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Sample records for access oa publishing

  1. Open Access Publishing in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothkopf, U.; Meakins, S.

    2012-08-01

    Open Access (OA) in scholarly literature means the "immediate, free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles". The Open Access movement has been made possible thanks to the wide-spread availability of internet access and has received increasing interest since the 1990s, mostly due to the fast rising journal subscription prices. This presentation will review the current situation of Open Access in astronomy. It will answer the question why it makes sense to publish in an OA journal and will provide criteria to judge the quality of OA journals and publishers, along with suggestions how to identify so-called predatory publishers.

  2. Open Access Publishing in the Electronic Age.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Gábor L

    2014-10-01

    The principle of open-access (OA) publishing is more and more prevalent also on the field of laboratory medicine. Open-access journals (OAJs) are available online to the reader usually without financial, legal, or technical barriers. Some are subsidized, and some require payment on behalf of the author. OAJs are one of the two general methods for providing OA. The other one is self-archiving in a repository. The electronic journal of the IFCC (eJIFCC) is a platinum OAJ- i.e. there is no charge to read, or to submit to this journal. Traditionally, the author was required to transfer the copyright to the journal publisher. Publishers claimed this was necessary in order to protect author's rights. However, many authors found this unsatisfactory, and have used their influence to affect a gradual move towards a license to publish instead. Under such a system, the publisher has permission to edit, print, and distribute the article commercially, but the author(s) retain the other rights themselves. An OA mandate is a policy adopted by a research institution, research funder, or government which requires researchers to make their published, peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers OA by self-archiving their peer-reviewed drafts in a repository ("green OA") or by publishing them in an OAJ ("gold OA"). Creative Commons (CC) is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools. The free, easy-to-use copyright licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use creative work. CC licenses let you easily change your copyright terms from the default of "all rights reserved" to "some rights reserved." OA publishing also raises a number of new ethical problems (e.g. predatory publishers, fake papers). Laboratory scientists are encouraged to publish their scientific results OA (especially in eJIFCC). They should, however, be aware of their rights, institutional mandate

  3. Open Access Publishing in the Electronic Age

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The principle of open-access (OA) publishing is more and more prevalent also on the field of laboratory medicine. Open-access journals (OAJs) are available online to the reader usually without financial, legal, or technical barriers. Some are subsidized, and some require payment on behalf of the author. OAJs are one of the two general methods for providing OA. The other one is self-archiving in a repository. The electronic journal of the IFCC (eJIFCC) is a platinum OAJ— i.e. there is no charge to read, or to submit to this journal. Traditionally, the author was required to transfer the copyright to the journal publisher. Publishers claimed this was necessary in order to protect author’s rights. However, many authors found this unsatisfactory, and have used their influence to affect a gradual move towards a license to publish instead. Under such a system, the publisher has permission to edit, print, and distribute the article commercially, but the author(s) retain the other rights themselves. An OA mandate is a policy adopted by a research institution, research funder, or government which requires researchers to make their published, peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers OA by self-archiving their peer-reviewed drafts in a repository (“green OA”) or by publishing them in an OAJ (“gold OA”). Creative Commons (CC) is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools. The free, easy-to-use copyright licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use creative work. CC licenses let you easily change your copyright terms from the default of “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved.” OA publishing also raises a number of new ethical problems (e.g. predatory publishers, fake papers). Laboratory scientists are encouraged to publish their scientific results OA (especially in eJIFCC). They should, however, be aware of their rights

  4. Open Access Publishing in the Electronic Age

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The principle of open-access (OA) publishing is more and more prevalent also on the field of laboratory medicine. Open-access journals (OAJs) are available online to the reader usually without financial, legal, or technical barriers. Some are subsidized, and some require payment on behalf of the author. OAJs are one of the two general methods for providing OA. The other one is self-archiving in a repository. The electronic journal of the IFCC (eJIFCC) is a platinum OAJ— i.e. there is no charge to read, or to submit to this journal. Traditionally, the author was required to transfer the copyright to the journal publisher. Publishers claimed this was necessary in order to protect author’s rights. However, many authors found this unsatisfactory, and have used their influence to affect a gradual move towards a license to publish instead. Under such a system, the publisher has permission to edit, print, and distribute the article commercially, but the author(s) retain the other rights themselves. An OA mandate is a policy adopted by a research institution, research funder, or government which requires researchers to make their published, peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers OA by self-archiving their peer-reviewed drafts in a repository (“green OA”) or by publishing them in an OAJ (“gold OA”). Creative Commons (CC) is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools. The free, easy-to-use copyright licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use creative work. CC licenses let you easily change your copyright terms from the default of “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved.” OA publishing also raises a number of new ethical problems (e.g. predatory publishers, fake papers). Laboratory scientists are encouraged to publish their scientific results OA (especially in eJIFCC). They should, however, be aware of their rights

  5. Open access: implications for scholarly publishing and medical libraries

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper reviews and analyzes the evolution of the open access (OA) publishing movement and its impact on the traditional scholarly publishing model. Procedures: A literature survey and analysis of definitions of OA, problems with the current publishing model, historical developments, funding agency responses, stakeholder viewpoints, and implications for scientific libraries and publishing are performed. Findings: The Internet's transformation of information access has fueled interest in reshaping what many see as a dysfunctional, high-cost system of scholarly publishing. For years, librarians alone advocated for change, until relatively recently when interest in OA and related initiatives spread to the scientific community, governmental groups, funding agencies, publishers, and the general public. Conclusions: Most stakeholders acknowledge that change in the publishing landscape is inevitable, but heated debate continues over what form this transformation will take. The most frequently discussed remedies for the troubled current system are the “green” road (self-archiving articles published in non-OA journals) and the “gold” road (publishing in OA journals). Both movements will likely intensify, with a multiplicity of models and initiatives coexisting for some time. PMID:16888657

  6. In ... and out: open access publishing in scientific journals.

    PubMed

    Boumil, Marcia M; Salem, Deeb N

    2014-01-01

    Open access (OA) journals are a growing phenomenon largely of the past decade wherein readers can access the content of scientific journals without paying for a subscription. The costs are borne by authors (or their institutions) who pay a fee to be published, thus allowing readers to access, search, print, and cite the journals without cost. Although the OA model, in and of itself, need not diminish scientific rigor, selectivity, or peer review, the "author pays" model creates an inherent conflict of interest: it operates with the incentive on the part of the journal to publish more and reject less. This is coupled with cost containment measures that affect the journals' ability to engage experienced editors and professional staff to scrutinize data, data analyses, and author conflicts of interest. While some OA journals appear to be comparable to their print competitors, others are "predatory" and have no legitimacy at all. Two recent "scams"--one recently published in Science--highlight the urgency of addressing the issues raised by OA publication so that OA does not lose its credibility just as it begins to gather substantial momentum. High-quality journals develop their reputations over time, and OA outlets will be no exception. For this to occur, however, the OA audience will need to be satisfied that OA can deliver high-quality publications utilizing rigorous peer review, editing, and conflict of interest scrutiny. Academic tenure and promotion committees that review scholarly credentials are understandably skeptical of publications in unrecognized journals, and the large number of new OA outlets contributes to this urgency from their perspective as well.

  7. Anatomy of open access publishing: a study of longitudinal development and internal structure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Open access (OA) is a revolutionary way of providing access to the scholarly journal literature made possible by the Internet. The primary aim of this study was to measure the volume of scientific articles published in full immediate OA journals from 2000 to 2011, while observing longitudinal internal shifts in the structure of OA publishing concerning revenue models, publisher types and relative distribution among scientific disciplines. The secondary aim was to measure the share of OA articles of all journal articles, including articles made OA by publishers with a delay and individual author-paid OA articles in subscription journals (hybrid OA), as these subsets of OA publishing have mostly been ignored in previous studies. Methods Stratified random sampling of journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals (n = 787) was performed. The annual publication volumes spanning 2000 to 2011 were retrieved from major publication indexes and through manual data collection. Results An estimated 340,000 articles were published by 6,713 full immediate OA journals during 2011. OA journals requiring article-processing charges have become increasingly common, publishing 166,700 articles in 2011 (49% of all OA articles). This growth is related to the growth of commercial publishers, who, despite only a marginal presence a decade ago, have grown to become key actors on the OA scene, responsible for 120,000 of the articles published in 2011. Publication volume has grown within all major scientific disciplines, however, biomedicine has seen a particularly rapid 16-fold growth between 2000 (7,400 articles) and 2011 (120,900 articles). Over the past decade, OA journal publishing has steadily increased its relative share of all scholarly journal articles by about 1% annually. Approximately 17% of the 1.66 million articles published during 2011 and indexed in the most comprehensive article-level index of scholarly articles (Scopus) are available OA through journal

  8. Open access: academic publishing and its implications for knowledge equity in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Matheka, Duncan Mwangangi; Nderitu, Joseph; Mutonga, Daniel; Otiti, Mary Iwaret; Siegel, Karen; Demaio, Alessandro Rhyll

    2014-01-01

    Traditional, subscription-based scientific publishing has its limitations: often, articles are inaccessible to the majority of researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where journal subscriptions or one-time access fees are cost-prohibitive. Open access (OA) publishing, in which journals provide online access to articles free of charge, breaks this barrier and allows unrestricted access to scientific and scholarly information to researchers all over the globe. At the same time, one major limitation to OA is a high publishing cost that is placed on authors. Following recent developments to OA publishing policies in the UK and even LMICs, this article highlights the current status and future challenges of OA in Africa. We place particular emphasis on Kenya, where multidisciplinary efforts to improve access have been established. We note that these efforts in Kenya can be further strengthened and potentially replicated in other African countries, with the goal of elevating the visibility of African research and improving access for African researchers to global research, and, ultimately, bring social and economic benefits to the region. We (1) offer recommendations for overcoming the challenges of implementing OA in Africa and (2) call for urgent action by African governments to follow the suit of high-income countries like the UK and Australia, mandating OA for publicly-funded research in their region and supporting future research into how OA might bring social and economic benefits to Africa. PMID:24716579

  9. Open access: academic publishing and its implications for knowledge equity in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Traditional, subscription-based scientific publishing has its limitations: often, articles are inaccessible to the majority of researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where journal subscriptions or one-time access fees are cost-prohibitive. Open access (OA) publishing, in which journals provide online access to articles free of charge, breaks this barrier and allows unrestricted access to scientific and scholarly information to researchers all over the globe. At the same time, one major limitation to OA is a high publishing cost that is placed on authors. Following recent developments to OA publishing policies in the UK and even LMICs, this article highlights the current status and future challenges of OA in Africa. We place particular emphasis on Kenya, where multidisciplinary efforts to improve access have been established. We note that these efforts in Kenya can be further strengthened and potentially replicated in other African countries, with the goal of elevating the visibility of African research and improving access for African researchers to global research, and, ultimately, bring social and economic benefits to the region. We (1) offer recommendations for overcoming the challenges of implementing OA in Africa and (2) call for urgent action by African governments to follow the suit of high-income countries like the UK and Australia, mandating OA for publicly-funded research in their region and supporting future research into how OA might bring social and economic benefits to Africa. PMID:24716579

  10. Quality Assessment of Studies Published in Open Access and Subscription Journals: Results of a Systematic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Roberta; Milovanovic, Sonja; Stojanovic, Jovana; Efremov, Ljupcho; Amore, Rosarita; Boccia, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Along with the proliferation of Open Access (OA) publishing, the interest for comparing the scientific quality of studies published in OA journals versus subscription journals has also increased. With our study we aimed to compare the methodological quality and the quality of reporting of primary epidemiological studies and systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in OA and non-OA journals. Methods In order to identify the studies to appraise, we listed all OA and non-OA journals which published in 2013 at least one primary epidemiologic study (case-control or cohort study design), and at least one systematic review or meta-analysis in the field of oncology. For the appraisal, we picked up the first studies published in 2013 with case-control or cohort study design from OA journals (Group A; n = 12), and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group B; n = 26); the first systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in 2013 from OA journals (Group C; n = 15), and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group D; n = 32). We evaluated the methodological quality of studies by assessing the compliance of case-control and cohort studies to Newcastle and Ottawa Scale (NOS) scale, and the compliance of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) scale. The quality of reporting was assessed considering the adherence of case-control and cohort studies to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist, and the adherence of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) checklist. Results Among case-control and cohort studies published in OA and non-OA journals, we did not observe significant differences in the median value of NOS score (Group A: 7 (IQR 7–8) versus Group B: 8 (7–9); p = 0.5) and in the adherence to STROBE checklist (Group A, 75% versus Group B, 80%; p = 0.1). The

  11. Equity for open-access journal publishing.

    PubMed

    Shieber, Stuart M

    2009-08-01

    Open-access journals, which provide access to their scholarly articles freely and without limitations, are at a systematic disadvantage relative to traditional closed-access journal publishing and its subscription-based business model. A simple, cost-effective remedy to this inequity could put open-access publishing on a path to become a sustainable, efficient system. PMID:19652697

  12. The Development of Open Access Journal Publishing from 1993 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Laakso, Mikael; Welling, Patrik; Bukvova, Helena; Nyman, Linus; Björk, Bo-Christer; Hedlund, Turid

    2011-01-01

    Open Access (OA) is a model for publishing scholarly peer reviewed journals, made possible by the Internet. The full text of OA journals and articles can be freely read, as the publishing is funded through means other than subscriptions. Empirical research concerning the quantitative development of OA publishing has so far consisted of scattered individual studies providing brief snapshots, using varying methods and data sources. This study adopts a systematic method for studying the development of OA journals from their beginnings in the early 1990s until 2009. Because no comprehensive index of OA articles exists, systematic manual data collection from journal web sites was conducted based on journal-level data extracted from the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). Due to the high number of journals registered in the DOAJ, almost 5000 at the time of the study, stratified random sampling was used. A separate sample of verified early pioneer OA journals was also studied. The results show a very rapid growth of OA publishing during the period 1993–2009. During the last year an estimated 191 000 articles were published in 4769 journals. Since the year 2000, the average annual growth rate has been 18% for the number of journals and 30% for the number of articles. This can be contrasted to the reported 3,5% yearly volume increase in journal publishing in general. In 2009 the share of articles in OA journals, of all peer reviewed journal articles, reached 7,7%. Overall, the results document a rapid growth in OA journal publishing over the last fifteen years. Based on the sampling results and qualitative data a division into three distinct periods is suggested: The Pioneering years (1993–1999), the Innovation years (2000–2004), and the Consolidation years (2005–2009). PMID:21695139

  13. The development of open access journal publishing from 1993 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Mikael; Welling, Patrik; Bukvova, Helena; Nyman, Linus; Björk, Bo-Christer; Hedlund, Turid

    2011-01-01

    Open Access (OA) is a model for publishing scholarly peer reviewed journals, made possible by the Internet. The full text of OA journals and articles can be freely read, as the publishing is funded through means other than subscriptions. Empirical research concerning the quantitative development of OA publishing has so far consisted of scattered individual studies providing brief snapshots, using varying methods and data sources. This study adopts a systematic method for studying the development of OA journals from their beginnings in the early 1990s until 2009. Because no comprehensive index of OA articles exists, systematic manual data collection from journal web sites was conducted based on journal-level data extracted from the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). Due to the high number of journals registered in the DOAJ, almost 5000 at the time of the study, stratified random sampling was used. A separate sample of verified early pioneer OA journals was also studied. The results show a very rapid growth of OA publishing during the period 1993-2009. During the last year an estimated 191 000 articles were published in 4769 journals. Since the year 2000, the average annual growth rate has been 18% for the number of journals and 30% for the number of articles. This can be contrasted to the reported 3,5% yearly volume increase in journal publishing in general. In 2009 the share of articles in OA journals, of all peer reviewed journal articles, reached 7,7%. Overall, the results document a rapid growth in OA journal publishing over the last fifteen years. Based on the sampling results and qualitative data a division into three distinct periods is suggested: The Pioneering years (1993-1999), the Innovation years (2000-2004), and the Consolidation years (2005-2009). PMID:21695139

  14. Open Access Publishing: What Authors Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nariani, Rajiv; Fernandez, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Campus-based open access author funds are being considered by many academic libraries as a way to support authors publishing in open access journals. Article processing fees for open access have been introduced recently by publishers and have not yet been widely accepted by authors. Few studies have surveyed authors on their reasons for publishing…

  15. The Future of Open Access Publishing in the Netherlands: Constant Dripping Wears Away the Stone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woutersen-Windhouwer, Saskia

    2013-01-01

    At present, about 20% of the scientific publications worldwide are freely (open-access) available (Bjork, Welling, Laakso, Majlender, Hedlund, & Guonason, 2010) and this percentage is constantly on the rise. In the Netherlands, a similar trend is visible (see Fig. 1). Why is open-access (OA) publishing important, and why will it become even more…

  16. [The publishing industry against open access journals].

    PubMed

    Camargo Junior, Kenneth Rochel de

    2012-12-01

    Open-access journal publishing has significantly grown in recent years. Restricted access publications have, in turn, increasing access costs as they benefit from a unique economic model in which relevant work and essential inputs are provided free of charge to vendors who have a captive market that has almost no competition. An additional issue typical of industries that work under the copyright regime is that the oligopoly market structure of the publishing industry which in turn further contributes to increase their products' prices. Mandatory open-access policies, as determined by the NIH, constitute a threat to this business model and are being challenged by the industry on several fronts, including the passage of legislation to undermine these initiatives. The purpose of this commentary article was to review key aspects of this confrontation and to suggest potential strategies for encouraging open-access publishing in Brazil. PMID:23380837

  17. [The publishing industry against open access journals].

    PubMed

    Camargo Junior, Kenneth Rochel de

    2012-12-01

    Open-access journal publishing has significantly grown in recent years. Restricted access publications have, in turn, increasing access costs as they benefit from a unique economic model in which relevant work and essential inputs are provided free of charge to vendors who have a captive market that has almost no competition. An additional issue typical of industries that work under the copyright regime is that the oligopoly market structure of the publishing industry which in turn further contributes to increase their products' prices. Mandatory open-access policies, as determined by the NIH, constitute a threat to this business model and are being challenged by the industry on several fronts, including the passage of legislation to undermine these initiatives. The purpose of this commentary article was to review key aspects of this confrontation and to suggest potential strategies for encouraging open-access publishing in Brazil.

  18. A longitudinal study of independent scholar-published open access journals.

    PubMed

    Björk, Bo-Christer; Shen, Cenyu; Laakso, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Open Access (OA) is nowadays increasingly being used as a business model for the publishing of scholarly peer reviewed journals, both by specialized OA publishing companies and major, predominantly subscription-based publishers. However, in the early days of the web OA journals were mainly founded by independent academics, who were dissatisfied with the predominant print and subscription paradigm and wanted to test the opportunities offered by the new medium. There is still an on-going debate about how OA journals should be operated, and the volunteer model used by many such 'indie' journals has been proposed as a viable alternative to the model adopted by big professional publishers where publishing activities are funded by authors paying expensive article processing charges (APCs). Our longitudinal quantitative study of 250 'indie' OA journals founded prior to 2002, showed that 51% of these journals were still in operation in 2014 and that the median number of articles published per year had risen from 11 to 18 among the survivors. Of these surviving journals, only 8% had started collecting APCs. A more detailed qualitative case study of five such journals provided insights into how such journals have tried to ensure the continuity and longevity of operations. PMID:27190709

  19. A longitudinal study of independent scholar-published open access journals

    PubMed Central

    Björk, Bo-Christer; Laakso, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Open Access (OA) is nowadays increasingly being used as a business model for the publishing of scholarly peer reviewed journals, both by specialized OA publishing companies and major, predominantly subscription-based publishers. However, in the early days of the web OA journals were mainly founded by independent academics, who were dissatisfied with the predominant print and subscription paradigm and wanted to test the opportunities offered by the new medium. There is still an on-going debate about how OA journals should be operated, and the volunteer model used by many such ‘indie’ journals has been proposed as a viable alternative to the model adopted by big professional publishers where publishing activities are funded by authors paying expensive article processing charges (APCs). Our longitudinal quantitative study of 250 ‘indie’ OA journals founded prior to 2002, showed that 51% of these journals were still in operation in 2014 and that the median number of articles published per year had risen from 11 to 18 among the survivors. Of these surviving journals, only 8% had started collecting APCs. A more detailed qualitative case study of five such journals provided insights into how such journals have tried to ensure the continuity and longevity of operations. PMID:27190709

  20. Librarians and Libraries Supporting Open Access Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Jennifer; Koufogiannakis, Denise; Ryan, Pam

    2009-01-01

    As new models of scholarly communication emerge, librarians and libraries have responded by developing and supporting new methods of storing and providing access to information and by creating new publishing support services. This article will examine the roles of libraries and librarians in developing and supporting open access publishing…

  1. Open Access Publishing - Strengths and Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The journal crisis and the demand for free accessibility to the results of publicly funded research were the main drivers of the Open Access movement since the late 1990's. Besides many academic institutions that support the different ways of Open Access publishing, there is a growing number of publishing houses that are specialized on this new access and business model of scholarly literature. The lecture provides an overview of the different kinds of Open Access publishing, discusses the variety of underlying business models, names the advantages and potentials for researches and the public, and overcomes some objections against Open Access. Besides the increased visibility and information supply, the topic of copyrights and exploitation rights will be discussed. Furthermore, it is a central aim of the presentation to show that Open Access does not only support full peer-review, but also provides the potential for even enhanced quality assurance. The financing of business models based on open accessible literature is another important part to be outlined in the lecture.

  2. The ethics of open access publishing.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael

    2013-03-22

    Should those who work on ethics welcome or resist moves to open access publishing? This paper analyses arguments in favour and against the increasing requirement for open access publishing and considers their implications for bioethics research. In the context of biomedical science, major funders are increasingly mandating open access as a condition of funding and such moves are also common in other disciplines. Whilst there has been some debate about the implications of open-access for the social sciences and humanities, there has been little if any discussion about the implications of open access for ethics. This is surprising given both the central role of public reason and critique in ethics and the fact that many of the arguments made for and against open access have been couched in moral terms. In what follows I argue that those who work in ethics have a strong interest in supporting moves towards more open publishing approaches which have the potential both to inform and promote richer and more diverse forms of public deliberation and to be enriched by them. The importance of public deliberation in practical and applied ethics suggests that ethicists have a particular interest in the promotion of diverse and experimental forms of publication and debate and in supporting new, more creative and more participatory approaches to publication.

  3. Publisher's Note: EPL and Open Access Articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancarani, Barbara; Brassac, Catherine; Burr, Frédéric; Dose, Volker; King, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    In May 2007 the EPLA Board of Directors welcomed the CERN initiative for the creation of a Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics (SCOAP3) and agreed to enter into negotiations to enable high energy physics papers to be published in EPL with selective open access. At a subsequent meeting in August 2007, the Board decided to offer substantial initial discount while open access remained a small fraction of the content of EPL. A necessary precursor to negotiation with SCOAP3 is a general open access policy. The Directors agreed that this policy should offer a free-to-read option for all authors in all sections of EPL and so provide fair opportunities across the broad range of physics covered by EPL. The policy for the journal should allow individual authors, their institutions, funding agencies or sponsoring consortia to pay for published articles to be freely available to all, permanently. The Board stressed the importance of maintaining EPL as a refereed journal with robust and reliable content, in contrast to a repository or preprint server. EPL would remain a subscription journal for content that is not free to read and authors, institutions or funding agencies may choose to pay for their articles to be open access. As an initial step in this open access venture, a single-article fee of € 1000 ( 1330) can now be paid by individuals who choose to have their article published free to all. This pricing, which is substantially discounted, ensures that EPL remains competitive with other similar journals. EPL will continue to ensure this policy is sustainable although the journal must remain financially viable and the pricing scheme will be under continual review. At this stage we welcome enquires concerning an institutional membership fee that would allow that institute to pay in advance for open access publications in EPL for authors from that institute. The fee would follow a band structure, based on the number of articles that

  4. Quantum game theory and open access publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Bernius, Steffen; Dugall, Berndt

    2007-08-01

    The digital revolution of the information age and in particular the sweeping changes of scientific communication brought about by computing and novel communication technology, potentiate global, high grade scientific information for free. The arXiv, for example, is the leading scientific communication platform, mainly for mathematics and physics, where everyone in the world has free access on. While in some scientific disciplines the open access way is successfully realized, other disciplines (e.g. humanities and social sciences) dwell on the traditional path, even though many scientists belonging to these communities approve the open access principle. In this paper we try to explain these different publication patterns by using a game theoretical approach. Based on the assumption, that the main goal of scientists is the maximization of their reputation, we model different possible game settings, namely a zero sum game, the prisoners’ dilemma case and a version of the stag hunt game, that show the dilemma of scientists belonging to “non-open access communities”. From an individual perspective, they have no incentive to deviate from the Nash equilibrium of traditional publishing. By extending the model using the quantum game theory approach it can be shown, that if the strength of entanglement exceeds a certain value, the scientists will overcome the dilemma and terminate to publish only traditionally in all three settings.

  5. Publishing in Open Access Education Journals: The Authors' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonin, Bryna; Younce, Leigh M.

    2010-01-01

    Open access publishing is now an accepted method of scholarly communication. However, the greatest traction for open access publishing thus far has been in the sciences. Penetration of open access publishing has been much slower among the social sciences. This study surveys 309 authors from recent issues of open access journals in education to…

  6. Medical Publishing Triage – Chronicling Predatory Open Access Publishers

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    This editorial examines the problem of predatory publishers and how they have negatively affected scholarly communication. Society relies on high-quality, peer-reviewed articles for public policy, legal cases, and improving the public health. Researchers need to be aware of how predatory publishers operate and need to avoid falling into their traps. The editorial examines the recent history of predatory publishers and how they have become prominent in the world of scholarly journals. PMID:25737780

  7. Open access: changing global science publishing

    PubMed Central

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Kitas, George D.

    2013-01-01

    The article reflects on open access as a strategy of changing the quality of science communication globally. Successful examples of open-access journals are presented to highlight implications of archiving in open digital repositories for the quality and citability of research output. Advantages and downsides of gold, green, and hybrid models of open access operating in diverse scientific environments are described. It is assumed that open access is a global trend which influences the workflow in scholarly journals, changing their quality, credibility, and indexability. PMID:23986284

  8. Open access: changing global science publishing.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Kitas, George D

    2013-08-01

    The article reflects on open access as a strategy of changing the quality of science communication globally. Successful examples of open-access journals are presented to highlight implications of archiving in open digital repositories for the quality and citability of research output. Advantages and downsides of gold, green, and hybrid models of open access operating in diverse scientific environments are described. It is assumed that open access is a global trend which influences the workflow in scholarly journals, changing their quality, credibility, and indexability.

  9. The future of academic publishing: what is open access?

    PubMed

    Collins, Jannette

    2005-04-01

    For more than 200 years, publishers have been charging users (i.e., subscribers) for access to scientific information to make a profit. Authors have been required to grant copyright ownership to the publisher. This system was not questioned until the Internet popularized electronic publishing. The Internet allows for rapid dissemination of information to millions of readers. Some people have seen this as an opportunity to revolutionize the system of scientific publishing and to make it one that provides free, open access to all scientific information to all persons everywhere in the world. Such systems have been launched and have instigated a wave of dialogue among proponents and opponents alike. At the center of the controversy is the issue of who will pay for the costs of publishing, because an open-access system is not free, and this threatens the backbone of the traditional publishing industry. Currently, open-access publishers charge authors a fee to have their articles published. Because of this and the uncertainty of the sustainability of the open-access system, some authors are hesitant to participate in the new system. This article reviews the events that led to the creation of open-access publishing, the arguments for and against it, and the implications of open access for the future of academic publishing.

  10. Publishing in Discipline-Specific Open Access Journals: Opportunities and Outreach for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomaszewski, Robert; Poulin, Sonia; MacDonald, Karen I.

    2013-01-01

    Open access (OA) journals promote the opportunity for peer-reviewed journal articles to be freely accessible. In recent years, the number of OA journals has exploded in all disciplines. Previous studies have identified print-based pedagogical discipline-specific journals outside the field of Library and Information Science (LIS) for librarians to…

  11. Open Access Publishing in Indian Premier Research Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhat, Mohammad Hanief

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Publishing research findings in open access journals is a means of enhancing visibility and consequently increasing the impact of publications. This study provides an overview of open access publishing in premier research institutes of India. Method: The publication output of each institution from 2003 to 2007 was ascertained through…

  12. Publishing in open access era: focus on respiratory journals.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ni; Xu, Dingyao; Zhong, Xiyao; Li, Li; Ling, Qibo; Bu, Zhaode

    2014-05-01

    We have entered an open access publishing era. The impact and significance of open access is still under debate after two decades of evolution. Open access journals benefit researchers and the general public by promoting visibility, sharing and communicating. Non-mainstream journals should turn the challenge of open access into opportunity of presenting best research articles to the global readership. Open access journals need to optimize their business models to promote the healthy and continuous development.

  13. Rejected Manuscripts in Publishers' Archives: Legal Rights and Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburger, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on an analysis of how various archival repositories deal with rejected manuscripts in publishers' archives as part of existing collections and as potential donations, and includes suggestions for ways to provide access while maintaining the author's legal rights. Viewpoints from the journal editor, author, archivist, and…

  14. High Drama Marks Hearing over Free Access to Published Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    A life-and-death battle is going on over public access to federally financed research--life for taxpayers and many scientists, and death for publishers. Or so each side claims. That battle, whose outcome will affect many university researchers, kicked into high gear on Capitol Hill on September 11, as the combatants debated the merits of a bill…

  15. Authors attain comparable or slightly higher rates of citation publishing in an open access journal (CytoJournal) compared to traditional cytopathology journals - A five year (2007-2011) experience

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Nora K.; Nathan, Romil; Ahmed, Yasin K.; Shidham, Vinod B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The era of Open Access (OA) publication, a platform which serves to better disseminate scientific knowledge, is upon us, as more OA journals are in existence than ever before. The idea that peer-reviewed OA publication leads to higher rates of citation has been put forth and shown to be true in several publications. This is a significant benefit to authors and is in addition to another relatively less obvious but highly critical component of the OA charter, i.e. retention of the copyright by the authors in the public domain. In this study, we analyzed the citation rates of OA and traditional non-OA publications specifically for authors in the field of cytopathology. Design: We compared the citation patterns for authors who had published in both OA and traditional non-OA peer-reviewed, scientific, cytopathology journals. Citations in an OA publication (CytoJournal) were analyzed comparatively with traditional non-OA cytopathology journals (Acta Cytologica, Cancer Cytopathology, Cytopathology, and Diagnostic Cytopathology) using the data from web of science citation analysis site (based on which the impact factors (IF) are calculated). After comparing citations per publication, as well as a time adjusted citation quotient (which takes into account the time since publication), we also analyzed the statistics after excluding the data for meeting abstracts. Results: Total 28 authors published 314 publications as articles and meeting abstracts (25 authors after excluding the abstracts). The rate of citation and time adjusted citation quotient were higher for OA in the group where abstracts were included (P < 0.05 for both). The rates were also slightly higher for OA than non-OA when the meeting abstracts were excluded, but the difference was statistically insignificant (P = 0.57 and P = 0.45). Conclusion We observed that for the same author, the publications in the OA journal attained a higher rate of citation than the publications in the traditional non-OA

  16. Pay Big to Publish Fast: Academic Journal Rackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truth, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In the context of open-access (OA) academic publishing, the mounting pressure cross global academe to publish or perish has spawned an exponentially growing number of dodgy academic e-journals charging high fees to authors, often US$300-650, and even triple that amount, promising super-fast processing and publication open-access (OA) online.…

  17. Education Scholars' Perceptions and Practices toward Open Access Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellingford, Lori Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Although open access publishing has been available since 1998, we know little regarding scholars' perceptions and practices toward publishing in open access outlets, especially in the social science community. Open access publishing has been slow to penetrate the field of education, yet the potential impact of open access could make this…

  18. International Development and Research Capacities: Increasing Access to African Scholarly Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Amy Scott; Esseh, Samuel; Willinsky, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the evolving relationship between Canada and the African academic research community through the promotion of a concept known as Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) and with an eye to its implications for increasing the circulation of research through such means as open access (OA) publishing…

  19. How To Promote Data Quality And Access? Publish It!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. J.; Pfeiffenberger, H.

    2011-12-01

    Started during IPY 2007-2008, the Earth System Science Data journal (Copernicus) has now 'tested the waters' of earth system data publishing for approximately 2 years with some success. The journal has published more than 30 data sets, of remarkable breadth and variety, all under a Creative Commons Attribution license. Users can now find well-described, quality-controlled and freely accessible data on soils, permafrost, sediment transport, ice sheets, surface radiation, ocean-atmosphere fluxes, ocean chemistry, gravity fields, and combined radar and web cam observations of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption plume. Several of the data sets derive specifically from IPY or from polar regions, but a large portion, including a substantial special issue on ocean carbon, cover broad temporal and geographic domains; the contributors themselves come from leading science institutions around the world. ESSD has attracted the particular interest of international research teams, particularly those who, as in the case of ocean carbon data, have spent many years gathering, collating and calibrating global data sets under long-term named programs, but who lack within those programs the mechanisms to distribute those data sets widely outside their specialist teams and to ensure proper citation credit for those remarkable collaborative data processing efforts. An in-progress special issue on global ocean plankton function types, again representing years of international data collaboration, provides a further example of ESSD utility to large research programs. We anticipate an interesting test case of parallel special issues with companion science journals - data sets in ESSD to accompany science publications in a prominent research journal. We see the ESSD practices and products as useful steps to increase quality of and access to important data sets.

  20. Publishers Hire PR Firm to Counter Open-Access Publishing Movement: Former Board of "Topology" Starts a Rival Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan; Monastersky, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Association of American Publishers has hired a public-relations firm with a hard-hitting reputation to respond to the open-access-publishing movement, which campaigns for scientific results to be made freely available to the public. The firm, Dezenhall Resources, designs aggressive public-relations campaigns to counter activist groups. The…

  1. Status of open access in the biomedical field in 2005*†

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Mamiko; Kurata, Keiko; Sakai, Yukiko; Morioka, Tomoko; Kato, Shinya; Mine, Shinji; Ueda, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to document the state of open access (OA) in the biomedical field in 2005. Methods: PubMed was used to collect bibliographic data on target articles published in 2005. PubMed, Google Scholar, Google, and OAIster were then used to establish the availability of free full text online for these publications. Articles were analyzed by type of OA, country, type of article, impact factor, publisher, and publishing model to provide insight into the current state of OA. Results: Twenty-seven percent of all the articles were accessible as OA articles. More than 70% of the OA articles were provided through journal websites. Mid-rank commercial publishers often provided OA articles in OA journals, while society publishers tended to provide OA articles in the context of a traditional subscription model. The rate of OA articles available from the websites of individual authors or in institutional repositories was quite low. Discussion/Conclusions: In 2005, OA in the biomedical field was achieved under an umbrella of existing scholarly communication systems. Typically, OA articles were published as part of subscription journals published by scholarly societies. OA journals published by BioMed Central contributed to a small portion of all OA articles. PMID:19159007

  2. Characteristics of Open Access Journals in Six Subject Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, William H.; Linvill, Anne C.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the characteristics of 663 Open Access (OA) journals in biology, computer science, economics, history, medicine, and psychology, then compare the OA journals with impact factors to comparable subscription journals. There is great variation in the size of OA journals; the largest publishes more than 2,700 articles per year, but half…

  3. Maximizing Accessibility of Academic Publications: Applications of Electronic Publishing Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffress, Laura; Lyle, Stacey D.

    2012-01-01

    Professors at higher education institutions often feel pressure to "publish or perish" in order to maintain their standing in the academic community, yet a large number of these publications languish in obscure technical journals or are presented only once at a conference or online journal. While these methods achieve the goal of…

  4. Scientific Journal Publishing: Yearly Volume and Open Access Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjork, Bo-Christer; Roos, Annikki; Lauri, Mari

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We estimate the total yearly volume of peer-reviewed scientific journal articles published world-wide as well as the share of these articles available openly on the Web either directly or as copies in e-print repositories. Method: We rely on data from two commercial databases (ISI and Ulrich's Periodicals Directory) supplemented by…

  5. Perspective on Open-Access Publishing: An Interview with Peter Suber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornwell, Reid; Suber, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In this edition of Perspectives, Reid Cornwell discusses open-access publishing with Peter Suber, senior researcher at the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, senior research professor of philosophy at Earlham College, and currently visiting fellow at Yale Law School. Open access means that scholarly work is freely and openly…

  6. Open Access Publishing Trend Analysis: Statistics beyond the Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poltronieri, Elisabetta; Bravo, Elena; Curti, Moreno; Maurizio Ferri,; Mancini, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this analysis was twofold: to track the number of open access journals acquiring impact factor, and to investigate the distribution of subject categories pertaining to these journals. As a case study, journals in which the researchers of the National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità) in Italy have…

  7. Measuring, Rating, Supporting, and Strengthening Open Access Scholarly Publishing in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neto, Silvio Carvalho; Willinsky, John; Alperin, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the extent and nature of open access scholarly publishing in Brazil, one of the world's leaders in providing universal access to its research and scholarship. It utilizes Brazil's Qualis journal evaluation system, along with other relevant data bases to address the association between scholarly quality and open access in the…

  8. Globalization, Open Access Publishing, and the Disappearance of Print: Threat or Opportunity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, J. J.

    Academic publishing is changing rapidly as a result of mutually dependent developments. Electronic publishing was born through the emergence of the Internet. The Internet has accelerated globalization, which in turn has enhanced the consolidation of commercial publishing houses and the collaboration between libraries. Old business models are being replaced by new business models, such as open access publishing. The familiar print format is disappearing for journals and perhaps for books. This chapter presents an overview of these developments and addresses potential threats and opportunities to the parties involved in publishing.

  9. Open access, library and publisher competition, and the evolution of general commerce.

    PubMed

    Odlyzko, Andrew M

    2015-02-01

    Discussions of the economics of scholarly communication are usually devoted to Open Access, rising journal prices, publisher profits, and boycotts. That ignores what seems a much more important development in this market. Publishers, through the oft-reviled Big Deal packages, are providing much greater and more egalitarian access to the journal literature, an approximation to true Open Access. In the process, they are also marginalizing libraries and obtaining a greater share of the resources going into scholarly communication. This is enabling a continuation of publisher profits as well as of what for decades has been called "unsustainable journal price escalation." It is also inhibiting the spread of Open Access and potentially leading to an oligopoly of publishers controlling distribution through large-scale licensing. The Big Deal practices are worth studying for several general reasons. The degree to which publishers succeed in diminishing the role of libraries may be an indicator of the degree and speed at which universities transform themselves. More importantly, these Big Deals appear to point the way to the future of the whole economy, where progress is characterized by declining privacy, increasing price discrimination, increasing opaqueness in pricing, increasing reliance on low-paid or unpaid work of others for profits, and business models that depend on customer inertia.

  10. Open access, library and publisher competition, and the evolution of general commerce.

    PubMed

    Odlyzko, Andrew M

    2015-02-01

    Discussions of the economics of scholarly communication are usually devoted to Open Access, rising journal prices, publisher profits, and boycotts. That ignores what seems a much more important development in this market. Publishers, through the oft-reviled Big Deal packages, are providing much greater and more egalitarian access to the journal literature, an approximation to true Open Access. In the process, they are also marginalizing libraries and obtaining a greater share of the resources going into scholarly communication. This is enabling a continuation of publisher profits as well as of what for decades has been called "unsustainable journal price escalation." It is also inhibiting the spread of Open Access and potentially leading to an oligopoly of publishers controlling distribution through large-scale licensing. The Big Deal practices are worth studying for several general reasons. The degree to which publishers succeed in diminishing the role of libraries may be an indicator of the degree and speed at which universities transform themselves. More importantly, these Big Deals appear to point the way to the future of the whole economy, where progress is characterized by declining privacy, increasing price discrimination, increasing opaqueness in pricing, increasing reliance on low-paid or unpaid work of others for profits, and business models that depend on customer inertia. PMID:24699504

  11. Publishers' PR Tactic Angers University Presses and Open-Access Advocates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on reactions to the Association of American Publishers' new public-relations campaign, which has upset many university presses and research librarians, as well as open-access advocates. The effort, known as the "Partnership for Research Integrity in Science & Medicine," or Prism, is the latest tactic in a continuing…

  12. Patterns of citations of open access and non-open access conservation biology journal papers and book chapters.

    PubMed

    Calver, Michael C; Bradley, J Stuart

    2010-06-01

    Open access (OA) publishing, whereby authors, their institutions, or their granting bodies pay or provide a repository through which peer-reviewed work is available online for free, is championed as a model to increase the number of citations per paper and disseminate results widely, especially to researchers in developing countries. We compared the number of citations of OA and non-OA papers in six journals and four books published since 2000 to test whether OA increases number of citations overall and increases citations made by authors in developing countries. After controlling for type of paper (e.g., review or research paper), length of paper, authors' citation profiles, number of authors per paper, and whether the author or the publisher released the paper in OA, OA had no statistically significant influence on the overall number of citations per journal paper. Journal papers were cited more frequently if the authors had published highly cited papers previously, were members of large teams of authors, or published relatively long papers, but papers were not cited more frequently if they were published in an OA source. Nevertheless, author-archived OA book chapters accrued up to eight times more citations than chapters in the same book that were not available through OA, perhaps because there is no online abstracting service for book chapters. There was also little evidence that journal papers or book chapters published in OA received more citations from authors in developing countries relative to those journal papers or book chapters not published in OA. For scholarly publications in conservation biology, only book chapters had an OA citation advantage, and OA did not increase the number of citations papers or chapters received from authors in developing countries.

  13. Scholarly Publishing's Evolving Landscape: Impact Metrics, Electronic-Only Journals, and Open Access in Journalism and Communication Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antell, Karen; Foote, Joe S.; Foote, Jody Bales

    2016-01-01

    This study surveys the landscape of scholarly publishing, with particular emphasis on scholarly journals in the communication discipline, measuring the shift to electronic publishing in six selected disciplines and exploring two other important emerging topics: open-access publishing and new journal citation metrics. The goals are to inform…

  14. Using Open and Interoperable Ways to Publish and Access LANCE AIRS Near-Real Time Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Lynnes, C.; Vollmer, B.; Savtchenko, A. K.; Yang, W.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Near-Real Time (NRT) data from the Land Atmosphere Near real time Capability for EOS (LANCE) provide the information on the global and regional atmospheric state with very low latency. An open and interoperable platform is useful to facilitate access to and integration of LANCE AIRS NRT data. This paper discusses the use of open-source software components to build Web services for publishing and accessing AIRS NRT data in the context of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). The AIRS NRT data have also been made available through an OPeNDAP server. OPeNDAP allows several open-source netCDF-based tools such as Integrated Data Viewer, Ferret and Panoply to directly display the Level 2 data over the network. To enable users to locate swath data files in the OPeNDAP server that lie within a certain geographical area, graphical "granule maps" are being added to show the outline of each file on a map of the Earth. The metadata of AIRS NRT data and services is then explored to implement information advertisement and discovery in catalogue systems. Datacasting, an RSS-based technology for accessing Earth Science data and information to facilitate the subscriptions to AIRS NRT data availability, filtering, downloading and viewing data, is also discussed. To provide an easy entry point to AIRS NRT data and services, a Web portal designed for customized data downloading and visualization is introduced.

  15. [Medical journals and open access].

    PubMed

    Sember, Marijan

    2008-01-01

    The open access (OA) or the idea of a free access to scholarly literature published in electronic form has been already well established in the field of medicine. Medline has already been free for a decade, PubMed Central has been growing steadily. The global crisis of the scientific publishing, becoming increasingly dominated by multinational companies and constant increase of journal prices have moved to action not only individuals and institutions but governments and research charities too. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the main open access initiatives and resources in biomedicine (PubMed, PubMed Central, BioMed Central, PLoS). The OA pros and cons are briefly discussed emphasizing the benefits of OA to medical research and practice. PMID:18792564

  16. 38 CFR 1.552 - Public access to information that affects the public when not published in the Federal Register...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirement. (b) When publishing or making available to the public any opinion, order, statement of policy... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public access to information that affects the public when not published in the Federal Register as constructive notice....

  17. 28 CFR Appendix D to Part 36 - 1991 Standards for Accessible Design as Originally Published on July 26, 1991

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Originally Published on July 26, 1991 D Appendix D to Part 36 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY BY PUBLIC ACCOMMODATIONS AND IN COMMERCIAL FACILITIES Pt. 36, App. D Appendix D to Part 36—1991 Standards for Accessible Design as Originally Published on July 26,...

  18. 28 CFR Appendix D to Part 36 - 1991 Standards for Accessible Design as Originally Published on July 26, 1991

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Originally Published on July 26, 1991 D Appendix D to Part 36 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY BY PUBLIC ACCOMMODATIONS AND IN COMMERCIAL FACILITIES Pt. 36, App. D Appendix D to Part 36—1991 Standards for Accessible Design as Originally Published on July 26,...

  19. Standardised online data access and publishing for Earth Systems and Climate data in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Druken, K. A.; Trenham, C.; Wang, J.; Wyborn, L. A.; Smillie, J.; Allen, C.; Porter, D.

    2015-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) hosts Australia's largest repository (10+ PB) of research data collections spanning a wide range of fields from climate, coasts, oceans, and geophysics through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and the social sciences. Spatial scales range from global to local ultra-high resolution, requiring storage volumes from MB to PB. The data have been organised to be highly connected to both the NCI HPC and cloud resources (e.g., interactive visualisation and analysis environments). Researchers can login to utilise the high performance infrastructure for these data collections, or access the data via standards-based web services. Our aim is to provide a trusted platform to support interdisciplinary research across all the collections as well as services for use of the data within individual communities. We thus cater to a wide range of researcher needs, whilst needing to maintain a consistent approach to data management and publishing. All research data collections hosted at NCI are governed by a data management plan, prior to being published through a variety of platforms and web services such as OPeNDAP, HTTP, and WMS. The data management plan ensures the use of standard formats (when available) that comply with relevant data conventions (e.g., CF-Convention) and metadata standards (e.g., ISO19115). Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) can be minted at NCI and assigned to datasets and collections. Large scale data growth and use in a variety of research fields has led to a rise in, and acceptance of, open spatial data formats such as NetCDF4/HDF5, prompting a need to extend these data conventions to fields such as geophysics and satellite Earth observations. The fusion of DOI-minted data that is discoverable and accessible via metadata and web services, creates a complete picture of data hosting, discovery, use, and citation. This enables standardised and reproducible data analysis.

  20. Using Open and Interoperable Ways to Publish and Access LANCE AIRS Near-Real Time Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Peisheng; Lynnes, Christopher; Vollmer, Bruce; Savtchenko, Andrey; Theobald, Michael; Yang, Wenli

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Near-Real Time (NRT) data from the Land Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) element at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) provides information on the global and regional atmospheric state, with very low temporal latency, to support climate research and improve weather forecasting. An open and interoperable platform is useful to facilitate access to, and integration of, LANCE AIRS NRT data. As Web services technology has matured in recent years, a new scalable Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is emerging as the basic platform for distributed computing and large networks of interoperable applications. Following the provide-register-discover-consume SOA paradigm, this presentation discusses how to use open-source geospatial software components to build Web services for publishing and accessing AIRS NRT data, explore the metadata relevant to registering and discovering data and services in the catalogue systems, and implement a Web portal to facilitate users' consumption of the data and services.

  1. Open Access to the Scientific Journal Literature: Situation 2009

    PubMed Central

    Björk, Bo-Christer; Welling, Patrik; Laakso, Mikael; Majlender, Peter; Hedlund, Turid; Guðnason, Guðni

    2010-01-01

    Background The Internet has recently made possible the free global availability of scientific journal articles. Open Access (OA) can occur either via OA scientific journals, or via authors posting manuscripts of articles published in subscription journals in open web repositories. So far there have been few systematic studies showing how big the extent of OA is, in particular studies covering all fields of science. Methodology/Principal Findings The proportion of peer reviewed scholarly journal articles, which are available openly in full text on the web, was studied using a random sample of 1837 titles and a web search engine. Of articles published in 2008, 8,5% were freely available at the publishers' sites. For an additional 11,9% free manuscript versions could be found using search engines, making the overall OA percentage 20,4%. Chemistry (13%) had the lowest overall share of OA, Earth Sciences (33%) the highest. In medicine, biochemistry and chemistry publishing in OA journals was more common. In all other fields author-posted manuscript copies dominated the picture. Conclusions/Significance The results show that OA already has a significant positive impact on the availability of the scientific journal literature and that there are big differences between scientific disciplines in the uptake. Due to the lack of awareness of OA-publishing among scientists in most fields outside physics, the results should be of general interest to all scholars. The results should also interest academic publishers, who need to take into account OA in their business strategies and copyright policies, as well as research funders, who like the NIH are starting to require OA availability of results from research projects they fund. The method and search tools developed also offer a good basis for more in-depth studies as well as longitudinal studies. PMID:20585653

  2. Taking the Plunge: Open Access at the "Canadian Journal of Sociology." Case Studies in Open Access Publishing. Number Five

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggerty, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Presents a personal account of the transfer to open access of the leading Canadian journal of sociology. Background: The Canadian Journal of Sociology had established a strong position, internationally, among sociology journals. However, subscriptions were falling as readers increasingly accessed the resource through libraries and a…

  3. A Bibliometric Study of Scholarly Articles Published by Library and Information Science Authors about Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandbois, Jennifer; Beheshti, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to gain a greater understanding of the development of open access practices amongst library and information science authors, since their role is integral to the success of the broader open access movement. Method: Data were collected from scholarly articles about open access by library and information science authors…

  4. Open Access on a Zero Budget: A Case Study of "Postcolonial Text": Case Studies in Open Access Publishing. Number Three

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willinsky, John; Mendis, Ranjini

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The founding of a new open access journal is described in terms of its use of the open source software Open Journal Systems, its contribution to a new field of inquiry and its ability to operate on a zero budget in terms of regular expenses. Method: A case study method is deployed describing the circumstances of the journal's…

  5. The Post-Embargo Open Access Citation Advantage: It Exists (Probably), Its Modest (Usually), and the Rich Get Richer (of Course).

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Many studies show that open access (OA) articles-articles from scholarly journals made freely available to readers without requiring subscription fees-are downloaded, and presumably read, more often than closed access/subscription-only articles. Assertions that OA articles are also cited more often generate more controversy. Confounding factors (authors may self-select only the best articles to make OA; absence of an appropriate control group of non-OA articles with which to compare citation figures; conflation of pre-publication vs. published/publisher versions of articles, etc.) make demonstrating a real citation difference difficult. This study addresses those factors and shows that an open access citation advantage as high as 19% exists, even when articles are embargoed during some or all of their prime citation years. Not surprisingly, better (defined as above median) articles gain more when made OA. PMID:27548723

  6. The Post-Embargo Open Access Citation Advantage: It Exists (Probably), It’s Modest (Usually), and the Rich Get Richer (of Course)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many studies show that open access (OA) articles—articles from scholarly journals made freely available to readers without requiring subscription fees—are downloaded, and presumably read, more often than closed access/subscription-only articles. Assertions that OA articles are also cited more often generate more controversy. Confounding factors (authors may self-select only the best articles to make OA; absence of an appropriate control group of non-OA articles with which to compare citation figures; conflation of pre-publication vs. published/publisher versions of articles, etc.) make demonstrating a real citation difference difficult. This study addresses those factors and shows that an open access citation advantage as high as 19% exists, even when articles are embargoed during some or all of their prime citation years. Not surprisingly, better (defined as above median) articles gain more when made OA. PMID:27548723

  7. Current state of open access to journal publications from the University of Zagreb School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Škorić, Lea; Vrkić, Dina; Petrak, Jelka

    2016-01-01

    Aims To identify the share of open access (OA) papers in the total number of journal publications authored by the members of the University of Zagreb School of Medicine (UZSM) in 2014. Methods Bibliographic data on 543 UZSM papers published in 2014 were collected using PubMed advanced search strategies and manual data collection methods. The items that had “free full text” icons were considered as gold OA papers. Their OA availability was checked using the provided link to full-text. The rest of the UZSM papers were analyzed for potential green OA through self-archiving in institutional repository. Papers published by Croatian journals were particularly analyzed. Results Full texts of approximately 65% of all UZSM papers were freely available. Most of them were published in gold OA journals (55% of all UZSM papers or 85% of all UZSM OA papers). In the UZSM repository, there were additional 52 freely available authors’ manuscripts from subscription-based journals (10% of all UZSM papers or 15% of all UZSM OA papers). Conclusion The overall proportion of OA in our study is higher than in similar studies, but only half of gold OA papers are accessible via PubMed directly. The results of our study indicate that increased quality of metadata and linking of the bibliographic records to full texts could assure better visibility. Moreover, only a quarter of papers from subscription-based journals that allow self-archiving are deposited in the UZSM repository. We believe that UZSM should consider mandating all faculty members to deposit their publications in UZSM OA repository to increase visibility and improve access to its scientific output. PMID:26935617

  8. Be Creative, Determined, and Wise: Open Library Publishing and the Global South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Libraries throughout the world are increasingly involved in the production of scholarly publications. Much of this has been thanks to the growth of open access (OA) publishing in all its forms, from peer-reviewed "gold" journals to "green" self-archiving, and electronic theses and dissertation (ETD) repositories. As a result, more and more of the…

  9. A Study of Innovative Features in Scholarly Open Access Journals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence of the Internet has triggered tremendous changes in the publication of scientific peer-reviewed journals. Today, journals are usually available in parallel electronic versions, but the way the peer-review process works, the look of articles and journals, and the rigid and slow publication schedules have remained largely unchanged, at least for the vast majority of subscription-based journals. Those publishing firms and scholarly publishers who have chosen the more radical option of open access (OA), in which the content of journals is freely accessible to anybody with Internet connectivity, have had a much bigger degree of freedom to experiment with innovations. Objective The objective was to study how open access journals have experimented with innovations concerning ways of organizing the peer review, the format of journals and articles, new interactive and media formats, and novel publishing revenue models. Methods The features of 24 open access journals were studied. The journals were chosen in a nonrandom manner from the approximately 7000 existing OA journals based on available information about interesting journals and include both representative cases and highly innovative outlier cases. Results Most early OA journals in the 1990s were founded by individual scholars and used a business model based on voluntary work close in spirit to open-source development of software. In the next wave, many long-established journals, in particular society journals and journals from regions such as Latin America, made their articles OA when they started publishing parallel electronic versions. From about 2002 on, newly founded professional OA publishing firms using article-processing charges to fund their operations have emerged. Over the years, there have been several experiments with new forms of peer review, media enhancements, and the inclusion of structured data sets with articles. In recent years, the growth of OA publishing has also been

  10. 10 years experience with pioneering open access publishing in health informatics: the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR).

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2010-01-01

    Peer-reviewed journals remain important vehicles for knowledge transfer and dissemination in health informatics, yet, their format, processes and business models are changing only slowly. Up to the end of last century, it was common for individual researchers and scientific organizations to leave the business of knowledge transfer to professional publishers, signing away their rights to the works in the process, which in turn impeded wider dissemination. Traditional medical informatics journals are poorly cited and the visibility and uptake of articles beyond the medical informatics community remain limited. In 1999, the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR; http://www.jmir.org) was launched, featuring several innovations including 1) ownership and copyright retained by the authors, 2) electronic-only, "lean" non-for-profit publishing, 3) openly accessible articles with a reversed business model (author pays instead of reader pays), 4) technological innovations such as automatic XML tagging and reference checking, on-the-fly PDF generation from XML, etc., enabling wide distribution in various bibliographic and full-text databases. In the past 10 years, despite limited resources, the journal has emerged as a leading journal in health informatics, and is presently ranked the top journal in the medical informatics and health services research categories by impact factor. The paper summarizes some of the features of the Journal, and uses bibliometric and access data to compare the influence of the Journal on the discipline of medical informatics and other disciplines. While traditional medical informatics journals are primarily cited by other Medical Informatics journals (33%-46% of citations), JMIR papers are to a more often cited by "end-users" (policy, public health, clinical journals), which may be partly attributable to the "open access advantage". PMID:20841900

  11. 10 years experience with pioneering open access publishing in health informatics: the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR).

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2010-01-01

    Peer-reviewed journals remain important vehicles for knowledge transfer and dissemination in health informatics, yet, their format, processes and business models are changing only slowly. Up to the end of last century, it was common for individual researchers and scientific organizations to leave the business of knowledge transfer to professional publishers, signing away their rights to the works in the process, which in turn impeded wider dissemination. Traditional medical informatics journals are poorly cited and the visibility and uptake of articles beyond the medical informatics community remain limited. In 1999, the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR; http://www.jmir.org) was launched, featuring several innovations including 1) ownership and copyright retained by the authors, 2) electronic-only, "lean" non-for-profit publishing, 3) openly accessible articles with a reversed business model (author pays instead of reader pays), 4) technological innovations such as automatic XML tagging and reference checking, on-the-fly PDF generation from XML, etc., enabling wide distribution in various bibliographic and full-text databases. In the past 10 years, despite limited resources, the journal has emerged as a leading journal in health informatics, and is presently ranked the top journal in the medical informatics and health services research categories by impact factor. The paper summarizes some of the features of the Journal, and uses bibliometric and access data to compare the influence of the Journal on the discipline of medical informatics and other disciplines. While traditional medical informatics journals are primarily cited by other Medical Informatics journals (33%-46% of citations), JMIR papers are to a more often cited by "end-users" (policy, public health, clinical journals), which may be partly attributable to the "open access advantage".

  12. Discriminating Between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee

    PubMed Central

    Hansoti, Bhakti; Langdorf, Mark I.; Murphy, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Open access (OA) medical publishing is growing rapidly. While subscription-based publishing does not charge the author, OA does. This opens the door for “predatory” publishers who take authors’ money but provide no substantial peer review or indexing to truly disseminate research findings. Discriminating between predatory and legitimate OA publishers is difficult. Methods We searched a number of library indexing databases that were available to us through the University of California, Irvine Libraries for journals in the field of emergency medicine (EM). Using criteria from Jeffrey Beall, University of Colorado librarian and an expert on predatory publishing, and the Research Committee of the International Federation for EM, we categorized EM journals as legitimate or likely predatory. Results We identified 150 journal titles related to EM from all sources, 55 of which met our criteria for OA (37%, the rest subscription based). Of these 55, 25 (45%) were likely to be predatory. We present lists of clearly legitimate OA journals, and, conversely, likely predatory ones. We present criteria a researcher can use to discriminate between the two. We present the indexing profiles of legitimate EM OA journals, to inform the researcher about degree of dissemination of research findings by journal. Conclusion OA journals are proliferating rapidly. About half in EM are legitimate. The rest take substantial money from unsuspecting, usually junior, researchers and provide no value for true dissemination of findings. Researchers should be educated and aware of scam journals. PMID:27625710

  13. Discriminating Between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee

    PubMed Central

    Hansoti, Bhakti; Langdorf, Mark I.; Murphy, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Open access (OA) medical publishing is growing rapidly. While subscription-based publishing does not charge the author, OA does. This opens the door for “predatory” publishers who take authors’ money but provide no substantial peer review or indexing to truly disseminate research findings. Discriminating between predatory and legitimate OA publishers is difficult. Methods We searched a number of library indexing databases that were available to us through the University of California, Irvine Libraries for journals in the field of emergency medicine (EM). Using criteria from Jeffrey Beall, University of Colorado librarian and an expert on predatory publishing, and the Research Committee of the International Federation for EM, we categorized EM journals as legitimate or likely predatory. Results We identified 150 journal titles related to EM from all sources, 55 of which met our criteria for OA (37%, the rest subscription based). Of these 55, 25 (45%) were likely to be predatory. We present lists of clearly legitimate OA journals, and, conversely, likely predatory ones. We present criteria a researcher can use to discriminate between the two. We present the indexing profiles of legitimate EM OA journals, to inform the researcher about degree of dissemination of research findings by journal. Conclusion OA journals are proliferating rapidly. About half in EM are legitimate. The rest take substantial money from unsuspecting, usually junior, researchers and provide no value for true dissemination of findings. Researchers should be educated and aware of scam journals.

  14. Douglas OA-4A Dolphin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1938-01-01

    Douglas OA-4A Dolphin: This twin-engine Douglas OA-4A Dolphin was unusual in comparison with other OA-4s in that it employed a nose wheel instead of a tail wheel during its NACA testing at Langley. Here is is seen in the NACA hangar in September 1938.

  15. Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities? Findings from a 2011 Survey of Academic Publishers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Marisa L.; Dalton, Joan T.; McMillan, Gail; Read, Max; Seamans, Nancy H.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide are requiring submission of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) by graduate students and are subsequently providing open access to these works in online repositories. Faculty advisors and graduate students are concerned that such unfettered access to their work could diminish…

  16. OneSearch Gives You Access to More Than 7,000 Publishers and Content Providers | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Robin Meckley, Contributing Writer OneSearch, an exciting new resource from the Scientific Library, is now available to the NCI at Frederick community. This new resource provides a quick and easy way to search multiple Scientific Library resources and collections using a single search box for journal articles, books, media, and more. A large central index is compiled from more than 7,000 publishers and content providers outside the library’s holdings.

  17. Facilitating Full-text Access to Biomedical Literature Using Open Access Resources.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongyu; Hou, Zhen; Li, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Open access (OA) resources and local libraries often have their own literature databases, especially in the field of biomedicine. We have developed a method of linking a local library to a biomedical OA resource facilitating researchers' full-text article access. The method uses a model based on vector space to measure similarities between two articles in local library and OA resources. The method achieved an F-score of 99.61%. This method of article linkage and mapping between local library and OA resources is available for use. Through this work, we have improved the full-text access of the biomedical OA resources.

  18. Institutional open access funds: now is the time.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Charles D; Weil, Beth T

    2010-05-01

    To date, the Berkeley OA fund has ensured that 43 articles are free to be read immediately upon publication and 44 additional articles are now in the pipeline. The full scope of OA publishing during this period was significantly larger, at least by a factor of four. The OA fund allocation will continue to be carefully managed over the coming years. We are tracking our potential liability assuming the OA landscape grows with additional publishers and OA options. The amount predicted as necessary to maintain the fund based on the initial 18-month uptake data is US$45,000. This is less than 1% of the US$6.2 million the library invests in subscribing to closed-access digital journals. We are paying attention in particular to the attempts by the California Digital Library, which negotiates major journal publisher licenses on behalf of the UC campuses, to include terms within the licenses that enable UC authors to take advantage of publishers'hybrid OA options [16]. And it comes with far less of the myriad overhead costs associated with those closed-access subscriptions because that subscription price doesn't tell the full story of the actual cost of maintaining the subscription. Those subscriptions involve staff-intensive license negotiations. Institutions develop and maintain systems architectures in order to ensure that only authorized users have access and respond to challenges from publishers of the content when actual or potential breaches of the licenses are identified (publishers invest hugely in monitoring use of their content in order to ensure the license terms are not breached and are quite willing to contact the institutional subscriber when any untoward activity appears on their logs). They must, in certain instances, maintain the confidentiality of certain clauses in the licenses and increasingly respond to freedom of information, public records act requests related to the investments of public resources in those contracts. The need to experiment is

  19. Institutional open access funds: now is the time.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Charles D; Weil, Beth T

    2010-05-25

    To date, the Berkeley OA fund has ensured that 43 articles are free to be read immediately upon publication and 44 additional articles are now in the pipeline. The full scope of OA publishing during this period was significantly larger, at least by a factor of four. The OA fund allocation will continue to be carefully managed over the coming years. We are tracking our potential liability assuming the OA landscape grows with additional publishers and OA options. The amount predicted as necessary to maintain the fund based on the initial 18-month uptake data is US$45,000. This is less than 1% of the US$6.2 million the library invests in subscribing to closed-access digital journals. We are paying attention in particular to the attempts by the California Digital Library, which negotiates major journal publisher licenses on behalf of the UC campuses, to include terms within the licenses that enable UC authors to take advantage of publishers'hybrid OA options [16]. And it comes with far less of the myriad overhead costs associated with those closed-access subscriptions because that subscription price doesn't tell the full story of the actual cost of maintaining the subscription. Those subscriptions involve staff-intensive license negotiations. Institutions develop and maintain systems architectures in order to ensure that only authorized users have access and respond to challenges from publishers of the content when actual or potential breaches of the licenses are identified (publishers invest hugely in monitoring use of their content in order to ensure the license terms are not breached and are quite willing to contact the institutional subscriber when any untoward activity appears on their logs). They must, in certain instances, maintain the confidentiality of certain clauses in the licenses and increasingly respond to freedom of information, public records act requests related to the investments of public resources in those contracts. The need to experiment is

  20. Publishers' Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EPL Management Team

    2008-12-01

    We would like to thank all our contributors, subscribers, reviewers, and readers for their interest in EPL during 2008. You each play an invaluable role in the promotion, prestige, development and success of the journal and therefore your continued support is greatly appreciated. The Directors' vision for EPL to become a leading home for global physics letters, to offer rapid publication of ground-breaking physics results from the international community, and to provide the broadest coverage of physics research, is beginning to take shape as increased submissions, reduced acceptance rates, raised scientific quality, rapid publication, and greater visibility amongst the community are achieved. The latest published articles will continue to be freely available for 30 days from their on-line publication. Those articles highlighted by the Co-Editors in 2008 will remain free-to-all for the entire of 2009. We invite you to visit the website regularly (http://www.epljournal.org) to stay up-to-date with the journal's latest developments and to read the most recent articles. Our most recent opportunity publicized on the EPL website and in the CERN SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics) messages is below: Open Access Opportunity for Authors of Experimental and Theoretical HEP Articles EPL is delighted to offer open access free of charge to all authors submitting experimental and theoretical letters in PACS codes 10 and 20. This offer will remain open until the SCOAP3 agreement at CERN takes effect. Authors submitting any article to EPL will continue to be offered the opportunity to make their published letter open access for a one-off payment. However, with effect from 1 November 2008, any author who submits work related to subject areas within PACS 10 and 20 will benefit from open access at no charge, meaning their published article will be available free to all readers, forever. ``Physics of Elementary Particles and Fields'' and

  1. Osteoarthritis year 2011 in review: imaging in OA--a radiologists' perspective.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, D; Roemer, F W; Guermazi, A

    2012-03-01

    With major technological advances and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to large longitudinal osteoarthritis (OA) studies the role of imaging has become increasingly important for OA research over the last years. Currently, radiography, MRI and ultrasound are the most established imaging tools applied in a research setting. MRI assessment of OA features can be morphologic, compositional and can be applied in non-loaded and loaded conditions. Morphologic assessment includes semiquantitative and quantitative analyses. Novel semiquantitative scoring methods for knee, hip and hand OA using MRI were introduced. A series of key reports were published this year, reviewing the importance of radiography and MRI as a research tool. Although radiography is insensitive for the detection of OA-related structural pathology when compared to MRI, it still has been widely used for subject inclusion in observational and interventional studies due also to a straight forward disease definition that was established more than 50 years ago. In an attempt to generate an MRI-based definition of structural disease, a Delphi exercise was performed to develop a testable MRI definition of structural OA. This presentation reviews publications related to imaging of OA, published in English between September 2010 and October 2011, excluding animal studies or in vitro data. This is not a systematic or comprehensive review and the selection of papers included is based on the expert opinions of the presenter, from a musculoskeletal radiologist's perspective.

  2. A survey of authors publishing in four megajournals.

    PubMed

    Solomon, David J

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine the characteristics of megajournal authors, the nature of the manuscripts they are submitting to these journals, factors influencing their decision to publish in a megajournal, sources of funding for article processing charges (APCs) or other fees and their likelihood of submitting to a megajournal in the future. Methods. Web-based survey of 2,128 authors who recently published in BMJ Open, PeerJ, PLOS ONE or SAGE Open. Results. The response rate ranged from 26% for BMJ Open to 47% for SAGE Open. The authors were international, largely academics who had recently published in both subscription and Open Access (OA) journals. Across journals about 25% of the articles were preliminary findings and just under half were resubmissions of manuscripts rejected by other journals. Editors from other BMJ journals and perhaps to a lesser extent SAGE and PLOS journals appear to be encouraging authors to submit manuscripts that were rejected by the editor's journals to a megajournal published by the same publisher. Quality of the journal and speed of the review process were important factors across all four journals. Impact factor was important for PLOS ONE authors but less so for BMJ Open authors, which also has an impact factor. The review criteria and the fact the journal was OA were other significant factors particularly important for PeerJ authors. The reputation of the publisher was an important factor for SAGE Open and BMJ Open. About half of PLOS ONE and around a third of BMJ Open and PeerJ authors used grant funding for publishing charges while only about 10% of SAGE Open used grant funding for publication charges. Around 60% of SAGE Open and 32% of PeerJ authors self-funded their publication fees however the fees are modest for these journals. The majority of authors from all 4 journals were pleased with their experience and indicated they were likely to submit to the same or similar journal in the future. Conclusions. Megajournals are drawing an

  3. A survey of authors publishing in four megajournals.

    PubMed

    Solomon, David J

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine the characteristics of megajournal authors, the nature of the manuscripts they are submitting to these journals, factors influencing their decision to publish in a megajournal, sources of funding for article processing charges (APCs) or other fees and their likelihood of submitting to a megajournal in the future. Methods. Web-based survey of 2,128 authors who recently published in BMJ Open, PeerJ, PLOS ONE or SAGE Open. Results. The response rate ranged from 26% for BMJ Open to 47% for SAGE Open. The authors were international, largely academics who had recently published in both subscription and Open Access (OA) journals. Across journals about 25% of the articles were preliminary findings and just under half were resubmissions of manuscripts rejected by other journals. Editors from other BMJ journals and perhaps to a lesser extent SAGE and PLOS journals appear to be encouraging authors to submit manuscripts that were rejected by the editor's journals to a megajournal published by the same publisher. Quality of the journal and speed of the review process were important factors across all four journals. Impact factor was important for PLOS ONE authors but less so for BMJ Open authors, which also has an impact factor. The review criteria and the fact the journal was OA were other significant factors particularly important for PeerJ authors. The reputation of the publisher was an important factor for SAGE Open and BMJ Open. About half of PLOS ONE and around a third of BMJ Open and PeerJ authors used grant funding for publishing charges while only about 10% of SAGE Open used grant funding for publication charges. Around 60% of SAGE Open and 32% of PeerJ authors self-funded their publication fees however the fees are modest for these journals. The majority of authors from all 4 journals were pleased with their experience and indicated they were likely to submit to the same or similar journal in the future. Conclusions. Megajournals are drawing an

  4. Article processing charges for open access publication-the situation for research intensive universities in the USA and Canada.

    PubMed

    Solomon, David; Björk, Bo-Christer

    2016-01-01

    Background. Open access (OA) publishing via article processing charges (APCs) is growing as an alternative to subscription publishing. The Pay It Forward (PIF) Project is exploring the feasibility of transitioning from paying subscriptions to funding APCs for faculty at research intensive universities. Estimating of the cost of APCs for the journals authors at research intensive universities tend to publish is essential for the PIF project and similar initiatives. This paper presents our research into this question. Methods. We identified APC prices for publications by authors at the 4 research intensive United States (US) and Canadian universities involved in the study. We also obtained APC payment records from several Western European universities and funding agencies. Both data sets were merged with Web of Science (WoS) metadata. We calculated the average APCs for articles and proceedings in 13 discipline categories published by researchers at research intensive universities. We also identified 41 journals published by traditionally subscription publishers which have recently converted to APC funded OA and recorded the APCs they charge. Results. We identified 7,629 payment records from the 4 European APC payment databases and 14,356 OA articles authored by PIF partner university faculty for which we had listed APC prices. APCs for full OA journals published by PIF authors averaged 1,775 USD; full OA journal APCs paid by Western European funders averaged 1,865 USD; hybrid APCs paid by Western European funders averaged 2,887 USD. The APC for converted journals published by major subscription publishers averaged 1,825 USD. APC funded OA is concentrated in the life and basic sciences. APCs funded articles in the social sciences and humanities are often multidisciplinary and published in journals such as PLOS ONE that largely publish in the life sciences. Conclusions. Full OA journal APCs average a little under 2,000 USD while hybrid articles average about 3,000 USD

  5. Article processing charges for open access publication—the situation for research intensive universities in the USA and Canada

    PubMed Central

    Björk, Bo-Christer

    2016-01-01

    Background. Open access (OA) publishing via article processing charges (APCs) is growing as an alternative to subscription publishing. The Pay It Forward (PIF) Project is exploring the feasibility of transitioning from paying subscriptions to funding APCs for faculty at research intensive universities. Estimating of the cost of APCs for the journals authors at research intensive universities tend to publish is essential for the PIF project and similar initiatives. This paper presents our research into this question. Methods. We identified APC prices for publications by authors at the 4 research intensive United States (US) and Canadian universities involved in the study. We also obtained APC payment records from several Western European universities and funding agencies. Both data sets were merged with Web of Science (WoS) metadata. We calculated the average APCs for articles and proceedings in 13 discipline categories published by researchers at research intensive universities. We also identified 41 journals published by traditionally subscription publishers which have recently converted to APC funded OA and recorded the APCs they charge. Results. We identified 7,629 payment records from the 4 European APC payment databases and 14,356 OA articles authored by PIF partner university faculty for which we had listed APC prices. APCs for full OA journals published by PIF authors averaged 1,775 USD; full OA journal APCs paid by Western European funders averaged 1,865 USD; hybrid APCs paid by Western European funders averaged 2,887 USD. The APC for converted journals published by major subscription publishers averaged 1,825 USD. APC funded OA is concentrated in the life and basic sciences. APCs funded articles in the social sciences and humanities are often multidisciplinary and published in journals such as PLOS ONE that largely publish in the life sciences. Conclusions. Full OA journal APCs average a little under 2,000 USD while hybrid articles average about 3,000 USD

  6. Article processing charges for open access publication-the situation for research intensive universities in the USA and Canada.

    PubMed

    Solomon, David; Björk, Bo-Christer

    2016-01-01

    Background. Open access (OA) publishing via article processing charges (APCs) is growing as an alternative to subscription publishing. The Pay It Forward (PIF) Project is exploring the feasibility of transitioning from paying subscriptions to funding APCs for faculty at research intensive universities. Estimating of the cost of APCs for the journals authors at research intensive universities tend to publish is essential for the PIF project and similar initiatives. This paper presents our research into this question. Methods. We identified APC prices for publications by authors at the 4 research intensive United States (US) and Canadian universities involved in the study. We also obtained APC payment records from several Western European universities and funding agencies. Both data sets were merged with Web of Science (WoS) metadata. We calculated the average APCs for articles and proceedings in 13 discipline categories published by researchers at research intensive universities. We also identified 41 journals published by traditionally subscription publishers which have recently converted to APC funded OA and recorded the APCs they charge. Results. We identified 7,629 payment records from the 4 European APC payment databases and 14,356 OA articles authored by PIF partner university faculty for which we had listed APC prices. APCs for full OA journals published by PIF authors averaged 1,775 USD; full OA journal APCs paid by Western European funders averaged 1,865 USD; hybrid APCs paid by Western European funders averaged 2,887 USD. The APC for converted journals published by major subscription publishers averaged 1,825 USD. APC funded OA is concentrated in the life and basic sciences. APCs funded articles in the social sciences and humanities are often multidisciplinary and published in journals such as PLOS ONE that largely publish in the life sciences. Conclusions. Full OA journal APCs average a little under 2,000 USD while hybrid articles average about 3,000 USD

  7. The Inevitability of Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Open access (OA) is an alternative business model for the publication of scholarly journals. It makes articles freely available to readers on the Internet and covers the costs associated with publication through means other than subscriptions. This article argues that Gold OA, where all of the articles of a journal are available at the time of…

  8. Development of Disruptive Open Access Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Terry; McConkey, Brigette

    2009-01-01

    Open access (OA) publication has emerged, with disruptive effects, as a major outlet for scholarly publication. OA publication is usually associated with on-line distribution and provides access to scholarly publications to anyone, anywhere--regardless of their ability to pay subscription fees or their association with an educational institution.…

  9. Positioning Open Access Journals in a LIS Journal Ranking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Jingfeng

    2012-01-01

    This research uses the h-index to rank the quality of library and information science journals between 2004 and 2008. Selected open access (OA) journals are included in the ranking to assess current OA development in support of scholarly communication. It is found that OA journals have gained momentum supporting high-quality research and…

  10. For 481 biomedical open access journals, articles are not searchable in the Directory of Open Access Journals nor in conventional biomedical databases.

    PubMed

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Background. Open access (OA) journals allows access to research papers free of charge to the reader. Traditionally, biomedical researchers use databases like MEDLINE and EMBASE to discover new advances. However, biomedical OA journals might not fulfill such databases' criteria, hindering dissemination. The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) is a database exclusively listing OA journals. The aim of this study was to investigate DOAJ's coverage of biomedical OA journals compared with the conventional biomedical databases. Methods. Information on all journals listed in four conventional biomedical databases (MEDLINE, PubMed Central, EMBASE and SCOPUS) and DOAJ were gathered. Journals were included if they were (1) actively publishing, (2) full OA, (3) prospectively indexed in one or more database, and (4) of biomedical subject. Impact factor and journal language were also collected. DOAJ was compared with conventional databases regarding the proportion of journals covered, along with their impact factor and publishing language. The proportion of journals with articles indexed by DOAJ was determined. Results. In total, 3,236 biomedical OA journals were included in the study. Of the included journals, 86.7% were listed in DOAJ. Combined, the conventional biomedical databases listed 75.0% of the journals; 18.7% in MEDLINE; 36.5% in PubMed Central; 51.5% in SCOPUS and 50.6% in EMBASE. Of the journals in DOAJ, 88.7% published in English and 20.6% had received impact factor for 2012 compared with 93.5% and 26.0%, respectively, for journals in the conventional biomedical databases. A subset of 51.1% and 48.5% of the journals in DOAJ had articles indexed from 2012 and 2013, respectively. Of journals exclusively listed in DOAJ, one journal had received an impact factor for 2012, and 59.6% of the journals had no content from 2013 indexed in DOAJ. Conclusions. DOAJ is the most complete registry of biomedical OA journals compared with five conventional biomedical databases

  11. For 481 biomedical open access journals, articles are not searchable in the Directory of Open Access Journals nor in conventional biomedical databases

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Background. Open access (OA) journals allows access to research papers free of charge to the reader. Traditionally, biomedical researchers use databases like MEDLINE and EMBASE to discover new advances. However, biomedical OA journals might not fulfill such databases’ criteria, hindering dissemination. The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) is a database exclusively listing OA journals. The aim of this study was to investigate DOAJ’s coverage of biomedical OA journals compared with the conventional biomedical databases. Methods. Information on all journals listed in four conventional biomedical databases (MEDLINE, PubMed Central, EMBASE and SCOPUS) and DOAJ were gathered. Journals were included if they were (1) actively publishing, (2) full OA, (3) prospectively indexed in one or more database, and (4) of biomedical subject. Impact factor and journal language were also collected. DOAJ was compared with conventional databases regarding the proportion of journals covered, along with their impact factor and publishing language. The proportion of journals with articles indexed by DOAJ was determined. Results. In total, 3,236 biomedical OA journals were included in the study. Of the included journals, 86.7% were listed in DOAJ. Combined, the conventional biomedical databases listed 75.0% of the journals; 18.7% in MEDLINE; 36.5% in PubMed Central; 51.5% in SCOPUS and 50.6% in EMBASE. Of the journals in DOAJ, 88.7% published in English and 20.6% had received impact factor for 2012 compared with 93.5% and 26.0%, respectively, for journals in the conventional biomedical databases. A subset of 51.1% and 48.5% of the journals in DOAJ had articles indexed from 2012 and 2013, respectively. Of journals exclusively listed in DOAJ, one journal had received an impact factor for 2012, and 59.6% of the journals had no content from 2013 indexed in DOAJ. Conclusions. DOAJ is the most complete registry of biomedical OA journals compared with five conventional biomedical

  12. For 481 biomedical open access journals, articles are not searchable in the Directory of Open Access Journals nor in conventional biomedical databases.

    PubMed

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Background. Open access (OA) journals allows access to research papers free of charge to the reader. Traditionally, biomedical researchers use databases like MEDLINE and EMBASE to discover new advances. However, biomedical OA journals might not fulfill such databases' criteria, hindering dissemination. The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) is a database exclusively listing OA journals. The aim of this study was to investigate DOAJ's coverage of biomedical OA journals compared with the conventional biomedical databases. Methods. Information on all journals listed in four conventional biomedical databases (MEDLINE, PubMed Central, EMBASE and SCOPUS) and DOAJ were gathered. Journals were included if they were (1) actively publishing, (2) full OA, (3) prospectively indexed in one or more database, and (4) of biomedical subject. Impact factor and journal language were also collected. DOAJ was compared with conventional databases regarding the proportion of journals covered, along with their impact factor and publishing language. The proportion of journals with articles indexed by DOAJ was determined. Results. In total, 3,236 biomedical OA journals were included in the study. Of the included journals, 86.7% were listed in DOAJ. Combined, the conventional biomedical databases listed 75.0% of the journals; 18.7% in MEDLINE; 36.5% in PubMed Central; 51.5% in SCOPUS and 50.6% in EMBASE. Of the journals in DOAJ, 88.7% published in English and 20.6% had received impact factor for 2012 compared with 93.5% and 26.0%, respectively, for journals in the conventional biomedical databases. A subset of 51.1% and 48.5% of the journals in DOAJ had articles indexed from 2012 and 2013, respectively. Of journals exclusively listed in DOAJ, one journal had received an impact factor for 2012, and 59.6% of the journals had no content from 2013 indexed in DOAJ. Conclusions. DOAJ is the most complete registry of biomedical OA journals compared with five conventional biomedical databases

  13. Issues in Electronic Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadow, Charles T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses issues related to electronic publishing. Topics include writing; reading; production, distribution, and commerce; copyright and ownership of intellectual property; archival storage; technical obsolescence; control of content; equality of access; and cultural changes. (Author/LRW)

  14. Knee Contact Force in Subjects with Symmetrical OA Grades: Differences between OA Severities

    PubMed Central

    Richards, C.; Higginson, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    In using musculoskeletal models, researchers can calculate muscle forces, and subsequently joint contact forces, providing insight into joint loading and the progression of such diseases as osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to estimate the knee contact force (KCF) in patients with varying degrees of OA severity using muscle forces and joint reaction forces derived from OpenSim. Walking data was obtained from individuals with severe (n=2), moderate (n=10) and no signs of OA (n=14). For each subject, we generated 3D, muscle-actuated, forward dynamic simulations of the walking trials. Muscle forces that reproduced each subject’s gait were calculated. KCFs were then calculated using the vector sum of the muscle forces and joint reaction forces along the longitudinal axis of the femur. Moderate OA subjects exhibited a similar KCF pattern to healthy subjects, with lower KCF peaks (p = 0.0169). Although subjects with severe OA had similar initial peak KCF to healthy and moderate OA subjects (more than 4 times BW), the pattern of the KCF was very different between groups. After an initial peak, subjects with severe OA continually unloaded the joint, whereas healthy and moderate OA subjects reloaded the knee during late stance. In subjects with symmetric OA grades, there appears to be differences in loading between OA severities. Similar initial peaks of KCF imply that reduction of peak KCF may not be a compensatory strategy for OA patients; however, reducing duration of high magnitude loads may be employed. PMID:20627301

  15. Problems with traditional science publishing and finding a wider niche for post-publication peer review.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Dobránszki, Judit

    2015-01-01

    Science affects multiple basic sectors of society. Therefore, the findings made in science impact what takes place at a commercial level. More specifically, errors in the literature, incorrect findings, fraudulent data, poorly written scientific reports, or studies that cannot be reproduced not only serve as a burden on tax-payers' money, but they also serve to diminish public trust in science and its findings. Therefore, there is every need to fortify the validity of data that exists in the science literature, not only to build trust among peers, and to sustain that trust, but to reestablish trust in the public and private academic sectors that are witnessing a veritable battle-ground in the world of science publishing, in some ways spurred by the rapid evolution of the open access (OA) movement. Even though many science journals, traditional and OA, claim to be peer reviewed, the truth is that different levels of peer review occur, and in some cases no, insufficient, or pseudo-peer review takes place. This ultimately leads to the erosion of quality and importance of science, allowing essentially anything to become published, provided that an outlet can be found. In some cases, predatory OA journals serve this purpose, allowing papers to be published, often without any peer review or quality control. In the light of an explosion of such cases in predatory OA publishing, and in severe inefficiencies and possible bias in the peer review of even respectable science journals, as evidenced by the increasing attention given to retractions, there is an urgent need to reform the way in which authors, editors, and publishers conduct the first line of quality control, the peer review. One way to address the problem is through post-publication peer review (PPPR), an efficient complement to traditional peer-review that allows for the continuous improvement and strengthening of the quality of science publishing. PPPR may also serve as a way to renew trust in scientific

  16. Cyberscience and the Knowledge-Based Economy. Open Access and Trade Publishing: From Contradiction to Compatibility with Non-Exclusive Copyright Licensing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armbruster, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Open source, open content and open access are set to fundamentally alter the conditions of knowledge production and distribution. Open source, open content and open access are also the most tangible result of the shift towards e-science and digital networking. Yet, widespread misperceptions exist about the impact of this shift on knowledge…

  17. Peer Review Quality and Transparency of the Peer-Review Process in Open Access and Subscription Journals

    PubMed Central

    Wicherts, Jelte M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent controversies highlighting substandard peer review in Open Access (OA) and traditional (subscription) journals have increased the need for authors, funders, publishers, and institutions to assure quality of peer-review in academic journals. I propose that transparency of the peer-review process may be seen as an indicator of the quality of peer-review, and develop and validate a tool enabling different stakeholders to assess transparency of the peer-review process. Methods and Findings Based on editorial guidelines and best practices, I developed a 14-item tool to rate transparency of the peer-review process on the basis of journals’ websites. In Study 1, a random sample of 231 authors of papers in 92 subscription journals in different fields rated transparency of the journals that published their work. Authors’ ratings of the transparency were positively associated with quality of the peer-review process but unrelated to journal’s impact factors. In Study 2, 20 experts on OA publishing assessed the transparency of established (non-OA) journals, OA journals categorized as being published by potential predatory publishers, and journals from the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). Results show high reliability across items (α = .91) and sufficient reliability across raters. Ratings differentiated the three types of journals well. In Study 3, academic librarians rated a random sample of 140 DOAJ journals and another 54 journals that had received a hoax paper written by Bohannon to test peer-review quality. Journals with higher transparency ratings were less likely to accept the flawed paper and showed higher impact as measured by the h5 index from Google Scholar. Conclusions The tool to assess transparency of the peer-review process at academic journals shows promising reliability and validity. The transparency of the peer-review process can be seen as an indicator of peer-review quality allowing the tool to be used to predict academic

  18. Systematic review of the concurrent and predictive validity of MRI biomarkers in OA

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, D.J.; Zhang, W.; Conaghan, Philip G.; Hirko, K.; Menashe, L.; Li, L.; Reichmann, W.M.; Losina, E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To summarize literature on the concurrent and predictive validity of MRI-based measures of osteoarthritis (OA) structural change. Methods An online literature search was conducted of the OVID, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychInfo and Cochrane databases of articles published up to the time of the search, April 2009. 1338 abstracts obtained with this search were preliminarily screened for relevance by two reviewers. Of these, 243 were selected for data extraction for this analysis on validity as well as separate reviews on discriminate validity and diagnostic performance. Of these 142 manuscripts included data pertinent to concurrent validity and 61 manuscripts for the predictive validity review. For this analysis we extracted data on criterion (concurrent and predictive) validity from both longitudinal and cross-sectional studies for all synovial joint tissues as it relates to MRI measurement in OA. Results Concurrent validity of MRI in OA has been examined compared to symptoms, radiography, histology/pathology, arthroscopy, CT, and alignment. The relation of bone marrow lesions, synovitis and effusion to pain was moderate to strong. There was a weak or no relation of cartilage morphology or meniscal tears to pain. The relation of cartilage morphology to radiographic OA and radiographic joint space was inconsistent. There was a higher frequency of meniscal tears, synovitis and other features in persons with radiographic OA. The relation of cartilage to other constructs including histology and arthroscopy was stronger. Predictive validity of MRI in OA has been examined for ability to predict total knee replacement (TKR), change in symptoms, radiographic progression as well as MRI progression. Quantitative cartilage volume change and presence of cartilage defects or bone marrow lesions are potential predictors of TKR. Conclusion MRI has inherent strengths and unique advantages in its ability to visualize multiple individual tissue pathologies relating to pain

  19. Evaluation of OAS Education Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Howard B.; And Others

    An in-depth evaluation of four Organization of American States educational journals is presented. The journals, published for distribution among Latin American countries, were "Tecnologia Educativa", "Curriculum", "Educacion de Adultors", and "La Educacion". Assessment was made of the journals' mandates, implementation procedures, and managerial…

  20. Open Access: What You Need to Know Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    2011-01-01

    Academic libraries routinely struggle to afford access to expensive journals, and patrons may not be able to obtain every scholarly paper they need. Is Open Access (OA) the answer? In this ALA Editions Special Report, Crawford helps readers understand what OA is (and isn't), as he concisely: (1) Analyzes the factors that have brought libraries to…

  1. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  2. Why publish?

    PubMed

    Waugaman, W R

    1991-10-01

    The following article encourages student nurse anesthetists to publish knowledge learned from clinical and educational experiences; however, the same philosophy and advice applies to all nurse anesthetists. Dr. Waugaman presented the information in this article to more than 700 students who attended a Student Luncheon on August 6. The luncheon was among many special activities held for students during the 58th AANA Annual Meeting in Nashville, August 3-8, 1991. For more information on submitting manuscripts to the AANA Journal, please refer to "Information for Authors," published in each issue of the AANA Journal, and the February 1991 article titled "A style change for the AANA Journal," authored by Michael A. Fiedler, CRNA, MS, and E. Jane McCarthy, CRNA, PhD.

  3. A Publisher view on the future of scholarly publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Jose

    2015-08-01

    The journal publishing landscape is changing rapidly. With the massive move from print to online taking place at the end of the last century, we are now seeing a shift from traditional subscription based publishing model to ‘hybrid’ models and full Open Access publishing. Other major changes are taking place at the article interface level (from a static PDF to the “Article of the Future”), in data and code repository linking, in publishing data and code and hence make it citable and discoverable, and in many other subject area specific online innovations that are being introduced.Elsevier is actively involved - both in Open Access publishing, and in content innovation - in discussing, and taking the lead through many big and smaller scale initiatives. This presentation will outline Elsevier’s perspective on the future of scientific publishing with regards to these developments.

  4. Publisher's Announcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scriven, Neil

    2003-12-01

    We are delighted to announce that the new Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General for 2004 will be Professor Carl M Bender of Washington University, St. Louis. Carl will, with the help of his world class editorial board, maintain standards of scientific rigour whilst ensuring that research published is of the highest importance. Carl attained his first degree in physics at Cornell University before studying for his PhD at Harvard. He later worked at The Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and at MIT before assuming his current position at Washington University, St Louis. He has been a visiting professor at Technion, Haifa, and Imperial College, London and a scientific consultant for Los Alamos National Laboratory. His main expertise is in using classical applied mathematics to solve a broad range of problems in high-energy theoretical physics and mathematical physics. Since the publication of his book Advanced Mathematical Methods for Scientists and Engineers, written with Steven Orszag, he has been regarded as an expert on the subject of asymptotic analysis and perturbative methods. `Carl publishes his own internationally-important research in the journal and has been an invaluable, energetic member of the Editorial Board for some time' said Professor Ed Corrigan, Carl's predecessor as Editor, `he will be an excellent Editor-in-Chief'. Our grateful thanks and best wishes go to Professor Corrigan who has done a magnificent job for the journal during his five-year tenure.

  5. An Update on AGU Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilst, Rob; Hanson, Brooks

    2013-07-01

    In the past year, AGU publishing has undergone substantial change, and we realize that this has caused some anxiety and concern among you, our members. As the start of a regular Eos series on issues in scientific publishing in general and AGU's content in particular, we provide here an overview and update of recent developments, with an emphasis on the partnership between AGU and Wiley. Topical entries, for instance on open access, will be published later.

  6. Communicating the Open Access Message: A Case Study from Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    Since 2009, Open Access (OA) Week has been celebrated worldwide in October each year. It is an opportunity for librarians to engage with the research community and demonstrate the value that they bring to their organisations in the area of disseminating scholarly output. Although thousands of events have been held since the inception of OA Week, a…

  7. The Rise of Open Access in the Creative, Educational and Science Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel-Chisholm, Scott; Fitzgerald, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Management of intellectual property and, in particular, copyright is one of the most challenging issues in an increasingly digital world. The rise of the open access (OA) movement provides a new model for managing intellectual property in educational and research environments. OA aims to promote greater and more efficient access to educational and…

  8. Open-access colonoscopy in Ontario: Associated factors and quality

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, Shane; Rabeneck, Linda; Paszat, Lawrence F; Sutradhar, Rinku; Wilton, Andrew S; Tinmouth, Jill

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Open-access (OA) colonoscopy may increase efficiency and decrease wait times; however, because the patient is seen for the first time at the endoscopy appointment, previous processes, such as information about the procedure, preparation and appropriate triage, may be suboptimal. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with OA colonoscopy and to determine the relationship between OA colonoscopy and an important quality measure, incomplete colonoscopy. METHODS: A population-based analysis of all adult outpatients undergoing a first-time colonoscopy between 1997 and 2007 in Ontario was performed. Colonoscopy was considered to be OA if there were no visits in the preceding five years with the physician performing the colonoscopy. Using logistic regression, patient, physician and institution factors associated with OA colonoscopy were identified. Using propensity score matching, the relationship between OA colonoscopy and incomplete colonoscopy in 2006 was examined. RESULTS: A total of 1,079,259 colonoscopies were performed. Of these, 14% were OA in 1997 compared with 26% in 2007. Patients 50 to 69 years of age, those from higher-income neighbourhoods and those with less comorbidity were more likely to undergo OA colonoscopy. The odds of receiving OA colonoscopy were six times greater in a nonhospital clinic compared with a community hospital. Colonoscopy was more likely to be complete if the procedure was OA (OR 1.3 [95% CI 1.2 to 1.4]; P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Rates of OA colonoscopy have increased substantially since 1997. Institution type was most strongly associated with OA colonoscopy. Colonoscopy completeness, a recognized quality indicator, does not appear to be compromised by OA colonoscopy. PMID:23781517

  9. Data Sharing & Publishing at Nature Publishing Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanDecar, J. C.; Hrynaszkiewicz, I.; Hufton, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the research community has come to recognize that upon-request data sharing has important limitations1,2. The Nature-titled journals feel that researchers have a duty to share data without undue qualifications, in a manner that allows others to replicate and build upon their published findings. Historically, the Nature journals have been strong supporters of data deposition in communities with existing data mandates, and have required data sharing upon request in all other cases. To help address some of the limitations of upon-request data sharing, the Nature titles have strengthened their existing data policies and forged a new partnership with Scientific Data, to promote wider data sharing in discoverable, citeable and reusable forms, and to ensure that scientists get appropriate credit for sharing3. Scientific Data is a new peer-reviewed journal for descriptions of research datasets, which works with a wide of range of public data repositories4. Articles at Scientific Data may either expand on research publications at other journals or may be used to publish new datasets. The Nature Publishing Group has also signed the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles5, and Scientific Data is our first journal to include formal data citations. We are currently in the process of adding data citation support to our various journals. 1 Wicherts, J. M., Borsboom, D., Kats, J. & Molenaar, D. The poor availability of psychological research data for reanalysis. Am. Psychol. 61, 726-728, doi:10.1037/0003-066x.61.7.726 (2006). 2 Vines, T. H. et al. Mandated data archiving greatly improves access to research data. FASEB J. 27, 1304-1308, doi:10.1096/fj.12-218164 (2013). 3 Data-access practices strengthened. Nature 515, 312, doi:10.1038/515312a (2014). 4 More bang for your byte. Sci. Data 1, 140010, doi:10.1038/sdata.2014.10 (2014). 5 Data Citation Synthesis Group: Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles. (FORCE11, San Diego, CA, 2014).

  10. Bone as an imaging biomarker and treatment target in OA

    PubMed Central

    Neogi, Tuhina; Felson, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Radiographic joint-space width is the standard structural outcome for trials in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but MRI provides comprehensive 3D insights into the multi-tissue pathology of OA and could provide a superior means of monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. A new study highlights bone as an imaging biomarker. PMID:27383914

  11. Open Access to Scientific Literature: An Assessment of Awareness Support and Usage among Academic Librarians at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Marsha Ann Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Open Access (OA) to scholarly communications is a critical component in providing equitable admission to scholarly information and a key vehicle toward the achievement of global access to research in the knowledge building process. A standard and universally accepted process for guaranteeing OA permits complimentary access to knowledge, research…

  12. Public Access and Open Access: Is There a Difference? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Robin Meckley, Contributing Writer, and Tracie Frederick, Guest Writer Open access and public access—are they different concepts or are they the same? What do they mean for the researchers at NCI at Frederick? “Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. What makes it possible is the Internet and the consent of the author or copyright-holder,” according to an open access website maintained by Peter Suber, director, Harvard Open Access Project.

  13. Potential of gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-oaTOFMS) in flavor research.

    PubMed

    Fay, Laurent B; Newton, Anthony; Simian, Hervé; Robert, Fabien; Douce, David; Hancock, Peter; Green, Martin; Blank, Imre

    2003-04-23

    Gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-oaTOFMS) is an emerging technique offering a straightforward access to a resolving power up to 7000. This paper deals with the use of GC-oaTOFMS to identify the flavor components of a complex seafood flavor extract and to quantify furanones formed in model Maillard reactions. A seafood extract was selected as a representative example for complex food flavors and was previously analyzed using GC-quadrupole MS, leaving several molecules unidentified. GC-oaTOFMS analysis was focused on these unknowns to evaluate its potential in flavor research, particularly for determining exact masses. N-Methyldithiodimethylamine, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and tetrahydro-2,4-dimethyl-4H-pyrrolo[2,1-d]-1,3,5-dithiazine were successfully identified on the basis of the precise mass determination of their molecular ions and their major fragments. A second set of experiments was performed to test the capabilities of the GC-oaTOFMS for quantification. Calibration curves were found to be linear over a dynamic range of 10(3) for the quantification of furanones. The quantitative data obtained using GC-oaTOFMS confirmed earlier results that the formation of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone was favored in the xylose/glycine model reaction and 2(or 5)-ethyl-4-hydroxy-5(or 2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone in the xylose/alanine model reaction. It was concluded that GC-oaTOFMS may become a powerful analytical tool for the flavor chemist for both identification and quantification purposes, the latter in particular when combined with stable isotope dilution assay.

  14. Library Networks and Electronic Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olvey, Lee D.

    1995-01-01

    Provides a description of present and proposed plans and strategies of OCLC (Online Computer Library Center) and their relationship to electronic publishing. FirstSearch (end-user access to secondary information), GUIDON (electronic journals online) and FastDoc (document delivery) are emphasized. (JKP)

  15. Government Publishing: Past to Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernon, Peter; Relyea, Harold C.

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of government publishing that focuses on the United States national government. Documents the shift from paper to electronic publication and discusses implications. Highlights include public availability and access, propaganda, policy, workshops on information dissemination, preservation of electronic resources, and the…

  16. Automatic Publishing of Library Bulletins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inbal, Moshe

    1980-01-01

    Describes the use of a computer to publish library bulletins that list recent accessions of technical reports according to the subject classification scheme of NTIS/SRIM (National Technical Information Service's Scientific Reports in Microfiche). The codes file, the four computer program functions, and costs/economy are discussed. (JD)

  17. The Principle and the Pragmatist: On Conflict and Coalescence for Librarian Engagement with Open Access Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This article considers Open Access (OA) training and the supports and structures in place in academic libraries in the United States from the perspective of a new librarian. OA programming is contextualized by the larger project of Scholarly Communication in academic libraries, and the two share a historical focus on journal literature and a…

  18. Activation of RNase L is dependent on OAS3 expression during infection with diverse human viruses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yize; Banerjee, Shuvojit; Wang, Yuyan; Goldstein, Stephen A.; Dong, Beihua; Gaughan, Christina; Silverman, Robert H.; Weiss, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    The 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase (OAS)–RNase L system is an IFN-induced antiviral pathway. RNase L activity depends on 2-5A, synthesized by OAS. Although all three enzymatically active OAS proteins in humans—OAS1, OAS2, and OAS3—synthesize 2-5A upon binding dsRNA, it is unclear which are responsible for RNase L activation during viral infection. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) technology to engineer human A549-derived cell lines in which each of the OAS genes or RNase L is knocked out. Upon transfection with poly(rI):poly(rC), a synthetic surrogate for viral dsRNA, or infection with each of four viruses from different groups (West Nile virus, Sindbis virus, influenza virus, or vaccinia virus), OAS1-KO and OAS2-KO cells synthesized amounts of 2-5A similar to those synthesized in parental wild-type cells, causing RNase L activation as assessed by rRNA degradation. In contrast, OAS3-KO cells synthesized minimal 2-5A, and rRNA remained intact, similar to infected RNase L-KO cells. All four viruses replicated to higher titers in OAS3-KO or RNase L-KO A549 cells than in parental, OAS1-KO, or OAS2-KO cells, demonstrating the antiviral effects of OAS3. OAS3 displayed a higher affinity for dsRNA in intact cells than either OAS1 or OAS2, consistent with its dominant role in RNase L activation. Finally, the requirement for OAS3 as the major OAS isoform responsible for RNase L activation was not restricted to A549 cells, because OAS3-KO cells derived from two other human cell lines also were deficient in RNase L activation. PMID:26858407

  19. Activation of RNase L is dependent on OAS3 expression during infection with diverse human viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Yize; Banerjee, Shuvojit; Wang, Yuyan; Goldstein, Stephen A; Dong, Beihua; Gaughan, Christina; Silverman, Robert H; Weiss, Susan R

    2016-02-23

    The 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase (OAS)-RNase L system is an IFN-induced antiviral pathway. RNase L activity depends on 2-5A, synthesized by OAS. Although all three enzymatically active OAS proteins in humans--OAS1, OAS2, and OAS3--synthesize 2-5A upon binding dsRNA, it is unclear which are responsible for RNase L activation during viral infection. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) technology to engineer human A549-derived cell lines in which each of the OAS genes or RNase L is knocked out. Upon transfection with poly(rI):poly(rC), a synthetic surrogate for viral dsRNA, or infection with each of four viruses from different groups (West Nile virus, Sindbis virus, influenza virus, or vaccinia virus), OAS1-KO and OAS2-KO cells synthesized amounts of 2-5A similar to those synthesized in parental wild-type cells, causing RNase L activation as assessed by rRNA degradation. In contrast, OAS3-KO cells synthesized minimal 2-5A, and rRNA remained intact, similar to infected RNase L-KO cells. All four viruses replicated to higher titers in OAS3-KO or RNase L-KO A549 cells than in parental, OAS1-KO, or OAS2-KO cells, demonstrating the antiviral effects of OAS3. OAS3 displayed a higher affinity for dsRNA in intact cells than either OAS1 or OAS2, consistent with its dominant role in RNase L activation. Finally, the requirement for OAS3 as the major OAS isoform responsible for RNase L activation was not restricted to A549 cells, because OAS3-KO cells derived from two other human cell lines also were deficient in RNase L activation. PMID:26858407

  20. Publishing Support for Small Print-Based Publishers: Options for ARL Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivins, October; Luther, Judy

    2011-01-01

    This project was originally defined to explore the potential for ARL libraries to provide support to small, print-only publishers in order to ensure long-term digital access to their content. Research library publishing programs vary widely, from posting PDFs in an institutional repository to full-fledged publishing operations. During the life of…

  1. Regenerative approaches for the treatment of early OA.

    PubMed

    de Girolamo, L; Kon, E; Filardo, G; Marmotti, A G; Soler, F; Peretti, G M; Vannini, F; Madry, H; Chubinskaya, S

    2016-06-01

    The diagnosis and the prompt treatment of early osteoarthritis (OA) represent vital steps for delaying the onset and progression of fully blown OA, which is the most common form of arthritis, involving more than 10 % of the world's population older than 60 years of age. Nonsurgical treatments such as physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory medications, and other disease-modifying drugs all have modest and short-lasting effect. In this context, the biological approaches have recently gained more and more attention. Growth factors, blood derivatives, such as platelet concentrates, and mesenchymal adult stem cells, either expanded or freshly isolated, are advocated amongst the most promising tool for the treatment of OA, especially in the early phases. Primarily targeted towards focal cartilage defects, these biological agents have indeed recently showed promising results to relieve pain and reduce inflammation in patients with more advanced OA as well, with the final aim to halt the progression of the disease and the need for joint replacement. However, despite of a number of satisfactory in vitro and pre-clinical studies, the evidences are still limited to support their clinical efficacy in OA setting. PMID:27120191

  2. If Information Wants To Be Free...Then Who's Going To Pay for It? [and] A Question of Access: SPARC, BioOne, and Society-Driven Electronic Publishing [and] Who Is Going To Mine Digital Library Resources? And How?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaser, Richard T.; Johnson, Richard K.; Rudner, Lawrence

    2000-01-01

    Discusses Fair Use and the public perception; models for funding information services; publishers illusion that information is/should be free; Internet's role in making information freely available; scholarly communication systems: Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and BioOne (an electronic aggregation of bioscience…

  3. [Publishing models in medical journals].

    PubMed

    Reyes, Humberto B

    2012-02-01

    Medical journals are published by scientific societies, universities, publishing agencies and other for-profit or non-profit organizations. The traditional way to cover the expenses in printed journals has been a "subscribers pay" model. The rise of electronic versions in the internet, either together with the printed version or replacing it entirely, plus a progressive adherence to an "open access" for electronic versions, has created financial difficulties. Therefore, the "authors pay" model has been added. Both models can be subsidized by commercial or institutional advertising, but still a main source for financing relies either in subscriptions or in authors' payments. A small source of income that helps to cover publishing costs is a "charge for manuscript reception", currently applied by several journals. Those authors whose work has institutional or external support can use their grants to cover any charges, but the situation is more difficult for those who do not have such support. Since 1872, Sociedad Médica de Santiago-Chilean Society of Internal Medicine, owner and publisher of Revista Médica de Chile, has employed the "subscribers pay" model, subsidized by commercial advertising and temporary sponsors (Chilean government and others). The printed journal is reproduced in an open access electronic version, in www.scielo.cl. The increasing cost of both publications systems demands a time for reflection.

  4. Embracing Electronic Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    Electronic publishing is the grandest revolution in the capture and dissemination of academic and professional knowledge since Caxton developed the printing press. This article examines electronic publishing, describes different electronic publishing scenarios (authors' cooperative, consolidator/retailer/agent oligopsony, publisher oligopoly), and…

  5. Electronic Journal Market Overview in 1997: Part 1--The Publishers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the electronic journal market and focuses on publishers doing innovative projects. Discusses predominate market models; publishers and the Internet; issues surrounding electronic journals: pricing, security, electronic page layout, copyright, backfile availability, reliability, and accessibility. Highlights selected…

  6. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Soil Characteristics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Z; Nesic, Z.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret soil information at the SSA-OA tower site in 1994 as part of BOREAS. Data sets collected include soil respiration, temperature, moisture, and gravimetric data. The data are stored in tabular ASCII format.

  7. Inflammation and intracellular metabolism: new targets in OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu-Bryan, R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Articular cartilage degeneration is hallmark of osteoarthritis (OA). Low-grade chronic inflammation in the joint can promote OA progression. Emerging evidence indicates that bioenergy sensors couple metabolism with inflammation to switch physiological and clinical phenotypes. Changes in cellular bioenergy metabolism can reprogram inflammatory responses, and inflammation can disturb cellular energy balance and increase cell stress. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) are two critical bioenergy sensors that regulate energy balance at both cellular and whole-body levels. Dysregulation of AMPK and SIRT1 has been implicated in diverse human diseases and aging. This review reveals recent findings on the role of AMPK and SIRT1 in joint tissue homeostasis and OA, with a focus on how AMPK and SIRT1 in articular chondrocytes modulate intracellular energy metabolism during stress responses (e.g., inflammatory responses) and how these changes dictate specific effector functions, and discusses translational significance of AMPK and SIRT1 as new therapeutic targets for OA. PMID:26521729

  8. Copyright of Electronic Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Elaine; Wang, Bob

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the importance of copyright, considers the main causes of copyright infringement in electronic publishing, discusses fair use of a copyrighted work, and suggests methods to safeguard copyrighted electronic publishing, including legislation, contracts, and technology. (Author/LRW)

  9. Baseline Vitamin D Status is Predictive of Longitudinal Change in Tibial BMD in Knee Osteoarthritis (OA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With its lack of effective treatment and high prevalence, the public health impact of OA is substantial. Peri-articular bone in OA can be evaluated with the medial:lateral tibial BMD ratio (M:L BMD) obtained from dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Higher M:L BMD is associated with medial OA features...

  10. 41 CFR 102-85.25 - What is the basic principle governing OAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the basic principle governing OAs? 102-85.25 Section 102-85.25 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... governing OAs? The basic principle governing OAs is to adopt the private sector practice of capturing in...

  11. 41 CFR 102-85.25 - What is the basic principle governing OAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What is the basic principle governing OAs? 102-85.25 Section 102-85.25 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... governing OAs? The basic principle governing OAs is to adopt the private sector practice of capturing in...

  12. 41 CFR 102-85.25 - What is the basic principle governing OAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What is the basic principle governing OAs? 102-85.25 Section 102-85.25 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... governing OAs? The basic principle governing OAs is to adopt the private sector practice of capturing in...

  13. 15 CFR 742.17 - Exports of firearms to OAS member countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., terrorism, and transnational organized crime. (e) OAS member countries to which firearms controls under this... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exports of firearms to OAS member... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.17 Exports of firearms to OAS member countries....

  14. 41 CFR 102-85.140 - How are changes in Rent reflected in OAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... changes in ways that are identified in the OA, then no change to the OA is required. Typically, OAs state... amortized capital expenses which do not entail a change in service level. Also, in Federally-owned space... contract rent rate) that will translate into a change in the customer agency's Rent. Changes in...

  15. 41 CFR 102-85.140 - How are changes in Rent reflected in OAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... changes in ways that are identified in the OA, then no change to the OA is required. Typically, OAs state... amortized capital expenses which do not entail a change in service level. Also, in Federally-owned space... contract rent rate) that will translate into a change in the customer agency's Rent. Changes in...

  16. 41 CFR 102-85.140 - How are changes in Rent reflected in OAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... changes in ways that are identified in the OA, then no change to the OA is required. Typically, OAs state... amortized capital expenses which do not entail a change in service level. Also, in Federally-owned space... contract rent rate) that will translate into a change in the customer agency's Rent. Changes in...

  17. 41 CFR 102-85.140 - How are changes in Rent reflected in OAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... changes in ways that are identified in the OA, then no change to the OA is required. Typically, OAs state... amortized capital expenses which do not entail a change in service level. Also, in Federally-owned space... contract rent rate) that will translate into a change in the customer agency's Rent. Changes in...

  18. Darwin and his publisher.

    PubMed

    McClay, David

    2009-01-01

    Charles Darwin's publisher John Murray played an important, if often underrated, role in bringing his theories to the public. As their letters and publishing archives show they had a friendly, business like and successful relationship. This was despite fundamental scientific and religious differences between the men. In addition to publishing Darwin, Murray also published many of the critical and supportive works and reviews which Darwin's own works excited.

  19. Etiquette in scientific publishing.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vinod

    2013-10-01

    Publishing a scientific article in a journal with a high impact factor and a good reputation is considered prestigious among one's peer group and an essential achievement for career progression. In the drive to get their work published, researchers can forget, either intentionally or unintentionally, the ethics that should be followed in scientific publishing. In an environment where "publish or perish" rules the day, some authors might be tempted to bend or break rules. This special article is intended to raise awareness among orthodontic journal editors, authors, and readers about the types of scientific misconduct in the current publishing scenario and to provide insight into the ways these misconducts are managed by the Committee of Publishing Ethics. Case studies are presented, and various plagiarism detection software programs used by publishing companies are briefly described.

  20. Scientific Publishing: Adding Value, Delivering Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, Beth

    2015-08-01

    Publishers are developing new services and applying new technologies to improve publication and reading experiences for the scholarly community. This needs to be implemented with care to avoid adding technology-driven complexity. Our publishing processes need to be widely accessible to both authors and readers and to maintain the scientific record. Beth Mayes will outline new developments at IOP Publishing delivering (1) improvements to the presentation of articles and their commitment to formats that go beyond the PDF, improving the understanding of research. (2) How IOP Publishing is responding to the growing calls for metadata and linking that involve being central to the shared information ecosystem for astronomy. (3) After publication, discuss how publishers invest in metrics and new initiatives for discovery that improve the impact of published research.

  1. The Open Access Model of Meteorologische Zeitschrift and other meteorological journals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeis, S.

    2009-09-01

    Today's availability and possibilities of the internet have already brought significant changes to the means of scientific communication. This also affects the publication and reception of peer-reviewed papers in scientific journals. In pre-internet times, the publication of scientific journals was mainly financed through subscription fees paid by libraries and other subscribers. The readers went to the libraries of their institution to search, read, and photocopy these papers. Today, everybody expects to have scientific papers more or less freely available on their desktop computers and from their printers. This has forced the publishers to change the financial model for the publication of scientific papers. An increasing number of journals now publish papers whose production costs have to be paid before the publication by the author or its institution. Those "pre-paid” papers are then freely available from the internet. This publication model has become known as "Open Access (OA)” model. Also the 126-year old Meteorologische Zeitschrift has changed its publication model to an Optional Open Access model. The features of this model will be presented and compared to other OA models with meteorological journals. This change in the publication models with a shift of its payment from the end (libraries and subscribers) to the beginning of the publication process (authors) has also confronted the scientific research and funding institutions with some problems. They must now also change their structures in financing one of their major outputs, the publications of their researchers. A few aspects of the present state of this shift will be addressed.

  2. Mitochondrial localization of the OAS1 p46 isoform associated with a common single nucleotide polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The expression of 2′-5′-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) is induced by type 1 Interferons (IFNs) in response to viral infection. The OAS proteins have a unique ability to produce 2′-5′ Oligoadenylates, which bind and activate the ribonuclease RNase L. The RNase L degrades cellular RNAs which in turn inhibits protein translation and induces apoptosis. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the OAS1 gene have been associated with disease. We have investigated the functional effect of two common SNPs in the OAS1 gene. The SNP rs10774671 affects splicing to one of the exons in the OAS1 gene giving rise to differential expression of the OAS1 isoforms, and the SNP rs1131454 (former rs3741981) resides in exon 3 giving rise to OAS1 isoforms with either a Glycine or a Serine at position 162 in the core OAS unit. Results We have used three human cell lines with different genotypes in the OAS1 SNP rs10774671, HeLa cells with the AA genotype, HT1080 cells with AG, and Daudi cells with GG. The main OAS1 isoform expressed in Daudi and HT1080 cells was p46, and the main OAS1 isoform expressed in HeLa cells was p42. In addition, low levels of the OAS1 p52 mRNA was detected in HeLa cells and p48 mRNA in Daudi cells, and trace amounts of p44a mRNA were detected in the three cell lines treated with type 1 interferon. We show that the OAS1 p46 isoform was localized in the mitochondria in Daudi cells, whereas the OAS1 isoforms in HeLa cells were primarily localized in cytoplasmic vacuoles/lysosomes. By using recombinantly expressed OAS1 mutant proteins, we found that the OAS1 SNP rs1131454 (former rs3741981) did not affect the enzymatic OAS1 activity. Conclusions The SNP rs10774671 determines differential expression of the OAS1 isoforms. In Daudi and HT1080 cells the p46 isoform is the most abundantly expressed isoform associated with the G allele, whereas in HeLa cells the most abundantly expressed isoform is p42 associated with the A allele. The SNP rs

  3. Avoiding the Peril of Publishing Qualitative Scholarship in Predatory Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beall, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Scholarly communication is caught between the traditions of the past and the possibilities of the future. Specifically, scholarly open-access publishing is enabling greater access to research but, at the same time, is enabling an abundance of low quality publishers and an apparent increase in author misconduct. In this article I examine six…

  4. "Predatory" Online Journals Lure Scholars Who Are Eager to Publish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stratford, Michael

    2012-01-01

    OMICS Publishing Group is an open-access publisher operating under an author-pays model. Unlike traditional journal subscriptions in which readers or institutions pay to read content, OMICS relies on its contributors for financial support. Although the author-pays model is not a new phenomenon in the realm of open access, its recent popularity has…

  5. High systemic bone mineral density increases the risk of incident knee OA and joint space narrowing, but not radiographic progression of existing knee OA: The MOST study

    PubMed Central

    Nevitt, Michael C.; Zhang, Yuqing; Javaid, M. Kassim; Neogi, Tuhina; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Niu, Jingbo; McCulloch, Charles E.; Segal, Neil A.; Felson, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies suggest that high systemic bone mineral density (BMD) is associated with incident knee OA defined by osteophytes, but not with joint space narrowing (JSN), and are inconsistent regarding BMD and progression of existing OA. We tested the association of BMD with incident and progressive tibiofemoral OA in a large, prospective study of men and women ages 50–79 with, or at risk for, knee OA. Methods Baseline and 30-month weight-bearing PA and lateral knee x-rays were scored for K–L grade, JSN and osteophytes. Incident OA was defined as the development of K–L grade ≥2 at follow-up. All knees were classified for increases in grade of JSN and osteophytes from baseline. The association of gender-specific quartiles of baseline BMD with risk of incident and progressive OA was analyzed using logistic regression, adjusting for covariates. Results The mean age of 1,754 subjects was 63.2 (SD, 7.8) and BMI 29.9 (SD, 5.4). In knees without baseline OA, higher femoral neck and whole body BMD were associated with an increased risk of incident OA and increases in grade of JSN and osteophytes (p < 0.01 for trends); adjusted odds were 2.3 to 2.9-fold greater in the highest vs. the lowest BMD quartiles. In knees with existing OA, progression was not significantly related to BMD. Conclusions In knees without OA, higher systemic BMD was associated with a greater risk of the onset of JSN and K–L grade ≥2. The role of systemic BMD in early knee OA pathogenesis warrants further investigation. PMID:19147619

  6. Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hwataik; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2009-04-01

    It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sensors within cylindrical probes installed between louver blades or at the downstream face of the louver. Numerical results show quite good agreements with experimental data, and provide insights regarding measurement system design. The simulations indicate that velocity profiles are more spatially uniform at the louver outlet relative to between louver blades, that pressure drops imposed by the sensor bars are smaller with sensor bars at the louver outlet, and that placement of the sensor bars between louver blades substantially increases air velocities inside the louver. These findings suggest there is an advantage to placing the sensor bars at the louver outlet face.

  7. Publishing priorities of biomedical research funders

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To understand the publishing priorities, especially in relation to open access, of 10 UK biomedical research funders. Design Semistructured interviews. Setting 10 UK biomedical research funders. Participants 12 employees with responsibility for research management at 10 UK biomedical research funders; a purposive sample to represent a range of backgrounds and organisation types. Conclusions Publicly funded and large biomedical research funders are committed to open access publishing and are pleased with recent developments which have stimulated growth in this area. Smaller charitable funders are supportive of the aims of open access, but are concerned about the practical implications for their budgets and their funded researchers. Across the board, biomedical research funders are turning their attention to other priorities for sharing research outputs, including data, protocols and negative results. Further work is required to understand how smaller funders, including charitable funders, can support open access. PMID:24154520

  8. Lights, Camera, Publishing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Nina C.

    2008-01-01

    Are university presses ready for their close-up? In a nod to Hollywood, a growing number of trade publishers are producing book trailers to promote new titles. But do video teasers have a role in university-press publishing? What about longer formats? Based on an entirely unscientific poll of publicists at 25 university presses, the answer appears…

  9. Publishing: Alternatives and Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penchansky, Mimi; And Others

    The Library Association of the City University of New York presents an annotated bibliography on the subject of small and alternative publishing. In the first section directories, indexes, catalogs, and reviews are briefly described. Book distributors for small publishers are listed next. The major portion of the bibliography is a listing of books…

  10. Publishing in English Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judy, Stephen N., Ed.

    Intended for both newcomers to writing and experienced writers, this book presents ideas that will simplify the process of submitting and getting published, cut down on the false starts and mistakes, and provide a catalyst to the educational writer. The titles of the articles and their authors are as follows: "Publishing in the Elementary Language…

  11. Electronic publishing in radiology: economics and the future.

    PubMed

    Chew, Felix S; Llewellyn, Kevin T; Olsen, Kathryn M

    2004-11-01

    Scholarly publishing is a large market involving thousands of peer-reviewed journals but a decreasing number of publishers. An economic model can be described in which authors give their work to publishers who then sell access to this work. Because each published article is a unique work with few if any substitutes, publishers have some degree of monopoly power and can price their products accordingly. The advent of desktop publishing using personal computers made it possible for individuals to publish material without publishers, an activity that gained momentum when the publishing medium shifted from paper to electronic, and from electronic publishing to the Internet. This activity destabilized the industry, and in the rush to gain market share by providing free content, unsustainable business models were created. Scholarly publishing is now dominated by a small number of multinational corporations that acquired many smaller publishing operations. As these companies have exercised their monopoly power, an open access movement has gained traction in which authors (or their institutions) initially pay for publication, but readers have free and open access to the published articles. This movement is in diametric opposition to the commercial publishing model, and it remains to be seen whether and how well the two can coexist in the future.

  12. Use of multi-disciplinary mooring data to extend intermittent OA observations from ship surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Send, U.; Ohman, M. D.; Martz, T. R.; Dickson, A. G.; Feely, R. A.; Demer, D.; Washburn, L.

    2012-12-01

    Ship surveys along the US West Coast have provided valuable insight into the conditions and changes in the water column that affect the ocean acidification state. Examples are the decades of CalCOFI sampling off southern California, and the West Coast ship survey published in Feely et al 2008. What is lacking in these observations is a description of the temporal variability of the conditions observed, and of the processes at work that lead to observed conditions or changes. Multi-disciplinary moorings are ideally suited for adding this dimension to the available observations which is critical for an understanding of the OA mechanisms. One example is the occurrence of corrosive water near the seafloor on the continental shelf, which was found in the Feely et al survey. Time series data from a mooring off Del Mar, California, with oxygen and pH sensors near the bottom in 100m depth show the frequency and intensity of corrosive and hypoxic conditions there, and how they relate to physical processes (cross-shelf and along-shelf flow), biological conditions, and climate processes (here La Nina). In the upwelling and open-ocean regimes off Pt. Conception two moorings (CCE1, CCE2) have been collecting data since early 2009 and 2010, respectively, co-located with CalCOFI stations and CCE LTER cardinal sites for ship observations. A glider also routinely passes by these moorings (along CalCOFI line 80). The moorings carry physical, oxygen, pH, pCO2, nutrient, and ecosystem sensors (chlorophyll fluorescence, water column irradiance absorption, acoustic backscatter) and telemeter most data in real-time. The mooring time series show the variability of OA parameters on daily, weekly, seasonal, and interannual time scales, and in the context of the spatial and historical sampling from ships. The multi-disciplinary sensor suite allows to study the forcing of the OA variability on those various time scales, and the impact on the ecosystem. Combined with the spatial information

  13. Electronic Publishing and Collection Development, a Subscription Agent's View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallas, Philip

    Trends in publishing, advances in technology and pressures on library budgets have combined to put libraries and publishers at odds with each other. Research libraries expect broad, easy access to electronic information, greater convenience and faster delivery but at reduced cost. Publishers are exploring new channels for distributing their…

  14. Corporate Mergers in the Publishing Industry: Helpful or Intrusive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudman, Herbert C.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the effects of corporate mergers in the publishing industry on the publishing of textbooks and standardized tests. Concludes that restructuring, acquisitions, and mergers have an intrusive effect on established practices of academic publishing and may severely limit the access of scholars to the academic marketplace. (FMW)

  15. Trends in scientific publishing: Dark clouds loom large.

    PubMed

    Vinny, Pulikottil Wilson; Vishnu, Venugopalan Y; Lal, Vivek

    2016-04-15

    The world wide web has brought about a paradigm shift in the way medical research is published and accessed. The ease with which a new journal can be started/hosted by publishing start-ups is unprecedented. The tremendous capabilities of the world wide web and the open access revolution when combined with a highly profitable business have attracted unscrupulous fraudulent operators to the publishing industry. The intent of these fraudulent publishers is solely driven by profit with utter disregard to scientific content, peer reviews and ethics. This phenomenon has been referred to as "predatory publishing". The "international" tag of such journals often betrays their true origins. The gold open access model of publishing, where the author pays the publisher, when coupled with a non-existent peer review threatens to blur the distinction between science and pseudoscience. The average researcher needs to be made more aware of this clear and present danger to the scientific community. Prevention is better than cure.

  16. New journals for publishing medical case reports.

    PubMed

    Akers, Katherine G

    2016-04-01

    Because they do not rank highly in the hierarchy of evidence and are not frequently cited, case reports describing the clinical circumstances of single patients are seldom published by medical journals. However, many clinicians argue that case reports have significant educational value, advance medical knowledge, and complement evidence-based medicine. Over the last several years, a vast number (∼160) of new peer-reviewed journals have emerged that focus on publishing case reports. These journals are typically open access and have relatively high acceptance rates. However, approximately half of the publishers of case reports journals engage in questionable or "predatory" publishing practices. Authors of case reports may benefit from greater awareness of these new publication venues as well as an ability to discriminate between reputable and non-reputable journal publishers. PMID:27076803

  17. New journals for publishing medical case reports

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Katherine G.

    2016-01-01

    Because they do not rank highly in the hierarchy of evidence and are not frequently cited, case reports describing the clinical circumstances of single patients are seldom published by medical journals. However, many clinicians argue that case reports have significant educational value, advance medical knowledge, and complement evidence-based medicine. Over the last several years, a vast number (∼160) of new peer-reviewed journals have emerged that focus on publishing case reports. These journals are typically open access and have relatively high acceptance rates. However, approximately half of the publishers of case reports journals engage in questionable or “predatory” publishing practices. Authors of case reports may benefit from greater awareness of these new publication venues as well as an ability to discriminate between reputable and non-reputable journal publishers. PMID:27076803

  18. Updating realistic access.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Mike

    2010-05-01

    Nearly six years ago Ira Mellman, then Editor-in-Chief of the JCB, published an editorial entitled "Providing realistic access" (1). It described the Journal's efforts to reconcile its subscription-based business model with the goal of providing public access to scholarly journal content. Since then, developments in the public-access movement are bringing us closer to the ideal of universal public access. But will there still be a place for selective journals like the JCB when we achieve that objective? PMID:20375430

  19. A Review of Open Access Self-Archiving Mandate Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Jingfeng; Gilchrist, Sarah B.; Smith, Nathaniel X. P.; Kingery, Justin A.; Radecki, Jennifer R.; Wilhelm, Marcia L.; Harrison, Keith C.; Ashby, Michael L.; Mahn, Alyson J.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the history of open access (OA) policies and examines the current status of mandate policy implementations. It finds that hundreds of policies have been proposed and adopted at various organizational levels and many of them have shown a positive effect on the rate of repository content accumulation. However, it also detects…

  20. Activation of the 2-5OAS/RNase L pathway in CVB1 or HAV/18f infected FRhK-4 cells does not require induction of OAS1 or OAS2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kulka, Michael; Calvo, Mona S.; Ngo, Diana T.; Wales, Samantha Q.; Goswami, Biswendu B.

    2009-05-25

    The latent, constitutively expressed protein RNase L is activated in coxsackievirus and HAV strain 18f infected FRhK-4 cells. Endogenous oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) from uninfected and virus infected cell extracts synthesizes active forms of the triphosphorylated 2-5A oligomer (the only known activator of RNase L) in vitro and endogenous 2-5A is detected in infected cell extracts. However, only the largest OAS isoform, OAS3, is readily detected throughout the time course of infection. While IFNbeta treatment results in an increase in the level of all three OAS isoforms in FRhK-4 cells, IFNbeta pretreatment does not affect the temporal onset or enhancement of RNase L activity nor inhibit virus replication. Our results indicate that CVB1 and HAV/18f activate the 2-5OAS/RNase L pathway in FRhK-4 cells during permissive infection through endogenous levels of OAS, but contrary to that reported for some picornaviruses, CVB1 and HAV/18f replication is insensitive to this activated antiviral pathway.

  1. Ethics in Scientific Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Leslie J.

    2012-08-01

    We all learn in elementary school not turn in other people's writing as if it were our own (plagiarism), and in high school science labs not to fake our data. But there are many other practices in scientific publishing that are depressingly common and almost as unethical. At about the 20 percent level authors are deliberately hiding recent work -- by themselves as well as by others -- so as to enhance the apparent novelty of their most recent paper. Some people lie about the dates the data were obtained, to cover up conflicts of interest, or inappropriate use of privileged information. Others will publish the same conference proceeding in multiple volumes, or publish the same result in multiple journals with only trivial additions of data or analysis (self-plagiarism). These shady practices should be roundly condemned and stopped. I will discuss these and other unethical actions I have seen over the years, and steps editors are taking to stop them.

  2. Electronic Scholarly Journal Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Robin P.; Pomerantz, Jeffrey P.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the literature that has led to the possible transformation of scholarly publishing through electronic distribution of journals. Discusses the concepts of scholarly communication and computer mediated communication; network delivery experiments; CD-ROM delivery projects; acceptance by the scholarly community; and research and development.…

  3. Publishers, Participants All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Will

    2011-01-01

    Students need opportunities throughout the curriculum to follow their passions and publish quality work for global audiences to interact with. Social media afford the opportunity for students to contribute to the world in meaningful ways, do real work for real audiences for real purposes, find great teachers and collaborators from around the…

  4. New Media Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Ian

    The media industry is the fastest growing business in the world today; additional leisure time, coupled with increasingly global distribution, has created large international markets for information and entertainment. The United Kingdom is relatively strong in the three main areas concerned with new media publishing: information technology,…

  5. Censorship and the Publishers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, James J.

    1975-01-01

    "What one school or community sees as educationally effective, another might denounce as tasteless or unnecessarily abrasive or just too novel." If you've ever wondered what it's like to be a caught on the publisher's side of censorship in schools, read this article. (Editor)

  6. 15 CFR 742.17 - Exports of firearms to OAS member countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activities as drug trafficking, terrorism, and transnational organized crime. (c) Contract sanctity. Contract sanctity provisions are not available for license applications under this § 742.17. (d) OAS Model..., terrorism, and transnational organized crime. (e) OAS member countries to which firearms controls under...

  7. 15 CFR 742.17 - Exports of firearms to OAS member countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... activities as drug trafficking, terrorism, and transnational organized crime. (c) Contract sanctity. Contract sanctity provisions are not available for license applications under this § 742.17. (d) OAS Model..., terrorism, and transnational organized crime. (e) OAS member countries to which firearms controls under...

  8. 15 CFR 742.17 - Exports of firearms to OAS member countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... activities as drug trafficking, terrorism, and transnational organized crime. (c) Contract sanctity. Contract sanctity provisions are not available for license applications under this § 742.17. (d) OAS Model..., terrorism, and transnational organized crime. (e) OAS member countries to which firearms controls under...

  9. 15 CFR 742.17 - Exports of firearms to OAS member countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... activities as drug trafficking, terrorism, and transnational organized crime. (c) Contract sanctity. Contract sanctity provisions are not available for license applications under this § 742.17. (d) OAS Model..., terrorism, and transnational organized crime. (e) OAS member countries to which firearms controls under...

  10. Heat capacities and entropies of Mg2SiOa, Mn2SiOa, and Co2SiOa between 5 and 380 K

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, Richard A.; Hemingway, Bruch S.; Takei, Humihiko

    1982-01-01

    whereas the shoulder near 12 K corresponds to the change from the collinear to a canted spin structure. Our calorimetric values for the antiferromagnetic-paramagnetictr ansition temperature (N6el Temperature) are in excellent agreement with those obtained by powder magnetic susceptibility measurements, 49t2 K and 5015 K for co2Sioa and Mn2Sioa respectively. The thermal Debye temperature, 0$, of Mg2Sioa calculated from our c$ measurements between 6.3 and 13.8 K is 768+15 K and agrees well with the elastic vaiue ofi of 758 K based on the mean sound velocity calculated from the room temperature elastic stiffness constants (ci:) of Graham and Barsch. At 298.15K (25"c) the molar heat capacitiesa re 118.6,1 28.7, and 133.4J /(mol . K) and the molar entropiesa re 94.11-r0.101, 55.910.4a nd,1 42.6-+0.J2l (mol . K) respectivelyf or Mg2SiO4M, n2SiOaa, nd Co2SiOa.

  11. Prepare to publish.

    PubMed

    Price, P M

    2000-01-01

    "I couldn't possibly write an article." "I don't have anything worthwhile to write about." "I am not qualified to write for publication." Do any of these statements sound familiar? This article is intended to dispel these beliefs. You can write an article. You care for the most complex patients in the health care system so you do have something worthwhile to write about. Beside correct spelling and grammar there are no special skills, certificates or diplomas required for publishing. You are qualified to write for publication. The purpose of this article is to take the mystique out of the publication process. Each step of publishing an article will be explained, from idea formation to framing your first article. Practical examples and recommendations will be presented. The essential components of the APA format necessary for Dynamics: The Official Journal of the Canadian Association of Critical Care Nurses will be outlined and resources to assist you will be provided. PMID:11235448

  12. Prepare to publish.

    PubMed

    Price, P M

    2000-01-01

    "I couldn't possibly write an article." "I don't have anything worthwhile to write about." "I am not qualified to write for publication." Do any of these statements sound familiar? This article is intended to dispel these beliefs. You can write an article. You care for the most complex patients in the health care system so you do have something worthwhile to write about. Beside correct spelling and grammar there are no special skills, certificates or diplomas required for publishing. You are qualified to write for publication. The purpose of this article is to take the mystique out of the publication process. Each step of publishing an article will be explained, from idea formation to framing your first article. Practical examples and recommendations will be presented. The essential components of the APA format necessary for Dynamics: The Official Journal of the Canadian Association of Critical Care Nurses will be outlined and resources to assist you will be provided.

  13. 41 CFR 102-85.205 - What happens if a customer agency continues occupancy after the expiration of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... expiration of an OA? A mutual goal of GSA and its customers is to have current OAs in place for all space... owned, different provisions in the following table apply: Holdover Tenancy—Customer...

  14. 41 CFR 102-85.205 - What happens if a customer agency continues occupancy after the expiration of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... expiration of an OA? A mutual goal of GSA and its customers is to have current OAs in place for all space... owned, different provisions in the following table apply: Holdover Tenancy—Customer...

  15. Build infrastructure in publishing scientific journals to benefit medical scientists

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ni; Xu, Dingyao; Zhong, Xiyao; Li, Li; Ling, Qibo

    2014-01-01

    There is urgent need for medical journals to optimize their publishing processes and strategies to satisfy the huge need for medical scientists to publish their articles, and then obtain better prestige and impact in scientific and research community. These strategies include optimizing the process of peer-review, utilizing open-access publishing models actively, finding ways of saving costs and getting revenue, smartly dealing with research fraud or misconduct, maintaining sound relationship with pharmaceutical companies, and managing to provide relevant and useful information for clinical practitioners and researchers. Scientists, publishers, societies and organizations need to work together to publish internationally renowned medical journals. PMID:24653634

  16. Real ePublishing, Really Publishing! How To Create Digital Books by and for All Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condon, Mark W. F.; McGuffee, Michael

    This book aims to help teachers turn their classrooms into their very own publishing companies. All that is needed is a computer, a word processor, a digital camera, a color printer, and access to the Internet. The book explains that a new genre of publication, Webbes, are simple nonfiction picture books, and that, matching meaningful text with…

  17. PLAGIARISM IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHING

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader’s own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  18. Plagiarism in scientific publishing.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2012-12-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader's own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  19. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: Refereeing standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, C.; Scriven, N.

    2004-08-01

    On 1 January 2004 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General (J. Phys. A). I am flattered at the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Ed Corrigan, has worked tirelessly for the last five years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements. Before accepting the position of Editor-in-Chief, I visited the office of J. Phys. A to examine the organization and to assess its strengths and weaknesses. This office is located at the Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP) headquarters in Bristol. J. Phys. A has been expanding rapidly and now publishes at the rate of nearly 1000 articles (or about 14,000 pages) per year. The entire operation of the journal is conducted in a very small space---about 15 square metres! Working in this space are six highly intelligent, talented, hard working, and dedicated people: Neil Scriven, Publisher; Mike Williams, Publishing Editor; Rose Gray and Sarah Nadin, Publishing Administrators; Laura Smith and Steve Richards, Production Editors. In this small space every day about eight submitted manuscripts are downloaded from the computer or received in the post. These papers are then processed and catalogued, referees are selected, and the papers are sent out for evaluation. In this small space the referees' reports are received, publication decisions are made, and accepted articles are then published quickly by IOPP. The whole operation is amazingly efficient. Indeed, one of the great strengths of J. Phys. A is the speed at which papers are processed. The average time between the receipt of a manuscript and an editorial decision is under sixty days. (Many distinguished journals take three to five times this amount of time.) This speed of publication is an extremely strong enticement for

  20. RETRACTION: Publishers' Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    post="(Executive Editor">Graeme Watt,

    2010-06-01

    Withdrawal of the paper "Was the fine-structure constant variable over cosmological time?" by L. D. Thong, N. M. Giao, N. T. Hung and T. V. Hung (EPL, 87 (2009) 69002) This paper has been formally withdrawn on ethical grounds because the article contains extensive and repeated instances of plagiarism. EPL treats all identified evidence of plagiarism in the published articles most seriously. Such unethical behaviour will not be tolerated under any circumstance. It is unfortunate that this misconduct was not detected before going to press. My thanks to Editor colleagues from other journals for bringing this fact to my attention.

  1. The Open Data Repository's Data Publisher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, N.; Lafuente, B.; Downs, R. T.; Bristow, T.; Blake, D. F.; Fonda, M.; Pires, A.

    2015-12-01

    Data management and data publication are becoming increasingly important components of research workflows. The complexity of managing data, publishing data online, and archiving data has not decreased significantly even as computing access and power has greatly increased. The Open Data Repository's Data Publisher software (http://www.opendatarepository.org) strives to make data archiving, management, and publication a standard part of a researcher's workflow using simple, web-based tools and commodity server hardware. The publication engine allows for uploading, searching, and display of data with graphing capabilities and downloadable files. Access is controlled through a robust permissions system that can control publication at the field level and can be granted to the general public or protected so that only registered users at various permission levels receive access. Data Publisher also allows researchers to subscribe to meta-data standards through a plugin system, embargo data publication at their discretion, and collaborate with other researchers through various levels of data sharing. As the software matures, semantic data standards will be implemented to facilitate machine reading of data and each database will provide a REST application programming interface for programmatic access. Additionally, a citation system will allow snapshots of any data set to be archived and cited for publication while the data itself can remain living and continuously evolve beyond the snapshot date. The software runs on a traditional LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) server and is available on GitHub (http://github.com/opendatarepository) under a GPLv2 open source license. The goal of the Open Data Repository is to lower the cost and training barrier to entry so that any researcher can easily publish their data and ensure it is archived for posterity. We gratefully acknowledge the support for this study by the Science-Enabling Research Activity (SERA), and NASA NNX11AP82A

  2. The Open Data Repositorys Data Publisher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N.; Lafuente, B.; Downs, R. T.; Blake, D.; Bristow, T.; Fonda, M.; Pires, A.

    2015-01-01

    Data management and data publication are becoming increasingly important components of researcher's workflows. The complexity of managing data, publishing data online, and archiving data has not decreased significantly even as computing access and power has greatly increased. The Open Data Repository's Data Publisher software strives to make data archiving, management, and publication a standard part of a researcher's workflow using simple, web-based tools and commodity server hardware. The publication engine allows for uploading, searching, and display of data with graphing capabilities and downloadable files. Access is controlled through a robust permissions system that can control publication at the field level and can be granted to the general public or protected so that only registered users at various permission levels receive access. Data Publisher also allows researchers to subscribe to meta-data standards through a plugin system, embargo data publication at their discretion, and collaborate with other researchers through various levels of data sharing. As the software matures, semantic data standards will be implemented to facilitate machine reading of data and each database will provide a REST application programming interface for programmatic access. Additionally, a citation system will allow snapshots of any data set to be archived and cited for publication while the data itself can remain living and continuously evolve beyond the snapshot date. The software runs on a traditional LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) server and is available on GitHub (http://github.com/opendatarepository) under a GPLv2 open source license. The goal of the Open Data Repository is to lower the cost and training barrier to entry so that any researcher can easily publish their data and ensure it is archived for posterity.

  3. Data Publishing - View from the Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, David; Pfeiffenberger, Hans

    2014-05-01

    As data publishing journals - Earth System Science Data (ESSD, Copernicus, since 2009), Geophysical Data Journal (GDJ, Wiley, recent) and Scientific Data (SD, Nature Publishing Group, anticipated from May 2014) - expose data sets, implement data description and data review practices, and develop partnerships with data centres and data providers, we anticipate substantial benefits for the broad earth system and environmental research communities but also substantial challenges for all parties. A primary advantage emerges from open access to convergent data: subsurface hydrographic data near Antarctica, for example, now available for combination and comparison with nearby atmospheric data (both documented in ESSD), basin-scale precipitation data (accessed through GDJ) for comparison and interpolation with long-term global precipitation records (accessed from ESSD), or, imagining not too far into the future, stomach content and abundance data for European fish (from ESSD) linked to genetic or nutritional data (from SD). In addition to increased opportunity for discovery and collaboration, we also notice parallel developments of new tools for (published) data visualization and display and increasing acceptance of data publication as a useful and anticipated dissemination step included in project- and institution-based data management plans. All parties - providers, publishers and users - will benefit as various indexing services (SCI, SCOPUS, DCI etc.) acknowledge the creative, intellectual and meritorious efforts of data preparation and data provision. The challenges facing data publication, in most cases very familiar to the data community but made more acute by the advances in data publishing, include diverging metadata standards (among biomedical, green ocean modeling and meteorological communities, for example), adhering to standards and practices for permanent identification while also accommodating 'living' data, and maintaining prompt but rigorous review and

  4. Web Accessibility and Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz

    Access to, and movement around, complex online environments, of which the World Wide Web (Web) is the most popular example, has long been considered an important and major issue in the Web design and usability field. The commonly used slang phrase ‘surfing the Web’ implies rapid and free access, pointing to its importance among designers and users alike. It has also been long established that this potentially complex and difficult access is further complicated, and becomes neither rapid nor free, if the user is disabled. There are millions of people who have disabilities that affect their use of the Web. Web accessibility aims to help these people to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with, as well as contribute to, the Web, and thereby the society in general. This accessibility is, in part, facilitated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) currently moving from version one to two. These guidelines are intended to encourage designers to make sure their sites conform to specifications, and in that conformance enable the assistive technologies of disabled users to better interact with the page content. In this way, it was hoped that accessibility could be supported. While this is in part true, guidelines do not solve all problems and the new WCAG version two guidelines are surrounded by controversy and intrigue. This chapter aims to establish the published literature related to Web accessibility and Web accessibility guidelines, and discuss limitations of the current guidelines and future directions.

  5. Electronic Publishing and The American Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkey, R. W.

    1999-12-01

    Electronic Publishing has created, and will continue to create, new opportunities and challenges for representing scientific work in new media and formats. The AAS will position itself to take advantage of these, both for newly created works and for improved representation of works already published. It is the view of the AAS that we hold the works that we publish in trust for our community and are obligated to protect the integrity of these works and to assure that they continue to be available to the research community. Assignment of copyright to the AAS by the author plays a central role in the preservation of the integrity and accessability of the literature published by the American Astronomical Society. In return for such assignment the AAS allows the author to freely use the work for his/her own purpose and to control the grant of permission to third parties to use such materials. The AAS retains the right to republish the work in whatever format or medium, and to retain the rights after the author's death. Specific advantages to this approach include: Assurance of the continued availability of the materials to the research and educational communities; A guarantee of the intellectual integrity of the materials in the archive; Stimulation of the development of new means of presentation or of access to the archival literature; and Provision of a uniformity of treatment for copyright issues and to relieve the individual authors of much of the administrative work.

  6. Accessibility Videos.

    PubMed

    Kurppa, Ari; Nordlund, Marika

    2016-01-01

    It can be difficult to understand accessibility, if you do not have the personal experience. The Accessibility Centre ESKE produced short videos which demonstrate the meaning of accessibility in different situations. Videos will raise accessibility awareness of architects, other planners and professionals in the construction field and maintenance. PMID:27534282

  7. Why publish with AGU?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graedel, T. E.

    The most visible activity of the American Geophysical Union is its publication of scientific journals. There are eight of these: Journal of Geophysical Research—Space Physics (JGR I), Journal of Geophysical Research—Solid Earth (JGR II), Journal of Geophysical Research—Oceans and Atmospheres (JGR III), Radio Science (RS), Water Resources Research (WRR), Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Reviews of Geophysics and Space Physics (RGSP), and the newest, Tectonics.AGU's journals have established solid reputations for scientific excellence over the years. Reputation is not sufficient to sustain a high quality journal, however, since other factors enter into an author's decision on where to publish his or her work. In this article the characteristics of AGU's journals are compared with those of its competitors, with the aim of furnishing guidance to prospective authors and a better understanding of the value of the products to purchasers.

  8. Two-dimensional (2D) infrared (IR) correlation spectroscopy for dynamic absorption behavior of oleic acid (OA) onto silica gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkawa, Takuma; Kanematsu, Wataru; Shinzawa, Hideyuki

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic absorption behavior of oleic acid (OA) onto silica gel was probed by infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Once OA is injected into silica gel placed on a horizontal attenuated total reflectance prism, the silica gel starts to absorb the OA molecules due to the molecular-level interaction based on hydrogen bonding between the COOH of OA and the OH of silica gel. The substantial level of variation of spectral feature is readily observed during the absorption of OA onto silica gel. 2D correlation analysis of the time-dependent IR spectra reveals fine details of absorption dynamics of OA molecules depending on the molecular structure. The predominant absorption of the monomers occurs at the onset of the absorption, and it is then quickly followed by the decrease in the dimers. In other words, the dissociation of the liquid crystals occurs via the disuniting of the tightly packed OA dimers.

  9. Operational results for the experimental DOE/NASA Mod-OA wind turbine project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, R. K.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    The Mod-OA wind turbine project which was to gain early experience in the operation of large wind turbines in a utility environment is discussed. The Mod-OA wind turbines were a first generation design, and even though not cost effective, the operating experience and performance characteristics had a significant effect on the design and development of the second and third generation machines. The Mod-OA machines were modified as a result of the operational experience, particularly the blade development and control system strategy. The results of study to investigate the interaction of a Mod-OA wind turbine with an isolated diesel generation system are discussed. The machine configuration, its advantages and disadvantages and the machine performance and availability are discussed.

  10. The Economics of Publishing and the Publishing of Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Manna, Manfredi

    2003-01-01

    Explores the relationship between economics and scientific journal publishing. Topics include journal pricing in economics; market power exerted by the dominant commercial publisher in economics journal publishing; academic experiments to improve scholarly communication in economics; policies of the United Kingdom Competition Commission; and…

  11. Growth, Defects and Electrooptic Properties of RbTiOAsO4 Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-yang; Wei, Jing-qian; Yin, Xin; Hu, Xiao-bo; Cui, Wei-hong; Guan, Qing-cai; Liu, Yao-gang

    1999-09-01

    RbTiOAsO4 (RTA) crystals of high optical quality were grown with flux method. The defects of RTA crystals are mainly growth striations, growth sector boundaries and sometimes ferroelectric domains. The refractive indices and electrooptic coefficients were measured together with dielectric constants, ionic conductivity and direct current resistivities. It is shown that RbTiOAsO4 is not only as good a nonlinear optical crystal as KTiOPO4 but also a superior electrooptic crystal.

  12. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Weekly Tower CH4 and N2O Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurtell, George; Edwards, Grant; Simpson, George; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected various trace gas and energy flux data in its efforts to characterize the temporal energy and gas exchanges that occurred over the SSA-OA site. This data set contains methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes that were measured at the BOREAS SSA-OA site. These fluxes were measured from 16-Apr to 16-Sep-1994. The data were averaged to weekly values and are available in tabular ASCII files.

  13. A candidate gene for X-linked Ocular Albinism (OA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, M.T.; Schiaffino, V.; Rugarli, E.

    1994-09-01

    Ocular Albinism of the Nettleship-Fall type 1 (OA1) is the most common form of ocular albinism. It is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait with affected males showing severe reduction of visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, photophobia. Ophthalmologic examination reveals foveal hypoplasia, hypopigmentation of the retina and iris translucency. Microscopic examination of melanocytes suggests that the underlying defect in OA1 is an abnormality in melanosome formation. Recently we assembled a 350 kb cosmid contig spanning the entire critical region on Xp22.3, which measures approximately 110 kb. A minimum set of cosmids was used to identify transcribed sequences using both cDNA selection and exon amplification. Two putative exons recovered by exon amplification strategy were found to be highly conserved throughout evolution and, therefore, they were used as probes for the screening of fetal and adult retina cDNA libraries. This led to the isolation of clones spanning a full-length cDNA which measures 7.6 kb. Sequence analysis revealed that the predicted protein product shows homology with syntrophines and a Xenopus laevis apical protein. The gene covers approximately 170 kb of DNA and spans the entire critical region for OA1, being deleted in two patients with contiguous gene deletion including OA1 and in one patient with isolated OA1. Therefore, this new gene represents a very strong candidate for involvement in OA1 (an alternative, but unlikely possibility to be considered is that the true OA1 gene lies within an intron of the former). Northern analysis revealed very high level of expression in retina and melanoma. Unlike most Xp22.3 genes, this gene is conserved in the mouse. We are currently performing SSCP analysis and direct sequencing of exons on DNAs from approximately 60 unrelated patients with OA1 for mutation detection.

  14. Publishing in the Next Few Years: A Commercial Publisher's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Harry J. J.

    Over the past 15 years, internet technology changed the ways of publishing tremendously. It is truly revolutionary that both fresh and historic science publications are so much easier to search and find. This revolution has not been completed and all parties involved in science publishing are continuously adjusting their activities to the new rules and opportunities. From a commercial publisher's perspective, I will extrapolate what happens today to predict what happens in the next few years with journal subscriptions, book publishing, marketing, production and other steps in the publishing process.

  15. Applied and implied semantics in crystallographic publishing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Crystallography is a data-rich, software-intensive scientific discipline with a community that has undertaken direct responsibility for publishing its own scientific journals. That community has worked actively to develop information exchange standards allowing readers of structure reports to access directly, and interact with, the scientific content of the articles. Results Structure reports submitted to some journals of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr) can be automatically validated and published through an efficient and cost-effective workflow. Readers can view and interact with the structures in three-dimensional visualization applications, and can access the experimental data should they wish to perform their own independent structure solution and refinement. The journals also layer on top of this facility a number of automated annotations and interpretations to add further scientific value. Conclusions The benefits of semantically rich information exchange standards have revolutionised the scholarly publishing process for crystallography, and establish a model relevant to many other physical science disciplines. PMID:22932420

  16. Seven Tips for Publishing Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumashiro, Kevin K.

    2004-01-01

    The publishing industry in the field of education is undergoing several profound changes. New publishers are emerging while established publishers are merging. More book series (that is, books on a certain topic that are approved and mentored by one or more established scholars in the field) are being created. Alternative paths are becoming more…

  17. Strategic Change in AAS Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Julie

    2015-08-01

    The American Astronomical Society has embarked on a process of strategic change in its publishing program. The process has incuded authors, AAS leaders, editors, publishing experts, librarians, and data scientists. This session will outline the still ongoing process and present some both upcoming and already available new AAS Publishing features and services to the global astronomy community.

  18. Love's Labour's Lost: Latino Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueredo, Danilo H.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of publishing of Latino literature and journals in the U.S. Nineteenth-century Latino publishing in different geographical regions is examined and the impact of social changes on 20th-century writing is discussed. Bilingual publishing and the role of academic presses are highlighted. (MMU)

  19. Perilous terra incognita--open-access journals.

    PubMed

    Balon, Richard

    2014-04-01

    The author focuses on a new rapidly spreading practice of publication in open-access journals. The pros and cons of open-access journals are discussed. Publishing in these journals may be cost prohibitive for educators and junior faculty members. Some authors may be lured by the ease of publishing in open-access journals (and their, at times, inflated self-description, e.g., "international", "scientific"), and their possibly valuable contributions will escape the attention of Academic Psychiatry readership in the vast sea of open-access journals. The readership may be flooded with a large number of low-quality articles (maybe not even properly peer-reviewed) from open-access journals. It may take some time to sort out what is and what is not relevant and useful. Open-access publishing represents a problematic and controversial practice and may be associated with a conflict of interest for the editors and publishers of these journals.

  20. CAISI Operational Assessment (OA) data collection results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-31

    One of the lessons learned from Operation Desert Shield/Storm was the inability of deployed Combat Service Support (CSS) computers to exchange data effectively in a battlefield environment. The work-around solution to this previously identified problem has been to physically carry floppy disks between computers. A General Officer Steering Committee, directed by the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, determined that immediate corrective action was necessary to ensure viability of the CSS Battlefield Mission Area. The study recommended that a three-phased system development plan address short-, mid- and long-term CSS automation communication interface requirements. In response to this study, Program Executive Office (PEO) Standard Army Management Information System (STAMIS) authorized the development of the CSS Automated Information System Interface (CAISI). Phase I (Near-Term) equipped the {open_quotes}first to fight{close_quotes} Contingency Corps units. Phase II (Mid-Term) is being fielded to the remainder of Force Package One units in the active force. Phase III (Long-Term) will equip the remaining units. CAISI is now in the early stages of Phase II fielding. Prior to full Phase II fielding, CAISI must be approved for production by a Milestone III decision authority. Part of the data that will be used in the Milestone III decision is a demonstration of the CAISI`s operational suitability, as assessed by the US Army Operational Test and Evaluation Command (OPTEC). This assessment will be performed through an Operational Assessment (OA) using data provided from previous technical testing, such as the CAISI Customer User Test (CUT), and a field training exercise conducted by units of the XVIII Airborne Corps. The field training exercise data collection took place during two events.

  1. Access to human, animal, and environmental journals is still limited for the One Health community*

    PubMed Central

    Vreeland, Carol E.; Alpi, Kristine M.; Pike, Caitlin A.; Whitman, Elisabeth E.; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Objective “One Health” is an interdisciplinary approach to evaluating and managing the health and well-being of humans, animals, and the environments they share that relies on knowledge from the domains of human health, animal health, and the environmental sciences. The authors' objective was to evaluate the extent of open access (OA) to journal articles in a sample of literature from these domains. We hypothesized that OA to articles in human health or environmental journals was greater than access to animal health literature. Methods A One Health seminar series provided fifteen topics. One librarian translated each topic into a search strategy and searched four databases for articles from 2011 to 2012. Two independent investigators assigned each article to human health, the environment, animal health, all, other, or combined categories. Article and journal-level OA were determined. Each journal was also assigned a subject category and its indexing evaluated. Results Searches retrieved 2,651 unique articles from 1,138 journals; 1,919 (72%) articles came from 406 journals that contributed more than 1 article. Seventy-seven (7%) journals dealt with all 3 One Health domains; the remaining journals represented human health 487 (43%), environment 172 (15%), animal health 141 (12%), and other/combined categories 261 (23%). The proportion of OA journals in animal health (40%) differed significantly from journals categorized as human (28%), environment (28%), and more than 1 category (29%). The proportion of OA for articles by subject categories ranged from 25%–34%; only the difference between human (34%) and environment (25%) was significant. Conclusions OA to human health literature is more comparable to animal health than hypothesized. Environmental journals had less OA than anticipated. PMID:27076796

  2. Trends in scientific publishing: Dark clouds loom large.

    PubMed

    Vinny, Pulikottil Wilson; Vishnu, Venugopalan Y; Lal, Vivek

    2016-04-15

    The world wide web has brought about a paradigm shift in the way medical research is published and accessed. The ease with which a new journal can be started/hosted by publishing start-ups is unprecedented. The tremendous capabilities of the world wide web and the open access revolution when combined with a highly profitable business have attracted unscrupulous fraudulent operators to the publishing industry. The intent of these fraudulent publishers is solely driven by profit with utter disregard to scientific content, peer reviews and ethics. This phenomenon has been referred to as "predatory publishing". The "international" tag of such journals often betrays their true origins. The gold open access model of publishing, where the author pays the publisher, when coupled with a non-existent peer review threatens to blur the distinction between science and pseudoscience. The average researcher needs to be made more aware of this clear and present danger to the scientific community. Prevention is better than cure. PMID:27000235

  3. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  4. Five Steps to an Accessible Classroom Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amundson, Linda

    2009-01-01

    When teachers or technology coordinators publish a website, they are providing a product for a diverse group of people. That's why website design should follow accessibility guidelines. Websites should be accessible to those with visual, hearing, movement, cognitive, and speech disabilities. Good design means greater accessibility for all. This…

  5. Astronomical Publishing: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchra, John

    Just in the last few years scientific publishing has moved rapidly away from the modes that served it well for over two centuries. As "digital natives" take over the field and rapid and open access comes to dominate the way we communicate, both scholarly journals and libraries need to adopt new business models to serve their communities. This is best done by identifying new "added value" such as databases, full text searching, full cross indexing while at the same time retaining the high quality of peer reviewed publication.

  6. Open Access Metadata, Catalogers, and Vendors: The Future of Cataloging Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Emily Alinder

    2013-01-01

    The open access (OA) movement is working to transform scholarly communication around the world, but this philosophy can also apply to metadata and cataloging records. While some notable, large academic libraries, such as Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Cambridge, released their cataloging records under OA…

  7. Disappearing Act: Persistence and Attrition of Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) in an Open Access Medical Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaraja, Aragudige; Joseph, Shine A.; Polen, Hyla H.; Clauson, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to assess and catalogue the magnitude of URL attrition in a high-impact, open access (OA) general medical journal. Design/methodology/approach: All "Public Library of Science Medicine (PLoS Medicine)" articles for 2005-2007 were evaluated and the following items were assessed: number of entries per issue; type of…

  8. “Let’s Talk about OA Pain”: A Qualitative Analysis of the Perceptions of People Suffering from OA. Towards the Development of a Specific Pain OA-Related Questionnaire, the Osteoarthritis Symptom Inventory Scale (OASIS)

    PubMed Central

    Cedraschi, Christine; Delézay, Sylvie; Marty, Marc; Berenbaum, Francis; Bouhassira, Didier; Henrotin, Yves; Laroche, Françoise; Perrot, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pain is the primary outcome measurement in osteoarthritis, and its assessment is mostly based on its intensity. The management of this difficult chronic condition could be improved by using pain descriptors to improve analyses of painful sensations. This should help to define subgroups of patients based on pain phenotype, for more adapted treatment. This study draws upon patients’ descriptions of their pain, to identify and understand their perception of osteoarthritis pain and to categorize pain dimensions. Methods This qualitative study was conducted with representative types of patients suffering from osteoarthritis. Two focus groups were conducted with a sample of 14 participants, with either recent or chronic OA, at one or multiple sites. Focus groups were semi-structured and used open-ended questions addressing personal experiences to explore the experiences of patients with OA pain and the meanings they attributed to these pains. Results Two main points emerged from content analyses: -A major difficulty in getting patients to describe their osteoarthritis pain: perception that nobody wants to hear about it; necessity to preserve one’s self and social image; notion of self-imposed stoicism; and perception of osteoarthritis as a complex, changing, illogical disease associated with aging. -Osteoarthritis pains were numerous and differed in intensity, duration, depth, type of occurrence, impact and rhythm, but also in painful sensations and associated symptoms. Based on analyses of the verbatim interviews, seven dimensions of OA pain emerged: pain sensory description, OA-related symptoms, pain variability profile, pain-triggering factors, pain and physical activity, mood and image, general physical symptoms. Summary In osteoarthritis, pain analysis should not be restricted to intensity. Our qualitative study identified pain descriptors and defined seven dimensions of osteoarthritis pain. Based on these dimensions, we aim to develop a specific

  9. Research Library Publishing Services: New Options for University Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Karla L.

    2008-01-01

    A 2007 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) survey indicates that research libraries are rapidly developing publishing services: 65 percent of 80 responding ARL member libraries currently deliver or are in processing of planning these services. Established journal titles dominate this emerging publishing sector and are the main drivers of…

  10. Publish or Perish: The Myth and Reality of Academic Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Icy

    2014-01-01

    While writing for scholarly publications is considered a crucial dimension of academic work, the "publish-or-perish" system in our field has increasingly caused anxiety and induced stress among not only young academics but also more established scholars. Using my own publishing experience as a point of departure, I challenge the…

  11. Functional evolution of the OAS1 viral sensor: Insights from old world primates.

    PubMed

    Fish, Ian; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    Infections with viral pathogens impose considerable selective pressure on host defensive genes. Those genes at the forefront, responsible for identifying and binding exogenous molecular viral components, will carry the hallmarks of this struggle. Oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) enzymes play a major role in the innate defense against a large number of viruses by acting as sensors of viral infections. Following their up-regulation by the interferon pathway, OASs bind viral dsRNA and then signal ribonuclease L (RNase L) to degrade RNA, shutting down viral and host protein synthesis. We have investigated the evolution of OAS1 in twenty-two Old World monkey species. We identified a total of 35 codons with the earmarks of positive selection and we performed a comprehensive analysis of their functional significance using in silico modeling of the OAS1 protein. Subdividing OAS1 into functional domains revealed intense purifying selection in the active domain but significant positive directional selection in the RNA-binding domain (RBD), the region where OAS1 binds viral dsRNA. The modeling analysis revealed a concentration of rapidly evolving residues in one region of the RBD suggestive of the sub-functionalization of different regions of the RBD. This analysis also identified several positively selected residues circumscribing the entry to the active site suggesting adaptive evasion of viral antagonism and/or selection for production of oligoadenylate of different length.

  12. Publish--Don't Perish!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpin, Glennelle; Halpin, Gerald

    This paper proposes basic guidelines for the publishing and preparation of manuscripts, with the focus on the publication of empirical research in scientific journals. It is assumed that research is complete only when the results are shared. The guidelines serve as standards, and cover all stages of publishing from the first review of literature…

  13. A Manifesto for Scholarly Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    While university presses grapple with the economic and technological challenges now affecting how books are published--the subject of a thousand and one AAUP conference sessions, e-mail-list debates, and news articles--discussion of "what" is published seems to have taken a back seat. And understandably so. Why obsess about content if books are…

  14. Desktop Publishing in the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstyn, Joan N., Ed.

    Highlighting changes in the work of people within the university, this book presents nine essays that examine the effects of desktop publishing and electronic publishing on professors and students, librarians, and those who work at university presses and in publication departments. Essays in the book are: (1) "Introduction: The Promise of Desktop…

  15. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  16. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  17. Publishers, Publishing and the Internet: How Journal Publishing Will Survive and Prosper in the Electronic Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John E.

    1997-01-01

    The Internet will change how publishers function. Publishers will need to acquire new skills in developing multimedia; become custodians of intellectual property rather than producers of printed artifacts; know copyright and contract law, especially international aspects; and work more closely with universities to deliver electronic information…

  18. Genetic Variation in OAS1 Is a Risk Factor for Initial Infection with West Nile Virus in Man

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jean K.; Lisco, Andrea; McDermott, David H.; Huynh, Linda; Ward, Jerrold M.; Johnson, Bernard; Johnson, Hope; Pape, John; Foster, Gregory A.; Krysztof, David; Follmann, Dean; Stramer, Susan L.; Margolis, Leonid B.; Murphy, Philip M.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a re-emerging pathogen that can cause fatal encephalitis. In mice, susceptibility to WNV has been reported to result from a single point mutation in oas1b, which encodes 2′–5′ oligoadenylate synthetase 1b, a member of the type I interferon-regulated OAS gene family involved in viral RNA degradation. In man, the human ortholog of oas1b appears to be OAS1. The ‘A’ allele at SNP rs10774671 of OAS1 has previously been shown to alter splicing of OAS1 and to be associated with reduced OAS activity in PBMCs. Here we show that the frequency of this hypofunctional allele is increased in both symptomatic and asymptomatic WNV seroconverters (Caucasians from five US centers; total n = 501; OR = 1.6 [95% CI 1.2–2.0], P = 0.0002 in a recessive genetic model). We then directly tested the effect of this SNP on viral replication in a novel ex vivo model of WNV infection in primary human lymphoid tissue. Virus accumulation varied markedly among donors, and was highest for individuals homozygous for the ‘A’ allele (P<0.0001). Together, these data identify OAS1 SNP rs10774671 as a host genetic risk factor for initial infection with WNV in humans. PMID:19247438

  19. Gaining Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses issues schools and universities have encountered in complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and making their facilities more accessible to the disabled. The ADA's vagueness and the architect's need for understanding the regulations is highlighted. (GR)

  20. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  1. Capital access.

    PubMed

    Towne, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    To maintain their viability, hospitals are being compelled to invest in big capital projects such as information technology and renovation and construction. This gatefold examines the trends in credit and capital, and how they affect hospitals' access to money.

  2. The Ethics of Reprint Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Daniel C.

    1971-01-01

    Reprint publishers have been charged with deceptive marketing tactics, high prices and needless duplication of titles which would seem to reflect a questionable code of ethics. Some possible solutions to these, poor communications, problems are given. (Author)

  3. [Trends of electronic publishing in medicine and life sciences].

    PubMed

    Strelski-Waisman, Neta; Waisman, Dan

    2005-09-01

    Scientific publication in the electronic media is gaining popularity in academic libraries, research institutions and commercial organizations. The electronic journal may shorten the processes of writing and publication, decrease publication and distribution costs, and enable access from any location in the world. Electronic publications have unique advantages: it is possible to search them, to create hyperlinks to references and footnotes, as well as to information on the web and to include graphics and photographs at a very low cost. Audio, video and tri-dimensional images may also be included. Electronic publishing may also speed up review and publication processes and enable the writer to receive immediate feedback through the web. However, in spite of the advantages, there are certain points that must be considered: accessibility to previously published material is not guaranteed as databases are not always stable and coverage may change without notice. In addition, the price that commercial publishers charge for their services may be very high or be subject to the purchase of a packaged deal that may include unwanted databases. Many issues of copyright and the use of published material are not yet finalized. In this review we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the electronic scientific publication, the feasibility of keeping appropriate quality and peer-review process, the stability and accessibility of databases managed by the publishers and the acceptance of the electronic format by scientists and clinicians. PMID:16218535

  4. Low Levels of Vitamin D and Worsening of Knee OA: Results from Two Longitudinal Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To confirm reports that 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) deficiency is associated with an increased risk of joint space narrowing or cartilage loss in osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: We measured 25-OH D levels in subjects from two longitudinal cohort studies, the Framingham Osteoarthritis Stud...

  5. 41 CFR 102-85.20 - What does an Occupancy Agreement (OA) do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... defines GSA's relationship with each customer agency and: (a) Establishes specific financial terms... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does an Occupancy Agreement (OA) do? 102-85.20 Section 102-85.20 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  6. Spectral correction of OA signals based on multiple irradiation sensing: experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, K. Gerrit; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Akarçay, H. Günhan

    2016-03-01

    In this study we show that the spectral distortion of OA signals, caused by wavelength-dependent optical attenuation inside the bulk tissue, can be corrected based on OA imaging, when using multiple-irradiation sensing. The tissue is modeled as a strongly scattering background, in which a discrete number of blood vessels, characterized by a higher absorption than the background, are sparsely distributed. OA signals generated by these vessels, which serve as intrinsic "influence detectors", are recorded as a function of irradiation position. In order to account for realistic situations, we have developed a semi-empirical light diffusion model that is fitted to the recorded signals, so as to determine the background's optical effective attenuation coefficient for arbitrarily shaped tissues. The experimental validation of this model was performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms. The results demonstrate a successful correction of the measured OA spectrum of the embedded vessel-like inclusions, in the presence of lateral geometrical boundaries and when vessel-like absorbing structures influence the light propagation.

  7. 41 CFR 102-85.55 - What are the terms and conditions included in an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Occupancy Agreement § 102-85.55 What are the terms and conditions... the actual space and services to be provided and all associated actual costs to the customer during.... OAs typically describe the following, depending on whether the space is leased or Federally owned:...

  8. 41 CFR 102-85.55 - What are the terms and conditions included in an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Occupancy Agreement § 102-85.55 What are the terms and conditions... the actual space and services to be provided and all associated actual costs to the customer during.... OAs typically describe the following, depending on whether the space is leased or Federally owned:...

  9. Functional Imaging in OA: Role of Imaging in the Evaluation of Tissue Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Corey P.

    2014-01-01

    Functional imaging refers broadly to the visualization of organ or tissue physiology using medical image modalities. In load-bearing tissues of the body, including articular cartilage lining the bony ends of joints, changes in strain, stress, and material properties occur in osteoarthritis (OA), providing an opportunity to probe tissue function through the progression of the disease. Here, biomechanical measures in cartilage and related joint tissues are discussed as key imaging biomarkers in the evaluation of OA. Emphasis will be placed on the a) potential of radiography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging to assess early tissue pathomechanics in OA, b) relative utility of kinematic, structural, morphological, and biomechanical measures as functional imaging biomarkers, and c) improved diagnostic specificity through the combination of multiple imaging biomarkers with unique contrasts, including elastography and quantitative assessments of tissue biochemistry. In comparison to other modalities, magnetic resonance imaging provides an extensive range of functional measures at the tissue level, with conventional and emerging techniques available to potentially to assess the spectrum of preclinical to advance OA. PMID:25278049

  10. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Z.; Nesic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and momentum flux data above the canopy along with meteorological and soils data at the BOREAS SSA-OA site from mid-April to the end of the year for 1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  11. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Understory Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Z.; Nesic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and momentum flux data under the canopy along with meteorological and soils data at the BOREAS SSA-OA site from mid-October to mid-November of 1993 and throughout all of 1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  12. 41 CFR 102-85.140 - How are changes in Rent reflected in OAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are changes in Rent reflected in OAs? 102-85.140 Section 102-85.140 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Rent...

  13. Melanosome-autonomous regulation of size and number: the OA1 receptor sustains PMEL expression.

    PubMed

    Falletta, Paola; Bagnato, Paola; Bono, Maria; Monticone, Massimiliano; Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria; Bennett, Dorothy C; Goding, Colin R; Tacchetti, Carlo; Valetti, Caterina

    2014-07-01

    Little is known as to how cells ensure that organelle size and number are coordinated to correctly couple organelle biogenesis to the demands of proliferation or differentiation. OA1 is a melanosome-associated G-protein-coupled receptor involved in melanosome biogenesis during melanocyte differentiation. Cells lacking OA1 contain fewer, but larger, mature melanosomes. Here, we show that OA1 loss of function reduces both the basal expression and the α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone/cAMP-dependent induction of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), the master regulator of melanocyte differentiation. In turn, this leads to a significant reduction in expression of PMEL, a major melanosomal structural protein, but does not affect tyrosinase and melanin levels. In line with its pivotal role in sensing melanosome maturation, OA1 expression rescues melanosome biogenesis, activates MITF expression and thereby coordinates melanosome size and number, providing a quality control mechanism for the organelle in which resides. Thus, resident sensor receptors can activate a transcriptional cascade to specifically promote organelle biogenesis. PMID:24650003

  14. Operation and maintenance manual for the optical alignment system (OAS) system 6250

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, A.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-16

    The OAS is a camera and laser system that will be used as an end effector on the LDUA to properly align the arm with the entry riser. It is attached to the LDUA by means of a Tool Interface Plat (TIP) which provides a feed through for all electrical and pneumatic utilities needed by the end effector to operate.

  15. 78 FR 39649 - Passenger Vessels Accessibility Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1196 RIN 3014-AA11 Passenger Vessels Accessibility... Tuesday, June 25, 2013, make the following correction: PART 1196--PASSENGER VESSELS...

  16. Predatory Publishing, Questionable Peer Review, and Fraudulent Conferences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Open-access is a model for publishing scholarly, peer-reviewed journals on the Internet that relies on sources of funding other than subscription fees. Some publishers and editors have exploited the author-pays model of open-access, publishing for their own profit. Submissions are encouraged through widely distributed e-mails on behalf of a growing number of journals that may accept many or all submissions and subject them to little, if any, peer review or editorial oversight. Bogus conference invitations are distributed in a similar fashion. The results of these less than ethical practices might include loss of faculty member time and money, inappropriate article inclusions in curriculum vitae, and costs to the college or funding source. PMID:25657363

  17. Predatory publishing, questionable peer review, and fraudulent conferences.

    PubMed

    Bowman, John D

    2014-12-15

    Open-access is a model for publishing scholarly, peer-reviewed journals on the Internet that relies on sources of funding other than subscription fees. Some publishers and editors have exploited the author-pays model of open-access, publishing for their own profit. Submissions are encouraged through widely distributed e-mails on behalf of a growing number of journals that may accept many or all submissions and subject them to little, if any, peer review or editorial oversight. Bogus conference invitations are distributed in a similar fashion. The results of these less than ethical practices might include loss of faculty member time and money, inappropriate article inclusions in curriculum vitae, and costs to the college or funding source.

  18. Open Access: Current Status, AAS Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Kevin B.; Biemesderfer, Chris

    Open Access, defined as the free provision of information by science publishers, is not likely to be mandated by law anytime soon in the United States. A collaborative effort, initiated by the House Science Committee, to come to some consensus within the scientific publishing enterprise has resulted in the release of the so-called "Roundtable Recommendations". These will serve as a working model moving forward on fundamental shared starting points for both publishers and authors as well as the Open Access community. The AAS' delayed open access model for publishing is flexible, supportive of our discipline and equitably distributes the cost of publishing to authors and readers. The AAS can support this flexible model because it is not dependent on journal revenues for the support of its member-focused activities.

  19. Access & Equity Newsletter. Volume 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Included in this edition of the "In-the-Know" Access & Equity Newsletter are: (1) State Losing Black Instructors (Gina Smith); (2) Time to Join Together to Seek "Economic Rights" (Darla Moore); and (3) "Advancing Diversity in Higher Education--Diversity Digest" (Mark Giles, Ed.), which is a reprint of an article originally published in…

  20. IBVS — Novel Features of a Small OA Astronomical Journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, A.

    2010-10-01

    The Information Bulletin on Variable Stars (IBVS) is a small, specialized astronomical journal. It has served the variable star community since 1961. An Open Access electronic version was started in 1994. This electronic version offers innovative services to the reader: the use of third-party tools for visualization (Aladin) and third-party name resolution services (SIMBAD or GCVS for objects, and ADS for author names) for search. Considerable efforts have been made to interconnect the journal with other electronic resources such as publications, databases, and archives, like CDS, ADS, GCVS, NED, WFPDB and WEBDA. Additional aspects of this small electronic journal to be discussed are: archiving policies, copyrights and the use of OAI-PMH.

  1. Structural insights into human GPCR protein OA1: a computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anirban; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Andhirka, Sai Krishna; Aradhyam, Gopala Krishna; Joshi, Rajendra

    2012-05-01

    Human ocular albinism type 1 protein (OA1)-a member of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily-is an integral membrane glycoprotein expressed exclusively by intracellular organelles known as melanocytes, and is responsible for the proper biogenesis of melanosomes. Mutations in the Oa1 gene are responsible for the disease ocular albinism. Despite its clinical importance, there is a lack of in-depth understanding of its structure and mechanism of activation due to the absence of a crystal structure. In the present study, homology modeling was applied to predicting OA1 structure following thorough sequence analysis and secondary structure predictions. The predicted model had the signature residues and motifs expected of GPCRs, and was used for carrying out molecular docking studies with an endogenous ligand, L-DOPA and an antagonist, dopamine; the results agreed quite well with the available experimental data. Finally, three sets of explicit molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in lipid bilayer, the results of which not only confirmed the stability of the predicted model, but also helped witness some differences in structural features such as rotamer toggle switch, helical tilts and hydrogen bonding pattern that helped distinguish between the agonist- and antagonist-bound receptor forms. In place of the typical "D/ERY"-motif-mediated "ionic lock", a hydrogen bond mediated by the "DAY" motif was observed that could be used to distinguish the agonist and antagonist bound forms of OA1. In the absence of a crystal structure, this study helped to shed some light on the structural features of OA1, and its behavior in the presence of an agonist and an antagonist, which might be helpful in the future drug discovery process for ocular albinism. PMID:21938455

  2. Sources, Properties, Aging, and Anthropogenic Influences on OA and SOA over the Southeast US and the Amazon duing SOAS, DC3, SEAC4RS, and GoAmazon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SE US and the Amazon have large sources of biogenic VOCs, varying anthropogenic pollution impacts, and often poor organic aerosol (OA) model performance. Recent results on the sources, properties, aging, and impact of anthropogenic pollution on OA and secondary OA (SOA) over ...

  3. GPNMB/OA protein increases the invasiveness of human metastatic prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 through MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Bodei, Serena; Bedussi, Francesca; Fragni, Martina; Bonini, Sara Anna; Simeone, Claudio; Zani, Danilo; Berruti, Alfredo; Missale, Cristina; Memo, Maurizio; Spano, PierFranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2014-04-15

    Non-metastatic glycoprotein melanoma protein B (GPNMB), also known as osteoactivin (OA) is expressed in a wide array of tumors and represents an emerging target for drug development. In this study, we investigated the role of GPNMB/OA in the progression of human metastatic DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells. GPNMB/OA contribution in PCa malignant phenotype has been analyzed by small interfering RNA-induced GPNMB/OA silencing. We found that following GPNMB/OA silencing the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells, evaluated by using in vitro invasivity assay, as well as the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity were equally strongly inhibited. By contrast knocking down GPNMB/OA weakly attenuated cell proliferation rate of DU145, an effect that paralleled with an increase number of apoptotic cells. However, PC3 cell growth seems to be not affected by GPNMB/OA. Together, these data reveal that GPNMB/OA acts as a critical molecular mediator promoting the acquisition of the more aggressive, pro-metastatic phenotype distinctive of human DU145 and PC3 cell lines. - Highlights: • GPNMB/OA expression correlates with DU145 and PC3 cells malignant phenotype. • GPNMB/OA silencing affects the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells. • GPNMB/OA increases invasiveness by up-regulating MMPs activity. • GPNMB/OA promotes DU145 and PC3 cells progression into a more aggressive phenotype.

  4. Publishing protocols for partnered research.

    PubMed

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Woodard, LeChauncy; Garvin, Jennifer H; Murawsky, Jeffrey; Petersen, Laura A

    2014-12-01

    Published scientific protocols are advocated as a means of controlling bias in research reporting. Indeed, many journals require a study protocol with manuscript submission. However, publishing protocols of partnered research (PPR) can be challenging in light of the research model's dynamic nature, especially as no current reporting standards exist. Nevertheless, as these protocols become more prevalent, a priori documentation of methods in partnered research studies becomes increasingly important. Using as illustration a suite of studies aimed at improving coordination and communication in the primary care setting, we sought to identify challenges in publishing PPR relative to traditional designs, present alternative solutions to PPR publication, and propose an initial checklist of content to be included in protocols of partnered research. Challenges to publishing PPR include reporting details of research components intended to be co-created with operational partners, changes to sampling and entry strategy, and alignment of scientific and operational goals. Proposed solutions include emulating reporting standards of qualitative research, participatory action research, and adaptive trial designs, as well as embracing technological tools that facilitate publishing adaptive protocols, with version histories that are able to be updated as major protocol changes occur. Finally, we present a proposed checklist of reporting elements for partnered research protocols. PMID:25355092

  5. Should surgical outcomes be published?

    PubMed

    Chou, Evelyn; Abboudi, Hamid; Shamim Khan, Mohammed; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2015-04-01

    Despite publishing surgical outcomes being a positive step forwards in the progression of England's healthcare system, it has no doubt been faced with criticism and reservations. This review article aims to discuss the pros and cons of publishing individual surgical outcomes, as well as the challenges faced. Publishing outcomes requires data from a number of sources such as national clinical audits, hospital episode statistics, patient-reported outcomes, registers and information from revalidation. As yet, eight surgical specialties have begun publishing their data, including cardiac (coronary artery bypass graft, valve and aortic surgery), endocrine (thyroidectomy, lobectomy, isthmusectomy), orthopaedic (hip and knee replacement), urological (full and partial nephrectomies, nephroureterectomy), colorectal (bowel tumour removal), upper gastrointestinal (stomach cancer and oesophageal cancer removal, bariatric surgery), ear, nose and throat surgery (larynx, oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx and salivary gland cancer removal), as well as vascular surgery (abdominal aortic aneurysm, carotid endarterectomy). However, not all procedures have been addressed. Despite the controversy surrounding the topic of publishing surgical outcomes, the advantages of reporting outcomes outweigh the disadvantages, and these challenges can be overcome, to create a more reliable, trustworthy and transparent NHS. Perhaps one of the main challenges has been the difficulty in collecting large amounts of clinically significant data able to quantify the performance of surgeons.

  6. Publishing protocols for partnered research.

    PubMed

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Woodard, LeChauncy; Garvin, Jennifer H; Murawsky, Jeffrey; Petersen, Laura A

    2014-12-01

    Published scientific protocols are advocated as a means of controlling bias in research reporting. Indeed, many journals require a study protocol with manuscript submission. However, publishing protocols of partnered research (PPR) can be challenging in light of the research model's dynamic nature, especially as no current reporting standards exist. Nevertheless, as these protocols become more prevalent, a priori documentation of methods in partnered research studies becomes increasingly important. Using as illustration a suite of studies aimed at improving coordination and communication in the primary care setting, we sought to identify challenges in publishing PPR relative to traditional designs, present alternative solutions to PPR publication, and propose an initial checklist of content to be included in protocols of partnered research. Challenges to publishing PPR include reporting details of research components intended to be co-created with operational partners, changes to sampling and entry strategy, and alignment of scientific and operational goals. Proposed solutions include emulating reporting standards of qualitative research, participatory action research, and adaptive trial designs, as well as embracing technological tools that facilitate publishing adaptive protocols, with version histories that are able to be updated as major protocol changes occur. Finally, we present a proposed checklist of reporting elements for partnered research protocols.

  7. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  8. [Sanitary classification of publishing products].

    PubMed

    Teksheva, L M

    2001-01-01

    The natural asthenopic pattern of the process of reading shows it necessary to set sanitary standards of publishing production, namely, printing type styling and the printing quality of publications. The necessity of sanitary classification of publishing production stems from the specificity of reading the publications of different functional uses and from the physiological features of vision in different age group readers. The developed sanitary classification of printing production is based on the researches into the actual visual load while reading the publications of different types by readers of different ages.

  9. High Anti-Dengue Virus Activity of the OAS Gene Family Is Associated With Increased Severity of Dengue.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Lin, Ren-Jye; Kalayanarooj, Sita Mint; Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan; Casademont, Isabelle; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Yu, Han-Pang; Lert-Itthiporn, Worachart; Chaiyaratana, Wathanee; Tangthawornchaikul, Nattaya; Tangnararatchakit, Kanchana; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Chang, Bi-Lan; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Yoksan, Sutee; Malasit, Prida; Despres, Philipe; Paul, Richard; Lin, Yi-Ling; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj

    2015-12-15

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that afflicts millions of individuals worldwide every year. Infection by any of the 4 dengue virus (DENV) serotypes can result in a spectrum of disease severity. We investigated the impact of variants of interferon-regulated innate immunity genes with a potent antiviral effect on the outcome of DENV infection. We compared the effect of OAS gene family variants on 2 DENV serotypes in cell culture. While both OAS1-p42 and p46 showed antiviral activity against DENV-2, only OAS1-p42 presented anti-DENV-1 activity. Conversely, whereas both OAS3_S381 and R381 variants were able to block DENV-1 infection, the anti-DENV-2 activity observed for OAS3_S381 was largely lost for the R381 variant. By means of an allelic association study of a cohort of 740 patients with dengue, we found a protective effect of OAS3_R381 against shock (odds ratio [OR], 0.37; P < .001). This effect was due to DENV-2 infections (OR, 0.13; P = .007) but was absent for DENV-1, in accordance with the serotype-dependent OAS3 activity found in the functional study. Severe dengue has long been associated with a cytokine storm of unclear origin. This work identifies an early innate immunity process that could lead to the immune overreaction observed in severe dengue and could be triggered by a specific host genotype-pathogen genotype interaction.

  10. 77 FR 37553 - Access Authorization Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... direct final rule published in the Federal Register on May 3, 2012 (77 FR 26149) is confirmed as June 22...: On May 3, 2012 (77 FR 26149), the NRC published a direct final rule amending its regulations at Title... COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 11 and 25 RIN 3150-AJ00 Access Authorization Fees AGENCY: Nuclear...

  11. Publishing perishing? Towards tomorrow's information architecture.

    PubMed

    Seringhaus, Michael R; Gerstein, Mark B

    2007-01-01

    Scientific articles are tailored to present information in human-readable aliquots. Although the Internet has revolutionized the way our society thinks about information, the traditional text-based framework of the scientific article remains largely unchanged. This format imposes sharp constraints upon the type and quantity of biological information published today. Academic journals alone cannot capture the findings of modern genome-scale inquiry. Like many other disciplines, molecular biology is a science of facts: information inherently suited to database storage. In the past decade, a proliferation of public and private databases has emerged to house genome sequence, protein structure information, functional genomics data and more; these digital repositories are now a vital component of scientific communication. The next challenge is to integrate this vast and ever-growing body of information with academic journals and other media. To truly integrate scientific information we must modernize academic publishing to exploit the power of the Internet. This means more than online access to articles, hyperlinked references and web-based supplemental data; it means making articles fully computer-readable with intelligent markup and Structured Digital Abstracts.Here, we examine the changing roles of scholarly journals and databases. We present our vision of the optimal information architecture for the biosciences, and close with tangible steps to improve our handling of scientific information today while paving the way for an expansive central index in the future.

  12. Expression of ocular albinism 1 (OA1), 3, 4- dihydroxy- L-phenylalanine (DOPA) receptor, in both neuronal and non-neuronal organs.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Nobuhiko; Naito, Saki; Masukawa, Daiki; Kaneda, Moemi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Yamashita, Yui; Endo, Itaru; Nakamura, Fumio; Goshima, Yoshio

    2015-03-30

    Oa1 is the casual gene for ocular albinism-1 in humans. The gene product OA1, alternatively designated as GPR143, belongs to G-protein coupled receptors. It has been reported that OA1 is a specific receptor for 3, 4-dihydroxy- L-phenylalanine (DOPA) in retinal pigmental epithelium where DOPA facilitates the pigmentation via OA1 stimulation. We have recently shown that OA1 mediates DOPA-induced depressor response in rat nucleus tractus solitarii. However, the distribution and function of OA1 in other regions are largely unknown. We have generated oa1 knockout mice and examined OA1 expression in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues by immunohistochemical analyses using anti-mouse OA1 monoclonal antibodies. In the telencephalon, OA1 was expressed in cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Predominant expression of OA1 was observed in the pyramidal neurons in these regions. OA1 was also expressed in habenular nucleus, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, and medulla oblongata. The expression of OA1 in the nucleus tractus solitarii of medulla oblongata may support the reduction of blood pressure by the microinjection of DOPA into this region. Outside of the nervous system, OA1 was expressed in heart, lung, liver, kidney and spleen. Abundant expression was observed in the renal tubules and the splenic capsules. These peripheral regions are innervated by numerous sympathetic nerve endings. In addition, substantia nigra contains a large population of dopaminergic neurons. Thus, the immunohistochemical analyses suggest that OA1 may modulate the monoaminergic functions in both peripheral and central nervous systems. PMID:25601010

  13. Reflections on efforts to improve medical publishing in Africa.

    PubMed

    Gondwe, Mzamose

    2010-12-01

    Over the last five years several scholarly publishing associations have been launched in Africa - the Forum for African Medical Editors (FAME), the Society of African Journals (SAJE), the Consortium of African Scholarly Publishers (CASP), the Africa Journals Partnership Project and the African Association of Science Editors (AASE). What, if any, has been the impact of these initiatives? This paper reviews the most notable of these associations, FAME, which was established in 2003 with the support of the World Association of Medical Editors, the Council of Science Editors and the Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR). FAME is evaluated in relation to two other international scholarly publishing associations - the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO) in South America and the Eastern Mediterranean Association of Medical Editors (EMAME). The article also discusses the future of FAME with regards to new developments in open access publishing through African Journals Online.

  14. miR-139 modulates MCPIP1/IL-6 expression and induces apoptosis in human OA chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Makki, Mohammad Shahidul; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2015-01-01

    IL-6 is an inflammatory cytokine and its overexpression plays an important role in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. Expression of IL-6 is regulated post-transcriptionally by MCPIP1. The 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of MCPIP1 mRNA harbors a miR-139 ‘seed sequence', therefore we examined the post-transcriptional regulation of MCPIP1 by miR-139 and its impact on IL-6 expression in OA chondrocytes. Expression of miR-139 was found to be high in the damaged portion of the OA cartilage compared with unaffected cartilage from the same patient and was also induced by IL-1β in OA chondrocytes. Inhibition of miR-139 decreased the expression of IL-6 mRNA by 38% and of secreted IL-6 protein by 40%. However, overexpression of miR-139 increased the expression of IL-6 mRNA by 36% and of secreted IL-6 protein by 56%. These data correlated with altered expression profile of MCPIP1 in transfected chondrocytes. Studies with a luciferase reporter construct confirmed the interactions of miR-139 with the ‘seed sequence' located in the 3′ UTR of MCPIP mRNA. Furthermore, miR-139 overexpression increased the catabolic gene expression but expression of anabolic markers remained unchanged. Overexpression of miR-139 also induced apoptosis in OA chondrocytes. Importantly, we also discovered that IL-6 is a potent inducer of miR-139 expression in OA chondrocytes. These findings indicate that miR-139 functions as a post-transcriptional regulator of MCPIP1 expression and enhances IL-6 expression, which further upregulates miR-139 expression in OA chondrocytes. These results support our hypothesis that miR-139-mediated downregulation of MCPIP1 promotes IL-6 expression in OA. Therefore, targeting miR-139 could be therapeutically beneficial in the management of OA. PMID:26450708

  15. Contrasted patterns of variation and evolutionary convergence at the antiviral OAS1 gene in old world primates.

    PubMed

    Fish, Ian; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2015-09-01

    The oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1) enzyme acts as an innate sensor of viral infection and plays a major role in the defense against a wide diversity of viruses. Polymorphisms at OAS1 have been shown to correlate with differential susceptibility to several infections of great public health significance, including hepatitis C virus, SARS coronavirus, and West Nile virus. Population genetics analyses in hominoids have revealed interesting evolutionary patterns. In Central African chimpanzee, OAS1 has evolved under long-term balancing selection, resulting in the persistence of polymorphisms since the origin of hominoids, whereas human populations have acquired and retained OAS1 alleles from Neanderthal and Denisovan origin. We decided to further investigate the evolution of OAS1 in primates by characterizing intra-specific variation in four species commonly used as models in infectious disease research: the rhesus macaque, the cynomolgus macaque, the olive baboon, and the Guinea baboon. In baboons, OAS1 harbors a very low level of variation. In contrast, OAS1 in macaques exhibits a level of polymorphism far greater than the genomic average, which is consistent with the action of balancing selection. The region of the enzyme that directly interacts with viral RNA, the RNA-binding domain, contains a number of polymorphisms likely to affect the RNA-binding affinity of OAS1. This strongly suggests that pathogen-driven balancing selection acting on the RNA-binding domain of OAS1 is maintaining variation at this locus. Interestingly, we found that a number of polymorphisms involved in RNA-binding were shared between macaques and chimpanzees. This represents an unusual case of convergent polymorphism.

  16. Contrasted patterns of variation and evolutionary convergence at the antiviral OAS1 gene in old world primates.

    PubMed

    Fish, Ian; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2015-09-01

    The oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1) enzyme acts as an innate sensor of viral infection and plays a major role in the defense against a wide diversity of viruses. Polymorphisms at OAS1 have been shown to correlate with differential susceptibility to several infections of great public health significance, including hepatitis C virus, SARS coronavirus, and West Nile virus. Population genetics analyses in hominoids have revealed interesting evolutionary patterns. In Central African chimpanzee, OAS1 has evolved under long-term balancing selection, resulting in the persistence of polymorphisms since the origin of hominoids, whereas human populations have acquired and retained OAS1 alleles from Neanderthal and Denisovan origin. We decided to further investigate the evolution of OAS1 in primates by characterizing intra-specific variation in four species commonly used as models in infectious disease research: the rhesus macaque, the cynomolgus macaque, the olive baboon, and the Guinea baboon. In baboons, OAS1 harbors a very low level of variation. In contrast, OAS1 in macaques exhibits a level of polymorphism far greater than the genomic average, which is consistent with the action of balancing selection. The region of the enzyme that directly interacts with viral RNA, the RNA-binding domain, contains a number of polymorphisms likely to affect the RNA-binding affinity of OAS1. This strongly suggests that pathogen-driven balancing selection acting on the RNA-binding domain of OAS1 is maintaining variation at this locus. Interestingly, we found that a number of polymorphisms involved in RNA-binding were shared between macaques and chimpanzees. This represents an unusual case of convergent polymorphism. PMID:26156123

  17. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  18. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  19. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  20. EDITORIAL AND PUBLISHER'S NOTE: BIPM to Publish Metrologia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D.

    1990-01-01

    Beginning in January of next year Metrologia will be published by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. This does not mean that a new journal is being created: externally the journal may have changed a little, but internally any changes will be of form rather than of substance. Metrologia was intended originally as a vehicle that would permit the metrological community to communicate progress in fundamental scientific measurements, to report original experiments and techniques in the area of secondary measurement, to review work in specialist fields and to disseminate the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures. The promotion of these activities remains the central objective of editorial policy. The separation from our friends in Springer-Verlag is one we view with some regret and not a little trepidation. On the days when things were not going well in the editorial office at the BIPM it was always a source of comfort to remember the willingness and professionalism with which our colleagues at Springer-Verlag supported the production and distribution of the journal. For some time, however, it has been felt at the BIPM that the Bureau should take direct responsibility for all aspects of Metrologia. This feeling led to discussions on the future of the journal and in June to the decision to separate. For those of us at the BIPM, the change represents an occasion to review the activities and priorities of the journal and so to revivify it. Our hope is to retain the best features of the existing Metrologia and to add to them others which will both expand the readership and bring to the journal a yet greater fraction of the finest articles on the topic of precise measurement. Publisher's Note The first issue of Metrologia was published in 1965. That issue, as have been all others since, was published by Springer-Verlag "under the Auspices of the International Committee for Weights and Measures". This phrase is the public expression of what

  1. The Future of Scholarly Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In these times of financial crisis, much of the discussion about scholarly publishing has focused on budgets, the switch to electronic formats, and the future of the monograph. Throughout, however, university presses have continued to bring out important scholarship that is the mainstay of academe. "The Chronicle Review" asked a group of editors…

  2. A Course in Desktop Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerick, Nancy M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes "Promotional Publications," a required course for public relations majors, which teaches the basics of desktop publishing. Outlines how the course covers the preparation of publications used as communication tools in public relations, advertising, and organizations, with an emphasis upon design, layout, and technology. (MM)

  3. Publishing Research in LIS Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenton, Andrew K.

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to the considerable coverage of research methods and report writing, relatively little attention has been given in the professional literature to the steps that should be taken and issues which may be borne in mind by a researcher seeking to have his or her work published. By addressing ten broad questions reflecting common concerns,…

  4. Access to Resources: The International Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Line, Maurice B.

    1986-01-01

    Notes four Ages of Access to published knowledge--Individual, Local, National, and International--and considers impact of computers and electronic technology. Speed of access, automatic catalogs, digital text storage and transmission, need for observance of common standards and procedures, international cooperation, and worldwide system of…

  5. Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    The Commission on Preservation and Access was established to foster and support collaboration among libraries and allied organizations in order to ensure the preservation of the published and documentary record in all formats and to provide enhanced access to scholarly information. The Commission's newsletter keeps preservation and access…

  6. A New Era of Open Access?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercieca, Paul; Macauley, Peter

    2008-01-01

    There has been a push for open access journals for more than a decade in a higher education and research environment in which the "publish or perish" syndrome is as dominant as ever. This article examines the success, or otherwise, of open access schemes in light of the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) initiative. It compares the…

  7. Open Access, Education Research, and Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlough, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: The open access movement has successfully drawn attention to economic and political aspects of scholarly communication through a significant body of commentary that debates the merits of open access and the potential damage it may do to scholarly publishing. Researchers within the field of education research, notably John…

  8. 78 FR 20255 - Leased Commercial Access

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We published a final rule document at 73 FR 10675, February 28, 2008, revising rules... carte leased access service shall be passed through to the leased access programmer. (h) The maximum... relief, the petitioner must show by clear and convincing evidence that the cable operator has...

  9. Achieving open access to conservation science.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Richard A; Lee, Jasmine R; Watson, James E M

    2014-12-01

    Conservation science is a crisis discipline in which the results of scientific enquiry must be made available quickly to those implementing management. We assessed the extent to which scientific research published since the year 2000 in 20 conservation science journals is publicly available. Of the 19,207 papers published, 1,667 (8.68%) are freely downloadable from an official repository. Moreover, only 938 papers (4.88%) meet the standard definition of open access in which material can be freely reused providing attribution to the authors is given. This compares poorly with a comparable set of 20 evolutionary biology journals, where 31.93% of papers are freely downloadable and 7.49% are open access. Seventeen of the 20 conservation journals offer an open access option, but fewer than 5% of the papers are available through open access. The cost of accessing the full body of conservation science runs into tens of thousands of dollars per year for institutional subscribers, and many conservation practitioners cannot access pay-per-view science through their workplace. However, important initiatives such as Research4Life are making science available to organizations in developing countries. We urge authors of conservation science to pay for open access on a per-article basis or to choose publication in open access journals, taking care to ensure the license allows reuse for any purpose providing attribution is given. Currently, it would cost $51 million to make all conservation science published since 2000 freely available by paying the open access fees currently levied to authors. Publishers of conservation journals might consider more cost effective models for open access and conservation-oriented organizations running journals could consider a broader range of options for open access to nonmembers such as sponsorship of open access via membership fees.

  10. Achieving open access to conservation science.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Richard A; Lee, Jasmine R; Watson, James E M

    2014-12-01

    Conservation science is a crisis discipline in which the results of scientific enquiry must be made available quickly to those implementing management. We assessed the extent to which scientific research published since the year 2000 in 20 conservation science journals is publicly available. Of the 19,207 papers published, 1,667 (8.68%) are freely downloadable from an official repository. Moreover, only 938 papers (4.88%) meet the standard definition of open access in which material can be freely reused providing attribution to the authors is given. This compares poorly with a comparable set of 20 evolutionary biology journals, where 31.93% of papers are freely downloadable and 7.49% are open access. Seventeen of the 20 conservation journals offer an open access option, but fewer than 5% of the papers are available through open access. The cost of accessing the full body of conservation science runs into tens of thousands of dollars per year for institutional subscribers, and many conservation practitioners cannot access pay-per-view science through their workplace. However, important initiatives such as Research4Life are making science available to organizations in developing countries. We urge authors of conservation science to pay for open access on a per-article basis or to choose publication in open access journals, taking care to ensure the license allows reuse for any purpose providing attribution is given. Currently, it would cost $51 million to make all conservation science published since 2000 freely available by paying the open access fees currently levied to authors. Publishers of conservation journals might consider more cost effective models for open access and conservation-oriented organizations running journals could consider a broader range of options for open access to nonmembers such as sponsorship of open access via membership fees. PMID:25158824

  11. The Trend towards Self-Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Pat

    1992-01-01

    Discusses reasons for the self-publishing trend in Canada. Topics addressed include changes in the publishing industry, desktop publishing, quality control, printing, publicity, reviews, marketing, and the future of self-publishing. Two sidebars discuss vanity presses and self-publishing and libraries. (32 references) (LRW)

  12. Electrons, Electronic Publishing, and Electronic Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownrigg, Edwin B.; Lynch, Clifford A.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a perspective on electronic publishing by distinguishing between "Newtonian" publishing and "quantum-mechanical" publishing. Highlights include media and publishing, works delivered through electronic media, electronic publishing and the printed word, management of intellectual property, and recent copyright-law issues and their…

  13. The GBIF Integrated Publishing Toolkit: Facilitating the Efficient Publishing of Biodiversity Data on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Tim; Döring, Markus; Guralnick, Robert; Bloom, David; Wieczorek, John; Braak, Kyle; Otegui, Javier; Russell, Laura; Desmet, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The planet is experiencing an ongoing global biodiversity crisis. Measuring the magnitude and rate of change more effectively requires access to organized, easily discoverable, and digitally-formatted biodiversity data, both legacy and new, from across the globe. Assembling this coherent digital representation of biodiversity requires the integration of data that have historically been analog, dispersed, and heterogeneous. The Integrated Publishing Toolkit (IPT) is a software package developed to support biodiversity dataset publication in a common format. The IPT’s two primary functions are to 1) encode existing species occurrence datasets and checklists, such as records from natural history collections or observations, in the Darwin Core standard to enhance interoperability of data, and 2) publish and archive data and metadata for broad use in a Darwin Core Archive, a set of files following a standard format. Here we discuss the key need for the IPT, how it has developed in response to community input, and how it continues to evolve to streamline and enhance the interoperability, discoverability, and mobilization of new data types beyond basic Darwin Core records. We close with a discussion how IPT has impacted the biodiversity research community, how it enhances data publishing in more traditional journal venues, along with new features implemented in the latest version of the IPT, and future plans for more enhancements. PMID:25099149

  14. The GBIF integrated publishing toolkit: facilitating the efficient publishing of biodiversity data on the internet.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Tim; Döring, Markus; Guralnick, Robert; Bloom, David; Wieczorek, John; Braak, Kyle; Otegui, Javier; Russell, Laura; Desmet, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The planet is experiencing an ongoing global biodiversity crisis. Measuring the magnitude and rate of change more effectively requires access to organized, easily discoverable, and digitally-formatted biodiversity data, both legacy and new, from across the globe. Assembling this coherent digital representation of biodiversity requires the integration of data that have historically been analog, dispersed, and heterogeneous. The Integrated Publishing Toolkit (IPT) is a software package developed to support biodiversity dataset publication in a common format. The IPT's two primary functions are to 1) encode existing species occurrence datasets and checklists, such as records from natural history collections or observations, in the Darwin Core standard to enhance interoperability of data, and 2) publish and archive data and metadata for broad use in a Darwin Core Archive, a set of files following a standard format. Here we discuss the key need for the IPT, how it has developed in response to community input, and how it continues to evolve to streamline and enhance the interoperability, discoverability, and mobilization of new data types beyond basic Darwin Core records. We close with a discussion how IPT has impacted the biodiversity research community, how it enhances data publishing in more traditional journal venues, along with new features implemented in the latest version of the IPT, and future plans for more enhancements.

  15. The GBIF integrated publishing toolkit: facilitating the efficient publishing of biodiversity data on the internet.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Tim; Döring, Markus; Guralnick, Robert; Bloom, David; Wieczorek, John; Braak, Kyle; Otegui, Javier; Russell, Laura; Desmet, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The planet is experiencing an ongoing global biodiversity crisis. Measuring the magnitude and rate of change more effectively requires access to organized, easily discoverable, and digitally-formatted biodiversity data, both legacy and new, from across the globe. Assembling this coherent digital representation of biodiversity requires the integration of data that have historically been analog, dispersed, and heterogeneous. The Integrated Publishing Toolkit (IPT) is a software package developed to support biodiversity dataset publication in a common format. The IPT's two primary functions are to 1) encode existing species occurrence datasets and checklists, such as records from natural history collections or observations, in the Darwin Core standard to enhance interoperability of data, and 2) publish and archive data and metadata for broad use in a Darwin Core Archive, a set of files following a standard format. Here we discuss the key need for the IPT, how it has developed in response to community input, and how it continues to evolve to streamline and enhance the interoperability, discoverability, and mobilization of new data types beyond basic Darwin Core records. We close with a discussion how IPT has impacted the biodiversity research community, how it enhances data publishing in more traditional journal venues, along with new features implemented in the latest version of the IPT, and future plans for more enhancements. PMID:25099149

  16. Celebrations and Tough Questions Follow Harvard's Move to Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    In light of a decision by members of Harvard University's Faculty of Arts and Sciences to make access to their scholarly papers free, advocates of open access celebrated, but some publishers expressed concern. Members of Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences voted unanimously to provide the university with copies of their published articles and…

  17. Critical appraisal of published literature

    PubMed Central

    Umesh, Goneppanavar; Karippacheril, John George; Magazine, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    With a large output of medical literature coming out every year, it is impossible for readers to read every article. Critical appraisal of scientific literature is an important skill to be mastered not only by academic medical professionals but also by those involved in clinical practice. Before incorporating changes into the management of their patients, a thorough evaluation of the current or published literature is an important step in clinical practice. It is necessary for assessing the published literature for its scientific validity and generalizability to the specific patient community and reader's work environment. Simple steps have been provided by Consolidated Standard for Reporting Trial statements, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and several other resources which if implemented may help the reader to avoid reading flawed literature and prevent the incorporation of biased or untrustworthy information into our practice. PMID:27729695

  18. Construction of low-cost, Mod-OA wood composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Two sixty-foot, low-cost, wood composite blades for service on 200 kW Mod-OA wind turbines were constructed. The blades were constructed of epoxy resin-bonded Douglas fir veneers for the leading edge sections, and paper honeycombcored, birch plywood faced panels for the afterbody sections. The blades were joined to the wind turbine hub by epoxy resin-bonded steel load take-off studs embedded into the root end of the blades. The blades were installed on the 200 kW Mod-OA wind turbine facility at Kahuku, Hawaii, The blades completed nearly 8,000 hours of operation over an 18 month period at an average power of 150 kW prior to replacement with another set of wood composite blades. The blades were replaced because of a corrosion failure of the steel shank on one stud. Inspections showed that the wood composite structure remained in excellent condition.

  19. Flux growth and properties of RbTiOAsO 4 (RTA) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianru; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Min; Nie, Dezhen

    1993-03-01

    Flux growth of RbTiOAsO4 (RTA) crystal is reported. The unit cell parameters are determined as a = 13.2428 Å, b = 10.7624 Å and c = 6.6685 Å. The transmission spectra range is 0.38 to 5.1 μ. The refractive indices at the various wavelengths and the nonlinear optical coefficients are measured. The phase matching curve for 1.064 μ laser is calculated.

  20. BOREAS TF-2 SSA-OA Tethersonde Meteorological and Ozone Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, A. James; Mickle, Robert E.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux-2 (BOREAS TF-2) team collected meteorological and ozone measurements from instruments mounted below a tethered balloon. These data were collected at the Southern Study Area Old Aspen (SSA-OA) site to extend meteorological and ozone measurements made from the flux tower to heights of 300 m. The tethersonde operated during the fall of 1993 and the spring, summer, and fall of 1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  1. Altered function in cartilage derived mesenchymal stem cell leads to OA-related cartilage erosion

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zenan; Ma, Pei; Wu, Nan; Su, Xinlin; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Chao; Liu, Sen; Chen, Weisheng; Ma, Bupeng; Yang, Xu; Ma, Yufen; Weng, Xisheng; Qiu, Guixing; Huang, Shishu; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    A portion of osteoarthritis (OA) patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) had monocondylar destruction in medial femoral condyle, but healthy-appearant cartilage in lateral side. However, there is limited information concerning functional differences of cartilage derived mesenchymal stem cell (CMSC) between these two locations in the same donor and its possible role in the pathogenesis of OA. Cells isolated from the degraded cartilage in medial condyle and normal cartilage in lateral side from OA patients were identified with co-expressed markers CD105 and CD166 and confirmed as CMSCs by immunophenotype. The relative percentage, proliferation activity, multi-lineage differentiation potential and miRNA expression profile of CMSCs in two groups were compared by flow cytometry, CCK-8 assay, cytochemical staining, immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and miRNA microarray analysis. Our study suggested that the percentage (10.61±6.97% vs. 18.44±9.97%, P<0.05) and proliferation rate (P<0.01) of CD105+/CD166+ CMSCs from the degraded cartilage were significantly reduced compared with those from the normal cartilage. CMSCs from the degraded cartilage also showed stronger osteogenic (P<0.05), weaker adipogenic (P<0.01), and comparable chondrogenic potential (P>0.05) during differentiation. MiR-31-5p and miR-424-5p were down regulated in CMSCs from the degraded cartilage. In conclusion, altered function such as reduced percentage and proliferation ability, as well as changes in differentiation profile of CMSC contributed to homeostasis imbalance, leading to OA-related cartilage erosion. Furthermore, regulatory networks of multiple miRNAs may be partially responsible for the dysfunction of CMSCs. PMID:27158337

  2. Evaluation of an operating MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donham, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Operating loads and structural damage were monitored during operation of the MOD-OA electric generating system. The turbine was damaged locally between stations 48 and 125 after 2.8 million rotations. Loads due to degraded yaw stiffness and fretting at rib station 48 were identified as primary to this distress. The repaired blades operated an additional 4.8 million rotations without problems.

  3. High-power continuous-wave frequency-doubling in KTiOAsO4.

    PubMed

    Zeil, Peter; Zukauskas, Andrius; Tjörnhammar, Staffan; Canalias, Carlota; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik

    2013-12-16

    High-power continuous-wave generation at 533 nm is demonstrated in bulk periodically poled KTiOAsO(4) (KTA) by single-pass frequency doubling of a VBG-locked Yb-doped fiber laser. Absorption characteristic and second harmonic generation (SHG) performance of different KTA samples are studied and compared. The best performing sample catered for 25%-efficient SHG of 13.6 W green light with high spatial beam quality M(2) <1.2.

  4. Operating experience with the 200 kW MOD-OA wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.; Saunders, A. L.; Nyland, T. W.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    The machine configuration and its advantages and disadvantages, particularly as it affects reliability are discussed. The machine performance, both availability and power output characteristics are described. The Mod-OA operational experience is documented. The characteristics of the wind energy generated, the machine performance, and the subsystem strengths and weaknesses are discussed. An assessment of the project success in fulfilling its goals and objectives is also presented.

  5. In silico analysis of miRNA-mediated gene regulation in OCA and OA genes.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Balu; Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-12-01

    Albinism is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder due to low secretion of melanin. The oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and ocular albinism (OA) genes are responsible for melanin production and also act as a potential targets for miRNAs. The role of miRNA is to inhibit the protein synthesis partially or completely by binding with the 3'UTR of the mRNA thus regulating gene expression. In this analysis, we predicted the genetic variation that occurred in 3'UTR of the transcript which can be a reason for low melanin production thus causing albinism. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3'UTR cause more new binding sites for miRNA which binds with mRNA which leads to inhibit the translation process either partially or completely. The SNPs in the mRNA of OCA and OA genes can create new binding sites for miRNA which may control the gene expression and lead to hypopigmentation. We have developed a computational procedure to determine the SNPs in the 3'UTR region of mRNA of OCA (TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2) and OA (GPR143) genes which will be a potential cause for albinism. We identified 37 SNPs in five genes that are predicted to create 87 new binding sites on mRNA, which may lead to abrogation of the translation process. Expression analysis confirms that these genes are highly expressed in skin and eye regions. It is well supported by enrichment analysis that these genes are mainly involved in eye pigmentation and melanin biosynthesis process. The network analysis also shows how the genes are interacting and expressing in a complex network. This insight provides clue to wet-lab researches to understand the expression pattern of OCA and OA genes and binding phenomenon of mRNA and miRNA upon mutation, which is responsible for inhibition of translation process at genomic levels. PMID:25060099

  6. Acute Cardiotoxicity Evaluation of the Marine Biotoxins OA, DTX-1 and YTX

    PubMed Central

    Ferreiro, Sara F.; Carrera, Cristina; Vilariño, Natalia; Louzao, M. Carmen; Santamarina, Germán; Cantalapiedra, Antonio G.; Botana, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Phycotoxins are marine toxins produced by phytoplankton that can get accumulated in filter feeding shellfish. Human intoxication episodes occur due to contaminated seafood consumption. Okadaic acid (OA) and dynophysistoxins (DTXs) are phycotoxins responsible for a severe gastrointestinal syndrome called diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP). Yessotoxins (YTXs) are marine toxins initially included in the DSP class but currently classified as a separated group. Food safety authorities from several countries have regulated the content of DSPs and YTXs in shellfish to protect human health. In mice, OA and YTX have been associated with ultrastructural heart damage in vivo. Therefore, this study explored the potential of OA, DTX-1 and YTX to cause acute heart toxicity. Cardiotoxicity was evaluated in vitro by measuring hERG (human èter-a-go-go gene) channel activity and in vivo using electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings and cardiac damage biomarkers. The results demonstrated that these toxins do not exert acute effects on hERG channel activity. Additionally, in vivo experiments showed that these compounds do not alter cardiac biomarkers and ECG in rats acutely. Despite the ultrastructural damage to the heart reported for these toxins, no acute alterations of heart function have been detected in vivo, suggesting a functional compensation in the short term. PMID:25826053

  7. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-dialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-dialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency-dialysis access; Chronic kidney failure-dialysis access; Chronic renal failure-dialysis access

  8. How to write an article: Preparing a publishable manuscript!

    PubMed

    Shidham, Vinod B; Pitman, Martha B; Demay, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Most of the scientific work presented as abstracts (platforms and posters) at various conferences have the potential to be published as articles in peer-reviewed journals. This DIY (Do It Yourself) article on how to achieve that goal is an extension of the symposium presented at the 36(th) European Congress of Cytology, Istanbul, Turkey (presentation available on net at http://alturl.com/q6bfp). The criteria for manuscript authorship should be based on the ICMJE (International Committee of Medical Journal Editors) Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts. The next step is to choose the appropriate journal to submit the manuscript and review the 'Instructions to the authors' for that journal. Although initially it may appear to be an insurmountable task, diligent organizational discipline with a little patience and perseverance with input from mentors should lead to the preparation of a nearly perfect publishable manuscript even by a novice. Ultimately, the published article is an excellent track record of academic productivity with contribution to the general public good by encouraging the exchange of experience and innovation. It is a highly rewarding conduit to the personal success and growth leading to the collective achievement of continued scientific progress. Recent emergences of journals and publishers offering the platform and opportunity to publish under an open access charter provides the opportunity for authors to protect their copyright from being lost to conventional publishers. Publishing your work on this open platform is the most rewarding mission and is the recommended option in the current modern era.[This open access article can be linked (copy-paste link from HTML version of this article) or reproduced FREELY if original reference details are prominently identifiable].

  9. How to write an article: Preparing a publishable manuscript!

    PubMed Central

    Shidham, Vinod B.; Pitman, Martha B.; DeMay, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the scientific work presented as abstracts (platforms and posters) at various conferences have the potential to be published as articles in peer-reviewed journals. This DIY (Do It Yourself) article on how to achieve that goal is an extension of the symposium presented at the 36th European Congress of Cytology, Istanbul, Turkey (presentation available on net at http://alturl.com/q6bfp). The criteria for manuscript authorship should be based on the ICMJE (International Committee of Medical Journal Editors) Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts. The next step is to choose the appropriate journal to submit the manuscript and review the ‘Instructions to the authors’ for that journal. Although initially it may appear to be an insurmountable task, diligent organizational discipline with a little patience and perseverance with input from mentors should lead to the preparation of a nearly perfect publishable manuscript even by a novice. Ultimately, the published article is an excellent track record of academic productivity with contribution to the general public good by encouraging the exchange of experience and innovation. It is a highly rewarding conduit to the personal success and growth leading to the collective achievement of continued scientific progress. Recent emergences of journals and publishers offering the platform and opportunity to publish under an open access charter provides the opportunity for authors to protect their copyright from being lost to conventional publishers. Publishing your work on this open platform is the most rewarding mission and is the recommended option in the current modern era. [This open access article can be linked (copy-paste link from HTML version of this article) or reproduced FREELY if original reference details are prominently identifiable]. PMID:22363390

  10. In-vitro and in-vivo comparison of T-OA microemulsions and solid dispersions based on EPDC.

    PubMed

    Hou, Peng; Cao, Sali; Ni, Jian; Zhang, Tao; Cai, Zhengjun; Liu, Juanjuan; Wang, Ye; Wang, Penglong; Lei, Haimin; Liu, Yong

    2015-02-01

    The goal of this study was to enhance the absorption of a new water-insoluble antitumor lead compound, T-OA (3β-hydroxyolea-12-en-28-oic acid-3, 5, 6-trimethylpyrazin-2-methyl ester). Early-stage preparation discovery concept (EPDC) was employed in this study. Based on this concept, a microemulsion system was chosen as the method of improving bioavailability. The solubility of T-OA was checked in different oils, surfactants and cosurfactants. Ternary phase diagrams were constructed to evaluate the microemulsion domain. Developed high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to determine drug content. The transparent o/w microemulsion formulation composed of oleic acid (oil), Tween 80 (surfactant), ethanol (co-surfactant) and water enhanced the solubility of T-OA up to 20 mg/mL. It was characterized in terms of appearance, content, viscosity, zeta potential, conductivity, morphology and particle size. The particle size distribution, viscosity, conductivity and zeta potential were found to be 70 nm, 15.57 MPa s, 44.1 μS cm(-1) and -0.174, respectively. Oral bioavailability of T-OA microemulsion and oleic acid solution were checked by using rat model. Contrast to the solid dispersion and proto drug, the area-under-the-curve (AUC) of T-OA microemulsion and oleic acid solution were significantly enhanced. The relative bioavailability of T-OA microemulsion was found to be 5654.7%, which is 57-fold higher than the pure drug. Improved T-OA solubility in microemulsion was found sustained 48 h in dilution study. While the solid dispersion may precipitate under the gastrointestinal circumstance based on dilution results. The in-vivo and in-vitro results indicated that, compare to improve the solubility, it is more important to maintain and prolong the T-OA dissolved status, for improvement of the in-vivo absorption. PMID:24256156

  11. Publishing Ethics and Predatory Practices: A Dilemma for All Stakeholders of Science Communication

    PubMed Central

    Yessirkepov, Marlen; Diyanova, Svetlana N.; Kitas, George D.

    2015-01-01

    Publishing scholarly articles in traditional and newly-launched journals is a responsible task, requiring diligence from authors, reviewers, editors, and publishers. The current generation of scientific authors has ample opportunities for publicizing their research. However, they have to selectively target journals and publish in compliance with the established norms of publishing ethics. Over the past few years, numerous illegitimate or predatory journals have emerged in most fields of science. By exploiting gold Open Access publishing, these journals paved the way for low-quality articles that threatened to change the landscape of evidence-based science. Authors, reviewers, editors, established publishers, and learned associations should be informed about predatory publishing practices and contribute to the trustworthiness of scholarly publications. In line with this, there have been several attempts to distinguish legitimate and illegitimate journals by blacklisting unethical journals (the Jeffrey Beall's list), issuing a statement on transparency and best publishing practices (the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association's and other global organizations' draft document), and tightening the indexing criteria by the Directory of Open Access Journals. None of these measures alone turned to be sufficient. All stakeholders of science communication should be aware of multiple facets of unethical practices and publish well-checked and evidence-based articles. PMID:26240476

  12. Publishing Ethics and Predatory Practices: A Dilemma for All Stakeholders of Science Communication.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Diyanova, Svetlana N; Kitas, George D

    2015-08-01

    Publishing scholarly articles in traditional and newly-launched journals is a responsible task, requiring diligence from authors, reviewers, editors, and publishers. The current generation of scientific authors has ample opportunities for publicizing their research. However, they have to selectively target journals and publish in compliance with the established norms of publishing ethics. Over the past few years, numerous illegitimate or predatory journals have emerged in most fields of science. By exploiting gold Open Access publishing, these journals paved the way for low-quality articles that threatened to change the landscape of evidence-based science. Authors, reviewers, editors, established publishers, and learned associations should be informed about predatory publishing practices and contribute to the trustworthiness of scholarly publications. In line with this, there have been several attempts to distinguish legitimate and illegitimate journals by blacklisting unethical journals (the Jeffrey Beall's list), issuing a statement on transparency and best publishing practices (the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association's and other global organizations' draft document), and tightening the indexing criteria by the Directory of Open Access Journals. None of these measures alone turned to be sufficient. All stakeholders of science communication should be aware of multiple facets of unethical practices and publish well-checked and evidence-based articles.

  13. Publishing Ethics and Predatory Practices: A Dilemma for All Stakeholders of Science Communication.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Diyanova, Svetlana N; Kitas, George D

    2015-08-01

    Publishing scholarly articles in traditional and newly-launched journals is a responsible task, requiring diligence from authors, reviewers, editors, and publishers. The current generation of scientific authors has ample opportunities for publicizing their research. However, they have to selectively target journals and publish in compliance with the established norms of publishing ethics. Over the past few years, numerous illegitimate or predatory journals have emerged in most fields of science. By exploiting gold Open Access publishing, these journals paved the way for low-quality articles that threatened to change the landscape of evidence-based science. Authors, reviewers, editors, established publishers, and learned associations should be informed about predatory publishing practices and contribute to the trustworthiness of scholarly publications. In line with this, there have been several attempts to distinguish legitimate and illegitimate journals by blacklisting unethical journals (the Jeffrey Beall's list), issuing a statement on transparency and best publishing practices (the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association's and other global organizations' draft document), and tightening the indexing criteria by the Directory of Open Access Journals. None of these measures alone turned to be sufficient. All stakeholders of science communication should be aware of multiple facets of unethical practices and publish well-checked and evidence-based articles. PMID:26240476

  14. Knee biomechanics of moderate OA patients measured during gait at a self-selected and fast walking speed.

    PubMed

    Landry, Scott C; McKean, Kelly A; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L; Stanish, William D; Deluzio, Kevin J

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic disorder resulting in degenerative changes to the knee joint. Three-dimensional gait analysis provides a unique method of measuring knee dynamics during activities of daily living such as walking. The purpose of this study was to identify biomechanical features characterizing the gait of patients with mild-to-moderate knee OA and to determine if the biomechanical differences become more pronounced as the locomotor system is stressed by walking faster. Principal component analysis was used to compare the gait patterns of a moderate knee OA group (n=41) and a control group (n=43). The subjects walked at their self-selected speed as well as at 150% of that speed. The two subject groups did not differ in knee joint angles, stride length, and stride time or walking speed. Differences in the magnitude and shape of the knee joint moment waveforms were found between the two groups. The OA group had larger adduction moment magnitudes during stance and this higher magnitude was sustained for a longer portion of the gait cycle. The OA group also had a reduced flexion moment and a reduced external rotation moment during early stance. Increasing speed was associated with an increase in the magnitude of all joint moments. The fast walks did not, however, increase or bring out any biomechanical differences between the OA and control groups that did not exist at the self-selected walks.

  15. A facile strategy to synthesize monodisperse superparamagnetic OA-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles with PEG assistant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Minmin; Zhu, Aimei; Zhang, Qiugen; Liu, Qinglin

    2014-11-01

    A facile strategy was reported to synthesize monodisperse super-paramagnetic oleic acid (OA) modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which the poly ethylene glycol (PEG) was used as the assistant. The influence of the molecular weight and concentration of PEG was investigated in the process of OA-modification. In addition, the mechanism of PEG action in the reaction system was discussed. The morphology and properties of the as-synthesized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The size (12 nm) of the as-prepared Fe3O4 nanoparticles is smaller than the superparamagnetic critical size (25 nm) of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which endows the OA-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles with superparamagnetic property. Furthermore, the dispersibility and stability of as-synthesized OA-modified Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were very good. As the stabilizer and dispersant, PEG played a very important role and did not encapsulate the OA-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The condition for OA-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles preparation was optimized.

  16. Electronic publishing: implications for health sciences libraries and librarians.

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, J L

    1986-01-01

    Increasingly we hear of "electronic publishing" in the form of books and journals made available as databases, either through traditional online services or through electronic message services. This paper explores its potential impact on the medical library community and on the relationship between end user and librarian. The librarian's new roles as intermediary, facilitator, and advocate for end users are examined. The question of developing expertise for evaluating information as well as facilitating access is addressed. PMID:3511993

  17. The changing landscape of scholarly publishing: will radiation research survive?

    PubMed

    Odell, Jere; Whipple, Elizabeth C

    2013-10-01

    As a society published journal, Radiation Research has been a successful and enduring project of the Radiation Research Society (RRS). In 59 years of publication, the journal has produced 732 issues and 10,712 articles. As a nonprofit organization, RRS, like most societies, has used revenues from subscriptions to support, in part, the life of the organization (meetings, conferences and grants to new scholars). The model for scientific publishing, however, continues to evolve. Radiation Research has weathered the rise of electronic publishing, consolidation in the commercial publishing industry, the aggregation of library subscriptions and library subscription cuts. Recent years have seen dramatic changes in how scholarly publishing is financed and new funder and institution policies will accelerate these changes. The growth of open access to journal articles reflects the information habits of readers and facilitates the dissemination of new knowledge. The Radiation Research Society, however, will need to account for and adapt to changes in the publishing market if it intends to support the communication of peer reviewed scholarship in the future.

  18. Role of ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) GPCR in Asian gypsy moth development and transcriptional expression of heat-shock protein genes.

    PubMed

    Sun, LiLi; Wang, ZhiYing; Wu, HongQu; Liu, Peng; Zou, ChuanShan; Xue, XuTing; Cao, ChuanWang

    2016-01-01

    The ocular albinism type 1 gene, named OA1, is a coding pigment cell-specific G protein-coupled receptor exclusively localized in intracellular organelles. However, the function of OA1 in insects remains generally unknown. In the present study, we explore for the first time the function of LdOA1 in the Asian gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. To identify the function of LdOA1 gene in the development and growth of the Asian gypsy moth, the LdOA1 gene in third instar larvae was knocked down by RNAi. Compared with the controls, the knockdown of LdOA1 increased larval mortality but did not significantly affect their utilization of nutrition. Moreover, LdOA1 was stably transformed into the third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. The LdOA1 gene in the transformed D. melanogaster modulated the expression of heat-shock protein (hsp) and increased the expression of hsp genes under deltamethrin stress, which indicates that LdOA1 is involved in the regulation of hsp gene expression. These results deepen our understanding of the molecular function of OA1 in insects. PMID:26778432

  19. Role of ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) GPCR in Asian gypsy moth development and transcriptional expression of heat-shock protein genes.

    PubMed

    Sun, LiLi; Wang, ZhiYing; Wu, HongQu; Liu, Peng; Zou, ChuanShan; Xue, XuTing; Cao, ChuanWang

    2016-01-01

    The ocular albinism type 1 gene, named OA1, is a coding pigment cell-specific G protein-coupled receptor exclusively localized in intracellular organelles. However, the function of OA1 in insects remains generally unknown. In the present study, we explore for the first time the function of LdOA1 in the Asian gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. To identify the function of LdOA1 gene in the development and growth of the Asian gypsy moth, the LdOA1 gene in third instar larvae was knocked down by RNAi. Compared with the controls, the knockdown of LdOA1 increased larval mortality but did not significantly affect their utilization of nutrition. Moreover, LdOA1 was stably transformed into the third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. The LdOA1 gene in the transformed D. melanogaster modulated the expression of heat-shock protein (hsp) and increased the expression of hsp genes under deltamethrin stress, which indicates that LdOA1 is involved in the regulation of hsp gene expression. These results deepen our understanding of the molecular function of OA1 in insects.

  20. 7 Things You Should Know About[TM]... Open Textbook Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper offers seven things one should know about open textbook publishing. These seven facts are: (1) The open educational resources model, including textbooks, has emerged as a response to rising text prices, a need for greater access to high-quality learning materials, the proliferation of e-reader devices, and a trend in publishing toward…

  1. Keys to Successful Publishing of Technical Documentation on CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersten, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Discusses softcopy information publishing on CD-ROM and describes how to use it successfully for technical documentation. Four main areas are addressed: (1) characteristics of technical documentation; (2) goals for the information product, including access methods; (3) steps involved in publishing technical documentation on CD-ROM, including…

  2. 78 FR 3425 - Filiquarian Publishing, LLC; Choice Level, LLC; and Joshua Linsk; Analysis of Proposed Consent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Filiquarian Publishing, LLC; Choice Level, LLC; and Joshua Linsk; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid... Publishing, LLC; Choice Level, LLC; and Joshua Linsk, individually, and as an officer of the companies. The... use the reports for employment purposes. Choice Level provided the underlying records accessed...

  3. A Content Standard for Computational Models; Digital Rights Management (DRM) Architectures; A Digital Object Approach to Interoperable Rights Management: Finely-Grained Policy Enforcement Enabled by a Digital Object Infrastructure; LOCKSS: A Permanent Web Publishing and Access System; Tapestry of Time and Terrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Linda L.; Crosier, Scott J.; Smith, Terrence R.; Goodchild, Michael; Iannella, Renato; Erickson, John S.; Reich, Vicky; Rosenthal, David S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Includes five articles. Topics include requirements for a content standard to describe computational models; architectures for digital rights management systems; access control for digital information objects; LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) that allows libraries to run Web caches for specific journals; and a Web site from the U.S.…

  4. Publishing Chinese medicine knowledge as Linked Data on the Web

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chinese medicine (CM) draws growing attention from Western healthcare practitioners and patients. However, the integration of CM knowledge and Western medicine (WM) has been hindered by a barrier of languages and cultures as well as a lack of scientific evidence for CM's efficacy and safety. In addition, most of CM knowledge published with relational database technology makes the integration of databases even more challenging. Methods Linked Data approach was used in publishing CM knowledge. This approach was applied to publishing a CM linked dataset, namely RDF-TCM http://www.open-biomed.org.uk/rdf-tcm/ based on TCMGeneDIT, which provided association information about CM in English. Results The Linked Data approach made CM knowledge accessible through standards-compliant interfaces to facilitate the bridging of CM and WM. The open and programmatically-accessible RDF-TCM facilitated the creation of new data mash-up and novel federated query applications. Conclusion Publishing CM knowledge in Linked Data provides a point of departure for integration of CM databases. PMID:20663193

  5. The Once and Future Publishing Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okerson, Ann; Holzman, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The report explores the revitalization of library publishing and its possible future, and examines elements that influence the success and sustainability of library publishing initiatives. The authors trace the history of library publishing and factors that have transformed the publishing landscape, and describe several significant library-press…

  6. How to Publish without Financially Perishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mock, Rodney P.; Savage, Arline; Simkin, Mark G.

    2011-01-01

    Publication agreements vary by publisher and sometimes by contract as well. A number of such agreements now also include indemnity clauses. "Indemnifying a publisher" means agreeing to pay for any loss, damage, or liability incurred by the publisher, or it can mean that the publisher has the right to claim reimbursement for its loss, damage, or…

  7. Self-Published Books: An Empirical "Snapshot"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Jana; Fulton, Bruce; Helm, Marlene

    2012-01-01

    The number of books published by authors using fee-based publication services, such as Lulu and AuthorHouse, is overtaking the number of books published by mainstream publishers, according to Bowker's 2009 annual data. Little empirical research exists on self-published books. This article presents the results of an investigation of a random sample…

  8. Writing and Publishing: The Librarian's Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallwood, Carol, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Have you ever considered writing or reviewing for the library community? Are you interested in publishing a book on your favorite author or hobby? Do you need to write and publish for tenure? If so, "Writing and Publishing" is for you. Practical how-to guidance covering fiction, poetry, children's books/magazines, self-publishing, literary agents,…

  9. 75 FR 65214 - Equal Access to Justice Act Implementation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... Justice Act. The proposed regulation was published in the Federal Register at 75 FR 17622 (April 7, 2010... Oversight 12 CFR Part 1705 RIN 2590-AA29 Equal Access to Justice Act Implementation AGENCY: Federal Housing... 1302 and 1312 of HERA. B. Equal Access to Justice Act The Equal Access to Justice Act, 5 U.S.C....

  10. LERU roadmap towards Open Access.

    PubMed

    Ayris, Paul; Björnshauge, Lars; Collier, Mel; Ferwerda, Eelco; Jacobs, Neil; Sinikara, Kaisa; Swan, Alma; de Bries, Saskia; van Wesenbeeck, Astrid

    2015-09-01

    Money which is not directly spent on research and education, even though it is largely taxpayers´ money. As Harvard University already denounced in 2012, many large journal publishers have rendered the situation "fiscally unsustainable and academically restrictive", with some journals costing as much as $40,000 per year (and publishers drawing profits of 35% or more). If one of the wealthiest universities in the world can no longer afford it, who can? It is easy to picture the struggle of European universities with tighter budgets. In addition to subscription costs, academic research funding is also largely affected by "Article Processing Charges" (APC), which come at an additional cost of €2000/article, on average, when making individual articles Gold Open Access. Some publishers are in this way even being paid twice for the same content ("double dipping"). In the era of Open Science, Open Access to publications is one of the cornerstones of the new research paradigm and business models must support this transition. It should be one of the principal objectives of Commissioner Carlos Moedas and the Dutch EU Presidency (January-June 2016) to ensure that this transition happens. Further developing the EU´s leadership in research and innovation largely depends on it. With this statement "Moving Forwards on Open Access", LERU calls upon all universities, research institutes, research funders and researchers to sign this statement and give a clear signal towards the European Commission and the Dutch EU Presidency. PMID:27036747

  11. LERU roadmap towards Open Access.

    PubMed

    Ayris, Paul; Björnshauge, Lars; Collier, Mel; Ferwerda, Eelco; Jacobs, Neil; Sinikara, Kaisa; Swan, Alma; de Bries, Saskia; van Wesenbeeck, Astrid

    2015-09-01

    Money which is not directly spent on research and education, even though it is largely taxpayers´ money. As Harvard University already denounced in 2012, many large journal publishers have rendered the situation "fiscally unsustainable and academically restrictive", with some journals costing as much as $40,000 per year (and publishers drawing profits of 35% or more). If one of the wealthiest universities in the world can no longer afford it, who can? It is easy to picture the struggle of European universities with tighter budgets. In addition to subscription costs, academic research funding is also largely affected by "Article Processing Charges" (APC), which come at an additional cost of €2000/article, on average, when making individual articles Gold Open Access. Some publishers are in this way even being paid twice for the same content ("double dipping"). In the era of Open Science, Open Access to publications is one of the cornerstones of the new research paradigm and business models must support this transition. It should be one of the principal objectives of Commissioner Carlos Moedas and the Dutch EU Presidency (January-June 2016) to ensure that this transition happens. Further developing the EU´s leadership in research and innovation largely depends on it. With this statement "Moving Forwards on Open Access", LERU calls upon all universities, research institutes, research funders and researchers to sign this statement and give a clear signal towards the European Commission and the Dutch EU Presidency.

  12. JGR to publish LPSC Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AGU will publish the Proceedings of the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), organized by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), as a special supplement to the Red section of the Journal of Geophysical Research. The conference, being held this week in Houston, Tex., is sponsored by LPI, the Johnson Space Center, and AGU. The present 39-member board of JGR-Red associate editors will be expanded to account for the handling of the increased number of papers in petrology and geochemistry.William Boynton has accepted a 1-year special assignment as Proceedings Editor and will work in concert with JGR-Red Editor Thomas Ahrens. In addition, the regular JGR-Red board of associate editors has been expanded to include Boynton, Michael J. Drake, Richard A.F. Grieve, John F. Kerridge, Guenter W. Lugmair, James Papike, Robert O. Pepin, and Heinrich Wönke.

  13. The chirally rotated Schrödinger functional with Wilson fermions and automatic O(a) improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sint, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    A modified formulation of the Schrödinger functional (SF) is proposed. In the continuum it is related to the standard SF by a non-singlet chiral field rotation and therefore referred to as the chirally rotated SF ( χSF). On the lattice with Wilson fermions the relation is not exact, suggesting some interesting tests of universality. The main advantage of the χSF consists in its compatibility with the mechanism of automatic O(a) improvement. In this paper the basic set-up is introduced and discussed. Chirally rotated SF boundary conditions are implemented on the lattice using an orbifold construction. The lattice symmetries imply a list of counterterms, which determine how the action and the basic fermionic two-point functions are renormalised and O(a) improved. As with the standard SF, a logarithmically divergent boundary counterterm leads to a multiplicative renormalisation of the quark boundary fields. In addition, a finite dimension 3 boundary counterterm must be tuned in order to preserve the chirally rotated boundary conditions in the interacting theory. Once this is achieved, O(a) effects originating from the bulk action or from insertions of composite operators in the bulk can be avoided by the mechanism of automatic O(a) improvement. The remaining O(a) effects arise from the boundaries and can be cancelled by tuning a couple of O(a) boundary counterterms. The general results are illustrated in the free theory where the Sheikholeslami-Wohlert term is shown to affect correlation functions only at O(a), irrespective of its coefficient.

  14. Open Access in China and Its Effect on Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Dehua; Luo, Aijing; Liu, Haixia

    2013-01-01

    OA is to become the future of academic library exchanges in China. With the government's support and promotion of OA, more and more Chinese academic libraries have been committed to participating in OA. The rapid development of OA not only has changed the model of traditional scholarly communication and brought a free communication environment of…

  15. Publishing corruption discussion: predatory journalism.

    PubMed

    Jones, James W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2014-02-01

    Dr Spock is a brilliant young vascular surgeon who is up for tenure next year. He has been warned by the chair of surgery that he needs to increase his list of publications to assure passage. He has recently had a paper reviewed by one of the top journals in his specialty, Journal X-special, with several suggestions for revision. He received an e-mail request for manuscript submission from a newly minted, open access, Journal of Vascular Disease Therapy, which promises a quick and likely favorable response for a fee. What should be done? A. Send the paper to another peer reviewed journal with the suggested revisions. B. Resubmit the paper to Journal X-special. C. Submit to the online journal as is to save time. D. Submit to the online journal and another regular journal. E. Look for another job.

  16. Exchangeable hydrogen explains the pH of spodosol Oa horizons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.; David, M.B.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bartlett, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The chemistry of extremely acid Oa horizons does not conform to traditional pH, Al, and base saturation relationships. Results from two separate studies of northeastern U.S. forested soils were used to investigate relationships between pH in water or dilute salt solutions and other soil characteristics. In Oa horizons with pH below 4, soil pH in dilute CaCl2 solution was correlated with exchangeable H+ measured either by titration (r = -0.88, P = 0.0001, n = 142) or by electrode (r = -0.89, P = 0.0001, n = 45). Exchangeable H+ expressed as a percentage of the cation-exchange capacity (CEC) was linear with pH and showed similar slopes for data from both studies. For all samples, pHw = 4.21 - 1.80 x H+/CEC (R2 = 0.69, n = 194). The reciprocal of the H+/CEC ratio is base saturation with Al added to the bases. Because of the low pH, exchangeable Al does not appear to behave as an acid. Exchangeable H+ remains an operationally defined quantity because of the difficulty in separating exchange and hydrolysis reactions. In a variety of neutral-salt extractants, concentration of H+ were correlated with 0.1 M BaCl2-exchangeable H+ (r > 0.91, P = 0.0001, n = 26) regardless of the strength of the extract. Nine successive extractions with 0.33 mM CaCl2 removed more H+ than was removed by single batch extractions with either 1 M KCl or 0.1 M BaCl2 (average H+ of 70, 43, and 49 mmol kg-1, respectively for 26 samples). The data showed little difference in the chemical behavior of Oa horizons from a variety of geographical sites and vegetation types.

  17. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    SciTech Connect

    UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-10-28

    Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  18. 76 FR 60398 - Exemption to Prohibition on Circumvention of Copyright Protection Systems for Access Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Prohibition on Circumvention of Copyright Protection Systems for Access Control Technologies, 68 FR 62011... Circumvention of Copyright Protection Systems for Access Control Technologies, 71 FR 68472, 68480, published in... Protection Systems for Access Control Technologies, 65 FR 64556, 64564, published in the Federal...

  19. Open Access Theses in Institutional Repositories: An Exploratory Study of the Perceptions of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Kate Valentine; Liew, Chern Li

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: We examine doctoral students' awareness of and attitudes to open access forms of publication. Levels of awareness of open access and the concept of institutional repositories, publishing behaviour and perceptions of benefits and risks of open access publishing were explored. Method: Qualitative and quantitative data were collected…

  20. Microprocessor control system for 200-kilowatt Mod-OA wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, T. W.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1982-01-01

    The microprocessor system and program used to control the operation of the 200-kW Mod-OA wind turbines is described. The system is programmed to begin startup and shutdown sequences automatically and to control yaw motion. Rotor speed and power output are controlled with integral and proportional control of the blade pitch angle. Included in the report are a description of the hardware and a discussion of the software programming technique. A listing of the PL/M software program is given.

  1. BOREAS TF-2 SSA-OA Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Precipitation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Harold; Mickle, Robert; Staebler, Ralf; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux-2 (BOREAS TF-2) team collected energy, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and momentum flux data above the canopy and in profiles through the canopy, along with meteorological data at the BOREAS Southern Study Area-Old Aspen (SSA-OA) site. Above-canopy measurements began in early February and ran through mid-September of 1994. Measurements were collected over a longer period of 1994 than most BOREAS flux sites. Daily precipitation data from several gauges were also collected. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  2. Opportunities for Innovative Publishing in the Electronic Age?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.

    2013-03-01

    I recently experienced difficulty with a peer-reviewed article in an open access electronic journal when I requested some quite simple but important changes. The article had been put online and identified as "provisional" by the publisher. I took this to mean that it had been accepted through peer review but that further revision was possible before formal acceptance. My coauthors and I wanted to add some authors to an already quite long list, and the science content of the article was unaffected. We provided evidence that the contributions of the new authors met the normal standards for authorship. The publisher was, however, reluctant to make the change, stating that such a policy was standard throughout the scientific publishing world, and instead suggested that we publish an electronic erratum. The details of this case are not of concern, but it struck me that some of the protocols of the print age were being unnecessarily transferred to the electronic age. In a more general way there are opportunities for innovation in electronic publishing. Policies and practices that appear to be due to the constraints of print are being inherited by electronic publications for no good reason.

  3. Evaluation of an ovine testis cell line (OA3.Ts) for propagation of capripoxvirus isolates and development of an immunostaining technique for viral plaque visualization.

    PubMed

    Babiuk, Shawn; Parkyn, Geoff; Copps, John; Larence, June E; Sabara, Marta I; Bowden, Timothy R; Boyle, David B; Kitching, R Paul

    2007-09-01

    An ovine testis cell line (OA3.Ts) was evaluated and compared with primary lamb kidney (LK) cells for its utility in capripoxvirus propagation and titration. A comparison of OA3.Ts cell growth kinetics and morphology at low (<33) and high (34-36) passage levels indicated a difference in both characteristics. However, viral titers determined in low and high passage OA3.Ts cells were comparable with those obtained using LK cells. Capripoxvirus infection of OA3.Ts and LK cells resulted in a similar cytopathic effect, which allowed for the detection of discrete viral plaques following immunostaining with capripoxvirus-specific antiserum.

  4. Histone Modification Is Involved in Okadaic Acid (OA) Induced DNA Damage Response and G2-M Transition Arrest in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Pu; Hou, Haoli; Wen, Huan; Zhou, Hong; Gao, Fei; Wu, Jinping; Qiu, Zhengming; Li, Lijia

    2016-01-01

    Histone modifications are involved in regulation of chromatin structure. To investigate the relationship between chromatin modification and cell cycle regulation during plant cell proliferation, Okadaic acid (OA), a specific inhibitor of serine/threonine protein phosphatase, was applied in this study. The results showed that OA caused the cell cycle arrest at preprophase, leading to seedling growth inhibition. Western blotting assay revealed that the spatial distribution of phosphorylation of Ser10 histone H3 tails (H3S10ph) signals was altered under OA treatment. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found to be at higher levels and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay displayed DNA breaks happened at the chromatin after treatment with OA, companied with an increase in the acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 5 (H4K5ac) level. From these observations, we speculated that the alteration of the spatial distribution of H3S10ph and the level of H4K5ac was involved in the procedure that OA induced DNA breaks and G2-M arrested by the accumulation of ROS, and that the histone H3S10ph and H4K5ac might facilitate DNA repair by their association with the chromatin decondensation. PMID:27196101

  5. 2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetase 1(OAS1) inhibits PRRSV replication in Marc-145 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinhua; Feng, Na; Li, Zhenhong; Wang, Peng; Qi, Ziyu; Liang, Wan; Zhou, Xiang; Xu, Xuewen; Liu, Bang

    2016-08-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically destructive disease for global pig industry. Although its invasion mechanism is clear, the knowledge of pathogen and host interaction is less known. Here, we found that PPRSV infection led to induction of 2', 5'-oligoadenylate synthetase gene 1(OAS1), an important interferon-stimulated gene. More importantly, ectopic overexpression of OAS1 significantly restricted the replication of PRRSV in 24 and 36 h post-infection in Marc-145 cells, and indirect immunofluorescence assay with antibody against PRRSV N protein displayed significantly lower frequency of fluorescence stained cells and reduced cytopathogenic effects of PRRSV on OAS1-transfected Marc-145 cells. Meanwhile, knockdown of endogenous OAS1 increased the PRRSV ORF7 mRNA level to 1.6 and 1.7 times of that in control in 24 and 36 h post-infection of PRRSV, and led to approximate 5.5 times increase of the frequency of fluorescence positive cells compared to negative control (p < 0.01). The obtained results strongly support a direct restriction function of OAS1 to PRRSV replication, which may contribute to the antiviral effect of the interferon system on PRRSV replication. PMID:27395032

  6. Access to Scientific Publications: The Scientist's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Voronin, Yegor; Myrzahmetov, Askar; Bernstein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Background Scientific publishing is undergoing significant changes due to the growth of online publications, increases in the number of open access journals, and policies of funders and universities requiring authors to ensure that their publications become publicly accessible. Most studies of the impact of these changes have focused on the growth of articles available through open access or the number of open-access journals. Here, we investigated access to publications at a number of institutes and universities around the world, focusing on publications in HIV vaccine research – an area of biomedical research with special importance to the developing world. Methods and Findings We selected research papers in HIV vaccine research field, creating: 1) a first set of 50 most recently published papers with keywords “HIV vaccine” and 2) a second set of 200 articles randomly selected from those cited in the first set. Access to the majority (80%) of the recently published articles required subscription, while cited literature was much more accessible (67% freely available online). Subscriptions at a number of institutions around the world were assessed for providing access to subscription-only articles from the two sets. The access levels varied widely, ranging among institutions from 20% to 90%. Through the WHO-supported HINARI program, institutes in low-income countries had access comparable to that of institutes in the North. Finally, we examined the response rates for reprint requests sent to corresponding authors, a method commonly used before internet access became widespread. Contacting corresponding authors with requests for electronic copies of articles by email resulted in a 55-60% success rate, although in some cases it took up to 1.5 months to get a response. Conclusions While research articles are increasingly available on the internet in open access format, institutional subscriptions continue to play an important role. However, subscriptions do not

  7. Philadelphia Printing and Publishing, 1876-1976

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Thomas M.

    1976-01-01

    Two Philadelphia printing histories, both reflecting the relationship of printing to publishing, are examined in this article: the manufacture by the publisher of his own product and the development and commercialization of the photomechanical halftone process. (Author)

  8. Electronic Publishing and Library Technical Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aveney, Brian

    1984-01-01

    Trends in electronic editions, on-demand publishing, and online publishing are reviewed and their potential effects on library services and organization are discussed, including library material selection, acquisitions, cataloging, serials, circulation, and home printers. Thirteen references are provided. (EJS)

  9. Textbook Publishing: The Political and Economic Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    This article focuses on the political and economic realities surrounding textbook publishing. A discussion of the publishing industry includes an examination of industry decision makers and the influence of profit. State textbook adoption policies are also explored. (IAH)

  10. Rotationally sampled wind characteristics and correlations with MOD-OA wind turbine response

    SciTech Connect

    George, R.L.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents results of a comprehensive wind and wind turbine measurement program: the Clayton, New Mexico, vertical plane array/MOD-OA project. In this experiment, the turbulent wind was measured for a large array of fixed anemometers located two blade diameters upwind of a 200-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). Simultaneously, key wind turbine response parameters were also measured. The first of two major objectives of this experiment was to determine the turbulent wind, rotationally sampled to emulate the motion of the wind turbine blade, for the range of different wind speeds and stability classes actually experienced by the wind turbine. The second major objective was to correlate this rotationally sampled wind with the wind turbine blade stress and power, in order to assess the usefulness of the wind measurements for wind turbine loads testing a prediction. Time series of rotationally sampled winds and wind turbine blade bending moments and power were converted to frequency spectra using Fourier transform techniques. These spectra were used as the basis for both qualitative and quantitative comparisons among the various cases. A quantitative comparison between the rotationally sampled wind input and blade bending response was made, using the Fourier spectra to estimate the blade transfer function. These transfer functions were then used to calculate an approximate damping coefficient for the MOD-OA fiberglass blade.

  11. Patterns of Change within the Publishing Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirianni, F. J.

    This is one of several papers presented at a Federal Trade Commission Symposium on Media Concentration. It reviews the controversy between book publishers and the Authors Guild concerning the control of already published materials and the future of publishing, and it analyzes the market structure in order to put the issues into perspective. Some…

  12. Librarians and Publishers: An Uneasy Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuman, Patricia Glass

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between the library and publishing communities and issues that impact the relationship. Topics covered include an overview of cooperative efforts and tensions created by issues such as photocopying and copyright, repackaging of government information by commercial publishers, the power of publishing conglomerates, and…

  13. Trade Publishing: A Report from the Front.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fister, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the current condition of trade publishing and its future prospects based on interviews with editors, publishers, agents, and others. Discusses academic libraries and the future of trade publishing, including questions relating to electronic books, intellectual property, and social and economic benefits of sharing information…

  14. The Future of Scholarly Journal Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheim, Charles; Greenhalgh, Clare; Rowland, Fytton

    2000-01-01

    Surveys the recent literature on scholarly publishing and its conversion to the electronic medium. Presents results of a questionnaire survey of the United Kingdom-based scholarly publishing industry. Results suggest publishers are moving quickly towards use of the Internet as a major medium for distribution, though they do not expect an early…

  15. The Changing Business of Scholarly Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Karen

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of changes and trends in scholarly publishing highlights monographs; journals; user-centered publishing; electronic products and services, including adding value, marketing strategies, and new pricing systems; changing attitudes regarding copyright; trends in publishing industry reorganization; and impacts on research libraries. (LRW)

  16. Self-Publishing Indigenous Language Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Robert N.; Busch, John; Webb, B. Joanne

    Indigenous language programs that have a literacy component require reading materials. Recent advances in computer technology and certain legal changes in the publishing industry have made self-publishing such materials an easier task. This paper describes some of the steps necessary to self-publish indigenous language materials. Suggestions are…

  17. Apis mellifera octopamine receptor 1 (AmOA1) expression in antennal lobe networks of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster)

    PubMed Central

    Sinakevitch, Irina T.; Smith, Adrian N.; Locatelli, Fernando; Huerta, Ramon; Bazhenov, Maxim; Smith, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Octopamine (OA) underlies reinforcement during appetitive conditioning in the honey bee and fruit fly, acting via different subtypes of receptors. Recently, antibodies raised against a peptide sequence of one honey bee OA receptor, AmOA1, were used to study the distribution of these receptors in the honey bee brain (Sinakevitch et al., 2011). These antibodies also recognize an isoform of the AmOA1 ortholog in the fruit fly (OAMB, mushroom body OA receptor). Here we describe in detail the distribution of AmOA1 receptors in different types of neurons in the honey bee and fruit fly antennal lobes. We integrate this information into a detailed anatomical analysis of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), uni- and multi-glomerular projection neurons (uPNs, and mPNs) and local interneurons (LNs) in glomeruli of the antennal lobe. These neurons were revealed by dye injection into the antennal nerve, antennal lobe, medial and lateral antenno-protocerbral tracts (m-APT and l-APT), and lateral protocerebral lobe (LPL) by use of labeled cell lines in the fruit fly or by staining with anti-GABA. We found that ORN receptor terminals and uPNs largely do not show immunostaining for AmOA1. About seventeen GABAergic mPNs leave the antennal lobe through the ml-APT and branch into the LPL. Many, but not all, mPNs show staining for AmOA1. AmOA1 receptors are also in glomeruli on GABAergic processes associated with LNs. The data suggest that in both species one important action of OA in the antennal lobe involves modulation of different types of inhibitory neurons via AmOA1 receptors. We integrated this new information into a model of circuitry within glomeruli of the antennal lobes of these species. PMID:24187534

  18. Why should we publish Linked Data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blower, Jon; Riechert, Maik; Koubarakis, Manolis; Pace, Nino

    2016-04-01

    We use the Web every day to access information from all kinds of different sources. But the complexity and diversity of scientific data mean that discovering accessing and interpreting data remains a large challenge to researchers, decision-makers and other users. Different sources of useful information on data, algorithms, instruments and publications are scattered around the Web. How can we link all these things together to help users to better understand and exploit earth science data? How can we combine scientific data with other relevant data sources, when standards for describing and sharing data vary so widely between communities? "Linked Data" is a term that describes a set of standards and "best practices" for sharing data on the Web (http://www.w3.org/standards/semanticweb/data). These principles can be summarised as follows: 1. Create unique and persistent identifiers for the important "things" in a community (e.g. datasets, publications, algorithms, instruments). 2. Allow users to "look up" these identifiers on the web to find out more information about them. 3. Make this information machine-readable in a community-neutral format (such as RDF, Resource Description Framework). 4. Within this information, embed links to other things and concepts and say how these are related. 5. Optionally, provide web service interfaces to allow the user to perform sophisticated queries over this information (using a language such as SPARQL). The promise of Linked Data is that, through these techniques, data will be more discoverable, more comprehensible and more usable by different communities, not just the community that produced the data. As a result, many data providers (particularly public-sector institutions) are now publishing data in this way. However, this area is still in its infancy in terms of real-world applications. Data users need guidance and tools to help them use Linked Data. Data providers need reassurance that the investments they are making in

  19. Data publishing - visions of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Leonie; Klump, Jens; Bertelmann, Roland; Klar, Jochen; Enke, Harry; Rathmann, Torsten; Koudela, Daniela; Köhler, Klaus; Müller-Pfefferkorn, Ralph; van Uytvanck, Dieter; Strathmann, Stefan; Engelhardt, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    This poster describes future scenarios of information infrastructures in science and other fields of research. The scenarios presented are based on practical experience resulting from interaction with research data in a research center and its library, and further enriched by the results of a baseline study of existing data repositories and data infrastructures. The baseline study was conducted as part of the project "Requirements for a multi-disciplinary research data infrastructure (Radieschen)", which is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). Current changes in information infrastructures pose new challenges to libraries and scientific journals, which both act as information service providers, facilitating access to digital media, support publications of research data and enable their long-term archiving. Digital media and research data open new aspects in the field of activity of libraries and scientific journals. What will a library of the future look like? Will a library purely serve as interface to data centres? Will libraries and data centres merge into a new service unit? Will a future library be the interface to academic cloud services? Scientific journals already converted from mostly print editions to print and e-journals. What type of journals will emerge in the future? Is there a role for data-centred journals? Will there be journals to publish software code to make this type of research result citable and a part of the record of science? Just as users evolve from being consumers of information into producers, the role of information service providers, such as libraries, changes from a purely supporting to a contributing role. Furthermore, the role of the library changes from a central point of access for the search of publications to an important link in the value-adding chain from author to publication. Journals for software publication might be another vision for the future in data publishing. Software forms the missing link between big

  20. Melanoregulin, product of the dsu locus, links the BLOC-pathway and OA1 in organelle biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rachel, Rivka A; Nagashima, Kunio; O'Sullivan, T Norene; Frost, Laura S; Stefano, Frank P; Marigo, Valeria; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Humans with Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) or ocular albinism (OA1) display abnormal aspects of organelle biogenesis. The multigenic disorder HPS displays broad defects in biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles including melanosomes, platelet dense granules, and lysosomes. A phenotype of ocular pigmentation in OA1 is a smaller number of macromelanosomes, in contrast to HPS, where in many cases the melanosomes are smaller than normal. In these studies we define the role of the Mreg(dsu) gene, which suppresses the coat color dilution of Myo5a, melanophilin, and Rab27a mutant mice in maintaining melanosome size and distribution. We show that the product of the Mreg(dsu) locus, melanoregulin (MREG), interacts both with members of the HPS BLOC-2 complex and with Oa1 in regulating melanosome size. Loss of MREG function facilitates increase in the size of micromelanosomes in the choroid of the HPS BLOC-2 mutants ruby, ruby2, and cocoa, while a transgenic mouse overexpressing melanoregulin corrects the size of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) macromelanosomes in Oa1(ko/ko) mice. Collectively, these results suggest that MREG levels regulate pigment incorporation into melanosomes. Immunohistochemical analysis localizes melanoregulin not to melanosomes, but to small vesicles in the cytoplasm of the RPE, consistent with a role for this protein in regulating membrane interactions during melanosome biogenesis. These results provide the first link between the BLOC pathway and Oa1 in melanosome biogenesis, thus supporting the hypothesis that intracellular G-protein coupled receptors may be involved in the biogenesis of other organelles. Furthermore these studies provide the foundation for therapeutic approaches to correct the pigment defects in the RPE of HPS and OA1.

  1. Characterization of a prawn OA/TA receptor in Xenopus oocytes suggests functional selectivity between octopamine and tyramine.

    PubMed

    Jezzini, Sami H; Reyes-Colón, Dalynés; Sosa, María A

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the characterization of an octopamine/tyramine (OA/TA or TyrR1) receptor (OA/TAMac) cloned from the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, an animal used in the study of agonistic social behavior. The invertebrate OA/TA receptors are seven trans-membrane domain G-protein coupled receptors that are related to vertebrate adrenergic receptors. Behavioral studies in arthropods indicate that octopaminergic signaling systems modulate fight or flight behaviors with octopamine and/or tyramine functioning in a similar way to the adrenalins in vertebrate systems. Despite the importance of octopamine signaling in behavioral studies of decapod crustaceans there are no functional data available for any of their octopamine or tyramine receptors. We expressed OA/TAMac in Xenopus oocytes where agonist-evoked trans-membrane currents were used as readouts of receptor activity. The currents were most effectively evoked by tyramine but were also evoked by octopamine and dopamine. They were effectively blocked by yohimbine. The electrophysiological approach we used enabled the continuous observation of complex dynamics over time. Using voltage steps, we were able to simultaneously resolve two types of endogenous currents that are affected over different time scales. At higher concentrations we observe that octopamine and tyramine can produce different and opposing effects on both of these currents, presumably through the activity of the single expressed receptor type. The pharmacological profile and apparent functional-selectivity are consistent with properties first observed in the OA/TA receptor from the insect Drosophila melanogaster. As the first functional data reported for any crustacean OA/TA receptor, these results suggest that functional-selectivity between tyramine and octopamine is a feature of this receptor type that may be conserved among arthropods.

  2. Characterization of a Prawn OA/TA Receptor in Xenopus Oocytes Suggests Functional Selectivity between Octopamine and Tyramine

    PubMed Central

    Jezzini, Sami H.; Reyes-Colón, Dalynés; Sosa, María A.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the characterization of an octopamine/tyramine (OA/TA or TyrR1) receptor (OA/TAMac) cloned from the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, an animal used in the study of agonistic social behavior. The invertebrate OA/TA receptors are seven trans-membrane domain G-protein coupled receptors that are related to vertebrate adrenergic receptors. Behavioral studies in arthropods indicate that octopaminergic signaling systems modulate fight or flight behaviors with octopamine and/or tyramine functioning in a similar way to the adrenalins in vertebrate systems. Despite the importance of octopamine signaling in behavioral studies of decapod crustaceans there are no functional data available for any of their octopamine or tyramine receptors. We expressed OA/TAMac in Xenopus oocytes where agonist-evoked trans-membrane currents were used as readouts of receptor activity. The currents were most effectively evoked by tyramine but were also evoked by octopamine and dopamine. They were effectively blocked by yohimbine. The electrophysiological approach we used enabled the continuous observation of complex dynamics over time. Using voltage steps, we were able to simultaneously resolve two types of endogenous currents that are affected over different time scales. At higher concentrations we observe that octopamine and tyramine can produce different and opposing effects on both of these currents, presumably through the activity of the single expressed receptor type. The pharmacological profile and apparent functional-selectivity are consistent with properties first observed in the OA/TA receptor from the insect Drosophila melanogaster. As the first functional data reported for any crustacean OA/TA receptor, these results suggest that functional-selectivity between tyramine and octopamine is a feature of this receptor type that may be conserved among arthropods. PMID:25350749

  3. Melanoregulin, product of the dsu locus, links the BLOC-pathway and OA1 in organelle biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rachel, Rivka A; Nagashima, Kunio; O'Sullivan, T Norene; Frost, Laura S; Stefano, Frank P; Marigo, Valeria; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Humans with Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) or ocular albinism (OA1) display abnormal aspects of organelle biogenesis. The multigenic disorder HPS displays broad defects in biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles including melanosomes, platelet dense granules, and lysosomes. A phenotype of ocular pigmentation in OA1 is a smaller number of macromelanosomes, in contrast to HPS, where in many cases the melanosomes are smaller than normal. In these studies we define the role of the Mreg(dsu) gene, which suppresses the coat color dilution of Myo5a, melanophilin, and Rab27a mutant mice in maintaining melanosome size and distribution. We show that the product of the Mreg(dsu) locus, melanoregulin (MREG), interacts both with members of the HPS BLOC-2 complex and with Oa1 in regulating melanosome size. Loss of MREG function facilitates increase in the size of micromelanosomes in the choroid of the HPS BLOC-2 mutants ruby, ruby2, and cocoa, while a transgenic mouse overexpressing melanoregulin corrects the size of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) macromelanosomes in Oa1(ko/ko) mice. Collectively, these results suggest that MREG levels regulate pigment incorporation into melanosomes. Immunohistochemical analysis localizes melanoregulin not to melanosomes, but to small vesicles in the cytoplasm of the RPE, consistent with a role for this protein in regulating membrane interactions during melanosome biogenesis. These results provide the first link between the BLOC pathway and Oa1 in melanosome biogenesis, thus supporting the hypothesis that intracellular G-protein coupled receptors may be involved in the biogenesis of other organelles. Furthermore these studies provide the foundation for therapeutic approaches to correct the pigment defects in the RPE of HPS and OA1. PMID:22984402

  4. Dangerous Predatory Publishers Threaten Medical Research.

    PubMed

    Beall, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    This article introduces predatory publishers in the context of biomedical sciences research. It describes the characteristics of predatory publishers, including spamming and using fake metrics, and it describes the problems they cause for science and universities. Predatory journals often fail to properly manage peer review, allowing pseudo-science to be published dressed up as authentic science. Academic evaluation is also affected, as some researchers take advantage of the quick, easy, and cheap publishing predatory journals provide. By understanding how predatory publishers operate, researchers can avoid becoming victimized by them. PMID:27550476

  5. Dangerous Predatory Publishers Threaten Medical Research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces predatory publishers in the context of biomedical sciences research. It describes the characteristics of predatory publishers, including spamming and using fake metrics, and it describes the problems they cause for science and universities. Predatory journals often fail to properly manage peer review, allowing pseudo-science to be published dressed up as authentic science. Academic evaluation is also affected, as some researchers take advantage of the quick, easy, and cheap publishing predatory journals provide. By understanding how predatory publishers operate, researchers can avoid becoming victimized by them. PMID:27550476

  6. The ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) G-protein-coupled receptor functions with MART-1 at early stages of melanogenesis to control melanosome identity and composition.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Francesca; Bonetti, Ciro; Surace, Enrico M; Marigo, Valeria; Raposo, Graça

    2009-12-01

    OA1 (GPR143; GPCR, G-protein-coupled receptor), the protein product of the ocular albinism type 1 gene, encodes a pigment-cell-specific GPCR that localizes intracellularly to melanosomes. OA1 mutations result in ocular albinism due to alterations in melanosome formation, suggesting that OA1 is a key player in the biogenesis of melanosomes. To address the function of OA1 in melanosome biogenesis, we have used siRNA inactivation and combined morphological and biochemical methods to investigate melanosome ultrastructure, melanosomal protein localization and expression in human pigmented melanocytic cells. OA1 loss of function leads to decreased pigmentation and causes formation of enlarged aberrant premelanosomes harboring disorganized fibrillar structures and displaying proteins of mature melanosomes and lysosomes at their membrane. Moreover, we show that OA1 interacts biochemically with the premelanosomal protein MART-1. Inactivation of MART-1 by siRNA leads to a decreased stability of OA1 and is accompanied by similar defects in premelanosome biogenesis and composition. These data show for the first time that melanosome composition and identity are regulated at early stages by OA1 and that MART-1 likely acts as an escort protein for this GPCR. PMID:19717472

  7. 41 CFR 102-85.200 - Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Continued Occupancy... underlying lease and will specify whether or not renewal options are available. If the OA does not include a renewal option, customer agencies should assume relocation would be necessary upon OA expiration,...

  8. 41 CFR 102-85.200 - Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Continued Occupancy... underlying lease and will specify whether or not renewal options are available. If the OA does not include a renewal option, customer agencies should assume relocation would be necessary upon OA expiration,...

  9. 41 CFR 102-85.200 - Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Continued Occupancy... underlying lease and will specify whether or not renewal options are available. If the OA does not include a renewal option, customer agencies should assume relocation would be necessary upon OA expiration,...

  10. BJPsych Bulletin author mentoring scheme - helping trainees become published authors.

    PubMed

    Pimm, Jonathan; Galbraith, Niall

    2016-02-01

    The publishing world is changing rapidly. Innovations include the move to open access, the rise of social media and the transition to digitalisation. In the light of these developments and with ever-increasing pressures on early career psychiatrists and trainees to publish papers in journals with a recognised pedigree, the BJPsych Bulletin is piloting an author mentoring scheme. Mentors will help clinicians and aspiring academics develop articles from a pedestrian manuscript to one that will hopefully provoke important debate and aid changes in current practices. The scheme will run on a trial basis for approximately 12 months and will then be reviewed. Mentoring has been found to have an important effect of research output including publication and grant success; the hope is that this new initiative at the BJPsych Bulletin will result in such dividends to all involved. PMID:26958356

  11. BJPsych Bulletin author mentoring scheme - helping trainees become published authors.

    PubMed

    Pimm, Jonathan; Galbraith, Niall

    2016-02-01

    The publishing world is changing rapidly. Innovations include the move to open access, the rise of social media and the transition to digitalisation. In the light of these developments and with ever-increasing pressures on early career psychiatrists and trainees to publish papers in journals with a recognised pedigree, the BJPsych Bulletin is piloting an author mentoring scheme. Mentors will help clinicians and aspiring academics develop articles from a pedestrian manuscript to one that will hopefully provoke important debate and aid changes in current practices. The scheme will run on a trial basis for approximately 12 months and will then be reviewed. Mentoring has been found to have an important effect of research output including publication and grant success; the hope is that this new initiative at the BJPsych Bulletin will result in such dividends to all involved.

  12. A Quantitative Analysis of Published Skull Base Endoscopy Literature.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Douglas A; Ponce, Francisco A; Little, Andrew S; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Objectives Skull base endoscopy allows for minimal access approaches to the sinonasal contents and cranial base. Advances in endoscopic technique and applications have been published rapidly in recent decades. Setting We utilized an Internet-based scholarly database (Web of Science, Thomson Reuters) to query broad-based phrases regarding skull base endoscopy literature. Participants All skull base endoscopy publications. Main Outcome Measures Standard bibliometrics outcomes. Results We identified 4,082 relevant skull base endoscopy English-language articles published between 1973 and 2014. The 50 top-cited publications (n = 51, due to articles with equal citation counts) ranged in citation count from 397 to 88. Most of the articles were clinical case series or technique descriptions. Most (96% [49/51])were published in journals specific to either neurosurgery or otolaryngology. Conclusions A relatively small number of institutions and individuals have published a large amount of the literature. Most of the publications consisted of case series and technical advances, with a lack of randomized trials. PMID:26949585

  13. 77 FR 12284 - Access to Confidential Business Information; Protection Strategies Incorporated

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Access to Confidential Business Information; Protection Strategies Incorporated AGENCY... Strategies Incorporated (PSI) of Arlington, VA, to access information which has been submitted to EPA...

  14. 78 FR 32612 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility... previously published Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment...

  15. 78 FR 16448 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... previously published NPRM on Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 6916 (February 9... provided. Persons attending the meetings are requested to refrain from using perfume, cologne, and...

  16. 78 FR 10166 - Access Interpreting; Transfer of Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Access Interpreting; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces that pesticide related information submitted to EPA's Office...

  17. 76 FR 66089 - Access Authorization Program for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Access Authorization Program for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Regulatory guide; issuance. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing...

  18. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communications & IT Access to information and communication technology (ICT) is addressed by Board standards and guidelines issued ... Engineer (November 3) Access Board Approves Rules on ICT Refresh and Medical Diagnostic Equipment (September 14) Access ...

  19. Long-term balancing selection at the west nile virus resistance gene, Oas1b, maintains transspecific polymorphisms in the house mouse.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, William; Dvora, Shira; Gallo, Juliana; Orth, Annie; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2008-08-01

    Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) are interferon-inducible enzymes that participate in the first line of defense against a wide range of viral infection. Recent studies have determined that Oas1b, a member of the OAS gene family in the house mouse (Mus musculus), provides specific protection against flavivirus infection (e.g., West Nile virus, dengue fever virus, and yellow fever virus). We characterized the nucleotide sequence variation in coding and noncoding regions of the Oas1b gene for a large number of wild-derived strains of M. musculus and related species. Our sequence analyses determined that this gene is one of the most polymorphic genes ever described in any mammal. The level of variation in noncoding regions of Oas1b is an order of magnitude higher than the level reported for other regions of the mouse genome and is significantly different from the level of intraspecific variation expected under neutrality. Furthermore, a phylogenetic analysis of intronic sequences demonstrated that Oas1b alleles are ancient and that their divergence predates several speciation events, resulting in transspecific polymorphisms. The amino acid sequence of Oas1b is also extremely variable, with 1 out of 7 amino acid positions being polymorphic within M. musculus. Oas1b alleles are comparatively more divergent at synonymous positions than most autosomal genes and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution is remarkably high, suggesting that positive selection has been acting on Oas1b. The ancestry of Oas1b polymorphisms and the high level of amino acid polymorphisms strongly suggest that the allelic variation at Oas1b has been maintained in mouse populations by long-term balancing selection.

  20. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  1. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  2. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  3. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  4. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  5. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  6. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  7. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  8. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  9. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  10. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  11. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  12. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  13. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  14. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  15. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  16. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  17. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service covering published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  18. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1,000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  19. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  20. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service covering published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  1. 78 FR 49248 - Passenger Vessels Accessibility Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... additional time to submit comments. DATES: For the proposed rule published June 25, 2013 (78 FR 38102... passengers with disabilities. See 78 FR 38102, June 25, 2013. In that notice, the Access Board requested... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1196 RIN 3014-AA11 Passenger Vessels...

  2. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  3. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  4. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  5. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 21 .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  6. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  7. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  8. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  9. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  10. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  11. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  12. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  13. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  14. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  15. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service covering published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  16. 77 FR 54904 - Notice Inviting Publishers To Submit Tests for a Determination of Suitability for Use in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF). To use PDF you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free at the site. You may also access documents of...

  17. Neandertal origin of genetic variation at the cluster of OAS immunity genes.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Fernando L; Watkins, Joseph C; Hammer, Michael F

    2013-04-01

    Analyses of ancient DNA from extinct humans reveal signals of at least two independent hybridization events in the history of non-African populations. To date, there are very few examples of specific genetic variants that have been rigorously identified as introgressive. Here, we survey DNA sequence variation in the OAS gene cluster on chromosome 12 and provide strong evidence that a haplotype extending for ~185 kb introgressed from Neandertals. This haplotype is nearly restricted to Eurasians and is estimated to have diverged from the Neandertal sequence ~125 kya. Despite the potential for novel functional variation, the observed frequency of this haplotype is consistent with neutral introgression. This is the second locus in the human genome, after STAT2, carrying distinct haplotypes that appear to have introgressed separately from both Neandertals and Denisova. PMID:23315957

  18. The MOD-OA 200 kilowatt wind turbine generator design and analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, T. S.; Bodenschatz, C. A.; Eggers, A. G.; Hughes, P. S.; Lampe, R. F.; Lipner, M. H.; Schornhorst, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The project requirements, approach, system description, design requirements, design, analysis, system tests, installation safety considerations, failure modes and effects analysis, data acquisition, and initial performance for the MOD-OA 200 kw wind turbine generator are discussed. The components, the rotor, driven train, nacelle equipment, yaw drive mechanism and brake, tower, foundation, electrical system, and control systems are presented. The rotor includes the blades, hub and pitch change mechanism. The drive train includes the low speed shaft, speed increaser, high speed shaft, and rotor brake. The electrical system includes the generator, switchgear, transformer, and utility connection. The control systems are the blade pitch, yaw, and generator control, and the safety system. Manual, automatic, and remote control and Dynamic loads and fatigue are analyzed.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of OAS2 shows disease-specific DNA methylation profiles at individual CpG sites.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaolian; Boldrup, Linda; Coates, Philip J; Fahraeus, Robin; Nylander, Elisabet; Loizou, Christos; Olofsson, Katarina; Norberg-Spaak, Lena; Gärskog, Ola; Nylander, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are essential regulators of biological processes. Decreased DNA methylation of OAS2 (2'-5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase 2), encoding an antiviral protein, has been seen in psoriasis. To provide further insight into the epigenetic regulation of OAS2, we performed pyrosequencing to detect OAS2 DNA methylation status at 11 promoter and first exon located CpG sites in psoriasis (n = 12) and two common subtypes of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck: tongue (n = 12) and tonsillar (n = 11). Compared to corresponding controls, a general hypomethylation was seen in psoriasis. In tongue and tonsillar SCC, hypomethylation was found at only two CpG sites, the same two sites that were least demethylated in psoriasis. Despite differences in the specific residues targeted for methylation/demethylation, OAS2 expression was upregulated in all conditions and correlations between methylation and expression were seen in psoriasis and tongue SCC. Distinctive methylation status at four successively located CpG sites within a genomic area of 63 bp reveals a delicately integrated epigenetic program and indicates that detailed analysis of individual CpGs provides additional information into the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in specific disease states. Methylation analyses as clinical biomarkers need to be tailored according to disease-specific sites. PMID:27572959

  20. 41 CFR 102-85.70 - Are the standard OA terms appropriate for non-cancelable space?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Are the standard OA terms appropriate for non-cancelable space? 102-85.70 Section 102-85.70 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Occupancy Agreement § 102-85.70 Are the standard...

  1. 41 CFR 102-85.70 - Are the standard OA terms appropriate for non-cancelable space?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are the standard OA terms appropriate for non-cancelable space? 102-85.70 Section 102-85.70 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Occupancy Agreement § 102-85.70 Are the standard...

  2. Ocean acidification effects on Caribbean scleractinian coral calcification using a recirculating system: a novel approach to OA research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Projected increases in ocean pCO2 levels are likely to affect calcifying organisms more rapidly and to a greater extent than any other marine organisms. The effects of ocean acidification (OA) has been documented in numerous species of corals in both laboratory and field studies....

  3. Epigenetic regulation of OAS2 shows disease-specific DNA methylation profiles at individual CpG sites

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaolian; Boldrup, Linda; Coates, Philip J.; Fahraeus, Robin; Nylander, Elisabet; Loizou, Christos; Olofsson, Katarina; Norberg-Spaak, Lena; Gärskog, Ola; Nylander, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are essential regulators of biological processes. Decreased DNA methylation of OAS2 (2′-5′-Oligoadenylate Synthetase 2), encoding an antiviral protein, has been seen in psoriasis. To provide further insight into the epigenetic regulation of OAS2, we performed pyrosequencing to detect OAS2 DNA methylation status at 11 promoter and first exon located CpG sites in psoriasis (n = 12) and two common subtypes of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck: tongue (n = 12) and tonsillar (n = 11). Compared to corresponding controls, a general hypomethylation was seen in psoriasis. In tongue and tonsillar SCC, hypomethylation was found at only two CpG sites, the same two sites that were least demethylated in psoriasis. Despite differences in the specific residues targeted for methylation/demethylation, OAS2 expression was upregulated in all conditions and correlations between methylation and expression were seen in psoriasis and tongue SCC. Distinctive methylation status at four successively located CpG sites within a genomic area of 63 bp reveals a delicately integrated epigenetic program and indicates that detailed analysis of individual CpGs provides additional information into the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in specific disease states. Methylation analyses as clinical biomarkers need to be tailored according to disease-specific sites. PMID:27572959

  4. Well-Being among Older Adults with OA: Direct and Mediated Patterns of Control Beliefs, Optimism and Pessimism

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Aurora M.; Cotter, Kelly A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the contribution of important psychological resources (i.e., optimism, pessimism, control beliefs) to the psychological well-being of older adults with Osteoarthritis (OA); to assess the direct and mediated association of these psychosocial resources to outcomes (depressive symptoms, life satisfaction, and self-esteem). These objectives are important because OA is a significant stressor, treatments are limited, and psychological functioning is at risk for those coping with the condition, even compared to other chronic illnesses. Method A cross-sectional survey of 160 community-dwelling older adults with OA (81% women). Participants were not randomly selected, but nonetheless reflected the demographic makeup of the selection area. Results Ordinary least squares regression analyses using the PROCESS macro (Hayes, 2012) revealed that optimism and pessimism were associated with higher depressive symptoms and lower self-esteem indirectly through constraints beliefs. The analysis of life satisfaction showed that optimism and pessimism were each partially mediated through mastery and constraints beliefs. Discussion These results suggest that prior research, which has assessed these psychological resources as having singular relationships to outcomes, may have underestimated the importance of the relationship between these variables. We discuss possible points of intervention for older adults with OA who may experience increasing constraints beliefs over time. PMID:23418813

  5. 41 CFR 102-85.205 - What happens if a customer agency continues occupancy after the expiration of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... assignments. However, provisions are necessary to cover the GSA and customer relationship if an OA expires... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens if a... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued)...

  6. The new OGC Publish-Subscribe specification - status of work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigagli, Lorenzo; Echterhoff, Johannes; Braeckel, Aaron

    2013-04-01

    scope was identified after a public phase of analysis and requirements gathering. The PubSub standard version 1.0 in scheduled for release in the summer of 2013. Afterwards, specific PubSub extensions are expected to be defined for OGC Web Services (e.g. WCS, WFS, SOS). The cross-service requirements identified for PubSub 1.0 enable: • Notification capabilities as a module to existing services, with no impact on existing service semantics and by reusing service-specific filtering semantics; • Notifications of service and dataset updates in order to simplify/optimize harvesting by catalogues; • Actual data push and/or update notifications from access services (i.e. WCS, WFS, SOS) to the clients. The use-cases identified for PubSub 1.0 include: • Service Filtered Data Push and Notification. • Notification of Threshold Crossings. • Brokered publish/subscribe. • Distributed Data Synchronization. PubSub 1.0 comprises a core and two extension documents: • Core: defines an abstract description of the mandatory PubSub functionality, independent of the underlying binding technology (several extension classes are also defined, for optional capabilities). • SOAP binding: defines how the PubSub functionality is realized in SOAP services (i.e. leveraging WS-Notification). • RESTful binding: defines how the PubSub functionality is realized in RESTful services.

  7. The last bite was deadly--about responsibility in scientific publishing.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Dragan; Usichenko, Taras I; Lehmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Some open access journals are believed to have devaluated the highly respected image of the scientific journal. This has been, it is claimed, verified. Yet the project we believe failed and we show why we think that it failed. The study itself was badly conducted and the report, which Science published, was itself a perfect example of "bad science". If the article that was published in Science were to be taken as one of the "test" articles and Science as a victim journal (a perfect control though), the study would show the opposite of what author concluded in his paper: 100% of the controls (normal non-open access journals, in the present study this was Science) accepted the "bait" paper for publication, while in the experimental group only about 60% (open access journals) accepted the bait paper for publication. The conclusion is that, with respect to non-open access and open access, the probability of accepting pseudoscience is well in favor of this being done by a non-open access journal. Since this interpretation is based on some facts that were not included in the project itself, the only warranted result of this study would be that nothing could be concluded from it. It is concluded that the method that Bohannon used was heavily flawed and in addition immoral; that the report that was published by Science was inconclusive and that the act of publishing such report cannot be morally justified either. Various methods to improve the quality of published papers exist but scientific fraud with "good intentions" as a method to promote scientific publishing should be avoided.

  8. An Optically Accessible Pyrolysis Microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Joshua H.; David, Donald E.; Ellison, Barney; Daily, John W.

    2016-06-01

    We report an optically accessible pyrolysis micro-reactor suitable for in situ laser spectroscopic measurements. A radiative heating design allows for completely unobstructed views of the micro-reactor along two axes. The maximum temperature demonstrated here is only 1300 K (as opposed to 1700 K for the usual SiC micro-reactor) because of the melting point of fused silica, but alternative transparent materials will allow for higher temperatures. Laser induced fluorescence measurements on nitric oxide are presented as a proof of principle for spectroscopic characterization of pyrolysis conditions. (This work has been published in J. H. Baraban, D. E. David, G. B. Ellison, and J. W. Daily. An Optically Accessible Pyrolysis Micro-Reactor. Review of Scientific Instruments, 87(1):014101, 2016.)

  9. Modern Publishing Approach of Journal of Astronomy & Earth Sciences Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Filling a needed scholarly publishing avenue for astronomy education researchers and earth science education researchers, the Journal of Astronomy & Earth Sciences Education - JAESE published its first volume and issue in 2014. The Journal of Astronomy & Earth Sciences Education - JAESE is a scholarly, peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing original discipline-based education research and evaluation, with an emphasis of significant scientific results derived from ethical observations and systematic experimentation in science education and evaluation. International in scope, JAESE aims to publish the highest quality and timely articles from discipline-based education research that advance understanding of astronomy and earth sciences education and are likely to have a significant impact on the discipline or on policy. Articles are solicited describing both (i) systematic science education research and (ii) evaluated teaching innovations across the broadly defined Earth & space sciences education, including the disciplines of astronomy, climate education, energy resource science, environmental science, geology, geography, agriculture, meteorology, planetary sciences, and oceanography education. The publishing model adopted for this new journal is open-access and articles appear online in GoogleScholar, ERIC, and are searchable in catalogs of 440,000 libraries that index online journals of its type. Rather than paid for by library subscriptions or by society membership dues, the annual budget is covered by page-charges paid by individual authors, their institutions, grants or donors: This approach is common in scientific journals, but is relatively uncommon in education journals. Authors retain their own copyright. The journal is owned by the Clute Institute of Denver, which owns and operates 17 scholarly journals and currently edited by former American Astronomical Society Education Officer Tim Slater, who is an endowed professor at the University of Wyoming and

  10. NSF Anticipates Pushing Boundaries on Open-Access Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF), in carrying out the Obama administration's new push for greater public access to research published in scientific journals, will consider exclusivity periods shorter than the 12-month standard in the White House directive, as well as trade-offs involving data-sharing and considerations of publishers'…

  11. 20 CFR 902.3 - Published information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Published information. 902.3 Section 902.3 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES RULES REGARDING AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 902.3 Published information. (a) Federal Register. Pursuant to sections 552 and 553 of title 5 of...

  12. A Serious Look at Serious Music Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigman, Matthew

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the changing nature of the music publishing business. States that trends such as the decrease of music education in U.S. schools and the abuse of copyright by illegal photocopying in schools and churches have threatened the industry's existence. Includes information on recent corporate takeovers and changes among U.S. music publishers.…

  13. Publishers & Librarians: Two Cultures, One Goal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fister, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    For two professions so committed to meeting the needs of readers, publishers and librarians have distinct cultures. Put simply, one culture is all about developing and selling books; the other is about sharing them and fostering a culture of reading. But there is another basic difference, too. Publishers work closely with authors and use sales…

  14. Pages from the Desktop: Desktop Publishing Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1994-01-01

    Discusses changes that have made desktop publishing appealing and reasonably priced. Hardware, software, and printer options for getting started and moving on, typeface developments, and the key characteristics of desktop publishing are described. The author's notes on 33 articles from the personal computing literature from January-March 1994 are…

  15. What Does the Academic Publisher Actually Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, David

    1991-01-01

    A frustrated author recounts his own experiences and those of others in dealing with publishers. He concludes that academic publishers prefer exchanging ideas and academic gossip with authors to the basics of business, letting the books sell themselves to a captive audience of academic libraries. (MSE)

  16. Developing Collections of Web-Published Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Inga K.; Murray, Kathleen R.; Hartman, Cathy Nelson

    2007-01-01

    Librarians and archivists face challenges when adapting traditional collection development practices to meet the unique characteristics of Web-published materials. Likewise, preservation activities for Web-published materials must be undertaken at the outset of collection development lest they be lost forever. Standards and best practices for…

  17. An Overview of American Publishing for Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facente, Gary

    1986-01-01

    A financial survey of the American publishing scene (estimated net book sales, expenses for publishing and marketing professional books) is followed by descriptions of the editorial and marketing processes. Practices relating to contracts, imprints, distribution arrangements, and remainders are described noting changes in contemporary publishing…

  18. Researching, Writing, and Publishing Local History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felt, Thomas E.

    The book provides practical guidelines for the layman who is interested in researching, writing, and publishing local history. Two standards considered to be essential to the writing of local history are ethics and competence. The three aspects of competence which are discussed focus on researching, writing, and publishing. Chapter I identifies…

  19. Impacts of New Media on Scholarly Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalay, Yehuda E.

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes a few key results of a workshop, held in the University of California Berkeley in June 2006, organized by the Center for New Media and supported by Elsevier, the leading publisher of scholarly journals. The workshop focused on the following questions: How will scientific publishing be affected by New Media? How will the new…

  20. 9 CFR 390.2 - Published materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to Agency programs, which implement the laws listed in the Delegation of Authority, 7 CFR 2.15(a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Published materials. 390.2 Section 390... § 390.2 Published materials. FSIS rules and regulations relating to its regulatory responsibilities...

  1. Publish or perish: authorship and peer review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Publish or perish is defined in Wikipedia as the pressure to publish work constantly to further or sustain one’s career in academia. This is an apt description given that refereed scientific publications are the currency of science and the primary means for broad dissemination of knowledge. Professi...

  2. Publish, Don't Perish: Ten Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Katherine; Aulette, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Going public with research is an important part of the research process. Besides the intrinsic value of sharing experience and insights with a community of peers, in higher education, publishing is vital for job security and promotion. Despite these forces encouraging publishing, few academics actually do. The purpose of this article is to provide…

  3. 7 CFR 370.2 - Published materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... codified in this chapter III, title 7, and in 9 CFR chapter I. APHIS issues publications explaining animal... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Published materials. 370.2 Section 370.2 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION § 370.2 Published materials. Rules and regulations of...

  4. 9 CFR 390.2 - Published materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to Agency programs, which implement the laws listed in the Delegation of Authority, 7 CFR 2.15(a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Published materials. 390.2 Section 390... § 390.2 Published materials. FSIS rules and regulations relating to its regulatory responsibilities...

  5. 9 CFR 390.2 - Published materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to Agency programs, which implement the laws listed in the Delegation of Authority, 7 CFR 2.15(a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Published materials. 390.2 Section 390... § 390.2 Published materials. FSIS rules and regulations relating to its regulatory responsibilities...

  6. 7 CFR 370.2 - Published materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... codified in this chapter III, title 7, and in 9 CFR chapter I. APHIS issues publications explaining animal... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Published materials. 370.2 Section 370.2 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION § 370.2 Published materials. Rules and regulations of...

  7. 9 CFR 390.2 - Published materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to Agency programs, which implement the laws listed in the Delegation of Authority, 7 CFR 2.15(a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Published materials. 390.2 Section 390... § 390.2 Published materials. FSIS rules and regulations relating to its regulatory responsibilities...

  8. Electronic Journal Publishers: A Reference Librarian's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Charles F.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses problems that the lack of standardization in electronic journal publishing creates for reference or bibliographic instruction librarians and describes a study that examined science, technology, and medicine journals publishers' Web sites, focusing on those features most relevant to end users. (Author/LRW)

  9. Evolution of Scholarly Publishing and Library Services in Astronomy - Impact, Challenges, and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, Hema; Sheshadri, Geetha

    2015-08-01

    Science publishing and its procedures have evolved rapidly and incredibly. Technical advances in the production and promotion of science content have dramatically widened the visibility and reach, deepened the impact and intensified the thrust of our journals’ science content. Nevertheless, it is also true that with speed and ease of automation, quality is to be ferociously guarded. Could traditional methods when juxtaposed with the continuous onslaught of newer technologies, in our publishing procedures, be the answer. Are people still the quintessential element in technology?Why do we publish; the phrase “Publish or Perish” has itself, interestingly, evolved in its meaning. How have publishing procedures evolved through the years; what is the impact of these developments; what are the challenges and opportunities for scholarly publishers in this digital age. How do we cope with and preempt the abuse and distortion of internet data, and with unethical practices that threaten to cripple the peer review system, and jeopardize publishing ethics and academic integrity. How can publishers fulfill their responsibility to publish content that is explicitly original.With increasing demand from the astronomical community for e-journals and other e-resources and with the gradual loss of value for printed journals, librarians are developing and maintaining e-libraries and providing access to digital resources, and re-engineering their roles to provide advancing tools for e-pub content.How can we prepare for the future of publishing, or is it already here with the popularity of pre-print servers. How have publishers responded to the Open Access model while being aware that ‘the price of keeping something free comes with a cost’. Will potential authors be confused with identifying traditional peer reviewed content, the predatory journals, the fake reviewers, placing research in institutional repositories, copyright and licenses. Are libraries impacted by these

  10. The data paper: a mechanism to incentivize data publishing in biodiversity science

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Free and open access to primary biodiversity data is essential for informed decision-making to achieve conservation of biodiversity and sustainable development. However, primary biodiversity data are neither easily accessible nor discoverable. Among several impediments, one is a lack of incentives to data publishers for publishing of their data resources. One such mechanism currently lacking is recognition through conventional scholarly publication of enriched metadata, which should ensure rapid discovery of 'fit-for-use' biodiversity data resources. Discussion We review the state of the art of data discovery options and the mechanisms in place for incentivizing data publishers efforts towards easy, efficient and enhanced publishing, dissemination, sharing and re-use of biodiversity data. We propose the establishment of the 'biodiversity data paper' as one possible mechanism to offer scholarly recognition for efforts and investment by data publishers in authoring rich metadata and publishing them as citable academic papers. While detailing the benefits to data publishers, we describe the objectives, work flow and outcomes of the pilot project commissioned by the Global Biodiversity Information Facility in collaboration with scholarly publishers and pioneered by Pensoft Publishers through its journals Zookeys, PhytoKeys, MycoKeys, BioRisk, NeoBiota, Nature Conservation and the forthcoming Biodiversity Data Journal. We then debate further enhancements of the data paper beyond the pilot project and attempt to forecast the future uptake of data papers as an incentivization mechanism by the stakeholder communities. Conclusions We believe that in addition to recognition for those involved in the data publishing enterprise, data papers will also expedite publishing of fit-for-use biodiversity data resources. However, uptake and establishment of the data paper as a potential mechanism of scholarly recognition requires a high degree of commitment and investment

  11. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  12. What publishers do, and what it costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Jamie

    2015-08-01

    In the 350th year of the academic journal, it is perhaps surprising that Publishers have done such a poor job of explaining exactly what it is we do, how we add value to scientific discourse, and how we justify our charges.IOP Publishing occupies a somewhat unique position as publishing house wholly owned by a major society, and with approximately half of its portfolio managed on behalf of other societies and institutions, including several significant examples in the fields of Astronomy and Astrophysics.Studies of the costs of publishing, several different business models, and some major investment initiatives aimed at improving the author and reader experience, will be drawn upon as context to consider the true costs of publishing.

  13. The Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter. 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The Commission on Preservation and Access was established in 1986 to foster and support collaboration among libraries and allied organizations in order to ensure the preservation of the published and documentary record in all formats and to provide enhanced access to scholarly information. The Commission's newsletter keeps the preservation and…

  14. 75 FR 34960 - Import Administration IA ACCESS Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... ACCESS Pilot Program in the Federal Register at 75 FR 32341. The reference to the Docket No. ITA- 2010.... The Department publishes this notice to correct this number. Accordingly, in FR Doc. 2010-13733, at... International Trade Administration 19 CFR Part 351 Import Administration IA ACCESS Pilot Program AGENCY:...

  15. 49 CFR 7.7 - Access to materials and indices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to materials and indices. 7.7 Section 7.7... To Be Made Public by DOT § 7.7 Access to materials and indices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph... unnecessary and impracticable to publish the index of materials in the Federal Register. Information as to...

  16. 49 CFR 7.7 - Access to materials and indices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Access to materials and indices. 7.7 Section 7.7... To Be Made Public by DOT § 7.7 Access to materials and indices. (a) Except as provided in paragraph... unnecessary and impracticable to publish the index of materials in the Federal Register. Information as to...

  17. Publishing FAIR Data: An Exemplar Methodology Utilizing PHI-Base.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Iglesias, Alejandro; Rodríguez-González, Alejandro; Irvine, Alistair G; Sesma, Ane; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Wilkinson, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen-Host interaction data is core to our understanding of disease processes and their molecular/genetic bases. Facile access to such core data is particularly important for the plant sciences, where individual genetic and phenotypic observations have the added complexity of being dispersed over a wide diversity of plant species vs. the relatively fewer host species of interest to biomedical researchers. Recently, an international initiative interested in scholarly data publishing proposed that all scientific data should be "FAIR"-Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable. In this work, we describe the process of migrating a database of notable relevance to the plant sciences-the Pathogen-Host Interaction Database (PHI-base)-to a form that conforms to each of the FAIR Principles. We discuss the technical and architectural decisions, and the migration pathway, including observations of the difficulty and/or fidelity of each step. We examine how multiple FAIR principles can be addressed simultaneously through careful design decisions, including making data FAIR for both humans and machines with minimal duplication of effort. We note how FAIR data publishing involves more than data reformatting, requiring features beyond those exhibited by most life science Semantic Web or Linked Data resources. We explore the value-added by completing this FAIR data transformation, and then test the result through integrative questions that could not easily be asked over traditional Web-based data resources. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of providing explicit and reliable access to provenance information, which we argue enhances citation rates by encouraging and facilitating transparent scholarly reuse of these valuable data holdings.

  18. Publishing FAIR Data: An Exemplar Methodology Utilizing PHI-Base.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Iglesias, Alejandro; Rodríguez-González, Alejandro; Irvine, Alistair G; Sesma, Ane; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Wilkinson, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen-Host interaction data is core to our understanding of disease processes and their molecular/genetic bases. Facile access to such core data is particularly important for the plant sciences, where individual genetic and phenotypic observations have the added complexity of being dispersed over a wide diversity of plant species vs. the relatively fewer host species of interest to biomedical researchers. Recently, an international initiative interested in scholarly data publishing proposed that all scientific data should be "FAIR"-Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable. In this work, we describe the process of migrating a database of notable relevance to the plant sciences-the Pathogen-Host Interaction Database (PHI-base)-to a form that conforms to each of the FAIR Principles. We discuss the technical and architectural decisions, and the migration pathway, including observations of the difficulty and/or fidelity of each step. We examine how multiple FAIR principles can be addressed simultaneously through careful design decisions, including making data FAIR for both humans and machines with minimal duplication of effort. We note how FAIR data publishing involves more than data reformatting, requiring features beyond those exhibited by most life science Semantic Web or Linked Data resources. We explore the value-added by completing this FAIR data transformation, and then test the result through integrative questions that could not easily be asked over traditional Web-based data resources. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of providing explicit and reliable access to provenance information, which we argue enhances citation rates by encouraging and facilitating transparent scholarly reuse of these valuable data holdings. PMID:27433158

  19. Publishing FAIR Data: An Exemplar Methodology Utilizing PHI-Base

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Iglesias, Alejandro; Rodríguez-González, Alejandro; Irvine, Alistair G.; Sesma, Ane; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.; Wilkinson, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen-Host interaction data is core to our understanding of disease processes and their molecular/genetic bases. Facile access to such core data is particularly important for the plant sciences, where individual genetic and phenotypic observations have the added complexity of being dispersed over a wide diversity of plant species vs. the relatively fewer host species of interest to biomedical researchers. Recently, an international initiative interested in scholarly data publishing proposed that all scientific data should be “FAIR”—Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable. In this work, we describe the process of migrating a database of notable relevance to the plant sciences—the Pathogen-Host Interaction Database (PHI-base)—to a form that conforms to each of the FAIR Principles. We discuss the technical and architectural decisions, and the migration pathway, including observations of the difficulty and/or fidelity of each step. We examine how multiple FAIR principles can be addressed simultaneously through careful design decisions, including making data FAIR for both humans and machines with minimal duplication of effort. We note how FAIR data publishing involves more than data reformatting, requiring features beyond those exhibited by most life science Semantic Web or Linked Data resources. We explore the value-added by completing this FAIR data transformation, and then test the result through integrative questions that could not easily be asked over traditional Web-based data resources. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of providing explicit and reliable access to provenance information, which we argue enhances citation rates by encouraging and facilitating transparent scholarly reuse of these valuable data holdings. PMID:27433158

  20. Web Database Development: Implications for Academic Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernekes, Bob

    This paper discusses the preliminary planning, design, and development of a pilot project to create an Internet accessible database and search tool for locating and distributing company data and scholarly work. Team members established four project objectives: (1) to develop a Web accessible database and decision tool that creates Web pages on the…

  1. Who Gets to See Published Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The battle over public access to federally financed research is heating up again. The basic question is this: When taxpayers help pay for scholarly research, should those taxpayers get to see the results in the form of free access to the resulting journal articles? Actions in Washington this month highlight how far from settled the question is,…

  2. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  3. [SciELO: method for electronic publishing].

    PubMed

    Laerte Packer, A; Rocha Biojone, M; Antonio, I; Mayumi Takemaka, R; Pedroso García, A; Costa da Silva, A; Toshiyuki Murasaki, R; Mylek, C; Carvalho Reisl, O; Rocha F Delbucio, H C

    2001-01-01

    It describes the SciELO Methodology Scientific Electronic Library Online for electronic publishing of scientific periodicals, examining issues such as the transition from traditional printed publication to electronic publishing, the scientific communication process, the principles which founded the methodology development, its application in the building of the SciELO site, its modules and components, the tools use for its construction etc. The article also discusses the potentialities and trends for the area in Brazil and Latin America, pointing out questions and proposals which should be investigated and solved by the methodology. It concludes that the SciELO Methodology is an efficient, flexible and wide solution for the scientific electronic publishing.

  4. The five deadly sins of science publishing

    PubMed Central

    Tracz, Vitek

    2015-01-01

    Science cannot progress without scientists reporting their findings. And yet researchers have given control of this central pillar of the scientific process to science publishers, who are in the business of serving the interests of their journals; these are not always the same as the interests of science. This editorial describes the problems with the process of preparing and publishing research findings, and with judging their veracity and significance, and then explains how we at Faculty of 1000 are starting to tackle the ‘deadly sins’ of science publishing. PMID:26097694

  5. Truth in Science Publishing: A Personal Perspective.

    PubMed

    Südhof, Thomas C

    2016-08-01

    Scientists, public servants, and patient advocates alike increasingly question the validity of published scientific results, endangering the public's acceptance of science. Here, I argue that emerging flaws in the integrity of the peer review system are largely responsible. Distortions in peer review are driven by economic forces and enabled by a lack of accountability of journals, editors, and authors. One approach to restoring trust in the validity of published results may be to establish basic rules that render peer review more transparent, such as publishing the reviews (a practice already embraced by some journals) and monitoring not only the track records of authors but also of editors and journals. PMID:27564858

  6. Developing educational software for publisher vendors.

    PubMed

    Joseph, L S; Joseph, A F

    1985-09-01

    This article has provided the principles of CAI development, marketing strategies, information on getting started with CAI, and how to approach publisher vendors. Guidelines for software development proposals have been synthesized from major software publishers in nursing. There is a great demand for courseware that teaches critical thinking skills, problem solving, application, and analysis. Tutorials and simulations are much needed. Computer-assisted testing courseware will also be highly used by teachers at all levels in the future. Opportunity awaits the CAI author in the publishing arena! PMID:3903670

  7. Truth in Science Publishing: A Personal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Scientists, public servants, and patient advocates alike increasingly question the validity of published scientific results, endangering the public’s acceptance of science. Here, I argue that emerging flaws in the integrity of the peer review system are largely responsible. Distortions in peer review are driven by economic forces and enabled by a lack of accountability of journals, editors, and authors. One approach to restoring trust in the validity of published results may be to establish basic rules that render peer review more transparent, such as publishing the reviews (a practice already embraced by some journals) and monitoring not only the track records of authors but also of editors and journals. PMID:27564858

  8. The New Publishing: Technology's Impact on the Publishing Industry over the Next Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Gregory J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses technology's impact on the products, revenue sources, and distribution channels of the publishing industry over the next decade. Highlights include electronic books and copy protection; copyright; advantages of electronic books to users, libraries, and publishers; retailing schemes; changes in education; subscription publishing;…

  9. College Textbook Publishing: Patterns of Corporate Diversification and the Rationalization of the Publishing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Jacinto E.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the impact of publishing industry diversification on the college textbook publishing process. Topics discussed include characteristics and trends of the college publishing industry; corporate ownership and managerial practices; the rationalization of editorial and marketing processes; evaluative criteria; author selection; and suggestions…

  10. An Open Access future? Report from the eurocancercoms project

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, R; Warden, R

    2011-01-01

    In March 2011, as part of the background research to the FP7 Eurocancercoms project, the European Association for Cancer Research (EACR) conducted an online survey of its members working in Europe to discover their experiences of and attitudes to the issues surrounding academic publishing and Open Access. This paper presents the results from this survey and compares them to the results from a much larger survey on the same topic from the Study of Open Access Publishing (SOAP). The responses from both surveys show very positive attitudes to the Open Access publishing route; perhaps the most challenging statistic from the EACR survey is that 88% of respondents believe that publicly funded research should be made available to be read and used without access barriers As a conclusion and invitation to further discussion, this paper also contributes to the debate around subscription and Open Access publishing, supporting the case for accelerating the progress towards Open Access publishing of cancer research articles as a particularly supportive way of assisting all researchers to make unhindered progress with their work. PMID:22276063

  11. Health Care Access Among Deaf People.

    PubMed

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health knowledge for deaf people including those with even higher risk of marginalization. Examples of approaches to improve access to health care, such as providing powerful and visually accessible communication through the use of sign language, the implementation of important communication technologies, and cultural awareness trainings for health professionals are discussed. Programs that raise health knowledge in Deaf communities and models of primary health care centers for deaf people are also presented. Published documents can empower deaf people to realize their right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health.

  12. Distributed Publishing and HyperCite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Anne

    No one publisher or content owner can ever hope to service all of a given user's information needs. Thus a distributed system of publishing, whereby each publisher ensures that each ``knowledge pointer'' in their content links to and from all the other important knowledge pointers in given subject areas, ensures that users can go on ``information trails''. These trails become a voyage of discovery and the junction points on these trails can often be databases, which aim to provide some comprehensive cover of a subject. I shall describe Institute of Physics Publishing's efforts in this area, including our HyperCite technology, which allows users to roam the literature, backwards and forwards in time, and to experience fascinating information trails.

  13. Printing and Publishing Industry Training Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Training International, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Accounted is the supervisory training program currently in operation in the printing and publishing industry. The purpose of the training program is to increase managerial efficiency and to better prepare new supervisors. (DS)

  14. From course assignment paper to publishable manuscript.

    PubMed

    Rew, Lynn

    2012-12-01

    Both undergraduate and graduate nursing students are expected to write numerous papers in their educational programs; however, most of these papers are never published. Many students and faculty lack the skills needed to convert a course assignment paper to a publishable manuscript. The purpose of this article is to describe 10 steps that can transform a course assignment paper into a publishable manuscript. These steps include outlining, clarifying the topic, clearly stating the purpose, identifying an appropriate audience, revising with faculty's feedback, querying journal editors, revising to conform to journal's author guidelines, requesting and responding to peer feedback, and finally editing and proofreading prior to submitting the manuscript. Faculty members are encouraged to make writing assignments that students can then convert to publishable manuscripts. Such publications form an essential cornerstone of professional holistic nursing.

  15. Essay: The Future of Scientific Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandweiss, Jack

    2009-05-01

    How can the scientific publishing enterprise deal with the increasing specialization of individual physicists? The possible aids include virtual journals, the new APS journal Physics, and the possibility of artificial intelligence programs.

  16. Publishing integrity and good practices in editing in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Polenakovic, Momir; Gucev, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    The Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA), held a scientific workshop for journal editors in biomedicine: "Publishing integrity and good practices in editing in biomedicine" on April 25, 2014 in MASA, Skopje. The meeting looked into old problems and new situations in editing and publishing, with emphasis on the situation in developing countries. This global knowledge-based society is founded on the results obtained from scientific research. The data from basic research in developed countries contribute in a quite substantial manner to the newly added economic value. One of the main reasons for underdevelopment in South Eastern Europe (SEE) is certainly a low or non-existent contribution of scientific research in the newly added economic value. This has largely to do with the perception of the political elites which simply lack the insight on the crucial importance of science in development. In the long term this leads to societies in which there are distortions in the understanding of the most basic values. Academic publishing has experienced tremendous growth: so far there are at least 50 million scientific articles. Interestingly, publishing in developing countries has experienced a rate of growth higher than in developed countries. However, this is not the case with the Balkan countries. The meeting looked at some old and some newly emerging problems in editing and publishing. First, the high cost for universities and researchers to purchase journals adversely affects both publishing and editing. In developing countries the high cost of purchasing scientific literature is an almost insurmountable problem in spite of the fact that some publishing companies offer discounted fees. Open access journals in South Eastern European (SEE) countries are hardly achievable as this also incurs costs that have to be covered in some way or other. The peer review process has the fundamental difficulty that reviewers are in the situation of a Procrustean bed, tending to

  17. Publishing integrity and good practices in editing in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Polenakovic, Momir; Gucev, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    The Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA), held a scientific workshop for journal editors in biomedicine: "Publishing integrity and good practices in editing in biomedicine" on April 25, 2014 in MASA, Skopje. The meeting looked into old problems and new situations in editing and publishing, with emphasis on the situation in developing countries. This global knowledge-based society is founded on the results obtained from scientific research. The data from basic research in developed countries contribute in a quite substantial manner to the newly added economic value. One of the main reasons for underdevelopment in South Eastern Europe (SEE) is certainly a low or non-existent contribution of scientific research in the newly added economic value. This has largely to do with the perception of the political elites which simply lack the insight on the crucial importance of science in development. In the long term this leads to societies in which there are distortions in the understanding of the most basic values. Academic publishing has experienced tremendous growth: so far there are at least 50 million scientific articles. Interestingly, publishing in developing countries has experienced a rate of growth higher than in developed countries. However, this is not the case with the Balkan countries. The meeting looked at some old and some newly emerging problems in editing and publishing. First, the high cost for universities and researchers to purchase journals adversely affects both publishing and editing. In developing countries the high cost of purchasing scientific literature is an almost insurmountable problem in spite of the fact that some publishing companies offer discounted fees. Open access journals in South Eastern European (SEE) countries are hardly achievable as this also incurs costs that have to be covered in some way or other. The peer review process has the fundamental difficulty that reviewers are in the situation of a Procrustean bed, tending to

  18. Electronic Books: A Major Publishing Revolution. Part 1: General Considerations and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Donald T.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses electronic books and their impact on the publishing industry. Topics include a history of the book industry; downloadable ebooks; dedicated ebook readers; Web-accessible ebooks; print-on-demand books; advantages and disadvantages; copyright; ebook concerns in libraries, including licensing, lack of standards, bibliographic control, and…

  19. Legislation: Legislation and Regulations Affecting Libraries in 2002; Legislation and Regulations Affecting Publishing in 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheketoff, Emily; Costabile, Mary R.; Adler, Allan

    2003-01-01

    Reviews legislation and regulations affecting libraries and the publishing industry, including the Museum and Library Services Act; Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI); copyright; access to electronic government information; telecommunications and technology; electronic surveillance and privacy, including the USA Patriot Act;…

  20. Cataloging the Publications of Dark Horse Comics: One Publisher in an Academic Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    Libraries receiving the corpus of a comics publisher are presented with challenges, especially regarding preservation and access for special and circulating collections. Libraries must consider user research needs and collection relevance. Library literature is consulted and recommendations are made regarding bibliographic description, subject…

  1. Impact of socioeconomic factors on informed decision making and treatment choice in patients with hip and knee OA.

    PubMed

    Youm, Jiwon; Chan, Vanessa; Belkora, Jeffrey; Bozic, Kevin J

    2015-02-01

    It is unclear how socioeconomic (SES) status influences the effectiveness of shared decision making (SDM) tools. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of SES on the utility of SDM tools among patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). We performed a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of 123 patients with hip or knee OA. Higher education and higher income were independently associated with higher knowledge survey scores. Patients with private insurance were 2.7 times more likely than patients with Medicare to arrive at a decision after the initial office visit. Higher education was associated with lower odds of choosing surgery, even after adjusting for knowledge. Patient knowledge of their medical condition and treatment options varies with SES.

  2. Rural health care: redefining access.

    PubMed

    Collins, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The population and demographics of rural America are shifting once again. As our nation's unprecedented health care reform unfolds, it is becoming clear that rural communities have unique strengths, and capitalizing on these strengths can position them well for this health care transformation. Equally important are the distinct challenges that--with careful planning, attention, and resources--can be transformed into opportunities to thrive in the new health care environment. The North Carolina Institute of Medicine's Task Force on Rural Health recently published a report that highlights the strengths and challenges of rural communities [1]. In order to fully leverage these opportunities, we must continue to acknowledge the fundamental importance of access to basic health care, while also broadening our discussion to collectively tackle the additional components necessary to create healthy, thriving rural communities. As we reexamine the needs of rural communities, we should broaden our discussions to include an expansion of the types of access that are necessary for strengthening rural health. Collaboration, successful recruitment and retention, availability of specialty services, quality care, and cost effectiveness are some of the issues that must come into discussions about access to services. With this in mind, this issue of the NCMJ explores opportunities to strengthen the health of North Carolina's rural communities. PMID:25621473

  3. Fabrication of low-cost Mod-OA wood composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Gougeon, M.; Thomas, G.; Zuteck, M.

    1983-01-01

    The wood composite blades were fabricated by using epoxy resin-bonded laminates of Douglas fir veneers for the leading edge spar sections and honeycomb-cored birch plywood panels for the blade trailing edge or afterbody sections. The blade was joined to the wind turbine hub assembly by epoxy resin-bonded steel load take-off studs. The wood composite blades were installed in the Mod-OA wind turbine test facility at Kahuku, Hawaii. The wood composite blades have successfully completed high power (average of 150 kW) operations for an eighteen month period (nearly 8,000 hr) before replacement with another set of wood composite blades. The original set of blades was taken out of service because of the failure of the shank on one stud. An inspection of the blades at NASA-Lewis showed that the shank failure was caused by a high stress concentration at a corrosion pit on the shank fillet radius which resulted in fatigue stresses in excess of the endurance limit.

  4. Orientatio ad Sidera (OAS): a comprehensive project for cultural astronomy research in ancient Mediterranean cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio; César González-García, A.; Rodríguez-Antón, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    During the last decade (starting in 2005), the OAS Project has been run, with the support of the Spanish research agencies. Within its framework, research on cultural astronomy has been developed for a series of ancient cultures from the Atlantic Islands to the Arabian Peninsula with the Meditterranean Sea as the pricipal axis of the project. A catalogue of studies has been performed in a set of cultures such as the Megalithic Phenomenon, ancient Egypt, Middle East Bronze and Iron Age civilizations and the Roman World, among many others. In this essay a general scope of the project and a series of most interesting outcomes will be presented. The evolutionary ties of the megalithic monuments of the Iberian Peninsula and elsewhere, the pattern of orientation of Egyptian temples and skyscaping practices within the Hittite, Commagenian or Nabataean cultures, among others, will be shown; finishing in a comprehensive, statistical and comparative study of the orientation patterns of thousands of ancient monuments of the Mediterranean region. Finally, a sketch of our most recent, still ongoing, research on the astronomical and non-astronomical practices used in the planning of cities in the Roman World will be a compelling and promising closing remark of our analysis.

  5. BOREAS TE-1 CH4 Flux Data Over The SSA-OA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Darwin; Papagno, Andrea; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-1 team collected various data to characterize the soil-plant systems in the BOREAS SSA. Particular emphasis was placed on nutrient biochemistry, the stores and transfers of organic carbon, and how the characteristics were related to measured methane fluxes. The overall transect in the Prince Albert National Park (Saskatchewan, Canada) included the major plant communities and related soils that occurred in that section of the boreal forest. Soil physical, chemical, and biological measurements along the transect were used to characterize the static environment, which allowed them to be related to methane fluxes. Chamber techniques were used to provide a measure of methane production/uptake. Chamber measurements coupled with flask sampling were used to determine the seasonality of methane fluxes. This particular data set contains methane flux and soil profile methane concentration values from the SSA-OA site. The data were collected from 29-May to 17-Sep-1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. Impact of OAS1 Exon 7 rs10774671 Genetic Variation on Liver Fibrosis Progression in Egyptian HCV Genotype 4 Patients.

    PubMed

    Bader El Din, Noha G; Anany, Mohamed A; Dawood, Reham M; Ibrahim, Marwa K; El-Shenawy, Reem; El Abd, Yasmin S; El Awady, Mostafa K

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of genetic variants of oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10774671 at the exon 7 splice acceptor site on liver fibrosis progression and hepatitis C virus (HCV) outcome in Egyptian HCV genotype 4 patients. In this study, 195 subjects were enrolled; 60 controls and 135 chronic HCV genotype 4 patients with different fibrosis grades. All subjects were genotyped for OAS1 SNP rs10774671 polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. There was an increasing trend of liver fibrosis progression as 52.9% GG, 73.6% GA, and 83.3% AA genotypes were detected in late fibrosis patients (p = 0.025). The AA genotype was higher in the late fibrosis group than in the early fibrosis group (83.3% vs. 16.7%) (p = 0.001). The A allele was significantly affecting the liver fibrosis progression rate, more than the G allele (p = 0.001). The multivariate analysis showed that the OAS1 GA and AA genotypes were independent factors associated with liver progression (p = 0.009, odds ratio [OR] 3.467, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.273-7.584). In addition, the A allele was associated with liver fibrosis progression (p = 0.014, OR 2.525, 95% CI 1.157-4.545). The polymorphism at OAS1 exon 7 rs3741981 might be a potential genetic marker and can be useful in the assessment of liver fibrosis progression and disease outcome in HCV-infected patients. PMID:26505957

  7. Towards the N{sub f} = 2 deconfinement transition temperature with O(a) improved Wilson fermions: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Wittig, Hartmut; Philipsen, Owe; Zeidlewicz, Lars

    2011-05-23

    We give an update on our current project to determine the transition temperature and the order of the deconfinement transition in the chiral limit of two flavour QCD. We use nonperturbatively O(a) improved Wilson fermions of the Sheikholeslami-Wohlert type, employing the efficient deflation accelerated DDHMC algorithm. We start at lattices with N{sub t{>=}}12 and pion masses below 600 MeV, aiming at chiral and continuum limits with light quarks.

  8. Dissecting the contribution of knee joint NGF to spinal nociceptive sensitization in a model of OA pain in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, D.R.; Nwosu, L.; Walsh, D.A.; Chapman, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Although analgesic approaches targeting nerve growth factor (NGF) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) pain remain of clinical interest, neurophysiological mechanisms by which NGF contribute to OA pain remain unclear. We investigated the impact of local elevation of knee joint NGF on knee joint, vs remote (hindpaw), evoked responses of spinal neurones in a rodent model of OA pain. Design In vivo spinal electrophysiology was carried out in anaesthetised rats with established pain behaviour and joint pathology following intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), vs injection of saline. Neuronal responses to knee joint extension and flexion, mechanical punctate stimulation of the peripheral receptive fields over the knee and at a remote site (ipsilateral hind paw) were studied before, and following, intra-articular injection of NGF (10 μg/50 μl) or saline. Results MIA-injected rats exhibited significant local (knee joint) and remote (lowered hindpaw withdrawal thresholds) changes in pain behaviour, and joint pathology. Intra-articular injection of NGF significantly (P < 0.05) increased knee extension-evoked firing of spinal neurones and the size of the peripheral receptive fields of spinal neurones (100% increase) over the knee joint in MIA rats, compared to controls. Intra-articular NGF injection did not significantly alter responses of spinal neurones following noxious stimulation of the ipsilateral hind paw in MIA-injected rats. Conclusion The facilitatory effects of intra-articular injection of NGF on spinal neurones receiving input from the knee joint provide a mechanistic basis for NGF mediated augmentation of OA knee pain, however additional mechanisms may contribute to the spread of pain to remote sites. PMID:25623624

  9. Clinically important improvement in function is common in people with or at high risk of knee OA: the MOST study

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel K.; Keysor, Julie J.; LaValley, Michael P.; Lewis, Cora E.; Torner, James C.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Felson, David T.

    2010-01-01

    To calculate the frequency of clinically important improvement in function over 30 months and identify risk factors in people who have or are at risk of knee OA. Subjects were from MOST, a longitudinal study of persons with or at high risk of knee OA. We defined Minimal Clinically Important Improvement (MCII) with WOMAC physical function using three different methods. Baseline risk factors tested for improvement included age, gender, educational attainment, presence of radiographic knee OA (ROA), the number of comorbidities, Body Mass Index (BMI), knee pain, walking speed, isokinetic knee extensor strength, depressive symptoms, physical activity, and medication usage. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of baseline risk factors with MCII. Of the 1801 subjects (age= 63, BMI= 31, 63% female), most had mild limitations in baseline function (WOMAC = 19 +/− 11). Regardless how defined, a substantial percentage of subjects (24%–39%) reached MCII at 30 months. Compared to their counterparts, people with MCII were less likely to have ROA and to use medications, and were more likely to have a lower BMI, less knee pain, a faster walking speed, more knee strength, and fewer depressive symptoms. After adjustment, MCII was 40% to 50% less likely in those with ROA, and 1.9 to 2.0 times more likely in those walking 1.0 m/s faster than counterparts. Clinically important improvement is frequent in people with or at high risk of knee OA. The absence of ROA and a faster walking speed appear to be associated with clinically important improvements. PMID:20395640

  10. Liofilchem(®) O.A. Listeria agar and direct CAMP test provided sooner Listeria monocytogenes identification from neonatal bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Argentieri, Angela Valentina; D'Antonio, Marianna; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; Fazii, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnant women and newborns is a cause for serious concern, and invasive disease outcome strongly depends on prompt antibiotic therapy. To provide sooner identification from neonatal bacteremia we performed a CAMP test directly on positive blood aliquots and inoculated the Liofilchem(®) O.A. Listeria chromogenic agar as well, thus providing a 24-h turn-around time for response.

  11. Commentary: open access, open business, closed fairness!

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    A strong trend to move from print to online publication is largely perceived in scientific and nonscientific fields. A growing number of publishers increasingly opt for online publication as an option or a compulsory alternative. From readers' perspective, this is a highly appreciated facility, but from the author's, things are different mainly because of excessive article processing charges (APC) that make the open access system sometimes as a hindrance for many authors but a lucrative enterprise for many shareholders, enticing the most traditional and conservative publishers.

  12. [Books published in Spain on smoking].

    PubMed

    Guardiola, E; Sánchez-Carbonell, J

    1996-12-01

    Tobacco dependence, considered for a long time as a habit and, more recently, as an addiction, has many bad effects in health. The objective of this study was to analyse books published in this field in Spain. Books indexed in the ISBN Spanish database in CD-ROM (updated to 1993) dealing with addiction to tobacco, that included one of the following words: tabac*, tabak*, tabaq*, fuma*, fumad*, nicotine*, alquitran*, antitabac*, antitabaq*, cigarro*, cigarri*, exfumad*, pipa*, puro*, picadura* or filtro, were included in the study. Authors, ISBN classification, year of publication, language (of publication and original) and publishers were descriptively analysed. One hundred and four books were analysed. The highest number was published during the period 1990-1993 (42%); being 1993 (n = 15) and 1991 (n = 14) the most productive years. A big increase was observed from 1985. A great number (76% of books, n = 79) was written by personal authors and the 14% (n = 14) by public organizations. Most of the books (n = 88; 85%); were published in Spanish, followed by Catalan (n = 13; 13%); 21 books (20%) were translations: most of them from English (n = 12; 60%) or from French (n = 3; 14%). Forty six per cent of books was published by trade publishers and 31% by public organizations. According to the ISBN classification, these books were grouped in 20 different topics; but, most of them (70%) were included in three of these topics: hygiene (n = 42, 40%), pharmacology-toxicology-drugs (n = 18, 17%) and pathology-diseases and medical/therapeutical clinical practice (n = 14; 13%). The number of books published in Spain dealing with tobacco dependence has increased very much from 1985; it suggests that interest in this area in SPain has also increased. Most of the books are published in Spanish, and the most frequently translated language is English. These books are basically published by trade publishers and public organizations. These results have to be considered taking into

  13. [Books published in Spain on smoking].

    PubMed

    Guardiola, E; Sánchez-Carbonell, J

    1996-12-01

    Tobacco dependence, considered for a long time as a habit and, more recently, as an addiction, has many bad effects in health. The objective of this study was to analyse books published in this field in Spain. Books indexed in the ISBN Spanish database in CD-ROM (updated to 1993) dealing with addiction to tobacco, that included one of the following words: tabac*, tabak*, tabaq*, fuma*, fumad*, nicotine*, alquitran*, antitabac*, antitabaq*, cigarro*, cigarri*, exfumad*, pipa*, puro*, picadura* or filtro, were included in the study. Authors, ISBN classification, year of publication, language (of publication and original) and publishers were descriptively analysed. One hundred and four books were analysed. The highest number was published during the period 1990-1993 (42%); being 1993 (n = 15) and 1991 (n = 14) the most productive years. A big increase was observed from 1985. A great number (76% of books, n = 79) was written by personal authors and the 14% (n = 14) by public organizations. Most of the books (n = 88; 85%); were published in Spanish, followed by Catalan (n = 13; 13%); 21 books (20%) were translations: most of them from English (n = 12; 60%) or from French (n = 3; 14%). Forty six per cent of books was published by trade publishers and 31% by public organizations. According to the ISBN classification, these books were grouped in 20 different topics; but, most of them (70%) were included in three of these topics: hygiene (n = 42, 40%), pharmacology-toxicology-drugs (n = 18, 17%) and pathology-diseases and medical/therapeutical clinical practice (n = 14; 13%). The number of books published in Spain dealing with tobacco dependence has increased very much from 1985; it suggests that interest in this area in SPain has also increased. Most of the books are published in Spanish, and the most frequently translated language is English. These books are basically published by trade publishers and public organizations. These results have to be considered taking into

  14. Endocine™, N3OA and N3OASq; Three Mucosal Adjuvants That Enhance the Immune Response to Nasal Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Falkeborn, Tina; Bråve, Andreas; Larsson, Marie; Åkerlind, Britt; Schröder, Ulf; Hinkula, Jorma

    2013-01-01

    Annual outbreaks of seasonal influenza are controlled or prevented through vaccination in many countries. The seasonal vaccines used are either inactivated, currently administered parenterally, or live-attenuated given intranasally. In this study three mucosal adjuvants were examined for the influence on the humoral (mucosal and systemic) and cellular influenza A-specific immune responses induced by a nasally administered vaccine. We investigated in detail how the anionic Endocine™ and the cationic adjuvants N3OA and N3OASq mixed with a split inactivated influenza vaccine induced influenza A-specific immune responses as compared to the vaccine alone after intranasal immunization. The study showed that nasal administration of a split virus vaccine together with Endocine™ or N3OA induced significantly higher humoral and cell-mediated immune responses than the non-adjuvanted vaccine. N3OASq only significantly increased the cell-mediated immune response. Furthermore, nasal administration of the influenza vaccine in combination with any of the adjuvants; Endocine™, N3OA or N3OASq, significantly enhanced the mucosal immunity against influenza HA protein. Thus the addition of these mucosal adjuvants leads to enhanced immunity in the most relevant tissues, the upper respiratory tract and the systemic circulation. Nasal influenza vaccination with an inactivated split vaccine can therefore provide an important mucosal immune response, which is often low or absent after traditional parenteral vaccination. PMID:23950951

  15. Towards agreement on best practice for publishing raw clinical trial data

    PubMed Central

    Hrynaszkiewicz, Iain; Altman, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Many research-funding agencies now require open access to the results of research they have funded, and some also require that researchers make available the raw data generated from that research. Similarly, the journal Trials aims to address inadequate reporting in randomised controlled trials, and in order to fulfil this objective, the journal is working with the scientific and publishing communities to try to establish best practice for publishing raw data from clinical trials in peer-reviewed biomedical journals. Common issues encountered when considering raw data for publication include patient privacy – unless explicit consent for publication is obtained – and ownership, but agreed-upon policies for tackling these concerns do not appear to be addressed in the guidance or mandates currently established. Potential next steps for journal editors and publishers, ethics committees, research-funding agencies, and researchers are proposed, and alternatives to journal publication, such as restricted access repositories, are outlined. PMID:19296844

  16. Towards agreement on best practice for publishing raw clinical trial data.

    PubMed

    Hrynaszkiewicz, Iain; Altman, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Many research-funding agencies now require open access to the results of research they have funded, and some also require that researchers make available the raw data generated from that research. Similarly, the journal Trials aims to address inadequate reporting in randomised controlled trials, and in order to fulfil this objective, the journal is working with the scientific and publishing communities to try to establish best practice for publishing raw data from clinical trials in peer-reviewed biomedical journals. Common issues encountered when considering raw data for publication include patient privacy - unless explicit consent for publication is obtained - and ownership, but agreed-upon policies for tackling these concerns do not appear to be addressed in the guidance or mandates currently established. Potential next steps for journal editors and publishers, ethics committees, research-funding agencies, and researchers are proposed, and alternatives to journal publication, such as restricted access repositories, are outlined.

  17. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  18. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  19. Open Access and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shawn; Schmidt, Christian; Das, Chhaya; Tucker, Philip W

    2006-01-01

    Uncensored exchange of scientific results hastens progress. Open Access does not stop at the removal of price and permission barriers; still, censorship and reading disabilities, to name a few, hamper access to information. Here, we invite the scientific community and the public to discuss new methods to distribute, store and manage literature in order to achieve unfettered access to literature. PMID:16956402

  20. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  1. Expression of OA1 limits the fusion of a subset of MVBs with lysosomes - a mechanism potentially involved in the initial biogenesis of melanosomes.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Jolly, Rushee; Martin-Martin, Belen; Seabra, Miguel C; Piccirillo, Rosanna; Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria; Futter, Clare E

    2013-11-15

    Multivesicular endosomes/bodies (MVBs) deliver proteins, such as activated EGF receptor (EGFR), to the lysosome for degradation, and, in pigmented cells, MVBs containing PMEL are an initial stage in melanosome biogenesis. The mechanisms regulating numbers and fate of different populations of MVB are unclear. Here, we focus on the role of the G-protein-coupled receptor OA1 (also known as GPR143), which is expressed exclusively in pigmented cells and mutations in which cause the most common type of ocular albinism. When exogenously expressing PMEL, HeLa cells have been shown to form MVBs resembling early stage melanosomes. To focus on the role of OA1 in the initial stages of melanosome biogenesis we take advantage of the absence of the later stages of melanosome maturation in HeLa cells to determine whether OA1 activity can regulate MVB number and fate. Expression of wild-type but not OA1 mutants carrying inactivating mutations or deletions causes MVB numbers to increase. Whereas OA1 expression has no effect on delivery of EGFR-containing MVBs to the lysosome, it inhibits the lysosomal delivery of PMEL and PMEL-containing MVBs accumulate. We propose that OA1 activity delays delivery of PMEL-containing MVBs to the lysosome to allow time for melanin synthesis and commitment to melanosome biogenesis. PMID:24006264

  2. Enhancing Ocean Research Data Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Cynthia; Groman, Robert; Shepherd, Adam; Allison, Molly; Arko, Robert; Chen, Yu; Fox, Peter; Glover, David; Hitzler, Pascal; Leadbetter, Adam; Narock, Thomas; West, Patrick; Wiebe, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) works in partnership with ocean science investigators to publish data from research projects funded by the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections and the Office of Polar Programs Antarctic Organisms & Ecosystems Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation. Since 2006, researchers have been contributing data to the BCO-DMO data system, and it has developed into a rich repository of data from ocean, coastal and Great Lakes research programs. While the ultimate goal of the BCO-DMO is to ensure preservation of NSF funded project data and to provide open access to those data, achievement of those goals is attained through a series of related phases that benefits from active collaboration and cooperation with a large community of research scientists as well as curators of data and information at complementary data repositories. The BCO-DMO is just one of many intermediate data management centers created to facilitate long-term preservation of data and improve access to ocean research data. Through partnerships with other data management professionals and active involvement in local and global initiatives, BCO-DMO staff members are working to enhance access to ocean research data available from the online BCO-DMO data system. Continuing efforts in use of controlled vocabulary terms, development of ontology design patterns and publication of content as Linked Open Data are contributing to improved discovery and availability of BCO-DMO curated data and increased interoperability of related content available from distributed repositories. We will demonstrate how Semantic Web technologies (e.g. RDF/XML, SKOS, OWL and SPARQL) have been integrated into BCO-DMO data access and delivery systems to better serve the ocean research community and to contribute to an expanding global knowledge network.

  3. Mandatory Open Access Publishing for Electronic Theses and Dissertations: Ethics and Enthusiasm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Ann R.; Kimball, Miles A.; Ives, Maura

    2013-01-01

    This article argues against policies that require students to submit theses and dissertations to electronic institutional repositories. The article counters a variety of arguments often used to justify this practice. In addition, the article reports on the results of an examination of electronic thesis and dissertation policies at more than 150…

  4. Students' Perception about Online Interaction, Access and Publishing Content for Academic Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres-Gastelú, Carlos Arturo; Dominguez, Agustin Lagunes; García, Maria Alicia Flores; Kiss, Gábor; Espinoza, Angel Roberto Alejandre

    2015-01-01

    In this document we show preliminary results of students' perception about their level of ICT competencies in public secondary schools in Veracruz, Mexico. It was a quantitative study using a survey applied to 979 students from two schools. Survey was composed of 72 items. Preliminary results indicate a low level of ICT use in the students of…

  5. Argumentation, Authority, and Accessibility in Digital Publishing: A Retrospective on "Composition Forum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisser, Christian; Brock, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The authors report that the last decade has been an exciting time for electronic scholarly publication, especially in composition and rhetoric, where digital media experimentation has coincided with a rapidly increasing engagement with multimedia and multimodal composition. However, the field's embrace of electronic publication has been…

  6. An open access pilot freely sharing cancer genomic data from participants in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Becnel, Lauren B.; Pereira, Stacey; Drummond, Jennifer A.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R.; Kovar, Christie L.; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Hu, Jianhong; Muzny, Donna; McGuire, Amy L.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic data sharing in cancer has been restricted to aggregate or controlled-access initiatives to protect the privacy of research participants. By limiting access to these data, it has been argued that the autonomy of individuals who decide to participate in data sharing efforts has been superseded and the utility of the data as research and educational tools reduced. In a pilot Open Access (OA) project from the CPRIT-funded Texas Cancer Research Biobank, many Texas cancer patients were willing to openly share genomic data from tumor and normal matched pair specimens. For the first time, genetic data from 7 human cancer cases with matched normal are freely available without requirement for data use agreements nor any major restriction except that end users cannot attempt to re-identify the participants (http://txcrb.org/open.html). PMID:26882539

  7. An open access pilot freely sharing cancer genomic data from participants in Texas.

    PubMed

    Becnel, Lauren B; Pereira, Stacey; Drummond, Jennifer A; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R; Kovar, Christie L; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Hu, Jianhong; Muzny, Donna; McGuire, Amy L; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A

    2016-02-16

    Genomic data sharing in cancer has been restricted to aggregate or controlled-access initiatives to protect the privacy of research participants. By limiting access to these data, it has been argued that the autonomy of individuals who decide to participate in data sharing efforts has been superseded and the utility of the data as research and educational tools reduced. In a pilot Open Access (OA) project from the CPRIT-funded Texas Cancer Research Biobank, many Texas cancer patients were willing to openly share genomic data from tumor and normal matched pair specimens. For the first time, genetic data from 7 human cancer cases with matched normal are freely available without requirement for data use agreements nor any major restriction except that end users cannot attempt to re-identify the participants (http://txcrb.org/open.html).

  8. The Resource Identification Initiative: A cultural shift in publishing

    DOE PAGES

    Bandrowski, Anita; Brush, Matthew; Grethe, Jeffery S.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Kennedy, David N.; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R.; Martone, Maryann E.; Pols, Maaike; Tan, Serena; et al

    2015-05-29

    A central tenet in support of research reproducibility is the ability to uniquely identify research resources, i.e., reagents, tools, and materials that are used to perform experiments. However, current reporting practices for research resources are insufficient to allow humans and algorithms to identify the exact resources that are reported or answer basic questions such as “What other studies used resource X?” To address this issue, the Resource Identification Initiative was launched as a pilot project to improve the reporting standards for research resources in the methods sections of papers and thereby improve identifiability and reproducibility. The pilot engaged over 25more » biomedical journal editors from most major publishers, as well as scientists and funding officials. Authors were asked to include Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) in their manuscripts prior to publication for three resource types: antibodies, model organisms, and tools (including software and databases). RRIDs represent accession numbers assigned by an authoritative database, e.g., the model organism databases, for each type of resource. To make it easier for authors to obtain RRIDs, resources were aggregated from the appropriate databases and their RRIDs made available in a central web portal (www.scicrunch.org/resources). RRIDs meet three key criteria: they are machine readable, free to generate and access, and are consistent across publishers and journals. The pilot was launched in February of 2014 and over 300 papers have appeared that report RRIDs. The number of journals participating has expanded from the original 25 to more than 40. Here, we present an overview of the pilot project and its outcomes to date. We show that authors are generally accurate in performing the task of identifying resources and supportive of the goals of the project. We also show that identifiability of the resources pre- and post-pilot showed a dramatic improvement for all three resource types

  9. The Resource Identification Initiative: A cultural shift in publishing

    SciTech Connect

    Bandrowski, Anita; Brush, Matthew; Grethe, Jeffery S.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Kennedy, David N.; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R.; Martone, Maryann E.; Pols, Maaike; Tan, Serena; Washington, Nicole; Zudilova-Seinstra, Elena; Vasilevsky, Nicole

    2015-05-29

    A central tenet in support of research reproducibility is the ability to uniquely identify research resources, i.e., reagents, tools, and materials that are used to perform experiments. However, current reporting practices for research resources are insufficient to allow humans and algorithms to identify the exact resources that are reported or answer basic questions such as “What other studies used resource X?” To address this issue, the Resource Identification Initiative was launched as a pilot project to improve the reporting standards for research resources in the methods sections of papers and thereby improve identifiability and reproducibility. The pilot engaged over 25 biomedical journal editors from most major publishers, as well as scientists and funding officials. Authors were asked to include Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) in their manuscripts prior to publication for three resource types: antibodies, model organisms, and tools (including software and databases). RRIDs represent accession numbers assigned by an authoritative database, e.g., the model organism databases, for each type of resource. To make it easier for authors to obtain RRIDs, resources were aggregated from the appropriate databases and their RRIDs made available in a central web portal (www.scicrunch.org/resources). RRIDs meet three key criteria: they are machine readable, free to generate and access, and are consistent across publishers and journals. The pilot was launched in February of 2014 and over 300 papers have appeared that report RRIDs. The number of journals participating has expanded from the original 25 to more than 40. Here, we present an overview of the pilot project and its outcomes to date. We show that authors are generally accurate in performing the task of identifying resources and supportive of the goals of the project. We also show that identifiability of the resources pre- and post-pilot showed a dramatic improvement for all three resource types

  10. hFits: From Storing Metadata to Publishing ESO Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, I.; Dobrzycki, A.; Vuong, M.; Da Rocha, C.

    2012-09-01

    The ESO Archive holds ca. 20 million FITS files: raw observations taken at the La Silla Paranal Observatory in Chile, data from APEX and UKIRT(WFCAM) telescopes, pipeline-processed data generated by the Quality Control and Data Processing Group in ESO Garching and, since recently, reduced data delivered by the PI's through the ESO Phase 3 infrastructure. A metadata repository has been developed at the ESO Archive (Dobrzycki et al. 2007), (Vera et al. 2011), to hold all the FITS file headers with up-to-date information using data warehouse technology. Presently, the repository contains more that 10 billion keywords from headers of all ESO FITS files. We have added to the repository a mechanism for keeping track of header ingestion and modification, allowing to build incremental applications on top of it. The aim is to provide a framework allowing for creation of fast and good quality metadata query services. We present hFits, a tool for data publishing allowing for metadata enhancement. The tool reads from the metadata repository and inserts the metadata into the conventional relational database systems using a simple configuration framework. It utilises the metadata repository tracking mechanism to incrementally refresh the services and transparently propagate any metadata updates. It supports the use of user defined functions where, for example, WCS coordinates can be calculated or related metadata can be extracted from other information systems, and for each new header file it provides to the archived file the access attributes following ESO data access policy, publishing the data to the community.

  11. The Resource Identification Initiative: A cultural shift in publishing

    PubMed Central

    Bandrowski, Anita; Brush, Matthew; Grethe, Jeffery S.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Kennedy, David N.; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R.; Martone, Maryann E.; Pols, Maaike; Tan, Serena; Washington, Nicole; Zudilova-Seinstra, Elena; Vasilevsky, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet in support of research reproducibility is the ability to uniquely identify research resources, i.e., reagents, tools, and materials that are used to perform experiments. However, current reporting practices for research resources are insufficient to allow humans and algorithms to identify the exact resources that are reported or answer basic questions such as “What other studies used resource X?” To address this issue, the Resource Identification Initiative was launched as a pilot project to improve the reporting standards for research resources in the methods sections of papers and thereby improve identifiability and reproducibility. The pilot engaged over 25 biomedical journal editors from most major publishers, as well as scientists and funding officials. Authors were asked to include Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) in their manuscripts prior to publication for three resource types: antibodies, model organisms, and tools (including software and databases). RRIDs represent accession numbers assigned by an authoritative database, e.g., the model organism databases, for each type of resource. To make it easier for authors to obtain RRIDs, resources were aggregated from the appropriate databases and their RRIDs made available in a central web portal ( www.scicrunch.org/resources). RRIDs meet three key criteria: they are machine readable, free to generate and access, and are consistent across publishers and journals. The pilot was launched in February of 2014 and over 300 papers have appeared that report RRIDs. The number of journals participating has expanded from the original 25 to more than 40. Here, we present an overview of the pilot project and its outcomes to date. We show that authors are generally accurate in performing the task of identifying resources and supportive of the goals of the project. We also show that identifiability of the resources pre- and post-pilot showed a dramatic improvement for all three resource types

  12. The Resource Identification Initiative: A cultural shift in publishing.

    PubMed

    Bandrowski, Anita; Brush, Matthew; Grethe, Jeffery S; Haendel, Melissa A; Kennedy, David N; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R; Martone, Maryann E; Pols, Maaike; Tan, Serena; Washington, Nicole; Zudilova-Seinstra, Elena; Vasilevsky, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet in support of research reproducibility is the ability to uniquely identify research resources, i.e., reagents, tools, and materials that are used to perform experiments. However, current reporting practices for research resources are insufficient to allow humans and algorithms to identify the exact resources that are reported or answer basic questions such as "What other studies used resource X?" To address this issue, the Resource Identification Initiative was launched as a pilot project to improve the reporting standards for research resources in the methods sections of papers and thereby improve identifiability and reproducibility. The pilot engaged over 25 biomedical journal editors from most major publishers, as well as scientists and funding officials. Authors were asked to include Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) in their manuscripts prior to publication for three resource types: antibodies, model organisms, and tools (including software and databases). RRIDs represent accession numbers assigned by an authoritative database, e.g., the model organism databases, for each type of resource. To make it easier for authors to obtain RRIDs, resources were aggregated from the appropriate databases and their RRIDs made available in a central web portal ( www.scicrunch.org/resources). RRIDs meet three key criteria: they are machine readable, free to generate and access, and are consistent across publishers and journals. The pilot was launched in February of 2014 and over 300 papers have appeared that report RRIDs. The number of journals participating has expanded from the original 25 to more than 40. Here, we present an overview of the pilot project and its outcomes to date. We show that authors are generally accurate in performing the task of identifying resources and supportive of the goals of the project. We also show that identifiability of the resources pre- and post-pilot showed a dramatic improvement for all three resource types, suggesting

  13. Electronic publishing and intelligent information retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, A.

    1992-01-01

    Europeans are now taking steps to homogenize policies and standardize procedures in electronic publishing (EP) in astronomy and space sciences. This arose from an open meeting organized in Oct. 1991 at Strasbourg Observatory (France) and another business meeting held late Mar. 1992 with the major publishers and journal editors in astronomy and space sciences. The ultimate aim of EP might be considered as the so-called 'intelligent information retrieval' (IIR) or better named 'advanced information retrieval' (AIR), taking advantage of the fact that the material to be published appears at some stage in a machine-readable form. It is obvious that the combination of desktop and electronic publishing with networking and new structuring of knowledge bases will profoundly reshape not only our ways of publishing, but also our procedures of communicating and retrieving information. It should be noted that a world-wide survey among astronomers and space scientists carried out before the October 1991 colloquium on the various packages and machines used, indicated that TEX-related packages were already in majoritarian use in our community. It has also been stressed at each meeting that the European developments should be carried out in collaboration with what is done in the US (STELLAR project, for instance). American scientists and journal editors actually attended both meetings mentioned above. The paper will offer a review of the status of electronic publishing in astronomy and its possible contribution to advanced information retrieval in this field. It will also report on recent meetings such as the 'Astronomy from Large Databases-2 (ALD-2)' conference dealing with the latest developments in networking, in data, information, and knowledge bases, as well as in the related methodologies.

  14. Richmond Wellbeing Service Access Strategy for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gowling, Sarah; Persson, Jennie; Holt, Genevieve; Ashbourne, Sue; Bloomfield, James; Shortland, Hannah; Bate, Clare

    2016-01-01

    IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) is a national programme aimed at increasing availability of evidence based psychological therapies in the NHS. IAPT is primarily for people who have mild to moderate, common mental health difficulties such as depression, anxiety, phobias and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The programme seeks to use the least intrusive method of care possible to treat people at the time when it will be of most help to them. Individuals are able to self-refer into most IAPT services or alternatively can request to be referred by their GP or other services in the community. Richmond Wellbeing Service (RWS) is one such IAPT Service and this research is based on our work to promote accessibility of the service to one of the harder to reach population groups - older adults. We know that IAPT services could have a positive impact on older adults as it is believed on average, 25% of over 65 year olds face common mental health problems. However, only a third of these people discuss this with their GP and so are less likely to be referred to an IAPT Service. In relation to the above, this project was designed to look at increasing access for older adults into Richmond Wellbeing Service (RWS) specifically to improve access to the RWS by older adults by 100. The overall goal was to increase older adult (65+) referral rates by 20% over a year, in raw number this would translate to an increase of 100 over a year period, and in percentage terms an average of 8% of total referrals. Results yielded an increase of 39 referrals between baseline and test period. The majority of this increase had occurred in the final five months of the projects duration(31). Interestingly the number of older adults in the older age band (85+) almost doubled within this period (from 12 to 21). In total, in percentage terms this translates to an an increase of OA referrals from 6% up to 6.7%, as above we are aiming for 8% or an additional increase of 61 patients

  15. Richmond Wellbeing Service Access Strategy for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gowling, Sarah; Persson, Jennie; Holt, Genevieve; Ashbourne, Sue; Bloomfield, James; Shortland, Hannah; Bate, Clare

    2016-01-01

    IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) is a national programme aimed at increasing availability of evidence based psychological therapies in the NHS. IAPT is primarily for people who have mild to moderate, common mental health difficulties such as depression, anxiety, phobias and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The programme seeks to use the least intrusive method of care possible to treat people at the time when it will be of most help to them. Individuals are able to self-refer into most IAPT services or alternatively can request to be referred by their GP or other services in the community. Richmond Wellbeing Service (RWS) is one such IAPT Service and this research is based on our work to promote accessibility of the service to one of the harder to reach population groups - older adults. We know that IAPT services could have a positive impact on older adults as it is believed on average, 25% of over 65 year olds face common mental health problems. However, only a third of these people discuss this with their GP and so are less likely to be referred to an IAPT Service. In relation to the above, this project was designed to look at increasing access for older adults into Richmond Wellbeing Service (RWS) specifically to improve access to the RWS by older adults by 100. The overall goal was to increase older adult (65+) referral rates by 20% over a year, in raw number this would translate to an increase of 100 over a year period, and in percentage terms an average of 8% of total referrals. Results yielded an increase of 39 referrals between baseline and test period. The majority of this increase had occurred in the final five months of the projects duration(31). Interestingly the number of older adults in the older age band (85+) almost doubled within this period (from 12 to 21). In total, in percentage terms this translates to an an increase of OA referrals from 6% up to 6.7%, as above we are aiming for 8% or an additional increase of 61 patients

  16. THz-wave generation via stimulated polariton scattering in KTiOAsO4 crystal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weitao; Cong, Zhenhua; Liu, Zhaojun; Zhang, Xingyu; Qin, Zengguang; Tang, Guanqi; Li, Ning; Zhang, Yuangeng; Lu, Qingming

    2014-07-14

    A terahertz parametric oscillator based on KTiOAsO(4) crystal is demonstrated for the first time. With the near-forward scattering configuration X(ZZ)X + Δφ, the polarizations of the pump, the Stokes and the generated THz waves are parallel to the z-axis of the crystal KTA. When the incident angle θext of the pump wave is changed from 1.875° to 6.500°, the THz wave is intermittently tuned from 3.59 to 3.96 THz, from 4.21 to 4.50 THz, from 4.90 to 5.16 THz, from 5.62 to 5.66 THz and from 5.92 to 6.43 THz. The obtained maximum THz wave energy is 627 nJ at 4.30 THz with a pump energy of 100 mJ. It is believed that the terahertz wave generation is caused by the stimulated scattering of the polaritons associated with the most intensive transverse A(1) mode of 233.8 cm(-1). Four much weaker transverse A(1) modes of 132.9 cm(-1), 156.3 cm(-1),175.1 cm(-1), and 188.4 cm(-1) cause four frequency gaps, from 3.97 THz to 4.20 THz, from 4.51 to 4.89 THz, from 5.17 to 5.61 THz and from 5.67 to 5.91 THz, respectively.

  17. Almost Halfway There: An Analysis of the Open Access Behaviors of Academic Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Academic librarians are increasingly expected to advocate for scholarly communications reforms such as open access to scholarly publications, yet librarians do not always practice what they preach. Previous research examined librarian attitudes toward open access, whereas this article presents results of a study of open access publishing and…

  18. South Asian Nomads--A Literature Review. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Anita

    2011-01-01

    This review of literature on South Asian nomads is part of a series of monographs on educational access published by the Consortium for Research on Educational Access Transitions and Equity (CREATE). In the context of India, most recent work has focused on access to the education system for the poor. CREATE research in India has focused on …

  19. Implementation of Advanced Access in a Family Medicine Residency Practice.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ann; Wiser, Eric; Barclay, Emily; Aiello, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Several models of scheduling have been documented in the literature, including the traditional model, the carve-out model, and the advanced access model. We describe the implementation of the advanced access model in our clinic, which has been very successful. Advanced access has decreased third next available appointments to less than seven days for many of our providers and has increased individual primary care physician continuity for 40% of our providers. Interestingly, we had no gains in patient satisfaction, which is consistent with other previously published studies on advanced access. PMID:26665471

  20. Best practice guidelines on publishing ethics: a publisher's perspective, 2nd edition.

    PubMed

    Graf, Chris; Deakin, Lisa; Docking, Martine; Jones, Jackie; Joshua, Sue; McKerahan, Tiffany; Ottmar, Martin; Stevens, Allen; Wates, Edward; Wyatt, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Wiley has updated its publishing ethics guidelines, first published in 2006. The new guidelines provide guidance, resources, and practical advice on ethical concerns that arise in academic publishing for editors, authors, and researchers, among other audiences. New guidance is also included on whistle blowers, animal research, clinical research, and clinical trial registration, addressing cultural differences, human rights, and confidentiality. The guidelines are uniquely interdisciplinary and were reviewed by 24 editors and experts chosen from the wide range of communities that Wiley serves. The new guidelines are also published in Advanced Materials, Headache, International Journal of Clinical Practice, Social Science Quarterly, and on the website http://exchanges.wiley.com/ethicsguidelines. PMID:25329711