, their caretaking needs outstrip their parents' resources and abilities. When this occurs, the medical foster care system can provide the necessary health care and supervision to permit these children to live outside of hospitals. However, foster children with medical complexity experience extremes of social and medical risk, confounding their prognosis and quality of life beyond that of similar children living with biologic parents. Medical foster parents report inadequate training and preparation, perpetuating these health risks. Further, critical decisions that weigh the benefits and burdens of medical interventions for these children must accommodate complicated relationships involving foster families, caseworkers, biologic families, legal consultants, and clinicians. These variables can delay and undermine coordinated and comprehensive care. To rectify these issues, medical homes and written care plans can promote collaboration between providers, families, and agencies. Pediatricians should receive specialized training to meet the unique needs of this population. National policy and research agendas could target medical and social interventions to reduce the need for medical foster care for children with medical complexity, and to improve its quality for those children who do.

  11. Access to prenatal care: assessment of the adequacy of different indices.

    PubMed

    Santos Neto, Edson Theodoro dos; Oliveira, Adauto Emmerich; Zandonade, Eliana; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to compare the evaluation of adequate access to prenatal care according to different indices. Data to construct the indices were obtained from 1,006 patient interviews, prenatal cards, and medical charts for postpartum women who had been admitted for childbirth at maternity hospitals in Greater Metropolitan Vitória, Espírito Santo State, Brazil, from April to September 2010. The various indices for the evaluation of prenatal care were compared to the Kotelchuck index (1994) as the standard reference. Prevalence rates for adequacy were calculated, as were agreement, sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, accuracy, and likelihood ratios. The Takeda index showed the highest prevalence of adequacy (55.8%). The highest agreement was between the indices proposed by Villar et al. and Rosen et al. (adjusted kappa = 0.84). The study concludes that the Carvalho & Novaes index and the Brazilian Ministry of Health index are relevant for assessing adequate access to prenatal care.

  12. Effects of NCMS on access to care and financial protection in China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhiyuan; Van de Poel, Ellen; Van Doorslaer, Eddy; Yu, Baorong; Meng, Qingyue

    2014-08-01

    The introduction of the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) in rural China has been the most rapid and dramatic extension of health insurance coverage in the developing world in this millennium. The literature to date has mainly used the uneven rollout of NCMS across counties as a way of identifying its effects on access to care and financial protection. This study exploits the cross-county variation in NCMS generosity in 2006 and 2008 in the Ningxia and Shandong provinces to estimate the effect of coverage generosity on utilization and financial protection. Our results confirm earlier findings of NCMS being effective in increasing access to care but not in increasing financial protection. In addition, we find NCMS enrollees to be sensitive to the price incentives set in the NCMS design when choosing their provider and providers to respond by increasing prices and/or providing more expensive care.

  13. Negotiating candidacy: ethnic minority seniors' access to care.

    PubMed

    Koehn, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    The 'Barriers to Access to Care for Ethnic Minority Seniors ' (BACEMS) study in Vancouver, British Columbia, found that immigrant families torn between changing values and the economic realities that accompany immigration cannot always provide optimal care for their elders. Ethnic minority seniors further identified language barriers, immigration status, and limited awareness of the roles of the health authority and of specific service providers as barriers to health care. The configuration and delivery of health services, and health-care providers' limited knowledge of the seniors' needs and confounded these problems. To explore the barriers to access, the BACEMS study relied primarily on focus group data collected from ethnic minority seniors and their families and from health and multicultural service providers. The applicability of the recently developed model of 'candidacy', which emphasises the dynamic, multi-dimensional and contingent character of health-care access to ethnic minority seniors, was assessed. The candidacy framework increased sensitivity to ethnic minority seniors' issues and enabled organisation of the data into manageable conceptual units, which facilitated translation into recommendations for action, and revealed gaps that pose questions for future research. It has the potential to make Canadian research on the topic more co-ordinated.

  14. Understanding the gap in primary care access and use between teens and younger children.

    PubMed

    Burns, Marguerite E; Leininger, Lindsey Jeanne

    2012-10-01

    Primary health care use among teenagers falls short of clinical recommendations and consistently lags behind that of younger children. Using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, the authors explore three explanations for this age-related gap: family composition, parental awareness of children's health care needs, and the relative role of predisposing, enabling, and need-based factors for teens and younger children. Teenagers are 64% more likely to have no usual source of care and 25% more likely to have had no health care visit in the prior year relative to younger children. The gap narrows in families with children from both age-groups and among children with special health care needs. The largest disparity in primary care access exists between teens in families with no younger sibling(s) and younger children in families with no teen(s). A resolution to the age-related access gap will likely require understanding of, and intervention into, family-level determinants of poor access.

  15. Access to health care for undocumented migrants: a comparative policy analysis of England and the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Grit, Kor; den Otter, Joost J; Spreij, Anneke

    2012-02-01

    The presence of undocumented migrants is increasing in many Western countries despite wide-ranging attempts by governments to increase border security. Measures taken to control the influx of immigrants include policies that restrict access to publicly funded health care for undocumented migrants. These restrictions to health care access are controversial, and evidence suggests they do not always have the intended effect. This study provides a comparative analysis of institutional, actor-related, and contextual factors that have influenced health care policy development on undocumented migrants in England and the Netherlands. For undocumented migrants, England restricts its access to care at the point of service, while the Netherlands restricts through the payment system for services. The study includes an analysis of policy papers and semistructured, in-depth interviews with various actors in both countries. Findings confirm the influence of such contextual factors as immigration considerations and cost concerns on health care policy making in this area. However, these factors cannot explain the differences between the two countries. Previously enacted policies, especially the organization of the health care system, affected the kind of restrictions for undocumented migrants. Concerns about the side effects of generous treatment of undocumented migrants on other groups played a substantial role in formulating restrictive policies in both countries. Evidently, policy development and implementation is critically affected by institutional rules, which govern the degree of influence that doctors and professional medical associations have on the policy process.

  16. Recent Developments in Alcohol Services Research on Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, only about 10 percent of people with an alcohol or drug use disorder receive care for the condition, pointing to a large treatment gap. Several personal characteristics influence whether a person will receive treatment; additionally, many people with an alcohol use disorder do not perceive the need for treatment. The extent of the treatment gap differs somewhat across different population subgroups, such as those based on gender, age, or race and ethnicity. Recent health care reforms, such as implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, likely will improve access to substance abuse treatment. In addition, new treatment approaches, service delivery systems, and payment innovations may facilitate access to substance abuse services. Nevertheless, efforts to bridge the treatment gap will continue to be needed to ensure that all people who need alcohol and drug abuse treatment can actually receive it. PMID:27159809

  17. [Nursing ethics and the access to nursing care].

    PubMed

    Monteverde, Settimio

    2013-08-01

    The increasing number of ethical issues highlighted in everyday nursing care demonstrates the connectedness between nursing ethics and nursing practice. However, what is the role of ethical theories in this context? This question will be examined in this article by analysing the contribution made by the ethics of care, in particular in understandings of gender roles, asymmetries of power, professional knowledge and experience. The adoption and criticism of an emergent nursing ethics is discussed and stated from different viewpoints. The actuality of the caring approach is affirmed by a new reading of the given situation. This article first describes the traditional perception of nurses as marginalised actors in the health sector. By making reference to the current and growing global scarcity of nursing care, it contends that nursing will no longer be marginalised, but instead at the centre of public health attention and reputation. Nevertheless, marginalisation will persist by increasingly affecting the care receivers, especially those groups that are pushed to the fringes by the consequences of the healthcare market, such as persons of extreme old age, suffering from multiple morbidities, or with poor health literacy. Whereas the "classical" understanding of the ethics of care focuses on the nurse-patient relationship and on individual care and understanding of ethics, the new understanding confirms the classical, but adds an understanding of social ethics: caring for the access to care is seen as a main ethical goal of social justice within a nursing ethic.

  18. Health Care Reform and Medical Education: Forces toward Generalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Edward H.; Seifer, Sarena D.

    1995-01-01

    Health care reforms will dramatically change the culture of medical schools in areas of patient care, research, and education programs. Academic medical centers must construct mutually beneficial partnerships that will position them to take advantage of the opportunities rather than leave them without the diversity of resources needed to make…

  19. Medical Care and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old Medical Care and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old A A A The toddler months ... Following simple instructions? Saying a few words? Combining two words by age 2? The doctor may ask ...

  20. Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old A A A What's in this article? ... When to Call the Doctor During these early months, you might have many questions about your baby's ...

  1. Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old A A A What's in this article? ... really begin to show their personality during these months. So you might find yourself talking to your ...

  2. Medical Care and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Medical Care and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old A A A What's in this article? ... baby visits during this period, once at 9 months and again at 12 months . If you have ...

  3. The Paucity of Course Work in Medical Care Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jean; Becker, Selwyn

    1975-01-01

    In view of the current emphasis on measurement of the quality of health care services, reflected in regulatory provisions and accreditation requirements, an inquiry was made as to the extent to which medical schools are offering formal training in the techniques of medical care evaluation. (Editor)

  4. Medical Care: "Say Ahh!". Health and the Consumer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Elementary and Secondary Education.

    Secondary level students learn about medical care in this learning activity package, which is one in a series. The developers believe that consumer education in the health field would ensure better patient care and help eliminate incompetent medical practices and practitioners. The learning package includes instructions for the teacher,…

  5. From Institutional to Community Support: Consequences for Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Loon, Jos; Knibbe, Jeroen; Van Hove, Geert

    2005-01-01

    Background: Concerns have been raised about the quality of medical care available for people with intellectual disabilities in community-based services. The aims of this study were to evaluate a model of medical care developed during a programme of deinstitutionalization, based on a specialist physician supporting general practitioners (GPs).…

  6. Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Print A A A What's in this ... really begin to show their personality during these months. So you might find yourself talking to your ...

  7. Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Print A A A What's in this ... When to Call the Doctor During these early months, you might have many questions about your baby's ...

  8. Expanded Access to Non-VA Care Through the Veterans Choice Program. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) revises its medical regulations that implement section 101 of the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 (hereafter referred to as "the Choice Act"), which requires VA to establish a program to furnish hospital care and medical services through eligible non-VA health care providers to eligible veterans who either cannot be seen within the wait-time goals of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) or who qualify based on their place of residence (hereafter referred to as the "Veterans Choice Program" or the "Program"). These regulatory revisions are required by the most recent amendments to the Choice Act made by the Construction Authorization and Choice Improvement Act of 2014, and by the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015. The Construction Authorization and Choice Improvement Act of 2014 amended the Choice Act to define additional criteria that VA may use to determine that a veteran's travel to a VA medical facility is an "unusual or excessive burden," and the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015 amended the Choice Act to cover all veterans enrolled in the VA health care system, remove the 60-day limit on an episode of care, modify the wait-time and 40-mile distance eligibility criteria, and expand provider eligibility based on criteria as determined by VA. This interim final rule revises VA regulations consistent with the changes made to the Choice Act as described above.

  9. A Universal Health Care System? Unmet Need for Medical Care Among Regular and Irregular Immigrants in Italy.

    PubMed

    Busetta, Annalisa; Cetorelli, Valeria; Wilson, Ben

    2017-03-16

    Italy has a universal health care system that covers, in principle, the whole resident population, irrespective of citizenship and legal status. This study calculates the prevalence of unmet need for medical care among Italian citizens, regular and irregular immigrants and estimates logistic regression models to assess whether differences by citizenship and legal status hold true once adjusting for potential confounders. The analysis is based on two Surveys on Income and Living Conditions of Italian households and households with foreigners. Controlling for various factors, the odds of experiencing unmet need for medical care are 27% higher for regular immigrants than for Italian citizens and 59% higher for irregular immigrants. The gaps by citizenship and legal status are even more striking among those with chronic illnesses. These results reveal the high vulnerability of immigrants in Italy and the need to develop more effective policies to achieve health care access for all residents.

  10. Patients’ Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems. PMID:26690225

  11. Patients' Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice.

    PubMed

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-12-04

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems.

  12. [Hi-tech health care: modern status and prospects of development in medical facilities of the Ministry of Defence].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ia; Kuvshinov, K É; Makiev, R G; Pastukhov, A G

    2014-02-01

    The article is devoted to the current issues of providing hi-tech medical care in hospitals of the Ministry of Defence. Since the beginning of 2013 the executive body of the Russian Ministry of Defense pays special attention to improvement of the quality and accessibility of health care contingent of the Ministry of Defence. Thus, according to decision of the Minister of Defense of the Russian Federation, General of the Army Sergei Shoigu in 2013 more than 1.1 billion rubles (in 2012, targeted funding of high-tech medical care in the Ministry of Defence did not materialize) was allocated for military medical institutions of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation to provide high-tech medical care. As a result, in 7 months in 2013 the volume of medical care has increased by 32% in comparison with the same period in 2012. Currently the main military medical department of the Ministry of Defense is working to resolve the order of delivery and financing hi-tech medical care in the Armed Forces in the following areas: inclusion of military medical institutions of the Ministry of Defence in the list of health organizations, providing high-tech medical care, approved by Order of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, legal regulation of the provision of high-tech medical care in military medical establishments of the Ministry of defense of the Russian Federation within the budget appropriation allocated to the Ministry of Defence.

  13. Defining Medical Levels of Care for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, M.; Reyes, D.; Urbina, M.; Rubin, D.; Antonsen, E.

    2017-01-01

    NASA medical care standards establish requirements for providing health and medical programs for crewmembers during all phases of a mission. These requirements are intended to prevent or mitigate negative health consequences of long-duration spaceflight, thereby optimizing crew health and performance over the course of the mission. Current standards are documented in the two volumes of the NASA-STD-3001 Space Flight Human-System Standard document, established by the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Officer. Its purpose is to provide uniform technical standards for the design, selection, and application of medical hardware, software, processes, procedures, practices, and methods for human-rated systems. NASA-STD-3001 Vol. 1 identifies five levels of care for human spaceflight. These levels of care are accompanied by several components that illustrate the type of medical care expected for each. The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) of the Human Research Program has expanded the context of these provided levels of care and components. This supplemental information includes definitions for each component of care and example actions that describe the type of capabilities that coincide with the definition. This interpretation is necessary in order to fully and systematically define the capabilities required for each level of care in order to define the medical requirements and plan for infrastructure needed for medical systems of future exploration missions, such as one to Mars.

  14. [SOROKA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER: THE ROAD TO LEADERSHIP IN QUALITY OF MEDICAL CARE, SERVICE AND RESEARCH].

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ehud; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-02-01

    Soroka University Medical Center is a tertiary hospital, and the sole medical center in the Negev, the southern part of Israel. Soroka has invested in quality, service and research. The region has developed joint programs in order to advance the quality of medical care whilst optimizing the utilization of available resources. In this editorial we describe the path to leadership in quality of medical care, service and research.

  15. Mobile medical care units: an innovative use of Medicare funding.

    PubMed

    Kelley-Gillespie, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    Medicare is an underutilized payment source for home-delivered health care services for homebound elderly. An innovative service provision for home health care, Mobile Medical Care Units (MMCU), is presented. MMCU consist of a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals who are responsible for following the health care needs of their elderly patients on a continuous long-term basis across settings. This comprehensive care has significant impacts on homebound elderly and the health care industry. MMCU have the potential to be covered more inclusively by primary or supplemental health insurance plans, including Medicare, Medicaid, and HMO's, or by special funding from state aging departments.

  16. Progressive universalism? The impact of targeted coverage on health care access and expenditures in Peru.

    PubMed

    Neelsen, Sven; O'Donnell, Owen

    2017-02-16

    Like other countries seeking a progressive path to universalism, Peru has attempted to reduce inequalities in access to health care by granting the poor entitlement to tax-financed basic care without charge. We identify the impact of this policy by comparing the target population's change in health care utilization with that of poor adults already covered through employment-based insurance. There are positive effects on receipt of ambulatory care and medication that are largest among the elderly and the poorest. The probability of getting formal health care when sick is increased by almost two fifths, but the likelihood of being unable to afford treatment is reduced by more than a quarter. Consistent with the shallow coverage offered, there is no impact on use of inpatient care. Neither is there any effect on average out-of-pocket health care expenditure, but medical spending is reduced by up to 25% in the top quarter of the distribution. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Nurse practitioners and controlled substances prescriptive authority: improving access to care.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Michelle A; Tarlier, Denise S

    2013-03-01

    In 2007, Health Canada proposed a new framework to regulate prescriptive authority for controlled substances, titled New Classes of Practitioners Regulations (NCPR). The new regulatory framework was passed in November 2012; it gives nurse practitioners (NPs), midwives and podiatrists the authority to prescribe controlled medications under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. It is expected that authorizing NPs to write prescriptions for certain controlled substances commonly used in primary care will enhance flexibility and timeliness in primary care service delivery. Studies from the United States have shown positive outcomes in primary care access, decreased healthcare costs and the evolution and advancement of the NP role when prescriptive authority was expanded to include controlled substances. The purpose of this paper is to examine how NPs' prescriptive authority for controlled substances affects access to primary care and NP role development. Three key issues identified from the experience of one group of NPs in the United States (access to care, professional autonomy and prescriber knowledge) offer insight into the practice changes that may be anticipated for NPs in Canada now that they have acquired prescriptive authority for controlled substances. Recommendations are offered to assist nurse leaders and educators to best support NPs as they take on this new and important role responsibility.

  18. Social network approaches to recruitment, HIV prevention, medical care, and medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Latkin, Carl A.; Davey-Rothwell, Melissa A.; Knowlton, Amy R.; Alexander, Kamila A.; Williams, Chyvette T.; Boodram, Basmattee

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews current issues and advancements in social network approaches to HIV prevention and care. Social network analysis can provide a method to understand health disparities in HIV rates and treatment access and outcomes. Social network analysis is a value tool to link social structural factors to individual behaviors. Social networks provide an avenue for low cost and sustainable HIV prevention interventions that can be adapted and translated into diverse populations. Social networks can be utilized as a viable approach to recruitment for HIV testing and counseling, HIV prevention interventions, and optimizing HIV medical care and medication adherence. Social network interventions may be face-to-face or through social media. Key issues in designing social network interventions are contamination due to social diffusion, network stability, density, and the choice and training of network members. There are also ethical issues involved in the development and implementation of social network interventions. Social network analyses can also be used to understand HIV transmission dynamics. PMID:23673888

  19. Harm in the absence of care: Towards a medical ethics that cares.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, Elin

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the concept of care in contemporary medical practice and medical ethics. Although care has been hailed throughout the centuries as a crucial ideal in medical practice and as an honourable virtue to be observed in codes of medical ethics, I argue that contemporary medicine and medical ethics suffer from the lack of a theoretically sustainable concept of care and then discuss possible reasons that may help to explain this absence. I draw on the empirical studies of Carol Gilligan on care and connectedness as ontologically situated realities in human life. Based on a philosophical elaboration of her findings on the ethics of care emphasizing relationality, I try to show how the notion of 'relational ontology' originating from this stream of thought may be of help in developing a medical ethics that acknowledges care as a perspective to be observed in all interactions between physicians and patients.

  20. Medical Care Evaluation: An Old New Idea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoffel, Tom

    1976-01-01

    The systematic measurement of the quality of patient care based on outcome data is becoming a part of the delivery of that care. The author reviews the history of an early approach developed and crusaded by Dr. E. A. Codman 60 years ago and suggests some lessons it holds for today's health care professionals. (Editor/JT)

  1. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-21

    Services: 2010 ......................................................... 33 Appendix C. Financial Income Thresholds for VA Health Care Benefits...Appendix D. Increase to Financial Income Thresholds for VA Health Care Enrollment, in Priority Group 8, Calendar Year 2010...must submit a new VA Form 10-10EZ annually with updated financial information demonstrating inability to defray the expenses of necessary care.34

  2. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-27

    C. Financial Income Thresholds for VA Health Care Benefits, Calendar Year 2010...33 Appendix D. Increase to Financial Income Thresholds for VA Health Care...with updated financial information demonstrating inability to defray the expenses of necessary care.33 Veteran’s Status Eligibility for VA health

  3. Reply to "transforming oncology care": advancing value, accessing innovation.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Alternative payment models in oncology are already successfully standardizing care, curbing costs, and improving the patient experience. Yet, it is unclear whether decision makers are adequately considering patient access to innovation when creating these models, which could have severe consequences for a robust innovation ecosystem and the lives of afflicted patients. The suggested chart includes recommendations on: Allowing for the adoption of new, promising therapies; Promoting the measurement of patient-centered outcomes; and Providing support for personalized medicine.

  4. Resources and Capabilities of the Department of Veterans Affairs to Provide Timely and Accessible Care to Veterans.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Peter S; Ringel, Jeanne S; Ahluwalia, Sangeeta; Price, Rebecca Anhang; Buttorff, Christine; Concannon, Thomas W; Lovejoy, Susan L; Martsolf, Grant R; Rudin, Robert S; Schultz, Dana; Sloss, Elizabeth M; Watkins, Katherine E; Waxman, Daniel; Bauman, Melissa; Briscombe, Brian; Broyles, James R; Burns, Rachel M; Chen, Emily K; DeSantis, Amy Soo Jin; Ecola, Liisa; Fischer, Shira H; Friedberg, Mark W; Gidengil, Courtney A; Ginsburg, Paul B; Gulden, Timothy; Gutierrez, Carlos Ignacio; Hirshman, Samuel; Huang, Christina Y; Kandrack, Ryan; Kress, Amii; Leuschner, Kristin J; MacCarthy, Sarah; Maksabedian, Ervant J; Mann, Sean; Matthews, Luke Joseph; May, Linnea Warren; Mishra, Nishtha; Miyashiro, Lisa; Muchow, Ashley N; Nelson, Jason; Naranjo, Diana; O'Hanlon, Claire E; Pillemer, Francesca; Predmore, Zachary; Ross, Rachel; Ruder, Teague; Rutter, Carolyn M; Uscher-Pines, Lori; Vaiana, Mary E; Vesely, Joseph V; Hosek, Susan D; Farmer, Carrie M

    2016-05-09

    The Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 addressed the need for access to timely, high-quality health care for veterans. Section 201 of the legislation called for an independent assessment of various aspects of veterans' health care. The RAND Corporation was tasked with an assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) current and projected health care capabilities and resources. An examination of data from a variety of sources, along with a survey of VA medical facility leaders, revealed the breadth and depth of VA resources and capabilities: fiscal resources, workforce and human resources, physical infrastructure, interorganizational relationships, and information resources. The assessment identified barriers to the effective use of these resources and capabilities. Analysis of data on access to VA care and the quality of that care showed that almost all veterans live within 40 miles of a VA health facility, but fewer have access to VA specialty care. Veterans usually receive care within 14 days of their desired appointment date, but wait times vary considerably across VA facilities. VA has long played a national leadership role in measuring the quality of health care. The assessment showed that VA health care quality was as good or better on most measures compared with other health systems, but quality performance lagged at some VA facilities. VA will require more resources and capabilities to meet a projected increase in veterans' demand for VA care over the next five years. Options for increasing capacity include accelerated hiring, full nurse practice authority, and expanded use of telehealth.

  5. Understanding delayed access to antenatal care: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed access to antenatal care ('late booking’) has been linked to increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand why some women are late to access antenatal care. Methods 27 women presenting after 19 completed weeks gestation for their first hospital booking appointment were interviewed, using a semi-structured format, in community and maternity hospital settings in South Yorkshire, United Kingdom. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and entered onto NVivo 8 software. An interdisciplinary, iterative, thematic analysis was undertaken. Results The late booking women were diverse in terms of: age (15–37 years); parity (0–4); socioeconomic status; educational attainment and ethnicity. Three key themes relating to late booking were identified from our data: 1) 'not knowing’: realisation (absence of classic symptoms, misinterpretation); belief (age, subfertility, using contraception, lay hindrance); 2) 'knowing’: avoidance (ambivalence, fear, self-care); postponement (fear, location, not valuing care, self-care); and 3) 'delayed’ (professional and system failures, knowledge/empowerment issues). Conclusions Whilst vulnerable groups are strongly represented in this study, women do not always fit a socio-cultural stereotype of a 'late booker’. We report a new taxonomy of more complex reasons for late antenatal booking than the prevalent concepts of denial, concealment and disadvantage. Explanatory sub-themes are also discussed, which relate to psychological, empowerment and socio-cultural factors. These include poor reproductive health knowledge and delayed recognition of pregnancy, the influence of a pregnancy 'mindset’ and previous pregnancy experience, and the perceived value of antenatal care. The study also highlights deficiencies in early pregnancy diagnosis and service organisation. These issues should be considered by practitioners and service commissioners in order to promote

  6. Integrality in cervical cancer care: evaluation of access

    PubMed Central

    Brito-Silva, Keila; Bezerra, Adriana Falangola Benjamin; Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate integrity of access to uterine cervical cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment services. METHODS The tracer condition was analyzed using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach. The quantitative approach was based on secondary data from the analysis of cytology and biopsy exams performed between 2008 and 2010 on 25 to 59 year-old women in a municipality with a large population and with the necessary technological resources. Data were obtained from the Health Information System and the Regional Cervical Cancer Information System. Statistical analysis was performed using PASW statistic 17.0 software. The qualitative approach involved semi-structured interviews with service managers, health care professionals and users. NVivo 9.0 software was used for the content analysis of the primary data. RESULTS Pap smear coverage was low, possible due to insufficient screening and the difficulty of making appointments in primary care. The numbers of biopsies conducted are similar to those of abnormal cytologies, reflecting easy access to the specialized services. There was higher coverage among younger women. More serious diagnoses, for both cytologies and biopsies, were more prevalent in older women. CONCLUSIONS Insufficient coverage of cytologies, reported by the interviewees allows us to understand access difficulties in primary care, as well as the fragility of screening strategies. PMID:24897045

  7. Reducing medication errors in critical care: a multimodal approach

    PubMed Central

    Kruer, Rachel M; Jarrell, Andrew S; Latif, Asad

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has reported that medication errors are the single most common type of error in health care, representing 19% of all adverse events, while accounting for over 7,000 deaths annually. The frequency of medication errors in adult intensive care units can be as high as 947 per 1,000 patient-days, with a median of 105.9 per 1,000 patient-days. The formulation of drugs is a potential contributor to medication errors. Challenges related to drug formulation are specific to the various routes of medication administration, though errors associated with medication appearance and labeling occur among all drug formulations and routes of administration. Addressing these multifaceted challenges requires a multimodal approach. Changes in technology, training, systems, and safety culture are all strategies to potentially reduce medication errors related to drug formulation in the intensive care unit. PMID:25210478

  8. Investigating impacts of positional error on potential health care accessibility.

    PubMed

    Bell, Scott; Wilson, Kathi; Shah, Tayyab Ikram; Gersher, Sarina; Elliott, Tina

    2012-04-01

    Accessibility to health services at the local or community level is an effective approach to measuring health care delivery in various constituencies in Canada and the United States. GIS and spatial methods play an important role in measuring potential access to health services. The Three-Step Floating Catchment Area (3SFCA) method is a GIS based procedure developed to calculate potential (spatial) accessibility as a ratio of primary health care (PHC) providers to the surrounding population in urban settings. This method uses PHC provider locations in textual/address format supplied by local, regional, or national health authorities. An automated geocoding procedure is normally used to convert such addresses to a pair of geographic coordinates. The accuracy of geocoding depends on the type of reference data and the amount of value-added effort applied. This research investigates the success and accuracy of six geocoding methods as well as how geocoding error affects the 3SFCA method. ArcGIS software is used for geocoding and spatial accessibility estimation. Results will focus on two implications of geocoding: (1) the success and accuracy of different automated and value-added geocoding; and (2) the implications of these geocoding methods for GIS-based methods that generalise results based on location data.

  9. Equity in Access to Health Care Services in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Glorioso, Valeria; Subramanian, S V

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide new evidence on whether and how patterns of health care utilization deviate from horizontal equity in a country with a universal and egalitarian public health care system: Italy. Data Sources Secondary analysis of data from the Health Conditions and Health Care Utilization Survey 2005, conducted by the Italian National Institute of Statistics on a probability sample of the noninstitutionalized Italian population. Study Design Using multilevel logistic regression, we investigated how the probability of utilizing five health care services varies among individuals with equal health status but different SES. Data Collection/Extraction Respondents aged 18 or older at the interview time (n = 103,651). Principal Findings Overall, we found that use of primary care is inequitable in favor of the less well-off, hospitalization is equitable, and use of outpatient specialist care, basic medical tests, and diagnostic services is inequitable in favor of the well-off. Stratifying the analysis by health status, however, we found that the degree of inequity varies according to health status. Conclusions Despite its universal and egalitarian public health care system, Italy exhibits a significant degree of SES-related horizontal inequity in health services utilization. PMID:24949515

  10. Attitudes of health care trainees about genetics and disability: issues of access, health care communication, and decision making.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Kelly E; Gill, Carol J; Semik, Patrick; Kirschner, Kristi L

    2003-08-01

    Prior studies suggest that knowledge and attitudes of health care professionals influence patient communication and medical decision-making. To study this dynamic in the context of genetic disability, we developed a survey on health professionals' attitudes regarding disability and genetic screening and pilot-tested it on a sample of medical students, residents, and genetic counseling students (N=85). Despite minimal experience with disability or genetics, most respondents reported feeling comfortable dealing with genetics (59%) and disability (75%). The majority felt that disability caused significant suffering for both the person (51%) and family (64%), and that research should be directed toward preventing genetic disability (62%). Similar to prior literature, perceived "Quality of Life" was most often based on degrees of physical and cognitive functioning, pain, and social support. However, differences were found between genetic counseling trainees and other medical trainees in their relative emphasis of social versus medical issues in questions of disability and genetic testing, and these response patterns were associated with differences in the groups' priorities for offering information about social resources. Respondents agreed that access to genetic testing and information is personal and that testing should be available upon request for oneself (68%) and to a lesser degree for one's fetus (55%) or child (41%). However, the same individuals frequently stated that society should regulate access to such technologies. Although most felt that the patient and professional should jointly make such decisions on a case-by-case basis, it was also seen as appropriate for the health care professional to occasionally decline genetic testing. It seems appropriate that training and experience influence knowledge and attitudes. Therefore, it is critical to document knowledge and attitudes of various health care providers and trainees, including differences between

  11. The relationship between medical care costs and personal bankruptcy.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Billie Ann

    2006-01-01

    The number of personal bankruptcy filings has broken records over the last few years. Filings for nonbusiness bankruptcy protection totaled 1,650,279 in 2003, an increase of 9.6 percent between the years 2002 and 2003. This article examines the relationship in the United States between personal bankruptcy filings, and medical care costs and coverage. There seems to be a positive, statistically significant relationship between medical care costs and nonbusiness bankruptcy numbers; however, medical care coverage has limited or no explanatory value as a factor explaining total nonbusiness bankruptcy filings. The regression models suggest a weak or no relationship between the number of nonbusiness bankruptcy filings and health insurance coverage.

  12. [Internationalized medical care services increase need of health care providers to improve English communication skills].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chia-Ling

    2011-02-01

    English is the most important language used in international communication. Nurses today have significantly more opportunities to come into contact with clients of different nationalities. Therefore, English communication abilities are a critical to the effective care of foreign clients. Miscommunication due to language barriers can endanger the health and safety of foreign clients and hinder their access to healthcare resources. Basic English communicate skills allow nurses to better understand the feelings of foreign clients and to affect their satisfaction with healthcare services provided. The majority of clinical nurses in Taiwan are inadequately prepared to communicate with foreign clients or use English when delivering nursing care services. Although English is not an official language in Taiwan, strengthening English communication skills is necessary for Taiwan's healthcare service system. Faced with increasing numbers of foreign clients in their daily work, first-line nursing staffs need more training to improve English proficiency. In order to do so, support from the hospital director is the first priority. The second priority is to motivate nursing staffs to learn English; the third is to incorporate different English classes into the medical system and schedule class times to meet nurse scheduling needs; and the fourth is to establish international medical wards, with appropriate incentives in pay designed to attract and retain nursing staff proficient in English communication.

  13. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  14. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  15. Physician-assisted death with limited access to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Barutta, Joaquín; Vollmann, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    Even among advocates of legalising physician-assisted death, many argue that this should be done only once palliative care has become widely available. Meanwhile, according to them, physician-assisted death should be banned. Four arguments are often presented to support this claim, which we call the argument of lack of autonomy, the argument of existing alternatives, the argument of unfair inequalities and the argument of the antagonism between physician-assisted death and palliative care. We argue that although these arguments provide strong reasons to take appropriate measures to guarantee access to good quality palliative care to everyone who needs it, they do not justify a ban on physician-assisted death until we have achieved this goal.

  16. Intravenous medication administration in intensive care: opportunities for technological solutions.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jacqueline; Berner, Eta; Bothe, Olaf; Rymarchuk, Irina

    2008-11-06

    Medication administration errors have been shown to be frequent and serious. Error is particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as critical care. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of intravenous medication administration in five intensive care units. These data were used within the context of a larger study to design information system decision support in these settings. Nurses were observed during the course of their work and their intravenous medication administration process, order source, references used, calculation method, number of medications prepared simultaneously, and any interruptions occurring during the preparation and delivery phases of the administration event were recorded. In addition, chart reviews of medication administration records were completed and nurses were asked to complete an anonymous drop-box questionnaire regarding their experiences with medication administration error. The results of this study are discussed in terms of potential informatics solutions for reducing medication administration error.

  17. Physical and Mental Health and Access to Care among Nonmetropolitan Veterans Health Administration Patients Younger than 65 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alan; Weeks, William B.

    2006-01-01

    Context: The 4.5 million military veterans treated by the Veterans Health Administration (VA) are believed to experience poorer physical and mental health than nonveterans. Furthermore, nonmetropolitan residents have less access to medical services, whether or not they are veterans in VA care. A direct comparison of metropolitan and…

  18. Why a shared care record is an official medical record.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yulong; Orr, Martin; Warren, Jim; Humphrey, Gayl; Day, Karen; Tibby, Sarah; Fitzpatrick, Jo

    2013-10-18

    The literature describes three categories of health records: the Official Medical Records held by healthcare providers, Personal Health Records owned by patients, and--a possible in between case--the Shared Care Record. New complications and challenges arise with electronic storage of this latter class of record; for instance, an electronic shared care record may have multiple authors, which presents challenges regarding the roles and responsibilities for record-keeping. This article discusses the definitions and implementations of official medical records, personal health records and shared care records. We also consider the case of a New Zealand pilot of developing and implementing a shared care record in the National Shared Care Planning Programme. The nature and purpose of an official medical record remains the same whether in paper or electronic form. We maintain that a shared care record is an official medical record; it is not a personal health record that is owned and controlled by patients, although it is able to be viewed and interacted with by patients. A shared care record needs to meet the same criteria for medico-legal and ethical duties in the delivery of shared care as pertain to any official medical record.

  19. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    PubMed

    Conway, R; Kavanagh, R; Coughlan, R J; Carey, J J

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant's confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant's self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases.

  20. Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Programs (KP-MCP)

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Research within KP-MCP conducts, publishes, and disseminates high-quality epidemiologic and health services research to improve the health and medical care of Kaiser Permanente members and the society at large.

  1. 32 CFR 732.22 - Recovery of medical care payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... possible under workers compensation, no-fault insurance, or under medical payments insurance (all... statement. (c) For care rendered in States with no-fault insurance laws, comply with procedures outlined...

  2. 32 CFR 732.22 - Recovery of medical care payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... possible under workers compensation, no-fault insurance, or under medical payments insurance (all... statement. (c) For care rendered in States with no-fault insurance laws, comply with procedures outlined...

  3. Primary Medical Care and Children's Learning Problems

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Patrick J.; Feldman, William; Rosser, Walter

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe the major learning problems that confront the primary-care physician. They discuss why they believe that the primary-care physician has an important role in case finding, referral, case management, and advocacy for the child with learning problems and his or her family. PMID:21248891

  4. Ethical and professional considerations providing medical evaluation and care to refugee asylum seekers.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Ramin; Smith, Clyde L

    2013-01-01

    A significant number of asylum seekers who largely survived torture live in the United States. Asylum seekers have complex social and medical problems with significant barriers to health care access. When evaluating and providing care for survivors, health providers face important challenges regarding medical ethics and professional codes. We review ethical concerns in regard to accountability, the patient-physician relationship, and moral responsibilities to offer health care irrespective of patient legal status; competing professional responsibility toward society and the judiciary system; concerns about the consistency of asylum seekers' claims; ethical concerns surrounding involving trainees and researching within the evaluation setting; and the implication of broader societal views towards rights and social justice. We discuss contributing factors, including inadequate and insufficient provider training, varying and inadequate institutional commitment, asylum seekers' significant medical and social problems, and the broader health and social system issues. We review existing resources to address these concerns and offer suggestions.

  5. Medication management for nurses working in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wendy; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Baxter, Pamela; Ploeg, Jenny

    2012-09-01

    In long-term care (LTC), the complexity of residents' conditions and their treatment requirements present challenges for nurses managing medications. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore medication management as described by licensed nurses working in LTC. A total of 22 licensed nurses from 2 LTC facilities located in the Canadian province of Ontario participated in 4 focus groups. Thematic content analysis was used to organize data into themes and a conceptual model was developed. The overarching theme was that nurses are "racing against time" to manage medications and 3 subthemes described how they coped with this important care process: preparing to race, running the race, and finishing the race. Barriers to safe medication management included time restraints, knowledge limitations, interruptions and distractions, and poor communication. The findings can be used to better inform health-care providers and to guide future research. They also have the potential to directly impact outcomes related to safe medication management in LTC.

  6. Improving Access to Maternity Care for Women with Opioid Use Disorders: Colocation of Midwifery Services at an Addiction Treatment Program.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal drug and alcohol use is associated with serious medical and psychiatric morbidity for pregnant and postpartum women and their newborns. Participation in prenatal care has been shown to improve outcomes, even in the absence of treatment for substance use disorders. Unfortunately, women with substance use disorders often do not receive adequate prenatal care. Barriers to accessing care for pregnant women with substance use disorders include medical and psychiatric comorbidities, transportation, caring for existing children, housing and food insecurity, and overall lack of resources. In a health care system where care is delivered by each discipline separately, lack of communication between providers causes poorly coordinated services and missed opportunities. The integration of mental health and substance use treatment services in medical settings is a goal of health care reform. However, this approach has not been widely promoted in the context of maternity care. The Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Perinatal Addiction Treatment Program provides an integrated model of care for pregnant and postpartum women with substance use disorders, including the colocation of midwifery services in the context of a dedicated addiction treatment program. A structured approach to screening and intervention for drug and alcohol use in the outpatient prenatal clinic facilitates referral to treatment at the appropriate level. Providing midwifery care within the context of a substance use treatment program improves access to prenatal care, continuity of care throughout pregnancy and the postpartum, and availability of family planning services. The evolution of this innovative approach is described. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health.

  7. The impact of medical interpreter services on the quality of health care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Flores, Glenn

    2005-06-01

    Twenty-one million Americans are limited in English proficiency (LEP), but little is known about the effect of medical interpreter services on health care quality. Asystematic literature review was conducted on the impact of interpreter services on quality of care. Five database searches yielded 2,640 citations and a final database of 36 articles, after applying exclusion criteria. Multiple studies document that quality of care is compromised when LEP patients need but do not get interpreters. LEP patients' quality of care is inferior, and more interpreter errors occur with untrained ad hoc interpreters. Inadequate interpreter services can have serious consequences for patients with mental disorders. Trained professional interpreters and bilingual health care providers positively affect LEP patients' satisfaction, quality of care, and outcomes. Evidence suggests that optimal communication, patient satisfaction, and outcomes and the fewest interpreter errors occur when LEP patients have access to trained professional interpreters or bilingual providers.

  8. Primary health care use and health care accessibility among adolescents in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Barakat-Haddad, C; Siddiqua, A

    2015-05-19

    This study examined primary health care use and accessibility among adolescents living in the United Arab Emirates. In a cross-sectional study, we collected health care use, sociodemographic and residential data for a sample of 6363 adolescents. Logistic regression modelling was used to examine predictors of health care use. The most-consulted health professionals were dentists or orthodontists, family doctors and eye specialists. Local adolescents were more likely to attend public clinics/hospitals than private facilities, while the opposite was true for expatriates. In the previous 12 months 22.6% of the participants had not obtained the health care they needed and 19.5% had not had a routine health check-up. Common reasons for not obtaining care were busy schedules, dislike/fear of doctors and long waiting times. Predictors of not obtaining needed care included nationality and income, while those for having a routine check-up were mother's education and car ownership. Improvements to the health care sector may increase health care accessibility among adolescents.

  9. Medical education and information literacy in the era of open access.

    PubMed

    Brower, Stewart M

    2010-01-01

    The Open Access movement in scholarly communications poses new issues and concerns for medical education in general and information literacy education specifically. For medical educators, Open Access can affect the availability of new information, instructional materials, and scholarship in medical education. For students, Open Access materials continue to be available to them post-graduation, regardless of affiliation. Libraries and information literacy librarians are challenged in their responses to the Open Access publishing movement in how best to support Open Access endeavors within their own institutions, and how best to educate their user base about Open Access in general.

  10. Medical care delivery in the US space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Donald F.

    1991-01-01

    The stated goal of this meeting is to examine the use of telemedicine in disaster management, public health, and remote health care. NASA has a vested interest in providing health care to crews in remote environments. NASA has unique requirements for telemedicine support, in that our flight crews conduct their job in the most remote of all work environments. Compounding the degree of remoteness are other environmental concerns, including confinement, lack of atmosphere, spaceflight physiological deconditioning, and radiation exposure, to name a few. In-flight medical care is a key component in the overall support for missions, which also includes extensive medical screening during selection, preventive medical programs for astronauts, and in-flight medical monitoring and consultation. This latter element constitutes the telemedicine aspect of crew health care. The level of in-flight resources dedicated to medical care is determined by the perceived risk of a given mission, which in turn is related to mission duration, planned crew activities, and length of time required for return to definitive medical care facilities.

  11. Redesigning care at the Flinders Medical Centre: clinical process redesign using "lean thinking".

    PubMed

    Ben-Tovim, David I; Bassham, Jane E; Bennett, Denise M; Dougherty, Melissa L; Martin, Margaret A; O'Neill, Susan J; Sincock, Jackie L; Szwarcbord, Michael G

    2008-03-17

    *The Flinders Medical Centre (FMC) Redesigning Care program began in November 2003; it is a hospital-wide process improvement program applying an approach called "lean thinking" (developed in the manufacturing sector) to health care. *To date, the FMC has involved hundreds of staff from all areas of the hospital in a wide variety of process redesign activities. *The initial focus of the program was on improving the flow of patients through the emergency department, but the program quickly spread to involve the redesign of managing medical and surgical patients throughout the hospital, and to improving major support services. *The program has fallen into three main phases, each of which is described in this article: "getting the knowledge"; "stabilising high-volume flows"; and "standardising and sustaining". *Results to date show that the Redesigning Care program has enabled the hospital to provide safer and more accessible care during a period of growth in demand.

  12. 42 CFR 456.143 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.143...: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.143 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical care evaluation study must— (a) Identify and analyze medical or administrative factors related to the...

  13. 42 CFR 456.243 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.243... Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.243 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical care evaluation study must— (a) Identify and analyze medical or administrative factors related...

  14. [Inequality in access to health care services. Policy recommendations aimed at achieving equity].

    PubMed

    Urbanos-Garrido, Rosa

    2016-11-01

    This article reveals the presence of inequalities in access to health care that may be considered unfair and avoidable. These inequalities are related to coverage of clinical needs, to the financial problems faced by families in completing medical treatments, or to disparities in waiting times and the use of services for equal need. A substantial proportion of inequalities appears to have increased as a result of the measures adopted to face the economic crisis. The recommendations aimed at improving equity affect different pillars of the taxpayer-funded health system, including, among others, the definition of the right to public health care coverage, the formulas of cost-sharing, the distribution of powers between primary and specialty care, the reforms of clinical management, and the production and dissemination of information to facilitate the decision-making processes of health authorities, professionals and citizens. Moreover, it is recommended to focus on particularly vulnerable population groups.

  15. The Colombian health insurance system and its effect on access to health care.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Luz Stella; Salmon, J Warren; Swartzman, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In 1993, the Colombian government sought to reform its health care system under the guidance of international financial institutions (the World Bank and International Monetary Fund). These institutions maintain that individual private health insurance systems are more appropriate than previously established national public health structures for overcoming inequities in health care in developing countries. The reforms carried out following international financial institution guidelines are known as "neoliberal reforms." This qualitative study explores consumer health choices and associated factors, based on interviews with citizens living in Medellin, Colombia, in 2005-2006. The results show that most study participants belonging to low-income and middle-income strata, even with medical expense subsidies, faced significant barriers to accessing health care. Only upper-income participants reported a selection of different options without barriers, such as complementary and alternative medicines, along with private Western biomedicine. This study is unique in that the informal health system is linked to overall neo-liberal policy change.

  16. [The development of organization of medical social care of adolescents].

    PubMed

    Chicherin, L P; Nagaev, R Ia

    2014-01-01

    The model of the subject of the Russian Federation is used to consider means of development of health protection and health promotion in adolescents including implementation of the National strategy of activities in interest of children for 2012-2017 approved by decree No761 of the President of Russia in June 1 2012. The analysis is carried out concerning organization of medical social care to this group of population in medical institutions and organizations of different type in the Republic of Bashkortostan. Nowadays, in 29 territories medical social departments and rooms, 5 specialized health centers for children, 6 clinics friendly to youth are organized. The analysis of manpower support demonstrates that in spite of increasing of number of rooms and departments of medical social care for children and adolescents decreasing of staff jobs both of medical personnel and psychologists and social workers occurs. The differences in priorities of functioning of departments and rooms of medical social care under children polyclinics, health centers for children and clinics friendly to youth are established. The questionnaire survey of pediatricians and adolescents concerning perspectives of development of adolescent service established significant need in development of specialized complex center. At the basis of such center problems of medical, pedagogical, social, psychological, legal profile related to specific characteristics of development and medical social needs of adolescents can be resolved. The article demonstrates organizational form of unification on the functional basis of the department of medical social care of children polyclinic and clinic friendly to youth. During three years, number of visits of adolescents to specialists of the center increases and this testifies awareness of adolescents and youth about activities of department of medical social care. The most percentage of visits of adolescents to specialists was made with prevention purpose. Among

  17. Medicare and Caregivers: Planning for Medical Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... and medical power of attorney. Getting Help from SHIP Click for more information When you have a ... is the State Health Insurance Assistance Program, or SHIP. SHIP gives free health insurance counseling and guidance ...

  18. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-24

    Medicare-eligible retirees. Other TRICARE plans include TRICARE Young Adult , TRICARE Reserve Select and TRICARE Retired Reserve. TRICARE also...8 TRICARE Young Adult ...24 Does DOD Use Animals in Medical Research or Training ? ............................................. 24 Figures Figure

  19. [The place, role and importance of emergency medical care in the Serbian health care system].

    PubMed

    Nikić-Sovilj, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Emergency medical assistance is immediate, the current medical support that is provided hurted person to avoid any possible harmful consequences for his life and health. Emergency medical aid is part of the health care system that is rarely thought, but is still expected to be available always and continuously in case of need. Emergency medical assistance should always be available throughout the territory where people live, because there is no adequate replacement. Emergency Medical Services and emergency medical transportation services are health care that is provided in terms of all persons in the state of medical urgency. In urgent or emergency conditions, health care can be provided on the site of injuries and disease or health institution. Cases of medical urgency are ranked by degrees. The first and most difficult level of medical urgency indicate all urgent pathological conditions, diseases, injuries and poisoning, which occur in the workplace and public places. To expect medical team of emergency medical assistance at the scene intervened medical urgency, it is necessary to make call it. Call the phone number refers to the 94. Call sent to this number to receive orderly dispatcher. Dispatchers are employees who perform their work in the dispatching center. They appear in the phone number 94, made the assessment and screening calls, worry about the degree of urgency, and the absorption team, which team is the nearest place of the event. After received calls they send expert medical teams to the place of accident. In the dispatching center work always doctor and medical technician. Emergency medical care cases is a great professional and educational challenge and imposes a constant need in education of doctors and the whole emergency medical teams. Education of all employees in the state of emergency care is required continualy and for students too to receive new knowledge in the field of medical urgency by various professional purposes.

  20. 77 FR 20743 - Protective Force Personnel Medical, Physical Readiness, Training, and Access Authorization Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... on the proposed rule to amend the standards for medical, physical performance, training, and access... proposed rule to revise the standards for medical, physical performance, training, and access...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 1046 RIN 1992-AA40 Protective Force Personnel Medical, Physical...

  1. 5 CFR 293.504 - Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System. (a) All employee occupational medical records... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System. 293.504 Section 293.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF...

  2. 33 CFR 150.604 - Who controls access to medical monitoring and exposure records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who controls access to medical... Health Safety and Health (general) § 150.604 Who controls access to medical monitoring and exposure records? If medical monitoring is performed or exposure records are maintained by an employer, the...

  3. 32 CFR 324.13 - Access to medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to medical and psychological records. 324.13 Section 324.13 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF... to medical and psychological records. Individual access to medical and psychological records...

  4. [Problems in medical care for patients with cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Maksimova, T M; Lushkina, N P; Ogryzko, E V

    2012-01-01

    Despite showing that cardiovascular disease mortality in Russia is declining evaluation of medical care for cardiovascular patients, using different information sources, revealed a lot of problems in this field need it's solving. Together with modernization of medical services it is urgently necessary to transform the medical education, including post graduate, information support for medical professionals in field of modern medical technologies, using in countries with low mortality rates, creation the conditions for regular updating professional knowledge. It is necessary to reconsider formal criteria for medical care evaluation, especially taking into account co morbidity of cardiovascular diseases. Our data illustrate that social disparities influence on outcomes of diseases and so for further decreasing mortality rates and increasing the life expectancy adequate treatment must be provide for all patients independently of their material wellbeing.

  5. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  6. Improving Access to Noninstitutional Long-Term Care for American Indian Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Betty Jo (Josea); Creekmur, Beth; Cote, Sarah; Saliba, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Home-based primary care (HBPC) is an effective model of noninstitutional long-term care developed in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide ongoing care to homebound persons. Significant rural populations of American Indians have limited access to services designed for frail older adults. Fourteen Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs) initiated efforts to expand access to HBPC in concert with local tribes and Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities. This study characterizes the resulting emerging models of HBPC and co-management. Using an observational design, key respondent telephone interviews (n = 37) were conducted with stakeholders representing the 14 VAMCs to describe these HBPC programs, and HBPC models were evaluated in relation to VAMC organizational culture as revealed on the annual VA All Employee Survey. Twelve VAMCs independently developed HBPC expansion programs for American Indian veterans, and six different program models were implemented. Two models were unique to collaborations between VAMCs and tribes; in these collaborations, the tribes retained primary care responsibilities. VAMC used the other four models for delivery of care in remote rural areas to all veteran populations, American Indians and non-Indians alike. Strategies to improve access by reducing geographic barriers occur in all models. Comparing mean VAMC organizational culture ratings, as defined in the Competing Values Framework, revealed significant group differences for one of these six models. Findings from this study illustrate the flexibility of the HBPC program and opportunities for co-management and expansion of healthcare access for American Indians and non-Indians, particularly in rural areas. PMID:25854124

  7. Caring, Competence and Professional Identities in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the multiple discourses that influence medical education with a focus on the discourses of competence and caring. Discourses of competence are largely constituted through, and related to, biomedical and clinical issues whereas discourses of caring generally focus on social concerns. These discourses are not necessarily equal…

  8. A Study of Risks, Medical Care, and Infant Mortality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Helen C., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    Using vital records for live births which occurred in New York City in 1968, and infant deaths among them, this study of Risks, Medical Care, and Infant Mortality examined the characteristics of prenatal care among pregnant women from a wide range of racial, social, and economic backgrounds. (Author/SB)

  9. Launching care partners in medical-surgical nursing.

    PubMed

    Cusanza, Sharon

    2012-04-01

    In the wake of health care reform, a large health system developed a new model of medical-surgical nursing care delivery. To facilitate the subsequent culture change, a non-traditional educational approach was used to provide a dynamic experiential venue that included real-time feedback to facilitate nurses' behavioral transformation.

  10. Accessing and managing open medical resources in Africa over the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Rada; Khalifa, Aly; Jimenez-Castellanos, Ana; de la Calle, Guillermo; Ramirez-Robles, Maximo; Crespo, Jose; Perez-Rey, David; Garcia-Remesal, Miguel; Anguita, Alberto; Alonso-Calvo, Raul; de la Iglesia, Diana; Barreiro, Jose M.; Maojo, Victor

    2014-10-01

    Recent commentaries have proposed the advantages of using open exchange of data and informatics resources for improving health-related policies and patient care in Africa. Yet, in many African regions, both private medical and public health information systems are still unaffordable. Open exchange over the social Web 2.0 could encourage more altruistic support of medical initiatives. We have carried out some experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach to disseminate open data and informatics resources in Africa. After the experiments we developed the AFRICA BUILD Portal, the first Social Network for African biomedical researchers. Through the AFRICA BUILD Portal users can access in a transparent way to several resources. Currently, over 600 researchers are using distributed and open resources through this platform committed to low connections.

  11. The Walking Egg Project: Universal access to infertility care – from dream to reality

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, W.

    2013-01-01

    Childlessness and infertility care are neglected aspects of family planning in resource-poor countries, although the consequences of involuntary childlessness are much more dramatic and can create more wide ranging societal problems compared to Western societies, particularly for women. Because many families in developing countries completely depend on children for economic survival, childlessness has to be regarded as a social and public health issue and not only as an individual medical problem. In the Walking Egg Project we strive to raise awareness surrounding childlessness in resource-poor countries and to make infertility care in all its aspects, including assisted reproductive technologies, available and accessible for a much larger part of the world population. We hope to achieve this goal through innovation and research, advocacy and networking, training and capacity building and service delivery. The Walking Egg non-profit organization has chosen a holistic approach of reproductive health and therefore strengthening infertility care should go together with strengthening other aspects of family planning and mother care. Right from the start The Walking Project has approached the problem of infertility in a multidisciplinary and global manner. It gathers medical, social, ethical, epidemiological, juridical and economical scientists and experts along with artists and philosophers to discuss and work together towards its goal. We recently developed a simplified tWE lab IVF culture system with excellent results. According to our first cost calculation, the price of a single IVF cycle using the methodologies and protocols we described, seems to be less than 200 Euros. We realize that universal access to infertility care can only be achieved when good quality but affordable infertility care is linked to effective family planning and safe motherhood programmes. Only a global project with respect to sociocultural, ethical, economical and political differences can

  12. Canadian experiences in telehealth: equalizing access to quality care.

    PubMed

    Jennett, P A; Person, V L; Watson, M; Watanabe, M

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Conference "TExpo'98: Interactive Health" focused on four telehealth themes: community needs, Canadian experiences, industry perspectives, and access/security/interoperability issues. Health and socioeconomic needs have been the driving force behind telehealth initiatives; telelearning is one of the major Canadian initiatives. To encourage Canadian telehealth initiatives, the federal government is building a national health infrastructure. One element in this framework is concerned with empowering the public, strengthening health care services, and ensuring accountability. Technological advancements and innovative partnerships among health communities, government, users, professional bodies, and industry are critical to continued growth. Key issues including access, evaluation, implementation, privacy, confidentiality, security, and interoperability are of universal concern to participants. Research that examines the benefits and costs of telehealth is needed.

  13. [Delivery of medical care to the neurological intractable diseases at home].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Mieko

    2009-11-01

    It is the case of the great difficulties for patients living with neurological intractable diseases to visit outpatient when the diseases are in the progressive stage. The national nursing care insurance was matured and the revised medical insurance system led to open the local supportive clinic for home care in 2006. It has set easier access to medical care at home. This is encouraging for patients who wish to continue to live with their families at their long time home. The medical care at home is where the attending physician has to demonstrate the expertise of how to assemble in- and out- interdisciplinary medical team. Moving a hospital room simply into at home does not made a medical care at home. You have to begin recognizing what gaps needed to fill in between a hospital room and at home. This is the area beyond what a family doctor single-handedly deals with due to the nature of the diseases. The dual attending physician set-up is desirable including a family doctor and a specialist.

  14. Defense Health Care: TRICARE Multiyear Surveys Indicate Problems with Access to Care for Nonenrolled Beneficiaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    and clinics, referred to as military treatment facilities, or from civilian providers.2 DOD’s TRICARE Management Activity (TMA), which oversees the...areas called Prime Service Areas 2Through individual agreements between military treatment facilities and the Department of Veterans Affairs’ medical...refer to as non-PSAs). 5 Beneficiaries who use TRICARE Prime, a managed care option, must enroll and can obtain care through military treatment

  15. Health and Access to Care during the First 2 Years of the ACA Medicaid Expansions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sarah; Wherry, Laura R

    2017-03-09

    Background By September 2015, a total of 29 states and Washington, D.C., were participating in Medicaid expansions under the Affordable Care Act. We examined whether Medicaid expansions were associated with changes in insurance coverage, health care use, and health among low-income adults. Methods We compared changes in outcomes during the 2 years after implementation of the Medicaid expansion (2014 and 2015) relative to the 4 years before expansion (2010 through 2013) in states with and without expansions, using data from the National Health Interview Survey. The sample consisted of 60,766 U.S. citizens who were 19 to 64 years of age and had incomes below 138% of the federal poverty level. Outcomes included insurance coverage, access to and use of medical care in the past 12 months, and health status as reported by the respondents. Results A total of 29 states and Washington, D.C., expanded Medicaid by September 1, 2015. In year 2 after implementation, uninsurance rates were reduced in expansion states relative to nonexpansion states (difference-in-differences estimate, -8.2 percentage points; P<0.001) and rates of Medicaid coverage were increased (difference-in-differences estimate, 15.6 percentage points; P<0.001). Expansions were not associated with significant changes in the likelihood of a doctor visit or overnight hospital stay or health status as reported by the respondent. However, as compared with nonexpansion states, expansion states had a decrease in reports of inability to afford needed follow-up care (difference-in-differences estimate, -3.4 percentage points; P=0.002) and in reports of worry about paying medical bills (difference-in-differences estimate, -7.9 percentage points; P=0.002) and an increase in reports of medical care being delayed because of wait times for appointments (difference-in-differences estimate, 2.6 percentage points; P=0.02). Conclusions Medicaid expansion was associated with increased insurance coverage and access to care

  16. Need for accessible infertility care in Ghana: the patients’ voice

    PubMed Central

    Osei, Nana Yaw

    2016-01-01

    Abstract According to the Ghana Statistical Service (GSS) infertility and childlessness are the most important reason for divorce in Ghana. The traditional Ghanaian society is pro-natal and voluntary childlessness is very uncommon. Patient groups are almost non-existent in Sub-Saharan Africa, aggravating the situation of childless couples. Due to the lack of enough and affordable high quality infertility services, many women resort to traditional healing, witchcraft and spiritual mediation. Considering the severe sociocultural and economic consequences of childlessness, especially for women, there is an urgent need for accessible and affordable high quality infertility care in Ghana. PMID:27909570

  17. Planned creation of vascular access saves medical expenses for incident dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling-Chu; Lin, Ming-Yen; Hsieh, Chong-Chao; Chiu, Herng-Chia; Mau, Lih-Wen; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Chen, Hung-Chun; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2009-10-01

    Hospitalization to initiate hemodialysis (HD) through temporary catheterization and subsequent creation of permanent vascular access (VA) is costly. Therefore, we studied the influence of the timing of VA creation on medical expenses, length of stay (LOS) and 1-year primary patency rate in incident HD patients. We analyzed the medical expenses associated with hospitalization and LOS at VA creation in 486 incident HD patients at two hospitals in southern Taiwan. Patients with early VA creation, more than 1 month before HD initiation, were defined as the Planned group (n = 70); less than 1 month as the Delayed group (n = 48); and those with VA creation after the initiation of HD as the Urgent group (n = 368). The Urgent group had the highest inpatient medical expenses and LOS compared with the other two groups. Multiple regression analyses of inpatient medical expenses and LOS showed that the timing of VA creation, the type of VA, marital and employment status and the number of comorbidities were significant factors responsible for the differences between groups. Furthermore, higher inpatient medical expenses and longer LOS in the Urgent group were noted in the arteriovenous fistula and arteriovenous graft subgroups. Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis showed that the 1-year primary patency rate was highest in the Delayed group and lowest in the Planned group, while Cox regression analysis demonstrated that the type of VA, but not the timing of VA creation, was a significant risk factor for VA patency. Arteriovenous graft had a higher risk for occlusion than arteriovenous fistula. In conclusion, planned VA creation before the initiation of HD is associated with lower inpatient medical expenses and shorter LOS, which should be promoted for pre-end-stage renal disease care, but the care for VA should be further emphasized before the progression to end-stage renal disease, and the patency of the VA should be cautiously monitored.

  18. Rural Health Care Access and Policy in Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Roger; Kam, Sophia M; Regalado, Sophie M

    2016-01-01

    Compared to their urban counterparts, rural and remote inhabitants experience lower life expectancy and poorer health status. Nowhere is the worldwide shortage of health professionals more pronounced than in rural areas of developing countries. Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) includes a disproportionately large number of developing countries; therefore, this article explores SSA in depth as an example. Using the conceptual framework of access to primary health care, sustainable rural health service models, rural health workforce supply, and policy implications, this article presents a review of the academic and gray literature as the basis for recommendations designed to achieve greater health equity. An alternative international standard for health professional education is recommended. Decision makers should draw upon the expertise of communities to identify community-specific health priorities and should build capacity to enable the recruitment and training of local students from underserviced areas to deliver quality health care in rural community settings.

  19. Autonomous medical care for exploration class space missions.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Douglas; Smart, Kieran; Melton, Shannon; Polk, James D; Johnson-Throop, Kathy

    2008-04-01

    The US-based health care system of the International Space Station contains several subsystems, the Health Maintenance System, Environmental Health System and the Countermeasure System. These systems are designed to provide primary, secondary and tertiary medical prevention strategies. The medical system deployed in low Earth orbit for the International Space Station is designed to support a "stabilize and transport" concept of operations. In this paradigm, an ill or injured crewmember would be rapidly evacuated to a definitive medical care facility (DMCF) on Earth, rather than being treated for a protracted period on orbit. The medical requirements of the short (7 day) and long duration (up to 6 months) exploration class missions to the moon are similar to low Earth orbit class missions but also include an additional 4 to 5 days needed to transport an ill or injured crewmember to a DMCF on Earth. Mars exploration class missions are quite different in that they will significantly delay or prevent the return of an ill or injured crewmember to a DMCF. In addition the limited mass, power and volume afforded to medical care will prevent the mission designers from manifesting the entire capability of terrestrial care. National Aeronautics and Space Administration has identified five levels of care as part of its approach to medical support of future missions including the Constellation program. To implement an effective medical risk mitigation strategy for exploration class missions, modifications to the current suite of space medical systems may be needed, including new crew medical officer training methods, treatment guidelines, diagnostic and therapeutic resources, and improved medical informatics.

  20. Autonomous Medical Care for Exploration Class Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Smart, Kieran; Melton, Shannon; Polk, James D.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    The US-based health care system of the International Space Station (ISS) contains several subsystems, the Health Maintenance System, Environmental Health System and the Countermeasure System. These systems are designed to provide primary, secondary and tertiary medical prevention strategies. The medical system deployed in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) for the ISS is designed to enable a "stabilize and transport" concept of operations. In this paradigm, an ill or injured crewmember would be rapidly evacuated to a definitive medical care facility (DMCF) on Earth, rather than being treated for a protracted period on orbit. The medical requirements of the short (7 day) and long duration (up to 6 months) exploration class missions to the Moon are similar to LEO class missions with the additional 4 to 5 days needed to transport an ill or injured crewmember to a DCMF on Earth. Mars exploration class missions are quite different in that they will significantly delay or prevent the return of an ill or injured crewmember to a DMCF. In addition the limited mass, power and volume afforded to medical care will prevent the mission designers from manifesting the entire capability of terrestrial care. NASA has identified five Levels of Care as part of its approach to medical support of future missions including the Constellation program. In order to implement an effective medical risk mitigation strategy for exploration class missions, modifications to the current suite of space medical systems may be needed, including new Crew Medical Officer training methods, treatment guidelines, diagnostic and therapeutic resources, and improved medical informatics.

  1. Toward Ubiquitous Communication Platform for Emergency Medical Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Kenichi; Morishima, Naoto; Kanbara, Masayuki; Sunahara, Hideki; Imanishi, Masami

    Interaction between emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and doctors is essential in emergency medical care. Doctors require diverse information related to a patient to provide efficient aid. In 2005, we started the Ikoma119 project and have developed a ubiquitous communication platform for emergency medical care called Mobile ER. Our platform, which is based on wireless internet technology, has such desirable properties as low-cost, location-independent service, and ease of service introduction. We provide an overview of our platform and describe the services that we have developed. We also discuss the remaining issues to realize our platform's actual operation.

  2. A review of medical-grade honey in wound care.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Judy

    In the current healthcare environment, clinicians are increasingly under pressure to use wound care products that are cost effective. This includes products that can be used in a variety of wounds to achieve different outcomes, depending on the wound-bed requirements. Medical-grade honey has emerged as a product that can achieve a variety of outcomes within the wound and is safe and easy to use. This article reviews the use of a medical-grade honey, with a view to including it on the wound care formulary in both primary and secondary care. It featured in a poster presentation at the Wounds UK conference at Harrogate in 2011.

  3. Ongoing patient randomization: an innovation in medical care research.

    PubMed Central

    Cargill, V; Cohen, D; Kroenke, K; Neuhauser, D

    1986-01-01

    Hospitals often have rotational assignment of patients to one of several similar provider care teams. The research potential of these arrangements has gone unnoticed. By changing to random assignment of patients and physicians to provider care teams (firms) this kind of organization can be used for sequential, randomized clinical trials which are ethical and efficient. The paper describes such arrangements at three different hospitals: Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, Brooke Army Medical Center, and University Hospitals of Cleveland. Associated methodologic issues are discussed. This is a new, more widely applicable method for medical care research. PMID:3546202

  4. Methodology of the Access to Care and Timing Simulation Model for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Care.

    PubMed

    Santos, Argelio; Fallah, Nader; Lewis, Rachel; Dvorak, Marcel F; Fehlings, Michael G; Burns, Anthony Scott; Noonan, Vanessa K; Cheng, Christiana L; Chan, Elaine; Singh, Anoushka; Belanger, Lise M; Atkins, Derek

    2017-03-12

    Despite the relatively low incidence, the management and care of persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) can be resource intensive and complex, spanning multiple phases of care and disciplines. Using a simulation model built with a system level view of the healthcare system allows for prediction of the impact of interventions on patient and system outcomes from injury through to community reintegration after tSCI. The Access to Care and Timing (ACT) project developed a simulation model for tSCI care using techniques from operations research and its development has been described previously. The objective of this article is to briefly describe the methodology and the application of the ACT Model as it was used in several of the articles in this focus issue. The approaches employed in this model provide a framework to look into the complexity of interactions both within and among the different SCI programs, sites and phases of care.

  5. Increasing access to health care: examination of hospital community benefits and free care programs.

    PubMed

    Giffords, Elissa D; Wenze, Linda; Weiss, David M; Kass, Donna; Guercia, Rosemarie

    2005-08-01

    The present study explored hospital community benefits and free care programs at seven hospitals in Nassau and Suffolk counties in Long Island, NewYork. There were two components to this project: (1) assessment of information regarding the availability of free care and (2) an analysis of the community benefits information filed with state regulatory offices. Results show that not one of the seven hospitals consistently informed surveyors that free care was available to low-income, uninsured people. Surveyors had difficulty obtaining written free care policies. The article concludes with suggestions for government agencies, hospital administrators, social workers, and other advocates on how to get involved in efforts to increase access to health care for the uninsured population.

  6. Space medicine innovation and telehealth concept implementation for medical care during exploration-class missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Annie; Sullivan, Patrick; Beaudry, Catherine; Kuyumjian, Raffi; Comtois, Jean-Marc

    2012-12-01

    Medical care on the International Space Station (ISS) is provided using real-time communication with limited medical data transmission. In the occurrence of an off-nominal medical event, the medical care paradigm employed is 'stabilization and transportation', involving real-time management from ground and immediate return to Earth in the event that the medical contingency could not be resolved in due time in space. In preparation for future missions beyond Low-Earth orbit (LEO), medical concepts of operations are being developed to ensure adequate support for the new mission profiles: increased distance, duration and communication delays, as well as impossibility of emergency returns and limitations in terms of medical equipment availability. The current ISS paradigm of medical care would no longer be adequate due to these new constraints. The Operational Space Medicine group at the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is looking towards synergies between terrestrial and space medicine concepts for the delivery of medical care to deal with the new challenges of human space exploration as well as to provide benefits to the Canadian population. Remote and rural communities on Earth are, in fact, facing similar problems such as isolation, remoteness to tertiary care centers, resource scarcity, difficult (and expensive) emergency transfers, limited access to physicians and specialists and limited training of medical and nursing staff. There are a number of researchers and organizations, outside the space communities, working in the area of telehealth. They are designing and implementing terrestrial telehealth programs using real-time and store-and-forward techniques to provide isolated populations access to medical care. The cross-fertilization of space-Earth research could provide support for increased spin-off and spin-in effects and stimulate telehealth and space medicine innovations to engage in the new era of human space exploration. This paper will discuss the benefits

  7. The paucity of course work in medical care evaluation.

    PubMed

    Carroll, J; Becker, S

    1975-01-01

    In view of the current emphasis on measurement of the quality of health care services, reflected in regulatory provisions and accreditation requirements, an inquiry was made as to the extent to which medical schools are presently offering formal training in the techniques of medical care evaluation. Of 118 medical schools surveyed, 24 responded with the information that they are actually providing such training. The training reported ranged from a one-hour lecture to five elective courses. The implications of the findings are discussed with reference to the need of physicians to become familiar with the principles and methods of scientific evaluation of medical care. Some of the areas that might be covered in courses on evaluation are discussed, and examples of two current programs are given.

  8. MEDNET: Telemedicine via Satellite Combining Improved Access to Health-Care Services with Enhanced Social Cohesion in Rural Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulos, Dimitrios; Sachpazidis, Ilias; Rizou, Despoina; Menary, Wayne; Cardenas, Jose; Psarras, John

    Peru, officially classified as a middle-income country, has benefited from sustained economic growth in recent years. However, the benefits have not been seen by the vast majority of the population, particularly Peru's rural population. Virtually all of the nation's rural health-care centres are cut off from the rest of the country, so access to care for most people is not only difficult but also costly. MEDNET attempts to redress this issue by developing a medical health network with the help of the collaboration medical application based on TeleConsult & @HOME medical database for vital signs. The expected benefits include improved support for medics in the field, reduction of patient referrals, reduction in number of emergency interventions and improved times for medical diagnosis. An important caveat is the emphasis on exploiting the proposed infrastructure for education and social enterprise initiatives. The project has the full support of regional political and health authorities and, importantly, full local community support.

  9. Evaluating medication-related quality of care in residential aged care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Jodie B; Vitry, Agnes; Caughey, Gillian E

    2015-01-01

    Given the growing aged care population, the complexity of their medication-related needs and increased risk of adverse drug events, there is a necessity to systematically monitor and manage medication-related quality of care. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and synthesise medication-related quality of care indicators with respect to application to residential aged care. MEDLINE (Ovid), Psychinfo, CINAHL, Embase and Google® were searched from 2001 to 2013 for studies that were in English, focused on older people aged 65+ years and discussed the development, application or validation of original medication-related quality of care indicators. The quality of selected articles was appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program and psychometric qualities extracted and synthesised using content analysis. Indicators were mapped to six medication-related quality of care attributes and a minimum indicator set derived. Thirty three articles describing 25 indicator sets met the inclusion criteria. Thirteen (52%) contained prescribing quality indicators only. Eight (32%) were developed specifically for aged care. Twenty three (92%) were validated and seven (28%) assessed for reliability. The most common attribute addressed was medication appropriateness (n = 24). There were no indicators for evaluating medication use in those with limited life expectancy, which resulted in only five of the six attributes being addressed. The developed minimum indicator set contains 28 indicators representing 22 of 25 identified indicator sets. Whilst a wide variety of validated indicator sets exist, none addressed all aspects of medication-related quality of care pertinent to residential aged care. The minimum indicator set is intended as a foundation for comprehensively evaluating medication-related quality of care in this setting. Future work should focus on bridging identified gaps.

  10. A Framework for Context Sensitive Risk-Based Access Control in Medical Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Donghee; Kim, Dohoon; Park, Seog

    2015-01-01

    Since the access control environment has changed and the threat of insider information leakage has come to the fore, studies on risk-based access control models that decide access permissions dynamically have been conducted vigorously. Medical information systems should protect sensitive data such as medical information from insider threat and enable dynamic access control depending on the context such as life-threatening emergencies. In this paper, we suggest an approach and framework for context sensitive risk-based access control suitable for medical information systems. This approach categorizes context information, estimating and applying risk through context- and treatment-based permission profiling and specifications by expanding the eXtensible Access Control Markup Language (XACML) to apply risk. The proposed framework supports quick responses to medical situations and prevents unnecessary insider data access through dynamic access authorization decisions in accordance with the severity of the context and treatment.

  11. Practical considerations to guide development of access controls and decision support for genetic information in electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic testing is increasingly used as a tool throughout the health care system. In 2011 the number of clinically available genetic tests is approaching 2,000, and wide variation exists between these tests in their sensitivity, specificity, and clinical implications, as well as the potential for discrimination based on the results. Discussion As health care systems increasingly implement electronic medical record systems (EMRs) they must carefully consider how to use information from this wide spectrum of genetic tests, with whom to share information, and how to provide decision support for clinicians to properly interpret the information. Although some characteristics of genetic tests overlap with other medical test results, there are reasons to make genetic test results widely available to health care providers and counterbalancing reasons to restrict access to these test results to honor patient preferences, and avoid distracting or confusing clinicians with irrelevant but complex information. Electronic medical records can facilitate and provide reasonable restrictions on access to genetic test results and deliver education and decision support tools to guide appropriate interpretation and use. Summary This paper will serve to review some of the key characteristics of genetic tests as they relate to design of access control and decision support of genetic test information in the EMR, emphasizing the clear need for health information technology (HIT) to be part of optimal implementation of genetic medicine, and the importance of understanding key characteristics of genetic tests when designing HIT applications. PMID:22047175

  12. Community perceptions of the effects of rural hospital closure on access to care.

    PubMed

    Reif, S S; DesHarnais, S; Bernard, S

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to ascertain the perceptions of health professionals who were located in six rural communities where hospital closure occurred, regarding the impact of closure on community residents. These health professionals were asked to respond to questions about effects of hospital closures on the availability of medical services such as emergency care, physician services, hospital services and nursing home care. To control for trends in medical services utilization that were unrelated to hospital closure, the study design included comparison areas where similar hospitals remained open. A standardized questionnaire was administered to three health professionals in each of the areas that experienced a hospital closure and also in the matched comparison areas. Interviews of the health professionals in closure areas provide evidence suggestive of some perceived negative effects of hospital closure on these communities. These negative effects include difficulty recruiting and retaining physicians, concern of residents about the loss of their local emergency room, and increased travel times to receive hospital services. The perceived effects of closure appeared to be mediated by the distance required for travel to the nearest hospital. Respondents perceived increased travel times to most significantly affect vulnerable populations, such as the elderly, the disabled and the economically disadvantaged. Respondents in the majority of comparison areas also reported access barriers for vulnerable populations. These barriers primarily center on problems of obtaining transportation and enduring the rigors of travel. Improvements in the availability of transportation to medical care may offer some stabilization to communities where hospitals closed; however, it also is the case that transportation improvements are needed to increase access to care in rural communities where hospitals remained open.

  13. Military dependent medical care during World War II.

    PubMed

    Potter, M

    1990-02-01

    Dependent medical care at Army expense or at Army facilities during World War II was offered only on an emergency basis and at the discretion of the facility commanding officer. This had been the practice since 1884 when such care was specifically authorized by Congressional appropriation. Mobilization in 1898 and 1917 had brought a large number of state militiamen or inductees into the army--men who could leave their families behind. When mobilization began again in 1940, it was thought that a similar procedure would be followed. Events, however, overwhelmed the system as commanders of Army bases faced large numbers of young, pregnant wives who had followed their husbands. This had happened, in part, because of the dislocations of the Great Depression and, in part, because the wives of military inductees hoped to find work close to where their husbands were stationed. Although dependent medical care was not increased in proportion to the numbers of new dependents brought in by the war mobilization, medical care was provided for the four lower grades under the Emergency Maternity and Infant Care section of the Social Security Act of 1935. Subsequent to World War II and the experience of the Korean War, Congress saw it fit to specifically authorize medical care for dependents of military personnel as part of the soldiers' terms of employment, as a device to stimulate retention in service of both soldiers and doctors. In 1956 the United States Congress established the right at law of military dependents to medical care as specified in the Dependents' Medical Care Act.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Access to special care dentistry, part 5. Safety.

    PubMed

    Dougall, A; Fiske, J

    2008-08-23

    This article considers the delivery of efficient and effective dental services for patients whose disability and/or medical condition may not be obvious and which consequently can present a hidden challenge in the dental setting. Knowing that the patient has a particular condition, what its features are and how it impacts on dental treatment and oral health, and modifying treatment accordingly can minimise the risk of complications. The taking of a careful medical history that asks the right questions in a manner that encourages disclosure is key to highlighting hidden hazards and this article offers guidance for treating those patients who have epilepsy, latex sensitivity, acquired or inherited bleeding disorders and patients taking oral or intravenous bisphosphonates.

  15. A Strategic Approach to Medical Care for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsen, E.; Canga, M.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration missions will present significant new challenges to crew health, including effects of variable gravity environments, limited communication with Earth-based personnel for diagnosis and consultation for medical events, limited resupply, and limited ability for crew return. Providing health care capabilities for exploration class missions will require system trades be performed to identify a minimum set of requirements and crosscutting capabilities which can be used in design of exploration medical systems. Current and future medical data, information, and knowledge must be cataloged and put in formats that facilitate querying and analysis. These data may then be used to inform the medical research and development program through analysis of risk trade studies between medical care capabilities and system constraints such as mass, power, volume, and training. These studies will be used to define a Medical Concept of Operations to facilitate stakeholder discussions on expected medical capability for exploration missions. Medical Capability as a quantifiable variable is proposed as a surrogate risk metric and explored for trade space analysis that can improve communication between the medical and engineering approaches to mission design. The resulting medical system approach selected will inform NASA mission architecture, vehicle, and subsystem design for the next generation of spacecraft.

  16. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... adequate number of visits to specialists experienced in treating the specific medical condition and access to out-of-network providers when the network is not adequate for the enrollee's medical condition....

  17. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... adequate number of visits to specialists experienced in treating the specific medical condition and access to out-of-network providers when the network is not adequate for the enrollee's medical condition....

  18. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... adequate number of visits to specialists experienced in treating the specific medical condition and access to out-of-network providers when the network is not adequate for the enrollee's medical condition....

  19. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... monitor and treat enrollees with chronic, complex, or serious medical conditions, including access to an adequate number of visits to specialists experienced in treating the specific medical condition and...

  20. Veterans Medical Care: FY2010 Appropriations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-21

    37 Appendix C. Financial Income Thresholds for VA Health Care Benefits, Calendar Year 2010...39 Appendix D. 10% Increase to Financial Income Thresholds...agreement included the Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010; the Financial Services and General Government

  1. Medically Complex Home Care and Caregiver Strain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Sara M.; Macdonald, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the study: To examine (a) whether the content of caregiving tasks (i.e., nursing vs. personal care) contributes to variation in caregivers' strain and (b) whether the level of complexity of nursing tasks contributes to variation in strain among caregivers providing help with such tasks. Design and methods: The data came from the Cash…

  2. Caring, competence and professional identities in medical education.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Anna

    2011-08-01

    This paper considers the multiple discourses that influence medical education with a focus on the discourses of competence and caring. Discourses of competence are largely constituted through, and related to, biomedical and clinical issues whereas discourses of caring generally focus on social concerns. These discourses are not necessarily equal partners in the enterprise of medical education. Discourses of competence tend to be privileged while those discourses of caring are often marginalised. Medical students learn to be physicians, and develop professional identities, in the context of these competing discourses. This paper documents a qualitative study designed to explore how professional identities are developed in the context of competing discourses. The study included a Foucauldian discourse analysis of medical education curriculum documents (67 problem-based learning cases in total), 26 h of observation of a small group learning experience (a problem-based learning tutorial), and in-depth, open-ended interviews with five medical students and nine medical educators at a Canadian medical school. The paper describes how professional identities are developed in relation to discourses of competence, noting that students displayed what they considered to be desirable professional identities of confidence, capability and suitability. Also explored are the professional identities demonstrated in relation to discourses of caring, including those of benevolence and humbleness. Despite current conceptualisations, medical education is ripe with potential. The data indicate Foucauldian "spaces of freedom"-sites at which the complexity of the practice of medicine and the interwoven natures of the discourses of competence and caring might be taken into account as a means of challenging taken for granted cultural norms and broadening the medical gaze.

  3. Evaluating an information system for medical care evaluation studies.

    PubMed

    Holloway, D C; Wiczai, L J; Carlson, E T

    1975-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a computerized information system, the Professional Activity Study-Medical Audit Program (PAS-MAP), when used by the medical staff of a hospital to conduct medical care evaluation studies. PAS-MAP was compared to a manual system for collecting data not contained on the face sheets of medical records. The results indicated that, compared to the manual system, PAS-MAP: was less costly if more than 41 per cent of hospitalized patients were included in medical care evaluation studies; was as timely as the manual system for data it could provide but provided fewer clinical data elements than physicians requested; and was less protective against human error. Three decision makers assigned weights indicating the relative importance of these results. The weights were combined in an additive model to arrive at a score for each system. Based on these scores, the manual system was recommended for implementation.

  4. Equity in access to health care provision under the medicare security for small scale entrepreneurs in Dar es Salaam.

    PubMed

    Urassa, J A E

    2012-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess equity in access to health care provision under the Medicare Security for Small Scale Entrepreneurs (SSE). Methodological triangulation was used to an exploratory and randomized cross- sectional study in order to supplement information on the topic under investigation. Questionnaires were administered to 281 respondents and 6 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were held with males and females. Documentary review was also used. For quantitative aspect of the study, significant associations were measured using confidence intervals (95% CI) testing. Qualitative data were analyzed with assistance of Open code software. The results show that inequalities in access to health care services were found in respect to affordability of medical care costs, distance from home to health facilities, availability of drugs as well as medical equipments and supplies. As the result of existing inequalities some of clients were not satisfied with the provided health services. The study concludes by drawing policy and research implications of the findings.

  5. Colorectal Cancer Screening and Race in an Equal Access Medical System.

    PubMed

    Haddad, James D; You, David M

    2016-02-01

    National colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates have improved, but significant racial disparities have been identified. Improved access to care has been proposed as a solution to eliminate such disparities. To determine if racial disparities in CRC screening rates persist in a medical system without barriers to access or cost. A retrospective review study was performed, examining the healthcare effectiveness data and information set data from patients between the ages of 50 and 65 years who were eligible for CRC screening. Data on the type of CRC screening and rates of up-to-date screening were also examined. Data were available for 14,196 patients of whom 8809 (62%) reported race. Subjects included were 53% male and 47% female, with breakdown by race as follows: 53% White, 34% Asian/Pacific Islander, 11% Black, 1% Hispanic, and <1% Native-American. Overall, CRC screening and up-to-date rates were higher than the national average (81 and 72%, respectively). Blacks were less likely than non-Blacks to have undergone CRC screening (75 vs. 82%, p < 0.001), and were also less likely to be up-to-date with CRC screening (66 vs. 72%, p < 0.001). Despite elimination of access and cost barriers, racial disparities in CRC screening persist. Equal access to CRC screening tools will be necessary, but not sufficient, to eliminate the currently observed national trends. Further study should focus on elucidating patient-specific barriers to successful completion and maintenance of CRC screening.

  6. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., well-child care, well-adolescent care and childhood and adolescent immunizations. (b) Access to covered... & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH...

  7. Graduate medical education in the era of health care reform.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Mainiero, Martha B

    2013-09-01

    Medicare is the primary source of funding for graduate medical education (GME) in the United States. The growing deficit, a sluggish economy, and rising health care costs have focused attention on cutting spending, and GME reimbursement from Medicare is being considered among the entitlement programs for spending reduction. At the same time, health care reform will place new demands on residency training. The authors review the history of GME financing, the potential impact of GME spending cuts and health care reform on radiology training, and the new skills residents will need to practice in the era of health reform. As health care financing evolves, so must resident education.

  8. New diagnostic and information technology for mobile medical care.

    PubMed

    Bayne, C Gresham; Boling, Peter A

    2009-02-01

    Medicare reimbursement for home visits average around $100 without ancillaries, so making 10 home visits to prevent even a single $1,000 ambulance ride is cost-neutral for Medicare. Home medical care is only an added cost if it fails to offset acute care use. The government's demographic and financial pressure suggests a need to press ahead with the enhanced mobile care model, so the explosion in point-of-care devices should continue. The main challenge is to decide which ones provide dispositive value to patients.

  9. Patient-centered medical home: an emerging primary care model and the military health system.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Robert C; Doperak, Martin; Milner, Michelle; Motsinger, Charles; Newton, Terry; Padden, Maureen; Pastoor, Sara; Hughes, Cortney L; LeFurgy, Jennifer; Mun, Seong K

    2011-11-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a primary care model that aims to provide quality care that is coordinated, comprehensive, and cost-effective. PCMH is hinged upon building a strong patient-provider relationship and using a team-based approach to care to increase continuity and access. It is anticipated that PCMH can curb the growth of health care costs through better preventative medicine and lower utilization of services. The Navy, Air Force, and Army are implementing versions of PCMH, which includes the use of technologies for improved documentation, better disease management, improved communication between the care teams and patients, and increased access to care. This article examines PCMH in the Military Health System by providing examples of the transition from each of the branches. The authors argue that the military must overcome unique challenges to implement and sustain PCMH that civilian providers may not face because of the deployment of patients and staff, the military's mission of readiness, and the use of both on-base and off-base care by beneficiaries. Our objective is to lay out these considerations and to provide ways that they have been or can be addressed within the transition from traditional primary care to PCMH.

  10. Tuberculosis diagnosis: primary health care or emergency medical services?

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rubia Laine de Paula; Scatolin, Beatriz Estuque; Wysocki, Anneliese Domingues; Beraldo, Aline Ale; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Scatena, Lúcia Marina; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess primary health care and emergency medical services performance for tuberculosis diagnosis. METHODS Cross-sectional study were conducted with 90 health professionals from primary health care and 68 from emergency medical services, in Ribeirao Preto, SP, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. A structured questionnaire based on an instrument of tuberculosis care assessment was used. The association between health service and the variables of structure and process for tuberculosis diagnosis was assessed by Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test (both with 5% of statistical significance) and multiple correspondence analysis. RESULTS Primary health care was associated with the adequate provision of inputs and human resources, as well as with the sputum test request. Emergencial medical services were associated with the availability of X-ray equipment, work overload, human resources turnover, insufficient availability of health professionals, unavailability of sputum collection pots and do not request sputum test. In both services, tuberculosis diagnosis remained as a physician's responsibility. CONCLUSIONS Emergencial medical services presented weaknesses in its structure to identify tuberculosis suspects. Gaps on the process were identified in both primary health care and emergencial medical services. This situation highlights the need for qualification of health services that are the main gateway to health system to meet sector reforms that prioritize the timely diagnosis of tuberculosis and its control. PMID:24626553

  11. Changes in dental care access upon health care benefit expansion to include scaling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a policy change to expand Korean National Health Insurance (KNHI) benefit coverage to include scaling on access to dental care at the national level. Methods A nationally representative sample of 12,794 adults aged 20 to 64 years from Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (2010–2014) was analyzed. To examine the effect of the policy on the outcomes of interest (unmet dental care needs and preventive dental care utilization in the past year), an estimates-based probit model was used, incorporating marginal effects with a complex sampling structure. The effect of the policy on individuals depending on their income and education level was also assessed. Results Adjusting for potential covariates, the probability of having unmet needs for dental care decreased by 6.1% and preventative dental care utilization increased by 14% in the post-policy period compared to those in the pre-policy period (2010, 2012). High income and higher education levels were associated with fewer unmet dental care needs and more preventive dental visits. Conclusions The expansion of coverage to include scaling demonstrated to have a significant association with decreasing unmet dental care needs and increasing preventive dental care utilization. However, the policy disproportionately benefited certain groups, in contrast with the objective of the policy to benefit all participants in the KNHI system. PMID:28050318

  12. Physical Accessibility of Routine Prenatal Care for Women with Mobility Disability

    PubMed Central

    Wint, Amy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Ecker, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Routine prenatal care includes physical examinations and weight measurement. Little is known about whether access barriers to medical diagnostic equipment, such as examination tables and weight scales, affect prenatal care among pregnant women with physical disabilities. Methods: We conducted 2-hour, in-depth telephone interviews with 22 women using a semistructured, open-ended interview protocol. All women had significant mobility difficulties before pregnancy and had delivered babies within the prior 10 years. We recruited most participants through social networks. We sorted interview transcript texts using used NVivo software and conducted conventional content analyses to identify major themes. Results: Interviewee's mean (standard deviation) age was 34.8 (5.3) years. Most were white, well-educated, and higher income; 8 women had spinal cord injuries, 4 cerebral palsy, and 10 had other conditions; 18 used wheeled mobility aids. Some women's obstetricians had height adjustable examination tables, which facilitated transfers for physical examinations. Other women had difficulty transferring onto fixed height examination tables and were examined while sitting in their wheelchairs. Family members and/or clinical staff sometimes assisted with transfers; some women reported concerns about transfer safety. No women reported being routinely weighed on an accessible weight scale by their prenatal care clinicians. A few were never weighed during their pregnancies. Conclusions: Inaccessible examination tables and weight scales impede some pregnant women with physical disabilities from getting routine prenatal physical examinations and weight measurement. This represents substandard care. Adjustable height examination tables and wheelchair accessible weight scales could significantly improve care and comfort for pregnant women with physical disabilities. PMID:26484689

  13. The mosh pit experience: emergency medical care for concert injuries.

    PubMed

    Janchar, T; Samaddar, C; Milzman, D

    2000-01-01

    Effective planning is essential for medical personnel preparing to provide emergency care at mass gatherings. At large concerts where audience members participate in "moshing," crowd surfing, and stage diving, there may be a potential for a dramatic increase in injuries requiring medical attention. Injuries seen at emergency medical stations at 3 concerts, all with large mosh pits, over 4 event days were recorded and evaluated. Each event day had over 60,000 attendees. A total of 1,542 medical incidents (82.9 per 10,000) were reported over the 4 event days. There were 37% (466 patients, 25.1 per 10,000) of incidents related to moshing activity. Hospital transport was required for 2.5% (39 patients, 2.1 per 10,000) of medical visits with 74% (29 patients, 1.5 per 10,000) of those transported being for mosh pit-related injuries. When planning emergency medical care for such concerts with mosh pits, the potential for an increase in the number of medical incidents and injuries requiring medical attention and hospital transport should be taken into account for efficient medical coverage.

  14. Race, Medical Mistrust, and Segregation in Primary Care as Usual Source of Care: Findings from the Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Arnett, M J; Thorpe, R J; Gaskin, D J; Bowie, J V; LaVeist, T A

    2016-06-01

    Compared to White Americans, African-Americans are less likely to use primary care (PC) as their usual source of care. This is generally attributed to race differences in socioeconomic status and in access to primary care services. Little is known about the relationship between race differences in medical mistrust and the usual source of care disparity. Using data from the Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities (EHDIC) study, we examined the role of medical mistrust in choosing usual source of care in 1408 black and white adults who were exposed to the same healthcare facilities and low-income racially integrated community. Multinomial logistic regression models were estimated to examine the relationship between race, medical mistrust, and usual source of care. After adjusting for demographic and health-related factors, African-Americans were more likely than whites to use the emergency department (ED) (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 1.43 (95 % confidence interval (CI) [1.06-1.94])) and hospital outpatient department (RRR1.50 (95 %CI [1.10-2.05])) versus primary care as a usual source of care. When medical mistrust was added to the model, the gap between African-Americans' and whites' risk of using the ED versus primary care as a usual source of care closed (RRR = 1.29; 95 % CI [0.91-1.83]). However, race differences in the use of the hospital outpatient department remained even after accounting for medical mistrust (RRR = 1.67; 95 % CI [1.16-2.40]). Accounting for medical mistrust eliminated the ED-as-usual-source of care disparity. This study highlights the importance of medical mistrust as an intervention point for decreasing ED use as a usual source of care by low-income, urban African-Americans.

  15. Luxury Primary Care, Academic Medical Centers, and the Erosion of Science and Professional Ethics

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Medical schools and teaching hospitals have been hit particularly hard by the financial crisis affecting health care in the United States. To compete financially, many academic medical centers have recruited wealthy foreign patients and established luxury primary care clinics. At these clinics, patients are offered tests supported by little evidence of their clinical and/or cost effectiveness, which erodes the scientific underpinnings of medical practice. Given widespread disparities in health, wealth, and access to care, as well as growing cynicism and dissatisfaction with medicine among trainees, the promotion by these institutions of an overt, two-tiered system of care, which exacerbates inequities and injustice, erodes professional ethics. Academic medical centers should divert their intellectual and financial resources away from luxury primary care and toward more equitable and just programs designed to promote individual, community, and global health. The public and its legislators should, in turn, provide adequate funds to enable this. Ways for academic medicine to facilitate this largesse are discussed. PMID:14748866

  16. 42 CFR 456.242 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.242 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide that... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care...

  17. 42 CFR 456.142 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation...: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.142 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide...

  18. Integrating hospital medical care data with pharmaceutical education materials for diabetes self management.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shwu-Jiuan; Yeh, Yu-Ting; Li, Chun-Chuan; Chiu, Yuan-Ting; Huang, Juei-Fen; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic patients need long-term treatment and follow-up exams as well as appropriate self-care pharmaceutical education to get the disease under control and to prevent possible complications. Pharmaceutical treatment plays an essential role in diabetes. If patients don't understand the medicines and dosages they take, their blood glucose control may be affected. In addition, the possibility of developing hypoglycemia may be increased. In this paper, we enhance the POEM system, previously developed for diabetic patient education, by providing diabetic patients' pharmaceutical education. The new system integrates both diabetic patients' pharmaceutical education information and medical care information to provide them with more comprehensive personalized medication information so that they can access the on-line system afterwards. It also strengthens patients' understanding of pharmaceutical functions, side-effects and relevant knowledge thus increasing patients' adherence of medication orders and having better control in their blood glucose levels.

  19. Patient Navigators: Agents of Creating Community-Nested Patient-Centered Medical Homes for Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Melissa A.; Samaras, Athena T.; Nonzee, Narissa J.; Hajjar, Nadia; Frankovich, Carmi; Bularzik, Charito; Murphy, Kara; Endress, Richard; Tom, Laura S.; Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    Patient navigation is an internationally utilized, culturally grounded, and multifaceted strategy to optimize patients’ interface with the health-care team and system. The DuPage County Patient Navigation Collaborative (DPNC) is a campus–community partnership designed to improve access to care among uninsured breast and cervical cancer patients in DuPage County, IL. Importantly, the DPNC connects community-based social service delivery with the patient-centered medical home to achieve a community-nested patient-centered medical home model for cancer care. While the patient navigator experience has been qualitatively documented, the literature pertaining to patient navigation has largely focused on efficacy outcomes and program cost effectiveness. Here, we uniquely highlight stories of women enrolled in the DPNC, told from the perspective of patient navigators, to shed light on the myriad barriers that DPNC patients faced and document the strategies DPNC patient navigators implemented. PMID:27594792

  20. Modelling medical care usage under medical insurance scheme for urban non-working residents.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Linping; Tian, Wenhua; Tang, Weidong

    2013-06-01

    This research investigates and evaluates China's urban medical care usage for non-working residents using microsimulation techniques. It focuses on modelling medical services usage and simulating medical expenses on hospitalization treatments as well as clinic services for serious illness in an urban area for the period of 2008-2010. A static microsimulation model was created to project the impact of the medical insurance scheme. Four kinds of achievements have been made. For three different scenarios, the model predicted the hospitalization services costs and payments, as well as the balance of the social pool fund and the medical burden on families.

  1. Shopping for price in medical care.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Paul B

    2007-01-01

    Insurers are well positioned to support their enrollees in shopping for care because of their ability to analyze complex data--reflecting both their negotiated discounts and the enrollee's benefit structure--should they decide to commit resources to this task. Government transparency initiatives can help those who are uninsured or want to use out-of-network providers with data on prices and all patients by gathering and disseminating data on quality. But clumsy requirements to disclose insurer-provider contracts could lead to higher prices. Greater price transparency might help curb rising costs, but many overstate the likely magnitude of its contribution.

  2. Perceived Barriers to Health Care Access among Rural Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Williams, Kimberly A.; Carter, Mary W.; Spencer, S. Melinda; Solovieva, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    Context: Many rural elders experience limited access to health care. The majority of what we know about this issue has been based upon quantitative studies, yet qualitative studies might offer additional insight into individual perceptions of health care access. Purpose: To examine what barriers rural elders report when accessing needed health…

  3. Perceived Barriers to Health Care Access Among Rural Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Williams, Kimberly A.; Carter, Mary W.; Spencer, S. Melinda; Solovieva, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    Context: Many rural elders experience limited access to health care. The majority of what we know about this issue has been based upon quantitative studies, yet qualitative studies might offer additional insight into individual perceptions of health care access. Purpose: To examine what barriers rural elders report when accessing needed health…

  4. Medical care system for NASA-Mir spaceflights.

    PubMed

    Gontcharov, Igor B; Kovachevich, Irina V; Pool, Sam L; Navinkov, Alec L; Barratt, Michael R

    2002-12-01

    A fundamental goal of space medicine is to maintain the health and fitness of spacecrews. Meeting this goal requires reliable, effective, up-to-date medical support systems for use in microgravity. This article describes some of the factors considered in the design and assembly of Russian and U.S. in-flight medical care systems. The successful mutual use of U.S. and Russian medications and medical equipment under the NASA-Mir program conclusively demonstrated the importance and advantages of cooperation among participating space agencies. Continued progress toward the integration of U.S. and Russian flight medical systems will further increase the effectiveness of the medical support of joint missions aboard the International Space Station.

  5. Consumerism: forcing medical practices toward patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Ozmon, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Consumerism has been apart of many industries over the years; now consumerism may change the way many medical practices deliver healthcare. With the advent of consumer-driven healthcare, employers are shifting the decision-making power to their employees. Benefits strategies like health savings accounts and high-deductible insurance plans now allow the patients to control how and where they spend their money on medical care. Practices that seek to attract the more affluent and informed consumers are beginning to institute patient-centered systems designs that invite patients to actively participate in their healthcare. This article will outline the changes in the healthcare delivery system facing medical practices, the importance of patient-centered care, and six strategies to implement to change toward more patient-centered care.

  6. 28 CFR 541.32 - Medical and mental health care in the SHU.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical and mental health care in the SHU... necessary medical care. Emergency medical care is always available. (b) Mental Health Care. After every 30..., mental health staff will examine you, including a personal interview. Emergency mental health care...

  7. 28 CFR 541.32 - Medical and mental health care in the SHU.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical and mental health care in the SHU... necessary medical care. Emergency medical care is always available. (b) Mental Health Care. After every 30..., mental health staff will examine you, including a personal interview. Emergency mental health care...

  8. 28 CFR 541.32 - Medical and mental health care in the SHU.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical and mental health care in the SHU... necessary medical care. Emergency medical care is always available. (b) Mental Health Care. After every 30..., mental health staff will examine you, including a personal interview. Emergency mental health care...

  9. 28 CFR 541.32 - Medical and mental health care in the SHU.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical and mental health care in the SHU... necessary medical care. Emergency medical care is always available. (b) Mental Health Care. After every 30..., mental health staff will examine you, including a personal interview. Emergency mental health care...

  10. Best Practices in Access to Care. How the most Successful Clinics are Improving both Access and Continuity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-24

    access and continuity Best Practices in Access to Care 24 January 2011 CAPT Maureen Padden MD MPH FAAFP 1 Military Health System Conference Navy Medicine...JAN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Best Practices in Access to Care. How the most...enrollees will call for urgent visits – 45 to 55 of 10,000 enrollees – Rate will vary depending on day of week  Many open access practices have found: – 50

  11. 38 CFR 17.108 - Copayments for inpatient hospital care and outpatient medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... system and also is the document used for providing means-test information annually. (c) Copayments for... this section, a primary care visit is an episode of care furnished in a clinic that provides integrated, accessible healthcare services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of...

  12. "Bimodal" medical schools: excelling in research and primary care.

    PubMed

    Osborn, E H; O'Neil, E H

    1996-09-01

    The authors studied four "bimodal" medical schools--those ranked in the top 20% by the Association of American Medical Colleges both in production of primary care physicians and in receiving research grants from the National Institutes of Health. A descriptive, anthropologic method was used to describe the cultures of these schools and to determine common factors in their success. The four schools are at the University of Washington, the University of North Carolina, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of California, San Diego. These common factors ranged from characteristics of the schools to characteristics of their external environments. All four are part of large, state-supported universities. They are relatively new schools in areas of the country that have blossomed in biotechnology, aerospace, and computer industries. The schools' missions, admission committees, and educational programs reflect their dual role: to meet the health care needs of their states and to advance basic science knowledge in medicine. Each state has a strong Academy of Family Practice, and the medical schools have been in the forefront of residency training in this specialty. Federal- and state-funded Area Health Education Centers and private foundations have provided seed money for educational programs in community and rural settings that attract medical students to primary care. Research-intensive medical schools can encourage students to enter primary care specialties if they have strong primary care leaders and programs and if they support medical education programs outside the academic, tertiary-care center. A culture of mutual respect and commitment to community service is also essential to achieving this bimodal success.

  13. Recognizing and caring for the medically compromised child: 4. Children with other chronic medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, S C; Barnard, K M; Harrison, V E

    1999-01-01

    This is the fourth and final part of a series on recognizing and caring for medically compromised children. In this article, an outline of appropriate dental management for children with other more commonly encountered chronic medical conditions is given, together with a description of the disorders and their significance in dentistry. This group includes children with physically handicapping conditions and children with learning difficulties, as well as those who are medically compromised.

  14. Canada's non-status immigrants: negotiating access to health care and citizenship.

    PubMed

    Miklavcic, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Illegal immigration in Canada is characterized mainly by non-status immigrants who legally enter Canada and stay after their legal status expires and by failed refugee claimants. For these persons, immigration status or its absence plays an important role in determining the degree of access to Canadian health care. This article situates the clinical setting as a site of contention and negotiation of citizenship and care in social networks as well as pragmatic and discursive strategies. Drawing on the case of a patient who faced imminent deportation and became suicidal, in this article I depict how psychiatrists and other health practitioners embrace "bearing witness" as an ethical practice, which intersects the medical and legal spheres.

  15. 78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... of the Secretary David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel... States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project. This... MTF, and sustain readiness-related medical skills activities for the military providers....

  16. What sort of medical care is ideal? Differences in thoughts on medical care among residents of urban and rural/remote Japanese communities.

    PubMed

    Ikai, Tomoki; Suzuki, Tomio; Oshima, Tamiki; Kanayama, Hitomi; Kusaka, Yukinori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Terasawa, Hidekazu

    2015-09-27

    Studies of aspirational ideals of medical care generally focus on patients rather than on ordinary people receiving or not receiving medications at the time of interview. The literature has not accurately conveyed the distinct ideals in individual communities or undertaken inter-regional comparisons. This current qualitative study focused on ideal medical care as perceived by residents of distinct Japanese communities in their everyday lives. Between December 2011 and November 2012, one-on-one and group-based semi-structured interviews were conducted with 105 individuals, each of whom had continuously lived for 20 years or more in one of the four types of communities classified as either 'metropolitan area', 'provincial city', 'mountain/fishing village' or 'remote island' in Japan. Interviews were transcribed from digital audio recordings and then analysed (in tandem with non-verbal data including participants' appearances, attitudes and interview atmospheres) using constructivist grounded theory, in which we could get the voice and mind of the participant concerning ideal medical care. The common themes observed among the four community types included 'peace of mind because of the availability of medical care' and 'trust in medical professionals'. Themes that were characteristic of urban communities were the tendency to focus on the content of medical care, including 'high-level medical care', 'elimination of unnecessary medical care' and 'faster, cheaper medical care', whereas those that were characteristic of rural communities were the tendency to focus on lifestyle-oriented medical care such as 'support for local lifestyles', 'locally appropriate standards of medical care' and 'being free from dependence on medical care'. The sense of ideal medical care in urban communities tended to centre around the satisfaction with the content of medical care, whereas that in rural communities tended to centre around the ability to lead a secure life. By considering

  17. Access Scheme for Controlling Mobile Agents and its Application to Share Medical Information.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Ting; Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Chen, Yu- Xin; Hwang, Jen-Hung; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-01

    This study is showing the advantage of mobile agents to conquer heterogeneous system environments and contribute to a virtual integrated sharing system. Mobile agents will collect medical information from each medical institution as a method to achieve the medical purpose of data sharing. Besides, this research also provides an access control and key management mechanism by adopting Public key cryptography and Lagrange interpolation. The safety analysis of the system is based on a network attacker's perspective. The achievement of this study tries to improve the medical quality, prevent wasting medical resources and make medical resources access to appropriate configuration.

  18. Medical care reform: lessons from around the world.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, J E

    1997-01-01

    Once again the United States is in a ferment of health policy reform. Proposals abound but sage observers remark that national health insurance has been "just around the corner" more than once in the last forty years. This time may be different, however. Proposals from all across the ideological spectrum are converging on the notion of "managed care" which is perhaps best known in its guise as a health maintenance organization (HMO). Other forms of managed care exist but they have neither the history nor the incentives found in traditional HMOs. The discussion on national health insurance (NHI) proposals has focused on financing issues to the virtual exclusion of public health concerns. In this article, the author addresses rural health and public hospitals in the United States; two problems that have been with us for a long time. Then articles examining the Canadian and English medical care systems are reviewed, illustrating some of the weaknesses of these approaches to national medical care. Research studies relating to Europe and the developing nations are next. Once again, these are intended to highlight public health problems found in differing medical care systems. Finally, the author examines utopian views of the United States medical care system of the future: the reform proposal offered by the National Association for Public Health Policy, the experimental policy in Washington State, and a vision of a planned system. The review is intended to draw together the lessons offered by public health policy research in other countries and the United States and apply them to the issue at hand: reforming the United States medical care system.

  19. Psychological and medical care of gender nonconforming youth.

    PubMed

    Vance, Stanley R; Ehrensaft, Diane; Rosenthal, Stephen M

    2014-12-01

    Gender nonconforming (GN) children and adolescents, collectively referred to as GN youth, may seek care to understand their internal gender identities, socially transition to their affirmed genders, and/or physically transition to their affirmed genders. Because general pediatricians are often the first point of contact with the health care system for GN youth, familiarity with the psychological and medical approaches to providing care for this population is crucial. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of existing clinical practice guidelines for GN youth. Such guidelines emphasize a multidisciplinary approach with collaboration of medical, mental health, and social services/advocacy providers. Appropriate training needs to be provided to promote comprehensive, culturally competent care to GN youth, a population that has traditionally been underserved and at risk for negative psychosocial outcomes.

  20. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  1. A Strategic Approach to Medical Care for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canga, Michael A.; Shah, Ronak V.; Mindock, Jennifer A.; Antonsen, Erik L.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration missions will present significant new challenges to crew health, including effects of variable gravity environments, limited communication with Earth-based personnel for diagnosis and consultation for medical events, limited resupply, and limited ability for crew return. Providing health care capabilities for exploration class missions will require system trades be performed to identify a minimum set of requirements and crosscutting capabilities, which can be used in design of exploration medical systems. Medical data, information, and knowledge collected during current space missions must be catalogued and put in formats that facilitate querying and analysis. These data are used to inform the medical research and development program through analysis of risk trade studies between medical care capabilities and system constraints such as mass, power, volume, and training. Medical capability as a quantifiable variable is proposed as a surrogate risk metric and explored for trade space analysis that can improve communication between the medical and engineering approaches to mission design. The resulting medical system design approach selected will inform NASA mission architecture, vehicle, and subsystem design for the next generation of spacecraft.

  2. Improved Maternal and Child Health Care Access in a Rural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carcillo, Joseph A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an underserved rural community in which health care initiatives increased access to comprehensive care. Over a 3-year period, increased accessibility to maternal and child health care also increased use of preventive services, thus decreasing emergency room visits and hospitalizations as well as low birth weight, risk of congenital…

  3. [The Requirements of Medical Device Market Access in India].

    PubMed

    Qin, Shaoyan; Cui, Tao; Yin, Haisong

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the premarket registration procedures and the post market regulatory requirements in India. According to Indian medical device act and related medical regulations on medical device, this is a preliminary discussion on the registration management system to provide referance for foreign medical device to enter India market.

  4. [Palliative care at home, transferring information to emergency medical teams].

    PubMed

    Ribeaucoup, Luc; Roche, Blandine

    2015-11-01

    Many people wish to die at home. However, the end-of-life period can be marked by the occurrence of numerous symptoms causing situations of crisis. Emergency medical teams are therefore frequently called upon. In order to be able to make the right decisions in a short space of time, they must have quick access to all the relevant information.

  5. DISASTER MEDICAL CARE AND SHELTER—The Federal Program

    PubMed Central

    Dearing, W. Palmer

    1960-01-01

    The role of the physician in event of natural disaster or overwhelming (perhaps nuclear) attack by an enemy is: To assist the layman in preparing to meet his own health needs in a disaster situation until organized health services can reach him. To prepare and plan for the provision of organized medical care when conditions permit. To extend his own capability to render medical care outside his normal specialty. To assist in the training of allied and professional health workers and laymen for specific mobilization assignments in health services. PMID:18732323

  6. Stoicism, the physician, and care of medical outliers

    PubMed Central

    Papadimos, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    Background Medical outliers present a medical, psychological, social, and economic challenge to the physicians who care for them. The determinism of Stoic thought is explored as an intellectual basis for the pursuit of a correct mental attitude that will provide aid and comfort to physicians who care for medical outliers, thus fostering continued physician engagement in their care. Discussion The Stoic topics of good, the preferable, the morally indifferent, living consistently, and appropriate actions are reviewed. Furthermore, Zeno's cardinal virtues of Justice, Temperance, Bravery, and Wisdom are addressed, as are the Stoic passions of fear, lust, mental pain, and mental pleasure. These concepts must be understood by physicians if they are to comprehend and accept the Stoic view as it relates to having the proper attitude when caring for those with long-term and/or costly illnesses. Summary Practicing physicians, especially those that are hospital based, and most assuredly those practicing critical care medicine, will be emotionally challenged by the medical outlier. A Stoic approach to such a social and psychological burden may be of benefit. PMID:15588293

  7. End-of-life care in medical textbooks.

    PubMed

    Carron, A T; Lynn, J; Keaney, P

    1999-01-05

    Improvement in end-of-life care has become a demand of the public and a priority for health care professionals. Medical textbooks could support this improvement by functioning as educational resources and as reference material. In this paper, four widely used general medical textbooks are assessed for their coverage of nine content domains for 12 illnesses that often cause death; each domain in each disease and in each text was graded for presence and helpfulness of advice. Helpful information was rare, and only prognostication and medical treatments to alter the course of the disease were usually mentioned. Harrison's Textbook of Medicine, The Merck Manual, and Scientific American Medicine often mentioned at least a few of the domains in each disease, although not often in a way that would guide a clinician. Manual of Medical Therapeutics (The Washington Manual) includes little information about end-of-life care. Improvement seems possible. Short additions of information on end-of-life care would probably be effective. Many chapters discussed at length certain topics that are clearly optional; other textbooks addressed these topics only briefly. When dealing with end-of-life care, physicians should seek guidance from other sources and textbook authors and editors should improve the utility and completeness of their texts.

  8. Decreasing Falls in Acute Care Medical Patients: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Leslie; Veenema, Tener Goodwin

    2017-02-06

    Falls in acute care medical patients are a complex problem impacted by the constantly changing risk factors affecting this population. This integrative literature review analyzes current evidence to determine factors that continue to make falls a top patient safety problem within the medical unit microsystem. The goal of this review is to develop an evidence-based structure to guide process improvement and effective use of organization resources.

  9. Increasing the leadership role of medical directors in managed care.

    PubMed

    2002-11-01

    Based on the final group discussion of medical executives in managed care at the Specialist Cambridge Healthcare Summit on March 20-22, 2002, this article highlights the current limitations of medical directors' role in health plans and outlines practical approaches to appropriately increase their influence over the clinical outcomes of plan members, improve relationships of health plans with their key stakeholders, and optimize the overall delivery of healthcare in the United States.

  10. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography for Undersea Medical Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Navy Experimental Diving Unit NEDU TR 14-15 321 Bullfinch Rd NOVEMBER 2014 Panama City, FL 32407-7015 POINT-OF-CARE...MD LT, MC (SMO/UMO), USN Deputy Medical Department Head Medical Training Division Officer Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU) joseph.yetto...navy.mil 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Navy Experimental Diving

  11. Childhood Immunization and Access to Health Care: Evidence From Nepal.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Satis; Panda, Bibhudutta

    2016-03-01

    This article examines the effect of access to health care center, in terms of travel time, on childhood immunization in Nepal using the 2004 and 2011 waves of the Nepal Living Standards Measurement Surveys. We employ probit and instrumental variable probit estimation methods to estimate the causal effect of travel time on the probability of immunization. Results indicate that travel time to the nearest health center displays a significant negative association with the probability of immunization (coefficient = -0.015,P< .05). Furthermore, the effect of travel time tends to be stronger in rural and distant areas of Nepal's mountain and hill regions. The results suggest that policy interventions should increase the number of mobile clinics in rural villages and provide conditional cash transfer to incentivize immunization coverage at the household level. In addition, household income, parental education, ethnicity, and household location emerge as important determinants of immunization in Nepal.

  12. Veterans’s Medical Care: FY2014 Appropriations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-14

    a direct service provider of primary care, specialized care, and related medical and social support services to veterans through the nation’s largest...Military Construction and Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies Appropriations bill for FY2014 (MILCON-VA Appropriations bill). The full House...Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Subcommittee approved its version of the MILCON-VA Appropriations bill. The full Senate

  13. Modeling of medical care with stochastic Petri Nets.

    PubMed

    Leite, Cicilia R M; Martin, Daniel L; Sizilio, Glaucia R A; Dos Santos, Keylly E A; de Araujo, Bruno G; Valentim, Ricardo A M; Neto, Adriao D D; de Melo, Jorge D; Guerreiro, Ana M G

    2010-01-01

    Due to the need for management, control, and monitoring of information in an effient way. The hospital automation has been the object of a number of studies owing to constantly evolving technologies. However, many hospital processes are still manual in private and public hospitals. Thus, the aim of this study is to model and simulate of medical care provided to patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), using stochastic Petri Nets and their possible use in a number of automation processes.

  14. [Primary Care Health Houses: a new balance between continuity, accessibility of care and health professionals working conditions?].

    PubMed

    Clément, Marie-Caroline; Couralet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Mousquès, Julien; Pierre, Aurélie; Bourgueil, Yann

    2009-03-29

    This evaluation explore empirically, the concept of Multidisciplinary Health Houses, considered as a solution to maintain GP's in remote areas and simultaneously to improve quality of care. Our sample concern 9 health Houses, 71 health professionals of which 32 GP's in two regions. We mixed data collected by questionnaire, visits and interviews. Professional activity and consumptions of care by patients were assessed with claims data from national sickness fund database. Comparison was made with professionals and patients of local zones for each Health Houses. Beyond heterogeneity of health houses in terms of location, size, number of professionals involved, we found a higher level of equipment than average practices, larger access in the day, the week and the year and many informal collaboration. With the same medical activity, doctors declare to have longer holidays. Different level of collaboration can be identified according to the level of substitution between them to their patients. To conclude, Multidisciplinary Health Houses enable GP's to find new balance between work and leisure time and offers larger time accessibility to patients.

  15. 33 CFR 150.604 - Who controls access to medical monitoring and exposure records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who controls access to medical monitoring and exposure records? 150.604 Section 150.604 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Health Safety and Health (general) § 150.604 Who controls access to medical monitoring and...

  16. 45 CFR 5b.6 - Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records. 5b.6 Section 5b.6 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.6 Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records. (a) General. An individual...

  17. Understanding the Developing Role of Global Health Partnerships on Access to Medication: An STS Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngoasong, Michael Zisuh

    2010-01-01

    A conceptual framework for studying the role of global health partnerships (GHPs) in determining policy practices on access to medication is presented. Although GHPs are of a practical nature, they are implicitly theory informed. The narratives used by GHP partners in relating to access to medication have theoretical origins. Building on the…

  18. 29 CFR 1926.33 - Access to employee exposure and medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to employee exposure and medical records. 1926.33 Section 1926.33 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Health Provisions § 1926.33 Access to employee exposure and medical records. Note: The...

  19. Regionalization of services improves access to emergency vascular surgical care.

    PubMed

    Roche-Nagle, G; Bachynski, K; Nathens, A B; Angoulvant, D; Rubin, B B

    2013-04-01

    Management of vascular surgical emergencies requires rapid access to a vascular surgeon and hospital with the infrastructure necessary to manage vascular emergencies. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of regionalization of vascular surgery services in Toronto to University Health Network (UHN) and St Michael's Hospital (SMH) on the ability of CritiCall Ontario to transfer patients with life- and limb-threatening vascular emergencies for definitive care. A retrospective review of the CritiCall Ontario database was used to assess the outcome of all calls to CritiCall regarding patients with vascular disease from April 2003 to March 2010. The number of patients with vascular emergencies referred via CritiCall and accepted in transfer by the vascular centers at UHN or SMH increased 500% between 1 April 2003-31 December 2005 and 1 January 2006-31 March 2010. Together, the vascular centers at UHN and SMH accepted 94.8% of the 1002 vascular surgery patients referred via CritiCall from other hospitals between 1 January 2006 and 31 March 2010, and 72% of these patients originated in hospitals outside of the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network. Across Ontario, the number of physicians contacted before a patient was accepted in transfer fell from 2.9 ± 0.4 before to 1.7 ± 0.3 after the vascular centers opened. In conclusion, the vascular surgery centers at UHN and SMH have become provincial resources that enable the efficient transfer of patients with vascular surgical emergencies from across Ontario. Regionalization of services is a viable model to increase access to emergent care.

  20. Aviation and the delivery of medical care in remote regions: the Lesotho HIV experience.

    PubMed

    Furin, Jennifer; Shutts, Mike; Keshavjee, Salmaan

    2008-02-01

    In many regions of the world plagued by high burdens of disease, there is difficulty in accessing basic medical care. This is often due to logistical constraints and a lack of infrastructure such as roads. Medical aviation can play a major role in addressing some of these crucial issues as it allows for the rapid transport of patients, personnel, and medications to remote-and sometimes otherwise inaccessible-areas. Lesotho is a mountainous nation of 2 million people that provides a good example of medical aviation as a cornerstone in the delivery of health care. The population has a reported HIV seroprevalence of 25%, and many patients live in rural areas that are inaccessible by road. Mission Aviation Fellowship has joined forces with a medical team from the nongovernmental organization Partners In Health in an effort to launch a comprehensive program to address HIV and related problems in rural Lesotho. This medical aviation partnership has allowed for the provision of HIV prevention and treatment services to thousands of people living in the mountains. This commentary describes how medical aviation has been crucial in developing models to address complex, serious health problems in remote settings.

  1. Health and Federal Budgetary Effects of Increasing Access to Antiretroviral Medications for HIV by Expanding Medicaid

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, James G.; Haile, Brain; Kates, Jennifer; Chang, Sophia

    2001-01-01

    Objectives. This study modeled the health and federal fiscal effects of expanding Medicaid for HIV-infected people to improve access to highly active antiretroviral therapy. Methods. A disease state model of the US HIV epidemic, with and without Medicaid expansion, was used. Eligibility required a CD4 cell count less than 500/mm3 or viral load greater than 10 000, absent or inadequate medication insurance, and annual income less than $10 000. Two benefits were modeled, “full” and “limited” (medications, outpatient care). Federal spending for Medicaid, Medicare, AIDS Drug Assistance Program, Supplemental Security Income, and Social Security Disability Insurance were assessed. Results. An estimated 38 000 individuals would enroll in a Medicaid HIV expansion. Over 5 years, expansion would prevent an estimated 13 000 AIDS diagnoses and 2600 deaths and add 5816 years of life. Net federal costs for all programs are $739 million (full benefits) and $480 million (limited benefits); for Medicaid alone, the costs are $1.43 and $1.17 billion, respectively. Results were sensitive to awareness of serostatus, highly active antiretroviral therapy cost, and participation rate. Strategies for federal cost neutrality include Medicaid HIV drug price reductions as low as 9% and private insurance buy-ins. Conclusions. Expansion of the Medicaid eligibility to increase access to antiretroviral therapy would have substantial health benefits at affordable costs. PMID:11527783

  2. Shared medical appointments: improving access, outcomes, and satisfaction for patients with chronic cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kelly Bauer; Haney, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Improving access to care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction are primary objectives for healthcare practices. This article outlines benefits, concerns, and possible challenges of shared medical appointments (SMAs) for patients and providers. The SMA model was designed to support providers' demanding schedules by allowing patients with the same chronic condition to be seen in a group setting. By concentrating on patient education and disease management, interactive meetings provide an opportunity for patients to share both successes and struggles with others experiencing similar challenges. Studies demonstrated that SMAs improved patient access, enhanced outcomes, and promoted patient satisfaction. This article describes the potential benefits of SMAs for patients with chronic heart disease, which consumes a large number of healthcare dollars related to hospital admissions, acute exacerbations, and symptom management. Education for self-management of chronic disease can become repetitive and time consuming. The SMA model introduces a fresh and unique style of healthcare visits, allowing providers to devote more time and attention to patients and improve productivity. The SMA model provides an outstanding method for nurse practitioners to demonstrate their role as a primary care provider, by leading patients in group discussions and evaluating their current health status. Patient selection, preparation, and facilitation of an SMA are discussed to demonstrate the complementary nature of an SMA approach in a healthcare practice.

  3. [Structured medication management in primary care - a tool to promote medication safety].

    PubMed

    Mahler, Cornelia; Freund, Tobias; Baldauf, Annika; Jank, Susanne; Ludt, Sabine; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic disease usually need to take multiple medications. Drug-related interactions, adverse events, suboptimal adherence, and self-medication are components that can affect medication safety and lead to serious consequences for the patient. At present, regular medication reviews to check what medicines have been prescribed and what medicines are actually taken by the patient or the structured evaluation of drug-related problems rarely take place in Germany. The process of "medication reconciliation" or "medication review" as developed in the USA and the UK aim at increasing medication safety and therefore represent an instrument of quality assurance. Within the HeiCare(®) project a structured medication management was developed for general practice, with medical assistants playing a major role in the implementation of the process. Both the structured medication management and the tools developed for the medication check and medication counselling will be outlined in this article; also, findings on feasibility and acceptance in various projects and experiences from a total of 200 general practices (56 HeiCare(®), 29 HiCMan,115 PraCMan) will be described. The results were obtained from questionnaires and focus group discussions. The implementation of a structured medication management intervention into daily routine was seen as a challenge. Due to the high relevance of medication reconciliation for daily clinical practice, however, the checklists - once implemented successfully - have been applied even after the end of the project. They have led to the regular review and reconciliation of the physicians' documentation of the medicines prescribed (medication chart) with the medicines actually taken by the patient.

  4. Treating asthma by the guidelines: developing a medication management information system for use in primary care.

    PubMed

    Twiggs, Joan E; Fifield, J; Jackson, E; Cushman, R; Apter, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and assess an automated asthma medication management information system (MMIS) that provides patient-specific evaluative guidance based on 1997 NAEPP clinical consensus guidelines. MMIS was developed and implemented in primary care settings within a pediatric asthma disease management program. MMIS infrastructure featured a centralized database with Internet access. MMIS collects detailed patient asthma medication data, evaluates pharmacotherapy relative to practitioner-reported disease severity, symptom control and model of guideline-recommended severity-appropriate medications and produces a patient-specific "curbside consult" feedback report. A system algorithm translates actual detailed medication data into actual severity-specific medication-class combinations. A table-driven computer program compares actual medication-class combinations to a guideline-based medication-class combinations model. Methodology determines whether the patient was prescribed a "severity-appropriate" amount or an amount "more" or "less" medication than indicated for patient's reported severity. Feedback messages comment on comparison. Missing data, unrecognized amounts of controller medication or unrecognized medication combinations create error cases. Post hoc review analyzed error cases to determine prevalence of non-guideline medicating practices among these practitioners. Proportion of valid and error cases across two clinical visits before and after post hoc clinical review were measured, as well as proportion of severity-appropriate, out-of-severity and non-guideline medications. MMIS produced a valid feedback report for 83% of patient visits. Missing data accounted for 60% of error cases. Practitioners used severity-appropriate medications for 60% of cases. When non-severity-appropriate medications were used they tended to be "too much" rather than "too little" (22%, 5%), suggesting appropriate use of guideline-recommended "step

  5. Access to health care for illegal immigrants: a specific organisation in France.

    PubMed

    Duguet, Anne-Marie; Bévière, Bénédicte

    2011-01-01

    Health care is a fundamental human right in Europe, and all Member States recognise everyone's right to the access to preventive healthcare and to receive medical care in the event of sickness or pregnancy. Nevertheless, this right is focused on citizens and the application to migrants, particularly undocumented migrants, varies widely in the EU. The French legislation is organized with a humanitarian approach. In this article, the authors present the French system of social protection, the "Couvernture médicale universelle" or CMU, which provides the same protection to asylum seekers and documented immigrants as to nationals, and the "Aide médicale d'état" or AME, that is open to every person who does not fulfil the legal conditions to obtain the CMU, such as illegal immigrants. Created in 1995, recently access to the AME has been restricted. A claim of discrimination has been rejected by the Conseil d'Etat and 215,000 persons received the AME in 2009. The expenses incurred by the AME increased by 17% in 2010, and there is a debate in Parliament to limit care and to ask the recipient for a financial contribution.

  6. Injury and violence in Los Angeles. Impact on access to health care and surgical education.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A W; Sterling-Scott, R P; Carabello, G; Imari-Williams, I; Allmond, B; Foster, R S; Kennedy, F; Shoemaker, W C

    1992-06-01

    The Los Angeles County (California) Trauma Hospital System was designed to ensure that all patients requiring specialized trauma care would be transported directly to a trauma center using established trauma triage criteria. The designation and implementation of all level 1, 2, and 3 (rural) trauma centers were completed between October 1983 and July 1985. However, by February 1, 1985, one level 2 trauma center withdrew, and nine other level 2 and 3 trauma centers followed suit over the next few months and years. The reasons for closure of these 10 trauma centers were almost exclusively related to economic factors. The major impact of trauma center closure on surgical educational programs at the Drew University of Medicine and Science and the Martin Luther King, Jr/Charles R. Drew Medical Center have been additive and cumulative. The high volume of patients with trauma has been cited, sometimes correctly and sometimes incorrectly, as the primary reason for a lack of access to health care for patients without trauma. We have developed a blueprint for survival that, when fully implemented, will improve access to health care for all residents in our catchment area and optimize surgical education. While the Los Angeles County Trauma Hospital System has had many difficulties during the last 9 years, the population it serves is greater than that in 42 states in the United States. The experiences gained in Los Angeles County may be beneficial to statewide systems in the United States and in countries of comparable size.

  7. Cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online access to their electronic medical records: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rexhepi, Hanife; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Cajander, Åsa; Huvila, Isto

    2016-07-19

    Patients' access to their online medical records serves as one of the cornerstones in the efforts to increase patient engagement and improve healthcare outcomes. The aim of this article is to provide in-depth understanding of cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online medical records, as well as an increased understanding of the complexities of developing and launching e-Health services. The study result confirms that online access can help patients prepare for doctor visits and to understand their medical issues. In contrast to the fears of many physicians, the study shows that online access to medical records did not generate substantial anxiety, concerns or increased phone calls to the hospital.

  8. Psychiatric Correlates of Medical Care Costs among Veterans Receiving Mental Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Tracy L.; Moore, Sally A.; Luterek, Jane; Varra, Alethea A.; Hyerle, Lynne; Bush, Kristen; Mariano, Mary Jean; Liu, Chaun-Fen; Kivlahan, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Research on increased medical care costs associated with posttraumatic sequelae has focused on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the provisional diagnosis of Disorders of Extreme Stress Not Otherwise Specified (DESNOS) encompasses broader trauma-related difficulties and may be uniquely related to medical costs. We investigated whether…

  9. Transforming Medical Care: Case Study of an Exemplary, Small Medical Group

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Leif I.; Hroscikoski, Mary C.; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M.; Harper, Peter G.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Most published descriptions of organizations providing or improving quality of care concern large medical groups or systems; however, 90% of the medical care in the United States is provided by groups of no more than 20 physicians. We studied one such group to determine the organizational and cultural attributes that seem related to its achievements in care quality. METHODS A 15–family physician medical group was identified from comparative public performance scores of 27 medical groups providing most of the primary care in our metropolitan area. Semistructured interviews were conducted with diverse personnel in this group, operations were observed, and written documents were reviewed. Four primary care physician researchers and a consultant then reviewed transcriptions, field notes, and materials during semistructured sessions to identify the main attributes of this group and their probable origins. RESULTS This medical group ranked first in a composite measure of preventive services and fourth and sixth, respectively, in composite scores for coronary artery disease and diabetes care. Our analysis identified 12 attributes of this group that seemed to be associated with its good care quality, with patient-centeredness being the foundational attribute for most of the others. Historical factors important to most of these attributes included small size, physician ownership, and a high value on practice consistency among the clinicians in the group. CONCLUSIONS The identified 12 attributes of this medical group seem to be associated with its superior care quality, and most of them might be replicable by other small groups if they choose to work toward that end. PMID:16569713

  10. Intention-based critiquing of guideline-oriented medical care.

    PubMed

    Advani, A; Lo, K; Shahar, Y

    1998-01-01

    We present a methodology and tool for providing retrospective review and critiquing of guideline-based medical care given to patients. We show how our guideline representation language, Asbru, which supports the use of physicians intentions in addition to physician's actions, allows us to compare the care given to a patient at the level of the intention to treat in addition to the more detailed plan carried out. We have developed an algorithm based on this representation for retrospective quality assessment of guideline-based care. Our method takes the physician's and institution's preferences and policies into account in explaining or justifying physician deviations from the recommendations of a guideline.

  11. Resources and Capabilities of the Department of Veterans Affairs to Provide Timely and Accessible Care to Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Hussey, Peter S.; Ringel, Jeanne S.; Ahluwalia, Sangeeta; Price, Rebecca Anhang; Buttorff, Christine; Concannon, Thomas W.; Lovejoy, Susan L.; Martsolf, Grant R.; Rudin, Robert S.; Schultz, Dana; Sloss, Elizabeth M.; Watkins, Katherine E.; Waxman, Daniel; Bauman, Melissa; Briscombe, Brian; Broyles, James R.; Burns, Rachel M.; Chen, Emily K.; DeSantis, Amy Soo Jin; Ecola, Liisa; Fischer, Shira H.; Friedberg, Mark W.; Gidengil, Courtney A.; Ginsburg, Paul B.; Gulden, Timothy; Gutierrez, Carlos Ignacio; Hirshman, Samuel; Huang, Christina Y.; Kandrack, Ryan; Kress, Amii; Leuschner, Kristin J.; MacCarthy, Sarah; Maksabedian, Ervant J.; Mann, Sean; Matthews, Luke Joseph; May, Linnea Warren; Mishra, Nishtha; Miyashiro, Lisa; Muchow, Ashley N.; Nelson, Jason; Naranjo, Diana; O'Hanlon, Claire E.; Pillemer, Francesca; Predmore, Zachary; Ross, Rachel; Ruder, Teague; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Uscher-Pines, Lori; Vaiana, Mary E.; Vesely, Joseph V.; Hosek, Susan D.; Farmer, Carrie M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 addressed the need for access to timely, high-quality health care for veterans. Section 201 of the legislation called for an independent assessment of various aspects of veterans' health care. The RAND Corporation was tasked with an assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) current and projected health care capabilities and resources. An examination of data from a variety of sources, along with a survey of VA medical facility leaders, revealed the breadth and depth of VA resources and capabilities: fiscal resources, workforce and human resources, physical infrastructure, interorganizational relationships, and information resources. The assessment identified barriers to the effective use of these resources and capabilities. Analysis of data on access to VA care and the quality of that care showed that almost all veterans live within 40 miles of a VA health facility, but fewer have access to VA specialty care. Veterans usually receive care within 14 days of their desired appointment date, but wait times vary considerably across VA facilities. VA has long played a national leadership role in measuring the quality of health care. The assessment showed that VA health care quality was as good or better on most measures compared with other health systems, but quality performance lagged at some VA facilities. VA will require more resources and capabilities to meet a projected increase in veterans' demand for VA care over the next five years. Options for increasing capacity include accelerated hiring, full nurse practice authority, and expanded use of telehealth. PMID:28083424

  12. Barriers to medical care for white, black, and Hispanic American children.

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    As demonstrated by efforts to expand Medicaid coverage for poor and needy children, removing barriers to medical care continues to be an important social policy goal. Data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey, a multistage probability sample of 15,000 US households, was used to examine some of the barriers that black and Hispanic children encounter in obtaining access to medical care. Results from the 1987 study indicate that black and Hispanic children were more likely than white children to be poor, uninsured members of single-parent households, and to have to wait longer to see a medical provider. Yet differences in waiting time at the usual source of care remained after controlling for insurance. In 1987, 18.6% of uninsured white children were without a usual source of care compared with 28.4% and 25.2% of uninsured black and Hispanic children, respectively. Furthermore, 17.6% of uninsured white children made at least one routine visit to a physician during 1987, while only 11.4% and 10.6% of the uninsured black and Hispanic children, respectively, saw a physician for a regular checkup. PMID:8478969

  13. The Effects of Promoting Patient Access to Medical Records: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Stephen E.; Lin, Chen-Tan

    2003-01-01

    The Health Insurance Privacy and Portability Act (HIPPA) stipulates that patients must be permitted to review and amend their medical records. As information technology makes medical records more accessible to patients, it may become more commonplace for patients to review their records routinely. This article analyzes the potential benefits and drawbacks of facilitating patient access to the medical record by reviewing previously published research. Previous research includes analysis of clinical notes, surveys of patients and practitioners, and studies of patient-accessible medical records. Overall, studies suggest the potential for modest benefits (for instance, in enhancing doctor-patient communication). Risks (for instance, increasing patient worry or confusion) appear to be minimal in medical patients. The studies, however, were of limited quality and low statistical power to detect the variety of outcomes that may result from implementation of a patient-accessible medical record. The data from these studies lay the foundation for future research. PMID:12595402

  14. How Might the Affordable Care Act's Coverage Expansion Provisions Influence Demand for Medical Care?

    PubMed Central

    ABRAHAM, JEAN MARIE

    2014-01-01

    Context: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is predicted to expand health insurance to 25 million individuals. Since insurance reduces the price of medical care, the quantity of services demanded by these newly covered individuals is expected to rise. In this article I provide a comprehensive picture of the demographics, health status, and medical care utilization of the population targeted for the ACA's expansion of coverage, contrasted with that of other nonelderly, insured populations. In addition, I synthesize the current evidence regarding the causal impact of insurance on medical care demand, drawing heavily on recent evidence from Massachusetts and Oregon. Methods: Using the 2008 to 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, I conducted bivariate and multivariate analyses to examine differences between the ACA target population and other insured groups. I used the results from the descriptive analysis and quasi-experimental literature to generate “back of the envelope” estimates of the potential impact of the coverage expansion on total medical care utilization by the noninstitutionalized US population. Findings: Comparisons of the potential ACA target population with the privately and publicly insured reveal that the former is younger and more likely to be male. The ACA target population, and particularly the uninsured with incomes under 200% of the federal poverty line, reports lower rates of several medical conditions relative to those of the privately and publicly insured. Future changes in rates of inpatient hospitalization and ED use among the newly insured could vary widely, based on descriptive findings and inferences from the quasi-experimental literature. Results also suggest moderate increases in ambulatory care. Total increases in overall demand for medical care by the newly insured comprise a modest proportion of the aggregate utilization. Conclusions: With the expected increases in utilization resulting from the coverage expansion

  15. Patients’ online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic review in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Ellis, Beverley

    2015-01-01

    Background Online access to medical records by patients can potentially enhance provision of patient-centred care and improve satisfaction. However, online access and services may also prove to be an additional burden for the healthcare provider. Aim To assess the impact of providing patients with access to their general practice electronic health records (EHR) and other EHR-linked online services on the provision, quality, and safety of health care. Design and setting A systematic review was conducted that focused on all studies about online record access and transactional services in primary care. Method Data sources included MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EPOC, DARE, King’s Fund, Nuffield Health, PsycINFO, OpenGrey (1999–2012). The literature was independently screened against detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria; independent dual data extraction was conducted, the risk of bias (RoB) assessed, and a narrative synthesis of the evidence conducted. Results A total of 176 studies were identified, 17 of which were randomised controlled trials, cohort, or cluster studies. Patients reported improved satisfaction with online access and services compared with standard provision, improved self-care, and better communication and engagement with clinicians. Safety improvements were patient-led through identifying medication errors and facilitating more use of preventive services. Provision of online record access and services resulted in a moderate increase of e-mail, no change on telephone contact, but there were variable effects on face-to-face contact. However, other tasks were necessary to sustain these services, which impacted on clinician time. There were no reports of harm or breaches in privacy. Conclusion While the RoB scores suggest many of the studies were of low quality, patients using online services reported increased convenience and satisfaction. These services positively impacted on patient safety, although there were variations of

  16. Medication use in the neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Emily M.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Clark, Reese H.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objective We provide an update on medication use in infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in the United States and examine how use has changed over time. Study Design We performed a retrospective review (2005–2010) of a large prospectively collected administrative database. Result Medications most commonly administered during the study period were ampicillin, gentamicin, caffeine citrate, vancomycin, beractant, furosemide, fentanyl, dopamine, midazolam, and calfactant (56–681 exposures per 1000 infants). Those with the greatest relative increase in use included azithromycin, sildenafil, and milrinone. Medications with the greatest relative decrease in use included theophylline, metoclopramide, and doxapram. Conclusion Medication use in the NICU has changed substantially over time, and only 35% of the most commonly prescribed medications are FDA-approved in infants. PMID:24347262

  17. Health and access to care among employed and unemployed adults: United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Anne K; Bernstein, Amy B

    2012-01-01

    with selected chronic conditions, including hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, or cancer (NCHS unpublished analysis of NHIS data), and so the need for health care to treat these chronic conditions exists for both employed and unemployed adults. In addition to having poorer health, unemployed adults were more likely to delay or not receive needed medical care and needed prescriptions due to cost than their employed counterparts across categories of insurance coverage. Thus, the unemployed reported both worse health and less access to needed care and treatment than employed adults. This pattern was found not only for those without health insurance but also those with public and private insurance.

  18. The Role of Emergency Medical Services in Geriatrics: Bridging the Gap between Primary and Acute Care.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Judah; McVey, Jennifer; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Caring for older adults is a major function of emergency medical services (EMS). Traditional EMS systems were designed to treat single acute conditions; this approach contrasts with best practices for the care of frail older adults. Care might be improved by the early identification of those who are frail and at highest risk for adverse outcomes. Paramedics are well positioned to play an important role via a more thorough evaluation of frailty (or vulnerability). These findings may inform both pre-hospital and subsequent emergency department (ED) based decisions. Innovative programs involving EMS, the ED, and primary care could reduce the workload on EDs while improving patient access to care, and ultimately patient outcomes. Some frail older adults will benefit from the resources and specialized knowledge provided by the ED, while others may be better helped in alternative ways, usually in coordination with primary care. Discerning between these groups is a challenge worthy of further inquiry. In either case, care should be timely, with a focus on identifying emergent or acute care needs, frailty evaluation, mobility assessments, identifying appropriate goals for treatment, promoting functional independence, and striving to have the patient return to their usual place of residence if this can be done safely. Paramedics are uniquely positioned to play a larger role in the care of our aging population. Improving paramedic education as it pertains to geriatrics is a critical next step.

  19. Gatekeepers as Care Providers: The Care Work of Patient-centered Medical Home Clerical Staff.

    PubMed

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Ono, Sarah S; Stewart, Kenda R; Lampman, Michelle A; Rosenthal, Gary E; Stewart, Greg L

    2017-03-01

    International implementation of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model for delivering primary care has dramatically increased in the last decade. A majority of research on PCMH's impact has emphasized the care provided by clinically trained staff. In this article, we report our ethnographic analysis of data collected from Department of Veterans Affairs staff implementing PACT, the VA version of PCMH. Teams were trained to use within-team delegation, largely accomplished through attention to clinical licensure, to differentiate staff in providing efficient, patient-centered care. In doing so, PACT may reinforce a clinically defined culture of care that countermands PCMH ideals. Such competing rubrics for care are brought into relief through a focus on the care work performed by clerks. Ethnographic analysis identifies clerks' care as a kind of emotional dirty work, signaling important areas for future anthropological study of the relationships among patient-centered care, stigma, and clinical authority.

  20. Marketing home health care medical services: the physician's view.

    PubMed

    Ryan, E J; Phelps, R A

    1993-01-01

    The authors surveyed physicians serving the Jackson, Mississippi home health care market. They identified problems and studied physician perceptions regarding services provided by home health care agencies, private duty nursing agencies, and durable medical equipment suppliers. Respondents perceived home health care as providing: (1) increased patient satisfaction, (2) greater patient convenience, (3) earlier discharge, and (4) lowered patient costs. They least liked: (1) lack of control and involvement in the patient caring process, (2) paperwork, (3) quality control potential, and the possibility that patient costs could increase. Two sets of implications for health care marketers are presented that involve both national and regional levels. Overall results indicate that a growing and profitable market segment exists and is being served in an effective and socially responsible manner.