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Sample records for access primary care

  1. Racial Disparities In Geographic Access To Primary Care In Philadelphia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Elizabeth J; Polsky, Daniel; Barbu, Corentin M; Seymour, Jane W; Grande, David

    2016-08-01

    Primary care is often thought of as the gateway to improved health outcomes and can lead to more efficient use of health care resources. Because of primary care's cardinal importance, adequate access is an important health policy priority. In densely populated urban areas, spatial access to primary care providers across neighborhoods is poorly understood. We examined spatial variation in primary care access in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We calculated ratios of adults per primary care provider for each census tract and included buffer zones based on prespecified drive times around each tract. We found that the average ratio was 1,073; the supply of primary care providers varied widely across census tracts, ranging from 105 to 10,321. We identified six areas of Philadelphia that have much lower spatial accessibility to primary care relative to the rest of the city. After adjustment for sociodemographic and insurance characteristics, the odds of being in a low-access area were twenty-eight times greater for census tracts with a high proportion of African Americans than in tracts with a low proportion of African Americans. PMID:27503960

  2. Improving access to a primary care medical clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Meditz, R. W.; Manberg, C. L.; Rosner, F.

    1992-01-01

    Patients presenting to an episodic care walk-in clinic often warrant prompt but not necessarily emergency attention. Legitimate reasons often prohibit these patients from attending regularly scheduled daytime weekday clinics. Most patients interviewed thought that having a single primary care provider was important to ensure continuity of care. Access to primary care can be improved by scheduling clinics and ancillary services on nontraditional times and days. Enhanced communication can help patients differentiate routine from urgent from emergency conditions. Printed and audiovisual materials can be used to increase awareness of the benefits of comprehensive care. PMID:1507251

  3. Advanced access: reducing waiting and delays in primary care.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mark; Berwick, Donald M

    2003-02-26

    Delay of care is a persistent and undesirable feature of current health care systems. Although delay seems to be inevitable and linked to resource limitations, it often is neither. Rather, it is usually the result of unplanned, irrational scheduling and resource allocation. Application of queuing theory and principles of industrial engineering, adapted appropriately to clinical settings, can reduce delay substantially, even in small practices, without requiring additional resources. One model, sometimes referred to as advanced access, has increasingly been shown to reduce waiting times in primary care. The core principle of advanced access is that patients calling to schedule a physician visit are offered an appointment the same day. Advanced access is not sustainable if patient demand for appointments is permanently greater than physician capacity to offer appointments. Six elements of advanced access are important in its application balancing supply and demand, reducing backlog, reducing the variety of appointment types, developing contingency plans for unusual circumstances, working to adjust demand profiles, and increasing the availability of bottleneck resources. Although these principles are powerful, they are counter to deeply held beliefs and established practices in health care organizations. Adopting these principles requires strong leadership investment and support.

  4. Advanced access: reducing waiting and delays in primary care.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mark; Berwick, Donald M

    2003-02-26

    Delay of care is a persistent and undesirable feature of current health care systems. Although delay seems to be inevitable and linked to resource limitations, it often is neither. Rather, it is usually the result of unplanned, irrational scheduling and resource allocation. Application of queuing theory and principles of industrial engineering, adapted appropriately to clinical settings, can reduce delay substantially, even in small practices, without requiring additional resources. One model, sometimes referred to as advanced access, has increasingly been shown to reduce waiting times in primary care. The core principle of advanced access is that patients calling to schedule a physician visit are offered an appointment the same day. Advanced access is not sustainable if patient demand for appointments is permanently greater than physician capacity to offer appointments. Six elements of advanced access are important in its application balancing supply and demand, reducing backlog, reducing the variety of appointment types, developing contingency plans for unusual circumstances, working to adjust demand profiles, and increasing the availability of bottleneck resources. Although these principles are powerful, they are counter to deeply held beliefs and established practices in health care organizations. Adopting these principles requires strong leadership investment and support. PMID:12597760

  5. Role of Primary Health Care in Ensuring Access to Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Sambala, Evanson Z; Sapsed, Susan; Mkandawire, Mercy L

    2010-01-01

    To examine ways of ensuring access to health services within the framework of primary health care (PHC), since the goal of PHC to make universal health care available to all people has become increasingly neglected amid emerging themes of globalization, trade, and foreign policy. From a public health point of view, we argue that the premise of PHC can unlock barriers to health care services and contribute greatly to determining collective health through the promotion of universal basic health services. PHC has the most sophisticated and organized infrastructure, theories, and political principles, with which it can deal adequately with the issues of inequity, inequality, and social injustice which emerge from negative economic externalities and neo-liberal economic policies. Addressing these issues, especially the complex social and political influences that restrict access to medicines, may require the integration of different health initiatives into PHC. Based on current systems, PHC remains the only conventional health delivery service that can deal with resilient public health problems adequately. However, to strengthen its ability to do so, we propose the revitalization of PHC to incorporate scholarship that promotes human rights, partnerships, research and development, advocacy, and national drug policies. The concept of PHC can improve access; however, this will require the urgent interplay among theoretical, practical, political, and sociological influences arising from the economic, social, and political determinants of ill health in an era of globalization. PMID:20564760

  6. Role of primary health care in ensuring access to medicines.

    PubMed

    Sambala, Evanson Z; Sapsed, Susan; Mkandawire, Mercy L

    2010-06-01

    To examine ways of ensuring access to health services within the framework of primary health care (PHC), since the goal of PHC to make universal health care available to all people has become increasingly neglected amid emerging themes of globalization, trade, and foreign policy. From a public health point of view, we argue that the premise of PHC can unlock barriers to health care services and contribute greatly to determining collective health through the promotion of universal basic health services. PHC has the most sophisticated and organized infrastructure, theories, and political principles, with which it can deal adequately with the issues of inequity, inequality, and social injustice which emerge from negative economic externalities and neo-liberal economic policies. Addressing these issues, especially the complex social and political influences that restrict access to medicines, may require the integration of different health initiatives into PHC. Based on current systems, PHC remains the only conventional health delivery service that can deal with resilient public health problems adequately. However, to strengthen its ability to do so, we propose the revitalization of PHC to incorporate scholarship that promotes human rights, partnerships, research and development, advocacy, and national drug policies. The concept of PHC can improve access; however, this will require the urgent interplay among theoretical, practical, political, and sociological influences arising from the economic, social, and political determinants of ill health in an era of globalization.

  7. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care.

  8. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care. PMID:27232685

  9. Hypertensive patients in primary health care: access, connection and care involved in spontaneous demands.

    PubMed

    Girão, Ana Lívia Araújo; Freitas, Consuelo Helena Aires de

    2016-06-01

    Objective To assess the impacts of inclusion of care for spontaneous demands in the treatment of hypertensive patients in primary health care. Methods Third generation qualitative assessment survey conducted with 16 workers in a Primary Care Health Unit (PHCU) of the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceara, in the period between July and September of 2015. To collect data, systematic field observation and semi-structured interviews were used, and the stages of thematic content analysis were adopted for data analysis. Results Participants revealed that access, connection and care are fundamental to the treatment of hypertension. However, they said that the introduction of free access for spontaneous demands compromised the flow of care in the hypertension programs. Conclusion A dichotomy between the practice of care recommended by health policies and the one existing in the reality of PHCUs was shown, causing evident losses to the care of hypertensive patients in primary care. PMID:27253602

  10. Primary care access improvement: an empowerment-interaction model.

    PubMed

    Ledlow, G R; Bradshaw, D M; Shockley, C

    2000-05-01

    Improving community primary care access is a difficult and dynamic undertaking. Realizing a need to improve appointment availability, a systematic approach based on measurement, empowerment, and interaction was developed. The model fostered exchange of information and problem solving between interdependent staff sections within a managed care system. Measuring appointments demanded but not available proved to be a credible customer-focused approach to benchmark against set goals. Changing the organizational culture to become more sensitive to changing beneficiary needs was a paramount consideration. Dependent-group t tests were performed to compare the pretreatment and posttreatment effect. The empowerment-interaction model significantly improved the availability of routine and wellness-type appointments. The availability of urgent appointments improved but not significantly; a better prospective model needs to be developed. In aggregate, appointments demanded but not available (empowerment-interaction model) were more than 10% before the treatment and less than 3% with the treatment. PMID:10826388

  11. Improving access to depression care: descriptive report of a multidisciplinary primary care pilot service

    PubMed Central

    Symons, Lorrie; Tylee, André; Mann, Anthony; Jones, Roger; Plummer, Susan; Walker, Maria; Duff, Carole; Holt, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Background: Research has identified a need for improved depression care in primary care, while current United Kingdom (UK) health policy outlines standards for the management of the condition, including improved access to care. Innovative ways of working are needed to address these standards and provide better care. Aims: To pilot a multidisciplinary service for the management of depressed patients with a particular focus on facilitating access. Design of study: Uncontrolled descriptive pilot study. Setting: One general practice in inner London. Methods: The service was advertised by post to all 6689 adult patients registered with the practice. It provided open access and face-to-face assessment by a specially trained primary care nurse for patients who considered themselves to be depressed. Following assessment, depressed patients received systematic telephone support from nursing staff in addition to the usual care from the general practitioners (GPs). The service was evaluated for a 6-month period. Results: Sixty-six people, aged 19–77 years, 44 of them female, contacted the service, the majority in the first 2 months. Fifty-four patients were offered an assessment by the nurse. Thirty-five (80%) of the 44 attendees fulfilled criteria for major depression. Between them, the nurses and doctors achieved high levels of adherence to treatment and follow-up. This specialist service appears to have enabled a group of depressed patients, some of whom may not have sought or received help, to gain access to primary care. With appropriate supervision and training in depression care the nurses were able to assess and support depressed patients and this appeared to be acceptable to both patients and GPs. Conclusion: In its present form the service would not be cost-effective. However, we believe it could be adapted to suit the needs of individual or clusters of practices incorporating key elements of the service (open access and case management, in particular), and

  12. Primary health care use and health care accessibility among adolescents in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Barakat-Haddad, C; Siddiqua, A

    2015-05-19

    This study examined primary health care use and accessibility among adolescents living in the United Arab Emirates. In a cross-sectional study, we collected health care use, sociodemographic and residential data for a sample of 6363 adolescents. Logistic regression modelling was used to examine predictors of health care use. The most-consulted health professionals were dentists or orthodontists, family doctors and eye specialists. Local adolescents were more likely to attend public clinics/hospitals than private facilities, while the opposite was true for expatriates. In the previous 12 months 22.6% of the participants had not obtained the health care they needed and 19.5% had not had a routine health check-up. Common reasons for not obtaining care were busy schedules, dislike/fear of doctors and long waiting times. Predictors of not obtaining needed care included nationality and income, while those for having a routine check-up were mother's education and car ownership. Improvements to the health care sector may increase health care accessibility among adolescents.

  13. Interventions to Improve Access to Primary Care for People Who Are Homeless: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background People who are homeless encounter barriers to primary care despite having greater needs for health care, on average, than people who are not homeless. We evaluated the effectiveness of interventions to improve access to primary care for people who are homeless. Methods We performed a systematic review to identify studies in English published between January 1, 1995, and July 8, 2015, comparing interventions to improve access to a primary care provider with usual care among people who are homeless. The outcome of interest was access to a primary care provider. The risk of bias in the studies was evaluated, and the quality of the evidence was assessed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. Results From a total of 4,047 citations, we identified five eligible studies (one randomized controlled trial and four observational studies). With the exception of the randomized trial, the risk of bias was considered high in the remaining studies. In the randomized trial, people who were homeless, without serious mental illness, and who received either an outreach intervention plus clinic orientation or clinic orientation alone, had improved access to a primary care provider compared with those receiving usual care. An observational study that compared integration of primary care and other services for people who are homeless with usual care did not observe any difference in access to a primary care provider between the two groups. A small observational study showed improvement among participants with a primary care provider after receiving an intervention consisting of housing and supportive services compared with the period before the intervention. The quality of the evidence was considered moderate for both the outreach plus clinic orientation and clinic orientation alone, and low to very low for the other interventions. Despite limitations, the literature identified reports of

  14. Enhancing primary care for persons with spinal cord injury: More than improving physical accessibility.

    PubMed

    Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    In Ontario, Canada, legislation exists that mandates that all medical practices be fully accessible by 2025, in an effort to improve access to primary care for persons with physical disabilities. The simple removal of physical barriers may not guarantee improved access to appropriate care. In this clinical note, members of an interprofessional primary care-based Mobility Clinic reflect on opportunities to improve primary care beyond just better physical accessibility for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). The importance of collaborations between funders, researchers, and clinicians are examined. Using a participatory action research model, the unique perspective of consumers and consumer networks are incorporated into the Mobility Clinic's clinical and research efforts to improve primary care for persons with SCI. PMID:26111044

  15. Evaluation of Access, a Primary Care Program for Indigent Patients: Inpatient and Emergency Room Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Richard A.; Giancola, Angela; Gast, Andrea; Ho, Janice; Waddell, Rhondda

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated the impact of Accessing Community Care through Eastside Social Services (ACCESS), a program that provided indigent patients with free primary care, on inpatient admissions, emergency room (ER) visits, and subsequent charges. Data on 19 people before and after program enrollment showed significant decreases in ER visits following…

  16. Do new and traditional models of primary care differ with regard to access?

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; Easley, Julie; Thompson, Ashley E.; Boivin, Antoine; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Katz, Alan; Hogg, William E.; Breton, Mylaine; Francoeur, Danièle; Wong, Sabrina T.; Wodchis, Walter P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine access to primary care in new and traditional models using 2 dimensions of the concept of patient-centred access. Design An international survey examining the quality and costs of primary health care (the QUALICOPC study) was conducted in 2013 in Canada. This study adopted a descriptive cross-sectional survey method using data from practices across Canada. Each participating practice filled out the Family Physician Survey and the Practice Survey, and patients in each participating practice were asked to complete the Patient Experiences Survey. Setting All 10 Canadian provinces. Participants A total of 759 practices and 7172 patients. Main outcome measures Independent t tests were conducted to examine differences between new and traditional models of care in terms of availability and accommodation, and affordability of care. Results Of the 759 practices, 407 were identified as having new models of care and 352 were identified as traditional. New models of care were distinct with respect to payment structure, opening hours, and having an interdisciplinary work force. Most participating practices were from large cities or suburban areas. There were few differences between new and traditional models of care regarding accessibility and accommodation in primary care. Patients under new models of care reported easier access to other physicians in the same practice, while patients from traditional models reported seeing their regular family physicians more frequently. There was no difference between the new and traditional models of care with regard to affordability of primary care. Patients attending clinics with new models of care reported that their physicians were more involved with them as a whole person than patients attending clinics based on traditional models did. Conclusion Primary care access issues do not differ strongly between traditional and new models of care; however, patients in the new models of care believed that their

  17. Experiences among undocumented migrants accessing primary care in the United Kingdom: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Poduval, Shoba; Howard, Natasha; Jones, Lucy; Murwill, Phil; McKee, Martin; Legido-Quigley, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Immigration is a key political issue in the United Kingdom. The 2014 Immigration Act includes a number of measures intended to reduce net immigration, including removing the right of non-European Economic Area migrants to access free health care. This change risks widening existing health and social inequalities. This study explored the experiences of undocumented migrants trying to access primary care in the United Kingdom, their perspectives on proposed access restrictions, and suggestions for policymakers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 undocumented migrants and four volunteer staff at a charity clinic in London. Inductive thematic analysis drew out major themes. Many undocumented migrants already faced challenges accessing primary care. None of the migrants interviewed said that they would be able to afford charges to access primary care and most said they would have to wait until they were much more unwell and access care through Accident & Emergency (A&E) services. The consequences of limiting access to primary care, including threats to individual and public health consequences and the additional burden on the National Health Service, need to be fully considered by policymakers. The authors argue that an evidence-based approach would avoid legislation that targets vulnerable groups and provides no obvious economic or societal benefit.

  18. Why do we observe a limited impact of primary care access measures on clinical quality indicators?

    PubMed

    Chung, Sukyung; Panattoni, Laura; Hung, Dorothy; Johns, Nicole; Trujillo, Laurel; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the effects of enhanced primary care access and continuity on clinical quality in a large, multipayer, multispecialty ambulatory care organization with fee-for-service provider incentives. The difference-in-differences estimates indicate that access to own primary care physician is a statistically significant predictor of improved clinical quality, although the effect size is small such that clinical significance may be negligible. Reduced time for own primary care physician appointment and increased enrollment in electronic personal health record are positive predictors of chronic disease management processes and preventive screening but are inconsistently associated with clinical outcomes. Challenges in identifying relationships between access and quality outcomes in a real-world setting are also discussed. PMID:24594563

  19. Spatial access disparities to primary health care in rural and remote Australia.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Matthew Richard; Humphreys, John Stirling

    2015-01-01

    Poor spatial access to health care remains a key issue for rural populations worldwide. Whilst geographic information systems (GIS) have enabled the development of more sophisticated access measures, they are yet to be adopted into health policy and workforce planning. This paper provides and tests a new national-level approach to measuring primary health care (PHC) access for rural Australia, suitable for use in macro-level health policy. The new index was constructed using a modified two-step floating catchment area method framework and the smallest available geographic unit. Primary health care spatial access was operationalised using three broad components: availability of PHC (general practitioner) services; proximity of populations to PHC services; and PHC needs of the population. Data used in its measurement were specifically chosen for accuracy, reliability and ongoing availability for small areas. The resultant index reveals spatial disparities of access to PHC across rural Australia. While generally more remote areas experienced poorer access than more populated rural areas, there were numerous exceptions to this generalisation, with some rural areas close to metropolitan areas having very poor access and some increasingly remote areas having relatively good access. This new index provides a geographically-sensitive measure of access, which is readily updateable and enables a fine granulation of access disparities. Such an index can underpin national rural health programmes and policies designed to improve rural workforce recruitment and retention, and, importantly, health service planning and resource allocation decisions designed to improve equity of PHC access.

  20. Expanding access to primary care without additional budgets? A case study from Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Paul; Flessa, Steffen

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the impact of increased access to primary care on provider costs in the rural health district of Nouna, Burkina Faso. This study question is crucial for health care planning in this district, as other research work shows that the population has a higher need for health care services. From a public health perspective, an increase of utilisation of first-line health facilities would be necessary. However, the governmental budget that is needed to finance improved access was not known. The study is based on data of 2004 of a comprehensive provider cost information system. This database provides us with the actual costs of each primary health care facility (Centre de Santé et de Promotion Sociale, CSPS) in the health district. We determine the fixed and variable costs of each institution and calculate the average cost per service unit rendered in 2004. Based on the cost structure of each CSPS, we calculate the total costs if the demand for health care services increased. We conclude that the total provider costs of primary care (and therefore the governmental budget) would hardly rise if the coverage of the population were increased. This is mainly due to the fact that the highest variable costs are drugs, which are fully paid for by the customers (Bamako Initiative). The majority of other costs are fixed. Consequently, health care reforms that improve access to health care institutions must not fear dramatically increasing the costs of health care services. PMID:18197447

  1. Potential access to primary health care: what does the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement data show?

    PubMed Central

    Uchôa, Severina Alice da Costa; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Fronteira, Inês Santos Estevinho; Coêlho, Ardigleusa Alves; Martiniano, Claudia Santos; Brandão, Isabel Cristina Araújo; Yamamura, Mellina; Maroto, Renata Melo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the influence of contextual indicators on the performance of municipalities regarding potential access to primary health care in Brazil and to discuss the contribution from nurses working on this access. Method: a multicenter descriptive study based on secondary data from External Evaluation of the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement in Primary Care, with the participation of 17,202 primary care teams. The chi-square test of proportions was used to verify differences between the municipalities stratified based on size of the coverage area, supply, coordination, and integration; when necessary, the chi-square test with Yates correction or Fisher's exact test were employed. For the population variable, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used. Results: the majority of participants were nurses (n=15.876; 92,3%). Statistically significant differences were observed between the municipalities in terms of territory (p=0.0000), availability (p=0.0000), coordination of care (p=0.0000), integration (p=0.0000) and supply (p=0.0000), verifying that the municipalities that make up area 6 tend to have better performance in these dimensions. Conclusion: areas 4,5 and 6 performed better in every analyzed dimension, and the nurse had a leading role in the potential to access primary health care in Brazil. PMID:26959332

  2. Food insecure families: description of access and barriers to food from one pediatric primary care center.

    PubMed

    DeMartini, Tori L; Beck, Andrew F; Kahn, Robert S; Klein, Melissa D

    2013-12-01

    Despite evidence that food insecurity negatively impacts child health, health care providers play little role in addressing the issue. To inform potential primary care interventions, we sought to assess a range of challenges faced by food insecure (FI) families coming to an urban, pediatric primary care setting. A cross-sectional study was performed at a hospital-based, urban, academic pediatric primary care clinic that serves as a medical home for approximately 15,000 patients with 35,000 annual visits. Subjects included a convenience sample of caregivers of children presenting for either well child or ill care over a 4 months period in 2012. A self-administered survey assessed household food security status, shopping habits, transportation access, budgeting priorities, and perceptions about nutrition access in one's community. Bivariate analyses between food security status and these characteristics were performed using Chi square statistics or Fisher's exact test. The survey was completed by 199 caregivers. Approximately 33% of families were FI; 93% received food-related governmental assistance. FI families were more likely to obtain food from a corner/convenience store, utilize food banks, require transportation other than a household car, and prioritize paying bills before purchasing food. FI families perceived less access to healthy, affordable foods within their community. Thus, FI families may face unique barriers to accessing food. Knowledge of these barriers could allow clinicians to tailor in-clinic screening and create family-centered interventions.

  3. MAIN TRENDS IN ACCESS TO PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FOR ADOLESCENTS IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Mirzikashvili, N; Kazakhashvili, N

    2016-03-01

    This study identifies barriers to accessing primary health care among youth in Georgia to inform strategies for improving the appropriateness, quality and usage of primary health care services. The quantitative survey was conducted throughout Georgia among 1000 adolescents 11-19 years of age via interview. Multi stage probability sampling was used to administer questionnaires in the schools, universities and in the streets between March-May 2014 and September-October 2014. Young people in Georgia identified a range of problems in accessing primary health services. By far the most important issues were preventive checkups, geographical access, cost of care, and perceptions about the quality of care. The majority of respondents (78.4%) declared that they do not visit family doctor when well, and 81.9% said that no information was provided about reproductive health issues. Most (77.3%) stated that their family doctor had never talked about health promotion or life style risk factors. Access to health care is still problematic in the villages; and in some areas young people must travel more than 30 minutes by public transport. Limited access in rural areas compared to urban areas was statistically significant (p<0.05). As our survey data shows, most adolescents do not visit a health provider annually, obviating opportunities to integrate prevention into clinical encounters. Because repeated contacts with a primary care provider may occur over several years, clinicians should ideally have multiple opportunities to screen and counsel an adolescent patient for risky health behaviors. However, young people report that there is little screening or discussion about healthy lifestyles. The biggest health challenge for young people in Georgia is overcoming barriers (socioeconomic, geographic, trust, and perceived competence) to visit a doctor for regular preventive checkups and to get health behavior advice from health professional. Addressing the health and development needs

  4. Primary care satellite clinics and improved access to general and mental health services.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheck, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relationship between the implementation of community-based primary care clinics and improved access to general health care and/or mental health care, in both the general population and among people with disabling mental illness. STUDY SETTING: The 69 new community-based primary care clinics in underserved areas, established by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) between the last quarter of FY 1995 and the second quarter of FY 1998, including the 21 new clinics with a specialty mental health care component. DATA SOURCES: VA inpatient and outpatient workload files, 1990 U.S. Census data, and VA Compensation and Pension files were used to determine the proportion of all veterans, and the proportion of disabled veterans, living in each U.S. county who used VA general health care services and VA mental health services before and after these clinics began operation. DESIGN: Analysis of covariance was used to compare changes, from late FY 1995 through early FY 1998, in access to VA services in counties in which new primary care clinics were located, in counties in which clinics that included specialized mental health components were located, and for comparison, in other U.S. counties, adjusting for potentially confounding factors. KEY FINDINGS: Counties in which new clinics were located showed a significant increase from the FY 1995-FY 1998 study dates in the proportion of veterans who used general VA health care services. This increase was almost twice as large as that observed in comparison counties (4.2% vs. 2.5%: F = 12.6, df = 1,3118, p = .0004). However, the introduction of these clinics was not associated with a greater use of specialty VA mental health services in the general veteran population, or of either general health care services or mental health services among veterans who received VA compensation for psychiatric disorders. In contrast, in counties with new clinics that included a mental health component the proportion of

  5. An Assessment of How Nurse Practitioners Create Access to Primary Care in Canadian Residential Long-Term Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Carter, Nancy; Sangster-Gormley, Esther; Ploeg, Jenny; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Donald, Faith; Wickson-Griffiths, Abigail; Kaasalainen, Sharon; McAiney, Carrie; Brazil, Kevin; Taniguchi, Alan; Martin, Lori Schindel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the role and activities of nurse practitioners (NPs) working in long-term care (LTC) to understand concepts of access to primary care for residents. Utilizing the "FIT" framework developed by Penchanksy and Thomas, we used a directed content analysis method to analyze data from a pan-Canadian study of NPs in LTC. Individual and focus group interviews were conducted at four sites in western, central and eastern regions of Canada with 143 participants, including NPs, RNs, regulated and unregulated nursing staff, allied health professionals, physicians, administrators and directors and residents and family members. Participants emphasized how the availability and accessibility of the NP had an impact on access to primary and urgent care for residents. Understanding more about how NPs affect access in Canadian LTC will be valuable for nursing practice and healthcare planning and policy and may assist other countries in planning for the introduction of NPs in LTC settings to increase access to primary care. PMID:27673401

  6. Toward a strategy of patient-centered access to primary care.

    PubMed

    Berry, Leonard L; Beckham, Dan; Dettman, Amy; Mead, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Patient-centered access (PCA) to primary care services is rapidly becoming an imperative for efficiently delivering high-quality health care to patients. To enhance their PCA-related efforts, some medical practices and health systems have begun to use various tactics, including team-based care, satellite clinics, same-day and group appointments, greater use of physician assistants and nurse practitioners, and remote access to health services. However, few organizations are addressing the PCA imperative comprehensively by integrating these various tactics to develop an overall PCA management strategy. Successful integration means taking into account the changing competitive and reimbursement landscape in primary care, conducting an evidence-based assessment of the barriers and benefits of PCA implementation, and attending to the particular needs of the institution engaged in this important effort. This article provides a blueprint for creating a multifaceted but coordinated PCA strategy-one aimed squarely at making patient access a centerpiece of how health care is delivered. The case of a Wisconsin-based health system is used as an illustrative example of how other institutions might begin to conceive their fledgling PCA strategies without proposing it as a one-size-fits-all model. PMID:25199953

  7. Toward a strategy of patient-centered access to primary care.

    PubMed

    Berry, Leonard L; Beckham, Dan; Dettman, Amy; Mead, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Patient-centered access (PCA) to primary care services is rapidly becoming an imperative for efficiently delivering high-quality health care to patients. To enhance their PCA-related efforts, some medical practices and health systems have begun to use various tactics, including team-based care, satellite clinics, same-day and group appointments, greater use of physician assistants and nurse practitioners, and remote access to health services. However, few organizations are addressing the PCA imperative comprehensively by integrating these various tactics to develop an overall PCA management strategy. Successful integration means taking into account the changing competitive and reimbursement landscape in primary care, conducting an evidence-based assessment of the barriers and benefits of PCA implementation, and attending to the particular needs of the institution engaged in this important effort. This article provides a blueprint for creating a multifaceted but coordinated PCA strategy-one aimed squarely at making patient access a centerpiece of how health care is delivered. The case of a Wisconsin-based health system is used as an illustrative example of how other institutions might begin to conceive their fledgling PCA strategies without proposing it as a one-size-fits-all model.

  8. Does providing more accessible primary care psychology services lower the clinical threshold for referrals?

    PubMed Central

    Tata, P; Eagle, A; Green, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The growing number of specialist services being provided within primary care has lead to the argument that this will reduce the clinical threshold for referrals to these clinics. AIM: The possibility that increasing the accessibility of primary care psychology services will reduce the threshold for referral was examined by comparing levels of psychological disturbance among patients seen by practice-based clinical psychologists with those attending outpatient clinics. METHOD: Psychological symptoms, distress, disruption in daily life and satisfaction with life were assessed using a questionnaire-based methodology. A consecutive series of 177 patients, assessed in a local general practice or an outpatient department across a wide range of urban locations, was studied over a fixed period. RESULTS: The study revealed equivalent levels of psychopathology within both specialist and primary care clinics. Of the overall sample, 79% were likely to merit a formal psychiatric diagnosis, relating primarily to mood disorder. Levels of subjective distress and life satisfaction were also equivalent at both service locations. CONCLUSION: The lack of evidence for a reduction in clinical threshold for referral within the primary care sample suggests that general practitioners' referral rates are similar regardless of whether practice-based clinical psychology services are available. This has implications for primary-care-led commissioning of mental health services. PMID:8949326

  9. Access to primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas: a realist review

    PubMed Central

    Ford, John A; Wong, Geoff; Jones, Andy P; Steel, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this review is to identify and understand the contexts that effect access to high-quality primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas. Design A realist review. Data sources MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases and grey literature (from inception to December 2014). Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Broad inclusion criteria were used to allow articles which were not specific, but might be relevant to the population of interest to be considered. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were assessed for rigour and relevance and coded for concepts relating to context, mechanism or outcome. Analysis An overarching patient pathway was generated and used as the basis to explore contexts, causal mechanisms and outcomes. Results 162 articles were included. Most were from the USA or the UK, cross-sectional in design and presented subgroup data by age, rurality or deprivation. From these studies, a patient pathway was generated which included 7 steps (problem identified, decision to seek help, actively seek help, obtain appointment, get to appointment, primary care interaction and outcome). Important contexts were stoicism, education status, expectations of ageing, financial resources, understanding the healthcare system, access to suitable transport, capacity within practice, the booking system and experience of healthcare. Prominent causal mechanisms were health literacy, perceived convenience, patient empowerment and responsiveness of the practice. Conclusions Socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas face personal, community and healthcare barriers that limit their access to primary care. Initiatives should be targeted at local contextual factors to help individuals recognise problems, feel welcome, navigate the healthcare system, book appointments easily, access appropriate transport and have sufficient time with professional staff to improve their experience of healthcare; all of which

  10. HRSA's Models That Work Program: implications for improving access to primary health care.

    PubMed Central

    Crump, R L; Gaston, M H; Fergerson, G

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of the Models That Work Campaign (MTW) is improving access to health care for vulnerable and underserved populations. A collaboration between the Bureau of Primary Health Care (BPHC) at the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and 39 cosponsors--among them national associations, state and federal agencies, community-based organizations, foundations, and businesses--this initiative gives recognition and visibility to innovative and effective service delivery models. Models are selected based on a set of criteria that includes delivery of high quality primary care services, community participation, integration of health and social services, quantifiable outcomes, and replicability. Winners of the competition are showcased nationally and hired to provide training to other communities, to document and publish their strategies, and to provide onsite technical assistance on request. Images p220-a p222-a p223-a PMID:10476990

  11. Nurse managed center: access to primary health care for urban Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Neff, Donna Felber; Kinion, Elizabeth S; Cardina, Christen

    2007-01-01

    Urban Native Americans represent a small, diverse minority with unique health needs. The purposes of this descriptive retrospective study were to describe (a) the characteristics and primary health problems of urban Native Americans who receive primary health care at an urban nurse managed center (NMC) and (b) the nursing interventions provided at an urban NMC to urban Native Americans. A sample of 334 participants patient data were abstracted from a computerized clinical data set and coded based on the Omaha Classification System. The majority were over 40 years of age, were female, were single, completed high school, and were poor and uninsured, and many were unemployed. The most frequent health problems were related to pain, cardiovascular symptoms, dentition problems, and respiratory illnesses. The most frequent nursing interventions were for surveillance of physical signs and symptoms. The NMC was an accessible source of primary health care for urban Native Americans in northeastern Ohio. PMID:17266403

  12. The family-school-primary care triangle and the access to mental health care among migrant and ethnic minorities.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marta; Moleiro, Carla

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the concepts of mental health and help seeking behaviours of migrant and ethnic minority families constitutes an important step toward improving the intercultural competence of health and education professionals. This paper addresses these goals among ethnic and migrant minorities in Portugal. For this a multi-informant approach was selected. The study involved nine focus groups (N = 39) conducted with different samples: young immigrants (12-17 years), immigrant parents, teachers and health professionals. The results showed similarities and differences in concepts of mental health, as well as help seeking processes. Stigma continued to be recognized as a barrier in the access to mental health care. The paper argues that providing adequate training on mental health on cultural diversity competencies to health and education professionals can contribute to a better inter-communication and -relation system in the family-school-primary care triangle and thus facilitate access to mental health care for youth. PMID:21947737

  13. Measuring access to primary medical care: some examples of the use of geographical information systems.

    PubMed

    Parker, E B; Campbell, J L

    1998-06-01

    This paper explores the potential for geographical information system technology in defining some variables influencing the use of primary care medical services. Eighteen general practices in Scotland contributed to a study examining the accessibility of their services and their patients' use of the local Accident and Emergency Department. Geo-referencing of information was carried out through analysis of postcode data relating to practices and patients. This information was analyzed using ARC/INFO GIS software in conjunction with the ORACLE relational database and 1991 census information. The results demonstrate that GIS technology has an important role in defining and analyzing the use of health services by the population. PMID:10671022

  14. Indicators of accessibility to primary health care coverage in rural Odukpani, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Atting, I A; Egwu, I N

    1991-01-01

    Indicators of accessibility were investigated in Odukpani Local Government Area using a structured questionnaire administered to mothers or heads of households in the study area. The indicators considered included proportion of births attended by trained health personnel, proportion of children with diarrhea treated with oral rehydration therapy (ORT), distance from home to regular immunization site, and acceptability of primary health care services to the target population. Sociodemographic data revealed a typical developing country population profile and surprisingly high literacy rate (57.8%) relative to the national rate, an observation which may account for the appreciable level of awareness.

  15. Better access, quality, and cost for clinically complex veterans with home-based primary care.

    PubMed

    Edes, Thomas; Kinosian, Bruce; Vuckovic, Nancy H; Nichols, Linda Olivia; Becker, Margaret Mary; Hossain, Monir

    2014-10-01

    In successfully reducing healthcare expenditures, patient goals must be met and savings differentiated from cost shifting. Although the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) program for chronically ill individuals has resulted in cost reduction for the VA, it is unknown whether cost reduction results from restricting services or shifting costs to Medicare and whether HBPC meets patient goals. Cost projection using a hierarchical condition category (HCC) model adapted to the VA was used to determine VA plus Medicare projected costs for 9,425 newly enrolled HBPC recipients. Projected annual costs were compared with observed annualized costs before and during HBPC. To assess patient perspectives of care, 31 veterans and caregivers were interviewed from three representative programs. During HBPC, Medicare costs were 10.8% lower than projected, VA plus Medicare costs were 11.7% lower than projected, and combined hospitalizations were 25.5% lower than during the period without HBPC. Patients reported high satisfaction with HBPC team access, education, and continuity of care, which they felt contributed to fewer exacerbations, emergency visits, and hospitalizations. HBPC improves access while reducing hospitalizations and total cost. Medicare is currently testing the HBPC approach through the Independence at Home demonstration. PMID:25333529

  16. Associations between Extending Access to Primary Care and Emergency Department Visits: A Difference-In-Differences Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, William; Anselmi, Laura; Lau, Yiu-Shing; Bower, Peter; Checkland, Katherine; Elvey, Rebecca; Stokes, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Health services across the world increasingly face pressures on the use of expensive hospital services. Better organisation and delivery of primary care has the potential to manage demand and reduce costs for hospital services, but routine primary care services are not open during evenings and weekends. Extended access (evening and weekend opening) is hypothesized to reduce pressure on hospital services from emergency department visits. However, the existing evidence-base is weak, largely focused on emergency out-of-hours services, and analysed using a before-and after-methodology without effective comparators. Methods and Findings Throughout 2014, 56 primary care practices (346,024 patients) in Greater Manchester, England, offered 7-day extended access, compared with 469 primary care practices (2,596,330 patients) providing routine access. Extended access included evening and weekend opening and served both urgent and routine appointments. To assess the effects of extended primary care access on hospital services, we apply a difference-in-differences analysis using hospital administrative data from 2011 to 2014. Propensity score matching techniques were used to match practices without extended access to practices with extended access. Differences in the change in “minor” patient-initiated emergency department visits per 1,000 population were compared between practices with and without extended access. Populations registered to primary care practices with extended access demonstrated a 26.4% relative reduction (compared to practices without extended access) in patient-initiated emergency department visits for “minor” problems (95% CI -38.6% to -14.2%, absolute difference: -10,933 per year, 95% CI -15,995 to -5,866), and a 26.6% (95% CI -39.2% to -14.1%) relative reduction in costs of patient-initiated visits to emergency departments for minor problems (absolute difference: -£767,976, -£1,130,767 to -£405,184). There was an insignificant

  17. Elements of the patient-centered medical home associated with health outcomes among veterans: the role of primary care continuity, expanded access, and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Karin; Sun, Haili; Dolan, Emily; Maynard, Charles; Beste, Laruen; Bryson, Christopher; Schectman, Gordon; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-01-01

    Care continuity, access, and coordination are important features of the patient-centered medical home model and have been emphasized in the Veterans Health Administration patient-centered medical home implementation, called the Patient Aligned Care Team. Data from more than 4.3 million Veterans were used to assess the relationship between these attributes of Patient Aligned Care Team and Veterans Health Administration hospitalization and mortality. Controlling for demographics and comorbidity, we found that continuity with a primary care provider was associated with a lower likelihood of hospitalization and mortality among a large population of Veterans receiving VA primary care.

  18. Elements of the patient-centered medical home associated with health outcomes among veterans: the role of primary care continuity, expanded access, and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Karin; Sun, Haili; Dolan, Emily; Maynard, Charles; Beste, Laruen; Bryson, Christopher; Schectman, Gordon; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-01-01

    Care continuity, access, and coordination are important features of the patient-centered medical home model and have been emphasized in the Veterans Health Administration patient-centered medical home implementation, called the Patient Aligned Care Team. Data from more than 4.3 million Veterans were used to assess the relationship between these attributes of Patient Aligned Care Team and Veterans Health Administration hospitalization and mortality. Controlling for demographics and comorbidity, we found that continuity with a primary care provider was associated with a lower likelihood of hospitalization and mortality among a large population of Veterans receiving VA primary care. PMID:25180648

  19. Primary care access and its relationship with emergency department utilisation: an observational, cross-sectional, ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Matthew J; Patel, Brijesh; Bowen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent health service policies in the UK have focused on improving primary care access in order to reduce the use of costly emergency department services, even though the relationship between the two is based on weak or little evidence. Research is required to establish whether improving primary care access can influence emergency department attendance. Aim To ascertain whether a relationship exists between the degree of access to GP practices and avoidable emergency department attendances in an inner-London primary care trust (PCT). Design and setting Observational, cross-sectional ecological study in 68 general practices in Brent Primary Care Trust, north London, UK. Method GP practices were used as the unit of analysis and avoidable emergency department attendance as the dependent variable. Routinely collected data from GP practices, Hospital Episode Statistics, and census data for the period covering 2007–2009 were used across three broad domains: GP access characteristics, population characteristics, and health status aggregated to the level of the GP practice. Multiple linear regression was used to ascertain which variables account for the variation in emergency department attendance experienced by patients registered to each GP practice. Results None of the GP access variables accounted for the variation in emergency department attendance. The only variable that explained this variance was the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD). For every unit increase in IMD score of the GP practice, there would be an increase of 6.13 (95% CI = 4.56, 7.70) per 1000 patients per year in emergency department attendances. This accounted for 47.9% of the variance in emergency department attendances in Brent. Conclusion Avoidable emergency department attendance appears to be mostly driven by underlying deprivation rather than by the degree of access to primary care. PMID:22137415

  20. Improving Access to Primary Care for Adolescents: School Health Centers as a Service Delivery Strategy. MCH Policy Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santelli, John; Morreale, Madlyn; Wigton, Alyssa; Grason, Holly

    Recognizing that school-based health centers are one of the most promising recent innovations to address the health and related needs of adolescents, this report provides information on these centers as a strategy to improve the access of adolescents to primary care. The report is intended to assist state and local Maternal and Child Health (MCH)…

  1. How Adults' Access to Outpatient Physician Services Relates to the Local Supply of Primary Care Physicians in the Rural Southeast

    PubMed Central

    Pathman, Donald E; Ricketts, Thomas C; Konrad, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine how access to outpatient medical care varies with local primary care physician densities across primary care service areas (PCSAs) in the rural Southeast, for adults as a whole and separately for the elderly and poor. Data Sources Access data from a 2002 to 2003 telephone survey of 4,311 adults living in 298 PCSAs within 150 rural counties in eight Southeastern states were linked geographically with physician practice location data from the American Medical and American Osteopathic Associations and population data from the U.S. Census. Study Design In a cross-sectional study design, we used a series of logistic regression models to assess how 26 measures of various aspects of access to outpatient physician services varied for subjects arranged into five groups based on the population-per-physician ratios of the PCSAs where they lived. Principal Findings Among adults as a whole, more individuals reported traveling over 30 minutes for outpatient care in PCSAs with more than 3,500 people per physician than in PCSAs with fewer than 1,500 people per physician (39.1 versus 18.5 percent, p<.001) and more reported travel difficulties. Otherwise, PCSA density of primary care physicians was unrelated to reported barriers to care, unrelated to people's satisfaction with care, and unrelated to indicators of people's use of services. Use rates of six recommended preventive health services varied in no consistent direction with physician densities. Among the elderly, only the proportion traveling over 30 minutes for care was greater in areas with lowest physician densities. Among subjects covered under Medicaid or uninsured, lower local physician densities were associated with longer travel time, difficulties with travel and reaching one's physician by phone, and two areas of dissatisfaction with care. Conclusions For adults as a whole in the rural South and for the elderly there, low local primary care physician densities are associated with travel

  2. Addressing inequities in access to primary health care: lessons for the training of health care professionals from a regional medical school.

    PubMed

    Larkins, Sarah; Sen Gupta, Tarun; Evans, Rebecca; Murray, Richard; Preston, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    Attention to the inequitable distribution and limited access to primary health care resources is key to addressing the priority health needs of underserved populations in rural, remote and outer metropolitan areas. There is little high-quality evidence about improving access to quality primary health care services for underserved groups, particularly in relation to geographic barriers, and limited discussion about the training implications of reforms to improve access. To progress equity in access to primary health care services, health professional education institutions need to work with both the health sector and policy makers to address issues of workforce mix, recruitment and retention, and new models of primary health care delivery. This requires a fundamental shift in focus from these institutions and the health sector, to each view themselves as partners in an integrated teaching, research and service-oriented health system. This paper discusses the challenges and opportunities for primary health care professionals, educators and the health sector in providing quality teaching and clinical experiences for increasing numbers of health professionals as a result of the reform agenda. It then outlines some practical strategies based on theory and evolving experience for dealing with some of these challenges and capitalising on opportunities.

  3. Addressing inequities in access to primary health care: lessons for the training of health care professionals from a regional medical school.

    PubMed

    Larkins, Sarah; Sen Gupta, Tarun; Evans, Rebecca; Murray, Richard; Preston, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    Attention to the inequitable distribution and limited access to primary health care resources is key to addressing the priority health needs of underserved populations in rural, remote and outer metropolitan areas. There is little high-quality evidence about improving access to quality primary health care services for underserved groups, particularly in relation to geographic barriers, and limited discussion about the training implications of reforms to improve access. To progress equity in access to primary health care services, health professional education institutions need to work with both the health sector and policy makers to address issues of workforce mix, recruitment and retention, and new models of primary health care delivery. This requires a fundamental shift in focus from these institutions and the health sector, to each view themselves as partners in an integrated teaching, research and service-oriented health system. This paper discusses the challenges and opportunities for primary health care professionals, educators and the health sector in providing quality teaching and clinical experiences for increasing numbers of health professionals as a result of the reform agenda. It then outlines some practical strategies based on theory and evolving experience for dealing with some of these challenges and capitalising on opportunities. PMID:22112705

  4. Increased access to evidence-based primary mental health care: will the implementation match the rhetoric?

    PubMed

    Hickie, Ian B; McGorry, Patrick D

    2007-07-16

    There is clear evidence that coordinated systems of medical and psychological care ("collaborative care") are superior to single-provider-based treatment regimens. Although other general practice-based mental health schemes promoted collaborative care, the new Medicare Benefits Schedule payments revert largely to individual-provider service systems and fee-for-service rebates. Such systems have previously resulted in high out-of-pocket expenses, poor geographical and socioeconomic distribution of specialist services, and proliferation of individual-provider-based treatments rather than collaborative care. The new arrangements for broad access to psychological therapies should provide the financial basis for major structural reform. Unless this reform is closely monitored for equity of access, degree of out-of-pocket expenses, extent of development of evidence-based collaborative care structures, and impact on young people in the early phases of mental illness, we may waste this opportunity. The responsibility for achieving the best outcome does not lie only with governments. To date, the professions have not placed enough emphasis on systematically adopting evidence-based forms of collaborative care. PMID:17635093

  5. Increased access to evidence-based primary mental health care: will the implementation match the rhetoric?

    PubMed

    Hickie, Ian B; McGorry, Patrick D

    2007-07-16

    There is clear evidence that coordinated systems of medical and psychological care ("collaborative care") are superior to single-provider-based treatment regimens. Although other general practice-based mental health schemes promoted collaborative care, the new Medicare Benefits Schedule payments revert largely to individual-provider service systems and fee-for-service rebates. Such systems have previously resulted in high out-of-pocket expenses, poor geographical and socioeconomic distribution of specialist services, and proliferation of individual-provider-based treatments rather than collaborative care. The new arrangements for broad access to psychological therapies should provide the financial basis for major structural reform. Unless this reform is closely monitored for equity of access, degree of out-of-pocket expenses, extent of development of evidence-based collaborative care structures, and impact on young people in the early phases of mental illness, we may waste this opportunity. The responsibility for achieving the best outcome does not lie only with governments. To date, the professions have not placed enough emphasis on systematically adopting evidence-based forms of collaborative care.

  6. A Cost-Effective Model for Increasing Access to Mental Health Care at the Primary Care Level in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omigbodun, Olayinka O.

    2001-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Although effective treatment modalities for mental health problems currently exist in Nigeria, they remain irrelevant to the 70% of Nigeria's 120 million people who have no access to modern mental health care services. The nation's Health Ministry has adopted mental health as the 9th component of Primary Health Care (PHC) but ten years later, very little has been done to put this policy into practice. Mental Health is part of the training curriculum of PHC workers, but this appears to be money down the drain. AIMS OF THE STUDY: To review the weaknesses and problems with existing mode of mental health training for PHC workers with a view to developing a cost-effective model for integration. METHODS: A review and analysis of current training methods and their impact on the provision of mental health services in PHC in a rural and an urban local government area in Nigeria were done. An analysis of tested approaches for integrating mental health into PHC was carried out and a cost-effective model for the Nigerian situation based on these approaches and the local circumstances was derived. RESULTS: Virtually no mental health services are being provided at the PHC levels in the two local government areas studied. Current training is not effective and virtually none of what was learnt appears to be used by PHC workers in the field. Two models for integrating mental health into PHC emerged from the literature. Enhancement, which refers to the training of PHC personnel to carry out mental health care independently is not effective on its own and needs to be accompanied by supervision of PHC staff. Linkage, which occurs when mental health professionals leave their hospital bases to provide mental health care in PHC settings, requires a large number of skilled staff who are unavailable in Nigeria. In view of past experiences in Nigeria and other countries, a mixed enhancement-linkage model for mental health in PHC appears to be the most cost-effective approach for

  7. Greater access to information on how to prevent oral cancer among elderly using primary health care.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; dos Santos-Neto, Pedro Eleutério; de Sá, Maria Aparecida Barbosa; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Haikal, Desireé Sant'Ana; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigenia; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Educative actions are an important component of health promotion in Brazil's primary healthcare program, the Family Health Strategy (FHS). The efficacy of these actions is evidenced by compliance with healthy behaviors and in the reduction of rates of mortality and morbidity. The objective of this study was to identify whether access to information regarding the prevention of oral cancer is greater among elders whose residences are registered with the FHS. SPSS® was utilized to obtain estimates that were corrected for sample design, considering the magnitude of the associations between access to such information with personal determinants, the use and cost of healthcare, health-related behaviors and health outcomes. 58.9% of the 492 participating elders reported having access to such information. We verified that there was a greater chance for access among residents of houses registered by the FHS; those with greater per capita income (2.01/1.183.43); non-smokers (2.00/1.16-3.46); those that realized oral self-examination (6.35/3.46-11.64); and those that did not perceive discomfort in the mouth, head or neck (2.06/1.02-4.17). Access was greater among residents of homes registered by the FHS. Personal determinants of health, health-related behaviors and health outcomes are influenced or influence access to information regarding the prevention and management of oral diseases.

  8. The effects of expanding primary care access for the uninsured: implications for the health care workforce under health reform.

    PubMed

    Dow, Alan W; Bohannon, Arline; Garland, Sheryl; Mazmanian, Paul E; Retchin, Sheldon M

    2013-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act seeks to improve health equity in the United States by expanding Medicaid coverage for adults who are uninsured and/or socioeconomically disadvantaged; however, when millions more become eligible for Medicaid in 2014, the health care workforce and care delivery systems will be inadequate to meet the care needs of the U.S. population. To provide high-quality care efficiently to the expanded population of insured individuals, the health care workforce and care delivery structures will need to be tailored to meet the needs of specific groups within the population.To help create a foundation for understanding the use patterns of the newly insured and to recommend possible approaches to care delivery and workforce development, the authors describe the 13-year-old experience of the Virginia Coordinated Care program (VCC). The VCC, developed by Virginia Commonwealth University Health System in Richmond, Virginia, is a health-system-sponsored care coordination program that provides primary and specialty care services to patients who are indigent. The authors have categorized VCC patients from fiscal year 2011 by medical complexity. Then, on the basis of the resulting utilization data for each category over the next fiscal year, the authors describe the medical needs and health behaviors of the four different patient groups. Finally, the authors discuss possible approaches for providing primary, preventive, and specialty care to improve the health of the population while controlling costs and how adoption of the approaches might be shaped by care delivery systems and educational institutions. PMID:24128619

  9. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain.

  10. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. PMID:26304179

  11. Accessibility to primary health care in Belgium: an evaluation of policies awarding financial assistance in shortage areas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In many countries, financial assistance is awarded to physicians who settle in an area that is designated as a shortage area to prevent unequal accessibility to primary health care. Today, however, policy makers use fairly simple methods to define health care accessibility, with physician-to-population ratios (PPRs) within predefined administrative boundaries being overwhelmingly favoured. Our purpose is to verify whether these simple methods are accurate enough for adequately designating medical shortage areas and explore how these perform relative to more advanced GIS-based methods. Methods Using a geographical information system (GIS), we conduct a nation-wide study of accessibility to primary care physicians in Belgium using four different methods: PPR, distance to closest physician, cumulative opportunity, and floating catchment area (FCA) methods. Results The official method used by policy makers in Belgium (calculating PPR per physician zone) offers only a crude representation of health care accessibility, especially because large contiguous areas (physician zones) are considered. We found substantial differences in the number and spatial distribution of medical shortage areas when applying different methods. Conclusions The assessment of spatial health care accessibility and concomitant policy initiatives are affected by and dependent on the methodology used. The major disadvantage of PPR methods is its aggregated approach, masking subtle local variations. Some simple GIS methods overcome this issue, but have limitations in terms of conceptualisation of physician interaction and distance decay. Conceptually, the enhanced 2-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method, an advanced FCA method, was found to be most appropriate for supporting areal health care policies, since this method is able to calculate accessibility at a small scale (e.g. census tracts), takes interaction between physicians into account, and considers distance decay. While at

  12. [Primary care in Sweden].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-09-01

    Sweden was one of the first European Union countries that saw the opportunity in the free movement of professionals. First offers for jobs were managed in 2000. Since then, a large number of professionals have taken the opportunity of a decent job and have moved from Spain to Sweden. The Swedish health care model belongs to the group of national health systems. The right to health care is linked to legal citizenship. Health is financed through regional taxes, but there is a compulsory co-payment regardless of the financial situation of the patient. The provision of health care is decentralised at a regional level, and there is a mixture of private and public medical centres. Primary care is similar to that in Spain. Health professionals work as a team with a division of tasks. Like in Spain, waiting lists and coordination between primary and specialised care are a great problem. Patients may register with any public or private primary care centre and hospital provider within their region. Access to diagnostic tests and specialists are restricted to those selected by specialists. Doctors are salaried and their job and salary depend on their experience, professional abilities and regional needs. Medicine is curative. General practitioners are the gateway to the system, but they do not act as gatekeeper. Hospitals offer a number of training post, and the access is through an interview. Continuing medical education is encouraged and financed by the health centre in order to increase its revenues.

  13. The place of receptionists in access to primary care: Challenges in the space between community and consultation.

    PubMed

    Neuwelt, Pat M; Kearns, Robin A; Browne, Annette J

    2015-05-01

    At the point of entry to the health care system sit general practice receptionists (GPRs), a seldom studied employment group. The place of the receptionist involves both a location within the internal geography of the clinic and a position within the primary care team. Receptionists literally 'receive' those who phone or enter the clinic, and are a critical influence in their transformation from a 'person' to a 'patient'. This process occurs in a particular space: the 'waiting room'. We explore the waiting room and its dynamics in terms of 'acceptability', an under-examined aspect of access to primary care. We ask 'How do GPRs see their role with regard to patients with complex health and social needs, in light of the spatio-temporal constraints of their working environments?' We engaged receptionists as participants to explore perceptions of their roles and their workspaces, deriving narrative data from three focus groups involving 14 GPRs from 11 practices in the Northland region of New Zealand. The study employed an adapted form of grounded theory. Our findings indicate that GPRs are on the edge of the practice team, yet carry a complex role at the frontline, in the waiting space. They are de facto managers of this space; however, they have limited agency within general practice settings, due to the constraints imposed upon them by physical and organisational structures. The agency of GPRs is most evident in their ability to shape the social dynamics of the waiting space, and to frame the health care experience as positive for people whose usual experience is marginalisation. We conclude that, if well supported, receptionists have the potential to positively influence health care acceptability, and patients' access to care. PMID:25455478

  14. Access to primary health care for Australian young people: service provider perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Melissa; Bernard, Diana; Booth, Michael; Quine, Susan; Alperstein, Garth; Usherwood, Tim; Bennett, David

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To adequately address the complex health needs of young people, their access to services, and the quality of services received, must be improved. AIMS: To explore the barriers to service provision for young people and to identify the training needs of primary healthcare service providers in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. DESIGN OF STUDY: A cross-sectional, qualitative study of the perspectives of a range of health service providers. SETTING: A range of primary healthcare organisations across NSW. METHODS: Samples of general practitioners (GPs), youth health workers, youth health coordinators, and community health centre staff were drawn from urban and rural clusters across NSW. Focus groups and interviews were used to identify barriers to service provision and the training needs of service providers. Data were tape recorded, transcribed, and analysed. RESULTS: Barriers to service provision among GPs and community health centre staff included inadequate time, flexibility, skills, and confidence in working with young people, and poor linkages with other relevant services. Training needs included better knowledge of and skills in adolescent health requirements, working with adolescents, and working with other services. Barriers to service provision for youth health workers and coordinators included lack of financial resources and infrastructure. There were few linkages between groups of service providers. CONCLUSION: Models of service provision that allow stronger linkages between service providers, sufficient time for consultation with young people, adequate training and support of health professionals, and flexibility of service provision, including outreach, should be explored and evaluated. PMID:14960219

  15. Access to primary care and the route of emergency admission to hospital: retrospective analysis of national hospital administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Thomas E; Harris, Matthew; Watt, Hilary; Soljak, Michael; Richards, Emma; Gunning, Elinor; Bottle, Alex; Macinko, James; Majeed, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    Background The UK government is pursuing policies to improve primary care access, as many patients visit accident and emergency (A and E) departments after being unable to get suitable general practice appointments. Direct admission to hospital via a general practitioner (GP) averts A and E use, and may reduce total hospital costs. It could also enhance the continuity of information between GPs and hospital doctors, possibly improving healthcare outcomes. Objective To determine whether primary care access is associated with the route of emergency admission—via a GP versus via an A and E department. Methods Retrospective analysis of national administrative data from English hospitals for 2011–2012. Adults admitted in an emergency (unscheduled) for ≥1 night via a GP or an A and E department formed the study population. The measure of primary care access—the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt—was derived from a large, nationally representative patient survey. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate associations, adjusting for patient and admission characteristics. Results The analysis included 2 322 112 emergency admissions (81.9% via an A and E department). With a 5 unit increase in the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt, the adjusted odds of GP admission (vs A and E admission) was estimated to increase by 15% (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.17). The probability of GP admission if ≥95% of appointment attempts were successful in each general practice was estimated to be 19.6%. This probability reduced to 13.6% when <80% of appointment attempts were successful. This equates to 139 673 fewer GP admissions (456 232 vs 316 559) assuming no change in the total number of admissions. Associations were consistent in direction across geographical regions of England. Conclusions Among hospital inpatients admitted as an emergency, patients

  16. Hidden costs: the direct and indirect impact of user fees on access to malaria treatment and primary care in Mali.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ari; Goss, Adeline; Beckerman, Jessica; Castro, Arachu

    2012-11-01

    About 20 years after initial calls for the introduction of user fees in health systems in sub-Saharan Africa, a growing coalition is advocating for their removal. Several African countries have abolished user fees for health care for some or all of their citizens. However, fee-for-service health care delivery remains a primary health care funding model in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the impact of user fees on utilization of health services and household finances has been studied extensively, further research is needed to characterize the multi-faceted health and social problems associated with charging user fees. This ethnographic study aims to identify consequences of user fees on gender inequality, food insecurity, and household decision-making for a group of women living in poverty. Ethnographic life history interviews were conducted with 24 women in Yirimadjo, Mali in 2007. Purposive sampling selected participants across a broad socio-economic spectrum. Semi-structured interviews addressed participants' past medical history, socio-economic status, social and family history, and access to health care. Interview transcripts were coded using the guiding analytical framework of structural violence. Interviews revealed that user fees for health care not only decreased utilization of health services, but also resulted in delayed presentation for care, incomplete or inadequate care, compromised food security and household financial security, and reduced agency for women in health care decision making. The effects of user fees were amplified by conditions of poverty, as well as gender and health inequality; user fees in turn reinforced the inequalities created by those very conditions. The qualitative data reveal multi-faceted health and socioeconomic effects of user fees, and illustrate that user fees for health care may impact quality of care, health outcomes, food insecurity, and gender inequality, in addition to impacting health care utilization

  17. Barriers to access to treatment for mothers with postpartum depression in primary health care centers: a predictive model1

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Pablo; Vöhringer, Paul A.; Rojas, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Objective to develop a predictive model to evaluate the factors that modify the access to treatment for Postpartum Depression (PPD). Methods prospective study with mothers who participated in the monitoring of child health in primary care centers. For the initial assessment and during 3 months, it was considered: sociodemographic data, gyneco-obstetric data, data on the services provided, depressive symptoms according to the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS) and quality of life according to the Short Form-36 Health Status Questionnaire (SF-36). The diagnosis of depression was made based on MINI. Mothers diagnosed with PPD in the initial evaluation, were followed-up. Results a statistical model was constructed to determine the factors that prevented access to treatment, which consisted of: item 2 of EPDS (OR 0.43, 95%CI: 0.20-0.93) and item 5 (OR 0.48, 95%CI: 0.21-1.09), and previous history of depression treatment (OR 0.26, 95%CI: 0.61-1.06). Area under the ROC curve for the model=0.79; p-value for the Hosmer-Lemershow=0.73. Conclusion it was elaborated a simple, well standardized and accurate profile, which advises that nurses should pay attention to those mothers diagnosed with PPD, presenting low/no anhedonia (item 2 of EPDS), scarce/no panic/fear (item 5 of EPDS), and no history of depression, as it is likely that these women do not initiate treatment. PMID:27027674

  18. Pharmacists and the primary care workforce.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marie A

    2012-11-01

    The primary care workforce shortage will be magnified by the growing elderly population and expanded coverage as a result of health care reform initiatives. The pharmacist workforce consists of community-based health care professionals who are well trained and highly accessible, yet underutilized. Some health care professionals have advocated that primary care teams should include pharmacists with complementary skills to those of the physician to achieve quality improvement goals and enhance primary care practice efficiencies. New primary care delivery models such as medical homes, health neighborhoods, and accountable care organizations provide opportunities for pharmacists to become integral members of primary care interdisciplinary teams.

  19. Patients' Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice.

    PubMed

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-12-04

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems.

  20. Access to health care

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Martin; Maltais, Danielle; Hudon, Catherine; Lapointe, Lise; Ntetu, Antoine Lutumba

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access. DESIGN Qualitative study with focus groups. SETTING Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions. METHODS For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held. MAIN FINDINGS The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access. CONCLUSION Systematic callbacks, family physicians’ personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:16926944

  1. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  2. Cross-sectional study examining whether the extent of first-contact access to primary care differentially benefits those with certain personalities to receive preventive services

    PubMed Central

    Pandhi, Nancy; Schumacher, Jessica R; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Smith, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Objective The extent of first-contact access to primary care (ie, easy availability when needed) is associated with receiving recommended preventive services. Whether this access benefits patients at risk of preventive services underutilisation, such as those with certain personality characteristics, is unclear. Setting Secondary analysis of the 2003–2006 round of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. Participants 6975 respondents who reported a usual provider whose specialty was internal medicine or family medicine. Those reporting not visiting a medical provider in the past 12 months, and those who were uninsured were excluded. Primary outcome measures Receiving mammography, cholesterol testing and influenza vaccination. Adjusted predicted probabilities (aPP) of receiving these services were analysed stratified by personality characteristics overall, and if significant, then interacted with first-contact access. Results Lower conscientiousness as compared with higher conscientiousness predicted less of all 3 preventive services; mammography (aPP 80%; 95% CI (77% to 83%) vs aPP 85%; (95% CI 82% to 87%)), cholesterol testing (88%; (85% to 90%) vs 93% (91% to 94%), and influenza vaccination (62%; (59% to 64%) vs 66%; (63% to 68%)). Lower agreeableness as compared with higher agreeableness predicted less mammography (77%; (73% to 81%) vs 84%; (82% to 87%)) and less influenza vaccination (59%; (56% to 62%) vs 65%; (63% to 68%)). Lower extraversion predicted less cholesterol testing (88%; (86% to 91%) vs (92%; (90% to 94%)). Lower openness to experience predicted less influenza vaccination (59%; (56% to 63%) vs (68%; (65% to 70%)). For agreeableness, these differences in receiving preventive services did not persist when first-contact access to primary care was present. Conclusions Certain personality characteristics predicted receiving less preventive care services. For those with less agreeableness, improved first-contact access to primary care mitigated this effect

  3. Pediatric primary care as a component of systems of care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jonathan D

    2010-02-01

    Systems of care should be defined in a manner that includes primary care. The current definition of systems of care shares several attributes with the definition of primary care: both are defined as community-based services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally competent, and family focused. However, systems of care is defined as serving only children and youth with serious emotional disturbance and their families and does not fully embrace the concept of primary prevention. Although similarities in the definitions of primary care and systems of care may provide a theoretical foundation for including primary care within the systems of care framework, a definition of systems of care that incorporates the idea of prevention and takes into account the broad population served in primary care would provide communities with a definition that can be used to further the work of integrating primary care into systems of care.

  4. Pediatric Primary Care as a Component of Systems of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Systems of care should be defined in a manner that includes primary care. The current definition of systems of care shares several attributes with the definition of primary care: both are defined as community-based services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally competent, and family focused. However, systems of…

  5. What is primary care?

    PubMed

    1983-06-01

    This discussion of primary care directs attention to quality of care and the primary care team. Primary care is the care provided by the 1st person the patient sees who has been trained in health care. The answer to the question of who should provide primary care should be based on the tasks and responsibilities which must be met. These are: correct diagnosis as the precondition for treatment; appropriate treatment to restore maximum possible restoration of function; relief of pain and suffering and alleviation of anxieties associated with illness; appropriate referral for specialized diagnostic, treatment, and rehabilitation services; management responsibility for the overall health of the patient; preventive services, i.e., immunization, multiphasic screening for early detection, and preventive supervision; and health education and advice for health promotion, disease prevention, treatment and rehabilitation. The need for highly trained primary care practitioners is illustrated by a study conducted by Ciocco, Hunt, and Altman as part of the 1946 survey of group practice by the US Public Health Service. In each of 16 medical groups, they abstracted the records of 200 new patients to obtain data on the services received for a period of 14 days following admission. When they compared the 5 groups with the greatest average amount of hospital training of physicians with the 5 groups with the lowest amount, siginificant differences were found. There were more general examinations among patients of the groups in the high set, 46% against 36%, and there were fewer patients for whom no examination was recorded. Significant differences were also found in treatment between the high and low sets. The study implications were clear. The old style general practitioner can hardly be considered competent to provide a high quality of primary care, yet these were the primary care practitioners that the United Mine Workers Association (UMWA) medical care program encountered in the

  6. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  7. Primary care for the Roma in Europe: Position paper of the European forum for primary care

    PubMed Central

    Rotar Pavlič, Danica; Zelko, Erika; Vintges, Marga; Willems, Sara; Hanssens, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Roma populations’ low health status and limited access to health services, including primary care, has been documented in many European countries, and warrants specific health policies and practices. A variety of experiences shows how primary care can adjust its practices to reduce the barriers to primary care for Roma populations. At local level, establishing collaboration with Roma organisations helps primary care to improve mutual relations and quality of care. Mediation has proved to be an effective tool. Skills training of primary care practitioners may enhance their individual competences. Research and international sharing of experiences are further tools to improve primary care for the Roma people. PMID:27703542

  8. The acceptability and impact of a randomised controlled trial of welfare rights advice accessed via primary health care: qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, Suzanne; Mackintosh, Joan; White, Martin; Howel, Denise; Sandell, Adam

    2006-01-01

    . Conclusion Participation in the trial and the intervention was acceptable to participants. Welfare rights advice targeted at people aged 60 years or over and accessed via primary care had a positive impact on quality of life and resulted in increased social participation. The divergence of qualitative and quantitative findings suggests that both methods make important contributions to the evaluation of complex social interventions. PMID:16790054

  9. Accessing primary care Big Data: the development of a software algorithm to explore the rich content of consultation records

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, J; Darlow, B; McBain, L; Jones, O; Stubbe, M; Turner, N; Dowell, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a natural language processing software inference algorithm to classify the content of primary care consultations using electronic health record Big Data and subsequently test the algorithm's ability to estimate the prevalence and burden of childhood respiratory illness in primary care. Design Algorithm development and validation study. To classify consultations, the algorithm is designed to interrogate clinical narrative entered as free text, diagnostic (Read) codes created and medications prescribed on the day of the consultation. Setting Thirty-six consenting primary care practices from a mixed urban and semirural region of New Zealand. Three independent sets of 1200 child consultation records were randomly extracted from a data set of all general practitioner consultations in participating practices between 1 January 2008–31 December 2013 for children under 18 years of age (n=754 242). Each consultation record within these sets was independently classified by two expert clinicians as respiratory or non-respiratory, and subclassified according to respiratory diagnostic categories to create three ‘gold standard’ sets of classified records. These three gold standard record sets were used to train, test and validate the algorithm. Outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and F-measure were calculated to illustrate the algorithm's ability to replicate judgements of expert clinicians within the 1200 record gold standard validation set. Results The algorithm was able to identify respiratory consultations in the 1200 record validation set with a sensitivity of 0.72 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.78) and a specificity of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93 to 0.98). The positive predictive value of algorithm respiratory classification was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89 to 0.97). The positive predictive value of the algorithm classifying consultations as being related to specific respiratory diagnostic categories ranged from 0.68 (95% CI 0.40 to 1.00; other

  10. Primary care for refugees.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Barbara

    2011-02-15

    Over the past decade, at least 600,000 refugees from more than 60 different countries have been resettled in the United States. The personal history of a refugee is often marked by physical and emotional trauma. Although refugees come from many different countries and cultures, their shared pattern of experiences allows for some generalizations to be made about their health care needs and challenges. Before being accepted for resettlement in the United States, all refugees must pass an overseas medical screening examination, the purpose of which is to identify conditions that could result in ineligibility for admission to the United States. Primary care physicians have the opportunity to care for members of this unique population once they resettle. Refugees present to primary care physicians with a variety of health problems, including musculoskeletal and pain issues, mental and social health problems, infectious diseases, and longstanding undiagnosed chronic illnesses. Important infectious diseases to consider in the symptomatic patient include tuberculosis, parasites, and malaria. Health maintenance and immunizations should also be addressed. Language barriers, cross-cultural medicine issues, and low levels of health literacy provide additional challenges to caring for this population. The purpose of this article is to provide primary care physicians with a guide to some of the common issues that arise when caring for refugee patients.

  11. Interpreting the results of a modified gravity model: examining access to primary health care physicians in five Canadian provinces and territories

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary health care (PHC) encompasses an array of health and social services that focus on preventative, diagnostic, and basic care measures to maintain wellbeing and address illnesses. In Canada, PHC involves the provision of first-contact health care services by providers such as family physicians and general practitioners – collectively referred as PHC physicians here. Ensuring access is a key requirement of effective PHC delivery. This is because having access to PHC has been shown to positively impact a number of health outcomes. Methods We build on recent innovations in measuring potential spatial access to PHC physicians using geographic information systems (GIS) by running and then interpreting the findings of a modified gravity model. Elsewhere we have introduced the protocol for this model. In this article we run it for five selected Canadian provinces and territories. Our objectives are to present the results of the modified gravity model in order to: (1) understand how potential spatial access to PHC physicians can be interpreted in these Canadian jurisdictions, and (2) provide guidance regarding how findings of the modified gravity model should be interpreted in other analyses. Results Regarding the first objective, two distinct spatial patterns emerge regarding potential spatial access to PHC physicians in the five selected Canadian provinces: (1) a clear north–south pattern, where southern areas have greater potential spatial access than northern areas; and (2) while gradients of potential spatial access exist in and around urban areas, access outside of densely-to-moderately populated areas is fairly binary. Regarding the second objective, we identify three principles that others can use to interpret the findings of the modified gravity model when used in other research contexts. Conclusions Future applications of the modified gravity model are needed in order to refine the recommendations we provide on interpreting its results. It is

  12. ECHO Ontario Chronic Pain & Opioid Stewardship: Providing Access and Building Capacity for Primary Care Providers in Underserviced, Rural, and Remote Communities.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Ruth E; Flannery, John; Taenzer, Paul; Smith, Andrew; Smith, Karen; Fabico, Ralph; Zhao, Jane; Cameron, Lindsay; Chmelnitsky, Dana; Williams, Rob; Carlin, Leslie; Sidrak, Hannah; Arora, Sanjeev; Furlan, Andrea D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a prevalent and serious problem in the province of Ontario. Frontline primary care providers (PCPs) manage the majority of chronic pain patients, yet receive minimal training in chronic pain. ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) Ontario Chronic Pain & Opioid Stewardship aims to address the problem of chronic pain management in Ontario. This paper describes the development, operation, and evaluation of the ECHO Ontario Chronic Pain project. We discuss how ECHO increases PCP access and capacity to manage chronic pain, the development of a community of practice, as well as the limitations of our approach. The ECHO model is a promising approach for healthcare system improvement. ECHO's strength lies in its simplicity, adaptability, and use of existing telemedicine infrastructure to increase both access and capacity of PCPs in underserviced, rural, and remote communities.

  13. Health Care Access Among Deaf People.

    PubMed

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health knowledge for deaf people including those with even higher risk of marginalization. Examples of approaches to improve access to health care, such as providing powerful and visually accessible communication through the use of sign language, the implementation of important communication technologies, and cultural awareness trainings for health professionals are discussed. Programs that raise health knowledge in Deaf communities and models of primary health care centers for deaf people are also presented. Published documents can empower deaf people to realize their right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health.

  14. Learning from UK primary care.

    PubMed

    Hays, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The Australian Government is wise to examine other health care systems as it strives to improve the quality of care and address rising costs to both governments and individuals. Focus is currently on the United Kingdom, whose National Health Service (NHS) stands out as one that delivers good care at a reasonable price to all who need it. The Australian and UK systems have many similarities: universal access, tax payer support, no or low cost at point of delivery, and good population health outcomes. They also face similar pressures on services from aging, increasingly unwell yet expectant populations.However, there are also differences, largely in the way that health care is funded, organised and delivered. The NHS is a huge system for 60 million people in four home countries with diverging policies. Within England, the system is managed through 10 strategic health authorities, each responsible for about 5 million people and having the right to interpret national policy. Population based health care, including tertiary care, is funded locally via primary care trusts. PMID:19283244

  15. Integrating Palliative Care into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Rosemary D

    2016-09-01

    Improved quality of life, care consistent with patient goals of care, and decreased health care spending are benefits of palliative care. Palliative care is appropriate for anyone with a serious illness. Advances in technology and pharmaceuticals have resulted in increasing numbers of seriously ill individuals, many with a high symptom burden. The numbers of individuals who could benefit from palliative care far outweighs the number of palliative care specialists. To integrate palliative care into primary care it is essential that resources are available to improve generalist palliative care skills, identify appropriate patients and refer complex patients to specialist palliative care providers.

  16. Latino Adults’ Access to Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Zayas, Luis H.; Hansen, Marissa C.

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, epidemiological studies using state-of-the-art methodologies have documented the unmet mental health needs of Latinos adults in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This paper reviews 16 articles based on seven epidemiological studies, examines studies methodologies, and summarizes findings about how Latino adults access mental health services. Studies consistently report that, compared to non-Latino Whites, Latinos underutilize mental health services, are less likely to receive guideline congruent care, and rely more often on primary care for services. Structural, economic, psychiatric, and cultural factors influence Latinos’ service access. In spite of the valuable information these studies provide, methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs, scarcity of mixed Latino group samples) constrict knowledge about Latinos access to mental health services. Areas for future research and development needed to improve Latinos’ access and quality of mental health care are discussed. PMID:16598658

  17. Birth data accessibility via primary care health records to classify health status in a multi-ethnic population of children: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Rachel; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Stocks, Janet; Harding, Seeromanie; Wade, Angela; Griffiths, Chris; Sears, David; Fothergill, Helen; Slevin, Hannah; Lum, Sooky

    2015-01-01

    Background: Access to reliable birth data (birthweight (BW) and gestational age (GA)) is essential for the identification of individuals who are at subsequent health risk. Aims: This study aimed to explore the feasibility of retrospectively collecting birth data for schoolchildren from parental questionnaires (PQ) and general practitioners (GPs) in primary care clinics, in inner city neighbourhoods with high density of ethnic minority and disadvantaged populations. Methods: Attempts were made to obtain birth data from parents and GPs for 2,171 London primary schoolchildren (34% White, 29% Black African origin, 25% South Asians, 12% Other) as part of a larger study of respiratory health. Results: Information on BW and/or GA were obtained from parents for 2,052 (95%) children. Almost all parents (2,045) gave consent to access their children’s health records held by GPs. On the basis of parental information, GPs of 1,785 children were successfully contacted, and GPs of 1,202 children responded. Birth data were retrieved for only 482 children (22% of 2,052). Missing birth data from GPs were associated with non-white ethnicity, non-UK born, English not the dominant language at home or socioeconomic disadvantage. Paired data were available in 376 children for BW and in 407 children for GA. No significant difference in BW or GA was observed between PQ and GP data, with <5% difference between sources regardless of normal or low birth weight, or term or preterm status. Conclusions: Parental recall of birth data for primary schoolchildren yields high quality and rapid return of data, and it should be considered as a viable alternative in which there is limited access to birth records. It provides the potential to include children with an increased risk of health problems within epidemiological studies. PMID:25612149

  18. What Is Primary Care Informatics?

    PubMed Central

    de Lusignan, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Primary care informatics is an emerging academic discipline that remains undefined. The unique nature of primary care necessitates the development of its own informatics discipline. A definition of primary care informatics is proposed, which encompasses the distinctive nature of primary care. The core concepts and theory that should underpin it are described. Primary care informatics is defined as a science and as a subset of health informatics. The proposed definition is intended to focus the development of a generalizable core theory for this informatics subspecialty. PMID:12668690

  19. Homelessness: a problem for primary care?

    PubMed

    Riley, Anthony J; Harding, Geoffrey; Underwood, Martin R; Carter, Yvonne H

    2003-06-01

    Homelessness is a social problem that affects all facets of contemporary society. This paper discusses the concept of homelessness in terms of its historical context and the dominance of the pervasive 'victim blaming' ideologies, which, together with the worldwide economic changes that have contributed to a fiscal crisis of the state, and the resultant policies and circumstances, have led to an increase in the number of 'new homeless' people. This paper attempts to challenge the dominant political discourse on homelessness. The widespread healthcare problems and heterogeneity of homeless people have a particular impact on health services, with many homeless people inappropriately accessing local accident and emergency (A&E) departments because of barriers inhibiting adequate access to primary care. A number of primary care schemes have been successfully implemented to enable the homeless to have better access to appropriate care. However, there is no consistency in the level of services around the United Kingdom (UK), and innovations in service are not widespread and by their nature they are ad hoc. Despite the successes of such schemes, many homeless people still access health care inappropriately. Until homeless people are fully integrated into primary care the situation will not change. The question remains, how can appropriate access be established? A start can be made by building on some of the positive work that is already being done in primary care, but in reality general practitioners (GPs) will be 'swimming against the tide' unless a more integrated policy approach is adopted to tackle homelessness. PMID:12939894

  20. Primary care and public emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed Central

    Grumbach, K; Keane, D; Bindman, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Our objective was to evaluate whether referral to primary care settings would be clinically appropriate for and acceptable to patients waiting for emergency department care for nonemergency conditions. METHODS. We studied 700 patients waiting for emergency department care at a public hospital. Access to alternative sources of medical care, clinical appropriateness of emergency department use, and patients' willingness to use nonemergency services were measured and compared between patients with and without a regular source of care. RESULTS. Nearly half (45%) of the patients cited access barriers to primary care as their reason for using the emergency department. Only 13% of the patients waiting for care had conditions that were clinically appropriate for emergency department services. Patients with a regular source of care used the emergency department more appropriately than did patients without a regular source of care. Thirty-eight percent of the patients expressed a willingness to trade their emergency department visit for an appointment with a physician within 3 days. CONCLUSIONS. Public emergency departments could refer large numbers of patients to appointments at primary care facilities. This alternative would be viable only if the availability and coordination of primary care services were enhanced for low-income populations. PMID:8438975

  1. Social capital and access to primary health care in developing countries: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Hollard, Guillaume; Sene, Omar

    2016-01-01

    We test for a causal role of social capital, as measured by self-reported trust, in determining access to basic health facilities in Sub-Saharan Africa. To skirt the reverse-causality problems between social capital and basic health, we rely on instrumental-variable (IV) estimates. A one standard-deviation increase in trust is predicted to lead to a 0.22 standard-deviation fall in doctor absenteeism, a 0.31 standard-deviation fall in waiting time and a 0.30 standard-deviation fall in bribes. As a robustness check, we also use a different database regarding a different health issue, access to clean water. We find that a one standard-deviation rise in trust leads to a 0.33 standard-deviation rise in access to clean water. The variety of public goods considered provides insights about the possible channels through which social capital is converted into health improvements.

  2. Improving Access to Primary Care for a Growing Latino Population: The Role of Safety Net Providers in the Rural Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blewett, Lynn A.; Casey, Michelle; Call, Kathleen Thiede

    2004-01-01

    Many rural Midwestern communities are experiencing rapid growth in Latino populations with low rates of health insurance coverage, limited financial resources, language and cultural differences, and special health care needs. We report on 2-day site visits conducted in 2001 and 2002 in 3 communities (Marshalltown, Iowa; Great Bend, Kansas; and…

  3. Primary health care models

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Methods Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Main findings Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowledge was generally obtained from practical experiences rather than classroom learning; students could identify both advantages and disadvantages of working within the new PHC models; and although students regarded the new PHC models positively, these models did not influence their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Conclusion Knowledge of the new PHC models varies among fourth-year students, indicating a need for improved education strategies in the years before clinical training. Being able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the PHC models was not enough to influence participants’ choice of specialty. Educators and health care policy makers need to determine the best methods to promote and facilitate knowledge transfer about these PHC models. PMID:22518904

  4. Rural health care: redefining access.

    PubMed

    Collins, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The population and demographics of rural America are shifting once again. As our nation's unprecedented health care reform unfolds, it is becoming clear that rural communities have unique strengths, and capitalizing on these strengths can position them well for this health care transformation. Equally important are the distinct challenges that--with careful planning, attention, and resources--can be transformed into opportunities to thrive in the new health care environment. The North Carolina Institute of Medicine's Task Force on Rural Health recently published a report that highlights the strengths and challenges of rural communities [1]. In order to fully leverage these opportunities, we must continue to acknowledge the fundamental importance of access to basic health care, while also broadening our discussion to collectively tackle the additional components necessary to create healthy, thriving rural communities. As we reexamine the needs of rural communities, we should broaden our discussions to include an expansion of the types of access that are necessary for strengthening rural health. Collaboration, successful recruitment and retention, availability of specialty services, quality care, and cost effectiveness are some of the issues that must come into discussions about access to services. With this in mind, this issue of the NCMJ explores opportunities to strengthen the health of North Carolina's rural communities. PMID:25621473

  5. Primary care teams: New Zealand's experience with community-governed non-profit primary care.

    PubMed

    Crampton, Peter; Davis, Peter; Lay-Yee, Roy

    2005-05-01

    Community-governed non-profit primary care organisations started developing in New Zealand in the late 1980s with the aim to reduce financial, cultural and geographical barriers to access. New Zealand's new primary health care strategy aims to co-ordinate primary care and public health strategies with the overall objective of improving population health and reducing health inequalities. The purpose of this study is to carry out a detailed examination of the composition and characteristics of primary care teams in community-governed non-profit practices and compare them with more traditional primary care organisations, with the aim of drawing conclusions about the capacity of the different structures to carry out population-based primary care. The study used data from a representative national cross-sectional survey of general practitioners in New Zealand (2001/2002). Primary care teams were largest and most heterogeneous in community-governed non-profit practices, which employed about 3% of the county's general practitioners. Next most heterogeneous in terms of their primary care teams were practices that belonged to an Independent Practitioner Association, which employed the majority of the country's general practitioners (71.7%). Even though in absolute and relative terms the community-governed non-profit primary care sector is small, by providing a much needed element of professional and organisational pluralism and by experimenting with more diverse staffing arrangements, it is likely to continue to have an influence on primary care policy development in New Zealand.

  6. [Primary care in the United Kingdom].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-03-01

    The inadequate planning of health professionals in Spain has boosted the way out of doctors overseas. The United Kingdom is one of the countries chosen by Spanish doctors to develop their job. The National Health Service is a health system similar to the Spanish one. Health care services are financing mainly through taxes. The right to health care is linked to the citizen condition. The provision of health care is a mix-up of public and private enterprises. Primary Care is much closed to Spanish Primary Care. Doctors are "self-employed like" professionals. They can set their surgeries in a free area previously designed by the government. They have the right to make their own team and to manage their own budget. Medical salary is linked to professional capability and curriculum vitae. The main role of a General Practitioner is the prevention. Team work and coordination within primary and specialised care is more developed than in Spain. The access to diagnostic tests and to the specialist is controlled through waiting lists. General Practitioners work as gate-keepers. Patients may choose freely their doctor and consultations and hospital care are free at the point of use. Within the United Kingdom there are also health regions with problems due to inequalities to access and to treatment. There is a training path and the access to it is by Curricula. The number of training jobs is regulated by the local needs. Continuing education is compulsory and strictly regulated local and nationally. The National Health Service was the example for the Spanish health reform in 1986. While Spanish Primary health care is of quality, the efficiency of the health system would improve if staff in Primary Care settings were managed in a similar way to the British's.

  7. Slums’ Access to and Coverage of Primary Health Care Services: A Cross-Sectional Study in Shiraz, a Metropolis in Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Joulaei, Hassan; Bhuiyan, Azad R; Sayadi, Mehrab; Morady, Fariba; Afsar Kazerooni, Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The United Nations has predicted that the population of slum dwellers will have grown from one billion people worldwide to 2 billion by 2030. This trend is also predictable in Iran. In the Iranian metropolis of Shiraz, more than 10% of the residents live in slum areas. There are several problems regarding the delivery of social services in these areas. The aim of this study was to evaluate slums dwellers’ access to and coverage of health care. Methods: This cross-sectional face-to-face study included 380 household of slum dwellers via stratified random sampling. Demographics, accessibility of health services, coverage of health care, and route of receiving health services were recorded through interviews. Results: Approximately, 21.6% of the households had no physical access to health centers. The coverage rate of family planning programs for safe methods was 51.4% (95% CI: 48.86-53.9%). Vaccination coverage among children under 5 years old was 98% (95% CI: 97-99%). Furthermore, 34% of pregnant women had not received standard health care due to a lack of access to health centers. Conclusion: Limited access to health services along with inadequate knowledge of slum residents about health care facilities was the main barrier to the utilization of the health care in the slums. PMID:24753641

  8. A randomised controlled non-inferiority trial of primary care-based facilitated access to an alcohol reduction website (EFAR Spain): the study protocol

    PubMed Central

    López-Pelayo, Hugo; Wallace, Paul; Segura, Lidia; Miquel, Laia; Díaz, Estela; Teixidó, Lidia; Baena, Begoña; Struzzo, Pierliugio; Palacio-Vieira, Jorge; Casajuana, Cristina; Colom, Joan; Gual, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Early identification (EI) and brief interventions (BIs) for risky drinkers are effective tools in primary care. Lack of time in daily practice has been identified as one of the main barriers to implementation of BI. There is growing evidence that facilitated access by primary healthcare professionals (PHCPs) to a web-based BI can be a time-saving alternative to standard face-to-face BIs, but there is as yet no evidence about the effectiveness of this approach relative to conventional BI. The main aim of this study is to test non-inferiority of facilitation to a web-based BI for risky drinkers delivered by PHCP against face-to-face BI. Method and analysis A randomised controlled non-inferiority trial comparing both interventions will be performed in primary care health centres in Catalonia, Spain. Unselected adult patients attending participating centres will be given a leaflet inviting them to log on to a website to complete the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C) alcohol screening questionnaire. Participants with positive results will be requested online to complete a trial module including consent, baseline assessment and randomisation to either face-to-face BI by the practitioner or BI via the alcohol reduction website. Follow-up assessment of risky drinking will be undertaken online at 3 months and 1 year using the full AUDIT and D5-EQD5 scale. Proportions of risky drinkers in each group will be calculated and non-inferiority assessed against a specified margin of 10%. Assuming reduction of 30% of risky drinkers receiving standard intervention, 1000 patients will be required to give 90% power to reject the null hypothesis. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Ethics Commmittee of IDIAP Jordi Gol i Gurina P14/028. The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conference presentations. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02082990. PMID

  9. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  10. What is quality primary dental care?

    PubMed

    Campbell, S; Tickle, M

    2013-08-01

    In the first paper of a series exploring quality in primary dental care a definition for quality in dentistry is sought. There is a little agreement in academic literature as to what quality really means in primary dental care and without a true understanding it is difficult to measure and improve quality in a systematic way. 'Quality' of healthcare in dentistry will mean different things to practitioners, policy makers and patients but a framework could be modelled on other definitions within different healthcare sectors, with focus on access, equity and overall healthcare experience.

  11. Primary care psychiatry in Italy.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Domenico; Ferrannini, Luigi; Menchetti, Marco; Vaggi, Marco

    2014-06-01

    In Italy, the importance of integrating primary care and mental health has only recently been grasped. Several reasons may explain this delay: a) until 2005, primary care physicians worked individually instead of in group practices, without any functional network or structured contacts with colleagues; b) community mental health centers with multiprofessional teams were well structured and widespread in several regions but focused on people with severe and persistent mental disorders; and c) specific national government health policies were lacking. Only two regions have implemented explicit policies on this issue. The "G. Leggieri" program started by the Emilia-Romagna region health government in 1999 aims to coordinate unsolicited bottom-up cooperation initiatives developing since the 1980s. In Liguria, a regional work group was established in 2010 to boost the strategic role of collaborative programs between primary care and mental health services. This article describes the most innovative experiences relating to primary care psychiatry in Italy.

  12. Parents’ role in adolescent depression care: primary care provider perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Radovic, Ana; Reynolds, Kerry; McCauley, Heather L.; Sucato, Gina S.; Stein, Bradley D.; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand how primary care providers (PCPs) perceive barriers to adolescent depression care to inform strategies to increase treatment engagement. Study design We conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 PCPs recruited from community pediatric offices with access to integrated behavioral health services (i.e., low system-level barriers to care) who participated in a larger study on treating adolescent depression. Interviews addressed PCP perceptions of barriers to adolescents’ uptake of care for depression. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for key themes. Results Although PCPs mentioned several adolescent barriers to care, they thought parents played a critical role in assisting adolescents in accessing mental health services. Important aspects of the parental role in accessing treatment included transportation, financial support, and social support. PCP’s perceived that parental unwillingness to accept the depression diagnosis, family dysfunction and trauma were common barriers. PCPs contrasted this with examples of good family support they believed would enable adolescents to attend follow-up appointments and have a “life coach” at home to help monitor for side effects and watch for increased suicidality when starting antidepressants. Conclusions In this PCP population, which had enhanced access to mental health specialists, PCPs primarily reported attitudinal barriers to adolescent depression treatment, focusing mainly on perceived parent barriers. The results of these qualitative interviews provide a framework for understanding PCP perceptions of parental barriers to care, identifying that addressing complex parental barriers to care may be important for future interventions. PMID:26143382

  13. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePlus

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... A PCP is your main health care provider in non-emergency ... and teach healthy lifestyle choices Identify and treat common ...

  14. Access to care save lives.

    PubMed

    Blaney, C L

    1994-02-01

    Emergency treatment of such major complications of pregnancy as obstructed labor, hemorrhage, infection, hypertension disorders, and the effects of unsafe abortion, helps ameliorate morbidity and prevent mortality. Access to life-saving treatment (e.g., antibiotics, Cesarean sections, and blood transfusions) in developing countries is limited. Maternal mortality in one area of The Gambia, for example, is 2200 per 100,000 births. Improving access to care depends upon the availability of these services in communities, trained health personnel, service improvements, transportation provision, and community education. Detection of complications and early referral to an appropriate facility with a supportive and professional environment is key to saving lives. Political will and public pressure are needed before improvement in services can be successfully accomplished; politicians may ignore women with low status. Barriers to care are physical, cultural, technical, and economic. Cost or distance from home may prevent women from seeking care. Infection, hemorrhage, and uterine injury are frequently related to unsafe abortions, particularly among teenage women. Hospitals must be equipped with a reliable management system, surgical facilities, and clinical services. The WHO recommends upgrading community health centers with trained personnel, adequate supervision, and equipment. In Uganda, midwives are specially trained in advanced skills for use in remote areas: administration of oxytocin to evacuate the uterus and reduce bleeding, use of antibiotics for infections, and surgical repair of vaginal tears. Nurses in Zaire are trained to do Cesarean sections. In Sierra Leone and Nigeria, doctors are encouraged to receive training in obstetrics and to be posted in rural areas. In Sierra Leone, young men are trained to bring pregnant women in to care on stretchers. Maternity waiting homes near hospitals are another means to save lives. Lack of permission from a male relative may

  15. Evaluation of spatial accessibility to primary healthcare using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtsho, S.; Corner, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    Primary health care is considered to be one of the most important aspects of the health care system in any country, which directly helps in improving the health of the population. Potential spatial accessibility is a very important component of the primary health care system. One technique for studying spatial accessibility is by computing a gravity-based measure within a geographic information system (GIS) framework. In this study, straight-line distances between the associated population clusters and the health facilities and the provider-to-population ratio were used to compute the spatial accessibility of the population clusters for the whole country. Bhutan has been chosen as the case study area because it is quite easy to acquire and process data for the whole country due to its small size and population. The spatial accessibility measure of the 203 sub-districts shows noticeable disparities in health care accessibility in this country with about only 19 sub-districts achieving good health accessibility ranking. This study also examines a number of different health accessibility policy scenarios which can assist in identifying the most effective health policy from amongst many probable planning scenarios. Such a health accessibility measuring system can be incorporated into an existing spatial health system in developing countries to facilitate the proper planning and equitable distribution of health resources.

  16. Assessment, authorization and access to medicaid managed mental health care.

    PubMed

    Masland, Mary C; Snowden, Lonnie R; Wallace, Neal T

    2007-11-01

    Examined were effects on access of managed care assessment and authorization processes in California's 57 county mental health plans. Primary data on managed care implementation were collected from surveys of county plan administrators; secondary data were from Medicaid claims and enrollment files. Using multivariate fixed effects regression, we found that following implementation of managed care, greater access occurred in county plans where assessments and treatment were performed by the same clinician, and where service authorizations were made more rapidly. Lower access occurred in county plans where treating clinicians authorized services themselves. Results confirm the significant effects of managed care processes on outcomes and highlight the importance of system capacity.

  17. Developing a neighborhood primary care strategy.

    PubMed

    Halley, Marc D; Montijo, Sarah D; Gentz, Dale L; Miro, Lauri M

    2015-11-01

    For building and maintaining a primary care workforce to staff an integrated care delivery strategy, considerations include: > Geographic presence > Patient care modeling > Professional staffing. PMID:26685439

  18. Managed care can be better care for all citizens: a primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Bartholow, T

    1997-01-01

    The CPN seeks to enhance the care of patients by judicious expenditure of health care dollars, currently for the Unit "Community" Network, but ultimately also for other insurers who would enter risk-sharing relationships with the CPN. Improvements in health care delivery will be made in enhanced access to primary care, including telephone access to nurse triage; in collaboration and communication between the selected consultant and the referring primary care giver, including an electronic network allowing for selected information sharing; and in renewing medicine's collective commitment to care provided as close to home as possible, or in the home if this is the highest quality. The care of the uninsured remains a challenge and a normal obligation from which the CPN does not shrink. The economic realities of primary care delivery must be improved, with additional resources allocated being substantially rededicated to patient care. The patient's control of the selection of the site of health care and the absence of incentives to their primary care provider for a referral pattern different than the patient's choice will remain important to the CPN. The CPN hopes to provide the diplomacy between third party payers to enhance collaboration and minimize competition in the delivery of care in communities.

  19. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  20. Primary medical care in Seychelles.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, F M; Shamlaye, C

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes some of the current health problems faced by a tropical country whose standard of living and lifestyle is approaching that of many countries in Western Europe. Long-term health problems such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes have become at least as important as infectious diseases. A change in approach to a more proactive style of primary care is needed to allow the contribution of community doctors to be effective. The system of primary care in the Republic of Seychelles is based on the UK model of general practice where recent improvements in education and organization are raising standards. How some of these improvements might be transferred elsewhere is discussed.

  1. Critical Care in Critical Access Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Seright, Teresa J; Winters, Charlene A

    2015-10-01

    What began as a grant-funded demonstration project, as a means of bridging the gap in rural health care, has developed into a critical access hospital system comprising 1328 facilities across 45 states. A critical access hospital is not just a safety net for health care in a rural community. Such hospitals may also provide specialized services such as same-day surgery, infusion therapy, and intensive care. For hospitals located near the required minimum of 35 miles from a tertiary care center, management of critically ill patients may be a matter of stabilization and transfer. Critical access hospitals in more rural areas are often much farther from tertiary care; some of these hospitals are situated within frontier areas of the United States. This article describes the development of critical access hospitals, provision of care and services, challenges to critical care in critical access hospitals, and suggestions to address gaps in research and collaborative care.

  2. Serious mental illness and the role of primary care.

    PubMed

    Planner, Claire; Gask, Linda; Reilly, Siobhan

    2014-08-01

    Policies and guidelines from across the international community are attempting to galvanise action to address the unacceptably high morbidity and mortality rates amongst people with a serious mental illness (SMI). Primary care has a pivotal role to play in translating policy into evidence based practice in conjunction with other providers of health care services. This paper explores the current and potential of role of primary care providers in delivering health care to people with SMI. A review of research in the following key areas of primary health care provision is provided: access, screening and preventative care, routine monitoring and follow-up, diagnosis and delivery of treatments in accordance with guidelines and delivery of interventions. There is undoubtedly a need for further research to establish the effectiveness of primary care interventions and the organisation of services. Equally, understanding how primary care services can deliver high quality care and promoting effective working at the interface with other services must be priorities.

  3. Marketplace reforms and primary care career decisions.

    PubMed

    Retchin, S M; Boling, P A; Nettleman, M D; Mick, S S

    2001-04-01

    A dramatic shift in the postgraduate career choices of medical school graduates toward primary care occurred during the mid-1990s. While some attributed this shift to changes in medical school curricula, perceptions stemming from marketplace reforms were probably responsible. For the most part, these perceptions were probably generated through informal communications among medical students and through the media. More recently, additional marketplace influences, such as the consumer backlash toward managed care and unrealized gains in primary care physicians' personal incomes, may have fostered contrasting perceptions among medical students, leading to career choices away from primary care, particularly family practice. The authors offer two recommendations for enhancing the knowledge of medical students concerning workforce supply and career opportunities: an educational seminar in the second or third year of medical school, and a public-private partnership between the Bureau of Health Professions and the Association of American Medical Colleges to create a national database about the shape of the primary care and specialty workforces, accessible through the Internet for educators, students, and policymakers. The authors conclude that appropriate career counseling through these efficient methods could avoid future abrupt swings in specialty choices of medical school graduates and may facilitate a more predictable physician workforce supply. PMID:11299142

  4. Primary care: can it solve employers' health care dilemma?

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Martin-J; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Grundy, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Employers are beginning to recognize that investing in the primary care foundation of the health care system may help address their problems of rising health care costs and uneven quality. Primary care faces a crisis as a growing number of U.S. medical graduates are avoiding primary care careers because of relatively low reimbursement and an unsatisfying work life. Yet a strong primary care sector has been associated with reduced health care costs and improved quality. Through the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative and other efforts, some large employers are engaged in initiatives to strengthen primary care. PMID:18180490

  5. Incorporating Spirituality in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Kathleen S; Hay, Jennifer L; Lubetkin, Erica I

    2016-06-01

    Addressing cultural competency in health care involves recognizing the diverse characteristics of the patient population and understanding how they impact patient care. Spirituality is an aspect of cultural identity that has become increasingly recognized for its potential to impact health behaviors and healthcare decision-making. We consider the complex relationship between spirituality and health, exploring the role of spirituality in primary care, and consider the inclusion of spirituality in existing models of health promotion. We discuss the feasibility of incorporating spirituality into clinical practice, offering suggestions for physicians. PMID:26832335

  6. Treating impetigo in primary care.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Impetigo is a superficial, but contagious, bacterial infection of the skin that predominantly affects children and is common in primary care. In UK general practice, around half of the people with impetigo are treated with topical fusidic acid. However, bacterial resistance to this antibacterial drug is increasing. Here we discuss how patients with impetigo should be treated.

  7. Primary care for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D C

    1999-05-01

    People with disabilities are a unique population. Although there have been great advances in their care, access to reliable and consistent primary health care remains a difficult issue for many of these patients after discharge from medical rehabilitation units. Many of these health care needs are not unique to this patient population, but become compounded or exacerbated in people with disabilities. The effects of physical impairments on these patients' health need to be recognized. Specific attention must be paid to prevent the occurrence of secondary disabilities, which can drastically affect their independence. Ultimately, proper attention to the health care needs of people with disabilities will result in greater independence and improved health among this population.

  8. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  9. The barriers to accessing primary care resulting in hospital presentation for exacerbation of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a large teaching hospital in London.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Marium; Khachi, Hasanin

    2016-08-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) account direct costs of £1 billion each per year in the United Kingdom (UK). A national review of asthma deaths found that a significant proportion of patients die without seeking medical assistance or before emergency medical care could be provided. This study aims to establish the pathway that patients undertake to access care in the lead up to an accident and emergency (A&E) attendance and/or inpatient admission. Patients attending A&E and/or following an inpatient admission due to an exacerbation of asthma or COPD were reviewed by a specialist respiratory pharmacist during weekday working hours. Over a one-year period, 920 (224 asthma and 696 COPD) presentations for exacerbation of asthma and COPD were reviewed. Although the majority of the patients were registered with a general practitioner (GP), less than 50% received medical attention from their GP and/or had an active intervention prior to presenting to hospital. These findings correlate with those found in the national review of asthma deaths. At a time of increasing demands on healthcare resources, these results pose the question of how we can better triage patients to appropriate care settings to minimise unscheduled care and improve patient outcomes. PMID:27492527

  10. Primary care of adults with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, William F.; Berg, Joseph M.; Bradley, Elspeth; Cheetham, Tom; Denton, Richard; Heng, John; Hennen, Brian; Joyce, David; Kelly, Maureen; Korossy, Marika; Lunsky, Yona; McMillan, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To update the 2006 Canadian guidelines for primary care of adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and to make practical recommendations based on current knowledge to address the particular health issues of adults with DD. Quality of evidence Knowledgeable health care providers participating in a colloquium and a subsequent working group discussed and agreed on revisions to the 2006 guidelines based on a comprehensive review of publications, feedback gained from users of the guidelines, and personal clinical experiences. Most of the available evidence in this area of care is from expert opinion or published consensus statements (level III). Main message Adults with DD have complex health issues, many of them differing from those of the general population. Good primary care identifies the particular health issues faced by adults with DD to improve their quality of life, to improve their access to health care, and to prevent suffering, morbidity, and premature death. These guidelines synthesize general, physical, behavioural, and mental health issues of adults with DD that primary care providers should be aware of, and they present recommendations for screening and management based on current knowledge that practitioners can apply. Because of interacting biologic, psychoaffective, and social factors that contribute to the health and well-being of adults with DD, these guidelines emphasize involving caregivers, adapting procedures when appropriate, and seeking input from a range of health professionals when available. Ethical care is also emphasized. The guidelines are formulated within an ethical framework that pays attention to issues such as informed consent and the assessment of health benefits in relation to risks of harm. Conclusion Implementation of the guidelines proposed here would improve the health of adults with DD and would minimize disparities in health and health care between adults with DD and those in the general population

  11. Education in the Wake of Healthcare Reform: Increasing Primary Care Usage by Individuals Currently Reliant upon Emergency Departments for Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannebaum, Michael; Wilkin, Holley A.; Keys, Jobia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was introduced, in part, to increase access to primary care, which has been shown to provide patients with myriad health benefits. Objective: To increase primary care usage by understanding the beliefs about primary and emergency care most salient to those whose healthcare-seeking practices may be impacted…

  12. 'Excuse me, do any of you ladies speak English?' Perspectives of refugee women living in South Australia: barriers to accessing primary health care and achieving the Quality Use of Medicines.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alice; Gilbert, Andrew; Rao, Deepa; Kerr, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Reforms to the Australian health system aim to ensure that services are accessible, clinically and culturally appropriate, timely and affordable. During the reform consultation process there were urgent calls from stakeholders to specifically consider the health needs of the thousands of refugees who settle here each year, but little is known about what is needed from the refugee perspective. Access to health services is a basic requirement of achieving the quality use of medicines, as outlined in Australia's National Medicines Policy. This study aimed to identify the barriers to accessing primary health care services and explore medicine-related issues as experienced by refugee women in South Australia. Thirty-six women participated in focus groups with accredited and community interpreters and participants were from Sudan, Burundi, Congo, Burma, Afghanistan and Bhutan who spoke English (as a second language), Chin, Matu, Dari and Nepali. The main barrier to accessing primary health care and understanding GPs and pharmacists was not being able to speak or comprehend English. Interpreter services were used inconsistently or not at all. To implement the health reforms and achieve the quality use of medicines, refugees, support organisations, GPs, pharmacists and their staff require education, training and support.

  13. Primary-care physician compensation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Arik

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews existing models of physician compensation and presents information about current compensation patterns for primary-care physicians in the United States. Theories of work motivation are reviewed where they have relevance to the desired outcome of satisfied, productive physicians whose skills and expertise are retained in the workforce. Healthcare reforms that purport to bring accountability for healthcare quality and value-rather than simply volume-bring opportunities to redesign primary-care physician compensation and may allow for new compensation methodologies that increase job satisfaction. Physicians are increasingly shunning the responsibility of private practice and choosing to work as employees of a larger organization, often a hospital. Employers of physicians are seeking compensation models that reward both productivity and value. PMID:22786738

  14. Primary and secondary care integration.

    PubMed

    McCormick, I R; Boyd, M A

    1994-10-26

    Integration of primary and secondary health care is a goal of the 1993 New Zealand health reforms. Focus groups were selected to raise options and stimulate improved integration between primary and secondary care in the Auckland metropolitan and rural areas. Cooperation, communication, coordination, were considered relevant. Several detailed recommendations were produced. They fell into six groups; (1) liaison committees or meetings, (2) communication, (3) referral admission discharge, (4) joint ventures, (5) horizontal integration and (6) general. A key recommendation was that regional health authorities should fund liaison committees or functions to promote inter provider integration. The findings of the focus groups are placed in context of the wider requirements for integration. These are integrated funding, integrated information systems, integrated purchasing and utilisation management.

  15. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  16. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health.…

  17. Measuring the Attainment of Primary Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starfield, Barbara

    1979-01-01

    The definition of primary care is developed and a way is suggested to measure whether it is being achieved. Evaluative questions are identified that can determine whether a system of care is oriented toward primary care. They include assessing first-contact care, coordination of care, comprehensiveness, and longitudinality. (LBH)

  18. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education.

    PubMed

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students. PMID:27347257

  19. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education.

    PubMed

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students.

  20. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education

    PubMed Central

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students. PMID:27347257

  1. Unregulated access to health-care services is associated with overutilization--lessons from Austria.

    PubMed

    Pichlhöfer, Otto; Maier, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    The Austrian health-care system is characterized by free provider choice and uncontrolled access to all levels of care. Using primary data, the ECOHCARE study shows that hospitalization rates for the secondary and tertiary care levels in Austria are both 4.4 times higher than those reported from the USA using a similar methodology. At the same time, essential functions of the primary care sector are weak. We propose that regulating access to secondary and tertiary care and restricting free provider choice to the primary care level would both reverse over utilization and strengthen the primary care sector.

  2. Access to mental health in primary care: a qualitative meta-synthesis of evidence from the experience of people from 'hard to reach' groups.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Jonathan; Bower, Peter; Rogers, Anne; Dowrick, Christopher; Gask, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge about depression, access and help-seeking has increasingly been influenced from a range of disciplines including clinical and applied social science. A range of interventions can improve outcomes of depression and anxiety. However, many in need do not seek help, or their interaction with care-givers does not address their needs. We carried out a systematic search for qualitative articles focusing on the experiences of eight exemplar groups with exceptional problems in access (the homeless, long-term unemployed, adolescents with eating disorders, depressed elderly people, advanced cancer sufferers, patients with medically unexplained symptoms, asylum seekers and people from black and minority ethnic groups). Twenty articles representing these groups were selected, findings were then developed using qualitative meta-synthesis, this suggested a range of mechanisms accounting for poor access among these groups. Many regarded their mental health problems as rooted in social problems and employed a variety of self-management strategies to maintain function. These strategies could involve social withdrawal, focusing available resources on close family relationships and work roles. Over-investment in these roles could result in a sense of insecurity as wider networks were neglected. Material disadvantage affected both the resources people could bring to performing social roles and influenced help-seeking. A tacit understanding of the material, psychological and social 'costs' of engagement by patients and health professionals could influence decisions to seek and offer help. These costs were felt to be proportionally higher in deprived, marginalized and minority communities, where individual resources are limited and the stigma attached to mental ill-health is high.

  3. Reducing the health care burden for marginalised migrants: The potential role for primary care in Europe.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Catherine Agnes; Burns, Nicola; Mair, Frances Susanne; Dowrick, Christopher; Clissmann, Ciaran; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn; Lionis, Christos; Papadakaki, Maria; Saridaki, Aristoula; de Brun, Tomas; MacFarlane, Anne

    2016-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the health of migrants worldwide. Migrants, particularly those in marginalised situations, face significant barriers and inequities in entitlement and access to high quality health care. This study aimed to explore the potential role of primary care in mitigating such barriers and identify ways in which health care policies and systems can influence the ability of primary care to meet the needs of vulnerable and marginalised migrants. The study compared routinely available country-level data on health system structure and financing, policy support for language and communication, and barriers and facilitators to health care access reported in the published literature. These were then mapped to a framework of primary care systems to identify where the key features mitigating or amplifying barriers to access lay. Reflecting on the data generated, we argue that culturally-sensitive primary care can play a key role in delivering accessible, high-quality care to migrants in vulnerable situations. Policymakers and practitioners need to appreciate that both individual patient capacity, and the way health care systems are configured and funded, can constrain access to care and have a negative impact on the quality of care that practitioners can provide to such populations. Strategies to address these issues, from the level of policy through to practice, are urgently needed.

  4. Reducing the health care burden for marginalised migrants: The potential role for primary care in Europe.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Catherine Agnes; Burns, Nicola; Mair, Frances Susanne; Dowrick, Christopher; Clissmann, Ciaran; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn; Lionis, Christos; Papadakaki, Maria; Saridaki, Aristoula; de Brun, Tomas; MacFarlane, Anne

    2016-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the health of migrants worldwide. Migrants, particularly those in marginalised situations, face significant barriers and inequities in entitlement and access to high quality health care. This study aimed to explore the potential role of primary care in mitigating such barriers and identify ways in which health care policies and systems can influence the ability of primary care to meet the needs of vulnerable and marginalised migrants. The study compared routinely available country-level data on health system structure and financing, policy support for language and communication, and barriers and facilitators to health care access reported in the published literature. These were then mapped to a framework of primary care systems to identify where the key features mitigating or amplifying barriers to access lay. Reflecting on the data generated, we argue that culturally-sensitive primary care can play a key role in delivering accessible, high-quality care to migrants in vulnerable situations. Policymakers and practitioners need to appreciate that both individual patient capacity, and the way health care systems are configured and funded, can constrain access to care and have a negative impact on the quality of care that practitioners can provide to such populations. Strategies to address these issues, from the level of policy through to practice, are urgently needed. PMID:27080344

  5. The 10 Building Blocks of High-Performing Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Bodenheimer, Thomas; Ghorob, Amireh; Willard-Grace, Rachel; Grumbach, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Our experiences studying exemplar primary care practices, and our work assisting other practices to become more patient centered, led to a formulation of the essential elements of primary care, which we call the 10 building blocks of high-performing primary care. The building blocks include 4 foundational elements—engaged leadership, data-driven improvement, empanelment, and team-based care—that assist the implementation of the other 6 building blocks—patient-team partnership, population management, continuity of care, prompt access to care, comprehensiveness and care coordination, and a template of the future. The building blocks, which represent a synthesis of the innovative thinking that is transforming primary care in the United States, are both a description of existing high-performing practices and a model for improvement. PMID:24615313

  6. Cancer genetics in primary care.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kent D; Evans, James P

    2003-11-01

    Primary care physicians are in a unique position to apply recent advances in cancer genetics to the improved care of their patients. Although the impact of our burgeoning knowledge in this area is significant and growing, it is often incompletely understood by the general practitioner. In this article we review the genetic basis of cancer and focus attention on inherited forms of cancer using breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer gene 2 (BRCA2) as examples. Specific attributes of family and personal history are the most significant indicators of an increased risk of cancer in the individual patient. Genetic testing can be used to further assess risk and guide strategies for cancer screening, prevention, and treatment. However, the decision of whether to pursue genetic testing and the interpretation of results are complex. We review factors involved in these decisions as well as the implications, risks, and benefits of genetic testing for the individual and the family.

  7. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2016-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children’s health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children’s health. Nonetheless, they find that, on the whole, policies to improve access indeed improve children’s health, with the caveat that context plays a big role—medical care “matters more at some times, or for some children, than others.” Focusing on studies that can plausibly show a causal effect between policies to increase access and better health for children, and starting from an economic framework, they consider both the demand for and the supply of health care. On the demand side, they examine what happens when the government expands public insurance programs (such as Medicaid), or when parents are offered financial incentives to take their children to preventive appointments. On the supply side, they look at what happens when public insurance programs increase the payments that they offer to health-care providers, or when health-care providers are placed directly in schools where children spend their days. They also examine how the Affordable Care Act is likely to affect children’s access to medical care. Leininger and Levy reach three main conclusions. First, despite tremendous progress in recent decades, not all children have insurance coverage, and immigrant children are especially vulnerable. Second, insurance coverage alone doesn’t guarantee access to care, and insured children may still face barriers to getting the care they need. Finally, as this issue of Future of Children demonstrates, access to care is only one of the factors that policy makers should consider as they seek to make the nation’s children healthier. PMID:27516723

  8. 45 CFR 96.47 - Primary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and Tribal Organizations § 96.47 Primary care. Applications for direct funding of Indian tribes and tribal organizations under the primary care block grant must comply with 42 CFR Part 51c (Grants for... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care. 96.47 Section 96.47 Public...

  9. Screening and Identification in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonian, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews issues related to behavioral screening in pediatric primary care settings. Structural-organizational issues affecting the use of pediatric primary care screening are discussed. This study also reviewed selected screening instruments that have utility for use in the primary care setting. Clinical and research issues related to…

  10. 45 CFR 96.47 - Primary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and Tribal Organizations § 96.47 Primary care. Applications for direct funding of Indian tribes and tribal organizations under the primary care block grant must comply with 42 CFR Part 51c (Grants for... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Primary care. 96.47 Section 96.47 Public...

  11. Psychopharmacology in Primary Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Benich, Joseph J; Bragg, Scott W; Freedy, John R

    2016-06-01

    Psychopharmacology requires clinicians to stay current on the latest guidelines and to use dynamic treatment strategies. Psychiatric conditions are prevalent in the primary care population. Choice of treatment with psychopharmacology should be based on controlling the patient's predominant symptoms while taking into consideration patient age, treatment compliance, patient past response to treatments, dosing frequency, patient preference, medication side effects, potential medication interactions, drug precautions/warnings, and cost. Response to therapy, as well as side effects, needs to be evaluated at regular intervals. The goal is to minimize symptoms and return patients to their maximal level of functioning.

  12. The Australian experiment: how primary health care organizations supported the evolution of a primary health care system.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Caroline; Jackson, Claire L; Marley, John E; Wells, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Primary health care in Australia has undergone 2 decades of change. Starting with a vision for a national health strategy with general practice at its core, Australia established local meso-level primary health care organizations--Divisions of General Practice--moving from focus on individual practitioners to a professional collective local voice. The article identifies how these meso-level organizations have helped the Australian primary health care system evolve by supporting the roll-out of initiatives including national practice accreditation, a focus on quality improvement, expansion of multidisciplinary teams into general practice, regional integration, information technology adoption, and improved access to care. Nevertheless, there are still challenges to ensuring equitable access and the supply and distribution of a primary care workforce, addressing the increasing rates of chronic disease and obesity, and overcoming the fragmentation of funding and accountability in the Australian system.

  13. 45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes... direct primary care medical homes. A QHP issuer may provide coverage through a direct primary...

  14. Implementing a teenage health service in primary care.

    PubMed

    Green, Elizabeth; Larcombe, J; Horbury, I

    The health of teenagers is currently a priority of the NHS, with many schemes and projects being developed. There are documented difficulties for teenagers in accessing health care, especially within general practice. This article describes the development and evaluation of a tailor-made clinic in the primary care setting. PMID:16209395

  15. Collaborative care for depression in primary care: how psychiatry could "troubleshoot" current treatments and practices.

    PubMed

    Barkil-Oteo, Andres

    2013-06-01

    The bulk of mental health services for people with depression are provided in primary care settings. Primary care providers prescribe 79 percent of antidepressant medications and see 60 percent of people being treated for depression in the United States, and they do that with little support from specialist services. Depression is not effectively managed in the primary care setting. Collaborative care based on a team approach, a population health perspective, and measurement-based care has been proven to treat depression more effectively than care as usual in a variety of settings and for different populations, and it increases people's access to medications and behavioral therapies. Psychiatry has the responsibility of supporting the primary care sector in delivering mental health services by disseminating collaborative care approaches under recent initiatives and opportunities made possible by the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

  16. Primary care and care for older persons: position paper of the European Forum for Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Boeckxstaens, Pauline; De Graaf, Pim

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how to address the needs of the growing number of older patients in primary care practice. Primary care is not a fixed organisational structure but a combination of functional characteristics which has developed variably in European countries with differing responses to the emerging needs of older persons. Multimorbidity, frailty, disability and dependence play out differently in older persons; a key challenge for primary care is to provide a response that is adapted to the needs of individuals - as they see them and not as the professional defines them. Indeed, growing experience shows how to involve older persons in taking decisions. Contrary to popular opinion, older persons often rate their quality of life as high. Indeed, comprehensive primary care offers health promotion and prevention: also older people may benefit from measures that support their health and independence and some case descriptions show this potential. Although most people prefer to be in their own environment (home, community) during the last stage of life, providing end-of-life care in the community is a challenge for primary care because it requires continuity and coordination with specialist care. Successful models of care however do exist. Delivering seamless integrated care to older persons is a central theme in primary care. Rather than disease management, in primary care, case management is the preferred approach. Proactive geriatric assessment of individual medical, functional and social needs, including loneliness and isolation, has been shown to be useful and its place in primary care is the subject of further research. Clinical practice guidelines for multimorbidity are badly needed. Non-adherence to medication, linked to multiple and uncoordinated prescriptions, is a widespread and costly problem. Successful approaches in primary care are being developed, including the use of electronic patient files. With the general practitioner (GP) as the central care

  17. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  18. Ethical matters in rural integrated primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Daniel; Stenger, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    Integrated primary care is particularly valuable to rural communities. Behavioral health care is often in short supply, and small or close-knit communities can intensify the stigma of seeking specialty mental health in rural settings. These and other barriers result in reduced access to needed behavioral health care. Nonetheless, rural practice of integrated primary care presents unique challenges to practitioners of multiple disciplines, including issues of competence, confidentiality, and dual relationships. This article provides an illustrative vignette to describe ethical issues in the rural practice of integrated primary care. It will review discipline-specific guidance in approaching these challenges and will offer recommendations for addressing disparities in the approaches of various disciplines engaged in the practice of integrated primary care. PMID:23566130

  19. Why Medical Students Choose Primary Care Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassler, William J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study of factors influencing medical students to choose primary care careers, in contrast with high-technology careers, found students attracted by opportunity to provide direct care, ambulatory care, continuity of care, and involvement in psychosocial aspects of care. Age, race, gender, marital status, and some attitudes were not influential.…

  20. A feasibility study of translating "Living Well with Dementia" groups into a Primary Care Improving Access to Psychological Therapy service (innovative practice).

    PubMed

    Cheston, Richard; Howells, Liz

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the use of the "Living Well with Dementia" or LivDem model of group support for people affected by dementia within a Primary Care setting. Five people affected by dementia and their carers joined a 10-week group, although one man withdrew before the start due to illness. Joint sessions were held on the first and the final meetings, with separate parallel group sessions for people affected by dementia and their carers for the remaining eight sessions. One person affected by dementia and their carer withdrew due to illness before the end of the sessions : A self-report measure of Quality of Life suggested improvements for two of the three people affected by dementia who completed all of the sessions. The proxy ratings of carers indicated improvements for all three participants. Qualitative interviews were carried out with participants and carers to assess their experience of the group. Although both people affected by dementia and their carers found the LivDem intervention helpful, concerns remain about the continued need for support by a Dementia specialist.

  1. Academia, Chronic Care, and the Future of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most proposals to reform health care delivery center on a robust, well-designed primary care sector capable of reducing the health and cost consequences of major chronic illnesses. Ironically, the intensified policy interest in primary care coincides with a steep decline in the proportion of medical students choosing primary care careers. Negativity stemming from the experience of trying to care for chronically ill patients with complex conditions in poorly designed, chaotic primary care teaching settings may be influencing trainees to choose other career paths. Redesigning teaching clinics so that they routinely provide high quality, well-organized chronic care would appear to be a critical early step in addressing the looming primary care workforce crisis. The Chronic Care Model provides a proven framework for such a redesign, and has been, with organizational support and effort, successfully implemented in academic settings. PMID:20737241

  2. Building access to specialist care through e-consultation

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Rowan, Margo S; Afkham, Amir; Maranger, Julie; Keely, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited access to specialist care remains a major barrier to health care in Canada, affecting patients and primary care providers alike, in terms of both long wait times and inequitable availability. We developed an electronic consultation system, based on a secure web-based tool, as an alternative to face-to-face consultations, and ran a pilot study to evaluate its effectiveness and acceptability to practitioners. Methods In a pilot program conducted over 15 months starting in January 2010, the e-consultation system was tested with primary care providers and specialists in a large health region in Eastern Ontario, Canada. We collected utilization data from the electronic system itself (including quantitative data from satisfaction surveys) and qualitative information from focus groups and interviews with providers. Results Of 18 primary care providers in the pilot program, 13 participated in focus groups and 9 were interviewed; in addition, 10 of the 11 specialists in the program were interviewed. Results of our evaluation showed good uptake, high levels of satisfaction, improvement in the integration of referrals and consultations, and avoidance of unnecessary specialist visits. A total of 77 e-consultation requests were processed from 1 Jan. 2010 to 1 Apr. 2011. Less than 10% of the referrals required face-to-face follow-up. The most frequently noted benefits for patients (as perceived by providers) included improved access to specialist care and reduced wait times. Primary care providers valued the ability to assist with patient assessment and management by having access to a rapid response to clinical questions, clarifying the need for diagnostic tests or treatments, and confirming the need for a formal consultation. Specialists enjoyed the improved interaction with primary care providers, as well as having some control in the decision on which patients should be referred. Interpretation This low-cost referral system has potential for broader

  3. Caring for breast cancer survivors in primary care.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Kathryn; Stouder, April

    2016-10-01

    Women with a history of breast cancer compose the largest group of cancer survivors. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners can play a key role in caring for cancer survivors in primary care settings. This article provides a brief overview and synthesis of current breast cancer guidelines, other resources, and clinical observations that may help primary care providers to translate plans developed by oncology specialists into primary care delivery. PMID:27623290

  4. Psychiatric morbidity in primary care.

    PubMed

    al-Haddad, M K; al-Garf, A; al-Jowder, S; al-Zurba, F I

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of hidden psychiatric morbidity was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HAD). A total of 149 Bahraini patients aged > or = 16 years were selected randomly from those attending primary health care centres for problems other than psychiatric illness. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity using GHQ was 45.1% (cut-off > or = 5) and 27.1% (cut-off > or = 9). Using the HAD scale, the prevalence was 44.4% (cut-off > or = 8) and 23.6% (cut-off > or = 11). Psychiatric morbidity was more common in women aged 50-55 years, in divorcees or widows and in lesser educated patients. Either instrument could be used to diagnose psychiatric illness.

  5. The Promise Clinic: a service learning approach to increasing access to health care.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Manuel; Tan-Billet, Jennifer; Babineau, John; Jimenez, Jennifer Endres; Billet, Todd; Flash, Charlene; Levin, Steven; West, Bernadette; Tallia, Alfred

    2008-08-01

    The goal of the Promise Clinic (a project of an academic medical center and a local social services group) is to increase access to primary care for an underserved population while addressing deficiencies in medical education. Students manage common primary care problems, creating access for this mostly uninsured population.

  6. Access to Care and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá, Héctor E.; Albert, Stephanie L.; Roby, Dylan H.; Beckerman, Jacob; Champagne, Philippe; Brookmeyer, Ron; Prelip, Michael L.; Glik, Deborah C.; Inkelas, Moira; Garcia, Rosa-Elenna; Ortega, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading killer of Americans. CVD is understudied among Latinos, who have high levels of CVD risk factors. This study aimed to determine whether access to health care (ie, insurance status and having a usual source of care) is associated with 4 CVD prevention factors (ie, health care utilization, CVD screening, information received from health care providers, and lifestyle factors) among Latino adults and to evaluate whether the associations depended on CVD clinical risk/disease. Data were collected as part of a community-engaged food environment intervention study in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights, CA. Logistic regressions were fitted with insurance status and usual source of care as predictors of the 4 CVD prevention factors while controlling for demographics. Analyses were repeated with interactions between self-reported CVD clinical risk/disease and access to care measures. Access to health care significantly increased the odds of CVD prevention. Having a usual source of care was associated with all factors of prevention, whereas being insured was only associated with some factors of prevention. CVD clinical risk/disease did not moderate any associations. Although efforts to reduce CVD risk among Latinos through the Affordable Care Act could be impactful, they might have limited impact in curbing CVD among Latinos, via the law's expansion of insurance coverage. CVD prevention efforts must expand beyond the provision of insurance to effectively lower CVD rates. PMID:26313803

  7. Traveling towards disease: transportation barriers to health care access.

    PubMed

    Syed, Samina T; Gerber, Ben S; Sharp, Lisa K

    2013-10-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes.

  8. Traveling Towards Disease: Transportation Barriers to Health Care Access

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Ben S.; Sharp, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes. PMID:23543372

  9. A Primary Care Approach to Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Samiev, Djamshed; Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Armitage, Joel D.; Maness, Lori J

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are probably the most common hematologic malignancies in adults over the age of 60 and are a major source of morbidity and mortality among older age groups. Diagnosis and management of this chronic blood cancer has evolved significantly in recent years and there are Food and Drug Administration-approved therapies that can extend patients' life expectancy and improve quality of life. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are often involved in the process of diagnosis and follow-up of MDS patients, especially those in low-risk groups. They can therefore play an important role in improving patient care and quality of life by ensuring early referral and participating in supportive management. There is also a shortage of oncologists which increases the importance of the role of PCPs in management of MDS patients. In the face of limited resources, PCPs can improve access and quality of care in MDS patients. This article provides an overview of the common manifestations, diagnostic approaches, and therapeutic modalities of MDS for PCPs, with a focus on when to suspect MDS, when a referral is appropriate, and how to provide appropriate supportive care for patients diagnosed with MDS. PMID:24921029

  10. Increased access rate to a primary health-care centre by introducing a structured patient sorting system developed to make the most efficient use of the personnel: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Jörgen; Maun, Andy; Bornhöft, Lena; Kornbakk, Malena; Wedham, Sofia; Zaffar, Mona; Thanner, Cathrine

    2010-11-01

    The primary health-care centre (PHCC) participating in the study has had financial problems for several years and it has been particularly difficult to recruit general practitioners (GPs). As a result, the access rate to the PHCC was low. The purpose of this study was to increase the access rate to the PHCC and to make the most efficient use of the staff by introducing a structured patient sorting system. All personnel were involved in the implementation process and participated regularly in interdisciplinary work-groups. A variety of Drop-in receptions were created and a manual for sorting patients by condition was introduced. The main finding was that the total access rate to the PHCC increased by 27% and that each staff member increased their personal access rate by an average of 13%. Eighty-three percent of the patients who were initially treated by the rehabilitation team were treated solely by the team and did not need to see a GP. No medical backlashes were reported. These findings indicate a more efficient use of the personnel. Furthermore, both personnel and patients indicated an improvement in the possibility to book patient appointments after the introduction of the structured patient sorting system. PMID:21097727

  11. THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS IN PRIMARY CARE SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Roderick S.; Everett, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Shortages of primary care doctors are occurring globally; one means of meeting this demand has been the use of physician assistants (PAs). Introduced in the United States in the late 1960s to address doctor shortages, the PA movement has grown to over 75,000 providers in 2011 and spread to Australia, Canada, Great Britain, The Netherlands, Germany, Ghana, and South Africa. A purposeful literature review was undertaken to assess the contribution of PAs to primary care systems. Contemporary studies suggest that PAs can contribute to the successful attainment of primary care functions, particularly the provision of comprehensive care, accessibility, and accountability. Employing PAs seems a reasonable strategy for providing primary care for diverse populations. PMID:21851446

  12. Integrated primary care in Germany: the road ahead

    PubMed Central

    Schlette, Sophia; Lisac, Melanie; Blum, Kerstin

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement Health care delivery in Germany is highly fragmented, resulting in poor vertical and horizontal integration and a system that is focused on curing acute illness or single diseases instead of managing patients with more complex or chronic conditions, or managing the health of determined populations. While it is now widely accepted that a strong primary care system can help improve coordination and responsiveness in health care, primary care has so far not played this role in the German system. Primary care physicians traditionally do not have a gatekeeper function; patients can freely choose and directly access both primary and secondary care providers, making coordination and cooperation within and across sectors difficult. Description of policy development Since 2000, driven by the political leadership and initiative of the Federal Ministry of Health, the German Bundestag has passed several laws enabling new forms of care aimed to improve care coordination and to strengthen primary care as a key function in the German health care system. These include on the contractual side integrated care contracts, and on the delivery side disease management programmes, medical care centres, gatekeeping and ‘community medicine nurses’. Conclusion and discussion Recent policy reforms improved framework conditions for new forms of care. There is a clear commitment by the government and the introduction of selective contracting and financial incentives for stronger cooperation constitute major drivers for change. First evaluations, especially of disease management programmes, indicate that the new forms of care improve coordination and outcomes. Yet the process of strengthening primary care as a lever for better care coordination has only just begun. Future reforms need to address other structural barriers for change such as fragmented funding streams, inadequate payment systems, the lack of standardized IT systems and trans-sectoral education and training of

  13. Addressing Arkansas' rural primary care challenges.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, G

    1993-10-01

    Universal health coverage may become a reality by the year 2000 and implies a greater need for primary care physicians in rural Arkansas in the 21st century. We can start this decade to build the capacity for an outstanding rural primary care system for the next century. The number of rural primary care physicians can be increased by 1) placing a high priority on recruiting more students to primary care, 2) improving the attractiveness of rural practice, and 3) improving the long-term financial viability of rural primary care. The quality of rural primary care will be greatly influenced by changes in information technology. Medical outreach activities from urban centers to rural communities and changes in rural medical infrastructures will be necessary as we approach the year 2000.

  14. Can Primary Care Sleep Medicine Integration Work?

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Thomas D.; Herr, Adam; Thuras, Paul; Cook, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders are common in the veteran population. There is an increasing need for sleep medicine services in returning veterans. Primary care providers are uncomfortable diagnosing and treating sleep disorders. Patients often have to wait several days before they can be seen by a sleep clinician. This pilot project evaluated the feasibility of providing sleep medicine services to patients in a primary care setting. Primary care providers were involved in decision-making, resulting in improved satisfaction with sleep medicine services among primary care clinicians. PMID:25133050

  15. Health care reform and the primary care workforce bottleneck.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Mark D

    2012-04-01

    To establish and sustain the high-performing health care system envisioned in the Affordable Care Act (ACA), current provisions in the law to strengthen the primary care workforce must be funded, implemented, and tested. However, the United States is heading towards a severe primary care workforce bottleneck due to ballooning demand and vanishing supply. Demand will be fueled by the "silver tsunami" of 80 million Americans retiring over the next 20 years and the expanded insurance coverage for 32 million Americans in the ACA. The primary care workforce is declining because of decreased production and accelerated attrition. To mitigate the looming primary care bottleneck, even bolder policies will be needed to attract, train, and sustain a sufficient number of primary care professionals. General internists must continue their vital leadership in this effort. PMID:22042605

  16. Patterns in Primary Health Care Utilization among Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Allyson; Wood, David; Hou, Tao; Zhang, Jianyi

    2007-01-01

    Individuals living with intellectual and developmental disabilities face complex medical problems. Primary care physicians tend to provide basic medical care, serving as a base through which other forms of care can be accessed. In this study we describe patterns of primary care utilization among adults enrolled on the Florida Medicaid's Home and…

  17. Primary care for young African American men.

    PubMed

    Rich, J A

    2001-01-01

    Young African American men in the inner city have higher rates of mortality and morbidity from potentially preventable causes than other American men of the same age. They suffer disproportionately high rates of preventable illness from violence, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV infection. These young men present with problems related to sexual concerns, mental health issues, substance abuse, and violence. They also report substantial risk-taking behaviors, including unprotected sex, substance use, and weapon carrying, as well as exposure to violence. Access to and use of preventive primary care services has been limited for these patients in the past because of financial barriers and competing social issues. Racism and historical oppression have created barriers of mistrust for young men of color. Factors that contribute to their adverse health status, as well as ways to address these problems, are discussed.

  18. Secondary Surge Capacity: A Framework for Understanding Long-Term Access to Primary Care for Medically Vulnerable Populations in Disaster Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Brock-Martin, Amy; Karmaus, Wilfried; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2012-01-01

    Disasters create a secondary surge in casualties because of the sudden increased need for long-term health care. Surging demands for medical care after a disaster place excess strain on an overtaxed health care system operating at maximum or reduced capacity. We have applied a health services use model to identify areas of vulnerability that perpetuate health disparities for at-risk populations seeking care after a disaster. We have proposed a framework to understand the role of the medical system in modifying the health impact of the secondary surge on vulnerable populations. Baseline assessment of existing needs and the anticipation of ballooning chronic health care needs following the acute response for at-risk populations are overlooked vulnerability gaps in national surge capacity plans. PMID:23078479

  19. Evaluating primary care research networks.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Evelyn; Harvey, Janet; Sturt, Jackie

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents a conceptual framework and tool kit, generated from the evaluation of five primary care research networks (PCRNs) funded by the then London, National Health Service (NHS) Executive. We employed qualitative methods designed to match the most important characteristics of PCRNs, conducting five contextualized case studies covering the five networks. A conceptual evaluation framework based on a review of the organization science literature was developed and comprised the broad, but inter-related organizational dimensions of structure, processes, boundaries and network self-evaluation as input factors and strategic emphasis as epitomized by network objectives. These dimensions were comprised of more detailed subdimensions designed to capture the potential of the networks to create ideas and knowledge, or intellectual capital, the key construct upon which our evaluation tool kit was based. We considered the congruence, or fit, between network objectives and input factors: greater congruence implied greater ability to achieve implicit and overt objectives. We conclude that network evaluation must take place, over time, recognizing stage of development and potential for long-term viability, but within a generic framework of inputs and outputs. If there is a good fit or congruence between their input factors and network objectives, networks will be internally coherent and able to operate at optimum effectiveness. PMID:17683655

  20. Integrating Behavioral Health into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    McGough, Peter M; Bauer, Amy M; Collins, Laura; Dugdale, David C

    2016-04-01

    Depression is one of the more common diagnoses encountered in primary care, and primary care in turn provides the majority of care for patients with depression. Many approaches have been tried in efforts to improve the outcomes of depression management. This article outlines the partnership between the University of Washington (UW) Neighborhood Clinics and the UW Department of Psychiatry in implementing a collaborative care approach to integrating the management of anxiety and depression in the ambulatory primary care setting. This program was built on the chronic care model, which utilizes a team approach to caring for the patient. In addition to the patient and the primary care provider (PCP), the team included a medical social worker (MSW) as care manager and a psychiatrist as team consultant. The MSW would manage a registry of patients with depression at a clinic with several PCPs, contacting the patients on a regular basis to assess their status, and consulting with the psychiatrist on a weekly basis to discuss patients who were not achieving the goals of care. Any recommendation (eg, a change in medication dose or class) made by the psychiatrist was communicated to the PCP, who in turn would work with the patient on the new recommendation. This collaborative care approach resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients who achieved care plan goals. The authors believe this is an effective method for health systems to integrate mental health services into primary care. (Population Health Management 2016;19:81-87). PMID:26348355

  1. Addressing the primary care workforce crisis.

    PubMed

    Song, Zirui; Chopra, Vineet; McMahon, Laurence F

    2015-01-01

    Our nation's primary care system is in crisis. As medical homes and accountable care organizations increasingly rely on a strong primary care workforce, the shortage of primary care physicians now calls for more policy attention and urgency. In the spirit of the 2014 Institute of Medicine recommendations on graduate medical education (GME) funding, we propose that CMS explicitly reward teaching hospitals if a certain share of their graduates (we propose 30%) remain in primary care 3 years after residency, either through additional payments or release of a withhold. Such a policy could allow hospitals to retain GME funding at a time when continued federal subsidization of GME is being called into question. Moreover, hospitals stand to benefit from producing primary care physicians, both under traditional fee-for-service contracts that reward volume through referrals and, especially, under risk contracts that reward for greater numbers of covered lives. PMID:26618225

  2. Addressing the primary care workforce crisis.

    PubMed

    Song, Zirui; Chopra, Vineet; McMahon, Laurence F

    2015-08-01

    Our nation’s primary care system is in crisis. As medical homes and accountable care organizations increasingly rely on a strong primary care workforce, the shortage of primary care physicians now calls for more policy attention and urgency. In the spirit of the 2014 Institute of Medicine recommendations on graduate medical education (GME) funding, we propose that CMS explicitly reward teaching hospitals if a certain share of their graduates (we propose 30%) remain in primary care 3 years after residency, either through additional payments or release of a withhold. Such a policy could allow hospitals to retain GME funding at a time when continued federal subsidization of GME is being called into question. Moreover, hospitals stand to benefit from producing primary care physicians, both under traditional fee-for-service contracts that reward volume through referrals and, especially, under risk contracts that reward for greater numbers of covered lives. PMID:26625501

  3. Competition, gatekeeping, and health care access.

    PubMed

    Godager, Geir; Iversen, Tor; Ma, Ching-to Albert

    2015-01-01

    We study gatekeeping physicians' referrals of patients to specialty care. We derive theoretical results when competition in the physician market intensifies. First, due to competitive pressure, physicians refer patients to specialty care more often. Second, physicians earn more by treating patients themselves, so refer patients to specialty care less often. We assess empirically the overall effect of competition with data from a 2008-2009 Norwegian survey, National Health Insurance Administration, and Statistics Norway. From the data we construct three measures of competition: the number of open primary physician practices with and without population adjustment, and the Herfindahl-Hirschman index. The empirical results suggest that competition has negligible or small positive effects on referrals overall. Our results do not support the policy claim that increasing the number of primary care physicians reduces secondary care. PMID:25544400

  4. Primary care physician supply, physician compensation, and Medicare fees: what is the connection?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2008-11-01

    Primary care, a cornerstone of several health reform efforts, is believed by many to be in a crisis because of inadequate supply to meet future demand. This belief has focused attention on the adequacy of primary care physician supply and ways to boost access to primary care. One suggested approach is to raise Medicare fees for primary care services. Whether higher Medicare fees would increase physician interest in primary care specialties by reducing compensation disparities between primary care and other specialties has not been established. Further, many questions remain about the assumptions underlying these policy concerns. Is there really a primary care physician crisis? Why does compensation across physician specialties vary so widely? Can Medicare physician fee changes affect access to primary care? These questions defy simple answers. This issue brief lays out the latest information on physician workforce, compensation differences across physician specialties, and Medicare's physician fee-setting process. PMID:19048687

  5. Evaluation of the Arkansas Medicaid Primary Care Physician Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Andreas; Baker, John A.

    1996-01-01

    Arkansas implemented a primary-care case-management program in February 1994. This study evaluates the program during its first 17 months. Using quarterly data collected for the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), a pooled cross-sectional time series analysis (1991:4-1995:2) estimates the effect of eligibles' program enrollment on expenditure (total, inpatient hospital, outpatient hospital, physicians, prescription drugs, laboratory and X-ray) and utilization measures (outpatient visits, physician visits, prescription drugs). The Arkansas Medicaid managed care program appears to have somewhat reduced growth in total vendor payments and also appears to have improved access to primary medical services. PMID:10165704

  6. Establishment of primary health care in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Birt, C A

    1990-08-01

    Basic demographic and epidemiological data relevant to health problems in Vietnam are described in this paper. Existing health service arrangements are referred to, with particular emphasis on the strategy for development of primary health care. The establishment of the paediatric centre in Ho Chi Minh City is reported, and examples of its valuable work in primary health care development are described.

  7. Teaching Primary Health Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezzina, Paul; Keogh, Johann J.; Keogh, Mariana

    1998-01-01

    Nursing and radiology students (n=15) at the University of Malta who completed an interdisciplinary module on primary health care reported they found the theoretical material applicable to practice; the module enabled them to learn about their potential role in primary health care. (SK)

  8. The Outcomes of an Intervention Study to Reduce the Barriers Experienced by People with Intellectual Disabilities Accessing Primary Health Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, C. A.; Cooper, S.-A.; Morrison, J.; Finlayson, J.; Allan, L.; Robinson, N.; Burns, E.; Martin, G.

    2006-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities (IDs) experience significant health inequalities compared with the general population. The barriers people with IDs experience in accessing services contribute to these health inequalities. Professionals' significant unmet training needs are an important barrier to people with IDs accessing…

  9. Describing Primary Care Encounters: The Primary Care Network Survey and the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    PubMed Central

    Binns, Helen J.; Lanier, David; Pace, Wilson D.; Galliher, James M.; Ganiats, Theodore G.; Grey, Margaret; Ariza, Adolfo J.; Williams, Robert

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to describe clinical encounters in primary care research networks and compare them with those of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). METHODS Twenty US primary care research networks collected data on clinicians and patient encounters using the Primary Care Network Survey (PRINS) Clinician Interview (PRINS-1) and Patient Record (PRINS-2), which were newly developed based on NAMCS tools. Clinicians completed a PRINS-1 about themselves and a PRINS-2 for each of 30 patient visits. Data included patient characteristics; reason for the visit, diagnoses, and services ordered or performed. We compared PRINS data with data obtained from primary care physicians during 5 cycles of NAMCS (1997–2001). Data were weighted; PRINS reflects participating networks and NAMCS provides national estimates. RESULTS By discipline, 89% of PRINS clinicians were physicians, 4% were physicians in residency training, 5% were advanced practice nurses/nurse-practitioners, and 2% were physician’s assistants. The majority (53%) specialized in pediatrics (34% specialized in family medicine, 9% in internal medicine, and 4% in other specialties). All NAMCS clinicians were physicians, with 20% specializing in pediatrics. When NAMCS and PRINS visits were compared, larger proportions of PRINS visits involved preventive care and were made by children, members of minority racial groups, and individuals who did not have private health insurance. A diagnostic or other assessment service was performed for 99% of PRINS visits and 76% of NAMCS visits (95% confidence interval, 74.9%–78.0%). A preventive or counseling/education service was provided at 64% of PRINS visits and 37% of NAMCS visits (95% confidence interval, 35.1%–38.0%). CONCLUSIONS PRINS presents a view of diverse primary care visits and differs from NAMCS in its methods and findings. Further examinations of PRINS data are needed to assess their usefulness for describing encounters that

  10. Primary Health Care and Narrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John W

    2015-01-01

    Primary health care has received a lot of attention since the Alma Ata Conference, convened by the World Health Organization in 1978. Key to the strategy to improve health care outlined at the Alma Ata conference is citizen participation in every phase of service delivery. Although the goals of primary health care have not been achieved, the addition of narrative medicine may facilitate these ends. But a new epistemology is necessary, one that is compatible with narrative medicine, so that local knowledge is elevated in importance and incorporated into the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health programs. In this way, relevant, sustainable, and affordable care can be provided. The aim of this article is to discuss how primary health care might be improved through the introduction of narrative medicine into planning primary health care delivery. PMID:26222094

  11. The Experience of Working with Refugees: Counsellors in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Century, Gillian; Leavey, Gerard; Payne, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The provision of counselling services for refugee and asylum-seeking patients is relatively new in the UK and their complex needs may present considerable challenges within primary care, where access to specialist support resources is often limited. As far as we know, no previous research has attempted to look at the experiences of the counsellors…

  12. Judaism, justice, and access to health care.

    PubMed

    Mackler, A L

    1991-06-01

    This paper develops the traditional Jewish understanding of justice (tzedakah) and support for the needy, especially as related to the provision of medical care. After an examination of justice in the Hebrew Bible, the values and institutions of tzedakah in Rabbinic Judaism are explored, with a focus on legal codes and enforceable obligations. A standard of societal responsibility to provide for the basic needs of all, with a special obligation to save lives, emerges. A Jewish view of justice in access to health care is developed on the basis of this general standard, as well as explicit discussion in legal sources. Society is responsible for the securing of access to all health care needed by any individual. Elucidation of this standard of need and corresponding societal obligations, and the significance of the Jewish model for the contemporary United States, are considered.

  13. African Primary Care Research: Quality improvement cycles

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Improving the quality of clinical care and translating evidence into clinical practice is commonly a focus of primary care research. This article is part of a series on primary care research and outlines an approach to performing a quality improvement cycle as part of a research assignment at a Masters level. The article aims to help researchers design their quality improvement cycle and write their research project proposal. PMID:26245438

  14. Primary Mental Health Care in the Americas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima, Bruno R.

    This paper outlines selected differences between the United States and Latin America health care systems as they relate to primary mental health care. It notes that historically both the United States and Latin America have relied on custodial psychiatric hospitals. The alternative of community care for psychiatric patients is described as it is…

  15. Primary Care Practice Development: A Relationship-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William L.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Nutting, Paul A.; Stange, Kurt C.; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Numerous primary care practice development efforts, many related to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), are emerging across the United States with few guides available to inform them. This article presents a relationship-centered practice development approach to understand practice and to aid in fostering practice development to advance key attributes of primary care that include access to first-contact care, comprehensive care, coordination of care, and a personal relationship over time. METHODS Informed by complexity theory and relational theories of organizational learning, we built on discoveries from the American Academy of Family Physicians’ National Demonstration Project (NDP) and 15 years of research to understand and improve primary care practice. RESULTS Primary care practices can fruitfully be understood as complex adaptive systems consisting of a core (a practice’s key resources, organizational structure, and functional processes), adaptive reserve (practice features that enhance resilience, such as relationships), and attentiveness to the local environment. The effectiveness of these attributes represents the practice’s internal capability. With adequate motivation, healthy, thriving practices advance along a pathway of slow, continuous developmental change with occasional rapid periods of transformation as they evolve better fits with their environment. Practice development is enhanced through systematically using strategies that involve setting direction and boundaries, implementing sensing systems, focusing on creative tensions, and fostering learning conversations. CONCLUSIONS Successful practice development begins with changes that strengthen practices’ core, build adaptive reserve, and expand attentiveness to the local environment. Development progresses toward transformation through enhancing primary care attributes. PMID:20530396

  16. 76 FR 61103 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care... announces a solicitation for health care payer organizations to participate in the Comprehensive Primary Care initiative (CPC), a multipayer model designed to improve primary care. DATES: Letter of...

  17. Patients’ perceptions of the quality of care after primary care reform

    PubMed Central

    Tourigny, André; Aubin, Michele; Haggerty, Jeannie; Bonin, Lucie; Morin, Diane; Reinharz, Daniel; Leduc, Yvan; St-Pierre, Michele; Houle, Nathalie; Giguère, Anik; Benounissa, Zohra; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate how a primary care reform, which aimed to promote interprofessional and interorganizational collaborative practices, affected patients’ experiences of the core dimensions of primary care. DESIGN Before-and-after comparison of patients’ perceptions of care at the beginning of family medicine group (FMG) implementation (15 to 20 months after accreditation) and 18 months later. SETTING Five FMGs in the province of Quebec from various settings and types of practice. PARTICIPANTS A random sample of patients was selected in each FMG; a total of 1046 participants completed both the baseline and follow-up questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patients’ perceptions of relational and informational continuity, organizational and first-contact accessibility, attitude and efficiency of the clinic’s personnel and waiting times (service responsiveness), physician-nurse and primary care physician–specialist coordination, and intra-FMG collaboration were assessed over the telephone, mostly using a modified version of the Primary Care Assessment Tool. Additional items covered patients’ opinions about consulting nurses, patients’ use of emergency services, and patients’ recall of health promotion and preventive care received. RESULTS A total of 1275 patients were interviewed at the study baseline, and 82% also completed the follow-up interviews after 18 months (n = 1046). Overall, perceptions of relational and informational continuity increased significantly (P < .05), whereas organizational and first-contact accessibility and service responsiveness did not change significantly. Perception of physician-nurse coordination remained unchanged, but perception of primary care physician–specialist coordination decreased significantly (P < .05). The proportion of participants reporting visits with nurses and reporting use of FMGs’ emergency services increased significantly from baseline to follow-up (P < .05). CONCLUSION This reorganization

  18. Fundamental reform of payment for adult primary care: comprehensive payment for comprehensive care.

    PubMed

    Goroll, Allan H; Berenson, Robert A; Schoenbaum, Stephen C; Gardner, Laurence B

    2007-03-01

    Primary care is essential to the effective and efficient functioning of health care delivery systems, yet there is an impending crisis in the field due in part to a dysfunctional payment system. We present a fundamentally new model of payment for primary care, replacing encounter-based imbursement with comprehensive payment for comprehensive care. Unlike former iterations of primary care capitation (which simply bundled inadequate fee-for-service payments), our comprehensive payment model represents new investment in adult primary care, with substantial increases in payment over current levels. The comprehensive payment is directed to practices to include support for the modern systems and teams essential to the delivery of comprehensive, coordinated care. Income to primary physicians is increased commensurate with the high level of responsibility expected. To ensure optimal allocation of resources and the rewarding of desired outcomes, the comprehensive payment is needs/risk-adjusted and performance-based. Our model establishes a new social contract with the primary care community, substantially increasing payment in return for achieving important societal health system goals, including improved accessibility, quality, safety, and efficiency. Attainment of these goals should help offset and justify the costs of the investment. Field tests of this and other new models of payment for primary care are urgently needed. PMID:17356977

  19. Uncommon Caring: Primary Males and Implicit Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, James R.

    The caring and nurturing of children, which characterize primary education culture, have tended to shape a public perception of primary teaching as "women's work." Several social factors influence men's underrepresentation in the profession of primary education, such as parents not wanting their children exposed to "soft" males. Male primary…

  20. Substitution of Hospital Care with Primary Care: Defining the Conditions of Primary Care Plus

    PubMed Central

    Kroese, Mariëlle Elisabeth Aafje Lydia; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke Dingena; Elissen, Arianne Mathilda Josephus; Meerlo, Ronald Johan; Hanraets, Monique Margaretha Henriëtte; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyse barriers and facilitators in substituting hospital care with primary care to define preconditions for successful implementation. Methods: A descriptive feasibility study was performed to collect information on the feasibility of substituting hospital care with primary care. General practitioners were able to refer patients, about whom they had doubts regarding diagnosis, treatment and/or the need to refer to hospital care, to medical specialists who performed low-complex consultations at general practitioner practices. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with general practitioners and medical specialists, focus groups and notes from meetings in the Netherlands between April 2013 and January 2014. Data were analysed using a conventional content analysis which resulted in categorised barriers, facilitators and policy adjustments, after which preconditions were formulated. Results: The most important preconditions were make arrangements on governmental level, arrange a collective integrated IT-system, determine the appropriate profile for medical specialists, design a referral protocol for eligible patients, arrange deliberation possibilities for general practitioners and medical specialists and formulate a diagnostic protocol. Conclusions: The barriers, facilitators and formulated preconditions provided relevant input to change the design of substituting hospital care with primary care.

  1. Access to care - an unmet need in headache management?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Access to care for headache sufferers is not always simple. A survey conducted in a large number of members of lay associations point to the existence of multiple barriers to care for headache in several European countries. Patients usually discover the existence of specialized structures with a delay of several years after the onset of their headache. Furthermore, a relevant portion of them are not satisfied with the management of their disease, partly because of the poor efficacy of treatments and partly because of the difficulty to get in touch with the specialist. Headache disorders, and primary headaches in particular, represent an important issue in public health, because they are common, disabling and treatable. A joint effort is required from the relevant stakeholders (scientists, lay organizations, decision-makers, healthcare policymakers, and others) to improve the access to care for headache sufferers. PMID:24742114

  2. [Access to dental care during prenatal assistance].

    PubMed

    dos Santos Neto, Edson Theodoro; Oliveira, Adauto Emmerich; Zandonade, Eliana; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2012-11-01

    This study sought to evaluate the self-perceived response to dental care during prenatal assistance in the Unified Health System (SUS) in the Metropolitan Region of Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brazil. 1032 postpartum women were interviewed and 1006 prenatal records copied. Postpartum women's self-perceived response was measured by the Oral Health Index Profile-14. When an impact was identified, dental care rendered in educational, preventive and curative terms was considered adequate. When there was no impact, assistance was considered adequate in educational and preventive terms. The Chi-square test revealed an association between prenatal care and dental care. Oral health impact on quality of life was 14.7%. Dental care received by mothers in educational terms was rated at 41.3%, while in preventive terms it was 21% and in curative terms it was 16.6%. Six or more prenatal appointments coupled with educational activities was closely associated with adequate dental care (p < 0.05). Access to dental care is facilitated when pregnant women attend health services and become involved in educational activities during the prenatal period. Consequently, educational measures appear to indicate an improvement in prenatal care in the SUS.

  3. Integrality in cervical cancer care: evaluation of access

    PubMed Central

    Brito-Silva, Keila; Bezerra, Adriana Falangola Benjamin; Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate integrity of access to uterine cervical cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment services. METHODS The tracer condition was analyzed using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach. The quantitative approach was based on secondary data from the analysis of cytology and biopsy exams performed between 2008 and 2010 on 25 to 59 year-old women in a municipality with a large population and with the necessary technological resources. Data were obtained from the Health Information System and the Regional Cervical Cancer Information System. Statistical analysis was performed using PASW statistic 17.0 software. The qualitative approach involved semi-structured interviews with service managers, health care professionals and users. NVivo 9.0 software was used for the content analysis of the primary data. RESULTS Pap smear coverage was low, possible due to insufficient screening and the difficulty of making appointments in primary care. The numbers of biopsies conducted are similar to those of abnormal cytologies, reflecting easy access to the specialized services. There was higher coverage among younger women. More serious diagnoses, for both cytologies and biopsies, were more prevalent in older women. CONCLUSIONS Insufficient coverage of cytologies, reported by the interviewees allows us to understand access difficulties in primary care, as well as the fragility of screening strategies. PMID:24897045

  4. Welcome back? Frequent attenders to a pediatric primary care center.

    PubMed

    Klein, Melissa; Vaughn, Lisa M; Baker, Raymond C; Taylor, Trisha

    2011-09-01

    This study examines frequent attenders of a pediatric primary care clinic at a large urban children's hospital--who they are and their reasons for frequent attendance to the clinic. The literature suggests that some visits by frequent attenders may not be medically necessary, and these additional appointments may impair others' access to medical care within the same system. The key to eliminating excessive primary care visits is to determine if it is a problem in the primary care practice (quantify the problem), explore the reasons for the visits (from the patients' perspective), and then provide educational interventions that address the various causes for the extra visits and encourage the use of available resources, either ancillary services in the practice itself or resources and agencies available in the community (e.g. social service, legal aid).

  5. Embracing a diversified future for US primary care.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Although less focused upon given the current emphasis on the patient-centered medical home innovation, the future for US primary care is arguably one that will be characterized by diversity in service delivery structures and personnel. The drivers of this diversity include increased patient demand requiring a larger number of primary care access points; the need for lower-cost delivery structures that can flourish in a low-margin business model; greater interest in primary care delivery by retailers and hospitals that see their involvement as a means to enhance their core business goals; the increased desire by non-physician providers to gain work independence; and a growing cadre of younger PCPs whose career and job preferences leave them open to working in a variety of different settings and structures. A key issue to ask of a more diversified primary care system is whether or not it will be characterized by competition or cooperation. While a competitive system would not be unexpected given historical and current trends, such a system would likely stunt the prospects for a full revitalization of US primary care. However, there is reason to believe that a cooperative system is possible and would be advantageous, given the mutual dependencies that already exist among primary care stakeholders, and additional steps that could be taken to enhance such dependencies even more into the future. PMID:23379778

  6. Primary care and genetics and genomics.

    PubMed

    Scott, Joan; Trotter, Tracy

    2013-12-01

    With the recent expansion of genetic science, its evolving translation to clinical medicine, and the growing number of available resources for genomics in primary care, the primary care provider must increasingly integrate genetics and genomics into daily practice. Because primary care medicine combines the treatment of acute illness with disease prevention and anticipatory guidance, the primary care provider is in an ideal position to evaluate and treat patients for genetic disease. The notion that genetic knowledge is only rarely needed will have to be replaced with a comprehensive approach that integrates "genetic thinking" into every patient encounter. Genomic competencies will need to be added to the primary care provider's repertoire; such competencies include prevention, assessment, evaluation, and diagnosis of genetic conditions; the ordering and interpreting of genetic tests; communication with families; appropriate referrals; and the management or comanagement of care. The process of deciding when to order genetic tests, what tests to order, and how to interpret the results is complex, and the tests and their results have specific risks and benefits, especially for pediatric patients. The longitudinal nature of primary pediatric care provides the opportunity to obtain and continually update the family history, which is the most powerful initial genetic "test." The ongoing provider-family relationship, coupled with the astounding number of advances in genetic and genomic testing, also necessitates a constant re-evaluation of past diagnosis or nondiagnosis.

  7. Depression in primary care in Israel.

    PubMed

    Geulayov, Galit; Lipsitz, Joshua; Sabar, Ron; Gross, Raz

    2007-08-01

    Depression is a leading cause of morbidity, disability and health care utilization. It is commonly encountered in primary care settings yet is often missed or suboptimally managed. We summarize studies conducted in Israel on the prevalence of depression in primary care settings, its correlates, and predictors of treatment and outcome, and discuss their implications for clinical practice and public health policy. An electronic search was conducted using the MEDLINE and PsychINFO databases. The inclusion criteria were original studies that assessed aspects of depression in a population aged 18 or older, were conducted in primary care settings in Israel, and had sufficient detailed description of depression-related measures, study sample and outcome measures. Twelve articles reporting results from seven studies met these criteria. The prevalence of current depression in primary care varied considerably across studies: 1.6-5.9% for major depression, 1.1-5.4% for minor depression, 14.3-24% for depressive symptoms. Depression was consistently related to female gender and fewer years of education, and was associated with disability, decreased quality of life, and increased health-related expenditure. Many cases of depression were undiagnosed and most patients had persistent depression or achieved only partial remission. Depression represents a serious challenge for the primary health care system in Israel. Greater efforts should be focused on screening and treating depression in primary care. However, the studies reviewed here used different methodologies and assessed different aspects of depression and, therefore, should be generalized cautiously. Systematic research on the prevalence, correlates and management of depression in primary care, with emphasis on collaborative care models, is strongly needed to inform research, clinicians and health care policy makers. PMID:17877061

  8. It Is Time to Integrate Abortion Into Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Roe v Wade decision made safe abortion available but did not change the reality that more than 1 million women face an unwanted pregnancy every year. Forty years after Roe v Wade, the procedure is not accessible to many US women. The politics of abortion have led to a plethora of laws that create enormous barriers to abortion access, particularly for young, rural, and low-income women. Family medicine physicians and advanced practice clinicians are qualified to provide abortion care. To realize the promise of Roe v Wade, first-trimester abortion must be integrated into primary care and public health professionals and advocates must work to remove barriers to the provision of abortion within primary care settings. PMID:23153160

  9. Availability and accessibility of rural health care.

    PubMed

    Hicks, L L

    1990-10-01

    The 1980s saw a retrenchment of the ideology that government intervention could solve the problems of inadequate access to health services in rural areas. Increased emphasis was placed on an ideology that promoted deregulation and competitive market solutions. During the 1980s, the gap in the availability of physicians in metropolitan versus nonmetropolitan areas widened. Also during that time period, the gap between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan populations' utilization of physician services widened. In addition, many indicators of the health status of nonmetropolitan residents versus metropolitan residents worsened during the 1980s. As we enter the 1990s, concern about equitable access to needed health care services and for the vulnerability and fragility of rural health systems has resurfaced. A number of national policies and a research agenda to improve accessibility and availability of health services in rural areas are being considered.

  10. [Primary health care physician in modern conditions].

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Jasna

    2007-02-01

    Some basic considerations about the role and responsibilities of primary health care physician are presented. The attitude towards the patient and other activities of general practitioners are described. Rational, multidisciplinary and multifactorial dialogues and cooperation with other colleagues is also stressed. Team work and collaboration with other segments involved in the patient health care is an imperative. Working conditions are not equal in all health care settings, however, all health care personnel, regardless of their place of work, must implement rationalization of health care expenses and keep high professional level in urban and rural settings, even those distant from large medical centers. The possible misunderstandings of professional interests that can be destructive for working atmosphere are also mentioned. Primary health care is the cheapest and economically most efficient type of health care for a particular population. In this context, primary health care physicians/family doctors find their role and responsibilities, follow organizational principles, system and methods of work. To conclude, a more positive potential of primary health care and its affirmation is stressed.

  11. Optimising primary care for people with dementia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review considers key areas in primary care regarding the diagnosis of dementia. Issues surrounding assessment, policy and incentives are considered. In addition, the relevance of non-medication approaches for dementia in primary care, which aim to enhance or maintain quality of life by maximising psychological and social function in the context of existing disabilities, is deliberated. Finally, key issues about primary care medication management are considered, and relevant therapeutic strategies with recommendation for a collaborative approach that improve outcomes by linking primary and secondary healthcare services – including general practice and pharmacy – with social care needs are weighed up. A key aspect of such a collaborative approach is to support informal carers in optimising medication. PMID:24427181

  12. Integrated Primary Care Information Database (IPCI)

    Cancer.gov

    The Integrated Primary Care Information Database is a longitudinal observational database that was created specifically for pharmacoepidemiological and pharmacoeconomic studies, inlcuding data from computer-based patient records supplied voluntarily by general practitioners.

  13. Use of community-based participatory research in primary care to improve healthcare outcomes and disparities in care

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Hazel; White, Lauren; Steuerwald, Mark; Dulin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has emerged to bridge the gap between research and primary-care practice through community engagement and social action to increase health equity. It is widely acknowledged that access to high-quality primary care services is important to the overall health of a community. Here, CBPR studies in a primary care setting are reviewed to assess the use of CBPR associated with common health problems seen in primary care such as access to care and disparities in chronic disease management across vulnerable populations. CBPR involves building relationships with local communities, determining areas of need and establishing priorities for health concerns. Studies showing improved access to care for a Hispanic population, reduced asthma symptoms and weight loss are highlighted. PMID:24236682

  14. Provider satisfaction in army primary care clinics.

    PubMed

    Byers, V L; Mays, M Z; Mark, D D

    1999-02-01

    The job satisfaction of physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants was assessed during the course of a multicenter study of Army primary care clinics. All providers in nine clinics at three medical centers who were engaged in adult or family care were invited to participate in the study. Questionnaires on job satisfaction and other practice style variables were completed by 26 physicians, 19 nurse practitioners, and 13 physician assistants (46, 76, and 41% of eligible providers, respectively). Analysis revealed a broad range of job satisfaction in the sample. However, average levels of job satisfaction were not significantly different across the three groups of primary care providers. Autonomy and collaboration were significant predictors of job satisfaction. It is clear that changes in health care systems that reduce, or appear to reduce, the primary care provider's autonomy in clinical matters are likely to reduce provider satisfaction as well. PMID:10050571

  15. A New Path to Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-03-01

    The University of North Texas Health Science Center and the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine are partnering with Midland College and Midland Memorial Hospital to keep their own crop of future doctors in the area. The Primary Care Pathway identifies interested, high-achieving community college students likely to be successful in medical school and guarantees them an accelerated pathway to a doctor of osteopathic medicine degree, focusing earlier and more intensely on primary care. PMID:26928815

  16. A New Path to Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-03-01

    The University of North Texas Health Science Center and the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine are partnering with Midland College and Midland Memorial Hospital to keep their own crop of future doctors in the area. The Primary Care Pathway identifies interested, high-achieving community college students likely to be successful in medical school and guarantees them an accelerated pathway to a doctor of osteopathic medicine degree, focusing earlier and more intensely on primary care.

  17. Root doctors as providers of primary care.

    PubMed

    Stitt, V J

    1983-07-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two "root doctors." These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care.

  18. Root Doctors as Providers of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Van J.

    1983-01-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two “root doctors.” These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  19. Exploring primary care activities in ACT teams.

    PubMed

    Vanderlip, Erik R; Williams, Nancy A; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Katon, Wayne

    2014-05-01

    People with serious mental illness often receive inadequate primary and preventive care services. Federal healthcare reform endorses team-based care that provides high quality primary and preventive care to at risk populations. Assertive community treatment (ACT) teams offer a proven, standardized treatment approach effective in improving mental health outcomes for the seriously mentally ill. Much is known about the effectiveness of ACT teams in improving mental health outcomes, but the degree to which medical care needs are addressed is not established. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which ACT teams address the physical health of the population they serve. ACT team leaders were invited to complete an anonymous, web-based survey to explore attitudes and activities involving the primary care needs of their clients. Information was collected regarding the use of health screening tools, physical health assessments, provision of medical care and collaboration with primary care systems. Data was analyzed from 127 team leaders across the country, of which 55 completed the entire survey. Nearly every ACT team leader believed ACT teams have a role in identifying and managing the medical co-morbidities of their clientele. ACT teams report participation in many primary care activities. ACT teams are providing a substantial amount of primary and preventive services to their population. The survey suggests standardization of physical health identification, management or referral processes within ACT teams may result in improved quality of medical care. ACT teams are in a unique position to improve physical health care by virtue of having medically trained staff and frequent, close contact with their clients.

  20. Caring for patients with melanoma in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mary; Perrino, Laura; Sheets, Victoria; McDaniel, M Jane

    2014-07-01

    The incidence of melanoma is steadily rising and mortality continues to increase. This article describes types of melanoma and the role of primary care providers in the long-term management and follow-up of patients diagnosed with melanoma.

  1. Primary Care in Secondary Settings: Inherent Strains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Henry W.; Garfat, Thom

    2005-01-01

    There is an ever present struggle associated with reconciling "primary" care requirements for children and young people living in group care programs with "secondary" organizational demands imposed by external agency expectations and administrative requirements. That struggle finds its expression and potential balance in the daily work of staff.…

  2. Millennial transformation for primary care.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Michael

    2010-06-01

    We do not need a crystal ball to see the future. Our web-based future has already arrived in all other aspects of our lives--even our mobile phones. The tools for progress--Personal Health Records, Social Networks, and Online medical information--are widely available. The demand is at hand--Millennials are flexing consumer muscles as they enter the healthcare market. Real "Health Care Reform" requires fundamental changes in practice--which in turn requires effective use of information technologies and adaption to changing consumer expectations. The VHA and the MHS are uniquely capable of leveraging political, academic and technological forces to help move American health care through this millennial transformation. Federal health systems are positioned to demonstrate the value of innovation as America seeks healthcare reform. PMID:20572466

  3. Millennial transformation for primary care.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Michael

    2010-06-01

    We do not need a crystal ball to see the future. Our web-based future has already arrived in all other aspects of our lives--even our mobile phones. The tools for progress--Personal Health Records, Social Networks, and Online medical information--are widely available. The demand is at hand--Millennials are flexing consumer muscles as they enter the healthcare market. Real "Health Care Reform" requires fundamental changes in practice--which in turn requires effective use of information technologies and adaption to changing consumer expectations. The VHA and the MHS are uniquely capable of leveraging political, academic and technological forces to help move American health care through this millennial transformation. Federal health systems are positioned to demonstrate the value of innovation as America seeks healthcare reform.

  4. Public finance policy strategies to increase access to preconception care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kay A

    2006-09-01

    Policy and finance barriers reduce access to preconception care and, reportedly, limit professional practice changes that would improve the availability of needed services. Millions of women of childbearing age (15-44) lack adequate health coverage (i.e., uninsured or underinsured), and others live in medically underserved areas. Service delivery fragmentation and lack of professional guidelines are additional barriers. This paper reviews barriers and opportunities for financing preconception care, based on a review and analysis of state and federal policies. We describe states' experiences with and opportunities to improve health coverage, through public programs such as Medicaid, Medicaid waivers, and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The potential role of Title V and of community health centers in providing primary and preventive care to women also is discussed. In these and other public health and health coverage programs, opportunities exist to finance preconception care for low-income women. Three major policy directions are discussed. To increase access to preconception care among women of childbearing age, the federal and state governments have opportunities to: (1) improve health care coverage, (2) increase the supply of publicly subsidized health clinics, and (3) direct delivery of preconception screening and interventions in the context of public health programs.

  5. Oral health in the context of primary care in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Antonio C; Moysés, Simone T; Werneck, Renata I; Moysés, Samuel J

    2013-10-01

    This article presents an integrative literature review that analyses the advances and challenges in oral health care of the Brazilian primary health care system, based on a political agenda that envisages re-organising the unified health system (SistemaÚnico de Saúde - SUS). It is presumed that the actions suggested by the Alma-Ata Conference of 1978 are still up-to-date and relevant when adapted to the situation in Brazil. Several studies and policies are reviewed, including works demonstrating the importance of primary care as an organising platform in an integrated health-care network, Brazil's strategy for reorganising the primary care network known as the Family Health Strategy, and the National Oral Health Policy. This review discusses results obtained over the last twenty years, with special attention paid to changes in oral health-care practices, as well as the funding of action programmes and assistance cover. The conclusion is that oral healthcare in the Brazilian primary health care system has advanced over the past decades; however, serious obstacles have been experienced, especially with regard to the guarantee of universal access to services and funding. The continuous efforts of public managers and society should focus on the goal of achieving universal coverage for all Brazilians.

  6. [Antiseptic use in primary care].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Pérez, M Isabel; Lucio-Villegas Menéndez, M Eulalia; González, Laura López; Lluch, Natalia Aresté; Morató Agustí, M Luisa; Cachafeiro, Santiago Pérez

    2014-05-01

    Wounds can be classified according to their mechanism of action into surgical or traumatic (which may be incision wounds, such as those provoked by a sharp object; contusions, caused by a blunt force; puncture wounds, caused by long, sharp objects; lacerations, caused by tears to the tissue; or bites, which have a high risk of infection and consequently should not be sutured). Wounds can also be classified by their healing process into acute or chronic (pressure ulcers, vascular ulcers, neuropathic ulcers, acute wounds with torpid clinical course). The use of antiseptics in any of these wounds is usually limited to cleaning and initial care -up to 48 hours- and to washing of hands and instruments. The use of antiseptics in chronic or persistent wounds is more debatable. The same is true of burns, in which the use of formulations that encourage hydration is recommended. In the pediatric population, the use of antiseptics with a known safety profile and low absorption is usually recommended, especially in the care of the umbilical cord, in which evidence supports the use of chlorhexidine gluconate. Another use of antiseptics is the care of wounds produced by procedures used in body esthetics, such as piercings; in these procedures, it is advisable to use transparent antiseptics that allow visualization of the technique.

  7. Health Information Technology Needs Help from Primary Care Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.; Green, Lee A.; Phillips, Robert L.; Beasley, John W.; DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Klinkman, Michael S.; Hughes, John; Puro, Jon; Fox, Chester H.; Burdick, Tim

    2015-01-01

    While health information technology (HIT) efforts are beginning to yield measurable clinical benefits, more is needed to meet the needs of patients and clinicians. Primary care researchers are uniquely positioned to inform the evidence-based design and use of technology. Research strategies to ensure success include engaging patient and clinician stakeholders, working with existing practice-based research networks, and using established methods from other fields such as human factors engineering and implementation science. Policies are needed to help support primary care researchers in evaluating and implementing HIT into everyday practice, including expanded research funding, strengthened partnerships with vendors, open access to information systems, and support for the Primary Care Extension Program. Through these efforts, the goal of improved outcomes through HIT can be achieved. PMID:25957361

  8. Eating Disorders in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Sangvai, Devdutta

    2016-06-01

    Eating disorders are a complex set of illnesses most commonly affecting white adolescent girls and young women. The most common eating disorders seen in the primary care setting are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Treatment in the primary care environment ideally involves a physician, therapist, and nutritionist, although complex cases may require psychiatric and other specialist care. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with improved outcomes, whereas the consequences of untreated eating disorders, particularly anorexia nervosa, can be devastating, including death. PMID:27262009

  9. Structured career pathways in academic primary care.

    PubMed

    Foy, Robbie; Eccles, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Research in primary care has much to offer researchers and ultimately efforts to improve population health and health care. There is a need for capacity building and efforts to improve the science of research in this field. This article outlines a relatively structured career pathway for primary care researchers and offers advice on opportunities and commonly encountered pitfalls. It is largely based upon the authors' experiences and personal reflections as medically trained researchers but many of the implications and lessons are relevant to other clinical and research disciplines.

  10. Primary Care Physicians' Dementia Care Practices: Evidence of Geographic Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Zlateva, Ianita; Delaney, Colleen; Kleppinger, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores primary care physicians' (PCPs) self-reported approaches and barriers to management of patients with dementia, with a focus on comparisons in dementia care practices between PCPs in 2 states. Design and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were mailed to 600 randomly selected licensed PCPs in…

  11. Taking consultation-liaison psychiatry into primary care.

    PubMed

    Kisely, Stephen; Campbell, Leslie Anne

    2007-01-01

    Up to 50% of patients seen in primary care have mental health problems, the severity and duration of their problems often being similar to those of individuals seen in the specialized sector. This article describes the reasons, advantages, and challenges of collaborative or shared care between primary and mental health teams, which are similar to those of consultation-liaison psychiatry. In both settings, clinicians deal with the complex interrelationships between medical and psychiatric disorders. Although initial models emphasized collaboration between family physicians, psychiatrists, and nurses, collaborative care has expanded to involve patients, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, pharmacists, and other providers. Several factors are associated with favorable patient outcomes. These include delivery of interventions in primary care settings by providers who have met face-to-face and/or have pre-existing clinical relationships. In the case of depression, good outcomes are particularly associated with approaches that combined collaborative care with treatment guidelines and systematic follow-up, especially for those with more severe illness. Family physicians with access to collaborative care also report greater knowledge, skills, and comfort in managing psychiatric disorders, even after controlling for possible confounders such as demographics and interest in psychiatry. Perceived medico-legal barriers to collaborative care can be addressed by adequate personal professional liability protection on the part of each practitioner, and ensuring that other health care professionals with whom they work collaboratively are similarly covered.

  12. Health Literacy and Access to Care.

    PubMed

    Levy, Helen; Janke, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-documented links between low health literacy, low rates of health insurance coverage, and poor health outcomes, there has been almost no research on the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported access to care. This study analyzed a large, nationally representative sample of community-dwelling adults ages 50 and older to estimate the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported difficulty obtaining care. We found that individuals with low health literacy were significantly more likely than individuals with adequate health literacy to delay or forgo needed care or to report difficulty finding a provider, even after we controlled for other factors, including health insurance coverage, employment, race/ethnicity, poverty, and general cognitive function. They were also more likely to lack a usual source of care, although this result was only marginally significant after we controlled for other factors. The results show that in addition to any obstacles that low health literacy creates within the context of the clinical encounter, low health literacy also reduces the probability that people get in the door of the health care system in a timely way. PMID:27043757

  13. Health Literacy and Access to Care.

    PubMed

    Levy, Helen; Janke, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-documented links between low health literacy, low rates of health insurance coverage, and poor health outcomes, there has been almost no research on the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported access to care. This study analyzed a large, nationally representative sample of community-dwelling adults ages 50 and older to estimate the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported difficulty obtaining care. We found that individuals with low health literacy were significantly more likely than individuals with adequate health literacy to delay or forgo needed care or to report difficulty finding a provider, even after we controlled for other factors, including health insurance coverage, employment, race/ethnicity, poverty, and general cognitive function. They were also more likely to lack a usual source of care, although this result was only marginally significant after we controlled for other factors. The results show that in addition to any obstacles that low health literacy creates within the context of the clinical encounter, low health literacy also reduces the probability that people get in the door of the health care system in a timely way.

  14. Approach to economic evaluation in primary care

    PubMed Central

    McBrien, Kerry A.; Manns, Braden

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present an overview of the methods of economic evaluation in health care, using examples of studies applicable to primary care. Sources of information The main concepts discussed in this article were derived from expert opinion and substantiated with well respected textbooks and comprehensive Canadian guidelines. Examples of cost-effectiveness estimates were taken from the published literature. Main message We describe the basic principles of economic evaluation and provide an introduction to its interpretation, using examples of studies applicable to primary care. Conclusion A basic understanding of health economics will allow primary care practitioners to begin to incorporate economic data, including that from economic evaluations when they are available, into resource planning for their practices. PMID:23766042

  15. Access to care: leveraging dental education.

    PubMed

    Bertolami, Charles N; Berne, Robert

    2014-11-01

    If it is not a naïve expectation for dentists who have been beneficiaries of public generosity to share their good fortune with the public that made it possible, there may be a rational basis for enhancing the role of dental education in improving access to oral health care by promoting-but not requiring-a voluntary service commitment after graduation commensurate with the magnitude of the subsidy received. Such an approach would be in accordance with the Institute of Medicine's report Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations, but without the governmental coercion explicit in the report. A sustainable alternative proposal is made here, offering both greater options to students in the financing of their dental education and greater obligations for those students who accept state subsidies: providing tuition discounts for students of state-supported dental schools based not on past residency status but rather on a future commitment to public service. This arrangement could be good public policy that might also help to create a culture in which dental students are given authentic options as part of a profession-wide ideology of public service. The result could well contribute to improved oral health care for the underserved.

  16. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  17. Primary care--opportunities and threats. Developing prescribing in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, C. P.; Taylor, R. J.; Blenkinsopp, A.

    1997-01-01

    The latest white papers on the NHS focus on stimulating innovation in the delivery of primary care and removing barriers to further development. Some of this innovation relates directly to prescribing in primary care, and in this article the authors speculate on what might happen if the prescribing initiatives referred to in the white papers were extended and disseminated more widely. The initiatives which might have the biggest impact are those encouraging closer collaboration between general practitioners and community pharmacists and those aiding extension of the current nurse prescribing scheme in primary care. Both offer considerable opportunities to improve primary care, but both bear some potential risks. PMID:9116557

  18. The ORIGINS of Primary Health Care and SELECTIVE Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Cueto, Marcos

    2004-01-01

    I present a historical study of the role played by the World Health Organization and UNICEF in the emergence and diffusion of the concept of primary health care during the late 1970s and early 1980s. I have analyzed these organizations’ political context, their leaders, the methodologies and technologies associated with the primary health care perspective, and the debates on the meaning of primary health care. These debates led to the development of an alternative, more restricted approach, known as selective primary health care. My study examined library and archival sources; I cite examples from Latin America. PMID:15514221

  19. Are managed care organizations in the United States impeding the delivery of primary care by nurse practitioners? A 2012 update on managed care organization credentialing and reimbursement practices.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ware, Jamie; Bond, Lisa; Doria, Natalie; Cunningham, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will create an estimated 16 million newly insured people. Coupled with an estimated shortage of over 60,000 primary care physicians, the country's public health care system will be at a challenging crossroads, as there will be more patients waiting to see fewer doctors. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can help to ease this crisis. NPs are health care professionals with the capability to provide important and critical access to primary care, particularly for vulnerable populations. However, despite convincing data about the quality of care provided by NPs, many managed care organizations (MCOs) across the country do not credential NPs as primary care providers, limiting the ability of NPs to be reimbursed by private insurers. To assess current credentialing practices of health plans across the United States, a brief telephone survey was administered to 258 of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States, operated by 98 different MCOs. Results indicated that 74% of these HMOs currently credential NPs as primary care providers. Although this represents progress over prior assessments, findings suggest that just over one fourth of major HMOs still do not recognize NPs as primary care providers. Given the documented shortage of primary care physicians in low-income communities in the United States, these credentialing policies continue to diminish the ability of NPs to deliver primary care to vulnerable populations. Furthermore, these policies could negatively impact access to care for thousands of newly insured Americans who will be seeking a primary care provider in 2014.

  20. The Motivation-Facilitation Theory of Prenatal Care Access.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Roman, Marian W

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of services, accessing health care remains a problem in the United States and other developed countries. Prenatal care has the potential to improve perinatal outcomes and decrease health disparities, yet many women struggle with access to care. Current theories addressing access to prenatal care focus on barriers, although such knowledge is minimally useful for clinicians. We propose a middle-range theory, the motivation-facilitation theory of prenatal care access, which condenses the prenatal care access process into 2 interacting components: motivation and facilitation. Maternal motivation is the mother's desire to begin and maintain care. Facilitation represents the goal of the clinic to create easy, open access to person-centered beneficial care. This simple model directs the focus of research and change to the interface of the woman and the clinic and encourages practice-level interventions that facilitate women entering and maintaining prenatal care.

  1. Primary care appointment availability and preventive care utilization: evidence from an audit study.

    PubMed

    Saloner, Brendan; Polsky, Daniel; Friedman, Ari; Rhodes, Karin

    2015-04-01

    Insurance expansions under the Affordable Care Act raise concerns about primary care access in communities with large numbers of newly insured. We linked individual-level, cross-sectional data on adult preventive care utilization from the 2011-2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to novel county-level measures of primary care appointment availability collected from an experimental audit study conducted in 10 states in 2012 to 2013 and other county-level health service and demographic measures. In multivariate regressions, we found higher county-level appointment availability for privately insured adults was associated with significantly lower preventive care utilization among adults likely to have private insurance. Estimates were attenuated after controlling for county-level uninsurance, poverty, and unemployment. By contrast, greater availability of Medicaid appointments was associated with higher, but not statistically significant, preventive care utilization for likely Medicaid enrollees. Our study highlights that the relationship between preventive care utilization and primary care access in small areas likely differs by insurance status. PMID:25637580

  2. Transitional care issues influencing access to health care: employability and insurability.

    PubMed

    Hellstedt, Linda F

    2004-12-01

    Addressing the issues of employability and insurability remains a challenge for young adults with CHD, their parents, and health care professionals who care for this patient group. Because of their chronic condition, these young persons require ongoing access to health care, throughout their adult lives. Because most individuals obtain insurance through their place of employment (unless it is obtained under a spouse's policy), adolescents with CHD should begin to look carefully at career options that are compatible with their interests and their physical abilities. If it is more appropriate, assistance with referral to vocational rehabilitation programs may be given. Finally, guidance should include how to avoid issues of discrimination during a job interview and when working at one's place of employment. Legislation now supports many workers as long as they can carry out the job for which they were hired. With the continuing rise in cost of health care and health insurance coverage, young persons with CHD must understand the high importance of maintaining health care coverage for their chronic health condition, usually through a group plan in their place of employment. Current legislation supports supplemental coverage and portability of coverage when changing jobs, which minimizes or eliminates waiting periods for pre-existing conditions. Suggestions for ongoing health care are included not only for care by a cardiologist but noncardiac care, including a primary care practitioner, dental care, and obstetric-gynecologic care. With the size and life expectancy of this patient group growing each year, the issues of employability and insurability must continually be addressed by health care professionals in conjunction with government policy makers and insurance representatives. As additional long-term survival data become available on the natural history of CHD, it is hoped that insurance requirements will be modified to afford this group the insurance coverage

  3. Transitional care issues influencing access to health care: employability and insurability.

    PubMed

    Hellstedt, Linda F

    2004-12-01

    Addressing the issues of employability and insurability remains a challenge for young adults with CHD, their parents, and health care professionals who care for this patient group. Because of their chronic condition, these young persons require ongoing access to health care, throughout their adult lives. Because most individuals obtain insurance through their place of employment (unless it is obtained under a spouse's policy), adolescents with CHD should begin to look carefully at career options that are compatible with their interests and their physical abilities. If it is more appropriate, assistance with referral to vocational rehabilitation programs may be given. Finally, guidance should include how to avoid issues of discrimination during a job interview and when working at one's place of employment. Legislation now supports many workers as long as they can carry out the job for which they were hired. With the continuing rise in cost of health care and health insurance coverage, young persons with CHD must understand the high importance of maintaining health care coverage for their chronic health condition, usually through a group plan in their place of employment. Current legislation supports supplemental coverage and portability of coverage when changing jobs, which minimizes or eliminates waiting periods for pre-existing conditions. Suggestions for ongoing health care are included not only for care by a cardiologist but noncardiac care, including a primary care practitioner, dental care, and obstetric-gynecologic care. With the size and life expectancy of this patient group growing each year, the issues of employability and insurability must continually be addressed by health care professionals in conjunction with government policy makers and insurance representatives. As additional long-term survival data become available on the natural history of CHD, it is hoped that insurance requirements will be modified to afford this group the insurance coverage

  4. Humanization policy in primary health care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Junges, José Roque

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze humanization practices in primary health care in the Brazilian Unified Health System according to the principles of the National Humanization Policy. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was carried out, followed by a meta-synthesis, using the following databases: BDENF (nursing database), BDTD (Brazilian digital library of theses and dissertations), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to nursing and allied health literature), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean health care sciences literature), MedLine (International health care sciences literature), PAHO (Pan-American Health Care Organization Library) and SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online). The following descriptors were used: Humanization; Humanizing Health Care; Reception: Humanized care: Humanization in health care; Bonding; Family Health Care Program; Primary Care; Public Health and Sistema Único de Saúde (the Brazilian public health care system). Research articles, case studies, reports of experiences, dissertations, theses and chapters of books written in Portuguese, English or Spanish, published between 2003 and 2011, were included in the analysis. RESULTS Among the 4,127 publications found on the topic, 40 studies were evaluated and included in the analysis, producing three main categories: the first referring to the infrastructure and organization of the primary care service, made clear the dissatisfaction with the physical structure and equipment of the services and with the flow of attendance, which can facilitate or make difficult the access. The second, referring to the health work process, showed issues about the insufficient number of professionals, fragmentation of the work processes, the professional profile and responsibility. The third category, referring to the relational technologies, indicated the reception, bonding, listening, respect and dialog with the service users. CONCLUSIONS Although many practices were cited as humanizing they do not produce changes

  5. Diverticular Disease in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Wensaas, Knut-Arne; Hungin, Amrit Pali

    2016-10-01

    Diverticular disease is a chronic and common condition, and yet the impact of diverticular disease in primary care is largely unknown. The diagnosis of diverticular disease relies on the demonstration of diverticula in the colon, and the necessary investigations are often not available in primary care. The specificity and sensitivity of symptoms, clinical signs and laboratory tests alone are generally low and consequently the diagnostic process will be characterized by uncertainty. Also, the criteria for symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease in the absence of macroscopic inflammation are not clearly defined. Therefore both the prevalence of diverticular disease and the incidence of diverticulitis in primary care are unknown. Current recommendations for treatment and follow-up of patients with acute diverticulitis are based on studies where the diagnosis has been verified by computerized tomography. The results cannot be directly transferred to primary care where the diagnosis has to rely on the interpretation of symptoms and signs. Therefore, one must allow for greater diagnostic uncertainty, and safety netting in the event of unexpected development of the condition is an important aspect of the management of diverticulitis in primary care. The highest prevalence of diverticular disease is found among older patients, where multimorbidity and polypharmacy is common. The challenge is to remember the possible contribution of diverticular disease to the patient's overall condition and to foresee its implications in terms of advice and treatment in relation to other diseases. PMID:27622376

  6. Large Independent Primary Care Medical Groups

    PubMed Central

    Casalino, Lawrence P.; Chen, Melinda A.; Staub, C. Todd; Press, Matthew J.; Mendelsohn, Jayme L.; Lynch, John T.; Miranda, Yesenia

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE In the turbulent US health care environment, many primary care physicians seek hospital employment. Large physician-owned primary care groups are an alternative, but few physicians or policy makers realize that such groups exist. We wanted to describe these groups, their advantages, and their challenges. METHODS We identified 21 groups and studied 5 that varied in size and location. We conducted interviews with group leaders, surveyed randomly selected group physicians, and interviewed external observers—leaders of a health plan, hospital, and specialty medical group that shared patients with the group. We triangulated responses from group leaders, group physicians, and external observers to identify key themes. RESULTS The groups’ physicians work in small practices, with the group providing economies of scale necessary to develop laboratory and imaging services, health information technology, and quality improvement infrastructure. The groups differ in their size and the extent to which they engage in value-based contracting, though all are moving to increase the amount of financial risk they take for their quality and cost performance. Unlike hospital-employed and multispecialty groups, independent primary care groups can aim to reduce health care costs without conflicting incentives to fill hospital beds and keep specialist incomes high. Each group was positively regarded by external observers. The groups are under pressure, however, to sell to organizations that can provide capital for additional infrastructure to engage in value-based contracting, as well as provide substantial income to physicians from the sale. CONCLUSIONS Large, independent primary care groups have the potential to make primary care attractive to physicians and to improve patient care by combining human scale advantages of physician autonomy and the small practice setting with resources that are important to succeed in value-based contracting. PMID:26755779

  7. Skill mix, roles and remuneration in the primary care workforce: who are the healthcare professionals in the primary care teams across the world?

    PubMed

    Freund, Tobias; Everett, Christine; Griffiths, Peter; Hudon, Catherine; Naccarella, Lucio; Laurant, Miranda

    2015-03-01

    World-wide, shortages of primary care physicians and an increased demand for services have provided the impetus for delivering team-based primary care. The diversity of the primary care workforce is increasing to include a wider range of health professionals such as nurse practitioners, registered nurses and other clinical staff members. Although this development is observed internationally, skill mix in the primary care team and the speed of progress to deliver team-based care differs across countries. This work aims to provide an overview of education, tasks and remuneration of nurses and other primary care team members in six OECD countries. Based on a framework of team organization across the care continuum, six national experts compare skill-mix, education and training, tasks and remuneration of health professionals within primary care teams in the United States, Canada, Australia, England, Germany and the Netherlands. Nurses are the main non-physician health professional working along with doctors in most countries although types and roles in primary care vary considerably between countries. However, the number of allied health professionals and support workers, such as medical assistants, working in primary care is increasing. Shifting from 'task delegation' to 'team care' is a global trend but limited by traditional role concepts, legal frameworks and reimbursement schemes. In general, remuneration follows the complexity of medical tasks taken over by each profession. Clear definitions of each team-member's role may facilitate optimally shared responsibility for patient care within primary care teams. Skill mix changes in primary care may help to maintain access to primary care and quality of care delivery. Learning from experiences in other countries may inspire policy makers and researchers to work on efficient and effective teams care models worldwide.

  8. Interlibrary loan in primary access libraries: challenging the traditional view

    PubMed Central

    Dudden, Rosalind Farnam; Coldren, Sue; Condon, Joyce Elizabeth; Katsh, Sara; Reiter, Catherine Morton; Roth, Pamela Lynn

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Primary access libraries serve as the foundation of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) interlibrary loan (ILL) hierarchy, yet few published reports directly address the important role these libraries play in the ILL system. This may reflect the traditional view that small, primary access libraries are largely users of ILL, rather than important contributors to the effectiveness and efficiency of the national ILL system. Objective: This study was undertaken to test several commonly held beliefs regarding ILL system use by primary access libraries. Hypotheses: Three hypotheses were developed. H1: Colorado and Wyoming primary access libraries comply with the recommended ILL guideline of adhering to a hierarchical structure, emphasizing local borrowing. H2: The closures of two Colorado Council of Medical Librarians (CCML) primary access libraries in 1996 resulted in twenty-three Colorado primary access libraries' borrowing more from their state resource library in 1997. H3: The number of subscriptions held by Colorado and Wyoming primary access libraries is positively correlated with the number of items they loan and negatively correlated with the number of items they borrow. Methods: The hypotheses were tested using the 1992 and 1997 DOCLINE and OCLC data of fifty-four health sciences libraries, including fifty primary access libraries, two state resource libraries, and two general academic libraries in Colorado and Wyoming. The ILL data were obtained electronically and analyzed using Microsoft Word 98, Microsoft Excel 98, and JMP 3.2.2. Results: CCML primary access libraries comply with the recommended guideline to emphasize local borrowing by supplying each other with the majority of their ILLs, instead of overburdening libraries located at higher levels in the ILL hierarchy (H1). The closures of two CCML primary access libraries appear to have affected the entire ILL system, resulting in a greater volume of ILL activity for the

  9. Rainbows: a primary health care initiative for primary schools.

    PubMed

    Munns, Ailsa; Forde, Karen A; Krouzecky, Miriam; Shields, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Within the current Australian health system is the understanding of a need to change from the predominate biomedical model to incorporate a comprehensive primary health care centred approach, embracing the social contexts of health and wellbeing. Recent research investigated the benefits of the primary health care philosophy and strategies in relation to the Rainbows programme which addresses grief and loss in primary school aged students in Western Australia. A multidisciplinary collaboration between the Western Australian Departments of Health and Education enabled community school health nurse coordinators to train teacher facilitators in the implementation of Rainbows, enabling support for students and their parents. The results of this qualitative study indicate that all participants regard Rainbows as effective, with many perceived benefits to students and their families. PMID:26281402

  10. The Teamlet Model of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Bodenheimer, Thomas; Laing, Brian Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    The 15-minute visit does not allow the physician sufficient time to provide the variety of services expected of primary care. A teamlet (little team) model of care is proposed to extend the 15-minute physician visit. The teamlet consists of 1 clinician and 2 health coaches. A clinical encounter includes 4 parts: a previsit by the coach, a visit by the clinician together with the coach, a postvisit by the coach, and between-visit care by the coach. Medical assistants or other practice personnel would require retraining to assume the health coach role. Some organizations have instituted aspects of the teamlet model. Primary care practices interested in trying out the teamlet concept need to train 2 health coaches for each full-time equivalent clinician to ensure smooth patient flow. PMID:17893389

  11. Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care looks forward to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Licciardone, John C

    2009-01-01

    Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care, which enters its third year of operation in 2009 under the umbrella of BioMed Central, continues to promote and advance open access publishing through universal online access without charge, indexing in PubMed and archiving in PubMed Central, retention of authors' copyright, and expeditious peer review. Notable accomplishments during 2008 included a median lag time of four months from initial manuscript submission to publication, designation of eight articles as "highly accessed," and achievement of a balanced proportion of publications in our core topic areas of osteopathic medicine and primary care. In October 2008, Springer Science+Business Media, a major publisher of journals in science, technology, and medicine, acquired the BioMed Central Group. Our 2009 Editorial Board is presented herein, as well as a new mechanism for posting book reviews on the Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care website. We continue to encourage manuscript submissions and reader comments on our articles. Waivers or discounts of article processing charges are available via several mechanisms for eligible authors who submit qualified manuscripts. PMID:19193237

  12. [Management of psychological trauma in primary care].

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rodrigo A; Cortés, Paula F; Accatino, Luigi; Sorensen, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to traumatic events is frequent in the general population and psychiatric sequelae such as post-traumatic stress disorders are common. The symptoms of psychiatric sequelae after trauma are vague, with multiple psychological and physical symptoms, which can confuse the health care professional. This paper seeks to facilitate the work in primary care, providing practical information about the diagnosis, initial management and referral of patients who have suffered traumatic experiences. Some early interventions and treatments are suggested. PMID:27552016

  13. Educating primary care clinicians about health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Chiapa, Ana L

    2007-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health disparities inarguably exist in the United States. It is important to educate primary care clinicians regarding this topic because they have the ability to have an impact in the reduction of health disparities. This article presents the evidence that disparities exist, how clinicians contribute to these disparities, and what primary care clinicians can do to reduce disparities in their practice. Clinicians are able to impact health disparities by receiving and providing cross-cultural education, communicating effectively with patients, and practicing evidence-based medicine. The changes suggested herein will have an impact on the current state of health of our nation. PMID:17371577

  14. [Thyroid dysfunction in primary care medicine].

    PubMed

    Wuerzner, Kaisa; Pasche, Olivier; Rodondi, Nicolas; Portmann, Luc

    2010-12-01

    Thyroid function tests include the measuring of the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (T4) in the case of abnormal TSH. These tests are frequently performed in primary care medicine since many clinical situations can be suggestive of dysthyroidism, as for example fatigue, depressive states or cardiac arthmia. In the case of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, the indications for treatment are controversial there being a lack of significant randomised studies. For primary care physicians faced with abnormal thyroid function tests we propose a diagnostic approach, clinical recommendations, and indications for referral to the specialist. PMID:21207724

  15. [The scientific entertainer in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Santos, José Manuel; Lapetra, José

    2012-09-01

    The scientific method is capable of being applied in primary care. In this article we defend the role of the "scientific entertainer "as strategic and necessary in achieving this goal. The task has to include playful and light-hearted content. We explore some words in English that may help us to understand the concept of "scientific entertainer" from a semantic point of view (showman, master of ceremonies, entrepreneur, go-between) also in Spanish language (counsellor, mediator, methodologist) and finally in Latin and Greek (tripalium, negotium, chronos, kairos). We define the clinical, manager or research health-worker who is skilled in primary care as a "primarylogist". PMID:22018794

  16. [The scientific entertainer in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Santos, José Manuel; Lapetra, José

    2012-09-01

    The scientific method is capable of being applied in primary care. In this article we defend the role of the "scientific entertainer "as strategic and necessary in achieving this goal. The task has to include playful and light-hearted content. We explore some words in English that may help us to understand the concept of "scientific entertainer" from a semantic point of view (showman, master of ceremonies, entrepreneur, go-between) also in Spanish language (counsellor, mediator, methodologist) and finally in Latin and Greek (tripalium, negotium, chronos, kairos). We define the clinical, manager or research health-worker who is skilled in primary care as a "primarylogist".

  17. [Psychosomatic primary care for urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Hohenfellner, U

    2015-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a significant impairment of the quality of life. Many patients are treated insufficiently or even suffer from complications of incontinence surgery. Psychosomatic primary care serves to improve the diagnostic work-up and helps to select the appropriate therapeutic option. It also optimizes the treatment outcome by supplementing the somatically oriented urological therapy with the psychosomatically aligned extended medical dialogue and body-oriented methods. Psychosomatic primary care is based on the biopsychosocial model and uses theoretical knowledge and practical techniques that can be learnt under professional guidance. PMID:25488343

  18. Primary care physician shortages could be eliminated through use of teams, nonphysicians, and electronic communication.

    PubMed

    Green, Linda V; Savin, Sergei; Lu, Yina

    2013-01-01

    Most existing estimates of the shortage of primary care physicians are based on simple ratios, such as one physician for every 2,500 patients. These estimates do not consider the impact of such ratios on patients' ability to get timely access to care. They also do not quantify the impact of changing patient demographics on the demand side and alternative methods of delivering care on the supply side. We used simulation methods to provide estimates of the number of primary care physicians needed, based on a comprehensive analysis considering access, demographics, and changing practice patterns. We show that the implementation of some increasingly popular operational changes in the ways clinicians deliver care-including the use of teams or "pods," better information technology and sharing of data, and the use of nonphysicians-have the potential to offset completely the increase in demand for physician services while improving access to care, thereby averting a primary care physician shortage.

  19. Primary care physician use across the breast cancer care continuum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Lofters, Aisha; Moineddin, Rahim; Decker, Kathleen; Groome, Patti; Kendell, Cynthia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Li, Dongdong; McBride, Mary L.; Mittmann, Nicole; Porter, Geoff; Turner, Donna; Urquhart, Robin; Winget, Marcy; Zhang, Yang; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe primary care physician (PCP) use and continuity of PCP care across the breast cancer care continuum. Design Population-based, retrospective cohort study using provincial cancer registries linked to health administrative databases. Setting British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. Participants All women with incident invasive breast cancer from 2007 to 2012 in Manitoba and Ontario and from 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia. Main outcome measures The number and proportions of visits to PCPs were determined. Continuity of care was measured using the Usual Provider of Care index calculated as the proportion of visits to the most-often-visited PCP in the 6 to 30 months before a breast cancer diagnosis (baseline) and from 1 to 3 years following a breast cancer diagnosis (survivorship). Results More than three-quarters of patients visited their PCPs 2 or more times during the breast cancer diagnostic period, and more than 80% of patients had at least 1 PCP visit during breast cancer adjuvant treatment. Contact with the PCP decreased over time during breast cancer survivorship. Of the 3 phases, women appeared to be most likely to not have PCP contact during adjuvant treatment, with 10.7% (Ontario) to 18.7% (British Columbia) of women having no PCP visits during this phase. However, a sizable minority of women had at least monthly visits during the treatment phase, particularly in Manitoba and Ontario, where approximately a quarter of women saw a PCP at least monthly. We observed higher continuity of care with PCPs in survivorship (compared with baseline) in all provinces. Conclusion Primary care physicians were generally involved throughout the breast cancer care continuum, but the level of involvement varied across care phases and by province. Future interventions will aim to further integrate primary and oncology care. PMID:27737994

  20. The work of a clinical psychologist in primary care.

    PubMed

    Johnston, M

    1978-11-01

    The data presented suggest that general practitioners would be likely to refer a large number of patients with diverse problems to clinical psychologists working in health centres. Compared with a centrally organized clinical psychology service, the work of the primary care psychologist is likely to offer the following advantages:1. Access to psychological help for patients with a need for such help, but who could not attend a central clinic owing to problems associated with travel, work, physical disability, or even a presenting problem such as agoraphobia.2. Greater continuity of care of patients.3. Increased communication between the psychologist and members of the primary care teams.4. Possibility of the psychologist seeing the patient earlier, before the problems have become entrenched.5. Less need for referral to other agencies.6. Reduced stigma for the patient.7. Development of new therapeutic approaches relevant to problems presenting in primary care.8. More flexible and more relevant therapy due to seeing the patients in their home setting.9. Greater therapeutic involvement of the patient's family.10. Reduced costs and inconvenience for the patient's family.11. Reduced administrative and ambulance service costs.While these points do not overcome the need for a formal evaluation of the work of psychologists in primary care, they do suggest that there are advantages in this type of service over the services which are currently available and that a full evaluation would be worth undertaking.

  1. Primary care for adults on the autism spectrum.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Christina; Kripke, Clarissa Calliope; Raymaker, Dora

    2014-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is defined by differences in social communication and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities. Skills and challenges can change depending on environmental stimuli, supports, and stressors. Quality of life can be improved by the use of accommodations, assistive technologies, therapies to improve adaptive function or communication, caregiver training, acceptance, access, and inclusion. This article focuses on the identification of ASD in adults, referrals for services, the recognition of associated conditions, strategies and accommodations to facilitate effective primary care services, and ethical issues related to caring for autistic adults.

  2. Tobacco use disorder treatment in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Kunyk, Diane; Els, Charl; Papadakis, Sophia; Selby, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To test a team-based, site-specific, multicomponent clinical system pathway designed for enhancing tobacco use disorder treatment by primary care physicians. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting Sixty primary care sites in Alberta. Participants A convenience sample of 198 primary care physicians from the population of 2857. Main outcome measures Data collection occurred between September 2010 and February 2012 on 3 distinct measures. Twenty-four weeks after the intervention, audits of the primary care practices assessed the adoption and sustainability of 10 tobacco clinical system pathway components, a survey measured changes in physicians’ treatment intentions, and patient chart reviews examined changes in physicians’ consistency with the treatment algorithm. Results The completion rate by physicians was 89.4%. An intention-to-treat approach was undertaken for statistical analysis. Intervention uptake was demonstrated by positive changes at 4 weeks in how many of the 10 clinical system measures were performed (mean [SD] = 4.22 [1.60] vs 8.57 [1.46]; P < .001). Physicians demonstrated significant favourable changes in 9 of the 12 measures of treatment intention (P < .05). The 18 282 chart reviews documented significant increases in 6 of the 8 algorithm components. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the provision of a tobacco clinical system pathway that incorporates other members of the health care team and builds on existing office infrastructures will support positive and sustainable changes in tobacco use disorder treatment by physicians in primary care. This study reaffirms the substantive and important role of supporting how treatment is delivered in physicians’ practices. PMID:25022640

  3. Primary health care of the newborn baby.

    PubMed

    Bhakoo, O N; Kumar, R

    1990-01-01

    More than 50% of infant deaths in India occur during the neonatal period. High priority therefore needs to be given to improving the survival of newborns. A large number of neonatal deaths have their origin in the perinatal period and are mainly determined by the health and nutritional status of the mother, the quality of care during pregnancy and delivery, and the immediate care of the newborn at birth. Main causes of neonatal mortality are birth asphyxia, respiratory problems, and infections, especially tetanus. Most such deaths occur among low birthweight babies. Hypothermia, undernutrition, and mismanaged breast feeding may also indirectly contribute to neonatal mortality. Community-based studies have, however, demonstrated that most neonatal mortality can be affordably prevented through primary health care. Efforts are underway to expand the health care infrastructure, but the outreach of maternal and child health care remains unsatisfactory especially in rural areas. PMID:12319228

  4. Geriatric depression assessment by rural primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, M; Vogels, L; Gravdal, J

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Depression is the fourth leading cause of the global disease burden, and approximately one in four elderly people may suffer from depression or depressive symptoms. Depression in later life is generally regarded as highly treatable, but under-treatment is still common in this population, especially among those in rural areas where access to healthcare is often an issue. In this study rural primary care physicians’ practices, attitudes, barriers and perceived needs in the diagnosis and treatment of geriatric depression were described, and trends in care delivery examined. Methods A survey was sent to 162 rural Illinois family physicians and general internists. The survey focused on current practices, attitudes and perceptions regarding geriatric depression, barriers to and needs for improvement in depression care and physician and practice characteristics. Results Seventy-six physicians (47%) responded. The rural physicians indicated that over one-third of their patients aged 60 years and older were depressed. All reported routine screening for depression, with 24% using the Beck Depression Inventory. Overall, physicians expressed positive attitudes about their involvement in treating older depressed patients. However, 45% indicated a ‘gap’ between ideal and available care in their rural practices. Physicians with higher proportions of elderly patients in their panels were more likely to feel that more training in residency in geriatric care would be helpful in improving care, and that better availability of psychologists and counselors would be important for improvement of care for older, depressed patients. Conclusions This study responds to recent calls to better understand how primary care physicians diagnose and treat depression in older adults. Generally, primary care physicians appear comfortable and prepared in depression diagnosis and management, but factors such as availability of appropriate care remain a challenge. PMID:19929129

  5. Integrated working between residential care homes and primary care: a survey of care homes in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Older people living in care homes in England have complex health needs due to a range of medical conditions, mental health needs and frailty. Despite an increasing policy expectation that professionals should operate in an integrated way across organisational boundaries, there is a lack of understanding between care homes and the National Health Service (NHS) about how the two sectors should work together, meaning that residents can experience a poor "fit" between their needs, and services they can access. This paper describes a survey to establish the current extent of integrated working that exists between care homes and primary and community health and social services. Methods A self-completion, online questionnaire was designed by the research team. Items on the different dimensions of integration (funding, administrative, organisational, service delivery, clinical care) were included. The survey was sent to a random sample of residential care homes with more than 25 beds (n = 621) in England in 2009. Responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results The survey achieved an overall response rate of 15.8%. Most care homes (78.7%) worked with more than one general practice. Respondents indicated that a mean of 14.1 professionals/ services (other than GPs) had visited the care homes in the last six months (SD 5.11, median 14); a mean of .39 (SD.163) professionals/services per bed. The most frequent services visiting were district nursing, chiropody and community psychiatric nurses. Many (60%) managers considered that they worked with the NHS in an integrated way, including sharing documents, engaging in integrated care planning and joint learning and training. However, some care home managers cited working practices dictated by NHS methods of service delivery and priorities for care, rather than those of the care home or residents, a lack of willingness by NHS professionals to share information, and low levels of respect for

  6. Organisation of Prevention in Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This report examines the possiblities of increasing the amount of preventive work being carried out by primary care workers in European communities. Before making practical recommendations about promoting prevention, an analysis is presented of the main present day problems. These center on the environment (not only physical but also social and…

  7. Primary care in the New Hebrides

    PubMed Central

    de Soldenhoff, R.

    1979-01-01

    The New Hebrides is a small Melanesian country in the South-West Pacific whose doctors are almost entirely recruited from France and Great Britain, the two countries which jointly administer the territory. This paper describes briefly the difficulties of providing primary health care for a fairly primitive island society. PMID:316455

  8. 78 FR 22527 - TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project AGENCY: Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice of Extension of the TRICARE South Region United States Coast Guard Access to Care Demonstration... fiscal year to TRICARE authorized Urgent Care Centers without obtaining an authorization from...

  9. Primary Care in Dentistry - An Untapped Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Dentistry is neither an allied health profession nor a paramedical profession. It is the only anatomically focused health care profession that is university-based and for which primary care responsibility is maintained by the profession. Dentists must have a reliable knowledge of basic clinical medicine for safely and effectively treating individuals with chronic and other diseases, which make them biologically and pharmacologically compromised. With changes in the life expectancy of people and lifestyles, as well as rapid advancement in biomedical sciences, dentists should have similar knowledge like a physician in any other fields of medicine. There are number of primary care activities that can be conducted in the dental office like screening of diabetics, managing hypertension etc., The present review was conducted after doing extensive literature search of peer-reviewed journals. The review throws a spotlight on these activities and also suggests some the measures that can be adopted to modify dental education to turn dentists to oral physicians. PMID:25810982

  10. Comparing Homeless Persons’ Care Experiences in Tailored Versus Nontailored Primary Care Programs

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Cheryl L.; Steward, Jocelyn L.; Jones, Richard N.; Roth, David L.; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J.; Kim, Theresa W.; Austin, Erika L.; Henry, Stephen Randal; Kay Johnson, N.; Shanette Granstaff, U.; O’Connell, James J.; Golden, Joya F.; Young, Alexander S.; Davis, Lori L.; Pollio, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We compared homeless patients’ experiences of care in health care organizations that differed in their degree of primary care design service tailoring. Methods. We surveyed homeless-experienced patients (either recently or currently homeless) at 3 Veterans Affairs (VA) mainstream primary care settings in Pennsylvania and Alabama, a homeless-tailored VA clinic in California, and a highly tailored non-VA Health Care for the Homeless Program in Massachusetts (January 2011-March 2012). We developed a survey, the “Primary Care Quality-Homeless Survey," to reflect the concerns and aspirations of homeless patients. Results. Mean scores at the tailored non-VA site were superior to those from the 3 mainstream VA sites (P < .001). Adjusting for patient characteristics, these differences remained significant for subscales assessing the patient–clinician relationship (P < .001) and perceptions of cooperation among providers (P = .004). There were 1.5- to 3-fold increased odds of an unfavorable experience in the domains of the patient–clinician relationship, cooperation, and access or coordination for the mainstream VA sites compared with the tailored non-VA site; the tailored VA site attained intermediate results. Conclusions. Tailored primary care service design was associated with a superior service experience for patients who experienced homelessness. PMID:24148052

  11. [Renewing primary health care in the Americas].

    PubMed

    Macinko, James; Montenegro, Hernán; Nebot Adell, Carme; Etienne, Carissa

    2007-01-01

    At the 2003 meeting of the Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the PAHO Member States issued a mandate to strengthen primary health care (Resolution CD44. R6). The mandate led in 2005 to the document "Renewing Primary Health Care in the Americas. A Position Paper of the Pan American Health Organization/WHO [World Health Organization]," and it culminated in the Declaration of Montevideo, an agreement among the governments of the Region of the Americas to renew their commitment to primary health care (PHC). Scientific data have shown that PHC, regarded as the basis of all the health systems in the Region, is a key component of effective health systems and can be adapted to the range of diverse social, cultural, and economic conditions that exist. The new, global health paradigm has given rise to changes in the population's health care needs. Health services and systems must adapt to address these changes. Building on the legacy of the International Conference on Primary Health Care, held in 1978 in Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics), PAHO proposes a group of strategies critical to adopting PHC-based health care systems based on the principles of equity, solidarity, and the right to the highest possible standard of health. The main objective of the strategies is to develop and/or strengthen PHC-based health systems in the entire Region of the Americas. A substantial effort will be required on the part of health professionals, citizens, governments, associations, and agencies. This document explains the strategies that must be employed at the national, subregional, Regional, and global levels.

  12. Opportunity Knocks: HIV Prevention in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Thrun, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    Expansions in health care coverage, a comprehensive framework for HIV prevention and care, electronic medical records, and novel HIV prevention modalities create a current opportunity to change the trajectory of the HIV epidemic in the United States. HIV is increasingly disproportionately found in populations historically at higher risk, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender women, injection drug users, and persons of color. This underscores the need for providers to identify persons at higher risk for HIV and assure the provision of screening and prevention services. In turn, universal screening for HIV-testing every adolescent and adult at least once in their lifetime-will increasingly be necessary to find the infrequent cases of HIV in lower risk populations. In both these domains, primary care providers will play a unique role in complementing traditional providers of HIV prevention and care services by increasing the proportion of their patients who have been screened for HIV, opening dialogues around sexual health, including asking about sexual orientation and gender identity, and prescribing antivirals as pre- and postexposure prophylaxis for their non-HIV-infected patients. Primary care providers must understand and embrace their importance along the HIV prevention and care continuum. PMID:26789615

  13. STRUCTURAL AND HIDDEN BARRIERS TO A LOCAL PRIMARY HEALTH CARE INFRASTRUCTURE: AUTONOMY, DECISIONS ABOUT PRIMARY HEALTH CARE, AND THE CENTRALITY AND SIGNIFICANCE OF POWER

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Christopher R.; Hansberry, Shantisha T.; Arrieta, Martha I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine a local primary health care infrastructure and the reality of primary health care from the perspective of residents of a small, urban community in the southern United States. Methodology/approach: Data derive from 13 semi-structured focus groups, plus three semi-structured interviews, and were analyzed inductively consistent with a grounded theory approach. Findings: Structural barriers to the local primary health care infrastructure include transportation, clinic and appointment wait time, and co-payments and health insurance. Hidden barriers consist of knowledge about local health care services, non-physician gatekeepers, and fear of medical care. Community residents have used home remedies and the emergency department at the local academic medical center to manage these structural and hidden barriers. Research limitations/implications: Findings might not generalize to primary health care infrastructures in other communities, respondent perspectives can be biased, and the data are subject to various interpretations and conceptual and thematic frameworks. Nevertheless, the structural and hidden barriers to the local primary health care infrastructure have considerably diminished the autonomy community residents have been able to exercise over their decisions about primary health care, ultimately suggesting that efforts concerned with increasing the access of medically underserved groups to primary health care in local communities should recognize the centrality and significance of power. Originality/value: This study addresses a gap in the sociological literature regarding the impact of specific barriers to primary health care among medically underserved groups. PMID:24532864

  14. Integrating Primary Medical Care With Addiction Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Weisner, Constance; Mertens, Jennifer; Parthasarathy, Sujaya; Moore, Charles; Lu, Yun

    2010-01-01

    Context The prevalence of medical disorders is high among substance abuse patients, yet medical services are seldom provided in coordination with substance abuse treatment. Objective To examine differences in treatment outcomes and costs between integrated and independent models of medical and substance abuse care as well as the effect of integrated care in a subgroup of patients with substance abuse–related medical conditions (SAMCs). Design Randomized controlled trial conducted between April 1997 and December 1998. Setting and Patients Adult men and women (n=592) who were admitted to a large health maintenance organization chemical dependency program in Sacramento, Calif. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned to receive treatment through an integrated model, in which primary health care was included within the addiction treatment program (n=285), or an independent treatment-as-usual model, in which primary care and substance abuse treatment were provided separately (n=307). Both programs were group based and lasted 8 weeks, with 10 months of aftercare available. Main Outcome Measures Abstinence outcomes, treatment utilization, and costs 6 months after randomization. Results Both groups showed improvement on all drug and alcohol measures. Overall, there were no differences in total abstinence rates between the integrated care and independent care groups (68% vs 63%, P=.18). For patients without SAMCs, there were also no differences in abstinence rates (integrated care, 66% vs independent care, 73%; P=.23) and there was a slight but nonsignificant trend of higher costs for the integrated care group ($367.96 vs $324.09, P=.19). However, patients with SAMCs (n=341) were more likely to be abstinent in the integrated care group than the independent care group (69% vs 55%, P=.006; odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-2.97). This was true for both those with medical (OR, 3.38; 95% CI, 1.68-6.80) and psychiatric (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1

  15. Disparities in Accessibility of Certified Primary Stroke Centers

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Michael T.; Wiebe, Doug; Bowman, Ariel; Wolff, Catherine S.; Albright, Karen C.; Roy, Jason; Balcer, Laura; Branas, Charles C.; Carr, Brendan G.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose We examine whether the proportion of the US population with ≤ 60 minute access to PSCs varies based on geographic and demographic factors. Methods Population level access to PSCs within 60 minutes was estimated using validated models of prehospital time accounting for critical prehospital time intervals and existing road networks. We examined the association between geographic factors, demographic factors, and access to care. Multivariable models quantified the association between demographics and PSC access for the entire US and then stratified by urbanicity. Results Of the 309 million people in the US, 65.8% had ≤ 60 minute PSC access by ground ambulance (87% major cities, 59% minor cities, 9% suburbs, and 1% rural). PSC access was lower in stroke belt states (44% vs. 69%). Non-Whites were more likely to have access than Whites (77% vs. 62%) and Hispanics were more likely to have access than non-Hispanics (78% vs. 64%). Demographics were not meaningfully associated with access in major cities or suburbs. In smaller cities there was less access in areas with lower income, less education, more uninsured, more Medicare and/or Medicaid eligibles, lower healthcare utilization and healthcare resources... Conclusions There are significant geographic disparities in access to PSCs. Access is limited in non-urban areas. Despite the higher burden of cerebrovascular disease in stroke belt states, access to care is lower in these areas. Select demographic and healthcare factors are strongly associated with access to care in smaller cities, but not in other areas, including major cities. PMID:25300972

  16. Primary Care of Women Aging with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Womack, Julie A.; Brandt, Cynthia A.; Justice, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    Women are living longer with HIV infection, but their life expectancy is shorter than for women in the general population. How best to manage the multiple comorbidities and polypharmacy that are common in HIV infected individuals has not been studied. This paper explores areas where the primary care of women with HIV may differ from that of aging women in the general population. We also discuss aspects of care that may not commonly be considered in those under the age of 65, specifically multimorbidity and polypharmacy. Incorporating a gerontologic approach in the care of these women may optimize outcomes until research provides more definitive answers as to how best to collaborate with women with HIV to provide them with optimal care. PMID:25782848

  17. Political, cultural and economic foundations of primary care in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kringos, Dionne S; Boerma, Wienke G W; van der Zee, Jouke; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2013-12-01

    This article explores various contributing factors to explain differences in the strength of the primary care (PC) structure and services delivery across Europe. Data on the strength of primary care in 31 European countries in 2009/10 were used. The results showed that the national political agenda, economy, prevailing values, and type of healthcare system are all important factors that influence the development of strong PC. Wealthier countries are associated with a weaker PC structure and lower PC accessibility, while Eastern European countries seemed to have used their growth in national income to strengthen the accessibility and continuity of PC. Countries governed by left-wing governments are associated with a stronger PC structure, accessibility and coordination of PC. Countries with a social-security based system are associated with a lower accessibility and continuity of PC; the opposite is true for transitional systems. Cultural values seemed to affect all aspects of PC. It can be concluded that strengthening PC means mobilising multiple leverage points, policy options, and political will in line with prevailing values in a country. PMID:24355465

  18. The integration of a telemental health service into rural primary medical care.

    PubMed

    Davis, G L; Boulger, J G; Hovland, J C; Hoven, N T

    2007-07-01

    Mental health care shortages in rural areas have resulted in the majority of services being offered through primary medical care settings. The authors argue that a paradigm shift must occur so that those in need of mental health care have reasonable, timely access to these services. Changes proposed include integrating mental health services into primary medical care settings, moving away from the traditional view of mental health care services (one therapist, one hour, and one client), and increasing the consultative role of psychologists and other mental health care providers in primary medical care. Characteristics of mental health providers that facilitate effective integration into primary medical care are presented. The results of a needs assessment survey and an example of a telemental health project are described. This project involved brief consultations with patients and their physicians from a shared care model using a broadband internet telecommunications link between a rural clinic and mental health service providers in an urban area.

  19. Assessing the Proximity Relationship of Walk-in Clinics and Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alissa; Revere, Lee; Ramphul, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the spatial relationship between primary care provider clinics and walk-in clinics. Using ZIP code level data from Harris County, Texas, the results suggest that primary care physicians and walk-in clinics are similarly located at lower rates in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status. Although current clinic location choices effectively broaden the gap in primary care access for the lower income population, the growing number of newly insured individuals may make it increasingly attractive for walk-in clinics to locate in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status and less competition from primary care physicians. PMID:27576053

  20. Utilization of Routine Primary Care Services Among Dancers.

    PubMed

    Alimena, Stephanie; Air, Mary E; Gribbin, Caitlin; Manejias, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the current utilization of primary and preventive health care services among dancers in order to assess their self-reported primary care needs. Participants were 37 dancers from a variety of dance backgrounds who presented for a free dancer health screening in a large US metropolitan area (30 females, 7 males; mean age: 27.5 ± 7.4 years; age range: 19 to 49 years; mean years of professional dancing: 6.4 ± 5.4 years). Dancers were screened for use of primary care, mental health, and women's health resources using the Health Screen for Professional Dancers developed by the Task Force on Dancer Health. Most dancers had health insurance (62.2%), but within the last 2 years, only approximately half of them (54.1%) reported having a physical examination by a physician. Within the last year, 54.1% of dancers had had a dental check-up, and 56.7% of female dancers received gynecologic care. Thirty percent of female participants indicated irregular menstrual cycles, 16.7% had never been to a gynecologist, and 16.7% were taking birth control. Utilization of calcium and vitamin D supplementation was 27.0% and 29.7%, respectively, and 73.0% were interested in nutritional counseling. A high rate of psychological fatigue and sleep deprivation was found (35.1%), along with a concomitant high rate of self-reported need for mental health counseling (29.7%). Cigarette and recreational drug use was low (5.4% and 5.4%); however, 32.4% engaged in binge drinking within the last year (based on the CDC definition). These findings indicate that dancers infrequently access primary care services, despite high self-reported need for nutritional, mental, and menstrual health counseling and treatment. More studies are warranted to understand dancers' primary health care seeking behavior. PMID:27661621

  1. Family history in primary care pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Tarini, Beth A; McInerney, Joseph D

    2013-12-01

    The family history has been called the first genetic test; it was a core element of primary care long before the current wave of genetics technologies and services became clinically relevant. Risk assessment based on family history allows providers to personalize and prioritize health messages, shifts the focus of health care from treatment to prevention, and can empower individuals and families to be stewards of their own health. In a world of rising health care costs, the family history is an important tool, with its primary cost being the clinician's time. However, a recent National Institutes of Health conference highlighted the lack of substantive evidence to support the clinical utility of family histories. Annual collection of a comprehensive 3-generation family history has been held up as the gold standard for practice. However, interval family histories targeted to symptoms and family histories tailored to a child's life stage (ie, age-based health) may be important and underappreciated methods of collecting family history that yield clinically actionable data and supplement existing family history information. In this article, we review the various applications, as well as capabilities and limitations, of the family history for primary care providers.

  2. Family History in Primary Care Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    The family history has been called the first genetic test; it was a core element of primary care long before the current wave of genetics technologies and services became clinically relevant. Risk assessment based on family history allows providers to personalize and prioritize health messages, shifts the focus of health care from treatment to prevention, and can empower individuals and families to be stewards of their own health. In a world of rising health care costs, the family history is an important tool, with its primary cost being the clinician’s time. However, a recent National Institutes of Health conference highlighted the lack of substantive evidence to support the clinical utility of family histories. Annual collection of a comprehensive 3-generation family history has been held up as the gold standard for practice. However, interval family histories targeted to symptoms and family histories tailored to a child’s life stage (ie, age-based health) may be important and underappreciated methods of collecting family history that yield clinically actionable data and supplement existing family history information. In this article, we review the various applications, as well as capabilities and limitations, of the family history for primary care providers. PMID:24298128

  3. Accessibility and use of primary healthcare for immigrants living in the Niagara Region.

    PubMed

    Lum, Irene D; Swartz, Rebecca H; Kwan, Matthew Y W

    2016-05-01

    Although the challenges of accessing and using primary healthcare for new immigrants to Canada have been fairly well documented, the focus has primarily been on large cities with significant immigrant populations. The experiences of immigrants living in smaller, less diverse urban centres remain largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the lived experiences of immigrants living in a small urban centre with regards to the primary healthcare system. A total of 13 immigrants living in the Greater Niagara Region participated in semi-structured interviews. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and then coded and analyzed for emergent themes using NVivo. Five factors were found to impact primary care access and use: lack of social contacts, lack of universal healthcare coverage during their initial arrival, language as a barrier, treatment preferences, and geographic distance to primary care. Overall findings suggest that immigrants moving to smaller areas such as the Niagara Region face similar barriers to primary care as those moving into large cities. Some barriers, however, appear to be specific to the context of smaller urban centres, further exacerbated by living in a small city due to a smaller immigrant population, fewer services for immigrants, and less diversity in practicing physicians. More research is required to understand the contextual factors inhibiting primary care access and use among immigrants moving to smaller urban centres, and determine effective strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27017093

  4. Accessibility and use of primary healthcare for immigrants living in the Niagara Region.

    PubMed

    Lum, Irene D; Swartz, Rebecca H; Kwan, Matthew Y W

    2016-05-01

    Although the challenges of accessing and using primary healthcare for new immigrants to Canada have been fairly well documented, the focus has primarily been on large cities with significant immigrant populations. The experiences of immigrants living in smaller, less diverse urban centres remain largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the lived experiences of immigrants living in a small urban centre with regards to the primary healthcare system. A total of 13 immigrants living in the Greater Niagara Region participated in semi-structured interviews. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and then coded and analyzed for emergent themes using NVivo. Five factors were found to impact primary care access and use: lack of social contacts, lack of universal healthcare coverage during their initial arrival, language as a barrier, treatment preferences, and geographic distance to primary care. Overall findings suggest that immigrants moving to smaller areas such as the Niagara Region face similar barriers to primary care as those moving into large cities. Some barriers, however, appear to be specific to the context of smaller urban centres, further exacerbated by living in a small city due to a smaller immigrant population, fewer services for immigrants, and less diversity in practicing physicians. More research is required to understand the contextual factors inhibiting primary care access and use among immigrants moving to smaller urban centres, and determine effective strategies to overcome these barriers.

  5. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Matthew Y.; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science. PMID:26114091

  6. Prediction of Dementia in Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Frank; Wiese, Birgitt; Bickel, Horst; Eiffländer-Gorfer, Sandra; Fuchs, Angela; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Köhler, Mirjam; Luck, Tobias; Mösch, Edelgard; Pentzek, Michael; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.; Wagner, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Maier, Wolfgang; van den Bussche, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Current approaches for AD prediction are based on biomarkers, which are however of restricted availability in primary care. AD prediction tools for primary care are therefore needed. We present a prediction score based on information that can be obtained in the primary care setting. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a longitudinal cohort study in 3.055 non-demented individuals above 75 years recruited via primary care chart registries (Study on Aging, Cognition and Dementia, AgeCoDe). After the baseline investigation we performed three follow-up investigations at 18 months intervals with incident dementia as the primary outcome. The best set of predictors was extracted from the baseline variables in one randomly selected half of the sample. This set included age, subjective memory impairment, performance on delayed verbal recall and verbal fluency, on the Mini-Mental-State-Examination, and on an instrumental activities of daily living scale. These variables were aggregated to a prediction score, which achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.84 for AD. The score was applied to the second half of the sample (test cohort). Here, the prediction accuracy was 0.79. With a cut-off of at least 80% sensitivity in the first cohort, 79.6% sensitivity, 66.4% specificity, 14.7% positive predictive value (PPV) and 97.8% negative predictive value of (NPV) for AD were achieved in the test cohort. At a cut-off for a high risk population (5% of individuals with the highest risk score in the first cohort) the PPV for AD was 39.1% (52% for any dementia) in the test cohort. Conclusions The prediction score has useful prediction accuracy. It can define individuals (1) sensitively for low cost-low risk interventions, or (2) more specific and with increased PPV for measures of prevention with greater costs or risks. As it is independent of technical aids, it may be used within large scale prevention programs. PMID:21364746

  7. Access Barriers to Prenatal Care in Emerging Adult Latinas.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosamar

    2016-03-01

    Despite efforts to improve access to prenatal care, emerging adult Latinas in the United States continue to enter care late in their pregnancies and/or underutilize these services. Since little is known about emerging adult Latinas and their prenatal care experiences, the purpose of this study was to identify actual and perceived prenatal care barriers in a sample of 54 emerging adult Latinas between 18 and 21 years of age. More than 95% of the sample experienced personal and institutional barriers when attempting to access prenatal care. Results from this study lend support for policy changes for time away from school or work to attend prenatal care and for group prenatal care.

  8. Interprofessional student-run primary health care clinics

    PubMed Central

    Pammett, Robert; Landry, Eric; Jorgenson, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Interprofessional student-run primary health care clinics have been a flagship model of health professional education in Canada for many years. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is support for implementing this educational model in the United Kingdom and to highlight the implications for pharmacy education in Scotland. Method: A cross-sectional postal survey of 3000 randomly selected citizens of Aberdeen city and shire, Scotland, aged 18 years and older. Results: Of the 824 questionnaires that were returned (response rate 27.5%), more than half of the respondents (62.4%; n = 514) would consider accessing health care from a student-led, walk-in service. The range of services they expect to see includes general health checks (60%; n = 494), help for sexually transmitted diseases (57.5%; n = 474), weight management (56.8%; n = 468), smoking cessation (54.4%; n = 448) and drug misuse services (47.2%; n = 387). Concerns raised pertained to student ability, suitability for children and accessibility. Many comments pertained to the improvement of the current system by offering after-hours care. Discussion: The positive response from the general public towards an interprofessional student-run primary health care clinic in Aberdeen suggests that this Canadian model of interdisciplinary health professional education would likely be a successful addition to the pharmacy curriculum in Scotland. PMID:26150889

  9. [Palliative care in Primary Care: presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Gonzalez-Losada, J; Chávez-Díaz, B

    2013-10-01

    We present a case of a patient diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme refractory to treatment. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary brain tumour and unfortunately the most aggressive, with an estimated mortality of about 90% in the first year after diagnosis. In our case the patient had reached a stage of life where quality of life was importsnt, with palliative care being the only recourse. The family is the mainstay in the provision of care of terminally ill patients, and without their active participation it would be difficult to achieve the objectives in patient care. We must also consider the family of the terminally ill in our care aim, as its members will experience a series of changes that will affect multiple areas where we should take action.

  10. The entrepreneurial role in primary care dentistry.

    PubMed

    Willcocks, S

    2012-03-01

    This paper explores the entrepreneurial role of dentists in primary care dentistry. It reviews the changing context of dentistry, not least the reforms being introduced by the health and social care bill. It suggests that this new context will reinforce the need to consider the business side of dental practice, in particular, the importance of quality, creativity and innovation, alongside the importance of meeting the needs of patients. An entrepreneurial approach will be required in order to sustain dental practice in an increasingly competitive environment. PMID:22402534

  11. Primary care in nursing homes revisited: survey of the experiences of primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, L E; Jennings, S; Gavin, R; McConaghy, D; Collins, D R

    2014-09-01

    The Irish Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA) published National Quality Standards for Residential Care Settings for Older People in 2009. We reported on experiences of general practitioners (GPs) in Dublin caring for nursing home patients (NHPs) in 2006. We revisit these experiences following publication of HIQA's standards. 400 GPs received an anonymous postal survey. Of 204 respondents, 145 (71%) felt NHPs required more contact time and 124 (61%) reported more complex consultations compared to other patients. Only 131 (64%) felt adequately trained in gerontology. 143 (70%) reported access to specialist advice, but only 6 (3%) reported a change in this following HIOA standards. 65 (32%) had witnessed substandard care in a NH, of which 16 (25%) made no report, similar figures to 2006. There remains similar levels of concern regarding patient complexity, substandard care, access to specialist support and training in the care of NHPs. Many GPs expressed uncertainty regarding their role in implementing HIQA standards.

  12. Contribution of Primary Care to Health Systems and Health

    PubMed Central

    Starfield, Barbara; Shi, Leiyu; Macinko, James

    2005-01-01

    Evidence of the health-promoting influence of primary care has been accumulating ever since researchers have been able to distinguish primary care from other aspects of the health services delivery system. This evidence shows that primary care helps prevent illness and death, regardless of whether the care is characterized by supply of primary care physicians, a relationship with a source of primary care, or the receipt of important features of primary care. The evidence also shows that primary care (in contrast to specialty care) is associated with a more equitable distribution of health in populations, a finding that holds in both cross-national and within-national studies. The means by which primary care improves health have been identified, thus suggesting ways to improve overall health and reduce differences in health across major population subgroups. PMID:16202000

  13. The next phase of Title VII funding for training primary care physicians for America's health care needs.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert L; Turner, Barbara J

    2012-01-01

    Health care reform will add millions of Americans to the ranks of the insured; however, their access to health care is threatened by a deep decline in the production of primary care physicians. Poorer access to primary care risks poorer health outcomes and higher costs. Meeting this increased demand requires a major investment in primary care training. Title VII, Section 747 of the Public Health Service Act previously supported the growth of the health care workforce but has been severely cut over the past 2 decades. New and expanded Title VII initiatives are required to increase the production of primary care physicians; establish high-functioning academic, community-based training practices; increase the supply of well-trained primary care faculty; foster innovation and rigorous evaluation of these programs; and ultimately to improve the responsiveness of teaching hospitals to community needs. To accomplish these goals, Congress should act on the Council on Graduate Medical Education's recommendation to increase funding for Title VII, Section 747 roughly 14-fold to $560 million annually. This amount represents a small investment in light of the billions that Medicare currently spends to support graduate medical education, and both should be held to account for meeting physician workforce needs. Expansion of Title VII, Section 747 with the goal of improving access to primary care would be an important part of a needed, broader effort to counter the decline of primary care. Failure to launch such a national primary care workforce revitalization program will put the health and economic viability of our nation at risk.

  14. Access to health care and religion among young American men.

    PubMed

    Gillum, R Frank; Jarrett, Nicole; Obisesan, Thomas O

    2009-12-01

    In order to elucidate cultural correlates of utilization of primary health services by young adult men, we investigated religion in which one was raised and service utilization. Using data from a national survey we tested the hypothesis that religion raised predicts access to and utilization of a regular medical care provider, examinations, HIV and other STD testing and counseling at ages 18-44 years in men born between 1958 and 1984. We also hypothesized that religion raised would be more predictive of utilization for Hispanic Americans and non-Hispanic Black Americans than for non-Hispanic White Americans. The study included a national sample of 4276 men aged 18-44 years. Descriptive and multivariate statistics were used to assess the hypotheses using data on religion raised and responses to 14 items assessing health care access and utilization. Compared to those raised in no religion, those raised mainline Protestant were more likely (p < 0.01) to report a usual source of care (67% vs. 79%), health insurance coverage (66% vs. 80%) and physical examination (43% vs. 48%). Religion raised was not associated with testicular exams, STD counseling or HIV testing. In multivariate analyses controlling for confounders, significant associations of religion raised with insurance coverage, a physician as usual source of care and physical examination remained which varied by race/ethnicity. In conclusion, although religion is a core aspect of culture that deserves further study as a possible determinant of health care utilization, we were not able to document any consistent pattern of significant association even in a population with high rates of religious participation.

  15. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related services that— (1) Include location, coordination, and monitoring of primary health care services; and (2... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care case management services....

  16. Behavioral health care for children: the massachusetts child psychiatry access project.

    PubMed

    Straus, John H; Sarvet, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Access to behavioral health care for children is essential to achieving good health care outcomes. Pediatric primary care providers have an essential role to play in identifying and treating behavioral health problems in children. However, they lack adequate training and resources and thus have generally been unable to meet children's need for behavioral health care. The Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project has addressed this problem by delivering telephone child psychiatry consultations and specialized care coordination support to over 95 percent of the pediatric primary care providers in Massachusetts. Established in 2004, the project consists of six regional hubs, each of which has one full-time-equivalent child psychiatrist, licensed therapist, and care coordinator. Collectively, the hubs are available to over 95 percent of the 1.5 million children in Massachusetts. In fiscal year 2013 the Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project served 10,553 children. Pediatric primary care providers enrolled in the project reported a dramatic improvement in their ability to meet the psychiatric needs of their patients. Telephone child psychiatry consultation programs for pediatric primary care providers, many modeled after the Massachusetts project, have spread across the United States.

  17. Biofield therapies: energy medicine and primary care.

    PubMed

    Rindfleisch, J Adam

    2010-03-01

    Energy medicine modalities, also known as biofield therapies, are perhaps the most mysterious and controversial complementary alternative medicine therapies. Although many of these approaches have existed for millennia, scientific investigation of these techniques is in its early stages; much remains to be learned about mechanisms of action and efficacy. These techniques are increasingly used in clinical and hospital settings and can be incorporated into an integrative primary care practice. This article describes several energy medicine and biofield therapies and outlines key elements they hold in common. Several specific approaches are described. Research findings related to the efficacy of energy medicine are summarized, and proposed mechanisms of action and safety issues are discussed. Guidelines are offered for primary care providers wishing to advise patients about energy medicine or to integrate it into their practices, and Internet and other resources for obtaining additional information are provided.

  18. The productivity of primary care research networks.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, F; Wild, A; Harvey, J; Fenton, E

    2000-01-01

    Primary care research networks are being publicly funded in the United Kingdom to promote a culture of research and development in primary care. This paper discusses the organisational form of these networks and how their productivity can be evaluated, drawing on evidence from management science. An evaluation of a research network has to take account of the complexity of the organisation, the influence of its local context, and its stage of development. Output measures, such as number of research papers, and process measures, such as number of research meetings, may contribute to an evaluation. However, as networking relies on the development of informal, trust-based relationships, the quality of interactions within a network is of paramount importance for its success. Networks can audit and reflect on their success in promoting such relationships and a more formal qualitative evaluation by an independent observer can document their success to those responsible for funding. PMID:11141879

  19. The productivity of primary care research networks.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, F; Wild, A; Harvey, J; Fenton, E

    2000-11-01

    Primary care research networks are being publicly funded in the United Kingdom to promote a culture of research and development in primary care. This paper discusses the organisational form of these networks and how their productivity can be evaluated, drawing on evidence from management science. An evaluation of a research network has to take account of the complexity of the organisation, the influence of its local context, and its stage of development. Output measures, such as number of research papers, and process measures, such as number of research meetings, may contribute to an evaluation. However, as networking relies on the development of informal, trust-based relationships, the quality of interactions within a network is of paramount importance for its success. Networks can audit and reflect on their success in promoting such relationships and a more formal qualitative evaluation by an independent observer can document their success to those responsible for funding. PMID:11141879

  20. Pharmacotherapy for Insomnia in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily; Narang, Puneet; Enja, Manasa; Lippmann, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy for insomnia in primary care settings can be challenging. Frequently, there are multiple coexisting medical and psychiatric conditions, drug interactions, concern regarding use of habit-forming sleep aids, and paucity of time in office visits to discuss management of sleep difficulties. This article reports the results of a literature search related to pharmacotherapy for insomnia and presents 4 clinical vignettes with corresponding treatment options. PMID:27486547

  1. Pharmacotherapy for Insomnia in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emily; Narang, Puneet; Enja, Manasa; Lippmann, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy for insomnia in primary care settings can be challenging. Frequently, there are multiple coexisting medical and psychiatric conditions, drug interactions, concern regarding use of habit-forming sleep aids, and paucity of time in office visits to discuss management of sleep difficulties. This article reports the results of a literature search related to pharmacotherapy for insomnia and presents 4 clinical vignettes with corresponding treatment options. PMID:27486547

  2. [Experience in treating mucoceles in Primary Care].

    PubMed

    Sabando Carranza, J A; Cortés Martinez, M; Calvo Carrasco, D

    2016-03-01

    Several cases of mucocele have been treated in our Primary Health Care centre. These are benign lesions, relatively frequent (2.5/1000), which is caused by a retention of mucous from the minor salivary glands into the oral cavity, mainly at the level of the lower lip. The experience in their treatment in this centre is presented, along with a review of the literature to see if our treatment was correct. PMID:26163872

  3. Shoulder pain in primary care: frozen shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, Angela; Mohammed, Khalid D

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that follows a protracted clinical course. We aim to review the management of patients with a diagnosis of frozen shoulder who are referred for specialist orthopaedic evaluation against existing guidelines in primary care. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM Referrals and clinical records were reviewed for all patients referred for orthopaedic specialist assessment who received a specialist diagnosis of frozen shoulder. Diagnostic, investigation and management practices from a regional primary health care setting in New Zealand were compared with guideline-recommended management. RESULTS Eighty patients with frozen shoulder were referred for orthopaedic evaluation in the 13 month study period, mostly from general practice. Fifteen patients (19%) were identified as having a frozen shoulder in their medical referral. Most (99%) had received previous imaging. Seven patients (12%) had received guideline recommended treatment. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Education of all clinicians involved in patient management is important to ensure an understanding of the long natural history of frozen shoulder and provide reassurance that outcomes are generally excellent. HealthPathways now include more information regarding diagnosis, imaging and evidence-based management for frozen shoulder. LESSONS Frozen shoulder may be under-diagnosed among patients referred for orthopaedic review. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used and may identify occult and unrelated pathology in this age-group. When managed according to clinical guidelines, patients report significant clinical and functional improvement with most reporting 80% function compared with normal after 1 year. KEYWORDS Adhesive capsulitis; bursitis; injections; practice guideline; primary health care; ultrasound.

  4. Two models of primary health care training.

    PubMed

    Hill, P; Samisoni, J

    1993-01-01

    In 1991, the Fiji School of Medicine restructured the training of its medical students, dividing the 7-year course into two phases. Students now undertake a 3-year community-oriented primary care practitioners course, after which they may elect to continue practice in a primary health care role, or to undertake further hospital-based training to complete their medical degree. The course responds to the health needs of the South Pacific, and the local patterns of morbidity and mortality, rather than measuring itself against the curricular demands of its more developed neighbours, Australia and New Zealand. At the same time, the Tropical Health Program of the University of Queensland Medical School responded to demands from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to develop primary health care training at degree level. This was intended to complement other strategies undertaken by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit such as the recruitment and support of indigenous students through mainstream health professional education. There was a need to address health priorities that are very different to those of the Australian population as a whole, as well as the sociopolitical and cultural context as it affects both students themselves and health issues in their communities. Both institutions have chosen problem-based teaching/learning as appropriate to their courses, and content is also similar, though with emphases that reflect the differing contexts. The two courses are examples of innovative responses by centres with university medical faculties to specific issues in health education. PMID:8433664

  5. Preventing violence through primary care intervention.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C; Quillian, J

    1992-08-01

    Homicide was the United States' second leading cause of death among people aged 15 to 24 in 1988; non-fatal assaults occur 100 times more frequently. Yet as a society, we have ignored the problem. Risk factors for violent injuries comprise sociological, developmental/psychological and neurophysiological elements. Providers of primary care for children, young adults and their families can help parents develop healthy parenting techniques in child-rearing, help the grade-school-aged child develop non-violent conflict-resolution skills, and help young people learn to avoid violence and potentially violent activities and situations. Health care providers are able to reduce the incidence of violent injuries by addressing the issue of violence in periodic examination visits with both parents and children. Familiarity with risk indicators enables the health care provider to intervene early when needed. An anticipatory guidance outline and a violence-induced injury-visit form are included. PMID:1294082

  6. Primary Care of the Prostate Cancer Survivor.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Erika M; Farrell, Timothy W

    2016-05-01

    This summary of the American Cancer Society Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines targets primary care physicians who coordinate care of prostate cancer survivors with subspecialists. Prostate cancer survivors should undergo prostate-specific antigen screening every six to 12 months and digital rectal examination annually. Surveillance of patients who choose watchful waiting for their prostate cancer should be conducted by a subspecialist. Any hematuria or rectal bleeding must be thoroughly evaluated. Prostate cancer survivors should be screened regularly for urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Patients with predominant urge incontinence symptoms, which can occur after surgical and radiation treatments, may benefit from an anticholinergic agent. If there is difficulty with bladder emptying, a trial of an alpha blocker may be considered. A phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor can effectively treat sexual dysfunction following treatment for prostate cancer. Osteoporosis screening should occur before initiation of androgen deprivation therapy, and patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy should be monitored for anemia, metabolic syndrome, and vasomotor symptoms. Healthy lifestyle choices should be encouraged, including weight management, regular physical activity, proper nutrition, and smoking cessation. Primary care physicians should be vigilant for psychosocial distress, including depression, among prostate cancer survivors, as well as the potential impact of this distress on patients' family members and partners. PMID:27175954

  7. [Social inequalities in health and primary care. SESPAS Report 2012].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Aguado, Ildefonso; Santaolaya Cesteros, María; Campos Esteban, Pilar

    2012-03-01

    The health system is a social determinant of health. Although not the most important determinant of health, the health system's potential contribution to reducing social inequalities in health should not be underestimated. Due to its characteristics, primary health care is well placed to attain equity in health. To make progress in achieving this goal, the main measures to be considered are the removal of barriers to access to services, the provision of care proportionate to need, and engagement in intersectoral work. This article reviews the background and framework for action to tackle social inequalities in health and provides a summary of the primary health care actions that could help to reduce social inequalities in health and are mentioned in the most important national and international documents on health policy. We hope to stimulate debate, promote research in the field and encourage implementation. The proposals are grouped in the following five intervention lines: information systems; participation; training; intersectoral work; and reorientation of health care. Each intervention is ordered according to its targets (population and civil society; primary health team; health center and health area management; and health policy decision-makers).

  8. Healthcare reform: implications for knowledge translation in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The primary care sector represents the linchpin of many health systems. However, the translation of evidence-based practices into patient care can be difficult, particularly during healthcare reform. This can have significant implications for patients, their communities, and the public purse. This is aptly demonstrated in the area of sexual health. The aim of this paper is to determine what works to facilitate evidence-based sexual healthcare within the primary care sector. Methods 431 clinicians (214 general practitioners and 217 practice nurses) in New South Wales, Australia, were surveyed about their awareness, their use, the perceived impact, and the factors that hindered the use of six resources to promote sexual healthcare. Descriptive statistics were calculated from the responses to the closed survey items, while responses to open-ended item were thematically analyzed. Results All six resources were reported to improve the delivery of evidence-based sexual healthcare. Two resources – both double-sided A4-placards – had the greatest reach and use. Barriers that hindered resource-use included limited time, limited perceived need, and limited access to, or familiarity with the resources. Furthermore, the reorganization of the primary care sector and the removal of particular medical benefits scheme items may have hampered clinician capacity to translate evidence-based practices into patient care. Conclusions Findings reveal: (1) the translation of evidence-based practices into patient care is viable despite reform; (2) the potential value of a multi-modal approach; (3) the dissemination of relatively inexpensive resources might influence clinical practices; and (4) reforms to governance and/or funding arrangements may widen the void between evidence-based practices and patient care. PMID:24274773

  9. Type of health insurance and the quality of primary care experience.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the association between type of health insurance coverage and quality of primary care as measured by its distinguishing attributes--first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. METHODS: The household component of the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey was used for this study. The analysis primarily focused on subjects aged younger than 65 years who identified a usual source of care. Logistic regressions were used to examine the independent effects of insurance status on primary care attributes while individual sociodemographic characteristics were controlled for. RESULTS: The experience of primary care varies according to insurance status. The insured are able to obtain better primary care than the uninsured, and the privately insured are able to obtain better primary care than the publicly insured. Those insured through fee-for-service coverage experience better longitudinal care and less of a barrier to access than those insured through health maintenance organizations (HMOs). CONCLUSIONS: While expanding insurance coverage is important for establishing access to care, efforts are needed to enhance the quality of primary health care, particularly for the publicly insured. Policymakers should closely monitor the quality of primary care provided by HMOs. PMID:11111255

  10. The breadth of primary care: a systematic literature review of its core dimensions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Even though there is general agreement that primary care is the linchpin of effective health care delivery, to date no efforts have been made to systematically review the scientific evidence supporting this supposition. The aim of this study was to examine the breadth of primary care by identifying its core dimensions and to assess the evidence for their interrelations and their relevance to outcomes at (primary) health system level. Methods A systematic review of the primary care literature was carried out, restricted to English language journals reporting original research or systematic reviews. Studies published between 2003 and July 2008 were searched in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, King's Fund Database, IDEAS Database, and EconLit. Results Eighty-five studies were identified. This review was able to provide insight in the complexity of primary care as a multidimensional system, by identifying ten core dimensions that constitute a primary care system. The structure of a primary care system consists of three dimensions: 1. governance; 2. economic conditions; and 3. workforce development. The primary care process is determined by four dimensions: 4. access; 5. continuity of care; 6. coordination of care; and 7. comprehensiveness of care. The outcome of a primary care system includes three dimensions: 8. quality of care; 9. efficiency care; and 10. equity in health. There is a considerable evidence base showing that primary care contributes through its dimensions to overall health system performance and health. Conclusions A primary care system can be defined and approached as a multidimensional system contributing to overall health system performance and health. PMID:20226084

  11. Children's Mental Health as a Primary Care and Concern

    PubMed Central

    Tolan, Patrick H.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    In response to the serious crisis in mental health care for children in the United States, this article proposes as a priority for psychology a comprehensive approach that treats mental health as a primary issue in child health and welfare. Consistent with the principles of a system of care and applying epidemiological, risk-development, and intervention-research findings, this approach emphasizes 4 components: easy access to effective professional clinical services for children exhibiting disorders; further development and application of sound prevention principles for high-risk youths; support for and access to short-term intervention in primary care settings; and greater recognition and promotion of mental health issues in common developmental settings and other influential systems. Integral to this approach is the need to implement these components simultaneously and to incorporate family-focused, culturally competent, evidence-based, and developmentally appropriate services. This comprehensive, simultaneous, and integrated approach is needed to achieve real progress in children's mental health in this country. PMID:16173893

  12. Primary care role in expanded newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    Hayeems, Robin Z.; Miller, Fiona A.; Carroll, June C.; Little, Julian; Allanson, Judith; Bytautas, Jessica P.; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Wilson, Brenda J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the role of primary care providers in informing and supporting families who receive positive screening results. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians, pediatricians, and midwives involved in newborn care. Main outcome measures Beliefs, practices, and barriers related to providing information to families who receive positive screening results for their newborns. Results A total of 819 providers participated (adjusted response rate of 60.9%). Of the respondents, 67.4% to 81.0% agreed that it was their responsibility to provide care to families of newborns who received positive screening results, and 64.2% to 84.8% agreed they should provide brochures or engage in general discussions about the identified conditions. Of the pediatricians, 67.3% endorsed having detailed discussions with families, but only 24.1% of family physicians and 27.6% of midwives endorsed this practice. All provider groups reported less involvement in information provision than they believed they should have. This discrepancy was most evident for family physicians: most stated that they should provide brochures (64.2%) or engage in general discussions (73.5%), but only a minority did so (15.3% and 27.7%, respectively). Family physicians reported insufficient time (42.2%), compensation (52.2%), and training (72.3%) to play this role, and only a minority agreed they were up to date (18.5%) or confident (16.5%) regarding newborn screening. Conclusion Providers of primary newborn care see an information-provision role for themselves in caring for families who receive positive newborn screening results. Efforts to further define the scope of this role combined with efforts to mitigate existing barriers are warranted. PMID:23946032

  13. Roles of primary care physicians in managing bipolar disorders in adults.

    PubMed

    Awaluddin, A; Jali, N; Bahari, R; Jamil, Z; Haron, N

    2015-01-01

    Management of bipolar disorder (BD) is challenging due to its multiple and complex facets of presentations as well as various levels of interventions. There is also limitation of treatment accessibility especially at the primary care level. Local evidence-based clinical practice guidelines address the importance of integrated care of BD at various levels. Primary care physicians hold pertinent role in maintaining remission and preventing relapse by providing systematic monitoring of people with BD. Pharmacological treatment in particular mood stabilisers remain the most effective management with psychosocial interventions as adjunct. This paper highlights the role of primary care physicians in the management of BD.

  14. Organizing care across the continuum: primary care, specialty services, acute and long-term care.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Nelly D; Cunning, Leslie; Andrews, Kaye; Martin, Dorothy; MacKay, Anne; Kuschminder, Katie; Congdon, Val

    2009-01-01

    Primary care networks (PCNs) facilitate integration of healthcare across the continuum. The Calgary Rural PCN implemented a community-based model where physicians and Alberta Health Services work together to deliver primary care addressing local population needs. This model is highly valued by physicians, decision-makers and providers, with early impacts on outcomes.

  15. The United States Chiropractic Workforce: An alternative or complement to primary care?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the United States (US) a shortage of primary care physicians has become evident. Other health care providers such as chiropractors might help address some of the nation’s primary care needs simply by being located in areas of lesser primary care resources. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the distribution of the chiropractic workforce across the country and compare it to that of primary care physicians. Methods We used nationally representative data to estimate the per 100,000 capita supply of chiropractors and primary care physicians according to the 306 predefined Hospital Referral Regions. Multiple variable Poisson regression was used to examine the influence of population characteristics on the supply of both practitioner-types. Results According to these data, there are 74,623 US chiropractors and the per capita supply of chiropractors varies more than 10-fold across the nation. Chiropractors practice in areas with greater supply of primary care physicians (Pearson’s correlation 0.17, p-value < 0.001) and appear to be more responsive to market conditions (i.e. more heavily influenced by population characteristics) in regards to practice location than primary care physicians. Conclusion These findings suggest that chiropractors practice in areas of greater primary care physician supply. Therefore chiropractors may be functioning in more complementary roles to primary care as opposed to an alternative point of access. PMID:23171540

  16. Delivery Complications Associated With Prenatal Care Access for Medicaid-Insured Mothers in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Bennett, Kevin J.; Probst, Janice C.

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy complications affect many women. It is likely that some complications can be avoided through routine primary and prenatal care of reasonable quality. The authors examined access to health care during pregnancy for mothers insured by Medicaid. The access indicator is potentially avoidable maternity complications (PAMCs). Potentially…

  17. Revitalizing primary health care--another utopian goal?

    PubMed

    Marahatta, Sujan B

    2010-01-01

    The quest for greater efficiency, fairness and responsiveness to the expectation of the people that system serve have brought about three generations of health system reforms in the twentieth century. The first generation saw the founding of national health care systems and extension to middle income nations of social insurance systems in the 1940s and 1950s. By the late 1960s the rising costs of hospital based care, its usage by better off, inaccessibility by the poor and rural population of even the most basic services heralded second generation reforms promoting primary health care as a means of achieving the affordable universal coverage. It included the best public health strategy that is prevention and the highest ethical principle of public health that is equity. It was expected the best system for reaching households with essential and affordable care, and the best route towards universal coverage. The primary health care approach though adopted universally did not materialize its notion of translating ethos of Health for All by 2000. Overall, primary health care movement by the end of 20th century became lifeless. Since the Declaration of Alma-Ata, fundamental changes have occurred affecting health service delivery, such as economic development and financing approaches, globalization of trade and knowledge, and the shift to privatization. This is the time to develop a new vision, taking into consideration the many changes affecting global health and the strategic developments in health of recent years. With this recognition, the third generation of reforms now underway in many countries is driven by the idea of responding more to demand, assuring access for the poor and emphasizing financing rather than just provision within the public sector. The key concern is: how to translate ethos of revitalizing in the reality. Otherwise the revitalizing concept will turn into utopian goal so like HFA by 2000 strategy. PMID:22610741

  18. Practice Constraints, Behavioral Problems, and Dementia Care: Primary Care Physicians’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Ladson; Reddy, Geetha; Flores, Yvette; Kravitz, Richard L.; Barker, Judith C.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To examine how practice constraints contribute to barriers in the health care of persons with dementia and their families, particularly with respect to behavioral aspects of care. Design Cross-sectional qualitative interview study of primary care physicians. Setting Physicians’ offices. Participants Forty primary care physicians in Northern California. Measurements Open-ended interviews lasted 30–60 minutes and were structured by an interview guide covering clinician background and practice setting, clinical care of a particular patient, and general approach to managing patients with AD or dementia. Interviews were transcribed and themes reflecting constraints of practice were identified through a systematic coding process. Results Recurring themes (i.e., those present in ≥25% of physician interviews) included insufficient time, difficulty in accessing and communicating with specialists, low reimbursement, poor connections with community social service agencies, and lack of interdisciplinary teams. Physician narratives suggest that these constraints may lead to delayed detection of behavior problems, “reactive” as opposed to proactive management of dementia, and increased reliance on pharmacological rather than psychosocial approaches. Conclusion Physicians often feel challenged in caring for dementia patients, particularly those who are more behaviorally complex, because of time and reimbursement constraints as well as other perceived barriers. Our results suggest that more effective educational interventions (for families and physicians) and broader structural changes are needed to better meet the needs of the elderly with dementia and their families now and in the future. Without these changes, dementia care is likely to continue to fall short. PMID:17823840

  19. Primary health care in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Buch, E

    1989-01-01

    Even though most countries have committed to primary health care (PHC), South Africa, a middle-income country, has an inadequate PHC system. The poor system has roots in the colonial period and apartheid reinforces this system. Race, class, and place of residence determine the type of health care individuals receive. South Africa falls far short of all 5 principles of PHC. Just 12% of the health budget goes to 40% of the population who live in the homelands which shows the inequitable distribution of health care resources and inadequate quality health care for all. Similarly, South Africa has not altered its communication and education techniques to improve preventive and promotive health services. It has not implemented any successful national campaigns such as a campaign against diarrhea deaths. South Africa does not make good use of available appropriate technology such as breast feeding, oral rehydration, refrigeration, and the ventilated improved pit latrine which lead to health for all. People in South Africa discuss community participation but it is not likely to occur without general political democracy. Some people have made local attempts at community participation but they tend to use inflexible means and request either cash or contributions in kind from people who have little. The elite in South Africa has not recognized the need to correct socioeconomic inequalities. The Population Development Plan Programme among white farmer-owners has showed some support for a multisectoral approach to improve health care, however. For example, it acknowledges that non-health-care interventions such as better salaries, literacy, and living conditions, lead to better health. The Department of National Health has discussed improved coordination of the budget to allow priority determination of national PHD and manpower plans. Nongovernmental organizations are beginning to use the PHC approach instead of the charitable approach.

  20. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage and access to health care.

    PubMed

    Kirby, James B; Kaneda, Toshiko

    2005-03-01

    Most research on access to health care focuses on individual-level determinants such as income and insurance coverage. The role of community-level factors in helping or hindering individuals in obtaining needed care, however, has not received much attention. We address this gap in the literature by examining how neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with access to health care. We find that living in disadvantaged neighborhoods reduces the likelihood of having a usual source of care and of obtaining recommended preventive services, while it increases the likelihood of having unmet medical need. These associations are not explained by the supply of health care providers. Furthermore, though controlling for individual-level characteristics reduces the association between neighborhood disadvantage and access to health care, a significant association remains. This suggests that when individuals who are disadvantaged are concentrated into specific areas, disadvantage becomes an "emergent characteristic " of those areas that predicts the ability of residents to obtain health care. PMID:15869118

  1. Primary care as intersecting social worlds.

    PubMed

    Tovey, P; Adams, J

    2001-03-01

    An enhanced role for primary health care (PHC) is currently a matter of political priority in the UK. This higher profile is drawing attention to a range of unresolved challenges and issues, relating to both the structure and content of provision, which currently permeate the system. Running in parallel with this is a recognition that: to date, PHC has been under-researched; that, as a result, our understanding of it is frequently poor; and that, as a consequence, fresh perspectives are needed in order to effectively research this uncertain, evolving and increasingly important healthcare sector. In this paper we argue that social worlds theory (SWT) provides, albeit in a suitably modified form, an ideal conceptual framework for the analysis of contemporary primary care. SWT is an approach which assumes complexity and constant evolution, and its core concepts are directed towards unravelling the consequences of encounters between different interest groups--something which is of particular utility at this time given the increasing attention to user participation, and an ongoing questioning of established patterns of professional authority. It is an approach which has rarely been employed empirically, even beyond medicine. In order to illustrate the wide relevance of the approach, we discuss how it can facilitate research at all levels of PHC: i.e., in relation to aspects of medical practice (the case of medically unexplained symptoms); shifts in service organisation (changing professional roles and the introduction of policy reforms); and issues which straddle both organisation and content (the increasing use of complementary medicine in primary care). In each case the approach is able to embrace the complexity of situations characterised by the intersection of professional and lay social worlds and is able to provide the conceptual tools through which resultant processes can be tracked and investigated. PMID:11218174

  2. Primary care as intersecting social worlds.

    PubMed

    Tovey, P; Adams, J

    2001-03-01

    An enhanced role for primary health care (PHC) is currently a matter of political priority in the UK. This higher profile is drawing attention to a range of unresolved challenges and issues, relating to both the structure and content of provision, which currently permeate the system. Running in parallel with this is a recognition that: to date, PHC has been under-researched; that, as a result, our understanding of it is frequently poor; and that, as a consequence, fresh perspectives are needed in order to effectively research this uncertain, evolving and increasingly important healthcare sector. In this paper we argue that social worlds theory (SWT) provides, albeit in a suitably modified form, an ideal conceptual framework for the analysis of contemporary primary care. SWT is an approach which assumes complexity and constant evolution, and its core concepts are directed towards unravelling the consequences of encounters between different interest groups--something which is of particular utility at this time given the increasing attention to user participation, and an ongoing questioning of established patterns of professional authority. It is an approach which has rarely been employed empirically, even beyond medicine. In order to illustrate the wide relevance of the approach, we discuss how it can facilitate research at all levels of PHC: i.e., in relation to aspects of medical practice (the case of medically unexplained symptoms); shifts in service organisation (changing professional roles and the introduction of policy reforms); and issues which straddle both organisation and content (the increasing use of complementary medicine in primary care). In each case the approach is able to embrace the complexity of situations characterised by the intersection of professional and lay social worlds and is able to provide the conceptual tools through which resultant processes can be tracked and investigated.

  3. Training the internist for primary care: a view from Nevada.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, K J

    1982-01-01

    The recent establishment of primary care residencies at the University of Nevada School of Medicine has raised important questions about local priorities in the training of physicians to provide primary care for adults. Because the amount of money available for health care training is decreasing, these questions also have national importance. Primary care internal medicine, not synonymous with general internal medicine, offers distinct advantages to patients over family practice adult care and primary care offered by internist subspecialists. The University of Nevada has a singular opportunity to organize a strong primary care internal medicine residency, but national problems of internal medicine emphasis exist. Nationwide changes in internal medicine residency programs (ongoing) and American Board of Internal Medicine nationalization of the fledgling primary care internal medicine fellowship movement are suggested. Specifically proposed is an extra year for primary care training with a single examination after four years, producing general internists with a primary care "minor." Alternately, and ideally, there would be a full two-year primary care fellowship with a separate internal medicine primary care subspecialty board examination. Either of the above options would provide necessary training and academic credibility for primary care internists, and would redirect internal medicine certification and training.

  4. Potential benefits of integrated COPD management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Kruis, A L; Chavannes, N H

    2010-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents a major and progressive cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, resulting in an important financial and health burden in coming decades. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has been proven to be the most effective treatment in all patients in whom respiratory symptoms are associated with diminished functional capacity or reduced quality of life. Nevertheless, despite wide recommendation and proven efficacy, the use of PR is limited in daily practice. Reasons for these include low accessibility and availability, high costs, and lack of motivation to continue a healthy life style after treatment. By contrast, it has been demonstrated that primary care patients can be reactivated by formulating personal targets and designing individualized treatment plans in collaboration with their general practitioner or practice nurse. Based on these personal plans and targets, specific education must be provided and development of self management skills should be actively encouraged. Ideally, elements of pulmonary rehabilitation are tailored into a comprehensive primary care integrated disease management program. In that way, the benefits of PR can be extended to a substantially larger part of the COPD population, to reach even those with milder stages of disease. Favorable long-term effects on exercise tolerance and quality of life in a number of studies have been demonstrated in recent years, but broad introduction in the primary care setting still needs further justification in the form of a proper cost effectiveness analysis. PMID:21214043

  5. Counselling in Primary Care: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eatock, John

    2000-01-01

    Presents a brief history of the growth of counseling in primary care. Discusses the challenges for primary care counselors and counseling, as well as the need for coordination, regulation and management. Also discusses the imperative for research support and the unique nature of counseling in primary care including challenges to its survival. (MKA)

  6. Physician perspectives on care of individuals with severe mobility impairments in primary care in Southwestern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Colleen; Lee, Joseph; Milligan, James; Hillier, Loretta M; Bauman, Craig

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high health risks associated with severe mobility impairments, individuals with physical disabilities are less likely to receive the same level of primary care as able-bodied persons. This study explores family physicians' perspectives on primary care for individuals with mobility impairments to identify and better understand the challenges that prevent equitable service delivery to this group of patients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the autumn of 2012 with a purposeful sample of 20 family physicians practising in Southwestern Ontario to gather their perspectives of the personal and professional barriers to healthcare delivery for individuals with mobility impairments, including perceptions of challenges, contributing reasons and possible improvements. A thematic analysis was conducted on the transcripts generated from the interviews to identify perceptions of existing barriers and gaps in care, needs and existing opportunities for improving primary care for this patient population. Eight themes emerged from the interviews that contributed to understanding the perceived challenges of providing care to patients with mobility impairments: transportation barriers, knowledge gaps and practice constraints resulting in episodic care rather than preventive care, incongruence between perceived and actual accessibility to care, emergency departments used as centres for primary care, inattention to mobility issues among specialist and community services, lack of easily accessible practice tools, low patient volumes impact decision-making regarding building decreased motivation to expand clinical capacity due to low patient volume, and lastly, remuneration issues. Despite this patient population presenting with high healthcare needs and significant barriers and care gaps in primary care, low prevalence rates negatively impact the acquisition of necessary equipment and knowledge required to optimally care for these patients in typical primary care

  7. Primary Care of the Renal Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Mark L.; Nolin, Thomas D.; Hasley, Peggy B.

    2010-01-01

    There has been a remarkable rise in the number of kidney transplant recipients (KTR) in the US over the last decade. Increasing use of potent immunosuppressants, which are also potentially diabetogenic and atherogenic, can result in worsening of pre-existing medical conditions as well as development of post-transplant disease. This, coupled with improving long-term survival, is putting tremendous pressure on transplant centers that were not designed to deliver primary care to KTR. Thus, increasing numbers of KTR will present to their primary care physicians (PCP) post-transplant for routine medical care. Similar to native chronic kidney disease patients, KTRs are vulnerable to cardiovascular disease as well as a host of other problems including bone disease, infections and malignancies. Deaths related to complications of cardiovascular disease and malignancies account for 60–65% of long-term mortality among KTRs. Guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation and the European Best Practice Guidelines Expert Group on the management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, diabetes and bone disease should be incorporated into the long-term care plan of the KTR to improve outcomes. A number of transplant centers do not supply PCPs with protocols and guidelines, making the task of the PCP more difficult. Despite this, PCPs are expected to continue to provide general preventive medicine, vaccinations and management of chronic medical problems. In this narrative review, we examine the common medical problems seen in KTR from the PCP’s perspective. Medical management issues related to immunosuppressive medications are also briefly discussed. PMID:20422302

  8. Gestational weight gain trajectories in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Piccinini-Vallis, Helena; Lee-Baggley, Dayna; Stewart, Moira; Ryan, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify gestational weight gain trajectories, stratified by prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), of women with singleton pregnancies who received prenatal care in a primary care setting, and to compare these trajectories with the 2009 Institute of Medicine gestational weight gain recommendations. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Halifax, NS. Participants Women who received prenatal care at the Dalhousie Family Medicine clinics in Halifax from 2009 to 2013. Main outcome measures For each prenatal visit, gestational age and weight measurements were obtained. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze the gestational weight gain trajectories. The upper limit of the guideline-recommended weekly gestational weight gain was compared with the 95% CI of the observed mean weekly gestational weight gain for each prepregnancy BMI category. Results A total of 280 women were included in the analyses. There was a significant interaction between prepregnancy BMI category and gestational weight gain over time (P < .001), with gestational weight gain being significantly lower among women with prepregnancy BMI of 30.0 kg/m2 or greater compared with those with BMI of 18.5 to less than 25.0 kg/m2 and 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2. When comparing women’s weight gain with the recommendations, women with prepregnancy BMI of 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2 had the most guideline discordance, deviating from the weight gain recommendations at 20 weeks’ gestation. Conclusion These results are relevant and of benefit to women and clinicians wishing to address excess gestational weight gain, and to researchers and policy makers developing interventions aimed at curbing gestational weight gain in primary care. Although our results showed women with prepregnancy BMI of 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2 gained the most excess, guideline-discordant weight, interventions should target all women planning or experiencing a pregnancy.

  9. Competencies for psychology practice in primary care.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Susan H; Grus, Catherine L; Cubic, Barbara A; Hunter, Christopher L; Kearney, Lisa K; Schuman, Catherine C; Karel, Michele J; Kessler, Rodger S; Larkin, Kevin T; McCutcheon, Stephen; Miller, Benjamin F; Nash, Justin; Qualls, Sara H; Connolly, Kathryn Sanders; Stancin, Terry; Stanton, Annette L; Sturm, Lynne A; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the outcome of a presidential initiative of 2012 American Psychological Association President Suzanne Bennett Johnson to delineate competencies for primary care (PC) psychology in six broad domains: science, systems, professionalism, relationships, application, and education. Essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes are described for each PC psychology competency. Two behavioral examples are provided to illustrate each competency. Clinical vignettes demonstrate the competencies in action. Delineation of these competencies is intended to inform education, practice, and research in PC psychology and efforts to further develop team-based competencies in PC.

  10. African Primary Care Research: Reviewing the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This is the second article in the series on African primary care research. The article focuses on how to search for relevant evidence in the published literature that can be used in the development of a research proposal. The article addresses the style of writing required and the nature of the arguments for the social and scientific value of the proposed study, as well as the use of literature in conceptual frameworks and in the methods. Finally, the article looks at how to keep track of the literature used and to reference it appropriately. PMID:26245433

  11. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Primary Care Update.

    PubMed

    Leung, Marcia A; Flaherty, Anna; Zhang, Julia A; Hara, Jared; Barber, Wayne; Burgess, Lawrence

    2016-06-01

    The primary care physician's role in recognizing sudden sensorineural hearing (SSNHL) loss and delivering initial treatment is critical in the management of the syndrome. This role involves recognizing its clinical symptoms, distinguishing it from conductive hearing loss with the Weber tuning fork or the Rauch hum test, and urgent administration of high dose oral corticosteroids. Diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed for audiometric testing or referral to otolaryngology. This paper provides an update on the initial evaluation and treatment of this syndrome based on the literature and clinical guideline recommendations. PMID:27413627

  12. Primary Care of the Patient with Asthma.

    PubMed

    Lenaeus, Michael J; Hirschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive lung disease includes asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because a previous issue of Medical Clinics of North America (2012;96[4]) was devoted to COPD, this article focuses on asthma in adults, and addresses some topics about COPD not addressed previously. Asthma is a heterogeneous disease marked by variable airflow obstruction and bronchial hyperreactivity. Onset is most common in early childhood, although many people develop asthma later in life. Adult-onset asthma presents a particular challenge in the primary care clinic because of incomplete understanding of the disorder, underreporting of symptoms, underdiagnosis, inadequate treatment, and high rate of comorbidity.

  13. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Primary Care Update

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Marcia A; Flaherty, Anna; Zhang, Julia A; Hara, Jared; Barber, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The primary care physician's role in recognizing sudden sensorineural hearing (SSNHL) loss and delivering initial treatment is critical in the management of the syndrome. This role involves recognizing its clinical symptoms, distinguishing it from conductive hearing loss with the Weber tuning fork or the Rauch hum test, and urgent administration of high dose oral corticosteroids. Diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed for audiometric testing or referral to otolaryngology. This paper provides an update on the initial evaluation and treatment of this syndrome based on the literature and clinical guideline recommendations. PMID:27413627

  14. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Primary Care Update.

    PubMed

    Leung, Marcia A; Flaherty, Anna; Zhang, Julia A; Hara, Jared; Barber, Wayne; Burgess, Lawrence

    2016-06-01

    The primary care physician's role in recognizing sudden sensorineural hearing (SSNHL) loss and delivering initial treatment is critical in the management of the syndrome. This role involves recognizing its clinical symptoms, distinguishing it from conductive hearing loss with the Weber tuning fork or the Rauch hum test, and urgent administration of high dose oral corticosteroids. Diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed for audiometric testing or referral to otolaryngology. This paper provides an update on the initial evaluation and treatment of this syndrome based on the literature and clinical guideline recommendations.

  15. [Antimicrobial stewardship in primary care setting].

    PubMed

    Mombelli, Matteo; Plüss-Suard, Catherine; Niquille, Anne; Zanetti, Giorgio; Boillat-Blanco, Noémie

    2016-04-13

    Antibiotic overuse in primary care setting is a major contributor to the development of resistant bacteria. Antibiotic consumption is low in Switzerland compared to neighbour countries, but improvement is possible and has to be pursued. Antibiotic stewardship helps physician to better recognize patients who need antibiotic (guidelines implementation, electronic decision support and laboratory testing) and educate patients about the uselessness of antibiotics in a given situation (delayed prescription and shared decision making). Clinical studies demonstrated the efficacy of these interventions in reducing antibiotic consumption, mainly in acute respiratory infections, without affecting patients' clinical outcome.

  16. A framework to support team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system.

    PubMed

    Naccarella, Lucio; Greenstock, Louise N; Brooks, Peter M

    2013-09-01

    Health systems with strong primary care orientations are known to be associated with improved equity, better access for patients to appropriate services at lower costs, and improved population health. Team-based models of primary care have emerged in response to health system challenges due to complex patient profiles, patient expectations and health system demands. Successful team-based models of primary care require a combination of interprofessional education and learning; organisational and management policies and systems; and practice support systems. To ensure evidence is put into practice, we propose a framework comprising five domains (theory, implementation, infrastructure, sustainability and evaluation) to assist policymakers, educators, researchers, managers and health professionals in supporting team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system.

  17. A framework to support team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system.

    PubMed

    Naccarella, Lucio; Greenstock, Louise N; Brooks, Peter M

    2013-09-01

    Health systems with strong primary care orientations are known to be associated with improved equity, better access for patients to appropriate services at lower costs, and improved population health. Team-based models of primary care have emerged in response to health system challenges due to complex patient profiles, patient expectations and health system demands. Successful team-based models of primary care require a combination of interprofessional education and learning; organisational and management policies and systems; and practice support systems. To ensure evidence is put into practice, we propose a framework comprising five domains (theory, implementation, infrastructure, sustainability and evaluation) to assist policymakers, educators, researchers, managers and health professionals in supporting team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system. PMID:25370088

  18. Integrated and Culturally Relevant Care: A Model to Prepare Social Workers for Primary Care Behavioral Health Practice.

    PubMed

    Davis, Tamara S; Guada, Joe; Reno, Rebecca; Peck, Adriane; Evans, Shannon; Sigal, Laura Moskow; Swenson, Staci

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers and researchers emphasize needs for an integrated, effective, and efficient health care system to address well-documented disparities and inequities in care experienced by diverse populations. The Affordable Care Act, through its support of integrated health care, addresses social determinants of health with a goal of increasing access to care. Social work is poised to assume a central position in health care reform and integrated behavioral health, but must prepare practitioners to work alongside medical providers in health care settings. This article describes a social work field education model developed in partnership with community mental health and health care providers. The model, Integrated and Culturally Relevant Care, prepares social work students to provide behavioral health services in integrated primary care environments.

  19. Links between systems in Accident & Emergency and primary care.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Nick

    2005-01-01

    The hospital emergency department and other elements of rapid access primary care constitute an emergency care network. Integration aims to maximise the network's strengths and overcome its weaknesses. Taking the patient as a starting point, it is possible to envisage an objective data model that can operate at multiple levels within the network to describe its process efficiency and clinical effectiveness. Other means of integration are also identified. These contain significant subjective elements. In particular, the decision support system of NHSDirect has operated successfully to legitimise national and local intervention based on skill-mix, whereas its technical operation has been susceptible to human deviation from prescribed routine. As we scrutinise a system, we discover that it contains people who are doing things. Logical elements in the system turn out to be givers or recipients of deliberate and thoughtful care. Information systems in Accident & Emergency (A&E) and primary care can help accountable planners to measure and control aspects of the network's operation. Clinicians also need their systems to enable, rather than constrain, effective interactions.

  20. Hospital-sponsored primary care: I. Organizational and financial effects.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M; Wickizer, T M; Wheeler, J R

    1984-01-01

    Findings are presented from a seven-year (1976-83) evaluation of the Community Hospital Program (CHP), a national demonstration program sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to assist 54 community hospitals in improving the organization of access to primary care. Upon grant expiration, 66 per cent of hospital-sponsored group practices continued under some form of hospital sponsorship; over 90 per cent developed or were planning to develop spin-off programs; and new physicians were recruited and retained in the community. About 9 per cent of hospital admissions were accounted for by group physicians and grantee hospitals experienced a greater annual increase in their market share of admissions than competing hospitals in the area. While only three of the groups generated sufficient revenue to cover expenses during the grant period, 21 additional groups broke even during the first post-grant year. Productivity and cost per visit compared favorably with most other forms of care. Hospitalization rates from the hospital-sponsored practices were somewhat lower than those for other forms of care. Medical director leadership and involvement and the organization design of the practice were among several key factors associated with higher performing practices. The ability of such joint hospital-physician ventures to meet the needs of the poor and elderly in a time of Medicare and Medicaid cutbacks is discussed along with suggestions for targeting future initiatives in primary care. PMID:6742268

  1. Better Together: Co-Location of Dental and Primary Care Provides Opportunities to Improve Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Pourat, Nadereh; Martinez, Ana E; Crall, James J

    2015-09-01

    Community Health Centers (CHCs) are one of the principal safety-net providers of health care for low-income and uninsured populations. Co-locating dental services in primary care settings provides an opportunity to improve access to dental care. Yet this study of California CHCs that provide primary care services shows that only about one-third of them co-located primary and dental care services on-site. An additional one-third were members of multisite organizations in which at least one other site provided dental care. The remaining one-third of CHC sites had no dental care capacity. Policy options to promote co-location include requiring on-site availability of dental services, providing infrastructure funding to build and equip dental facilities, and offering financial incentives to provide dental care and recruit dental providers.

  2. Assessing primary care in Croatia: could it be moved forward?

    PubMed

    Keglević, Mladenka Vrcić; Kovačić, Luka; Pavleković, Gordana

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that countries with strong primary care achieve better health outcomes at lower costs. Therefore, the effort of World Health Organization in promoting primary care as a basic principal of successful health care system is an ongoing process. Although Croatia was recognized as a country with primary care orientation due to the development of health centers and introduction of specialist training of general practitioners, it seems that many health care reforms aimed at better organization of health institutions and decreasing of health care costs did not result with higher primary care orientation. By application of the Primary Care Score instrument in 2014 (Croatia received 11.2 out of 20 possible points), and international comparison performed in 2002, it was concluded that among the eighteen OECD countries Croatia could be categorized as an "intermediate primary care country", obtaining the scores just a bit above the average.

  3. A Participatory Model of the Paradox of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Homa, Laura; Rose, Johnie; Hovmand, Peter S.; Cherng, Sarah T.; Riolo, Rick L.; Kraus, Alison; Biswas, Anindita; Burgess, Kelly; Aungst, Heide; Stange, Kurt C.; Brown, Kalanthe; Brooks-Terry, Margaret; Dec, Ellen; Jackson, Brigid; Gilliam, Jules; Kikano, George E.; Reichsman, Ann; Schaadt, Debbie; Hilfer, Jamie; Ticknor, Christine; Tyler, Carl V.; Van der Meulen, Anna; Ways, Heather; Weinberger, Richard F.; Williams, Christine

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The paradox of primary care is the observation that primary care is associated with apparently low levels of evidence-based care for individual diseases, but systems based on primary care have healthier populations, use fewer resources, and have less health inequality. The purpose of this article is to explore, from a complex systems perspective, mechanisms that might account for the effects of primary care beyond disease-specific care. METHODS In an 8-session, participatory group model-building process, patient, caregiver, and primary care clinician community stakeholders worked with academic investigators to develop and refine an agent-based computer simulation model to test hypotheses about mechanisms by which features of primary care could affect health and health equity. RESULTS In the resulting model, patients are at risk for acute illness, acute life-changing illness, chronic illness, and mental illness. Patients have changeable health behaviors and care-seeking tendencies that relate to their living in advantaged or disadvantaged neighborhoods. There are 2 types of care available to patients: primary and specialty. Primary care in the model is less effective than specialty care in treating single diseases, but it has the ability to treat multiple diseases at once. Primary care also can provide disease prevention visits, help patients improve their health behaviors, refer to specialty care, and develop relationships with patients that cause them to lower their threshold for seeking care. In a model run with primary care features turned off, primary care patients have poorer health. In a model run with all primary care features turned on, their conjoint effect leads to better population health for patients who seek primary care, with the primary care effect being particularly pronounced for patients who are disadvantaged and patients with multiple chronic conditions. Primary care leads to more total health care visits that are due to more disease

  4. [Clinical case: Complicated grief in primary care. Care plan].

    PubMed

    Ruymán Brito-Brito, Pedro; Rodríguez-Ramos, Mercedes; Pérez-García-Talavera, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This is the case of a 61-year-old patient woman that visits her nurse in Primary Health Care to get the control of blood pressure and glycemia. In the last two years has suffered the loss of her husband and of two brothers beside having lived through other vital stressful events that have taken her to a situation of complicated grief. The care plan is realized using the M. Gordon assessment system and standardized languages NANDA, NOC and NIC. The principal aims were the improvement of the depression level and the improvement in the affliction resolution. As suggested interventions were proposed to facilitate the grief and the derivation to a mental health unit. A follow-up of the patient was realized in nursing consultation at Primary health care to weekly intervals, in the beginning, and monthly, later. The evaluation of the care plan reflects an improvement in the criteria of Prigerson's complicated grief; an increase of the recreative activities; the retreat of the mourning that still she was guarding; as well as an improvement in the control of the blood pressure numbers. The attention of nurses before a case of complicated grief turns out to be complex. Nevertheless the suitable accomplishment of certain interventions orientated to facilitating the grief, with a follow-up in consultation, shows the efficiency. The difficulty in the boarding of the psychosocial problems meets increased at the moment of are necessary the nursing diagnostics adapted for every individual case. The work in group between nurses could improves the consensus.

  5. Access to health and health care: how race and ethnicity matter.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Lynne D; Norris, Marlaina

    2010-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in health are multifactorial; they reflect differences in biological vulnerability to disease as well as differences in social resources, environmental factors, and health care interventions. Understanding and intervening in health inequity require an understanding of the disparate access to all of the personal resources and environmental conditions that are needed to generate and sustain health, a set of circumstances that constitute access to health. These include access to health information, participation in health promotion and disease prevention activities, safe housing, nutritious foods, convenient exercise spaces, freedom from ambient violence, adequate social support, communities with social capital, and access to quality health care. Access to health care is facilitated by health insurance, a regular source of care, and a usual primary care provider. Various mechanisms through which access to health and access to health care are mediated by race and ethnicity are discussed; these include the built environment, social environment, residential segregation, stress, racism, and discrimination. Empirical evidence supporting the association between these factors and health inequities is also reviewed.

  6. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    PubMed

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen.

  7. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    PubMed

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-05-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen.

  8. [Patient safety in primary care: PREFASEG project].

    PubMed

    Catalán, Arantxa; Borrell, Francesc; Pons, Angels; Amado, Ester; Baena, José Miguel; Morales, Vicente

    2014-07-01

    The Institut Català de la Salut (ICS) has designed and integrated in electronic clinical station of primary care a new software tool to support the prescription of drugs, which can detect on-line certain medication errors. The software called PREFASEG (stands for Secure drug prescriptions) aims to prevent adverse events related to medication use in the field of primary health care (PHC). This study was made on the computerized medical record called CPT, which is used by all PHC physicians in our institution -3,750- and prescribing physicians through it. PREFASEG integrated in eCAP in July 2010 and six months later we performed a cross-sectional study to evaluate their usefulness and refine their design. The software alerts on-line in 5 dimensions: drug interactions, redundant treatments, allergies, contraindications of drugs with disease, and advises against drugs in over 75 years. PREFASEG generated 1,162,765 alerts (1 per 10 high treatment), with the detection of therapeutic duplication (62%) the most alerted. The overall acceptance rate is 35%, redundancies pharmacological (43%) and allergies (26%) are the most accepted. A total of 10,808 professionals (doctors and nurses) have accepted some of the recommendations of the program. PREFASEG is a feasible and highly efficient strategy to achieve an objective of Quality Plan for the NHS.

  9. [Research and protection of personal data in Primary Care].

    PubMed

    Garrido Elustondo, Sofía; Cabello Ballesteros, Luisa; Galende Domínguez, Inés; Riesgo Fuertes, Rosario; Rodríguez Barrientos, Ricardo; Polentinos Castro, Elena

    2012-03-01

    Research is one of the fundamental functions that have to be carried out in Primary Care. The clinical information stored in different records arising from medical care is a basic tool for this activity. The use of personal data for the purposes of research is legitimate according to our laws; however, this information must be treated confidentially at all times. Two alternatives are available for this. One is to obtain the informed consent of the patient, and the other is to dissociate the handling of the information. But in some situations, the compliance to legal demands when obtaining data for research is not easy, there being a series of obstacles which in many cases makes it impossible to carry out research. In this article, we will give guidance on how to access the information contained in records while respecting the rights of the patient and the current legislation.

  10. Global access to surgical care: a modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Alkire, Blake C; Raykar, Nakul P; Shrime, Mark G; Weiser, Thomas G; Bickler, Stephen W; Rose, John A; Nutt, Cameron T; Greenberg, Sarah L M; Kotagal, Meera; Riesel, Johanna N; Esquivel, Micaela; Uribe-Leitz, Tarsicio; Molina, George; Roy, Nobhojit; Meara, John G; Farmer, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background More than 2 billion people are unable to receive surgical care based on operating theatre density alone. The vision of the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery is universal access to safe, affordable surgical and anaesthesia care when needed. We aimed to estimate the number of individuals worldwide without access to surgical services as defined by the Commission’s vision. Methods We modelled access to surgical services in 196 countries with respect to four dimensions: timeliness, surgical capacity, safety, and affordability. We built a chance tree for each country to model the probability of surgical access with respect to each dimension, and from this we constructed a statistical model to estimate the proportion of the population in each country that does not have access to surgical services. We accounted for uncertainty with one-way sensitivity analyses, multiple imputation for missing data, and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Findings At least 4·8 billion people (95% posterior credible interval 4·6–5·0 [67%, 64–70]) of the world’s population do not have access to surgery. The proportion of the population without access varied widely when stratified by epidemiological region: greater than 95% of the population in south Asia and central, eastern, and western sub-Saharan Africa do not have access to care, whereas less than 5% of the population in Australasia, high-income North America, and western Europe lack access. Interpretation Most of the world’s population does not have access to surgical care, and access is inequitably distributed. The near absence of access in many low-income and middle-income countries represents a crisis, and as the global health community continues to support the advancement of universal health coverage, increasing access to surgical services will play a central role in ensuring health care for all. Funding None. PMID:25926087

  11. Economic evaluation in primary health care: the case of Western Kenya community based health care project.

    PubMed

    Wang'ombe, J K

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology and presents preliminary results of an economic appraisal of a community based health care project in Kenya. Community health workers, trained for 12 weeks and deployed in two locations in Kenya's Western Province, act as first contact providers of basic health care and promoters of selected health, sanitation and nutrition practices. A Cost Benefit Analysis has been undertaken using the Willingness to Pay approach to compare the costs of the project and its benefits. The benefits are in the form of more easily accessible basic health care and are measured as consumer surplus accruing to the community. Gain in consumer surplus is consequent on the fall of average user costs and rise in utilisation of the project established points of first contact with primary health care. The argument for the economic viability of the project is validated by the large Net Present Value and Benefit Cost Ratio obtained for the whole of the project area and for the two locations separately. Although the evaluation technique used faces the problem of valuation of community time, aggregation of health care services at all points of first contact and the partial nature of cost benefit analysis evaluations, the results are strongly in favour of decentralisation of primary health care on similar lines in the rest of the country. PMID:6427933

  12. A Conceptual Framework of Mapping Access to Health Care across EU Countries: The Patient Access Initiative.

    PubMed

    Souliotis, Kyriakos; Hasardzhiev, Stanimir; Agapidaki, Eirini

    2016-01-01

    Research evidence suggests that access to health care is the key influential factor for improved population health outcomes and health care system sustainability. Although the importance of addressing barriers in access to health care across European countries is well documented, little has been done to improve the situation. This is due to different definitions, approaches and policies, and partly due to persisting disparities in access within and between European countries. To bridge this gap, the Patient Access Partnership (PACT) developed (a) the '5As' definition of access, which details the five critical elements (adequacy, accessibility, affordability, appropriateness, and availability) of access to health care, (b) a multi-stakeholders' approach for mapping access, and (c) a 13-item questionnaire based on the 5As definition in an effort to address these obstacles and to identify best practices. These tools are expected to contribute effectively to addressing access barriers in practice, by suggesting a common framework and facilitating the exchange of knowledge and expertise, in order to improve access to health care between and within European countries. PMID:27237814

  13. Time Allocation in Primary Care Office Visits

    PubMed Central

    Tai-Seale, Ming; McGuire, Thomas G; Zhang, Weimin

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To use an innovative videotape analysis method to examine how clinic time was spent during elderly patients' visits to primary care physicians. Secondary objectives were to identify the factors that influence time allocations. Data Sources A convenience sample of 392 videotapes of routine office visits conducted between 1998 and 2000 from multiple primary care practices in the United States, supplemented by patient and physician surveys. Research Design Videotaped visits were examined for visit length and time devoted to specific topics—a novel approach to study time allocation. A survival analysis model analyzed the effects of patient, physician, and physician practice setting on how clinic time was spent. Principal Findings Very limited amount of time was dedicated to specific topics in office visits. The median visit length was 15.7 minutes covering a median of six topics. About 5 minutes were spent on the longest topic whereas the remaining topics each received 1.1 minutes. While time spent by patient and physician on a topic responded to many factors, length of the visit overall varied little even when contents of visits varied widely. Macro factors associated with each site had more influence on visit and topic length than the nature of the problem patients presented. Conclusions Many topics compete for visit time, resulting in small amount of time being spent on each topic. A highly regimented schedule might interfere with having sufficient time for patients with complex or multiple problems. Efforts to improve the quality of care need to recognize the time pressure on both patients and physicians, the effects of financial incentives, and the time costs of improving patient–physician interactions. PMID:17850524

  14. Role of the registered nurse in primary health care: meeting health care needs in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Smolowitz, Janice; Speakman, Elizabeth; Wojnar, Danuta; Whelan, Ellen-Marie; Ulrich, Suzan; Hayes, Carolyn; Wood, Laura

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread interest in the redesign of primary health care practice models to increase access to quality health care. Registered nurses (RNs) are well positioned to assume direct care and leadership roles based on their understanding of patient, family, and system priorities. This project identified 16 exemplar primary health care practices that used RNs to the full extent of their scope of practice in team-based care. Interviews were conducted with practice representatives. RN activities were performed within three general contexts: episodic and preventive care, chronic disease management, and practice operations. RNs performed nine general functions in these contexts including telephone triage, assessment and documentation of health status, chronic illness case management, hospital transition management, delegated care for episodic illness, health coaching, medication reconciliation, staff supervision, and quality improvement leadership. These functions improved quality and efficiency and decreased cost. Implications for policy, practice, and RN education are considered.

  15. [Cervical cancer as a tracer condition: a proposal for evaluation of primary health care].

    PubMed

    Bottari, Clarissa Moraes de Sousa; Vasconcellos, Miguel Murat; Mendonça, Maria Helena Magalhães de

    2008-01-01

    The use of tracer conditions as an evaluative technique suggests the possibility of inferring the quality of health care and setting evaluation standards for programmed actions. As a government strategy, primary health care is a key element for reorganization of the Brazilian health care model. This study analyzes the use of cervical cancer as a tracer condition for assessing primary care. Based on the results from questions on measures to control the disease from the perspective of health professionals and cervical cancer patients, we constructed a matrix of indicators relating primary care attributes to process/results indicators. The analytical plan to validate the results used triangulation of methods, associating data from qualitative and quantitative approaches, in addition to combining and cross-analyzing the various actors' points of view. The results suggest that cervical cancer is an excellent tracer condition for primary care in general, based on the similarity of such concepts as accessibility, coverage, comprehensiveness, technical and scientific quality, and effectiveness.

  16. Reflections on the past and future of primary care.

    PubMed

    Howell, Joel D

    2010-05-01

    Medical care and primary care were at one time synonymous. All health care was primary. The concept and terminology of primary care came into widespread use during the 1960s, reflecting a specific policy agenda: bolstering the role of the generalist physician, which had changed dramatically following World War II. This essay describes the transformation of the nineteenth-century physician making house calls on horseback into the twenty-first-century primary care physician contemplating the electronic records of her patient population. The essential point is that "primary care" was born out of tension with other forms of medical care. In the future, primary care will be reinvented, and changes will be caused by the sorts of external social, political, and economic forces that previously led to systemic transformation. PMID:20439858

  17. Health promotion and primary health care: examining the discourse.

    PubMed

    Ashcroft, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    The health promotion discourse is comprised of assumptions about health and health care that are compatible with primary health care. An examination of the health promotion discourse illustrates how assumptions of health can help to inform primary health care. Despite health promotion being a good fit for primary health care, this analysis demonstrates that the scope in which it is being implemented in primary health care settings is limited. The health promotion discourse appears largely compatible with primary health care-in theory and in the health care practices that follow. The aim of this article is to contribute to the advancement of theoretical understanding of the health promotion discourse, and the relevance of health promotion to primary health care.

  18. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs. PMID:26826073

  19. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs.

  20. Improving Access to Health Care: School-Based Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowden, Shauna L.; Calvert, Richard D.; Davis, Lisa; Gullotta, Thomas P.

    This article explores an approach for better serving the complete health care needs of children, specifically, the efficacy of school-based health centers (SBHCs) to provide a service delivery mechanism capable of functioning as a medical home for children, providing primary care for both their physical and behavioral health care needs. The…

  1. Everyday ethical dilemmas arising with electronic record use in primary care.

    PubMed

    Balka, Ellen; Tolar, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of electronic medical record systems (EMRs) into primary care settings alters work practices, introduces new challenges, and new roles. In the process of integrating an EMR into a primary care setting, clinic staff faced ethical challenges in their everyday work practices resulting from workarounds undertaken to compensate for a poor fit between system design and work practices, issues related to system access, and governance gaps. Examples of these issues are presented, and implications for system design are discussed.

  2. Innovative Primary Care Training: The Cambridge Health Alliance Oral Physician Program

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Brittany Anne; Swann, Brian; Jayaratne, Yasas S. N.; Outlaw, Jason; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the Oral Physician Program, a dental residency sponsored by Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and the Cambridge Health Alliance that offers an innovative model for training dentists to provide limited primary care. The didactic and clinical experiences increased residents' medical knowledge and interviewing skills, and faculty assessments supported their role as oral physicians. Oral physicians could increase patients'—especially patients from underserved groups—access to integrated oral and primary care services. PMID:22994253

  3. Primary care in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Health care and health status in general practice ambulatory care centres.

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, M.; Hodgetts, G.; Bardon, E.; Seguin, R.; Packer, D.; Geddes, J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the health care and health status of patients attending primary care clinics in Bosnia and Herzegovina. DESIGN: Assisted administration patient survey. SETTING: Two ambulatory care clinics (ambulantas) in each of three cities in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Tuzla, Mostar, and Banja Luka. PARTICIPANTS: Patients attending the ambulantas during a 1-week period in March 1999; 885 answered questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Each patient listed demographic characteristics and answered questions on satisfaction with health care and with the physical and financial accessibility of health care services and medications. A validated health status questionnaire (EuroQoL), previously used in parts of the former Yugoslavia, was administered. RESULTS: Only 22% of patients were employed; 57% could not pay the nominal fee to see a physician; 71% walked to the clinic; mean distance from patients' homes to the clinics was 2.3 km; 63% could not get the medications prescribed (in 85% of cases because of cost, not availability); 80% to 90% of answers to satisfaction questions suggested high satisfaction with the care patients received from their doctors; 67% of the time patients were referred to a specialist by general practitioners; 33% had problems walking; 17% had problems with self-care; 36% had problems with usual daily activities; 72% had at least some pain or discomfort; and 62% described at least some anxiety or depression. The three cities showed significant differences; patients in Tuzla generally had lower health status and more problems with health care. CONCLUSION: Unemployment and financial considerations reduced health care access in Bosnia and Herzegovina. While only one third of patients had physical difficulties, two thirds had emotional problems or pain. Satisfaction with physicians' care was high. PMID:11228029

  4. Primary care as a platform for full continuum health care risk management.

    PubMed

    Klepper, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Health care clinical and financial risk is a multivectored problem, requiring multivectored solutions that extend beyond primary care. Worksite clinics have emerged that leverage empowered primary care, but incorporate a range of tactics aimed at driving appropriate care and cost by disrupting health care's perverse incentives. This article describes some of those approaches and shows evidence of the performance that can result. PMID:24402068

  5. A multisectoral approach to primary health care in Fujian, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, H L; Mei, Y H; Qiu, X C; Zhang, H L; Lin, Q B; Guan, J H; Clayton, S

    1991-01-01

    The government of Yongan in Fujian province has developed a multisectoral primary health care program in the rural community of Dahu with the aim of reaching "Health for All" by 1993. In keeping with the spirit of the Alma Ata declaration and the tradition of local self-reliance in China, the program has involved the entire community and is financed almost exclusively at the local level. Community leaders were trained in the importance of primary health care so that they could serve as role models. The project includes school health education, domestic hygiene education, reconstruction of homes to separate the kitchen, toilet and animals pens, road construction to eliminate dust, environmental sanitation, occupational health, and the upgrading of health care facilities. A number of local ordinances regarding construction, zoning and smoking have also been instituted. The results of the project's first year of implementation in two villages indicate that construction of the new road is near completion, and access to clean water is almost universal. Gains are also reported in the percentage of the population receiving physical examinations, the number of health stations that now meet state standards, and the number of homes that are constructed according to the new guidelines.

  6. 'Fried chicken' medicine: the business of primary care.

    PubMed

    Culley, G A

    1994-01-01

    The current environment of pressures for health care reform have created a renewed interest in primary health care delivery. In most health care reform scenarios, family physicians and other primary care doctors are the case managers for all health care delivery. At the same time, there are intense activities from investment banking firms, insurance companies, hospitals, and home health companies, directed toward the purchase of primary care practices and organizing primary care delivery systems. These organizations seek to profit either from ancillary services generated by primary care or from capitation for a population of managed-care patients. Based on personal employment experiences with a for-profit hospital company, the author illustrates the difficulty in developing and managing primary care as a business and the inevitable conflict between management and primary care physicians. The article has detailed advice for family physicians to aid them in carefully examining organizational culture, financial structuring, physician relations, and operational aspects of any for-profit or hospital primary care system before deciding to become part of it. PMID:8289054

  7. 'Fried chicken' medicine: the business of primary care.

    PubMed

    Culley, G A

    1994-01-01

    The current environment of pressures for health care reform have created a renewed interest in primary health care delivery. In most health care reform scenarios, family physicians and other primary care doctors are the case managers for all health care delivery. At the same time, there are intense activities from investment banking firms, insurance companies, hospitals, and home health companies, directed toward the purchase of primary care practices and organizing primary care delivery systems. These organizations seek to profit either from ancillary services generated by primary care or from capitation for a population of managed-care patients. Based on personal employment experiences with a for-profit hospital company, the author illustrates the difficulty in developing and managing primary care as a business and the inevitable conflict between management and primary care physicians. The article has detailed advice for family physicians to aid them in carefully examining organizational culture, financial structuring, physician relations, and operational aspects of any for-profit or hospital primary care system before deciding to become part of it.

  8. Appointment standardization evaluation in a primary care facility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Li

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance on standardizing appointment slot length in a primary care clinic to understand the impact of providers' preferences and practice differences. Design/methodology/approach - The treatment time data were collected for each provider. There were six patient types: emergency/urgent care (ER/UC), follow-up patient (FU), new patient, office visit (OV), physical exam, and well-child care. Simulation model was developed to capture patient flow and measure patient wait time, provider idle time, cost, overtime, finish time, and the number of patients scheduled. Four scheduling scenarios were compared: scheduled all patients at 20 minutes; scheduled ER/UC, FU, OV at 20 minutes and others at 40 minutes; scheduled patient types on individual provider preference; and scheduled patient types on combined provider preference. Findings - Standardized scheduling among providers increase cost by 57 per cent, patient wait time by 83 per cent, provider idle time by five minutes per patient, overtime by 22 minutes, finish time by 30 minutes, and decrease patient access to care by approximately 11 per cent. An individualized scheduling approach could save as much as 14 per cent on cost and schedule 1.5 more patients. The combined preference method could save about 8 per cent while the number of patients scheduled remained the same. Research limitations/implications - The challenge is to actually disseminate the findings to medical providers and adjust scheduling systems accordingly. Originality/value - This paper concluded standardization of providers' clinic preference and practice negatively impact clinic service quality and access to care.

  9. Ontario's primary care reforms have transformed the local care landscape, but a plan is needed for ongoing improvement.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Brian; Glazier, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Primary care in Ontario, Canada, has undergone a series of reforms designed to improve access to care, patient and provider satisfaction, care quality, and health system efficiency and sustainability. We highlight key features of the reforms, which included patient enrollment with a primary care provider; funding for interprofessional primary care organizations; and physician reimbursement based on varying blends of fee-for-service, capitation, and pay-for-performance. With nearly 75 percent of Ontario's population now enrolled in these new models, total payments to primary care physicians increased by 32 percent between 2006 and 2010, and the proportion of Ontario primary care physicians who reported overall satisfaction with the practice of medicine rose from 76 percent in 2009 to 84 percent in 2012. However, primary care in Ontario also faces challenges. There is no meaningful performance measurement system that tracks the impact of these innovations, for example. A better system of risk adjustment is also needed in capitated plans so that groups have the incentive to take on high-need patients. Ongoing investment in these models is required despite fiscal constraints. We recommend a clearly articulated policy road map to continue the transformation. PMID:23569049

  10. Racism and health care access: a dialogue with childbearing women.

    PubMed

    Murrell, N L; Smith, R; Gill, G; Oxley, G

    1996-01-01

    The rates of low birth weight and preterm delivery are twice as high for African Americans as they are for Whites in the United States. Racism and health care access may be factors in this twofold disparity. To investigate this possibility, we conducted a qualitative study with African American prenatal and postpartum women (N = 14). In 1- to 2-hr interviews, we asked the participants to describe their ability to access health care and their experiences of racism. We then independently and collectively coded the data until consensus (95%) was obtained. Data categories included access to care, treatment, differences in care, stereotypes, and racism. Three themes emerged from the interviews: (a) the pervasiveness of the stereotype of pregnant African American women; (b) a care that is indifferent, inaccessible, and undignified; and (c) the totality of racism. These themes encompass social, political, and economic factors affecting the experiences of childbearing African American families and mandate the need for further investigation and intervention.

  11. Health and access to care for undocumented migrants living in the European Union: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Aniek; Howard, Natasha; Wolffers, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Background Literature on health and access to care of undocumented migrants in the European Union (EU) is limited and heterogeneous in focus and quality. Authors conducted a scoping review to identify the extent, nature and distribution of existing primary research (1990–2012), thus clarifying what is known, key gaps, and potential next steps. Methods Authors used Arksey and O’Malley’s six-stage scoping framework, with Levac, Colquhoun and O’Brien’s revisions, to review identified sources. Findings were summarized thematically: (i) physical, mental and social health issues, (ii) access and barriers to care, (iii) vulnerable groups and (iv) policy and rights. Results Fifty-four sources were included of 598 identified, with 93% (50/54) published during 2005–2012. EU member states from Eastern Europe were under-represented, particularly in single-country studies. Most study designs (52%) were qualitative. Sampling descriptions were generally poor, and sampling purposeful, with only four studies using any randomization. Demographic descriptions were far from uniform and only two studies focused on undocumented children and youth. Most (80%) included findings on health-care access, with obstacles reported at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Major access barriers included fear, lack of awareness of rights, socioeconomics. Mental disorders appeared widespread, while obstetric needs and injuries were key reasons for seeking care. Pregnant women, children and detainees appeared most vulnerable. While EU policy supports health-care access for undocumented migrants, practices remain haphazard, with studies reporting differing interpretation and implementation of rights at regional, institutional and individual levels. Conclusions This scoping review is an initial attempt to describe available primary evidence on health and access to care for undocumented migrants in the European Union. It underlines the need for more and better-quality research, increased

  12. Addressing suicidality in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J Michael; Rackley, Sandra

    2012-08-01

    By design or by default, primary care providers (PCPs)are frequently the vanguard in the fight against suicide. Recent studies have highlighted programs to improve screening and prevention of suicidality in the medical home, particularly among high-risk patients, such as adolescents, the elderly, and veterans. Increasing efforts are also being paid to improving the PCP's skill in assessing for suicidality. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that screening alone will not significantly lower suicide rates until it occurs within a well-integrated system that facilitates timely referral to more intensive mental health services for those patients who need them. Unfortunately, such systems are sorely lacking in many, if not most, areas of the USA. PMID:22644310

  13. [Shigellosis in a primary care practice].

    PubMed

    Ben-Noun, L; Shvartzman, P

    1994-11-15

    The epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 47 patients infected with Shigella in 3436 patients at a primary care clinic during 30 months were reviewed. Most cases were seen during the winter. The prominent clinical features were abdominal pain (91.5%), headaches (72.5%), bloody diarrhea (66%), mucoid stools (63.8%), fever (53.2%) and 75% had 4-10 stools per day. Most patients presented the first day of the illness (75%). S. sonnei has been found the most prevalent among 4 types of shigella. Resistance to ampicillin was complete and to Resprim 95%, but to nalidixic acid and to tetracycline, 4.9%. A third of the patients were treated with oral fluids and an appropriate diet and 2/3 received antibiotics. Children between 1-4 years of age who attend kindergartens are the main risk group for Shigellosis. PMID:7995566

  14. Detection of insomnia in primary care.

    PubMed

    Doghramji, P P

    2001-01-01

    Insomnia is a widespread condition with diverse presentations. Detection and diagnosis of insomnia present a particular challenge to the primary care physician. Patients seldom identify their sleep habits as the source of the complaints for which they are seeking treatment. Insomnia may be the result of many different medical or psychiatric illnesses or the side effects of medications or legal or illegal recreational drugs. Insomnia has a serious impact on daily activities and can cause serious or fatal injuries. With ever-increasing competition with sleep from 24-hour television broadcasts from hundreds of channels and the Internet, as well as more traditional distractions of late-night movies, clubs, and bars, we have become a society that sleeps 25% less than our ancestors did a century ago. We have no evidence, however, that we require less sleep than they did. This article presents strategies for detecting and diagnosing insomnia.

  15. Transplantation and the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    McGill, Rita L; Ko, Tina Y

    2011-11-01

    Increasing appreciation of the survival benefits of kidney transplantation, compared with chronic dialysis, has resulted in more patients with kidney disease being referred and receiving organs. The evolving disparity between a rapidly increasing pool of candidates and a smaller pool of available donors has created new issues for the physicians who care for kidney patients and their potential living donors. This article outlines current efforts to address the growing number of patients who await transplantation, including relaxation of traditional donation criteria, maximization of living donation, and donation schemas that permit incompatible donor-recipient pairs to participate through paired donation and transplantation chains. New ethical issues faced by donors and recipients are discussed. Surgical advances that reduce the morbidity of donors are also described, as is the role of the primary physician in medical issues of both donors and recipients. PMID:22098662

  16. Drinking Motives Among HIV Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jennifer C.; Aharonovich, Efrat; O’Leary, Ann; Wainberg, Milton; Hasin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Heavy drinking among individuals with HIV is associated with poor medication adherence and other health problems. Understanding reasons for drinking (drinking motives) in this population is therefore important and could inform intervention. Using concepts of drinking motives from previous alcohol research, we assessed these motives and drinking in 254 HIV-positive primary care patients (78.0% male; 94.5% African American or Hispanic) prior to their participation in an alcohol intervention trial. Three motives had good factor structure and internal consistency: “drinking to cope with negative affect”, “drinking for social facilitation” (both associated with heavier drinking), and “drinking due to social pressure” (associated with less drinking). Drinking motives may provide important content for alcohol intervention; clinical trials could indicate whether inclusion of such content improves intervention efficacy. Discussing motives in session could help providers assist clients in better managing psychological and social aspects of their lives without reliance on alcohol. PMID:24165984

  17. [Hoarseness from the viewpoint of primary care].

    PubMed

    Järhult, B; Persson, G B; Valeur, E

    1983-01-01

    Hoarseness is a symptom that is constantly encountered by doctors in primary care. It is the leading symptom in acute laryngitis and is often present as one of the symptoms in, for example, respiratory tract infections, influenza, and bronchitis. For the general practitioner, the infection factor as the cause of hoarseness is so dominant that other possible causes may fail to be taken into consideration. The general practitioner's possibilities for diagnosing the cause of this symptom are largely determined by habit, and by his ability to observe and assess the vocal chords. Examination of the vocal chords is often technically difficult, and patients in whom inspection presents difficulties should be remitted to an ear specialist. Hoarse smokers constitute a special group at risk, and these patients should be remitted for further examinations, if the general practitioner finds it hard to make a complete inspection of the chords. The article also describes an investigation on how hoarseness is handled at a health centre.

  18. Disparities in Primary Care EHR Adoption Rates

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Dominic; Zhang, Shun; Douglas, Megan; Sow, Charles; Strothers, Harry; Rust, George

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates electronic health record (EHR) adoption by primary care providers in Georgia to assess adoption disparities according to practice size and type, payer mix, and community characteristics. Frequency variances of EHR “Go Live” status were estimated. Odds ratios were calculated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Large practices and community health centers (CHCs) were more likely to Go Live (>80% EHR adoption) than rural health clinics and other underserved settings (53%). A significantly lower proportion (68.9%) of Medicaid predominant providers had achieved Go Live status and had a 47% higher risk of not achieving Go Live status than private insurance predominant practices. Disparities in EHR adoption rates may exacerbate existing disparities in health outcomes of patients served by these practices. Targeted support such as that provided to CHCs would level the playing field for practices now at a disadvantage. PMID:27587942

  19. Sexual and Reproductive Health Care for Women with Intellectual Disabilities: A Primary Care Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Nechama W.; Wilkinson, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) face multiple health disparities and challenges to accessing health care. Little is known about sexual health care of this population and about how to optimize women's reproductive health care for women with intellectual disabilities. Women with ID face important barriers to care, including lack of provider training and experience, hesitancy to broach the topic of sexual health, a lack of sexual knowledge and limited opportunities for sex education, disability-related barriers, higher prevalence of sexual abuse and assault, often underreported, lack of dialogue around this population's human right to consensual sexual expression, undertreatment of menstrual disorders, and legal and systemic barriers. We conducted a limited literature review related to six aspects of sexual health care of women with ID, including barriers to sexual health care, sex education, sexual abuse and consensual sexuality, contraception, screening for sexually transmitted infections and cervical cancer, and pregnancy and parenting. After providing background information about each topic, we suggest practice recommendations for primary care clinicians, using a rights-based framework. PMID:24455249

  20. Australia's primary health care workforce--research informing policy.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Kirsty A; Rayner, Frith K; Yen, Laurann E; Wells, Robert W; Glasgow, Nicholas J; Humphreys, John S

    2009-07-20

    In 2008, the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute (APHCRI) held a Primary Health Care Workforce Roundtable with practising clinicians, policymakers and researchers, which drew on Australian evidence in health care policy, systematic reviews, and expertise and experience of participants. Key recommendations for an adequate, sustainable and effective primary health care workforce that arose from the meeting included: simplifying the Medicare Benefits Schedule, which is unnecessarily complex and inflexible; effectively funding undergraduate and prevocational medical and nursing education and training in primary health care; developing career structure and training pathways for general practitioners and primary health care nurses; developing of functional primary health care teams; and using a blended funding model, comprising fee-for-service as well as capitation for patients with chronic or complex needs. A report from the meeting, detailing these policy options, was submitted to the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission for inclusion in their deliberations. PMID:19619091

  1. A primary health care project in Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Chen, P C; Tan, Y K

    1982-03-01

    A joint pilot project between the Ministry of Health and the Dept. of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Malaya, to test the value of village aides in extending the health care system into isolated Iban communities was begun in May 1979 in the Entabai District of Sarawak. A group of 15 village aides consisting of 11 traditional Iban manangs (medicine men) and 4 youths were trained to provide primary health care including simple curative care, preventive care, and to assist in the detection of malaria. Evaluation carreid out 2 years later showed the following. With regard to curative care, the village aides were each, on the average, treating 70.6 patients/month, the most common complaint being headache (30.4%), which along with abdominal pain, constipation, bodyache, diarrhea, vomiting, fever, worm infections, cough, and sore throat, accounted for 89% of all illnesses seen by them. Subsequent to the introduction of village aides in the project area, the number of seriously ill patients requiring admission to the rest beds of the klinik desa dropped by 43.8% and the number of emergency referrals to the backup divisional hospitals fell by 46.1% showing that patients were coming to the klink desa for treatment at an earlier stage. The 11 traditional Iban manangs, who had recently received training had, on their own accord, drastically reduced the use of traditional Iban modes of therapy in preference for modern medicine. During the 24 months immediately after the introduction of village aides into Entabai, 9 gravity feed water supply systems together with related health packages advocating general cleanliness, the use of latrines, and fences were affected, whereas only 6 such systems were installed in the previous 24 months, indicating that it is likely that the village aides were of some assistance in mobilizing the community with respect to self-help efforts. During the same period, the majority of longhouses in the area successfully established a number

  2. A primary health care project in Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Chen, P C; Tan, Y K

    1982-03-01

    A joint pilot project between the Ministry of Health and the Dept. of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Malaya, to test the value of village aides in extending the health care system into isolated Iban communities was begun in May 1979 in the Entabai District of Sarawak. A group of 15 village aides consisting of 11 traditional Iban manangs (medicine men) and 4 youths were trained to provide primary health care including simple curative care, preventive care, and to assist in the detection of malaria. Evaluation carreid out 2 years later showed the following. With regard to curative care, the village aides were each, on the average, treating 70.6 patients/month, the most common complaint being headache (30.4%), which along with abdominal pain, constipation, bodyache, diarrhea, vomiting, fever, worm infections, cough, and sore throat, accounted for 89% of all illnesses seen by them. Subsequent to the introduction of village aides in the project area, the number of seriously ill patients requiring admission to the rest beds of the klinik desa dropped by 43.8% and the number of emergency referrals to the backup divisional hospitals fell by 46.1% showing that patients were coming to the klink desa for treatment at an earlier stage. The 11 traditional Iban manangs, who had recently received training had, on their own accord, drastically reduced the use of traditional Iban modes of therapy in preference for modern medicine. During the 24 months immediately after the introduction of village aides into Entabai, 9 gravity feed water supply systems together with related health packages advocating general cleanliness, the use of latrines, and fences were affected, whereas only 6 such systems were installed in the previous 24 months, indicating that it is likely that the village aides were of some assistance in mobilizing the community with respect to self-help efforts. During the same period, the majority of longhouses in the area successfully established a number

  3. Addressing the emotional barriers to access to reproductive care.

    PubMed

    Rich, Camilla W; Domar, Alice D

    2016-05-01

    Health care professionals make the medical care of infertility patients a priority, with the goal of achieving a singleton pregnancy for each. Patients who never seek out care, who do not return for treatment after the diagnostic workup, or who drop out of treatment are rarely noticed. Yet this is the outcome for the majority of patients, and the primary reason after financial for treatment termination is the emotional aspect. Attending to the psychological needs of our patients must become a higher priority, to provide all patients true access to care. PMID:27054306

  4. Pioneering community-oriented primary care.

    PubMed

    Susser, M

    1999-01-01

    This is a retrospective report on the importance of Kark and Cassel's 1952 paper on community-oriented primary care (COPC). In 1978, WHO and UNICEF endorsed COPC. However, the ideas girding and framing this approach had first been given full expression in practice some four decades earlier. In Depression-Era South Africa, Sidney Kark, a leader of the National Department of Health, converted the emergent discipline of social medicine into a unique form of comprehensive practice and established the Pholela Health Center, which was the explicit model for COPC. COPC as founded and practiced by Kark was a community, family and personal practice; it also was a multidisciplinary and team practice. Furthermore, the innovations of COPC entailed monitoring, evaluation, and research. Evaluation is the essence of Kark and Kassel's paper, which offers a convincing demonstration of the effects of COPC. Its key findings include the following: 1) that there was a decline in the incidence of syphilis in the area served by the health center; 2) that diet and nutrition improved; and 3) that the crude mortality rate as well as the infant mortality rate--the standard marker--declined in Pholela. In the succeeding decades, OPC had an international legacy (through WHO and H. Jack Geiger's influence in the US Office of Economic Opportunity), which came full circle in the 1980s, when a young generation of South Africans began to search their history for models for their health care programs at the dawn of the post-Apartheid Era.

  5. EBM in primary care: a qualitative multicenter study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence based medicine (EBM) has made a substantial impact on primary care in Spain over the last few years. However, little research has been done into family physicians (FPs)' attitudes related to EBM. The present study investigates FPs' perceptions of EBM in the primary care context. Methods This study used qualitative methodology. Information was obtained from 8 focus groups composed of 67 FPs from 47 health centers in 4 autonomous regions in Spain. Intentional sampling considered participants' previous education in EBM, and their experience as tutors in family medicine or working groups' members of the Spanish Society of Family Practice. Sociological discourse analysis was used with the support of the MAXqda software. Results were validated by means of triangulation among researchers and contrast with participants. Results Findings were grouped into three main areas: 1) The tug-of-war between the "science" of EBM and "experience" in the search for good clinical practice in primary care; 2) The development of EBM sensemaking as a reaction to contextual factors and interests; 3) The paradox of doubt and trust in the new EBM experts. The meaning of EBM was dynamically constructed within the primary care context. FPs did not consider good clinical practice was limited to the vision of science that EBM represents. Its use appeared to be conditioned by several factors that transcended the common concept of barriers. Along with concerns about its objectivity, participants showed a tendency to see EBM as the use of simplified guidelines developed by EBM experts. Conclusions The identification of science with EBM and its recognition as a useful but insufficient tool for the good clinical practice requires rethinking new meanings of evidence within the primary care reality. Beyond the barriers related to accessing and putting into practice the EBM, its reactive use can determine FPs' questions and EBM development in a direction not always centred on patients

  6. Primary care medicine in crisis: toward reconstruction and renewal.

    PubMed

    Moore, Gordon; Showstack, Jonathan

    2003-02-01

    Primary care is in crisis. Despite its proud history and theoretical advantages, the field has failed to hold its own among medical specialties. While the rest of medicine promises technology and sophistication, the basic model of primary care has changed little over the past half-century. Why has the transition from general practice to today's primary care been so difficult? Many of the causes of this struggle may lie within primary care itself, ranging from failure to articulate to the public (and insurers and policymakers) what value it, and it alone, can offer, to taking on an ever-broadening set of roles and responsibilities while all too often falling short of its promises. Perhaps most important, in the emerging health care system, the lack of a discrete definition of primary care has allowed managed care organizations and payers, among others, to define the role of primary care to suit their own interests. In response to a changing marketplace, political uncertainty, and shifting consumer expectations, primary care will need to reconstruct itself. The reconstruction will not be easy. Nevertheless, a process should begin that moves the field in the right direction. Building on its unique abilities, primary care can emerge as a redefined product that is attractive to patients, payers, and primary care practitioners alike. PMID:12558374

  7. 42 CFR 438.804 - Primary care provider payment increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care provider payment increases. 438.804... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Conditions for Federal Financial Participation § 438.804 Primary care provider payment increases. (a) For MCO, PIHP or PAHP contracts that...

  8. The Development and Validation of a Rapid Assessment Tool of Primary Care in China

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jie; Liang, Yuan; Shi, LeiYu; Zhao, JingGe; Wang, YuTan; Kuang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. With Chinese health care reform increasingly emphasizing the importance of primary care, the need for a tool to evaluate primary care performance and service delivery is clear. This study presents a methodology for a rapid assessment of primary care organizations and service delivery in China. Methods. The study translated and adapted the Primary Care Assessment Tool-Adult Edition (PCAT-AE) into a Chinese version to measure core dimensions of primary care, namely, first contact, continuity, comprehensiveness, and coordination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess the validity and reliability of the Chinese Rapid Primary Care Assessment Tool (CR-PCAT). Eight community health centers in Guangdong province have been selected to participate in the survey. Results. A total of 1465 effective samples were included for data analysis. Eight items were eliminated following principal component analysis and reliability testing. The principal component analysis extracted five multiple-item scales (first contact utilization, first contact accessibility, ongoing care, comprehensiveness, and coordination). The tests of scaling assumptions were basically met. Conclusion. The standard psychometric evaluation indicates that the scales have achieved relatively good reliability and validity. The CR-PCAT provides a rapid and reliable measure of four core dimensions of primary care, which could be applied in various scenarios. PMID:26885509

  9. Primary care and prescription drugs: coverage, cost-sharing, and financial protection in six European countries.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Sarah; Mossialos, Elias

    2010-03-01

    This issue brief describes coverage, cost-sharing, and financial protection for pri-mary care and prescription drugs in Denmark, England, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Very few patients report unmet need for care or find general practitioner care unaffordable. Although none of the six countries spends more than 11 percent of gross domes-tic product on health care, compared with 16.2 percent in the United States, they are able to provide a level of access to and financial protection for primary care and prescription drugs that far exceeds what is available in the U.S. Several have focused recently on adapting cost-sharing design to reflect value by reducing user charges for highly effective care, preventive care, accepting referral to specialist care, adhering to clinical guidelines, and enrollment in dis-ease management programs. These innovations, and others described in the brief, could help inform U.S. policies for national health insurance reform.

  10. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access. PMID:25751545

  11. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Access to Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, James B.; Kaneda, Toshiko

    2005-01-01

    Most research on access to health care focuses on individual-level determinants such as income and insurance coverage. The role of community-level factors in helping or hindering individuals in obtaining needed care, however, has not received much attention. We address this gap in the literature by examining how neighborhood socioeconomic…

  12. Android-based access to holistic emergency care record.

    PubMed

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Prentza, Andriana; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of an Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system which interfaces with a Holistic Emergency Care Record (HECR) that aims at managing emergency care holistically by supporting EMS processes and is accessible by Android-enabled mobile devices. PMID:23823406

  13. The College Access, Retention and Employment (CARE) Program Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mara Cooper

    The College Access, Retention, and Employment (CARE) program was a 3-year initiative by Florida's Miami-Dade Community College. CARE was designed: to improve both the delivery and outcomes of postsecondary education for people with disabilities, with a special focus on minority groups, and to disseminate a model, describing the program, including…

  14. Community participation in primary health care.

    PubMed

    MacCormack, C P

    1983-04-01

    The advantages of a community participation approach in primary health care (PHC) are as follows: a community participation approach is a cost effective way to extend a health care system to the geographical and social periphery of a country; communities that begin to understand their health status objectively rather than fatalistically may be moved to take a series of preventive measures; communities that invest labor, time, money, and materials in health promoting activities are more committed to the use and maintenance of the things they produce, such as water supplies; health education is most effective in the context of village activities; and community health workers, if they are well chosen, have the confidence of the people. An error made in early efforts at community participation was to assume that villages were uniformly free from internal exploitation. Some are cohesive moral communities, but in other there is grievous exploitation of landless laborers by landowners and shopkeepers. Villages may be divided by caste or ethnic origin. Political organization of villages may be democratic or they may be governed in an authoritarian manner. In politically unstable countries where the central government has a rather tenuous control over the rural periphery, genuine community initiatives may be viewed as threatening and may not receive official encouragement. Social groups within communities may be tremendous assets. In planning the community participation aspects of primary health care, the collaboration of an anthropologist or rural sociologist with field experience is recommended. Promoting community participation is a skill which must be taught to community health workers, and backed up with support services. The genuine commitment of medical staff to community self help is crucial to the motivation process. Motivation within the community quickly breaks down if materials, expertise, and salaries fail to arrive when promised. Community activities are most

  15. A population-based analysis of incentive payments to primary care physicians for the care of patients with complex disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, M. Ruth; Law, Michael R.; Peterson, Sandra; Garrison, Scott; Hurley, Jeremiah; Cheng, Lucy; McGrail, Kimberlyn

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2007, the province of British Columbia implemented incentive payments to primary care physicians for the provision of comprehensive, continuous, guideline-informed care for patients with 2 or more chronic conditions. We examined the impact of this program on primary care access and continuity, rates of hospital admission and costs. Methods: We analyzed all BC patients who qualified for the incentive based on their diagnostic profile. We tracked primary care contacts and continuity, hospital admissions (total, via the emergency department and for targeted conditions), and cost of physician services, hospital care and pharmaceuticals, for 24 months before and 24 months after the intervention. Results: Of 155 754 eligible patients, 63.7% had at least 1 incentive payment billed. Incentive payments had no impact on primary care contacts (change in contacts per patient per month: 0.016, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.047 to 0.078) or continuity of care (mean monthly change: 0.012, 95% CI −0.001 to 0.024) and were associated with increased total rates of hospital admission (change in hospital admissions per 1000 patients per month: 1.46, 95% CI 0.04 to 2.89), relative to preintervention trends. Annual costs per patient did not decline (mean change: $455.81, 95% CI −$2.44 to $914.08). Interpretation: British Columbia’s $240-million investment in this program improved compensation for physicians doing the important work of caring for complex patients, but did not appear to improve primary care access or continuity, or constrain resource use elsewhere in the health care system. Policymakers should consider other strategies to improve care for this patient population. PMID:27527484

  16. Improving Access to Hospice Care: Informing the Debate

    PubMed Central

    CARLSON, MELISSA D.A.; MORRISON, R. SEAN; BRADLEY, ELIZABETH H.

    2015-01-01

    The most frequently cited policy solution for improving access to hospice care for patients and families is to expand hospice eligibility criteria under the Medicare Hospice Benefit. However, the substantial implications of such a policy change have not been fully articulated or evaluated. This paper seeks to identify and describe the implications of expanding Medicare Hospice Benefit eligibility on the nature of hospice care, the cost of hospice care to the Medicare program, and the very structure of hospice and palliative care delivery in the United States. The growth in hospice has been dramatic and the central issue facing policymakers and the hospice industry is defining the appropriate target population for hospice care. As policymakers and the hospice industry discuss the future of hospice and potential changes to the Medicare Hospice Benefit, it is critical to clearly delineate the options—and the implications and challenges of each option—for improving access to hospice care for patients and families. PMID:18363486

  17. Care coordination impacts on access to care for children with special health care needs enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kipyn

    2014-05-01

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) often require services from multiple health care providers. This study's objective is to evaluate whether CSHCN, enrolled in Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and receiving care coordination services, experience improved access to mental and specialty health care services. Using data from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, two separate outcomes are used to evaluate children's access to care: receipt of needed mental and specialty care and timely access to services. Using propensity score matching, CSHCN propensity for receiving care coordination services is derived and an assessment is made of care coordination's impact on the receipt of health care and whether care is delayed. Results demonstrate that care coordination is positively associated with whether a child receives the mental and specialty care that they need, regardless of whether or not that coordination is perceived to be adequate by parents. However, receiving care coordination services that parents perceive to be adequate has a larger impact on the timeliness in which care is received. This study indicates that care coordination is associated with an increased ability for CSHCN to access needed mental and specialty care. States should consider offering care coordination services that support provider communication and fulfill families' coordination needs to the CSHCN enrolled in their Medicaid and CHIP programs.

  18. Using a Mystery-Caller Approach to Examine Access to Prostate Cancer Care in Philadelphia

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Craig Evan; Ross, Michelle E.; Armstrong, Katrina; Branas, Charles C.; Rhodes, Karin V.; Bekelman, Justin E.; Wentz, Alicia; Stillson, Christian; Radhakrishnan, Archana; Oyeniran, Enny; Grande, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prior work suggests that access to health care may influence the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Mystery-caller methods have been used previously to measure access to care for health services such as primary care, where patients’ self-initiate requests for care. We used a mystery-caller survey for specialized prostate cancer care to assess dimensions of access to prostate cancer care. Materials and Methods We created an inventory of urology and radiation oncology practices in southeastern Pennsylvania. Using a ‘mystery caller’ approach, a research assistant posing as a medical office scheduler in a primary care office, attempted to make a new patient appointment on behalf of a referred patient. Linear regression was used to determine the association between time to next available appointment with practice and census tract characteristics. Results We successfully obtained information on new patient appointments from 198 practices out of the 223 in the region (88.8%). Radiation oncology practices were more likely to accept Medicaid compared to urology practices (91.3% vs 36.4%) and had shorter mean wait times for new patient appointments (9.0 vs 12.8 days). We did not observe significant differences in wait times according to census tract characteristics including neighborhood socioeconomic status and the proportion of male African American residents. Conclusions Mystery-caller methods that reflect real-world referral processes from primary care offices can be used to measure access to specialized cancer care. We observed significant differences in wait times and insurance acceptance between radiation oncology and urology practices. PMID:27723780

  19. Determinants of access to pediatric hospice care: A conceptual model

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the many difficult moments for families of children with life-limiting illnesses is to make the decision to access pediatric hospice care. Although determinants that influence families’ decisions to access pediatric hospice care have been recently identified, the relationship between these determinants and access to pediatric hospice care have not been explicated or grounded in accepted healthcare theories or models. Using the Andersen Behavioral Healthcare Utilization Model, this article presents a conceptual model describing the determinants of hospice access. Predisposing (demographic; social support; and knowledge, beliefs, and values), enabling (family and community resources) and need (perceived and evaluated needs) factors were identified through the use of hospice literature. The relationships among these factors are described and implications of the model for future study and practice are discussed. PMID:25983662

  20. Vascular Access Creation and Care--Perspective From India.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Krishnaswamy; Lobo, Valentine; Balasubramaniam, Jeyaraj; Mahaldar, Amol; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Kumbar, Lalathaksha

    2015-11-01

    India has one of the fastest growing economies in the world and is home to nearly one sixth of world's population. Chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension are common. Kidney disease is a known complication of these chronic diseases and is on the rise. Improving affordability with advanced care delivery has led to the increasing use of maintenance hemodialysis. Along with this hemodialysis comes the inevitable need for vascular access. Interventional nephrology in India is a fast-evolving discipline and promises to be a critical component of hemodialysis care in the future. This review provides a background on the current state of the CKD burden in India and the various vascular access options in use currently. In addition, we describe the experience of 2 centers in western and southern India in managing vascular access needs in hopes that they will serve as a model of the proliferation of vascular access care throughout India and in other developing countries. PMID:26524952

  1. Vascular Access Creation and Care--Perspective From India.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Krishnaswamy; Lobo, Valentine; Balasubramaniam, Jeyaraj; Mahaldar, Amol; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Kumbar, Lalathaksha

    2015-11-01

    India has one of the fastest growing economies in the world and is home to nearly one sixth of world's population. Chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension are common. Kidney disease is a known complication of these chronic diseases and is on the rise. Improving affordability with advanced care delivery has led to the increasing use of maintenance hemodialysis. Along with this hemodialysis comes the inevitable need for vascular access. Interventional nephrology in India is a fast-evolving discipline and promises to be a critical component of hemodialysis care in the future. This review provides a background on the current state of the CKD burden in India and the various vascular access options in use currently. In addition, we describe the experience of 2 centers in western and southern India in managing vascular access needs in hopes that they will serve as a model of the proliferation of vascular access care throughout India and in other developing countries.

  2. Impacting late life depression: integrating a depression intervention into primary care.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Sabine M; Shoai, Rebecca; Katon, Wayne; Callahan, Christopher; Unützer, Jürgen; Arean, Patricia; Callahan, Christopher; Della Penna, Richard; Harpole, Linda; Hegel, Mark; Noel, Polly Hitchcock; Hoffing, Marc; Hunkeler, Enid M; Katon, Wayne; Levine, Stuart; Lin, Elizabeth H B; Oddone, Eugene; Oishi, Sabine; Unützer, Jürgen; Williams, John

    2003-01-01

    groups and semi-structured individual interviews with all Depression Clinical Specialists (DCSs) working with Project IMPACT (Improving Mood: Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment), a study testing a collaborative care intervention for late life depression, to examine integration of the intervention model into primary care. DCSs described key intervention components, including supervision from a psychiatrist and a liaison primary care provider, weekly team meetings, computerized patient tracking, and outcomes assessment tools as effective in supporting patient care. DCSs discussed details of protocols, training, environmental set-up, and interpersonal factors that seemed to facilitate integration. DCSs also identified research-related factors that may need to be preserved in the real world. Basic elements of the IMPACT model seem to support integration of late life depression care into primary care. Research-related components may need modification for dissemination.

  3. Leadership in primary health care: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Anne

    2007-08-01

    A primary health care approach is essential to contemporary nursing roles such as practice nursing. This paper examines the evolution of primary health care as a global strategy for responding to the social determinants of health. Primary health care roles require knowledge of, and a focus on social determinants of health, particularly the societal factors that allow and perpetuate inequities and disadvantage. They also require a depth and breadth of leadership skills that are responsive to health needs, appropriate in the social and regulatory context, and visionary in balancing both workforce and client needs. The key to succeeding in working with communities and groups under a primary health care umbrella is to balance the big picture of comprehensive primary health care with operational strategies for selective primary health care. The other essential element involves using leadership skills to promote inclusiveness, empowerment and health literacy, and ultimately, better health.

  4. Review of Integrated Psychological Services in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michele S

    2016-06-01

    Reviews the book, Integrated Psychological Services in Primary Care edited by William Scott Craig (see record 2016-01850-000). This book opens with an article by the editor, in which he outlines the behavioral health needs of primary care patients and the rationale behind integrating mental health services in primary care settings. Subsequent chapters address basic and practical information for a variety of practice locations, such as Patient Centered Medical Home clinics, the Veteran's Administration medical centers, and primary care settings where the concept of integrated health is new. This is an excellent primer for anyone planning to implement an integrated care program or for those considering moving from an independent practice, agency, or traditional health care/hospital environment into an integrated primary care environment. The authors' writing styles made difficult concepts easy to understand and their knowledge of the utility of integration was evident. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27270257

  5. The adoption of the Reference Framework for diabetes care among primary care physicians in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C.S.; Wang, Harry H.X.; Kwan, Mandy W.M.; Chan, Wai Man; Fan, Carmen K.M.; Liang, Miaoyin; Li, Shannon TS; Fung, Franklin D.H.; Yeung, Ming Sze; Chan, David K.L.; Griffiths, Sian M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has been increasing both globally and locally. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are in a privileged position to provide first contact and continuing care for diabetic patients. A territory-wide Reference Framework for Diabetes Care for Adults has been released by the Hong Kong Primary Care Office in 2010, with the aim to further enhance evidence-based and high quality care for diabetes in the primary care setting through wide adoption of the Reference Framework. A valid questionnaire survey was conducted among PCPs to evaluate the levels of, and the factors associated with, their adoption of the Reference Framework. A total of 414 completed surveys were received with the response rate of 13.0%. The average adoption score was 3.29 (SD 0.51) out of 4. Approximately 70% of PCPs highly adopted the Reference Framework in their routine practice. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that the PCPs perceptions on the inclusion of sufficient local information (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.748, 95%CI 1.597–14.115, P = 0.005) and reduction of professional autonomy of PCPs (aOR = 1.859, 95%CI 1.013–3.411, P = 0.045) were more likely to influence their adoption level of the Reference Framework for diabetes care in daily practices. The overall level of guideline adoption was found to be relatively high among PCPs for adult diabetes in primary care settings. The adoption barriers identified in this study should be addressed in the continuous updating of the Reference Framework. Strategies need to be considered to enhance the guideline adoption and implementation capacity. PMID:27495018

  6. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  7. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  8. Social conditions and self-management are more powerful determinants of health than access to care.

    PubMed

    Pincus, T; Esther, R; DeWalt, D A; Callahan, L F

    1998-09-01

    Professional organizations advocate universal access to medical care as a primary approach to improving health in the population. Access to medical services is critical to outcomes of acute processes managed in an inpatient hospital, the setting of most medical education, research, and training, but seems to be limited in its capacity to affect outcomes of outpatient care, the setting of most medical activities. Persistent and widening disparities in health according to socioeconomic status provide evidence of limitations of access to care. First, job classification, a measure of socioeconomic status, was a better predictor of cardiovascular death than cholesterol level, blood pressure, and smoking combined in employed London civil servants with universal access to the National Health Service. Second, disparities in health according to socioeconomic status widened between 1970 and 1980 in the United Kingdom despite universal access (similar trends were seen in the United States). Third, in the United States, noncompletion of high school is a greater risk factor than biological factors for development of many diseases, an association that is explained only in part by age, ethnicity, sex, or smoking status. Fourth, level of formal education predicted cardiovascular mortality better than random assignment to active drug or placebo over 3 years in a clinical trial that provides optimal access to care. Increased recognition of limitations of universal access by physicians and their professional societies may enhance efforts to improve the health of the population. PMID:9735069

  9. The effects of telemedicine on racial and ethnic disparities in access to acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, Michael J; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T; Albright, Karen C; Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K; Branas, Charles C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been previously reported in acute stroke care. We sought to determine the effect of telemedicine (TM) on access to acute stroke care for racial and ethnic minorities in the state of Texas. Data were collected from the US Census Bureau, The Joint Commission and the American Hospital Association. Access for racial and ethnic minorities was determined by summing the population that could reach a primary stroke centre (PSC) or telemedicine spoke within specified time intervals using validated models. TM extended access to stroke expertise by 1.5 million residents. The odds of providing 60-minute access via TM were similar in Blacks and Whites (prevalence odds ratios (POR) 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.001). The odds of providing access via TM were also similar for Hispanics and non-Hispanics (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000). We found that telemedicine increased access to acute stroke care for 1.5 million Texans. While racial and ethnic disparities exist in other components of stroke care, we did not find evidence of disparities in access to the acute stroke expertise afforded by telemedicine. PMID:26116854

  10. International experts’ perspectives on a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care: implication for Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Setiyawati, Diana; Colucci, Erminia; Blashki, Grant; Wraith, Ruth; Minas, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing primary health care to incorporate mental health services is a key strategy for closing the treatment gap for people with mental disorders. The integration of psychological care into primary health care is a critical step in addressing poor access to mental health specialists. As the psychology profession is increasingly called upon to prepare psychologists for primary health care settings, an international experts' consensus is valuable in guiding the development of a high-quality curriculum for psychologists working in the primary health care context. A Delphi method was used to gain a consensus on the most appropriate roles and training for psychologists. Initial constructs and themes were derived from a detailed literature review and sent to 114 international experts in primary mental health care from five continents. Overall, 52 experts who participated agreed that psychologists should have wide-ranging roles and skills including clinical, health promotion and advocacy skills. This study has identified the specific roles and training needed by psychologists to enable them to work more effectively in primary health care settings. The consensus will inform the development of a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care in Indonesia, and is part of a broader suite of studies. PMID:25750818

  11. Primary Care of the Solid Organ Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher J; Pagalilauan, Genevieve

    2015-09-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is one of the major advances in medicine. Care of the SOT recipient is complex and continued partnership with the transplant specialist is essential to manage and treat complications and maintain health. The increased longevity of SOT recipients will lead to their being an evolving part of primary care practice, with ever more opportunities for care, education, and research of this rewarding patient population. This review discusses the overall primary care management of adult SOT recipients.

  12. Utilization and perceptions of primary health care services in Australian adults with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Scott, David; Happell, Brenda

    2013-06-01

    Persons accessing inpatient mental health services generally experience reduced access to and quality of primary health care. The objective of this study was to compare health service utilization and perceptions, and receipt of specified health services, in Australian adults with and without a previous mental illness diagnosis. A cross-sectional survey was administered by computer-assisted telephone interviewing in 2011; the main outcome measures were receipt of services in the previous 12 months, satisfaction with health care services, and concerns regarding health care affordability. Participants included 1275 adults residing in Queensland, Australia; 292 (23%) participants reported a diagnosis of mental illness, largely depression and/or anxiety (87%). The mental illness group had higher scores for concerns regarding health care affordability (mean ranks 778 vs. 706, respectively; z=-2.90, P=0.004) and lower scores for perceptions of health care service quality and accessibility (mean ranks 631 vs. 701, respectively; z=-2.90, P=0.004). After adjustment for increased utilization of services, the mental illness group had an increased likelihood of having received only 5 of 19 services in the past 12 months (odds ratios: 1.54-1.71). Compared to those with no mental illness, Australians with a mental illness report increased dissatisfaction with health care affordability, accessibility, and quality, and generally have similar odds of primary care services per health care utilization despite being at significantly greater risk of chronic disease.

  13. Sex Disparities in Access to Acute Stroke Care: Can Telemedicine Mitigate this Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K.; Albright, Karen C.; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T.; Branas, Charles C.; Grotta, James C.; Savitz, Sean I.; Carr, Brendan G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Women have more frequent and severe ischemic strokes than men, and are less likely to receive treatment for acute stroke. Primary stroke centers (PSCs) have been shown to utilize treatment more frequently. Further, as telemedicine (TM) has expanded access to acute stroke care we sought to investigate the association between PSC, TM and access to acute stroke care in the state of Texas. Methods Texas hospitals and resources were identified from the 2009 American Hospital Association Annual Survey. Hospitals were categorized as: (1) stand-alone PSCs not using telemedicine for acute stroke care, (2) PSCs using telemedicine for acute stroke care (PSC-TM), (3) non-PSC hospitals using telemedicine for acute stroke care, or (4) non-PSC hospitals not using telemedicine for acute stroke care. The proportion of the population who could reach a PSC within 60 minutes was determined for stand-alone PSCs, PSC-TM, and non-PSCs using TM for stroke care. Results Overall, women were as likely to have 60-minute access to a PSC or PSC-TM as their male counterparts (POR 1.02, 95% CI 1.02-1.03). Women were also just as likely to have access to acute stroke care via PSC or PSC-TM or TM as men (POR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.04). Discussion Our study found no sex disparities in access to stand alone PSCs or to hospitals using TM in the state of Texas. The results of this study suggest that telemedicine can be used as part of an inclusive strategy to improve access to care equally for men and women.

  14. The slow agonizing birth of primary health care services.

    PubMed

    Glatthaar, E

    1992-10-01

    Although the need for a network of effective primary health care (PHC) services which are affordable, accessible, acceptable, and available to all was recognized by an international conference at Alma Ata in 1978, countries are far from realizing this goal. The necessary knowledge, experience, and other resources are, however, available in South Africa to provide wide-scale primary health care to the national population. The world leader of PHC in the 1940s, South Africa has models of successful PHC services, but it continues to struggle toward implementation. Resources continue to be wasted on meetings to draft PHC strategies and related seminars as a result of politics, vested interests, unwillingness to cooperate and share, bureaucracy, territorialism, ad hoc decisions, and uncoordinated planning and implementation. Moreover, approaches to PHC are fragmented and PHC continues to not be understood by many health workers, decision makers, and academics. A unified commitment and determination on all fronts, immediate decisions on funding, coordinated implementations, and the rapid deployment of the variety of mobile clinic services are called for to successfully implement PHC in South Africa.

  15. Leadership for primary health care research.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, David

    2012-10-01

    Over the last decade, I have put together a new theory of leadership. This paper describes its four propositions, which are consistent with the research literature but which lead to conclusions that are not commonly held and seldom put into practice. The first proposition is a model describing the territory of leadership that is different from either the Leadership Qualities Framework, 2006 or the Medical Leadership Competency Framework, 2010, both of which have been devised specifically for the NHS (National Health Service). The second proposition concerns the ill-advised attempt of individuals to become expert in all aspects of leadership: complete in themselves. The third suggests how personality and capability are related. The fourth embraces and recommends the notion of complementary differences among leaders. As the NHS seeks increasing leadership effectiveness, these propositions may need to be considered and their implications woven into the fabric of NHS leader selection and development. Primary Health Care research, like all fields of collective human endeavour, is eminently in need of sound leadership and the same principles that facilitate sound leadership in other fields is likely to be relevant to research teams.

  16. Resilience and depression: perspectives from primary care.

    PubMed

    Dowrick, Christopher; Kokanovic, Renata; Hegarty, Kelsey; Griffiths, Frances; Gunn, Jane

    2008-10-01

    Resilience refers to the capacity for successful adaptation or change in the face of adversity. This concept has rarely been applied to the study of distress and depression. We propose two key elements of resilience - ordinary magic and personal medicine - which enable people to survive and flourish despite current experience of emotional distress. We investigate the extent to which these elements are considered important by a sample of 100 people, drawn from a longitudinal study of the management of depression in primary care in Victoria, Australia. We also assess how respondents rate personal resilience in comparison with help received from professional sources. Our data are obtained from semi-structured telephone interviews, and analysed inductively through refinement of our theoretical framework. We find substantial evidence of resilience both in terms of ordinary magic - drawing on existing social support and affectional bonds; and in terms of personal medicine - building on personal strengths and expanding positive emotions. There is a strong preference for personal over professional approaches to dealing with mental health problems. We conclude that personal resilience is important in the minds of our respondents, and that these elements should be actively considered in future research involving people with experience of mental health problems.

  17. Treating Teen Depression in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Sabrina

    2015-11-01

    I recently had an adolescent patient who presented with a chief complaint of depression. He had classic symptoms of difficulty sleeping, dysthymia, and anhedonia (loss of interest in things that used to bring him joy). He was a very smart and self-aware 17-year-old, and was able to describe his symptoms easily. There were no concerns for manic episodes or psychosis, and he met diagnostic criteria for unipolar major depressive disorder. He denied suicidal ideation, and was already seeing a therapist weekly for the last several months. He had a strong family history of depression, with his father, aunts, and grandmother who also carried a diagnosis of depression. He presented with the support of his mother, asking about next steps, and specifically, pharmacotherapy. This patient is a perfect example of an adolescent who is a good candidate for initiation of antidepressant medication. Primary care pediatricians should feel comfortable with first-line agents for major depressive disorder in certain adolescents with depression, but many feel hesitant and rely on child and adolescent psychiatry colleagues for prescriptions. PMID:26587812

  18. [Burnout syndrome in primary health care professionals].

    PubMed

    Martins, Leonardo Fernandes; Laport, Tamires Jordão; Menezes, Vinicius de Paula; Medeiros, Priscila Bonfante; Ronzani, Telmo Mota

    2014-12-01

    Burnout is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low occupational performance, which may occur among health professionals. This article evaluates burnout among workers in Primary Health Care (PHC) in three small towns in the Zona da Mata Mineira. The study analyzes associations by logistic regression between burnout, socioeconomic, and demographic aspects of work. A total of 149 professionals were selected, 107 of these responded to all questionnaires. To measure burnout, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used and to characterize the professional, a questionnaire assessing three different issues - namely individual and sociodemographic aspects and team area coverage - was used. 101 professionals were classified with positive indication for burnout. The variables present in the backward stepwise logistic regression model positively associated with indicative of burnout were: being younger than the population average (> 29.5 years) and use of drugs, including sedatives, tranquilizers and sleeping pills. The results contribute to the identification of factors associated with burnout and therefore highlight the need for more detailed investigation. PMID:25388182

  19. Integrated Behavioral Health Services: Improving Access to Mental Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturm, Lynne A.; Perry, Deborah F.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes innovative service delivery models and clinical strategies that support the social-emotional development of young children and their families in the pediatric primary care setting. By understanding the trends affecting well-child care, early childhood providers will be better equipped to partner with their pediatric…

  20. [Relations with emergency medical care and primary care doctor, home health care].

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kazunari; Ohta, Shoichi

    2016-02-01

    Medical care for an ultra-aging society has been shifted from hospital-centered to local community-based. This shift has yielded the so-called Integrated Community Care System. In the system, emergency medical care is considered important, as primary care doctors and home health care providers play a crucial role in coordinating with the department of emergency medicine. Since the patients move depending on their physical condition, a hospital and a community should collaborate in providing a circulating service. The revision of the medical payment system in 2014 clearly states the importance of "functional differentiation and strengthen and coordination of medical institutions, improvement of home health care". As part of the revision, the subacute care unit has been integrated into the community care unit, which is expected to have more than one role in community coordination. The medical fee has been set for the purpose of promoting the home medical care visit, and enhancing the capability of family doctors. In the section of end-of-life care for the elderly, there have been many issues such as reduction of the readmission rate and endorsement of a patient's decision-making, and judgment for active emergency medical care for patient admission. The concept of frailty as an indicator of prognosis has been introduced, which might be applied to the future of emergency medicine. As described above, the importance of a primary doctor and a family doctor should be identified more in the future; thereby it becomes essential for doctors to closely work with the hospital. Advancing the cooperation between a hospital and a community for seamless patient-centered care, the emergency medicine as an integrated community care will further develop by adapting to an ultra-aging society. PMID:26915240

  1. Community health workers in primary care practice: redesigning health care delivery systems to extend and improve diabetes care in underserved populations.

    PubMed

    Collinsworth, Ashley; Vulimiri, Madhulika; Snead, Christine; Walton, James

    2014-11-01

    New, comprehensive, approaches for chronic disease management are needed to ensure that patients, particularly those more likely to experience health disparities, have access to the clinical care, self-management resources, and support necessary for the prevention and control of diabetes. Community health workers (CHWs) have worked in community settings to reduce health care disparities and are currently being deployed in some clinical settings as a means of improving access to and quality of care. Guided by the chronic care model, Baylor Health Care System embedded CHWs within clinical teams in community clinics with the goal of reducing observed disparities in diabetes care and outcomes. This study examines findings from interviews with patients, CHWs, and primary care providers (PCPs) to understand how health care delivery systems can be redesigned to effectively incorporate CHWs and how embedding CHWs in primary care teams can produce informed, activated patients and prepared, proactive practice teams who can work together to achieve improved patient outcomes. Respondents indicated that the PCPs continued to provide clinical exams and manage patient care, but the roles of diabetes education, nutritional counseling, and patient activation were shifted to the CHWs. CHWs also provided patients with social support and connection to community resources. Integration of CHWs into clinical care teams improved patient knowledge and activation levels, the ability of PCPs to identify and proactively address specific patient needs, and patient outcomes.

  2. Language barriers in mental health care: a survey of primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Brisset, Camille; Leanza, Yvan; Rosenberg, Ellen; Vissandjée, Bilkis; Kirmayer, Laurence J; Muckle, Gina; Xenocostas, Spyridoula; Laforce, Hugues

    2014-12-01

    Many migrants do not speak the official language of their host country. This linguistic gap has been found to be an important contributor to disparities in access to services and health outcomes. This study examined primary care mental health practitioners' experiences with linguistic diversity. 113 practitioners in Montreal completed a self-report survey assessing their experiences working with allophones. About 40% of practitioners frequently encountered difficulties working in mental health with allophone clients. Few resources were available, and calling on an interpreter was the most common practice. Interpreters were expected to play many roles, which went beyond basic language translation. There is a clear need for training of practitioners on how to work with different types of interpreters. Training should highlight the benefits and limitations of the different roles that interpreters can play in health care delivery and the differences in communication dynamics with each role.

  3. The Social Implications of Health Care Reform: Reducing Access Barriers to Health Care Services for Uninsured Hispanic and Latino Americans in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Mitchell A.; Inguanzo, Marian M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is currently facing one of its most significant social challenges in decades in terms of its ability to provide access to primary care services to the millions of Americans who have lost their health insurance coverage in the recent economic recession. National statistics compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau for 2009…

  4. Human rights and immigrants' access to care.

    PubMed

    Parmet, Wendy; Fischer, Simon

    2013-12-01

    Although the human right to health is well established under international law, many states limit non-citizens' participation in public insurance programs. In the United States, immigrants face especially high barriers due to the lack of recognition of a broad right to health as well as federal statutes restricting many immigrants' eligibility to federally-funded insurance. High rates of uninsurance among immigrants have a detrimental effect on their health, as well as on the health of citizens who live in their communities. Finch vs. Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector, a recent case decided by the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, recognized the rights of legal immigrants in Massachusetts to state-supported health care, and demonstrates the importance of insuring immigrants in broadly-based, rather than immigrant-specific, programs.

  5. Human rights and immigrants' access to care.

    PubMed

    Parmet, Wendy; Fischer, Simon

    2013-12-01

    Although the human right to health is well established under international law, many states limit non-citizens' participation in public insurance programs. In the United States, immigrants face especially high barriers due to the lack of recognition of a broad right to health as well as federal statutes restricting many immigrants' eligibility to federally-funded insurance. High rates of uninsurance among immigrants have a detrimental effect on their health, as well as on the health of citizens who live in their communities. Finch vs. Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector, a recent case decided by the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, recognized the rights of legal immigrants in Massachusetts to state-supported health care, and demonstrates the importance of insuring immigrants in broadly-based, rather than immigrant-specific, programs. PMID:24715016

  6. [Primary health care and the millennium development goals].

    PubMed

    Faye, A; Bob, M; Fall, A; Fall, C

    2012-01-01

    Member countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) met in Alma Ata (8-12 September 1978) to define and advocate the implementation of primary health care (PHC) worldwide, above all, in developing countries, which had a real need to review their strategies for meeting the health needs of their populations. They did not suspect that 20 years later the vision they displayed would remain undeniably relevant. Here we examine the similarities and points of convergence of their declaration about PHC with the Millennium Development Goals that seek today to reduce poverty across the world. An exhaustive and analytic literature review was conducted to collect those similarities. Further analysis of the definitions, objectives, principles and recommendations of the Alma Ata Declaration and the Millennium Declaration reveals multiple dependencies and fundamental points of similarity between these two representations. Almost all states have pledged to achieve the eight MDG by 2015: to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, achieve universal primary education, promote gender equality and empower women, reduce child mortality, improve maternal health, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, ensure environmental sustainability, and develop a global partnership for development. The Alma Ata conference defined primary health care as essential health care, based on practical methods and techniques that are both scientifically sound and socially acceptable, universally accessible to all individuals and all families of the community, through their full participation and at a cost that the community and countries can afford at all stages of their development in the spirit of self-reliance and self-determination. It is an integral part of economic and social development. The following principles are involved in the achievement of both primary health care and the MDG: social equity, community participation, and intersectorality. Public health is an essential condition of poverty

  7. [Primary health care and the millennium development goals].

    PubMed

    Faye, A; Bob, M; Fall, A; Fall, C

    2012-01-01

    Member countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) met in Alma Ata (8-12 September 1978) to define and advocate the implementation of primary health care (PHC) worldwide, above all, in developing countries, which had a real need to review their strategies for meeting the health needs of their populations. They did not suspect that 20 years later the vision they displayed would remain undeniably relevant. Here we examine the similarities and points of convergence of their declaration about PHC with the Millennium Development Goals that seek today to reduce poverty across the world. An exhaustive and analytic literature review was conducted to collect those similarities. Further analysis of the definitions, objectives, principles and recommendations of the Alma Ata Declaration and the Millennium Declaration reveals multiple dependencies and fundamental points of similarity between these two representations. Almost all states have pledged to achieve the eight MDG by 2015: to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, achieve universal primary education, promote gender equality and empower women, reduce child mortality, improve maternal health, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, ensure environmental sustainability, and develop a global partnership for development. The Alma Ata conference defined primary health care as essential health care, based on practical methods and techniques that are both scientifically sound and socially acceptable, universally accessible to all individuals and all families of the community, through their full participation and at a cost that the community and countries can afford at all stages of their development in the spirit of self-reliance and self-determination. It is an integral part of economic and social development. The following principles are involved in the achievement of both primary health care and the MDG: social equity, community participation, and intersectorality. Public health is an essential condition of poverty

  8. Comparison of patients' experiences in public and private primary care clinics in Malta.

    PubMed

    Pullicino, Glorianne; Sciortino, Philip; Calleja, Neville; Schäfer, Willemijn; Boerma, Wienke; Groenewegen, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Demographic changes, technological developments and rising expectations require the analysis of public-private primary care (PC) service provision to inform policy makers. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study using the dataset of the Maltese arm of the QUALICOPC Project to compare the PC patients' experiences provided by public-funded and private (independent) general practitioners in Malta. Seven hundred patients from 70 clinics completed a self-administered questionnaire. Direct logistic regression showed that patients visiting the private sector experienced better continuity of care with more difficulty in accessing out-of-hours care. Such findings help to improve (primary) healthcare service provision and resource allocation.

  9. Will universal access to antiretroviral therapy ever be possible? The health care worker challenge.

    PubMed

    Maddison, André R; Schlech, Walter F

    2010-01-01

    The United Nations millennium development goal of providing universal access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for patients living with HIV/AIDS by 2010 is unachievable. Currently, four million people are receiving ART, of an estimated 13.7 million who need it. A major challenge to achieving this goal is the shortage of health care workers in low-income and low-resource areas of the world. Sub-Saharan African countries have 68% of the world's burden of illness from AIDS, yet have only 3% of health care workers worldwide. The shortage of health care providers is primarily caused by a national and international 'brain drain,' poor distribution of health care workers within countries, and health care worker burnout.Even though the millennium development goal to provide universal access to ART will not be met by 2010, it is imperative to continue to build on the momentum created by these humanitarian goals. The present literature review was written with the purpose of attracting research and policy attention toward evidence from small-scale projects in sub-Saharan Africa, which have been successful at increasing access to ART. Specifically, a primary-care model of ART delivery, which focuses on decentralization of services, task shifting and community involvement will be discussed. To improve the health care worker shortage in sub-Saharan Africa, the conventional model of health care delivery must be replaced with an innovative model that utilizes doctors, nurses and community members more effectively.

  10. Paying for Primary Care: The Factors Associated with Physician Self-selection into Payment Models.

    PubMed

    Rudoler, David; Deber, Raisa; Barnsley, Janet; Glazier, Richard H; Dass, Adrian Rohit; Laporte, Audrey

    2015-09-01

    To determine the factors associated with primary care physician self-selection into different payment models, we used a panel of eight waves of administrative data for all primary care physicians who practiced in Ontario between 2003/2004 and 2010/2011. We used a mixed effects logistic regression model to estimate physicians' choice of three alternative payment models: fee for service, enhanced fee for service, and blended capitation. We found that primary care physicians self-selected into payment models based on existing practice characteristics. Physicians with more complex patient populations were less likely to switch into capitation-based payment models where higher levels of effort were not financially rewarded. These findings suggested that investigations aimed at assessing the impact of different primary care reimbursement models on outcomes, including costs and access, should first account for potential selection effects.

  11. Paying for Primary Care: The Factors Associated with Physician Self-selection into Payment Models.

    PubMed

    Rudoler, David; Deber, Raisa; Barnsley, Janet; Glazier, Richard H; Dass, Adrian Rohit; Laporte, Audrey

    2015-09-01

    To determine the factors associated with primary care physician self-selection into different payment models, we used a panel of eight waves of administrative data for all primary care physicians who practiced in Ontario between 2003/2004 and 2010/2011. We used a mixed effects logistic regression model to estimate physicians' choice of three alternative payment models: fee for service, enhanced fee for service, and blended capitation. We found that primary care physicians self-selected into payment models based on existing practice characteristics. Physicians with more complex patient populations were less likely to switch into capitation-based payment models where higher levels of effort were not financially rewarded. These findings suggested that investigations aimed at assessing the impact of different primary care reimbursement models on outcomes, including costs and access, should first account for potential selection effects. PMID:26190516

  12. Monitoring access to out-of-hours care services in Scotland – a review

    PubMed Central

    Godden, Sylvia; Hilton, Simon; Pollock, Allyson M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Changes in the contractual responsibilities of primary care practitioners and health boards have resulted in a plethora of arrangements relating to out-of-hours healthcare services. Rather than being guaranteed access to a GP (usually either their own or another through a local GP co-operative), patients have a number of alternative routes to services. Our objective was to identify and assess the availability and adequacy of relevant standards, responsibilities and information systems in Scotland to monitor the impact of contractual changes to out-of-hours healthcare services on equity of access. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting All providers of primary care out-of-hours services in Scotland. Participants Not applicable. Main outcome measures First, identification and policy review of current standards and performance monitoring systems, data and information, primarily through directly contacting national and local organizations responsible for monitoring out-of-hours care, supplemented by literature searches to highlight specific issues arising from the review; and second, mapping of data items by out-of-hours provider type to identify overlap and significant gaps. Results In Scotland, data monitoring systems have not kept pace with changes in the organization of out-of-hours care, so the impact on access to services for different population groups is unknown. There are significant gaps in information collected with respect to workforce, distribution of services, service utilisation and clinical outcomes. Conclusions Since 2004 there have been major changes to the way patients access out-of-hours healthcare in the UK. In Scotland, none of the current systems provide information on whether the new services satisfy the key NHS principle of equity of access. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive review of data standards and systems relating to out-of-hours care in order to monitor and evaluate inputs, processes and outcomes of care not least in

  13. The expanding role of primary care in cancer control.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Greg; Berendsen, Annette; Crawford, S Michael; Dommett, Rachel; Earle, Craig; Emery, Jon; Fahey, Tom; Grassi, Luigi; Grunfeld, Eva; Gupta, Sumit; Hamilton, Willie; Hiom, Sara; Hunter, David; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Macleod, Una; Mason, Robert; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Neal, Richard D; Peake, Michael; Roland, Martin; Seifert, Bohumil; Sisler, Jeff; Sussman, Jonathan; Taplin, Stephen; Vedsted, Peter; Voruganti, Teja; Walter, Fiona; Wardle, Jane; Watson, Eila; Weller, David; Wender, Richard; Whelan, Jeremy; Whitlock, James; Wilkinson, Clare; de Wit, Niek; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2015-09-01

    The nature of cancer control is changing, with an increasing emphasis, fuelled by public and political demand, on prevention, early diagnosis, and patient experience during and after treatment. At the same time, primary care is increasingly promoted, by governments and health funders worldwide, as the preferred setting for most health care for reasons of increasing need, to stabilise health-care costs, and to accommodate patient preference for care close to home. It is timely, then, to consider how this expanding role for primary care can work for cancer control, which has long been dominated by highly technical interventions centred on treatment, and in which the contribution of primary care has been largely perceived as marginal. In this Commission, expert opinion from primary care and public health professionals with academic and clinical cancer expertise—from epidemiologists, psychologists, policy makers, and cancer specialists—has contributed to a detailed consideration of the evidence for cancer control provided in primary care and community care settings. Ranging from primary prevention to end-of-life care, the scope for new models of care is explored, and the actions needed to effect change are outlined. The strengths of primary care—its continuous, coordinated, and comprehensive care for individuals and families—are particularly evident in prevention and diagnosis, in shared follow-up and survivorship care, and in end-of-life care. A strong theme of integration of care runs throughout, and its elements (clinical, vertical, and functional) and the tools needed for integrated working are described in detail. All of this change, as it evolves, will need to be underpinned by new research and by continuing and shared multiprofessional development.

  14. Access to health care and social protection.

    PubMed

    Martin, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    In France, the access to healthcare has been conceived as a social right and is mainly managed through the coverage of the population by the National Health Insurance, which is a part of the whole French social security scheme. This system was based on the so-called Bismarckian model, which implies that it requires full employment and solid family links, as the insured persons are the workers and their dependents. This paper examines the typical problems that this system has to face as far as the right to healthcare is concerned. First, it addresses the need to introduce some universal coverage programs, in order to integrate the excluded population. Then, it addresses the issue of financial sustainability as the structural weakness of the French system--in which healthcare is still mainly provided by private practice physicians and governed by the principle of freedom--leads to conceive and implement complex forms of regulations between the State, the Social security institutions and the healthcare providers. PMID:22924190

  15. Understanding the culture of primary health care: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Camillo, Pat

    2004-01-01

    A qualitative, ethnographic study was undertaken to determine whether older women experienced barriers to health care related to gender and power relations within biomedical culture. A feminist perspective was utilized, incorporating concepts from critical medical anthropology. Data collection methods included individual interviews, focus groups and participant observation. The participants were active in guiding the research and validating the findings. Barriers related to gender and age were observed during primary health care visits, although they were not always directly apparent to the women. There is evidence to suggest that older women's ability to access primary health care depends on the degree of cultural connectedness they encounter within their particular health care facility. Using the findings of this study, a theoretical model is proposed to understand the culture of primary health care within a critical and cultural context. PMID:15587545

  16. Cold-spotting: linking primary care and public health to create communities of solution.

    PubMed

    Westfall, John M

    2013-01-01

    By providing enhanced primary care and social services to patients with high utilization of expensive emergency and hospital care, there is evidence that their health can improve and their costs can be lowered. This type of "hot-spotting" improves the care of individual patients. It may be that these patients live in communities with disintegrated social determinants of health, little community support, and poor access to primary care. These "cold spots" in the community may be amenable to interventions targeted at linking primary care and public health at broader community and population levels. Building local communities of solution that address the individual and population may help decrease these cold spots, thereby eliminating the hot spots as well.

  17. Health care access and preventive care among Vietnamese immigrants: do traditional beliefs and practices pose barriers?

    PubMed

    Jenkins, C N; Le, T; McPhee, S J; Stewart, S; Ha, N T

    1996-10-01

    Some have speculated that underutilization of Western health services among non-Western populations can be explained by traditional health beliefs and practices rooted deep within cultures. These beliefs and practices may act as barriers to access to and utilization of services. Among Vietnamese, in particular, a number of traditional health beliefs and practices have been identified which are said to pose barriers to Western medical care. No studies to date, however, have examined this hypothesis empirically. To examine this hypothesis, we measured traditional health beliefs and practices among Vietnamese in the San Francisco Bay area and analyzed the relationships between these factors and access to health care and use of preventive health services. The results of this study show clearly that many Vietnamese possess traditional health beliefs and practices which differ from those of the general U.S. population. Yet, the data do not support the hypothesis that these traditional beliefs and practices act as barriers to access to Western medical care or to utilization of preventive services. Being married and poverty status were the most consistent predictors of health care access. Furthermore, the components of access to health care (having some form of health insurance or having a regular doctor, for example) were the strongest predictors of preventive health care services utilization. Importantly, the cultural attributes of individuals did not explain either lack of health care access or underutilization of preventive health care services.

  18. A conservative case for universal access to health care.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Paul; Light, Donald W

    2006-01-01

    Universal access to health care has historically faced strident opposition from political conservatives in the United States, although it has long been accepted by most conservatives in the rest of the industrialized world. Now, in a global economy where American business is crippled by the rising cost of market-based health care, the time may be ripe for change. The key to fostering a new mindset among American conservatives is to show why universal access fulfills many of the basic values that all conservatives hold.

  19. Access to care provided by better safety net systems for the uninsured: measuring and conceptualizing adequacy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A

    2011-08-01

    This descriptive study assesses the access to care provided by five model and diverse safety net programs that enroll uninsured adults in a coordinated system offering primary care, hospital care, prescription drugs, and most specialist services. Physician use by safety net program members was similar to insured groups. However, there was less use of hospitals in the two programs that relied on uncompensated charity care. Considering access measures commonly used in population-based surveys, the uninsured in these five communities fared no better than uninsured elsewhere. However, respondents may consider enrollment in a well-structured safety net program to be equivalent to insurance. If so, population surveys may be least accurate in identifying uninsured people in the very communities that have the best safety net programs. On balance the five safety net systems profiled here meet the needs of low-income uninsured residents at a level that is roughly similar to that for people with insurance.

  20. Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

  1. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health.

  2. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health. PMID:26825100

  3. SGA Children in Pediatric Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Patrizia; Cioffi, Luigi; Limauro, Raffaele; Farris, Evelina; Bianco, Vincenzo; Sassi, Roberto; De Giovanni, Maria; Gallo, Valeria; D’Onofrio, Antonietta; Di Maio, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic evidences suggest a strong association between low birth weight and some diseases in adult life ( hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases).Aim of this study was to evaluate the obesity/overweight prevalence in a population of children born small for gestation age, SGA children 400, 208 males and 192 females compared to a population of children born appropriate for gestational age 6818 AGA children, 3502 males and 3316 females, during childhood. Our intention was also to build the natural history of weight gain during prepubertal age in children born SGA and AGA. Design and Methods: Observational prospective longitudinal study. We followed our patients from January2001 up to December 2010; weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were evaluated in all the SGA and AGA children. BMI z-score range for defining overweight and obesity was, respectively, 1.13 to 1.7 and >1.7 according to CDC growth charts. Results: In transversal evaluation, we prove that 10-year-old SGA females are twice obese and more overweight compared to equal age AGA females. In longitudinal evaluation, we highlight different observations: SGA children obese at 2 years are still obese at 10 years; the number of obese SGA children increases gradually until the age of 10; AGA children, appear to be less obese than SGA children at 10 years. Conclusion: SGA males and females are more obese at 5 and 10 years compared to the AGA population. Primary care pediatricians, through early detection of the children at risk, can carry out an effective obesity prevention project in SGA children. PMID:27583297

  4. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  5. Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Planning Template for Primary Care Offices

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Plan Template for Primary Care Provider Offices is intended to assist primary care providers and office managers with preparing their offices for quickly putting a plan in place to handle an increase in patient calls and visits, whether during the 2009-2010 influenza season or future influenza seasons.

  6. In Defence of Care: Gilligan's Relevance for Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the main, writing about care seems to contrast the ethics of justice with the ethics of care. Whilst the former deploys objectivity, the latter holds that individuals are connected. Problematically, contemporary primary education seemingly holds a-personal, justice conceptions as its basis and rationale. In turn, primary education, in parts,…

  7. College Students' Reasons for Depression Nondisclosure in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, William J.; Morrison, Patrick; Lombardero, Anayansi; Swingle, Kelsey; Campbell, Duncan G.

    2016-01-01

    Unwillingness to share depression experiences with primary care physicians contributes to the undertreatment of depression. This project examined college students' reasons for depression nondisclosure to primary care providers (PCPs). Undergraduate participants read a vignette describing someone with depression and completed measures of disclosure…

  8. International sources of learning for the organisation of primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the potential to learn from emerging international models of primary care organisation. It examines a series of exemplars from Southern Europe and Latin America which may help support moves towards a ‘new localism’ in the public management of primary care. Six lessons for the UK are identified. PMID:26265949

  9. Primary Care in the Baccalaureate Nursing Program. Pathways to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, Patricia T.

    The work and findings of the Southern Regional Education Board's Nursing Curriculum Project (NCP) for baccalaureate programs, which included faculty development programs for primary nursing care and clinical electives, are discussed. The historical background of primary care in the baccalaureate nursing program is traced, and characteristics of…

  10. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  11. Primary Care of Adult Women: Common Dermatologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M; Mhlaba, Julie; Roman, Carly

    2016-06-01

    Dermatologic disease often presents in the primary care setting. Therefore, it is important for the primary care provider to be familiar with the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common skin conditions. This article provides an overview of acne, rosacea, melasma, vitiligo, alopecia, nonmelanoma, and melanoma skin cancer, dermatitis, and lichen sclerosus. PMID:27212088

  12. Evidence for integrating eye health into primary health care in Africa: a health systems strengthening approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of unmet eye care needs in sub-Saharan Africa is compounded by barriers to accessing eye care, limited engagement with communities, a shortage of appropriately skilled health personnel, and inadequate support from health systems. The renewed focus on primary health care has led to support for greater integration of eye health into national health systems. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate available evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care in sub-Saharan Africa from a health systems strengthening perspective. Methods A scoping review method was used to gather and assess information from published literature, reviews, WHO policy documents and examples of eye and health care interventions in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings were compiled using a health systems strengthening framework. Results Limited information is available about eye health from a health systems strengthening approach. Particular components of the health systems framework lacking evidence are service delivery, equipment and supplies, financing, leadership and governance. There is some information to support interventions to strengthen human resources at all levels, partnerships and community participation; but little evidence showing their successful application to improve quality of care and access to comprehensive eye health services at the primary health level, and referral to other levels for specialist eye care. Conclusion Evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care is currently weak, particularly when applying a health systems framework. A realignment of eye health in the primary health care agenda will require context specific planning and a holistic approach, with careful attention to each of the health system components and to the public health system as a whole. Documentation and evaluation of existing projects are required, as are pilot projects of systematic approaches to interventions and application of best practices

  13. Organizational effectiveness. Primary care and the congruence model.

    PubMed

    Eiser, A R; Eiser, B J

    1996-10-01

    The congruence model is a framework used to analyze organizational strengths and weaknesses and pinpoint specific areas for improving effectiveness. This article provides an overview of organizations as open systems, with examples in the primary care arena. It explains and applies the congruence model in the context of primary care issues and functions, including methods by which the model can be used to diagnose organizational problems and generate solutions. Changes needed in primary care due to the managed care environment, and areas of potential problems and sensitivities requiring organizational changes to meet market and regulatory demands now placed on PCOs are examined.

  14. Primary health care for Hispanic children of migrant farm workers.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A H; Wold, J L; Spencer, L; Pittman, K

    2000-01-01

    Providing primary care to children of culturally diverse populations is a challenge for pediatric nurse practitioners and educators. The challenge is intensified when providing care to Hispanic children who are uprooted because their parent(s) are migrant farm workers. The creation of health-focused academic community partnerships is one unique strategy to improve primary care to these children. One such partnership is the ongoing Migrant Family Health Program in which practitioner nursing students and their faculty members provide primary health care to children who are enrolled in a summer education program for migrant children. PMID:11005882

  15. Health area profiles as tools for primary care development: New York's primary care initiative.

    PubMed

    Tenan, P M

    1992-10-01

    It is anticipated that the ACS measures will figure significantly in the formal evaluation of the PCI, which will be carried out by an independent evaluator during the second and third years of the program. ACS measures will also form, along with other relevant data, a module for program reporting that is part of the overall program for project monitoring and review. The program should be evaluated on its ability to adhere to ACS measures; infuse primary care resources into a community; observe and measure changes in the community's patterns of use for health services; examine the community's health status, especially for hospitalization for otherwise preventable conditions; and sustain effective, adequate health care resources within the community. PMID:10122100

  16. A method to measure the impact of primary care programs targeted to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Luther, Stephen L; Studnicki, James; Kromrey, Jeffrey; Lomando-Frakes, Kathleen; Grant, Pauline; Finley, Gabrielle C

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective population-based study was designed to test the impact on selected health outcomes of community-based primary care programs targeting racial and ethnic minorities. Zip codes were coded as either "high" or "low" access to targeted primary care programs to create the independent variable of interest. Outcome measures were chosen to represent unique dimensions of primary care. Generalized linear models were developed to compare rates for the outcome measures among blacks in high- and low-access areas. This study provides a useful approach that could be used to evaluate the impact of such programs in other communities.

  17. Rural-to-Urban Migrants' Experiences with Primary Care under Different Types of Medical Institutions in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jiazhi; Shi, Leiyu; Zou, Xia; Chen, Wen; Ling, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objectives China is facing the unprecedented challenge of rapidly increasing rural-to-urban migration. Migrants are in a vulnerable state when they attempt to access to primary care services. This study was designed to explore rural-to-urban migrants’ experiences in primary care, comparing their quality of primary care experiences under different types of medical institutions in Guangzhou, China. Methods The study employed a cross-sectional survey of 736 rural-to-urban migrants in Guangzhou, China in 2014. A validated Chinese version of Primary Care Assessment Tool—Adult Short Version (PCAT-AS), representing 10 primary care domains was used to collect information on migrants’ quality of primary care experiences. These domains include first contact (utilization), first contact (accessibility), ongoing care, coordination (referrals), coordination (information systems), comprehensiveness (services available), comprehensiveness (services provided), family-centeredness, community orientation and culturally competent. These measures were used to assess the quality of primary care performance as reported from patients’ perspective. Analysis of covariance was conducted for comparison on PCAT scores among migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals, municipal hospitals, community health centers/community health stations, and township health centers/rural health stations. Multiple linear regression models were used to explore factors associated with PCAT total scores. Results After adjustments were made, migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals (25.49) reported the highest PCAT total scores, followed by municipal hospitals (25.02), community health centers/community health stations (24.24), and township health centers/rural health stations (24.18). Tertiary hospital users reported significantly better performance in first contact (utilization), first contact (accessibility), coordination (information system), comprehensiveness (service

  18. Electronic health record functionality needed to better support primary care.

    PubMed

    Krist, Alex H; Beasley, John W; Crosson, Jesse C; Kibbe, David C; Klinkman, Michael S; Lehmann, Christoph U; Fox, Chester H; Mitchell, Jason M; Mold, James W; Pace, Wilson D; Peterson, Kevin A; Phillips, Robert L; Post, Robert; Puro, Jon; Raddock, Michael; Simkus, Ray; Waldren, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) must support primary care clinicians and patients, yet many clinicians remain dissatisfied with their system. This article presents a consensus statement about gaps in current EHR functionality and needed enhancements to support primary care. The Institute of Medicine primary care attributes were used to define needs and meaningful use (MU) objectives to define EHR functionality. Current objectives remain focused on disease rather than the whole person, ignoring factors such as personal risks, behaviors, family structure, and occupational and environmental influences. Primary care needs EHRs to move beyond documentation to interpreting and tracking information over time, as well as patient-partnering activities, support for team-based care, population-management tools that deliver care, and reduced documentation burden. While stage 3 MU's focus on outcomes is laudable, enhanced functionality is still needed, including EHR modifications, expanded use of patient portals, seamless integration with external applications, and advancement of national infrastructure and policies. PMID:24431335

  19. Infusing Mental Health Services into Primary Care for Very Young Children and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan-Sanoff, Margot; Talmi, Ayelet; Augustyn, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Thinking beyond physical health to include mental health and emotional well-being offers the pediatric clinician different approaches to old challenges and a new lens through which to view infant and parent behavior. Because pediatric primary care is accessible, universally available, has no entrance criteria, and is nonstigmatizing, clinicians…

  20. Managing violence in primary care: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat M; Dixon, Cath A; Tompkins, Charlotte N

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the risk factors for violence can help primary care staff to evaluate and manage risk in the primary care setting. They will be able to acknowledge that risk factors are not static but can vary according to time, place, situation, and support networks. General practitioners (GPs) should not ignore their clinical acumen, but should use their knowledge of the patient to form part of a risk assessment. Managing violence in primary care should focus on the individual; for example, in the training of primary care staff. It should also involve an examination of the wider structure of primary care; for example, the safe design of buildings, avoiding long waiting times, and having 'no intoxication' policies for practices. There is a pressing need for primary care-based research in this area. We acknowledge that in our understanding of this topic there are two extremes that should be avoided. The first is that our perceived risk of violence often exceeds the real, absolute risk. Where our perceptions are overstated, patients run the risk of being excluded from primary care or of being inappropriately detained on psychiatric wards under the Mental Health Act. At the other extreme, where risk is understated, staff can play the 'hero' or the 'martyr' in an attempt to defuse a situation without support from other colleagues. Like many other situations in primary care, working in isolation carries real and important risks. Threats of violence are best managed in primary care by having a collaborative practice approach underpinned by a support ethos from primary care organisations. PMID:14694671

  1. Using Quality Experts from Manufacturing to Transform Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Rose M.; Walsworth, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Improving Performance in Practice (IPIP) is an initiative convened by the American Board of Medical Specialties. It investigates the efficacy of coaches in helping primary-care practices improve the care of patients with diabetes and asthma. Most IPIP states use coaches who have a health care background, and are trained in quality…

  2. The Impact of Continuous Care and Primary Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Rhodes

    2003-01-01

    The University of New Mexico Child Care Center implemented a program for the care of infants and toddlers characterized by continuous care by primary caregivers. In addition to expected beneficial consequences for children, the program also produced two unexpected outcomes. Families developed a sense of community and mutual support, and teacher…

  3. Enhancing Access to Primary Cultural Heritage Materials of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Peter M.; Hyman, Malcolm

    This chapter is about enhancing access to primary cultural heritage materials of India housed in academic libraries by integrating them with machine-readable texts, lexical resources, and linguistic software in a digital library. Integrating primary cultural materials with a digital library can enable broad use of Indic collections for research and education. For the purposes of illustrating this procedure, we outline here the development of a prototype using the collections of Sanskrit manuscripts in the libraries at Brown University and the University of Pennsylvania and integrating them with The Sanskrit Library. The result is extendable to collections of Indic materials throughout the world and can serve as a model for digitization projects of cultural materials in other major culture-bearing languages such as Greek, Latin, Arabic, Persian, and Chinese.

  4. Primary care at Swiss universities - current state and perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that a strong primary care is a cornerstone of an efficient health care system. But Switzerland is facing a shortage of primary care physicians (PCPs). This pushed the Federal Council of Switzerland to introduce a multifaceted political programme to strengthen the position of primary care, including its academic role. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the situation of academic primary care at the five Swiss universities by the end of year 2012. Results Although primary care teaching activities have a long tradition at the five Swiss universities with activities starting in the beginning of the 1980ies; the academic institutes of primary care were only established in recent years (2005 – 2009). Only one of them has an established chair. Human and financial resources vary substantially. At all universities a broad variety of courses and lectures are offered, including teaching in private primary care practices with 1331 PCPs involved. Regarding research, differences among the institutes are tremendous, mainly caused by entirely different human resources and skills. Conclusion So far, the activities of the existing institutes at the Swiss Universities are mainly focused on teaching. However, for a complete academic institutionalization as well as an increased acceptance and attractiveness, more research activities are needed. In addition to an adequate basic funding of research positions, competitive research grants have to be created to establish a specialty-specific research culture. PMID:24885148

  5. Delays in Cancer Care Among Low-Income Minorities Despite Access

    PubMed Central

    Nonzee, Narissa J.; Ragas, Daiva M.; Ha Luu, Thanh; Phisuthikul, Ava M.; Tom, Laura; Dong, XinQi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Narrowing the racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in breast and cervical cancer requires an in-depth understanding of motivation for adherence to cancer screening and follow-up care. To inform patient-centered interventions, this study aimed to identify reasons why low-income women adhered to or delayed breast or cervical cancer screening, follow-up and treatment despite access to cancer care-related services. Methods: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted among women with access to cancer care-related services receiving care at an academic cancer center, federally qualified health centers, or free clinics in the Chicago metropolitan area. Transcripts were coded and analyzed for themes related to rationales for adherence. Results: Among 138 participants, most were African American (46%) or Hispanic (36%), English speaking (70%), and between ages 41 and 65 years (64%). Primary drivers of nonadherence included lack of knowledge of resources, denial or fear, competing obligations, and embarrassment. Facilitators included abnormality identification, patient activation, provider-initiated actions, and motivation from family or friends. Conclusions: Interventions targeting increased adherence to care among low-income and ethnic minority women should direct efforts to proactive, culturally and patient-informed education that enables patients to access resources and use the health care system, address misconceptions about cancer, ensure health care providers' communication of screening guidelines, and leverage the patient's social support network. PMID:26070037

  6. [Differences and similarities of primary care in the German and Spanish health care systems].

    PubMed

    Salvador Comino, María Rosa; Krane, Sibylla; Schelling, Jörg; Regife García, Víctor

    2016-02-01

    An efficient primary care is of particular importance for any countries' health care system. Many differences exist on how distinctive countries try to obtain the goal of an efficient, cost-effective primary care for its population. In this article we conducted a selective literature review, which includes both scientific and socio-political publications. The findings are complemented with the experience of a Spanish physician from Seville in her last year of training in family medicine, who completed a four months long rotation in the German health care system. We highlighted different features by comparing both countries, including their health care expenditure, the relation between primary and secondary care, the organization in the academic field and the training of future primary care physicians. It is clear that primary care in both countries plays a central role, have to deal with shortcomings, and in some points one system can learn from the other. PMID:26363955

  7. [Differences and similarities of primary care in the German and Spanish health care systems].

    PubMed

    Salvador Comino, María Rosa; Krane, Sibylla; Schelling, Jörg; Regife García, Víctor

    2016-02-01

    An efficient primary care is of particular importance for any countries' health care system. Many differences exist on how distinctive countries try to obtain the goal of an efficient, cost-effective primary care for its population. In this article we conducted a selective literature review, which includes both scientific and socio-political publications. The findings are complemented with the experience of a Spanish physician from Seville in her last year of training in family medicine, who completed a four months long rotation in the German health care system. We highlighted different features by comparing both countries, including their health care expenditure, the relation between primary and secondary care, the organization in the academic field and the training of future primary care physicians. It is clear that primary care in both countries plays a central role, have to deal with shortcomings, and in some points one system can learn from the other.

  8. Racial/ethnic differences in children's access to care.

    PubMed Central

    Weinick, R M; Krauss, N A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study explored reasons for racial and ethnic differences in children's usual sources of care. METHODS: Data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were examined by means of logistic regression techniques. RESULTS: Black and Hispanic children were substantially less likely than White children to have a usual source of care. These differences persisted after control for health insurance and socioeconomic status. Control for language ability, however, eliminated differences between Hispanic and White children. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that the marked Hispanic disadvantage in children's access to care noted in earlier studies may be related to language ability. PMID:11076248

  9. Quality of care in public and private primary health care facilities: structural comparisons in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Peabody, J W; Rahman, O; Fox, K; Gertler, P

    1994-06-01

    This article examines the quality of care provided by Jamaican primary health care clinics by comparing various structural quality indexes derived from a nationwide 1990 survey of 366 public clinics and 189 private clinics. This comparison points up important differences in the quality of care being provided by public versus private and urban versus rural facilities that might not have been anticipated. Among other things, the study found that the public clinics provided better prenatal diagnosis and counseling and more family planning services than the private clinics. However, the private clinics tended to be better condition, better equipped and supplied, and better able to provide certain laboratory test results in a timely manner. Comparison of urban and rural public clinics indicated that the urban clinics were somewhat better provisioned with equipment, supplies, and pharmaceuticals. However, the rural clinics appeared to be in better repair. Comparison of basic and higher-level public clinics showed the basic clinics to be in better condition and more fully staffed than the higher-level clinics while having similar perinatal diagnostic capabilities. However, the higher-level public clinics tended to have an overall profile more resembling that of the private clinics, being better equipped and supplied than the basic clinics. While structural measures of quality such as those employed here tend to poorly estimate health outcomes, they do serve as good indicators of access to services where resources are severely constrained. For policy-makers, the results presented here could prove useful in guiding concrete interventions, summarizing the structural elements of health care quality at different types of facilities, and providing a method for less costly evaluation of programs designed to improve services at primary health care clinics. PMID:8069333

  10. Cultural democracy: the way forward for primary care of hard to reach New Zealanders.

    PubMed

    Finau, Sitaleki A; Finau, Eseta

    2007-09-01

    The use of cultural democracy, the freedom to practice one's culture without fear, as a framework for primary care service provision is essential for improved health service in a multi cultural society like New Zealand. It is an effective approach to attaining health equity for all. Many successful health ventures are ethnic specific and have gone past cultural competency to the practice of cultural democracy. That is, the services are freely taking on the realities of clients without and malice from those of other ethnicities. In New Zealand the scientific health service to improve the health of a multi cultural society are available but there is a need to improve access and utilization by hard to reach New Zealanders. This paper discusses cultural democracy and provide example of how successful health ventures that had embraced cultural democracy were implemented. It suggests that cultural democracy will provide the intellectual impetus and robust philosophy for moving from equality to equity in health service access and utilization. This paper would provide a way forward to improved primary care utilization, efficiency, effectiveness and equitable access especially for the hard to reach populations. use the realities of Pacificans in New Zealand illustrate the use of cultural democracy, and thus equity to address the "inverse care law" of New Zealand. The desire is for primary care providers to take cognizance and use cultural democracy and equity as the basis for the design and practice of primary health care for the hard to reach New Zealanders.

  11. Gaps In Primary Care And Health System Performance In Six Latin American And Caribbean Countries.

    PubMed

    Macinko, James; Guanais, Frederico C; Mullachery, Pricila; Jimenez, Geronimo

    2016-08-01

    The rapid demographic and epidemiological transitions occurring in Latin America and the Caribbean have led to high levels of noncommunicable diseases in the region. In addition to reduced risk factors for chronic conditions, a strong health system for managing chronic conditions is vital. This study assessed the extent to which populations in six Latin American and Caribbean countries receive high-quality primary care, and it examined the relationship between experiences with care and perceptions of health system performance. We applied a validated survey on access, use, and satisfaction with health care services to nationally representative samples of the populations of Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Mexico, and Panama. Respondents reported considerable gaps in the ways in which primary care is organized, financed, and delivered. Nearly half reported using the emergency department for a condition they considered treatable in a primary care setting. Reports of more primary care problems were associated with worse perceptions of health system performance and quality and less receipt of preventive care. Urgent attention to primary care performance is required as the region's population continues to age at an unprecedented rate. PMID:27503978

  12. Gaps In Primary Care And Health System Performance In Six Latin American And Caribbean Countries.

    PubMed

    Macinko, James; Guanais, Frederico C; Mullachery, Pricila; Jimenez, Geronimo

    2016-08-01

    The rapid demographic and epidemiological transitions occurring in Latin America and the Caribbean have led to high levels of noncommunicable diseases in the region. In addition to reduced risk factors for chronic conditions, a strong health system for managing chronic conditions is vital. This study assessed the extent to which populations in six Latin American and Caribbean countries receive high-quality primary care, and it examined the relationship between experiences with care and perceptions of health system performance. We applied a validated survey on access, use, and satisfaction with health care services to nationally representative samples of the populations of Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Mexico, and Panama. Respondents reported considerable gaps in the ways in which primary care is organized, financed, and delivered. Nearly half reported using the emergency department for a condition they considered treatable in a primary care setting. Reports of more primary care problems were associated with worse perceptions of health system performance and quality and less receipt of preventive care. Urgent attention to primary care performance is required as the region's population continues to age at an unprecedented rate.

  13. The Value of Continuity between Primary Care and Surgical Care in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving continuity between primary care and cancer care is critical for improving cancer outcomes and curbing cancer costs. A dimension of continuity, we investigated how regularly patients receive their primary care and surgical care for colon cancer from the same hospital and whether this affects mortality and costs. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Registry (SEER)-Medicare data, we performed a retrospective cohort study of stage I-III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. There were 23,305 stage I-III colon cancer patients who received primary care in the year prior to diagnosis and underwent operative care for colon cancer. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their surgery and to their primary care provider’s main hospital, and then classified according to whether these two hospitals were same or different. Outcomes examined were hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazard for colon cancer specific mortality, and generalized linear estimate for costs at 12 months, from propensity score matched models. Results Fifty-two percent of stage I-III colon patients received primary care and surgical care from the same hospital. Primary care and surgical care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality, but was associated with lower inpatient, outpatient, and total costs of care. Total cost difference was $8,836 (95% CI $2,746–$14,577), a 20% reduction in total median cost of care at 12 months. Conclusions Receiving primary care and surgical care at the same hospital, compared to different hospitals, was associated with lower costs but still similar survival among stage I-III colon cancer patients. Nonetheless, health care policy which encourages further integration between primary care and cancer care in order to improve outcomes and decrease costs will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving health care

  14. Cost-effectiveness of a Primary Care Depression Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Jeffrey M; Rost, Kathryn M; Zhang, Mingliang; Williams, D Keith; Smith, Jeffrey; Fortney, John

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of a quality improvement depression intervention (enhanced care) in primary care settings relative to usual care. DESIGN Following stratification, we randomized 12 primary care practices to enhanced or usual care conditions and followed patients for 12 months. SETTING Primary care practices located in 10 states across the United States. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS Two hundred eleven patients beginning a new treatment episode for major depression. INTERVENTIONS Training the primary care team to assess, educate, and monitor depressed patients during the acute and continuation stages of their depression treatment episode over 1 year. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Cost-effectiveness was measured by calculating incremental (enhanced minus usual care) costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) derived from SF-36 data. The mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in the main analysis was $15,463 per QALY. The mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for the sensitivity analyses ranged from $11,341 (using geographic block variables to control for pre-intervention service utilization) to $19,976 (increasing the cost estimates by 50%) per QALY. CONCLUSIONS This quality improvement depression intervention was cost-effective relative to usual care compared to cost-effectiveness ratios for common primary care interventions and commonly cited cost-effectiveness ratio thresholds for intervention implementation. PMID:12823650

  15. HIV and the primary care physician in Japan.

    PubMed

    Asai, A

    1997-01-01

    Primary care physicians in Japan must provide comprehensive medical care and counseling for persons both infected with and at risk for HIV/AIDS. Despite existing activities and education programs, HIV case numbers continue to rise in Japan, and only a limited number of hospitals and physicians offer care to those with HIV/AIDS. Some doctors in Japan refuse to accept patients with HIV/AIDS because of the complex treatment often involved, prejudice regarding AIDS, and fear of transmission. Other impediments to effective treatment of HIV/AIDS in Japan include insufficient risk evaluation through outpatient services, lack of privacy, and restrictions and policies at medical facilities. If Japan's primary care physicians cannot participate in caring for those with HIV/AIDS, it will be impossible for every patient with HIV/AIDS to receive correct and adequate medical care. To enable primary care physicians to provide high-quality service and prevention counseling to those with HIV/AIDS, prejudice, fear, and logistic impediments must be eradicated. Comprehensive practice guidelines that protect patients' rights and privacy should be established immediately. The guidelines should direct primary care physicians toward a logical and proper approach to HIV/AIDS care by addressing fundamental treatment and effective prevention counseling as well as the social problems surrounding HIV/AIDS. In addition, research on the general knowledge level and prevalent attitudes among Japan's primary care physicians regarding HIV/AIDS would clarify which specific issues the guidelines should emphasize.

  16. 76 FR 12080 - TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... intended to improve access to urgent care including minor illness or injury for Coast Guard beneficiaries... treatment for an illness or injury that would not result in further disability or death if not treated... chronic conditions that are not true life threatening emergencies and may have been better ] suited...

  17. Access to Care: Overcoming the Rural Physician Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes three state-initiated programs that address the challenge of providing access to health care for Appalachia's rural residents: a traveling pediatric diabetes clinic serving eastern Kentucky; a telemedicine program operated out of Knoxville, Tennessee; and a new medical school in Kentucky dedicated to training doctors from Appalachia for…

  18. America's Children: Health Insurance and Access to Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Margaret, Ed.; Coye, Molly Joel, Ed.

    The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Children, Health Insurance, and Access to Care was assembled to address questions about health insurance for children, evaluating the strengths and limitations of insurance as a means of improving children's health from a variety of approaches and policies. Meeting between March 1997 and January 1998,…

  19. Maintaining standards of primary care in America

    PubMed Central

    Snider, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of present day attitudes toward maintaining standards of medical care in the United States is described, and the main methods identified. Their influence on current practice is discussed, and application made to the promotion of high standards of care in British general practice. PMID:317108

  20. Refugee health: a new model for delivering primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kay, Margaret; Jackson, Claire; Nicholson, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Providing health care to newly arrived refugees within the primary health care system has proved challenging. The primary health care sector needs enhanced capacity to provide quality health care for this population. The Primary Care Amplification Model has demonstrated its capacity to deliver effective health care to patients with chronic disease such as diabetes. This paper describes the adaption ofthe model to enhance the delivery ofhealth care to the refugee community. A 'beacon' practice with an expanded clinical capacity to deliver health care for refugees has been established. Partnerships link this practice with existing local general practices and community services. Governance involves collaboration between clinical leadership and relevant government and non-government organisations including local refugee communities. Integration with tertiary and community health sectors is facilitated and continuing education of health care providers is an important focus. Early incorporation of research in this model ensures effective feedback to inform providers of current health needs. Although implementation is currently in its formative phase, the Primary Care Amplification Model offers a flexible, yet robust framework to facilitate the delivery of quality health care to refugee patients.

  1. Holistic wound assessment in primary care.

    PubMed

    Cornforth, Amber

    2013-12-01

    Wound care is expensive and can cause immeasurable stress and inconvenience to patients and their significant others. It is therefore in the best interest of the patient, their significant others and the NHS as a whole that wounds are expertly assessed, managed and healed in the quickest timeframe possible. Nurses play a pivotal role in the process of accurate holistic wound assessment, evaluation and treatment. This article aims to help further develop and enhance both professional and clinical wound care assessment and evaluation skills. Pertinent wound care literature is critically reviewed and the crucial nature and important components of comprehensive wound assessment for facilitating the highest possible quality wound care to patients are presented alongside recommendations regarding how the enhanced knowledge and skills could be applied into everyday wound care practice.

  2. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume. PMID:22193182

  3. Recent Developments in Alcohol Services Research on Access to Care.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Laura A

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, only about 10 percent of people with an alcohol or drug use disorder receive care for the condition, pointing to a large treatment gap. Several personal characteristics influence whether a person will receive treatment; additionally, many people with an alcohol use disorder do not perceive the need for treatment. The extent of the treatment gap differs somewhat across different population subgroups, such as those based on gender, age, or race and ethnicity. Recent health care reforms, such as implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, likely will improve access to substance abuse treatment. In addition, new treatment approaches, service delivery systems, and payment innovations may facilitate access to substance abuse services. Nevertheless, efforts to bridge the treatment gap will continue to be needed to ensure that all people who need alcohol and drug abuse treatment can actually receive it. PMID:27159809

  4. Recent Developments in Alcohol Services Research on Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, only about 10 percent of people with an alcohol or drug use disorder receive care for the condition, pointing to a large treatment gap. Several personal characteristics influence whether a person will receive treatment; additionally, many people with an alcohol use disorder do not perceive the need for treatment. The extent of the treatment gap differs somewhat across different population subgroups, such as those based on gender, age, or race and ethnicity. Recent health care reforms, such as implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, likely will improve access to substance abuse treatment. In addition, new treatment approaches, service delivery systems, and payment innovations may facilitate access to substance abuse services. Nevertheless, efforts to bridge the treatment gap will continue to be needed to ensure that all people who need alcohol and drug abuse treatment can actually receive it. PMID:27159809

  5. Outness, Stigma, and Primary Health Care Utilization among Rural LGBT Populations

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, J.; Shaver, John; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies have noted significant health disadvantages experienced by LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) populations in the US. While several studies have identified that fears or experiences of stigma and disclosure of sexual orientation and/or gender identity to health care providers are significant barriers to health care utilization for LGBT people, these studies have concentrated almost exclusively on urban samples. Little is known about the impact of stigma specifically for rural LGBT populations, who may have less access to quality, LGBT-sensitive care than LGBT people in urban centers. Methodology LBGT individuals residing in rural areas of the United States were recruited online to participate in a survey examining the relationship between stigma, disclosure and “outness,” and utilization of primary care services. Data were collected and analyzed regarding LGBT individuals’ demographics, health care access, health risk factors, health status, outness to social contacts and primary care provider, and anticipated, internalized, and enacted stigmas. Results Higher scores on stigma scales were associated with lower utilization of health services for the transgender & non-binary group, while higher levels of disclosure of sexual orientation were associated with greater utilization of health services for cisgender men. Conclusions The results demonstrate the role of stigma in shaping access to primary health care among rural LGBT people and point to the need for interventions focused towards decreasing stigma in health care settings or increasing patients’ disclosure of orientation or gender identity to providers. Such interventions have the potential to increase utilization of primary and preventive health care services by LGBT people in rural areas. PMID:26731405

  6. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    PubMed

    Conway, R; Kavanagh, R; Coughlan, R J; Carey, J J

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant's confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant's self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases. PMID:25803956

  7. Development of the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) Instrument: A Practical Survey of Patients' Experiences in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Stefan. G.; Pollio, David E.; Jones, Richard N.; Steward, Jocelyn; Stringfellow, Erin J.; Gordon, Adam J.; Johnson, Nancy K.; Kim, Theresa A.; Granstaff, Unita; Austin, Erika L.; Young, Alexander S.; Golden, Joya; Davis, Lori L.; Roth, David L.; Holt, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Homeless patients face unique challenges in obtaining primary care responsive to their needs and context. Patient experience questionnaires could permit assessment of patient-centered medical homes for this population, but standard instruments may not reflect homeless patients' priorities and concerns. Objectives This report describes (a) the content and psychometric properties of a new primary care questionnaire for homeless patients and (b) the methods utilized in its development. Methods Starting with quality-related constructs from the Institute of Medicine, we identified relevant themes by interviewing homeless patients and experts in their care. A multidisciplinary team drafted a preliminary set of 78 items. This was administered to homeless-experienced clients (n=563) across 3 VA facilities and 1 non-VA Health Care for the Homeless Program. Using Item Response Theory, we examined Test Information Function curves to eliminate less informative items and devise plausibly distinct subscales. Results The resulting 33-item instrument (Primary Care Quality-Homeless, PCQ-H) has four subscales: Patient-Clinician Relationship (15 items), Cooperation among Clinicians (3 items), Access/Coordination (11 items) and Homeless-Specific Needs (4 items). Evidence for divergent and convergent validity is provided. Test Information Function (TIF) graphs showed adequate informational value to permit inferences about groups for 3 subscales (Relationship, Cooperation and Access/Coordination). The 3-item Cooperation subscale had lower informational value (TIF<5) but had good internal consistency (alpha=0.75) and patients frequently reported problems in this aspect of care. Conclusions Systematic application of qualitative and quantitative methods supported the development of a brief patient-reported questionnaire focused on the primary care of homeless patients and offers guidance for future population-specific instrument development. PMID:25023918

  8. Management of alcoholism in the primary care setting.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    Primary care physicians can play an important role in managing alcoholic patients. Identifying and treating alcoholism early, before it has interfered with patients' relationships and work, may increase the likelihood of prolonged recovery. Simple office interventions can help motivate patients to abstain and seek treatment. People who abuse alcohol and are unwilling to abstain can benefit from a recommendation to reduce their intake of alcohol. For alcohol-dependent patients who decide to stop drinking, primary care physicians often can manage withdrawal on an outpatient basis. Selecting an appropriate treatment program for each alcoholic patient is important, and referral to a specialist to assist in matching patients to treatments is often necessary. Primary care physicians also can help prevent relapse. Although disulfiram is of limited value, primary care physicians can support recovery by identifying coexistent psychosocial problems, helping patients to restructure their lives, and ensuring continuity of care. PMID:1595243

  9. [Nursing ethics and the access to nursing care].

    PubMed

    Monteverde, Settimio

    2013-08-01

    The increasing number of ethical issues highlighted in everyday nursing care demonstrates the connectedness between nursing ethics and nursing practice. However, what is the role of ethical theories in this context? This question will be examined in this article by analysing the contribution made by the ethics of care, in particular in understandings of gender roles, asymmetries of power, professional knowledge and experience. The adoption and criticism of an emergent nursing ethics is discussed and stated from different viewpoints. The actuality of the caring approach is affirmed by a new reading of the given situation. This article first describes the traditional perception of nurses as marginalised actors in the health sector. By making reference to the current and growing global scarcity of nursing care, it contends that nursing will no longer be marginalised, but instead at the centre of public health attention and reputation. Nevertheless, marginalisation will persist by increasingly affecting the care receivers, especially those groups that are pushed to the fringes by the consequences of the healthcare market, such as persons of extreme old age, suffering from multiple morbidities, or with poor health literacy. Whereas the "classical" understanding of the ethics of care focuses on the nurse-patient relationship and on individual care and understanding of ethics, the new understanding confirms the classical, but adds an understanding of social ethics: caring for the access to care is seen as a main ethical goal of social justice within a nursing ethic.

  10. Mental health collaborative care and its role in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, David E; Kilbourne, Amy M; Nord, Kristina M; Bauer, Mark S

    2013-08-01

    Collaborative care models (CCMs) provide a pragmatic strategy to deliver integrated mental health and medical care for persons with mental health conditions served in primary care settings. CCMs are team-based intervention to enact system-level redesign by improving patient care through organizational leadership support, provider decision support, and clinical information systems, as well as engaging patients in their care through self-management support and linkages to community resources. The model is also a cost-efficient strategy for primary care practices to improve outcomes for a range of mental health conditions across populations and settings. CCMs can help achieve integrated care aims underhealth care reform yet organizational and financial issues may affect adoption into routine primary care. Notably, successful implementation of CCMs in routine care will require alignment of financial incentives to support systems redesign investments, reimbursements for mental health providers, and adaptation across different practice settings and infrastructure to offer all CCM components. PMID:23881714

  11. Applying the guidelines for pharmacists integrating into primary care teams

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Arden R.; Pammett, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2013, Jorgenson et al. published guidelines for pharmacists integrating into primary care teams. These guidelines outlined 10 evidence-based recommendations designed to support pharmacists in successfully establishing practices in primary care environments. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed, practical approach to implementing these recommendations in real life, thereby aiding to validate their effectiveness. Methods: Both authors reviewed the guidelines independently and ranked the importance of each recommendation respective to their practice. Each author then provided feedback for each recommendation regarding the successes and challenges they encountered through implementation. This feedback was then consolidated into agreed upon statements for each recommendation. Results and Discussion: Focusing on building relationships (with an emphasis on face time) and demonstrating value to both primary care providers and patients were identified as key aspects in developing these new roles. Ensuring that the environment supports the practice, along with strategic positioning within the clinic, improves uptake and can maximize the usefulness of a pharmacist in primary care. Demonstrating consistent and competent clinical and documentation skills builds on the foundation of the other recommendations to allow for the effective provision of clinical pharmacy services. Additional recommendations include developing efficient ways (potentially provider specific) to communicate with primary care providers and addressing potential preconceived notions about the role of the pharmacist in primary care. Conclusion: We believe these guidelines hold up to real-life integration and emphatically recommend their use for new and existing primary care pharmacists. PMID:27540404

  12. State Medicaid Coverage, ESRD Incidence, and Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Hall, Yoshio N.; Mitani, Aya A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of low-income nonelderly adults covered by Medicaid varies widely by state. We sought to determine whether broader state Medicaid coverage, defined as the proportion of each state’s low-income nonelderly adult population covered by Medicaid, associates with lower state-level incidence of ESRD and greater access to care. The main outcomes were incidence of ESRD and five indicators of access to care. We identified 408,535 adults aged 20–64 years, who developed ESRD between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2008. Medicaid coverage among low-income nonelderly adults ranged from 12.2% to 66.0% (median 32.5%). For each additional 10% of the low-income nonelderly population covered by Medicaid, there was a 1.8% (95% confidence interval, 1.0% to 2.6%) decrease in ESRD incidence. Among nonelderly adults with ESRD, gaps in access to care between those with private insurance and those with Medicaid were narrower in states with broader coverage. For a 50-year-old white woman, the access gap to the kidney transplant waiting list between Medicaid and private insurance decreased by 7.7 percentage points in high (>45%) versus low (<25%) Medicaid coverage states. Similarly, the access gap to transplantation decreased by 4.0 percentage points and the access gap to peritoneal dialysis decreased by 3.8 percentage points in high Medicaid coverage states. In conclusion, states with broader Medicaid coverage had a lower incidence of ESRD and smaller insurance-related access gaps. PMID:24652791

  13. Teamwork in primary care: the views and experiences of nurses, midwives and health visitors.

    PubMed

    Wiles, R; Robison, J

    1994-08-01

    This paper reports on findings from a study of teamwork in primary care in one family health services authority in England. It is based on interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire with practice nurses, district nurses, health visitors and midwives in 20 practices. Six topics emerged as important in relation to the views of nurses, midwives and health visitors and their experiences of teamwork: team identity; leadership; access to general practitioners; philosophies of care; understanding of team members' roles and responsibilities; and, disagreement regarding roles and responsibilities. Differences in the various views and experiences of teamwork were identified. Midwives and health visitors emerged as the least integrated members of the primary health care team. Recent changes to the organization of primary health care services, as well as professional changes, are seen as accounting for the different experiences of the nursing groups. The potential for teamwork in the future is discussed.

  14. Treatment of active duty military with PTSD in primary care: A follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A M; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette; Avila, Laura L; Bryan, Craig J; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    First-line trauma-focused therapies offered in specialty mental health clinics do not reach many veterans and active duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Primary care is an ideal environment to expand access to mental health care. Several promising clinical case series reports of brief PTSD therapies adapted for primary care have shown positive results, but the long-term effectiveness with military members is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of an open trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral primary care-delivered protocol developed specifically for deployment-related PTSD in a sample of 24 active duty military (15 men, 9 women). Measures of PTSD symptom severity showed statistically and clinically significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment that were maintained at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessments. Similar reductions were maintained in depressive symptoms and ratings of global mental health functioning. PMID:26519833

  15. Treatment of active duty military with PTSD in primary care: A follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A M; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette; Avila, Laura L; Bryan, Craig J; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    First-line trauma-focused therapies offered in specialty mental health clinics do not reach many veterans and active duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Primary care is an ideal environment to expand access to mental health care. Several promising clinical case series reports of brief PTSD therapies adapted for primary care have shown positive results, but the long-term effectiveness with military members is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of an open trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral primary care-delivered protocol developed specifically for deployment-related PTSD in a sample of 24 active duty military (15 men, 9 women). Measures of PTSD symptom severity showed statistically and clinically significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment that were maintained at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessments. Similar reductions were maintained in depressive symptoms and ratings of global mental health functioning.

  16. Chronic disease management: the primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Bragaglia, Pauline; O'Brien, Lewis

    2007-01-01

    This response to the essay is a "view from the trenches" by two doctors who have worked over 23 years at the Group Health Centre in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. We would agree wholeheartedly that reducing wait times for selected procedures will not transform our health system, although they are a start that does provide improved quality of life for a relatively small number of people. We have struggled with the care gap between known best practices and the reality of care provided, from the perspectives of both prevention and chronic disease management. This has resulted in an acute awareness of the need for an across-the-system, "bottom-up" approach to the prevention of disease and management of healthcare. Limited resources must be carefully leveraged in innovative ways if we are to eliminate this care gap, decrease morbidity and minimize expensive "rescue" procedures that make our system increasingly unaffordable.

  17. Headache in primary care: how important is diagnosis to management?

    PubMed Central

    O'Flynn, Norma; Ridsdale, Leone

    2002-01-01

    Headache is a common presentation in primary care. The classification of headache was overhauled by the International Headache Society (IHS) in 1988, and the past decade has seen rapid growth in the understanding of headache disorders. The IHS places particular importance on precise headache diagnosis. This paper discusses the relevance of such an approach to primary care. A review of the literature revealed a dearth of evidence regarding headache management in primary care settings. The evidence from other settings is considered and gaps in the literature highlighted. PMID:12120731

  18. Pediatric psychopharmacology in primary care: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Mark A; dosReis, Susan; Reeves, Gloria M; Wissow, Lawrence S; Pruitt, David B; Foy, Jane Meschan

    2013-08-01

    In a 2009 policy statement focused on children's mental health, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that pediatric primary care physicians achieve competence in initiating care for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety, depression, and substance use/abuse. Because treatment for 3 of these conditions--ADHD, anxiety, and depression--may, under certain conditions, include medication, the primary purpose of this article is to offer guidance to assist primary care physicians in decision-making about their use of psychotropic medications for these conditions. A few medications with proven efficacy and safety are emphasized. Secondarily, other medications that may be useful for other disorders are noted.

  19. What Can Primary Care Learn From Sports Teams?

    PubMed

    Fiscella, Kevin; Fogarty, Colleen; Salas, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Teams are familiar to sports but relatively new to primary care. In this perspective, we use sports teams to illustrate key principles from team science and extract practical lessons for primary care teams. The most notable lessons include the need for continuous team learning based on presession planning and postsession debriefing, real-world team training focused on identified teamwork needs, and on-site team coaching. Implementation of these principles requires organizational commitment coupled with alignment of continuing medical education and recertification requirements with primary care teamwork competencies. PMID:27232689

  20. New Pathways for Primary Care: An Update on Primary Care Programs From the Innovation Center at CMS

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Those in practice find that the fee-for-service system does not adequately value the contributions made by primary care. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Innovation Center) was created by the Affordable Care Act to test new models of health care delivery to improve the quality of care while lowering costs. All programs coming out of the Innovation Center are tests of new payment and service delivery models. By changing both payment and delivery models and moving to a payment model that rewards physicians for quality of care instead of volume of care, we may be able to achieve the kind of health care patients want to receive and primary care physicians want to provide. PMID:22412007

  1. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Gateway to Screening for Bipolar Disorder in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel-Gasparro, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this mixed methods descriptive study was to explore Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs’) knowledge of bipolar disorder (BPD) and their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to screening patients with known depression for BPD. Methods: A mixed method study design using surveys on BPD knowledge and screening practices as well as focus group data collection method for facilitators and barriers to screening. Results: 89 APRNs completed the survey and 12 APRNs participated in the focus groups. APRNs in any practice setting had low knowledge scores of BPD. No significant differences in screening for BPD for primary and non primary care APRNs. Qualitative findings revealed screening relates to tool availability; time, unsure of when to screen, fear of sigma, symptoms knowledge of BPD, accessible referral system, personal experiences with BPD, and therapeutic relationships with patients. Conclusion: Misdiagnosis of BPD as unipolar depression is common in primary care settings, leading to a long lag time to optimal diagnosis and treatment. The wait time to diagnosis and treatment could be reduced if APRNs in primary care settings screen patients with a diagnosis of depression by using validated screening tools. These results can inform APRN practice and further research on the effectiveness of screening for reducing the morbidity and mortality of BPDs in primary care settings; underscores the need for integration of mental health care into primary care as well as the need for more APRN education on the diagnosis and management of bipolar disorders. PMID:27347256

  2. Strengthening of oral health systems: oral health through primary health care.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work with the newly established WHO Collaborating Centre, Kuwait University, to strengthen the development of appropriate models for primary oral health care.

  3. Barriers to improving primary care of depression: perspectives of medical group leaders.

    PubMed

    Whitebird, Robin R; Solberg, Leif I; Margolis, Karen L; Asche, Stephen E; Trangle, Michael A; Wineman, Arthur P

    2013-06-01

    Using clinical trials, researchers have demonstrated effective methods for treating depression in primary care, but improvements based on these trials are not being implemented. This might be because these improvements require more systematic organizational changes than can be made by individual physicians. We interviewed 82 physicians and administrative leaders of 41 medical groups to learn what is preventing those organizational changes. The identified barriers to improving care included external contextual problems (reimbursement, scarce resources, and access to/communication with specialty mental health), individual attitudes (physician and patient resistance), and internal care process barriers (organizational and condition complexity, difficulty standardizing and measuring care). Although many of these barriers are challenging, we can overcome them by setting clear priorities for change and allocating adequate resources. We must improve primary care of depression if we are to reduce its enormous adverse social and economic impacts. PMID:23515301

  4. Privacy and confidentiality issues in primary care: views of advanced practice nurses and their patients--an APRNet study [corrected].

    PubMed

    Deshefy-Longhi, Terry; Dixon, Jane Karpe; Olsen, Douglas; Grey, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    Various aspects of the concepts of privacy and confidentiality are discussed in relation to health care information in primary health care settings. In addition, findings are presented from patient and nurse practitioner focus groups held to elicit concerns that these two groups have in relation to privacy and confidentiality in their respective primary care settings. The focus groups were held prior to the implementation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accessibility Act in the USA. Implications for advanced practice registered nurses in primary care practices are provided.

  5. Implementing a patient centered medical home in the Veterans health administration: Perspectives of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Stewart, Kenda R; Stewart, Gregory L; Rosenthal, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of a patient centered medical home challenges primary care providers to change their scheduling practices to enhance patient access to care as well as to learn how to use performance metrics as part of a self-reflective practice redesign culture. As medical homes become more commonplace, health care administrators and primary care providers alike are eager to identify barriers to implementation. The objective of this study was to identify non-technological barriers to medical home implementation from the perspective of primary care providers. We conducted qualitative interviews with providers implementing the medical home model in Department of Veterans Affairs clinics-the most comprehensive rollout to date. Primary care providers reported favorable attitudes towards the model but discussed the importance of data infrastructure for practice redesign and panel management. Respondents emphasized the need for administrative leadership to support practice redesign by facilitating time for panel management and recognizing providers who utilize non-face-to-face ways of delivering clinical care. Health care systems considering adoption of the medical home model should ensure that they support both technological capacities and vertically aligned expectations for provider performance. PMID:26250631

  6. Living In A Country With A Strong Primary Care System Is Beneficial To People With Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Johan; Groenewegen, Peter P; Boerma, Wienke G W; Kringos, Dionne S

    2015-09-01

    In light of the growing pressure that multiple chronic diseases place on health care systems, we investigated whether strong primary care was associated with improved health outcomes for the chronically ill. We did this by combining country- and individual-level data for the twenty-seven countries of the European Union, focusing on people's self-rated health status and whether or not they had severe limitations or untreated conditions. We found that people with chronic conditions were more likely to be in good or very good health in countries that had a stronger primary care structure and better coordination of care. People with more than two chronic conditions benefited most: Their self-rated health was higher if they lived in countries with a stronger primary care structure, better continuity of care, and a more comprehensive package of primary care services. In general, while having access to a strong primary care system mattered for people with chronic conditions, the degree to which it mattered differed across specific subgroups (for example, people with primary care-sensitive conditions) and primary care dimensions. Primary care reforms, therefore, should be person centered, addressing the needs of subgroups of patients while also finding a balance between structure and service delivery.

  7. A research agenda on patient safety in primary care. Recommendations by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Verstappen, Wim; Gaal, Sander; Bowie, Paul; Parker, Diane; Lainer, Miriam; Valderas, Jose M.; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Healthcare can cause avoidable serious harm to patients. Primary care is not an exception, and the relative lack of research in this area lends urgency to a better understanding of patient safety, the future research agenda and the development of primary care oriented safety programmes. Objective: To outline a research agenda for patient safety improvement in primary care in Europe and beyond. Methods: The LINNEAUS collaboration partners analysed existing research on epidemiology and classification of errors, diagnostic and medication errors, safety culture, and learning for and improving patient safety. We discussed ideas for future research in several meetings, workshops and congresses with LINNEAUS collaboration partners, practising GPs, researchers in this field, and policy makers. Results: This paper summarizes and integrates the outcomes of the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care. It proposes a research agenda on improvement strategies for patient safety in primary care. In addition, it provides background information to help to connect research in this field with practicing GPs and other healthcare workers in primary care. Conclusion: Future research studies should target specific primary care domains, using prospective methods and innovative methods such as patient involvement. PMID:26339841

  8. Improving delivery of primary care for vulnerable migrants

    PubMed Central

    Pottie, Kevin; Batista, Ricardo; Mayhew, Maureen; Mota, Lorena; Grant, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify and prioritize innovative strategies to address the health concerns of vulnerable migrant populations. Design Modified Delphi consensus process. Setting Canada. Participants Forty-one primary care practitioners, including family physicians and nurse practitioners, who provided care for migrant populations. Methods We used a modified Delphi consensus process to identify and prioritize innovative strategies that could potentially improve the delivery of primary health care for vulnerable migrants. Forty-one primary care practitioners from various centres across Canada who cared for migrant populations proposed strategies and participated in the consensus process. Main findings The response rate was 93% for the first round. The 3 most highly ranked practice strategies to address delivery challenges for migrants were language interpretation, comprehensive interdisciplinary care, and evidence-based guidelines. Training and mentorship for practitioners, intersectoral collaboration, and immigrant community engagement ranked fourth, fifth, and sixth, respectively, as strategies to address delivery challenges. These strategies aligned with strategies coming out of the United States, Europe, and Australia, with the exception of the proposed evidence-based guidelines. Conclusion Primary health care practices across Canada now need to evolve to address the challenges inherent in caring for vulnerable migrants. The selected strategies provide guidance for practices and health systems interested in improving health care delivery for migrant populations. PMID:24452576

  9. Interprofessional education: preparing psychologists for success in integrated primary care.

    PubMed

    Cubic, Barbara; Mance, Janette; Turgesen, Jeri N; Lamanna, Jennifer D

    2012-03-01

    Rapidly occurring changes in the healthcare arena mean time is of the essence for psychology to formalize a strategic plan for training in primary care settings. The current article articulates factors affecting models of integrated care in Academic Health Centers (AHCs) and describes ways to identify and utilize resources at AHCs to develop interprofessional educational and clinical integrated care opportunities. The paper asserts that interprofessional educational experiences between psychology and other healthcare providers are vital to insure professionals value one another's disciplines in health care reform endeavors, most notably the patient-centered initiatives. The paper highlights ways to create shared values and common goals between primary care providers and psychologists, which are needed for trainee internalization of integrated care precepts. A developmental perspective to training from pre-doctoral, internship and postdoctoral levels for psychologists in integrated care is described. Lastly, a call to action is given for the field to develop more opportunities for psychology trainees to receive education and training within practica, internships and postdoctoral fellowships in primary care settings to address the reality that most patients seek their mental health treatment in primary care settings.

  10. Experience of primary care among homeless individuals with mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Chrystal, Joya G; Glover, Dawn L; Young, Alexander S; Whelan, Fiona; Austin, Erika L; Johnson, Nancy K; Pollio, David E; Holt, Cheryl L; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J; Kim, Theresa A; Daigle, Shanette G; Steward, Jocelyn L; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of primary care to homeless individuals with mental health conditions presents unique challenges. To inform healthcare improvement, we studied predictors of favorable primary care experience among homeless persons with mental health conditions treated at sites that varied in degree of homeless-specific service tailoring. This was a multi-site, survey-based comparison of primary care experiences at three mainstream primary care clinics of the Veterans Administration (VA), one homeless-tailored VA clinic, and one tailored non-VA healthcare program. Persons who accessed primary care service two or more times from July 2008 through June 2010 (N = 366) were randomly sampled. Predictor variables included patient and organization characteristics suggested by the patient perception model developed by Sofaer and Firminger (2005), with an emphasis on mental health. The primary care experience was assessed with the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) questionnaire, a validated survey instrument. Multiple regression identified predictors of positive experiences (i.e. higher PCQ-H total score). Significant predictors of a positive experience included a site offering tailored service design, perceived choice among providers, and currently domiciled status. There was an interaction effect between site and severe psychiatric symptoms. For persons with severe psychiatric symptoms, a homeless-tailored service design was significantly associated with a more favorable primary care experience. For persons without severe psychiatric symptoms, this difference was not significant. This study supports the importance of tailored healthcare delivery designed for homeless persons' needs, with such services potentially holding special relevance for persons with mental health conditions. To improve patient experience among the homeless, organizations may want to deliver services that are tailored to homelessness and offer a choice of providers.

  11. Randomised controlled trials in primary care: scope and application.

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Aziz; Smeeth, Liam; Ashcroft, Richard

    2002-01-01

    There is now widespread acknowledgement of the absence of a sound evidence base underpinning many of the decisions made in primary care. Randomised controlled trials represent the methodology of choicefor determining efficacy and effectiveness of interventions, yet researchers working in primary care have been reluctant to use intervention studies, favouring observational study designs. Unfamiliarity with the different trial designs now available, and the relative advantages and disadvantages conferred by each, may be one factor contributing to this paradox. In this paper, we consider the principal trial designs available to primary care researchers, discussing the contexts in which a particular design may prove most useful. This information will, we hope, also prove useful to primary care clinicians attempting to interpret trial findings. PMID:12236280

  12. Availability and Primary Health Care Orientation of Dementia-Related Services in Rural Saskatchewan, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Debra G.; Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Stewart, Norma J.; O’Connell, Megan E.; Kirk, Andrew; Crossley, Margaret; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Forbes, Dorothy; Innes, Anthea

    2015-01-01

    Community-based services are important for improving outcomes for individuals with dementia and their caregivers. This study examined: (a) availability of rural dementia-related services in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan, and (b) orientation of services toward six key attributes of primary health care (i.e., information/education, accessibility, population orientation, coordinated care, comprehensiveness, quality of care). Data were collected from 71 rural Home Care Assessors via cross-sectional survey. Basic health services were available in most communities (e.g., pharmacists, family physicians, palliative care, adult day programs, home care, long-term care facilities). Dementia-specific services typically were unavailable (e.g., health promotion, counseling, caregiver support groups, transportation, week-end/night respite). Mean scores on the primary health care orientation scales were low (range 12.4 to 17.5/25). Specific services to address needs of rural individuals with dementia and their caregivers are limited in availability and fit with primary health care attributes. PMID:26496646

  13. Guideline for primary care management of headache in adults

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Werner J.; Findlay, Ted; Moga, Carmen; Scott, N. Ann; Harstall, Christa; Taenzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To increase the use of evidence-informed approaches to diagnosis, investigation, and treatment of headache for patients in primary care. Quality of evidence A comprehensive search was conducted for relevant guidelines and systematic reviews published between January 2000 and May 2011. The guidelines were critically appraised using the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool, and the 6 highest-quality guidelines were used as seed guidelines for the guideline adaptation process. Main message A multidisciplinary guideline development group of primary care providers and other specialists crafted 91 specific recommendations using a consensus process. The recommendations cover diagnosis, investigation, and management of migraine, tension-type, medication-overuse, and cluster headache. Conclusion A clinical practice guideline for the Canadian health care context was created using a guideline adaptation process to assist multidisciplinary primary care practitioners in providing evidence-informed care for patients with headache. PMID:26273080

  14. Chronic Disease Patients’ Experiences With Accessing Health Care in Rural and Remote Areas

    PubMed Central

    Brundisini, F; Giacomini, M; DeJean, D; Vanstone, M; Winsor, S; Smith, A

    2013-01-01

    Background Rurality can contribute to the vulnerability of people with chronic diseases. Qualitative research can identify a wide range of health care access issues faced by patients living in a remote or rural setting. Objective To systematically review and synthesize qualitative research on the advantages and disadvantages rural patients with chronic diseases face when accessing both rural and distant care. Data Sources This report synthesizes 12 primary qualitative studies on the topic of access to health care for rural patients with chronic disease. Included studies were published between 2002 and 2012 and followed adult patients in North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Review Methods Qualitative meta-synthesis was used to integrate findings across primary research studies. Results Three major themes were identified: geography, availability of health care professionals, and rural culture. First, geographic distance from services poses access barriers, worsened by transportation problems or weather conditions. Community supports and rurally located services can help overcome these challenges. Second, the limited availability of health care professionals (coupled with low education or lack of peer support) increases the feeling of vulnerability. When care is available locally, patients appreciate long-term relationships with individual clinicians and care personalized by familiarity with the patient as a person. Finally, patients may feel culturally marginalized in the urban health care context, especially if health literacy is low. A culture of self-reliance and community belonging in rural areas may incline patients to do without distant care and may mitigate feelings of vulnerability. Limitations Qualitative research findings are not intended to generalize directly to populations, although meta-synthesis across a number of qualitative studies builds an increasingly robust understanding that is more likely to be transferable. Selected studies

  15. Efficacy of primary care in a nursing center.

    PubMed

    Helvie, C O

    1999-01-01

    Nursing opportunities have expanded beyond the traditional bedside role. Nurses serve in a variety of roles such as administrators, teachers, or primary care givers in a variety of settings. The role of primary care giver is a more recent role; it involves relatively independent nursing practice with clients who have acute or chronic illnesses. Client groups may include the elderly in high rise buildings, mothers and children at schools, or homeless and low-income populations at homeless shelters. This care is often provided in a nursing center. Nursing centers are nurse-managed centers in which nurses are accountable and responsible for care of clients; they are the primary provider of care and the one most seen by clients. Case managers may be in a position to refer patients to nursing centers or to work directly with nurse practitioners in nursing centers. However, questions about the primary care provided in nursing centers must be addressed for healthcare providers, insurance companies, and patients to be confident in the efficacy of this delivery system. Is the primary care comprehensive? Is it of high quality? Is it cost effective? Is it satisfactory to clients? These and other questions about the primary care provided in nursing centers must be answered to effect political and other changes needed to fulfill the role of nursing centers envisioned by early leaders of the movement. This article addresses questions related to the efficacy of primary care provided in nursing centers by family nurse practitioners. After defining efficacy, the discussion focuses on the components identified and studied in one nursing center and includes information on opportunities for case managers to utilize nursing centers for referral and appropriate follow-up of their patients.

  16. A literature review: polypharmacy protocol for primary care.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to critically evaluate published protocols on polypharmacy in adults ages 65 and older that are currently used in primary care settings that may potentially lead to fewer adverse drug events. A review of OVID, CINAHL, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, Medline, and PubMed databases was completed using the following key words: protocol, guideline, geriatrics, elderly, older adult, polypharmacy, and primary care. Inclusion criteria were: articles in medical, nursing, and pharmacology journals with an intervention, protocol, or guideline addressing polypharmacy that lead to fewer adverse drug events. Qualitative and quantitative studies were included. Exclusion criteria were: publications prior to the year 1992. A gap exists in the literature. No standardized protocol for addressing polypharmacy in the primary care setting was found. Mnemonics, algorithms, clinical practice guidelines, and clinical strategies for addressing polypharmacy in a variety of health care settings were found throughout the literature. Several screening instruments for use in primary care to assess potentially inappropriate prescription of medications in the elderly, such as the Beers Criteria and the STOPP screening tool, were identified. However, these screening instruments were not included in a standardized protocol to manage polypharmacy in primary care. Polypharmacy in the elderly is a critical problem that may result in adverse drug events such as falls, hospitalizations, and increased expenditures for both the patient and the health care system. No standardized protocols to address polypharmacy specific to the primary care setting were identified in this review of the literature. Given the growing population of elderly in this country and the high number of medications they consume, it is critical to focus on the utilization of a standardized protocol to address the potential harm of polypharmacy in the primary care setting and evaluate its effects on

  17. Promoting Physical Activity in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Joel; Lindsay, Elizabeth A.; Wilson, Douglas M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The principle barriers preventing health care professionals from promoting physical activity include an incomplete understanding of the evidence linking physical activity and health, difficulty in translating research findings into a feasible and efficacious clinical intervention, resistance to adopting a preventive orientation, and concerns about the risks of physical activity. Low level activities likely provide benefit with little risk. PMID:21229089

  18. Primary Care Clinician Expectations Regarding Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Melinda M.; Bond, Lynne A.; Howard, Alan; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Expectations regarding aging (ERA) in community-dwelling older adults are associated with personal health behaviors and health resource usage. Clinicians' age expectations likely influence patients' expectations and care delivery patterns; yet, limited research has explored clinicians' age expectations. The Expectations Regarding Aging…

  19. Primary care management of depression in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Judy

    2016-06-19

    Depression is the most common mental health disorder in children and adolescents, and primary care is often the first point of contact for children and adolescents with depression. Depression impacts all areas of life, impairing academics and interactions with family and friends. The purpose of this article is to help NPs identify and treat children and adolescents presenting with depression in the primary care setting. PMID:27214067

  20. Developmental paediatrics in primary care: what should we teach?

    PubMed Central

    Baird, G; Hall, D M

    1985-01-01

    There is little agreement about what constitutes good developmental paediatric practice at the level of primary care. Many of the available screening tests are intrinsically unsatisfactory or badly performed, but screening is only a small part of developmental paediatrics. Every primary care doctor should be familiar with the scientific basis of the subject even if a decision is made not to embark on a formal screening programme. PMID:2412629