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Sample records for access primary care

  1. Accessing primary care: a simulated patient study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, John L; Carter, Mary; Davey, Antoinette; Roberts, Martin J; Elliott, Marc N; Roland, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulated patient, or so-called ‘mystery-shopper’, studies are a controversial, but potentially useful, approach to take when conducting health services research. Aim To investigate the construct validity of survey questions relating to access to primary care included in the English GP Patient Survey. Design and setting Observational study in 41 general practices in rural, urban, and inner-city settings in the UK. Method Between May 2010 and March 2011, researchers telephoned practices at monthly intervals, simulating patients requesting routine, but prompt, appointments. Seven measures of access and appointment availability, measured from the mystery-shopper contacts, were related to seven measures of practice performance from the GP Patient Survey. Results Practices with lower access scores in the GP Patient Survey had poorer access and appointment availability for five out of seven items measured directly, when compared with practices that had higher scores. Scores on items from the national survey that related to appointment availability were significantly associated with direct measures of appointment availability. Patient-satisfaction levels and the likelihood that patients would recommend their practice were related to the availability of appointments. Patients’ reports of ease of telephone access in the national survey were unrelated to three out of four measures of practice call handling, but were related to the time taken to resolve an appointment request, suggesting responders’ possible confusion in answering this question. Conclusion Items relating to the accessibility of care in a the English GP patient survey have construct validity. Patients’ satisfaction with their practice is not related to practice call handling, but is related to appointment availability. PMID:23561783

  2. Racial Disparities In Geographic Access To Primary Care In Philadelphia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Elizabeth J; Polsky, Daniel; Barbu, Corentin M; Seymour, Jane W; Grande, David

    2016-08-01

    Primary care is often thought of as the gateway to improved health outcomes and can lead to more efficient use of health care resources. Because of primary care's cardinal importance, adequate access is an important health policy priority. In densely populated urban areas, spatial access to primary care providers across neighborhoods is poorly understood. We examined spatial variation in primary care access in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We calculated ratios of adults per primary care provider for each census tract and included buffer zones based on prespecified drive times around each tract. We found that the average ratio was 1,073; the supply of primary care providers varied widely across census tracts, ranging from 105 to 10,321. We identified six areas of Philadelphia that have much lower spatial accessibility to primary care relative to the rest of the city. After adjustment for sociodemographic and insurance characteristics, the odds of being in a low-access area were twenty-eight times greater for census tracts with a high proportion of African Americans than in tracts with a low proportion of African Americans. PMID:27503960

  3. StreetHealth - improving access to primary care.

    PubMed

    Hookey, Susan J

    2012-01-01

    Homeless, marginalised and other disadvantaged groups may be reluctant to access mainstream health services. StreetHealth, a mobile street-based after hours primary healthcare service, was developed to address the primary health care needs of disadvantaged groups in the western Melbourne region of Victoria. This article describes StreetHealth and reflects on strategies to improve access to primary care services in this population. Mainstream general practices may like to consider and adapt some of these strategies to better meet the needs of similar patients in their community. PMID:22276289

  4. Physical access to primary health care in Andean Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Perry, B; Gesler, W

    2000-05-01

    Limited physical access to primary health care is a major factor contributing to the poor health of populations in developing countries, particularly in mountain areas with rugged topography, harsh climates and extensive socioeconomic barriers. Assessing physical access to primary health care is an important exercise for health care planners and policy makers. The development of geographic information system (GIS) technology has greatly improved this assessment process in industrialized countries where digital cartographic data are widely available. In developing countries particularly in mountain areas, however, detailed cartographic data, even in hardcopy form, are nonexistent, inaccurate or severely lacking. This paper uses GIS technology to assess physical access to primary health care in a remote and impoverished region of Andean Bolivia. In addition, it proposes an alternative model of health personnel distribution to maximize physical accessibility. Methods involved extensive fieldwork in the region, utilizing GPS (global positioning system) technology in the development of the GIS and gathering other pertinent health data for the study. Satellite imagery also contributed to the development of the GIS and in the modeling process. The results indicate significant variation in physical access to primary health care across the three study sites. More importantly, this paper highlights the use of GIS technology as a powerful tool in improving physical accessibility in mountain areas of developing countries. PMID:10728839

  5. Advanced access: reducing waiting and delays in primary care.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mark; Berwick, Donald M

    2003-02-26

    Delay of care is a persistent and undesirable feature of current health care systems. Although delay seems to be inevitable and linked to resource limitations, it often is neither. Rather, it is usually the result of unplanned, irrational scheduling and resource allocation. Application of queuing theory and principles of industrial engineering, adapted appropriately to clinical settings, can reduce delay substantially, even in small practices, without requiring additional resources. One model, sometimes referred to as advanced access, has increasingly been shown to reduce waiting times in primary care. The core principle of advanced access is that patients calling to schedule a physician visit are offered an appointment the same day. Advanced access is not sustainable if patient demand for appointments is permanently greater than physician capacity to offer appointments. Six elements of advanced access are important in its application balancing supply and demand, reducing backlog, reducing the variety of appointment types, developing contingency plans for unusual circumstances, working to adjust demand profiles, and increasing the availability of bottleneck resources. Although these principles are powerful, they are counter to deeply held beliefs and established practices in health care organizations. Adopting these principles requires strong leadership investment and support. PMID:12597760

  6. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care. PMID:27232685

  7. Role of Primary Health Care in Ensuring Access to Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Sambala, Evanson Z; Sapsed, Susan; Mkandawire, Mercy L

    2010-01-01

    To examine ways of ensuring access to health services within the framework of primary health care (PHC), since the goal of PHC to make universal health care available to all people has become increasingly neglected amid emerging themes of globalization, trade, and foreign policy. From a public health point of view, we argue that the premise of PHC can unlock barriers to health care services and contribute greatly to determining collective health through the promotion of universal basic health services. PHC has the most sophisticated and organized infrastructure, theories, and political principles, with which it can deal adequately with the issues of inequity, inequality, and social injustice which emerge from negative economic externalities and neo-liberal economic policies. Addressing these issues, especially the complex social and political influences that restrict access to medicines, may require the integration of different health initiatives into PHC. Based on current systems, PHC remains the only conventional health delivery service that can deal with resilient public health problems adequately. However, to strengthen its ability to do so, we propose the revitalization of PHC to incorporate scholarship that promotes human rights, partnerships, research and development, advocacy, and national drug policies. The concept of PHC can improve access; however, this will require the urgent interplay among theoretical, practical, political, and sociological influences arising from the economic, social, and political determinants of ill health in an era of globalization. PMID:20564760

  8. Hypertensive patients in primary health care: access, connection and care involved in spontaneous demands.

    PubMed

    Girão, Ana Lívia Araújo; Freitas, Consuelo Helena Aires de

    2016-06-01

    Objective To assess the impacts of inclusion of care for spontaneous demands in the treatment of hypertensive patients in primary health care. Methods Third generation qualitative assessment survey conducted with 16 workers in a Primary Care Health Unit (PHCU) of the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceara, in the period between July and September of 2015. To collect data, systematic field observation and semi-structured interviews were used, and the stages of thematic content analysis were adopted for data analysis. Results Participants revealed that access, connection and care are fundamental to the treatment of hypertension. However, they said that the introduction of free access for spontaneous demands compromised the flow of care in the hypertension programs. Conclusion A dichotomy between the practice of care recommended by health policies and the one existing in the reality of PHCUs was shown, causing evident losses to the care of hypertensive patients in primary care. PMID:27253602

  9. Primary care access improvement: an empowerment-interaction model.

    PubMed

    Ledlow, G R; Bradshaw, D M; Shockley, C

    2000-05-01

    Improving community primary care access is a difficult and dynamic undertaking. Realizing a need to improve appointment availability, a systematic approach based on measurement, empowerment, and interaction was developed. The model fostered exchange of information and problem solving between interdependent staff sections within a managed care system. Measuring appointments demanded but not available proved to be a credible customer-focused approach to benchmark against set goals. Changing the organizational culture to become more sensitive to changing beneficiary needs was a paramount consideration. Dependent-group t tests were performed to compare the pretreatment and posttreatment effect. The empowerment-interaction model significantly improved the availability of routine and wellness-type appointments. The availability of urgent appointments improved but not significantly; a better prospective model needs to be developed. In aggregate, appointments demanded but not available (empowerment-interaction model) were more than 10% before the treatment and less than 3% with the treatment. PMID:10826388

  10. Access to Health Care for Hispanic Women: A Primary Health Care Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juarbe, Teresa C.

    1995-01-01

    Describes and analyzes from a primary health care perspective how sociopolitical and cultural issues are key factors that influence the health of Hispanic women and their ability to access health care. Looks at the implications for nursing practice, theory, and research and advocates social and political changes needed to improve the situation.…

  11. Primary care for urban adolescent girls from ethnically diverse populations: foregone care and access to confidential care.

    PubMed

    McKee, Diane; Fletcher, Jason

    2006-11-01

    Adolescent girls face unique challenges in health care utilization, which can result in unmet needs. We sought to describe settings of usual care and primary care use, and to identify predictors of foregone care and experience of confidential care in a primarily racial/ethnic minority low-income sample. We conducted an anonymous computer-assisted self-administered survey of 9th-12th grade girls (n=819) in three Bronx public high schools, the majority of whom were Hispanic (69.8%) and Black (21.4%). Most (80%) reported having a usual source of care. Of these, 77.2% had a regular doctor. Those least likely to have a usual source of care were non-U.S. born girls (73.1% vs. 83.1%) and less acculturated girls. Predictors of foregone care in the last year include being sexually active, poor family social support, and low self esteem. Predictors of access to confidential care at last visit were age, self-efficacy for confidential care, having a regular doctor, setting of care, and having had a recent physical exam. Many urban adolescent girls, especially non-U.S. born girls, lack a usual source of care and regular health care provider. Continued attention to reducing both financial and non-financial barriers to care is required to ensure access to and quality of care for diverse populations. PMID:17242529

  12. Not Near Enough: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Access to Nearby Behavioral Health Care and Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    VanderWielen, Lynn M.; Gilchrist, Emma C.; Nowels, Molly A.; Petterson, Stephen M.; Rust, George; Miller, Benjamin F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Racial, ethnic, and geographical health disparities have been widely documented in the United States. However, little attention has been directed towards disparities associated with integrated behavioral health and primary care services. Methods Access to behavioral health professionals among primary care physicians was examined using multinomial logistic regression analyses with 2010 National Plan and Provider Enumeration System, American Medical Association Physician Masterfile, and American Community Survey data. Results Primary care providers practicing in neighborhoods with higher percentages of African Americans and Hispanics were less likely to have geographically proximate behavioral health professionals. Primary care providers in rural areas were less likely to have geographically proximate behavioral health professionals. Conclusion Neighborhood-level factors are associated with access to nearby behavioral health and primary care. Additional behavioral health professionals are needed in racial/ ethnic minority neighborhoods and rural areas to provide access to behavioral health services, and to progress toward more integrated primary care. PMID:26320931

  13. Interventions to Improve Access to Primary Care for People Who Are Homeless: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background People who are homeless encounter barriers to primary care despite having greater needs for health care, on average, than people who are not homeless. We evaluated the effectiveness of interventions to improve access to primary care for people who are homeless. Methods We performed a systematic review to identify studies in English published between January 1, 1995, and July 8, 2015, comparing interventions to improve access to a primary care provider with usual care among people who are homeless. The outcome of interest was access to a primary care provider. The risk of bias in the studies was evaluated, and the quality of the evidence was assessed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. Results From a total of 4,047 citations, we identified five eligible studies (one randomized controlled trial and four observational studies). With the exception of the randomized trial, the risk of bias was considered high in the remaining studies. In the randomized trial, people who were homeless, without serious mental illness, and who received either an outreach intervention plus clinic orientation or clinic orientation alone, had improved access to a primary care provider compared with those receiving usual care. An observational study that compared integration of primary care and other services for people who are homeless with usual care did not observe any difference in access to a primary care provider between the two groups. A small observational study showed improvement among participants with a primary care provider after receiving an intervention consisting of housing and supportive services compared with the period before the intervention. The quality of the evidence was considered moderate for both the outreach plus clinic orientation and clinic orientation alone, and low to very low for the other interventions. Despite limitations, the literature identified reports of

  14. Enhancing primary care for persons with spinal cord injury: More than improving physical accessibility.

    PubMed

    Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    In Ontario, Canada, legislation exists that mandates that all medical practices be fully accessible by 2025, in an effort to improve access to primary care for persons with physical disabilities. The simple removal of physical barriers may not guarantee improved access to appropriate care. In this clinical note, members of an interprofessional primary care-based Mobility Clinic reflect on opportunities to improve primary care beyond just better physical accessibility for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). The importance of collaborations between funders, researchers, and clinicians are examined. Using a participatory action research model, the unique perspective of consumers and consumer networks are incorporated into the Mobility Clinic's clinical and research efforts to improve primary care for persons with SCI. PMID:26111044

  15. Evaluation of Access, a Primary Care Program for Indigent Patients: Inpatient and Emergency Room Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Richard A.; Giancola, Angela; Gast, Andrea; Ho, Janice; Waddell, Rhondda

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated the impact of Accessing Community Care through Eastside Social Services (ACCESS), a program that provided indigent patients with free primary care, on inpatient admissions, emergency room (ER) visits, and subsequent charges. Data on 19 people before and after program enrollment showed significant decreases in ER visits following…

  16. The space of access to primary mental health care: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Kovandžić, Marija; Funnell, Emma; Hammond, Jonathan; Ahmed, Abdi; Edwards, Suzanne; Clarke, Pam; Hibbert, Derek; Bristow, Katie; Dowrick, Christopher

    2012-05-01

    Guided by theoretical perspectives of relational social science, this paper draws on reanalyses of multiple qualitative datasets related to a multi-ethnic, economically disadvantaged area in Liverpool, UK, with the aim to advance general understanding of access to primary mental health care while using local Somali minority as an instrumental focus. The findings generate a novel concept: the space of access. The shape and dynamics of the space of access are determined by at least four fields of tensions: understandings of area and community; cognitive mapping of mental well-being, illness and care; positioning of primary care services; and dynamics of resources beyond the 'medical zone' of care. The conclusions indicate a need for de-centring and re-connecting the role of medical professionals within primary care which itself needs to be transformed by endorsement of multiple avenues of access to diverse support and intrepid communication among all involved actors. PMID:22386985

  17. Do new and traditional models of primary care differ with regard to access?

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; Easley, Julie; Thompson, Ashley E.; Boivin, Antoine; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Katz, Alan; Hogg, William E.; Breton, Mylaine; Francoeur, Danièle; Wong, Sabrina T.; Wodchis, Walter P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine access to primary care in new and traditional models using 2 dimensions of the concept of patient-centred access. Design An international survey examining the quality and costs of primary health care (the QUALICOPC study) was conducted in 2013 in Canada. This study adopted a descriptive cross-sectional survey method using data from practices across Canada. Each participating practice filled out the Family Physician Survey and the Practice Survey, and patients in each participating practice were asked to complete the Patient Experiences Survey. Setting All 10 Canadian provinces. Participants A total of 759 practices and 7172 patients. Main outcome measures Independent t tests were conducted to examine differences between new and traditional models of care in terms of availability and accommodation, and affordability of care. Results Of the 759 practices, 407 were identified as having new models of care and 352 were identified as traditional. New models of care were distinct with respect to payment structure, opening hours, and having an interdisciplinary work force. Most participating practices were from large cities or suburban areas. There were few differences between new and traditional models of care regarding accessibility and accommodation in primary care. Patients under new models of care reported easier access to other physicians in the same practice, while patients from traditional models reported seeing their regular family physicians more frequently. There was no difference between the new and traditional models of care with regard to affordability of primary care. Patients attending clinics with new models of care reported that their physicians were more involved with them as a whole person than patients attending clinics based on traditional models did. Conclusion Primary care access issues do not differ strongly between traditional and new models of care; however, patients in the new models of care believed that their

  18. Why do we observe a limited impact of primary care access measures on clinical quality indicators?

    PubMed

    Chung, Sukyung; Panattoni, Laura; Hung, Dorothy; Johns, Nicole; Trujillo, Laurel; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the effects of enhanced primary care access and continuity on clinical quality in a large, multipayer, multispecialty ambulatory care organization with fee-for-service provider incentives. The difference-in-differences estimates indicate that access to own primary care physician is a statistically significant predictor of improved clinical quality, although the effect size is small such that clinical significance may be negligible. Reduced time for own primary care physician appointment and increased enrollment in electronic personal health record are positive predictors of chronic disease management processes and preventive screening but are inconsistently associated with clinical outcomes. Challenges in identifying relationships between access and quality outcomes in a real-world setting are also discussed. PMID:24594563

  19. HIV multidisciplinary teams work: support services improve access to and retention in HIV primary care.

    PubMed

    Sherer, R; Stieglitz, K; Narra, J; Jasek, J; Green, L; Moore, B; Shott, S; Cohen, M

    2002-08-01

    The multidisciplinary team model of HIV care evolved out of necessity due to the diverse characteristics and needs of people living with HIV disease. Though it is now accepted as the international standard of care, it represents a significant departure from methods of care for other infectious diseases, and debate continues regarding the effectiveness of its interventions. The debate has been largely uninformed by data; for example, little is known about the relationship between ancillary support services and primary care outcomes. We hypothesized that support services increase access to and retention in HIV primary care in an inner city public hospital clinic. We conducted a retrospective analysis of clinical data sets on 2,647 patients at the CORE Center, Chicago from 1997-1998 to investigate the relationship between four support services-case management (CM), transportation (TRANS), mental health (MH) and chemical dependency (CD)-and access to and retention in HIV primary care. We found that patients who received each of these services were significantly more likely to receive any care, regular care and had more visits than patients with no service, and retention increased by 15-18%. Female gender, younger age, self-pay status and IDU predicted less regular care. Need for all services was substantial and significantly greater in women. Outcomes improved to the greatest extent among patients who needed and received each service. We conclude that support services significantly increased access to and retention in HIV primary care. Our findings validate the multidisciplinary team model of HIV care, and suggest that health services that are tailored to the express needs of patients lead to better care and improved health outcomes. Further testing of changes in health care delivery to meet the rapidly changing needs of people living with HIV disease and respond to the constantly changing practice of HIV medicine is urgently needed to maintain and extend the advances

  20. [Access to quality primary care for LGBT people].

    PubMed

    Bize, Raphaël; Volkmar, Erika; Berrut, Sylvie; Medico, Denise; Balthasar, Hugues; Bodenmann, Patrick; Makadon, Harvey J

    2011-09-01

    This article offers a comprehensive approach to the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, where respect for diversity and non judgemental care play a central role. It calls for a health and medical vision that goes beyond HIV risk. For those who never had to question their own sexual orientation or gender identity, it is certainly difficult to understand how the discovery of one's identity trait in childhood or early adolescence can be transformed under social pressure into a burden which often remains invisible but is associated with considerable emotional and medical morbidity. This article raises the following question: How many LGBT patients go unnoticed every week, leaving the physician's office without an opportunity to receive appropriate listening, support and care? PMID:21987880

  1. Potential access to primary health care: what does the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement data show?

    PubMed Central

    Uchôa, Severina Alice da Costa; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Fronteira, Inês Santos Estevinho; Coêlho, Ardigleusa Alves; Martiniano, Claudia Santos; Brandão, Isabel Cristina Araújo; Yamamura, Mellina; Maroto, Renata Melo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the influence of contextual indicators on the performance of municipalities regarding potential access to primary health care in Brazil and to discuss the contribution from nurses working on this access. Method: a multicenter descriptive study based on secondary data from External Evaluation of the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement in Primary Care, with the participation of 17,202 primary care teams. The chi-square test of proportions was used to verify differences between the municipalities stratified based on size of the coverage area, supply, coordination, and integration; when necessary, the chi-square test with Yates correction or Fisher's exact test were employed. For the population variable, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used. Results: the majority of participants were nurses (n=15.876; 92,3%). Statistically significant differences were observed between the municipalities in terms of territory (p=0.0000), availability (p=0.0000), coordination of care (p=0.0000), integration (p=0.0000) and supply (p=0.0000), verifying that the municipalities that make up area 6 tend to have better performance in these dimensions. Conclusion: areas 4,5 and 6 performed better in every analyzed dimension, and the nurse had a leading role in the potential to access primary health care in Brazil. PMID:26959332

  2. The Relationship between Same-Day Access and Continuity in Primary Care and Emergency Department Visits

    PubMed Central

    Cordasco, Kristina M.; Chow, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We examined how emergency department (ED) visits for potentially preventable, mental health, and other diagnoses were related to same-day access and provider continuity in primary care using administrative data from 71,296 patients in 22 VHA clinics over a three-year period. ED visits were categorized as non-emergent; primary care treatable; preventable; not preventable; or mental health-related. We conducted multi-level regression models adjusted for patient and clinic factors. More same-day access significantly predicted fewer non-emergent and primary care treatable ED visits while continuity was not significantly related to any type of ED visit. Neither measure was related to ED visits for mental health problems. PMID:26332981

  3. Food insecure families: description of access and barriers to food from one pediatric primary care center.

    PubMed

    DeMartini, Tori L; Beck, Andrew F; Kahn, Robert S; Klein, Melissa D

    2013-12-01

    Despite evidence that food insecurity negatively impacts child health, health care providers play little role in addressing the issue. To inform potential primary care interventions, we sought to assess a range of challenges faced by food insecure (FI) families coming to an urban, pediatric primary care setting. A cross-sectional study was performed at a hospital-based, urban, academic pediatric primary care clinic that serves as a medical home for approximately 15,000 patients with 35,000 annual visits. Subjects included a convenience sample of caregivers of children presenting for either well child or ill care over a 4 months period in 2012. A self-administered survey assessed household food security status, shopping habits, transportation access, budgeting priorities, and perceptions about nutrition access in one's community. Bivariate analyses between food security status and these characteristics were performed using Chi square statistics or Fisher's exact test. The survey was completed by 199 caregivers. Approximately 33% of families were FI; 93% received food-related governmental assistance. FI families were more likely to obtain food from a corner/convenience store, utilize food banks, require transportation other than a household car, and prioritize paying bills before purchasing food. FI families perceived less access to healthy, affordable foods within their community. Thus, FI families may face unique barriers to accessing food. Knowledge of these barriers could allow clinicians to tailor in-clinic screening and create family-centered interventions. PMID:23852328

  4. MAIN TRENDS IN ACCESS TO PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FOR ADOLESCENTS IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Mirzikashvili, N; Kazakhashvili, N

    2016-03-01

    This study identifies barriers to accessing primary health care among youth in Georgia to inform strategies for improving the appropriateness, quality and usage of primary health care services. The quantitative survey was conducted throughout Georgia among 1000 adolescents 11-19 years of age via interview. Multi stage probability sampling was used to administer questionnaires in the schools, universities and in the streets between March-May 2014 and September-October 2014. Young people in Georgia identified a range of problems in accessing primary health services. By far the most important issues were preventive checkups, geographical access, cost of care, and perceptions about the quality of care. The majority of respondents (78.4%) declared that they do not visit family doctor when well, and 81.9% said that no information was provided about reproductive health issues. Most (77.3%) stated that their family doctor had never talked about health promotion or life style risk factors. Access to health care is still problematic in the villages; and in some areas young people must travel more than 30 minutes by public transport. Limited access in rural areas compared to urban areas was statistically significant (p<0.05). As our survey data shows, most adolescents do not visit a health provider annually, obviating opportunities to integrate prevention into clinical encounters. Because repeated contacts with a primary care provider may occur over several years, clinicians should ideally have multiple opportunities to screen and counsel an adolescent patient for risky health behaviors. However, young people report that there is little screening or discussion about healthy lifestyles. The biggest health challenge for young people in Georgia is overcoming barriers (socioeconomic, geographic, trust, and perceived competence) to visit a doctor for regular preventive checkups and to get health behavior advice from health professional. Addressing the health and development needs

  5. Public housing relocations in Atlanta, Georgia, and declines in spatial access to safety net primary care

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Hannah LF; Wodarski, Stephanie; Cummings, Janet; Hunter-Jones, Josalin; Karnes, Conny; Ross, Zev; Druss, Ben; Bonney, Loida E

    2012-01-01

    This analysis investigates changes in spatial access to safety-net primary care in a sample of US public housing residents relocating via the HOPE VI initiative from public housing complexes to voucher-subsidized rental units; substance misusers were oversampled. We used gravity-based models to measure spatial access to care, and used mixed models to assess pre-/post-relocation changes in access. Half the sample experienced declines in spatial access of ≥79.83%; declines did not vary by substance misuse status. Results suggest that future public housing relocation initiatives should partner with relocaters, particularly those in poor health, to help them find housing near safety-net clinics. PMID:23060002

  6. Public housing relocations in Atlanta, Georgia, and declines in spatial access to safety net primary care.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Hannah L F; Wodarski, Stephanie; Cummings, Janet; Hunter-Jones, Josalin; Karnes, Conny; Ross, Zev; Druss, Ben; Bonney, Loida E

    2012-11-01

    This analysis investigates changes in spatial access to safety-net primary care in a sample of US public housing residents relocating via the HOPE VI initiative from public housing complexes to voucher-subsidized rental units; substance misusers were oversampled. We used gravity-based models to measure spatial access to care, and used mixed models to assess pre-/post-relocation changes in access. Half the sample experienced declines in spatial access of ≥ 79.83%; declines did not vary by substance misuse status. Results suggest that future public housing relocation initiatives should partner with relocaters, particularly those in poor health, to help them find housing near safety-net clinics. PMID:23060002

  7. Toward a strategy of patient-centered access to primary care.

    PubMed

    Berry, Leonard L; Beckham, Dan; Dettman, Amy; Mead, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Patient-centered access (PCA) to primary care services is rapidly becoming an imperative for efficiently delivering high-quality health care to patients. To enhance their PCA-related efforts, some medical practices and health systems have begun to use various tactics, including team-based care, satellite clinics, same-day and group appointments, greater use of physician assistants and nurse practitioners, and remote access to health services. However, few organizations are addressing the PCA imperative comprehensively by integrating these various tactics to develop an overall PCA management strategy. Successful integration means taking into account the changing competitive and reimbursement landscape in primary care, conducting an evidence-based assessment of the barriers and benefits of PCA implementation, and attending to the particular needs of the institution engaged in this important effort. This article provides a blueprint for creating a multifaceted but coordinated PCA strategy-one aimed squarely at making patient access a centerpiece of how health care is delivered. The case of a Wisconsin-based health system is used as an illustrative example of how other institutions might begin to conceive their fledgling PCA strategies without proposing it as a one-size-fits-all model. PMID:25199953

  8. Access to primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas: a realist review

    PubMed Central

    Ford, John A; Wong, Geoff; Jones, Andy P; Steel, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this review is to identify and understand the contexts that effect access to high-quality primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas. Design A realist review. Data sources MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases and grey literature (from inception to December 2014). Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Broad inclusion criteria were used to allow articles which were not specific, but might be relevant to the population of interest to be considered. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were assessed for rigour and relevance and coded for concepts relating to context, mechanism or outcome. Analysis An overarching patient pathway was generated and used as the basis to explore contexts, causal mechanisms and outcomes. Results 162 articles were included. Most were from the USA or the UK, cross-sectional in design and presented subgroup data by age, rurality or deprivation. From these studies, a patient pathway was generated which included 7 steps (problem identified, decision to seek help, actively seek help, obtain appointment, get to appointment, primary care interaction and outcome). Important contexts were stoicism, education status, expectations of ageing, financial resources, understanding the healthcare system, access to suitable transport, capacity within practice, the booking system and experience of healthcare. Prominent causal mechanisms were health literacy, perceived convenience, patient empowerment and responsiveness of the practice. Conclusions Socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas face personal, community and healthcare barriers that limit their access to primary care. Initiatives should be targeted at local contextual factors to help individuals recognise problems, feel welcome, navigate the healthcare system, book appointments easily, access appropriate transport and have sufficient time with professional staff to improve their experience of healthcare; all of which

  9. Primary health-care nurses and Internet health information-seeking: Access, barriers and quality checks.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Jean; Strong, Alison; Chan, Helen; Hanna, Sue; Huntington, Annette

    2016-02-01

    Online information is a critical resource for evidence-based practice and patient education. This study aimed to establish New Zealand nurses' access and evaluation of online health information in the primary care context using a postal questionnaire survey; there were 630 respondents from a random sample of 931 nurses. The majority of respondents were satisfied with work access to online information (84.5%, n = 501) and searched for online information at least several times a week (57.5%, n = 343). The major barrier to online information seeking was insufficient time, but 68 respondents had no work online information access. The level of nursing qualification was significantly correlated with computer confidence and information quality checking. A range of information evaluation approaches was used. Most nurses in study accessed and evaluated Internet information in contrast to the findings of earlier studies, but there were barriers preventing universal integration into practice. PMID:25355072

  10. Nurse managed center: access to primary health care for urban Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Neff, Donna Felber; Kinion, Elizabeth S; Cardina, Christen

    2007-01-01

    Urban Native Americans represent a small, diverse minority with unique health needs. The purposes of this descriptive retrospective study were to describe (a) the characteristics and primary health problems of urban Native Americans who receive primary health care at an urban nurse managed center (NMC) and (b) the nursing interventions provided at an urban NMC to urban Native Americans. A sample of 334 participants patient data were abstracted from a computerized clinical data set and coded based on the Omaha Classification System. The majority were over 40 years of age, were female, were single, completed high school, and were poor and uninsured, and many were unemployed. The most frequent health problems were related to pain, cardiovascular symptoms, dentition problems, and respiratory illnesses. The most frequent nursing interventions were for surveillance of physical signs and symptoms. The NMC was an accessible source of primary health care for urban Native Americans in northeastern Ohio. PMID:17266403

  11. The family-school-primary care triangle and the access to mental health care among migrant and ethnic minorities.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marta; Moleiro, Carla

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the concepts of mental health and help seeking behaviours of migrant and ethnic minority families constitutes an important step toward improving the intercultural competence of health and education professionals. This paper addresses these goals among ethnic and migrant minorities in Portugal. For this a multi-informant approach was selected. The study involved nine focus groups (N = 39) conducted with different samples: young immigrants (12-17 years), immigrant parents, teachers and health professionals. The results showed similarities and differences in concepts of mental health, as well as help seeking processes. Stigma continued to be recognized as a barrier in the access to mental health care. The paper argues that providing adequate training on mental health on cultural diversity competencies to health and education professionals can contribute to a better inter-communication and -relation system in the family-school-primary care triangle and thus facilitate access to mental health care for youth. PMID:21947737

  12. Multi-modal two-step floating catchment area analysis of primary health care accessibility.

    PubMed

    Langford, Mitchel; Higgs, Gary; Fry, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) techniques are popular for measuring potential geographical accessibility to health care services. This paper proposes methodological enhancements to increase the sophistication of the 2SFCA methodology by incorporating both public and private transport modes using dedicated network datasets. The proposed model yields separate accessibility scores for each modal group at each demand point to better reflect the differential accessibility levels experienced by each cohort. An empirical study of primary health care facilities in South Wales, UK, is used to illustrate the approach. Outcomes suggest the bus-riding cohort of each census tract experience much lower accessibility levels than those estimated by an undifferentiated (car-only) model. Car drivers' accessibility may also be misrepresented in an undifferentiated model because they potentially profit from the lower demand placed upon service provision points by bus riders. The ability to specify independent catchment sizes for each cohort in the multi-modal model allows aspects of preparedness to travel to be investigated. PMID:26798964

  13. The impact of case mix on timely access to appointments in a primary care group practice.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Asli; Balasubramanian, Hari

    2013-06-01

    At the heart of the practice of primary care is the concept of a physician panel. A panel refers to the set of patients for whose long term, holistic care the physician is responsible. A physician's appointment burden is determined by the size and composition of the panel. Size refers to the number of patients in the panel while composition refers to the case-mix, or the type of patients (older versus younger, healthy versus chronic patients), in the panel. In this paper, we quantify the impact of the size and case-mix on the ability of a multi-provider practice to provide adequate access to its empanelled patients. We use overflow frequency, or the probability that the demand exceeds the capacity, as a measure of access. We formulate problem of minimizing the maximum overflow for a multi-physician practice as a non-linear integer programming problem and establish structural insights that enable us to create simple yet near optimal heuristic strategies to change panels. This optimization framework helps a practice: (1) quantify the imbalances across physicians due to the variation in case mix and panel size, and the resulting effect on access; and (2) determine how panels can be altered in the least disruptive way to improve access. We illustrate our methodology using four test practices created using patient level data from the primary care practice at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. An important advantage of our approach is that it can be implemented in an Excel Spreadsheet and used for aggregate level planning and panel management decisions. PMID:23076360

  14. Primary health care accessibility challenges in remote indigenous communities in Canada's North

    PubMed Central

    Oosterveer, Tim Michiel; Kue Young, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite many improvements, health disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous populations in Canada's North persist. While a strong primary health care (PHC) system improves the health of a population, the majority of indigenous communities are very remote, and their access to PHC services is likely reduced. Understanding the challenges in accessing PHC services in these communities is necessary to improve the health of the population. Objective The objective of the study was to document and analyze the challenges in accessing PHC services by indigenous people in remote communities in Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT) from the perspectives of users and providers of PHC services. Methods Using explorative, qualitative methods, our study involved 14 semi-structured interviews with PHC service providers (SPs) and service users (SUs) in 5 communities across the NWT which varied according to population, remoteness, ethnic composition and health care resources. The interview guide was developed after key informant consultations. Results Both SPs and SUs understood the constraints in providing equitable access to PHC services in remote communities. The provision of emergency care was found to be particularly challenging, because of the lack of qualified staff in the community and the dependence on aeromedical evacuations. Wider dissemination of first aid skills among community members was seen to cover some gaps and also increase self-confidence. For non-emergency care, the need to travel outside the community was generally disliked. All recognized the need for more preventive services which were often postponed or delayed because of the overwhelming demand for acute care. As long as services were provided in a community, the satisfaction was high among SUs. SPs appreciated the orientation they received and the ability to build rapport with the community. Conclusions Northern SUs and SPs generally acknowledge the health consequences of living in remote

  15. The effect of socioeconomic status on access to primary care: an audit study

    PubMed Central

    Olah, Michelle E.; Gaisano, Gregory; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    socioeconomic status received preferential access to primary care over those presenting themselves as having low socioeconomic status. PMID:23439620

  16. Elements of the patient-centered medical home associated with health outcomes among veterans: the role of primary care continuity, expanded access, and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Karin; Sun, Haili; Dolan, Emily; Maynard, Charles; Beste, Laruen; Bryson, Christopher; Schectman, Gordon; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-01-01

    Care continuity, access, and coordination are important features of the patient-centered medical home model and have been emphasized in the Veterans Health Administration patient-centered medical home implementation, called the Patient Aligned Care Team. Data from more than 4.3 million Veterans were used to assess the relationship between these attributes of Patient Aligned Care Team and Veterans Health Administration hospitalization and mortality. Controlling for demographics and comorbidity, we found that continuity with a primary care provider was associated with a lower likelihood of hospitalization and mortality among a large population of Veterans receiving VA primary care. PMID:25180648

  17. A Cost-Effective Model for Increasing Access to Mental Health Care at the Primary Care Level in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omigbodun, Olayinka O.

    2001-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Although effective treatment modalities for mental health problems currently exist in Nigeria, they remain irrelevant to the 70% of Nigeria's 120 million people who have no access to modern mental health care services. The nation's Health Ministry has adopted mental health as the 9th component of Primary Health Care (PHC) but ten years later, very little has been done to put this policy into practice. Mental Health is part of the training curriculum of PHC workers, but this appears to be money down the drain. AIMS OF THE STUDY: To review the weaknesses and problems with existing mode of mental health training for PHC workers with a view to developing a cost-effective model for integration. METHODS: A review and analysis of current training methods and their impact on the provision of mental health services in PHC in a rural and an urban local government area in Nigeria were done. An analysis of tested approaches for integrating mental health into PHC was carried out and a cost-effective model for the Nigerian situation based on these approaches and the local circumstances was derived. RESULTS: Virtually no mental health services are being provided at the PHC levels in the two local government areas studied. Current training is not effective and virtually none of what was learnt appears to be used by PHC workers in the field. Two models for integrating mental health into PHC emerged from the literature. Enhancement, which refers to the training of PHC personnel to carry out mental health care independently is not effective on its own and needs to be accompanied by supervision of PHC staff. Linkage, which occurs when mental health professionals leave their hospital bases to provide mental health care in PHC settings, requires a large number of skilled staff who are unavailable in Nigeria. In view of past experiences in Nigeria and other countries, a mixed enhancement-linkage model for mental health in PHC appears to be the most cost-effective approach for

  18. Greater access to information on how to prevent oral cancer among elderly using primary health care.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; dos Santos-Neto, Pedro Eleutério; de Sá, Maria Aparecida Barbosa; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Haikal, Desireé Sant'Ana; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigenia; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Educative actions are an important component of health promotion in Brazil's primary healthcare program, the Family Health Strategy (FHS). The efficacy of these actions is evidenced by compliance with healthy behaviors and in the reduction of rates of mortality and morbidity. The objective of this study was to identify whether access to information regarding the prevention of oral cancer is greater among elders whose residences are registered with the FHS. SPSS® was utilized to obtain estimates that were corrected for sample design, considering the magnitude of the associations between access to such information with personal determinants, the use and cost of healthcare, health-related behaviors and health outcomes. 58.9% of the 492 participating elders reported having access to such information. We verified that there was a greater chance for access among residents of houses registered by the FHS; those with greater per capita income (2.01/1.183.43); non-smokers (2.00/1.16-3.46); those that realized oral self-examination (6.35/3.46-11.64); and those that did not perceive discomfort in the mouth, head or neck (2.06/1.02-4.17). Access was greater among residents of homes registered by the FHS. Personal determinants of health, health-related behaviors and health outcomes are influenced or influence access to information regarding the prevention and management of oral diseases. PMID:26132263

  19. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. PMID:26304179

  20. Patients’ online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic review in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Ellis, Beverley

    2015-01-01

    Background Online access to medical records by patients can potentially enhance provision of patient-centred care and improve satisfaction. However, online access and services may also prove to be an additional burden for the healthcare provider. Aim To assess the impact of providing patients with access to their general practice electronic health records (EHR) and other EHR-linked online services on the provision, quality, and safety of health care. Design and setting A systematic review was conducted that focused on all studies about online record access and transactional services in primary care. Method Data sources included MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EPOC, DARE, King’s Fund, Nuffield Health, PsycINFO, OpenGrey (1999–2012). The literature was independently screened against detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria; independent dual data extraction was conducted, the risk of bias (RoB) assessed, and a narrative synthesis of the evidence conducted. Results A total of 176 studies were identified, 17 of which were randomised controlled trials, cohort, or cluster studies. Patients reported improved satisfaction with online access and services compared with standard provision, improved self-care, and better communication and engagement with clinicians. Safety improvements were patient-led through identifying medication errors and facilitating more use of preventive services. Provision of online record access and services resulted in a moderate increase of e-mail, no change on telephone contact, but there were variable effects on face-to-face contact. However, other tasks were necessary to sustain these services, which impacted on clinician time. There were no reports of harm or breaches in privacy. Conclusion While the RoB scores suggest many of the studies were of low quality, patients using online services reported increased convenience and satisfaction. These services positively impacted on patient safety, although there were variations of

  1. [Primary care in Sweden].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-09-01

    Sweden was one of the first European Union countries that saw the opportunity in the free movement of professionals. First offers for jobs were managed in 2000. Since then, a large number of professionals have taken the opportunity of a decent job and have moved from Spain to Sweden. The Swedish health care model belongs to the group of national health systems. The right to health care is linked to legal citizenship. Health is financed through regional taxes, but there is a compulsory co-payment regardless of the financial situation of the patient. The provision of health care is decentralised at a regional level, and there is a mixture of private and public medical centres. Primary care is similar to that in Spain. Health professionals work as a team with a division of tasks. Like in Spain, waiting lists and coordination between primary and specialised care are a great problem. Patients may register with any public or private primary care centre and hospital provider within their region. Access to diagnostic tests and specialists are restricted to those selected by specialists. Doctors are salaried and their job and salary depend on their experience, professional abilities and regional needs. Medicine is curative. General practitioners are the gateway to the system, but they do not act as gatekeeper. Hospitals offer a number of training post, and the access is through an interview. Continuing medical education is encouraged and financed by the health centre in order to increase its revenues. PMID:26613624

  2. Integrated primary care improves access to healthcare for newly arrived refugees in Canada.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Josephine; Breward, Katherine; Breward, Michael; Alder, Rob; Arya, Neil

    2014-08-01

    In this study we quantify the impact of a partnership between a dedicated health clinic for government assisted refugees (GARs), a local reception centre and community providers, on wait times and referrals. This study used a before and after, repeated survey study design to analyze archived administrative data. Using various statistical techniques, outcomes for refugees arriving 18 months prior to the introduction of the clinic were compared with those of refugees arriving in the 18 months after the clinic was established. Our investigation revealed wait times to see a health care provider decreased by 30 % with the introduction of a dedicated refugee health clinic. The likelihood of GARs being referred to physician specialists decreased by 45 %, but those referred were more likely to require multiple referrals due to increasingly complex medical needs. Referrals to non-physician specialist health care providers nearly doubled following the availability of the clinic. The time-limited, but intense health needs of GARs, require an integrated community-based primary healthcare intervention that includes dedicated health system navigators to support timely, more culturally appropriate care and successful integration. PMID:24293090

  3. The place of receptionists in access to primary care: Challenges in the space between community and consultation.

    PubMed

    Neuwelt, Pat M; Kearns, Robin A; Browne, Annette J

    2015-05-01

    At the point of entry to the health care system sit general practice receptionists (GPRs), a seldom studied employment group. The place of the receptionist involves both a location within the internal geography of the clinic and a position within the primary care team. Receptionists literally 'receive' those who phone or enter the clinic, and are a critical influence in their transformation from a 'person' to a 'patient'. This process occurs in a particular space: the 'waiting room'. We explore the waiting room and its dynamics in terms of 'acceptability', an under-examined aspect of access to primary care. We ask 'How do GPRs see their role with regard to patients with complex health and social needs, in light of the spatio-temporal constraints of their working environments?' We engaged receptionists as participants to explore perceptions of their roles and their workspaces, deriving narrative data from three focus groups involving 14 GPRs from 11 practices in the Northland region of New Zealand. The study employed an adapted form of grounded theory. Our findings indicate that GPRs are on the edge of the practice team, yet carry a complex role at the frontline, in the waiting space. They are de facto managers of this space; however, they have limited agency within general practice settings, due to the constraints imposed upon them by physical and organisational structures. The agency of GPRs is most evident in their ability to shape the social dynamics of the waiting space, and to frame the health care experience as positive for people whose usual experience is marginalisation. We conclude that, if well supported, receptionists have the potential to positively influence health care acceptability, and patients' access to care. PMID:25455478

  4. Most primary care physicians are aware of prescription drug monitoring programs, but many find the data difficult to access.

    PubMed

    Rutkow, Lainie; Turner, Lydia; Lucas, Eleanor; Hwang, Catherine; Alexander, G Caleb

    2015-03-01

    State prescription drug monitoring programs are common tools intended to reduce prescription drug abuse and diversion, or the nonmedical use of a prescribed drug. The success of these programs depends largely upon physicians' awareness and use of them. We conducted a nationally representative mail survey of 1,000 practicing primary care physicians in 2014 to characterize their attitudes toward and awareness and use of prescription drug monitoring programs. A total of 420 eligible physicians (adjusted response rate: 58 percent) returned completed surveys. Among all physicians surveyed, 72 percent were aware of their state's prescription drug monitoring program, and 53 percent reported using one of the programs. We identified several barriers that may prevent greater use of the programs, including the time-consuming nature of information retrieval and the lack of an intuitive format for data provided by the programs. These results suggest that the majority of US primary care physicians are aware of and use prescription drug monitoring programs at least on occasion, although many did not access these programs routinely. To increase the use of the programs in clinical practice, states should consider implementing legal mandates, investing in prescriber education and outreach, and taking measures to enhance ease of access to and use of the programs. PMID:25732500

  5. Access to primary care and the route of emergency admission to hospital: retrospective analysis of national hospital administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Thomas E; Harris, Matthew; Watt, Hilary; Soljak, Michael; Richards, Emma; Gunning, Elinor; Bottle, Alex; Macinko, James; Majeed, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    Background The UK government is pursuing policies to improve primary care access, as many patients visit accident and emergency (A and E) departments after being unable to get suitable general practice appointments. Direct admission to hospital via a general practitioner (GP) averts A and E use, and may reduce total hospital costs. It could also enhance the continuity of information between GPs and hospital doctors, possibly improving healthcare outcomes. Objective To determine whether primary care access is associated with the route of emergency admission—via a GP versus via an A and E department. Methods Retrospective analysis of national administrative data from English hospitals for 2011–2012. Adults admitted in an emergency (unscheduled) for ≥1 night via a GP or an A and E department formed the study population. The measure of primary care access—the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt—was derived from a large, nationally representative patient survey. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate associations, adjusting for patient and admission characteristics. Results The analysis included 2 322 112 emergency admissions (81.9% via an A and E department). With a 5 unit increase in the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt, the adjusted odds of GP admission (vs A and E admission) was estimated to increase by 15% (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.17). The probability of GP admission if ≥95% of appointment attempts were successful in each general practice was estimated to be 19.6%. This probability reduced to 13.6% when <80% of appointment attempts were successful. This equates to 139 673 fewer GP admissions (456 232 vs 316 559) assuming no change in the total number of admissions. Associations were consistent in direction across geographical regions of England. Conclusions Among hospital inpatients admitted as an emergency, patients

  6. Investigation of infertility management in primary care with open access hysterosalpingography (HSG): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Scott; Murdoch, Alison; Rubin, Greg; Chinn, David; Wilsdon, John

    2006-03-01

    Infertility affects one in seven couples in the United Kingdom. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued guidance on the management of the infertile couple in February 2004, which included the statement "for the assessment of tubal damage, women not known to have co-morbidities (pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis or previous ectopic pregnancy) should be offered hysterosalpingography (HSG)". We made HSG available to six general practices in Newcastle upon Tyne as an open access investigation. Our aim was to evaluate the uptake of open access HSG, speed of access to specialist services and the quality of the information recorded in the referral letter. Using hospital clinical records we tracked the outcome of all infertile couples from the six pilot practices over a nine-month period. Of the 39 referrals identified, 10 women were eligible for open access HSG, of which six HSGs were organized by GPs. Couples who had open access HSG reached a diagnosis and management plan four weeks earlier than those who were referred directly (mean difference 4.0 weeks, 95% confidence interval (CI) -8.8 to 0.4 weeks). The information recorded in the referral letter was generally poor. However, all referrals made via the open access HSG service had the prerequisite tests done. Open access HSG allowed prompter access to specialist services with more complete information passed on in the referral letter. Open access HSG was used in 15% of all infertile couples and 60% of those who fitted the criteria for its use. Open access HSG together with semen analysis and endocrine blood tests may allow GPs to manage the initial stages of the infertile couple and make a diagnosis. PMID:16581721

  7. Help Seeking and Access to Primary Care for People from “Hard-to-Reach” Groups with Common Mental Health Problems

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, K.; Edwards, S.; Funnel, E.; Fisher, L.; Gask, L.; Dowrick, C.; Chew Graham, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. In the UK, most people with mental health problems are managed in primary care. However, many individuals in need of help are not able to access care, either because it is not available, or because the individual's interaction with care-givers deters or diverts help-seeking. Aims. To understand the experience of seeking care for distress from the perspective of potential patients from “hard-to-reach” groups. Methods. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews, analysed using a thematic framework. Results. Access to primary care is problematic in four main areas: how distress is conceptualised by individuals, the decision to seek help, barriers to help-seeking, and navigating and negotiating services. Conclusion. There are complex reasons why people from “hard-to-reach” groups may not conceptualise their distress as a biomedical problem. In addition, there are particular barriers to accessing primary care when distress is recognised by the person and help-seeking is attempted. We suggest how primary care could be more accessible to people from “hard-to-reach” groups including the need to offer a flexible, non-biomedical response to distress. PMID:22312546

  8. Primary care and health reform.

    PubMed

    Calman, Neil S; Golub, Maxine; Shuman, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    Skyrocketing health care costs are burdening our people and our economy, yet health care indicators show how little we are achieving with the money we spend. Federal and state governments, along with public-health experts and policymakers, are proposing a host of new initiatives to find solutions. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is designed to address both the quality and accessibility of health care, while reducing its cost. This article provides an overview of models supported by the Affordable Care Act that address one or more goals of the "Triple Aim": better health care for individuals, better health outcomes in the community, and lower health care costs. The models described below rely on the core principles of primary care: comprehensive, coordinated and continuous primary care; preventive care; and the sophisticated implementation of health information technology designed to promote communication between health care providers, enhance coordination of care, minimize duplication of services, and permit reporting on quality. These models will support better health care and reduced costs for people who access health care services but will not address health outcomes in the community at large. Health care professionals, working in concert with community-based organizations and advocates, must also address conditions that influence health in the broadest sense to truly improve the health of our communities and reduce health care costs. PMID:22976358

  9. Barriers to access to treatment for mothers with postpartum depression in primary health care centers: a predictive model.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Pablo; Vöhringer, Paul A; Rojas, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Objective to develop a predictive model to evaluate the factors that modify the access to treatment for Postpartum Depression (PPD). Methods prospective study with mothers who participated in the monitoring of child health in primary care centers. For the initial assessment and during 3 months, it was considered: sociodemographic data, gyneco-obstetric data, data on the services provided, depressive symptoms according to the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS) and quality of life according to the Short Form-36 Health Status Questionnaire (SF-36). The diagnosis of depression was made based on MINI. Mothers diagnosed with PPD in the initial evaluation, were followed-up. Results a statistical model was constructed to determine the factors that prevented access to treatment, which consisted of: item 2 of EPDS (OR 0.43, 95%CI: 0.20-0.93) and item 5 (OR 0.48, 95%CI: 0.21-1.09), and previous history of depression treatment (OR 0.26, 95%CI: 0.61-1.06). Area under the ROC curve for the model=0.79; p-value for the Hosmer-Lemershow=0.73. Conclusion it was elaborated a simple, well standardized and accurate profile, which advises that nurses should pay attention to those mothers diagnosed with PPD, presenting low/no anhedonia (item 2 of EPDS), scarce/no panic/fear (item 5 of EPDS), and no history of depression, as it is likely that these women do not initiate treatment. PMID:27027674

  10. Barriers to access to treatment for mothers with postpartum depression in primary health care centers: a predictive model1

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Pablo; Vöhringer, Paul A.; Rojas, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Objective to develop a predictive model to evaluate the factors that modify the access to treatment for Postpartum Depression (PPD). Methods prospective study with mothers who participated in the monitoring of child health in primary care centers. For the initial assessment and during 3 months, it was considered: sociodemographic data, gyneco-obstetric data, data on the services provided, depressive symptoms according to the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS) and quality of life according to the Short Form-36 Health Status Questionnaire (SF-36). The diagnosis of depression was made based on MINI. Mothers diagnosed with PPD in the initial evaluation, were followed-up. Results a statistical model was constructed to determine the factors that prevented access to treatment, which consisted of: item 2 of EPDS (OR 0.43, 95%CI: 0.20-0.93) and item 5 (OR 0.48, 95%CI: 0.21-1.09), and previous history of depression treatment (OR 0.26, 95%CI: 0.61-1.06). Area under the ROC curve for the model=0.79; p-value for the Hosmer-Lemershow=0.73. Conclusion it was elaborated a simple, well standardized and accurate profile, which advises that nurses should pay attention to those mothers diagnosed with PPD, presenting low/no anhedonia (item 2 of EPDS), scarce/no panic/fear (item 5 of EPDS), and no history of depression, as it is likely that these women do not initiate treatment. PMID:27027674

  11. Patients' Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice.

    PubMed

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems. PMID:26690225

  12. Patients’ Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems. PMID:26690225

  13. Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffer, Sandra, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This report contains 13 articles and book/film reviews on various topics related to the diffusion of health care information in developing countries; beginning with two articles which define primary health care, and suggest principles related to the community, communication, and the health practitioner upon which primary health care should be…

  14. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  15. Developing primary health care.

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, B; Cumberlege, J

    1987-01-01

    Primary health care is best provided by a primary health care team of general practitioners, community nurses, and other staff working together from good premises and looking after the population registered with the practice. It encourages personal and continuing care of patients and good communication among the members of the team. Efforts should be made to foster this model of primary care where possible and also to evaluate its effectiveness. Community services that are not provided by primary care teams should be organised on a defined geographical basis, and the boundaries of these services should coincide as much as possible. Such arrangements would facilitate effective community care and health promotion and can be organised to work well with primary care teams. The patient's right to freedom of choice of a doctor, however, should be retained, as it adds flexibility to the rigidity of fixed geographically based services. PMID:3119003

  16. Access to health care

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Martin; Maltais, Danielle; Hudon, Catherine; Lapointe, Lise; Ntetu, Antoine Lutumba

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access. DESIGN Qualitative study with focus groups. SETTING Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions. METHODS For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held. MAIN FINDINGS The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access. CONCLUSION Systematic callbacks, family physicians’ personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:16926944

  17. Cross-sectional study examining whether the extent of first-contact access to primary care differentially benefits those with certain personalities to receive preventive services

    PubMed Central

    Pandhi, Nancy; Schumacher, Jessica R; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Smith, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Objective The extent of first-contact access to primary care (ie, easy availability when needed) is associated with receiving recommended preventive services. Whether this access benefits patients at risk of preventive services underutilisation, such as those with certain personality characteristics, is unclear. Setting Secondary analysis of the 2003–2006 round of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. Participants 6975 respondents who reported a usual provider whose specialty was internal medicine or family medicine. Those reporting not visiting a medical provider in the past 12 months, and those who were uninsured were excluded. Primary outcome measures Receiving mammography, cholesterol testing and influenza vaccination. Adjusted predicted probabilities (aPP) of receiving these services were analysed stratified by personality characteristics overall, and if significant, then interacted with first-contact access. Results Lower conscientiousness as compared with higher conscientiousness predicted less of all 3 preventive services; mammography (aPP 80%; 95% CI (77% to 83%) vs aPP 85%; (95% CI 82% to 87%)), cholesterol testing (88%; (85% to 90%) vs 93% (91% to 94%), and influenza vaccination (62%; (59% to 64%) vs 66%; (63% to 68%)). Lower agreeableness as compared with higher agreeableness predicted less mammography (77%; (73% to 81%) vs 84%; (82% to 87%)) and less influenza vaccination (59%; (56% to 62%) vs 65%; (63% to 68%)). Lower extraversion predicted less cholesterol testing (88%; (86% to 91%) vs (92%; (90% to 94%)). Lower openness to experience predicted less influenza vaccination (59%; (56% to 63%) vs (68%; (65% to 70%)). For agreeableness, these differences in receiving preventive services did not persist when first-contact access to primary care was present. Conclusions Certain personality characteristics predicted receiving less preventive care services. For those with less agreeableness, improved first-contact access to primary care mitigated this effect

  18. Pediatric Primary Care as a Component of Systems of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Systems of care should be defined in a manner that includes primary care. The current definition of systems of care shares several attributes with the definition of primary care: both are defined as community-based services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally competent, and family focused. However, systems of…

  19. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  20. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - ...

  1. Why do patients with ‘primary care sensitive’ problems access ambulance services? A systematic mapping review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Matthew J; Shaw, Ali R G; Purdy, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objective Emergency ambulance use for problems that could be managed in primary care continues to rise owing to complex reasons that are poorly understood. The objective of this systematic review is to draw together published evidence across a variety of study methodologies and settings to gain a better understanding of why patients seek help from ambulance services for these problems. Design Systematic searches were undertaken across the MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, Health Management Information Consortium and Health Management Information Service publication databases. Google Scholar, Web of Science, OpenSigle, EThOS and DART databases were also systematically searched for reports, proceedings, book chapters and theses, along with hand-searching of grey literature sources. Studies were included if they reported on findings examining patient, carer, health professional or service management interactions with ambulance services for primary care problems. All study methodologies and perspectives were of interest. Data were extracted, quality assessed and systematically mapped according to key findings through generation of an iterative framework. Results A total of 31 studies met inclusion criteria. Findings were summarised across 5 broad categories: factors associated with individual patients; actions of care-givers and bystanders; population-level factors; health infrastructure factors; challenges faced by health professionals. A number of subcategories were developed to explore these factors in more detail. Conclusions This review reports important factors that may impact on ambulance use for primary care problems across a global setting, including demographic measures associated with deprivation, minority status and individual social circumstances. Categorising ambulance calls for primary care problems as ‘inappropriate’ is context dependant and may be unhelpful. Potential implications for triage and risk management strategies are discussed. PMID

  2. Interaction of palliative care and primary care.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amrita; Dzeng, Elizabeth; Cheng, M Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    Primary care physicians are often the first medical providers patients seek out, and are in an excellent position to provide primary palliative care. Primary palliative care encompasses basic skills including basic evaluation and management of symptoms and discussions about goals of care and advance care planning. Specialty palliative care consultation complements primary care by assisting with complex psychosocial-spiritual patient and family situations. This article reviews primary palliative care skill sets and criteria for when to consider referring patients to specialty palliative care and hospice services. PMID:25920056

  3. The acceptability and impact of a randomised controlled trial of welfare rights advice accessed via primary health care: qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, Suzanne; Mackintosh, Joan; White, Martin; Howel, Denise; Sandell, Adam

    2006-01-01

    . Conclusion Participation in the trial and the intervention was acceptable to participants. Welfare rights advice targeted at people aged 60 years or over and accessed via primary care had a positive impact on quality of life and resulted in increased social participation. The divergence of qualitative and quantitative findings suggests that both methods make important contributions to the evaluation of complex social interventions. PMID:16790054

  4. Accessing primary care Big Data: the development of a software algorithm to explore the rich content of consultation records

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, J; Darlow, B; McBain, L; Jones, O; Stubbe, M; Turner, N; Dowell, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a natural language processing software inference algorithm to classify the content of primary care consultations using electronic health record Big Data and subsequently test the algorithm's ability to estimate the prevalence and burden of childhood respiratory illness in primary care. Design Algorithm development and validation study. To classify consultations, the algorithm is designed to interrogate clinical narrative entered as free text, diagnostic (Read) codes created and medications prescribed on the day of the consultation. Setting Thirty-six consenting primary care practices from a mixed urban and semirural region of New Zealand. Three independent sets of 1200 child consultation records were randomly extracted from a data set of all general practitioner consultations in participating practices between 1 January 2008–31 December 2013 for children under 18 years of age (n=754 242). Each consultation record within these sets was independently classified by two expert clinicians as respiratory or non-respiratory, and subclassified according to respiratory diagnostic categories to create three ‘gold standard’ sets of classified records. These three gold standard record sets were used to train, test and validate the algorithm. Outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and F-measure were calculated to illustrate the algorithm's ability to replicate judgements of expert clinicians within the 1200 record gold standard validation set. Results The algorithm was able to identify respiratory consultations in the 1200 record validation set with a sensitivity of 0.72 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.78) and a specificity of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93 to 0.98). The positive predictive value of algorithm respiratory classification was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89 to 0.97). The positive predictive value of the algorithm classifying consultations as being related to specific respiratory diagnostic categories ranged from 0.68 (95% CI 0.40 to 1.00; other

  5. A narrative synthesis of the impact of primary health care delivery models for refugees in resettlement countries on access, quality and coordination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Refugees have many complex health care needs which should be addressed by the primary health care services, both on their arrival in resettlement countries and in their transition to long-term care. The aim of this narrative synthesis is to identify the components of primary health care service delivery models for such populations which have been effective in improving access, quality and coordination of care. Methods A systematic review of the literature, including published systematic reviews, was undertaken. Studies between 1990 and 2011 were identified by searching Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Australian Public Affairs Information Service – Health, Health and Society Database, Multicultural Australian and Immigration Studies and Google Scholar. A limited snowballing search of the reference lists of all included studies was also undertaken. A stakeholder advisory committee and international advisers provided papers from grey literature. Only English language studies of evaluated primary health care models of care for refugees in developed countries of resettlement were included. Results Twenty-five studies met the inclusion criteria for this review of which 15 were Australian and 10 overseas models. These could be categorised into six themes: service context, clinical model, workforce capacity, cost to clients, health and non-health services. Access was improved by multidisciplinary staff, use of interpreters and bilingual staff, no-cost or low-cost services, outreach services, free transport to and from appointments, longer clinic opening hours, patient advocacy, and use of gender-concordant providers. These services were affordable, appropriate and acceptable to the target groups. Coordination between the different health care services and services responding to the social needs of clients was improved through case management by specialist workers. Quality of care was improved by training in cultural sensitivity and

  6. Psychiatry and primary care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David

    2003-10-01

    There is now almost universal recognition that primary care is the place where most mentally distressed people first present for help. However, the pace at which the health system has adapted to this reality varies greatly from country to country, depending on the amount of resource devoted to mental illness services, the way in which primary care physicians have organized their practice, and the inertia of the system. Here we present several models from developed and developing countries and address briefly the issue of training of health workers. PMID:16946921

  7. Primary Care: Medicine's Gordian Knot.

    PubMed

    Oddone, Eugene Z; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-01-01

    Primary care is the cornerstone of effective and efficient healthcare systems. Patients prefer a trusted primary care provider to serve as the first contact for all of their healthcare questions, to help them make important health decisions, to help guide them through an expanding amount of medical information and to help coordinate their care with all other providers. Patients also prefer to establish an ongoing, continuous relationship with their primary care provider. However, fewer and fewer physicians are choosing primary care as a career, threatening the foundation of the health system. We explore the central challenges of primary care defined by work-force controversies about who can best deliver primary care. We also explore the current challenging reimbursement model for primary care that often results in fragmenting care for patients and providers. Finally, we explore new models of primary care health delivery that may serve as partial solutions to the current challenges. PMID:26802754

  8. Integrating Palliative Care into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Rosemary D

    2016-09-01

    Improved quality of life, care consistent with patient goals of care, and decreased health care spending are benefits of palliative care. Palliative care is appropriate for anyone with a serious illness. Advances in technology and pharmaceuticals have resulted in increasing numbers of seriously ill individuals, many with a high symptom burden. The numbers of individuals who could benefit from palliative care far outweighs the number of palliative care specialists. To integrate palliative care into primary care it is essential that resources are available to improve generalist palliative care skills, identify appropriate patients and refer complex patients to specialist palliative care providers. PMID:27497014

  9. Learning from UK primary care.

    PubMed

    Hays, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The Australian Government is wise to examine other health care systems as it strives to improve the quality of care and address rising costs to both governments and individuals. Focus is currently on the United Kingdom, whose National Health Service (NHS) stands out as one that delivers good care at a reasonable price to all who need it. The Australian and UK systems have many similarities: universal access, tax payer support, no or low cost at point of delivery, and good population health outcomes. They also face similar pressures on services from aging, increasingly unwell yet expectant populations.However, there are also differences, largely in the way that health care is funded, organised and delivered. The NHS is a huge system for 60 million people in four home countries with diverging policies. Within England, the system is managed through 10 strategic health authorities, each responsible for about 5 million people and having the right to interpret national policy. Population based health care, including tertiary care, is funded locally via primary care trusts. PMID:19283244

  10. Health Care System Accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Annie G; Barnett, Steven; Meador, Helen E; Wiggins, Erin A; Zazove, Philip

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND People who are deaf use health care services differently than the general population; little research has been carried out to understand the reasons. OBJECTIVE To better understand the health care experiences of deaf people who communicate in American Sign Language. DESIGN Qualitative analyses of focus group discussions in 3 U.S. cities. PARTICIPANTS Ninety-one deaf adults who communicate primarily in American Sign Language. MEASUREMENTS We collected information about health care communication and perceptions of clinicians' attitudes. We elicited stories of both positive and negative encounters, as well as recommendations for improving health care. RESULTS Communication difficulties were ubiquitous. Fear, mistrust, and frustration were prominent in participants' descriptions of health care encounters. Positive experiences were characterized by the presence of medically experienced certified interpreters, health care practitioners with sign language skills, and practitioners who made an effort to improve communication. Many participants acknowledged limited knowledge of their legal rights and did not advocate for themselves. Some participants believed that health care practitioners should learn more about sociocultural aspects of deafness. CONCLUSIONS Deaf people report difficulties using health care services. Physicians can facilitate change to improve this. Future research should explore the perspective of clinicians when working with deaf people, ways to improve communication, and the impact of programs that teach deaf people self-advocacy skills and about their legal rights. PMID:16499543

  11. Primary Health Care Needs of Immigrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC.

    This report constitutes the response by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (DHEW) to 1977 and 1978 Congressional directives to assess immigrants' access to health care and the impact of immigrants on public health services and resources. Areas covered in the report are: (1) the primary health care needs of immigrants, including…

  12. Concussion management by primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Pleacher, M D; Dexter, W W

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess current concussion management practices of primary care providers. Methods An 11 item questionnaire was mailed to primary care providers in the state of Maine, with serial mailings to non‐respondents. Results Over 50% of the questionnaires were completed, with nearly 70% of primary care providers indicating that they routinely use published guidelines as a tool in managing patients with concussion. Nearly two thirds of providers were aware that neuropsychological tests could be used, but only 16% had access to such tests within a week of injury. Conclusions Primary care providers are using published concussion management guidelines with high frequency, but many are unable to access neuropsychological testing when it is required. PMID:16371479

  13. Primary care and public emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed Central

    Grumbach, K; Keane, D; Bindman, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Our objective was to evaluate whether referral to primary care settings would be clinically appropriate for and acceptable to patients waiting for emergency department care for nonemergency conditions. METHODS. We studied 700 patients waiting for emergency department care at a public hospital. Access to alternative sources of medical care, clinical appropriateness of emergency department use, and patients' willingness to use nonemergency services were measured and compared between patients with and without a regular source of care. RESULTS. Nearly half (45%) of the patients cited access barriers to primary care as their reason for using the emergency department. Only 13% of the patients waiting for care had conditions that were clinically appropriate for emergency department services. Patients with a regular source of care used the emergency department more appropriately than did patients without a regular source of care. Thirty-eight percent of the patients expressed a willingness to trade their emergency department visit for an appointment with a physician within 3 days. CONCLUSIONS. Public emergency departments could refer large numbers of patients to appointments at primary care facilities. This alternative would be viable only if the availability and coordination of primary care services were enhanced for low-income populations. PMID:8438975

  14. Birth data accessibility via primary care health records to classify health status in a multi-ethnic population of children: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Rachel; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Stocks, Janet; Harding, Seeromanie; Wade, Angela; Griffiths, Chris; Sears, David; Fothergill, Helen; Slevin, Hannah; Lum, Sooky

    2015-01-01

    Background: Access to reliable birth data (birthweight (BW) and gestational age (GA)) is essential for the identification of individuals who are at subsequent health risk. Aims: This study aimed to explore the feasibility of retrospectively collecting birth data for schoolchildren from parental questionnaires (PQ) and general practitioners (GPs) in primary care clinics, in inner city neighbourhoods with high density of ethnic minority and disadvantaged populations. Methods: Attempts were made to obtain birth data from parents and GPs for 2,171 London primary schoolchildren (34% White, 29% Black African origin, 25% South Asians, 12% Other) as part of a larger study of respiratory health. Results: Information on BW and/or GA were obtained from parents for 2,052 (95%) children. Almost all parents (2,045) gave consent to access their children’s health records held by GPs. On the basis of parental information, GPs of 1,785 children were successfully contacted, and GPs of 1,202 children responded. Birth data were retrieved for only 482 children (22% of 2,052). Missing birth data from GPs were associated with non-white ethnicity, non-UK born, English not the dominant language at home or socioeconomic disadvantage. Paired data were available in 376 children for BW and in 407 children for GA. No significant difference in BW or GA was observed between PQ and GP data, with <5% difference between sources regardless of normal or low birth weight, or term or preterm status. Conclusions: Parental recall of birth data for primary schoolchildren yields high quality and rapid return of data, and it should be considered as a viable alternative in which there is limited access to birth records. It provides the potential to include children with an increased risk of health problems within epidemiological studies. PMID:25612149

  15. Improving Access to Primary Care for a Growing Latino Population: The Role of Safety Net Providers in the Rural Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blewett, Lynn A.; Casey, Michelle; Call, Kathleen Thiede

    2004-01-01

    Many rural Midwestern communities are experiencing rapid growth in Latino populations with low rates of health insurance coverage, limited financial resources, language and cultural differences, and special health care needs. We report on 2-day site visits conducted in 2001 and 2002 in 3 communities (Marshalltown, Iowa; Great Bend, Kansas; and…

  16. Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Danielle H; Mahoney, David; Freedy, John R

    2016-06-01

    Investigation for a possible anxiety disorder should be considered in patients with multiple or persistent anxiety symptoms or multiple somatic complaints without a clear somatic etiology. The ideal treatment for anxiety disorders is a combination of pharmacologic and behavioral strategies. As primary care health care evolves, it is expected that the management of mental health disorders (including anxiety disorders) will largely occur in the context of collaborative care models in which patients and primary care clinicians are assisted by trained case managers who help facilitate a more comprehensive, holistic treatment plan between primary care and mental health providers. PMID:27262005

  17. Rural health care: redefining access.

    PubMed

    Collins, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The population and demographics of rural America are shifting once again. As our nation's unprecedented health care reform unfolds, it is becoming clear that rural communities have unique strengths, and capitalizing on these strengths can position them well for this health care transformation. Equally important are the distinct challenges that--with careful planning, attention, and resources--can be transformed into opportunities to thrive in the new health care environment. The North Carolina Institute of Medicine's Task Force on Rural Health recently published a report that highlights the strengths and challenges of rural communities [1]. In order to fully leverage these opportunities, we must continue to acknowledge the fundamental importance of access to basic health care, while also broadening our discussion to collectively tackle the additional components necessary to create healthy, thriving rural communities. As we reexamine the needs of rural communities, we should broaden our discussions to include an expansion of the types of access that are necessary for strengthening rural health. Collaboration, successful recruitment and retention, availability of specialty services, quality care, and cost effectiveness are some of the issues that must come into discussions about access to services. With this in mind, this issue of the NCMJ explores opportunities to strengthen the health of North Carolina's rural communities. PMID:25621473

  18. Primary Care Availability, Safety Net Clinics, and Health Insurance Coverage: The Association of These Access Factors With Preventable Hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Murty, Sharanya; Begley, Charles E; Franzini, Luisa; Swint, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between physician/safety net availability and health insurance coverage and preventable hospitalizations (PHs) in nonelderly adults in an urban area. Preventable conditions (PHs) were identified for nonelderly adults in Harris County using the Texas Health Care Information Collection hospital database. Multivariable logistic regression models examined the association of health insurance and patient proximity to physicians and safety net clinics with the risk of a PH. Safety net availability reduced PH risk by 23% (P < .05) but only among the uninsured. Lack of health insurance increased PH risk by 30% (P < .05). PMID:27232686

  19. Primary health care nurse practitioners in Canada.

    PubMed

    DiCenso, Alba; Auffrey, Lucille; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Donald, Faith; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Matthews, Sue; Opsteen, Joanne

    2007-08-01

    Canada, like many countries, is in the midst of primary health care reform. A key priority is to improve access to primary health care, especially in remote communities and areas with physician shortages. As a result, there is an increased emphasis on the integration of primary health care nurse practitioners. As of March 2006, legislation exists in all provinces and two territories in Canada that allows nurse practitioners (NPs) to implement their expanded nursing role. In this paper, we will briefly review the historical development of the NP role in Canada and situate it in the international context; describe the NP role, supply of NPs in the country, and the settings in which they work; propose an NP practice model framework; summarize facilitators and barriers to NP role implementation in primary health care delivery; and outline strategies to address the barriers. PMID:18041990

  20. Introduction: Access to fertility care.

    PubMed

    Davis, Owen K; Sokol, Rebecca Z

    2016-05-01

    Given that only an estimated 24% of infertile couples in the United States can fully engage in the medical care required to successfully conceive, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) has incorporated improved access to the full gamut of fertility therapies as an integral component of the Society's strategic plan that was launched in 2014. Toward this end, the ASRM hosted a two-day summit held in Washington D.C. in September 2015 that attracted thought leaders, both speakers and attendees, from around the world. This issue's Views and Reviews focuses on several key areas integral to this effort: an appreciation of the economic challenges to access, as well as the impact and interplay of racial, ethnic, emotional and gender-specific issues in the treatment of infertility. The potential to broaden access to care through modification of existing assisted reproductive techniques is also explored. PMID:27054311

  1. [Primary care in the United Kingdom].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-03-01

    The inadequate planning of health professionals in Spain has boosted the way out of doctors overseas. The United Kingdom is one of the countries chosen by Spanish doctors to develop their job. The National Health Service is a health system similar to the Spanish one. Health care services are financing mainly through taxes. The right to health care is linked to the citizen condition. The provision of health care is a mix-up of public and private enterprises. Primary Care is much closed to Spanish Primary Care. Doctors are "self-employed like" professionals. They can set their surgeries in a free area previously designed by the government. They have the right to make their own team and to manage their own budget. Medical salary is linked to professional capability and curriculum vitae. The main role of a General Practitioner is the prevention. Team work and coordination within primary and specialised care is more developed than in Spain. The access to diagnostic tests and to the specialist is controlled through waiting lists. General Practitioners work as gate-keepers. Patients may choose freely their doctor and consultations and hospital care are free at the point of use. Within the United Kingdom there are also health regions with problems due to inequalities to access and to treatment. There is a training path and the access to it is by Curricula. The number of training jobs is regulated by the local needs. Continuing education is compulsory and strictly regulated local and nationally. The National Health Service was the example for the Spanish health reform in 1986. While Spanish Primary health care is of quality, the efficiency of the health system would improve if staff in Primary Care settings were managed in a similar way to the British's. PMID:26412408

  2. A sustainable primary care system: lessons from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Faber, Marjan J; Burgers, Jako S; Westert, Gert P

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch primary care system has drawn international attention, because of its high performance at low cost. Primary care practices are easily accessible during office hours and collaborate in a unique out-of-hours system. After the reforms in 2006, there are no copayments for patients receiving care in the primary care practice in which they are registered. Financial incentives support the transfer of care from hospital specialists to primary care physicians, and task delegation from primary care physicians to practice nurses. Regional collaborative care groups of primary care practices offer disease management programs. The quality assessment system and the electronic medical record system are predominantly driven by health care professionals. Bottom-up and top-down activities contributed to a successful Dutch primary care system. PMID:22668606

  3. Migrant health care: creativity in primary care.

    PubMed

    Artemis, L

    1996-01-01

    Historically, migrant health care services have always been in a precarious position for funding. The government currently proposes major cuts in federally and state-funded programs for indigent and underserved populations, making this state of precariousness the rule, rather than the exception. The primary care practitioner, therefore, must provide quality, cost-effective care with minimal resources. Case studies illustrate how services can be provided using creativity and community resources. PMID:9447073

  4. Models of primary care for frail patients

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Wilson, C. Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To discuss models of care for frail seniors provided in primary care settings and those developed by Canadian FPs. Sources of information Ovid MEDLINE and the Cochrane database were searched from 2010 to January 2014 using the terms models of care, family medicine, elderly, and geriatrics. Main message New models of funding for primary care have opened opportunities for ways of caring for complex frail older patients. Severity of frailty is an important factor, and more severe frailty should prompt consideration of using an alternate model of care for a senior. In Canada, models in use include integrated care systems, shared care models, home-based care models, and family medicine specialty clinics. No one model should take precedence but FPs should be involved in developing and implementing strategies that meet the needs of individual patients and communities. Organizational and remunerative supports will need to be put in place to achieve widespread uptake of such models. Conclusion Given the increased numbers of frail seniors and the decrease in access to hospital beds, prioritized care models should include ones focused on optimizing health, decreasing frailty, and helping to avoid hospitalization of frail and well seniors alike. The Health Care of the Elderly Program Committee at the College of Family Physicians of Canada is hosting a repository for models of care used by FPs and is asking physicians to submit their ideas for how to best care for frail seniors. PMID:26380850

  5. The Impact of Primary Care: A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Leiyu

    2012-01-01

    Primary care serves as the cornerstone in a strong healthcare system. However, it has long been overlooked in the United States (USA), and an imbalance between specialty and primary care exists. The objective of this focused review paper is to identify research evidence on the value of primary care both in the USA and internationally, focusing on the importance of effective primary care services in delivering quality healthcare, improving health outcomes, and reducing disparities. Literature searches were performed in PubMed as well as “snowballing” based on the bibliographies of the retrieved articles. The areas reviewed included primary care definitions, primary care measurement, primary care practice, primary care and health, primary care and quality, primary care and cost, primary care and equity, primary care and health centers, and primary care and healthcare reform. In both developed and developing countries, primary care has been demonstrated to be associated with enhanced access to healthcare services, better health outcomes, and a decrease in hospitalization and use of emergency department visits. Primary care can also help counteract the negative impact of poor economic conditions on health. PMID:24278694

  6. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  7. Slums’ Access to and Coverage of Primary Health Care Services: A Cross-Sectional Study in Shiraz, a Metropolis in Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Joulaei, Hassan; Bhuiyan, Azad R; Sayadi, Mehrab; Morady, Fariba; Afsar Kazerooni, Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The United Nations has predicted that the population of slum dwellers will have grown from one billion people worldwide to 2 billion by 2030. This trend is also predictable in Iran. In the Iranian metropolis of Shiraz, more than 10% of the residents live in slum areas. There are several problems regarding the delivery of social services in these areas. The aim of this study was to evaluate slums dwellers’ access to and coverage of health care. Methods: This cross-sectional face-to-face study included 380 household of slum dwellers via stratified random sampling. Demographics, accessibility of health services, coverage of health care, and route of receiving health services were recorded through interviews. Results: Approximately, 21.6% of the households had no physical access to health centers. The coverage rate of family planning programs for safe methods was 51.4% (95% CI: 48.86-53.9%). Vaccination coverage among children under 5 years old was 98% (95% CI: 97-99%). Furthermore, 34% of pregnant women had not received standard health care due to a lack of access to health centers. Conclusion: Limited access to health services along with inadequate knowledge of slum residents about health care facilities was the main barrier to the utilization of the health care in the slums. PMID:24753641

  8. African Primary Care Research: Qualitative interviewing in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of a series on African Primary Care Research and focuses on the topic of qualitative interviewing in primary care. In particular it looks at issues of study design, sample size, sampling and interviewing in relation to individual and focus group interviews. There is a particular focus on helping postgraduate students at a Masters level to write their research proposals. PMID:26245436

  9. Improving access to high-quality primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas: a mixed method study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ford, John A; Jones, Andrew P; Wong, Geoff; Clark, Allan B; Porter, Tom; Shakespeare, Tom; Swart, Ann Marie; Steel, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The UK has an ageing population, especially in rural areas, where deprivation is high among older people. Previous research has identified this group as at high risk of poor access to healthcare. The aim of this study is to generate a theory of how socioeconomically disadvantaged older people from rural areas access primary care, to develop an intervention based on this theory and test it in a feasibility trial. Methods and analysis On the basis of the MRC Framework for Developing and Evaluating Complex Interventions, three methods will be used to generate the theory. First, a realist review will elucidate the patient pathway based on existing literature. Second, an analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing will be completed using structural equation modelling. Third, 15 semistructured interviews will be undertaken with patients and four focus groups with health professionals. A triangulation protocol will be used to allow each of these methods to inform and be informed by each other, and to integrate data into one overall realist theory. Based on this theory, an intervention will be developed in discussion with stakeholders to ensure that the intervention is feasible and practical. The intervention will be tested within a feasibility trial, the design of which will depend on the intervention. Lessons from the feasibility trial will be used to refine the intervention and gather the information needed for a definitive trial. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval from the regional ethics committee has been granted for the focus groups with health professionals and interviews with patients. Ethics approval will be sought for the feasibility trial after the intervention has been designed. Findings will be disseminated to the key stakeholders involved in intervention development, to researchers, clinicians and health planners through peer-reviewed journal articles and conference publications, and locally through a dissemination event. PMID

  10. The inverse care law - is Australian primary care research funding headed this way?

    PubMed

    Brett, Tom

    2011-08-01

    Tudor Hart's Inverse Care Law classically described the inequity in medical service access in South Wales. From his primary care perspective, the availability of good medical care varied inversely with the need and the population served. In Australia, future funding for primary care research capacity building appears headed in a similar direction - at least for newly established medical schools. PMID:21814660

  11. Integrating Children's Mental Health into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Wissow, Lawrence S; van Ginneken, Nadja; Chandna, Jaya; Rahman, Atif

    2016-02-01

    Children's mental health problems are among global health advocates' highest priorities. Nearly three-quarters of adult disorders have their onset or origins during childhood, becoming progressively harder to treat over time. Integrating mental health with primary care and other more widely available health services has the potential to increase treatment access during childhood, but requires re-design of currently-available evidence-based practices to fit the context of primary care and place a greater emphasis on promoting positive mental health. While some of this re-design has yet to be accomplished, several components are currently well-defined and show promise of effectiveness and practicality. PMID:26613691

  12. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePlus

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... can give you a trusting, ongoing relationship with one medical professional over time. You can choose from ...

  13. Primary care. The odd couple.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nick

    2004-06-24

    Acute and primary care trust relationships can be fraught with baggage, vagueness and stereotypes. Changing that is about overt behaviours as well as structural and strategic issues. Payment by results and attitudes to commissioning pose significant challenges. PMID:15270356

  14. Primary care. More than words.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Keith; Ion, Vince; Merry, Marilyn; Sinfield, Paul

    2003-01-16

    There are few models for involving patients in primary care. Research in one primary care group, involving 92 patients from nine general practices, established a list of 20 standards most important to patients. When asked to assess themselves against these standards, practices rated their services higher than patients did. The research found considerable resistance to patient involvement from GPs, which needs to be addressed if the government's aims are to be achieved. PMID:12561491

  15. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePlus

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... A PCP is your main health care provider in non-emergency ... and teach healthy lifestyle choices Identify and treat common ...

  16. [Thyreopathy in primary care].

    PubMed

    Vlcek, P

    2011-09-01

    Thyroid gland disorders, as the core of all endocrinopathies, affect 5-7% of the population of the Czech Republic, with women being affected 6-8 times more often than men. Clinically, thyreopathies are divided into hormonal production disorders and morphology disorders. Thyroid hormones fT3, fT4 and TSH serum levels determine the diagnosis of a thyroid gland disorder. Primary hypothyreosis is characterized by reduced fT4 and increased TSH. Low T3 syndrome is a protective reaction of the organism and is associated with conversion of T4 into hormonally inactive triiodothyronine (rT3). Primary hyperthyreosis is characterized by higher fT4 and low TSH levels. Acute thyreoiditis: Inflammatory signs and normal thyroid function, anti-TPO as well as anti-TG are not elevated. Subacute thyreoiditis is manifested as an inflammation, normal anti-TPO and anti-TG, sometimes also hyperthyreosis. Chronic thyreoiditis, Hashimoto's struma is among the most frequent causes ofhypothyreosis in the Czech Republic and it is diagnosed through high anti-TPO and anti-TG levels and higher TSH. Thyreoidal adenomas and carcinomas are clinically usually euthyroid. Determination of tumour markers - thyreoglobulines in papillary and follicular carcinomas and calcitonin in medullar carcinoma that requires genetic assessment (determination of germinal mutations, usually with PCR)--is essential. PMID:21957775

  17. Access to Cancer Screening in People with Learning Disabilities in the UK: Cohort Study in the Health Improvement Network, a Primary Care Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, David P. J.; Horsfall, Laura; Hassiotis, Angela; Petersen, Irene; Walters, Kate; Nazareth, Irwin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether people with learning disability in the UK have poorer access to cancer screening. Design Four cohort studies comparing people with and without learning disability, within the recommended age ranges for cancer screening in the UK. We used Poisson regression to determine relative incidence rates of cancer screening. Setting The Health Improvement Network, a UK primary care database with over 450 General practices. Participants Individuals with a recorded diagnosis of learning disability including general diagnostic terms, specific syndromes, chromosomal abnormalities and autism in their General Practitioner computerised notes. For each type of cancer screening, a comparison cohort of up to six people without learning disability was selected for each person with a learning disability, using stratified sampling on age within GP practice. Main outcome measures Incidence rate ratios for receiving 1) a cervical smear test, 2) a mammogram, 3) a faecal occult blood test and 4) a prostate specific antigen test. Results Relative rates of screening for all four cancers were significantly lower for people with learning disability. The adjusted incidence rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) were Cervical smears: Number eligible with learning disability = 6,254; IRR = 0.54 (0.52–0.56). Mammograms: Number eligible with learning disability = 2,956; IRR = 0.76 (0.72–0.81); Prostate Specific Antigen: Number eligible = 3,520; IRR = 0.87 (0.80–0.96) and Faecal Occult Blood Number eligible = 6,566; 0.86 (0.78–0.94). Differences in screening rates were less pronounced in more socially deprived areas. Disparities in cervical screening rates narrowed over time, but were 45% lower in 2008/9, those for breast cancer screening appeared to widen and were 35% lower in 2009. Conclusion Despite recent incentives, people with learning disability in the UK are significantly less likely to receive screening tests for cancer that

  18. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  19. Phytotherapy in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanele; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  20. Primary care: can it solve employers' health care dilemma?

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Martin-J; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Grundy, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Employers are beginning to recognize that investing in the primary care foundation of the health care system may help address their problems of rising health care costs and uneven quality. Primary care faces a crisis as a growing number of U.S. medical graduates are avoiding primary care careers because of relatively low reimbursement and an unsatisfying work life. Yet a strong primary care sector has been associated with reduced health care costs and improved quality. Through the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative and other efforts, some large employers are engaged in initiatives to strengthen primary care. PMID:18180490

  1. Incorporating Spirituality in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Kathleen S; Hay, Jennifer L; Lubetkin, Erica I

    2016-06-01

    Addressing cultural competency in health care involves recognizing the diverse characteristics of the patient population and understanding how they impact patient care. Spirituality is an aspect of cultural identity that has become increasingly recognized for its potential to impact health behaviors and healthcare decision-making. We consider the complex relationship between spirituality and health, exploring the role of spirituality in primary care, and consider the inclusion of spirituality in existing models of health promotion. We discuss the feasibility of incorporating spirituality into clinical practice, offering suggestions for physicians. PMID:26832335

  2. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  3. Access to care: beyond health insurance.

    PubMed

    Strand de Oliveira, Justine

    2013-11-01

    Access to healthcare is derived from a complex mix of personal beliefs, cultural norms, and social structure, combined with available individual and community resources. This article reviews the concept of access to care and its evolution since the 1960s. The difference between potential and realized access and the question of social justice as it relates to access to care also are explored. PMID:24153091

  4. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  5. Collaborative Care for Adolescents With Depression in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Laura P.; Ludman, Evette; McCauley, Elizabeth; Lindenbaum, Jeff; Larison, Cindy; Zhou, Chuan; Clarke, Greg; Brent, David; Katon, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Up to 20%of adolescents experience an episode of major depression by age 18 years yet few receive evidence-based treatments for their depression. OBJECTIVE To determine whether a collaborative care intervention for adolescents with depression improves depressive outcomes compared with usual care. DESIGN Randomized trial with blinded outcome assessment conducted between April 2010 and April 2013. SETTING Nine primary care clinics in the Group Health system in Washington State. PARTICIPANTS Adolescents (aged 13–17 years) who screened positive for depression (Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item [PHQ-9] score ≥10) on 2 occasions or who screened positive and met criteria for major depression, spoke English, and had telephone access were recruited. Exclusions included alcohol/drug misuse, suicidal plan or recent attempt, bipolar disorder, developmental delay, and seeing a psychiatrist. INTERVENTIONS Twelve-month collaborative care intervention including an initial in-person engagement session and regular follow-up by master’s-level clinicians. Usual care control youth received depression screening results and could access mental health services through Group Health. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was change in depressive symptoms on a modified version of the Child Depression Rating Scale–Revised (CDRS-R; score range, 14–94) from baseline to 12 months. Secondary outcomes included change in Columbia Impairment Scale score (CIS), depression response (≥50% decrease on the CDRS-R), and remission (PHQ-9 score <5). RESULTS Intervention youth (n = 50), compared with those randomized to receive usual care (n = 51), had greater decreases in CDRS-R scores such that by 12 months intervention youth had a mean score of 27.5 (95%CI, 23.8–31.1) compared with 34.6 (95%CI, 30.6–38.6) in control youth (overall intervention effect: F2,747.3 = 7.24, P < .001). Both intervention and control youth experienced improvement on the CIS with no significant

  6. Primary care of adults with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, William F.; Berg, Joseph M.; Bradley, Elspeth; Cheetham, Tom; Denton, Richard; Heng, John; Hennen, Brian; Joyce, David; Kelly, Maureen; Korossy, Marika; Lunsky, Yona; McMillan, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To update the 2006 Canadian guidelines for primary care of adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and to make practical recommendations based on current knowledge to address the particular health issues of adults with DD. Quality of evidence Knowledgeable health care providers participating in a colloquium and a subsequent working group discussed and agreed on revisions to the 2006 guidelines based on a comprehensive review of publications, feedback gained from users of the guidelines, and personal clinical experiences. Most of the available evidence in this area of care is from expert opinion or published consensus statements (level III). Main message Adults with DD have complex health issues, many of them differing from those of the general population. Good primary care identifies the particular health issues faced by adults with DD to improve their quality of life, to improve their access to health care, and to prevent suffering, morbidity, and premature death. These guidelines synthesize general, physical, behavioural, and mental health issues of adults with DD that primary care providers should be aware of, and they present recommendations for screening and management based on current knowledge that practitioners can apply. Because of interacting biologic, psychoaffective, and social factors that contribute to the health and well-being of adults with DD, these guidelines emphasize involving caregivers, adapting procedures when appropriate, and seeking input from a range of health professionals when available. Ethical care is also emphasized. The guidelines are formulated within an ethical framework that pays attention to issues such as informed consent and the assessment of health benefits in relation to risks of harm. Conclusion Implementation of the guidelines proposed here would improve the health of adults with DD and would minimize disparities in health and health care between adults with DD and those in the general population

  7. Education in the Wake of Healthcare Reform: Increasing Primary Care Usage by Individuals Currently Reliant upon Emergency Departments for Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannebaum, Michael; Wilkin, Holley A.; Keys, Jobia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was introduced, in part, to increase access to primary care, which has been shown to provide patients with myriad health benefits. Objective: To increase primary care usage by understanding the beliefs about primary and emergency care most salient to those whose healthcare-seeking practices may be impacted…

  8. Primary-care physician compensation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Arik

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews existing models of physician compensation and presents information about current compensation patterns for primary-care physicians in the United States. Theories of work motivation are reviewed where they have relevance to the desired outcome of satisfied, productive physicians whose skills and expertise are retained in the workforce. Healthcare reforms that purport to bring accountability for healthcare quality and value-rather than simply volume-bring opportunities to redesign primary-care physician compensation and may allow for new compensation methodologies that increase job satisfaction. Physicians are increasingly shunning the responsibility of private practice and choosing to work as employees of a larger organization, often a hospital. Employers of physicians are seeking compensation models that reward both productivity and value. PMID:22786738

  9. The efficacy of primary care for vulnerable population groups.

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, D; Mort, E; Edwards, J

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews the existing literature on the efficacy of primary care with an emphasis on the evaluation of primary care for vulnerable populations: groups whose demographic, geographic, or economic characteristics impede or prevent their access to health care services. A significant portion of the literature derives from studies of poor and underserved populations. However, to construct a more complete evaluation of primary care services, the authors cite literature that has examined both advantaged and disadvantaged populations. Even then the literature is incomplete, at best. The article describes a definition of primary care suitable for policy analysis and formulation, reviews evidence on the efficacy of care that meets that definition, and concludes that widespread use of primary care services is likely to result in improved patient satisfaction and health status. PMID:7721596

  10. Primary care perspectives on generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Roy-Byrne, Peter P; Wagner, Amy

    2004-01-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in the impact and treatment of anxiety disorders. However, one type of anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), has received less attention than other disorders, such as panic disorder, despite the prevalence and amenability of this disorder to treatment in the primary care setting. Rates of GAD have been found to be between 2.8% and 8.5%, with a median prevalence of 5.8%-at least twice the rate reported in the National Comorbidity Survey. Up to one third of patients presenting to primary care clinics with somatic complaints had a mood or anxiety disorder. Generalized anxiety disorder is linked to the overuse of medical services: emergency department visits, hospitalizations, diagnostic and laboratory tests, pharmacy costs, and so on. Recognition of anxiety and depression in primary care is poor, with only 23% of pure anxiety cases being recognized compared with 56% of depression cases. The various stakeholders (patients, family members, employers, and insurers) in a patient's outcome often complicate treatment of anxiety. Barriers to effective treatment include time constraints, acute disease orientation of most care systems, lack of planned follow-up and monitoring, and relative unavailability of specialist access. The collaborative care approach is designed to overcome these barriers. With this approach, the patient is provided with additional educational materials, physicians are supported by physician extenders (nurses, social workers, or expert consultants) who provide case-based feedback, follow-up, extra visits, and telephone calls to patients. Providing efficacious treatment to primary care for GAD will require improving knowledge of providers and increasing patient engagement. PMID:15384933

  11. Choice and privatisation in Swedish primary care.

    PubMed

    Anell, Anders

    2011-10-01

    In 2007, a new wave of local reforms involving choice for the population and privatisation of providers was initiated in Swedish primary care. Important objectives behind reforms were to strengthen the role of primary care and to improve performance in terms of access and responsiveness. The purpose of this article was to compare the characteristics of the new models and to discuss changes in financial incentives for providers and challenges regarding governance from the part of county councils. A majority of the models being introduced across the 21 county councils can best be described as innovative combinations between a comprehensive responsibility for providers and significant degrees of freedom regarding choice for the population. Key financial characteristics of fixed payment and comprehensive financial responsibility for providers may create financial incentives to under-provide care. Informed choices by the population, in combination with reasonably low barriers for providers to enter the primary care market, should theoretically counterbalance such incentives. To facilitate such competition is indeed a challenge, not only because of difficulties in implementing informed choices but also because the new models favour large and/or horizontally integrated providers. To prevent monopolistic behaviour, county councils may have to accept more competition as well as more governance over clinical practice than initially intended. PMID:20701829

  12. Knowledge and perception of Prevention of Mother to Child services amongst pregnant women accessing antenatal clinic in a Primary Health Care centre in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Omidokun, Adedoyin D.; Ige, Olusimbo K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Few studies have assessed pregnant women's perceptions regarding prevention of mother to child of HIV and the available services at the primary health care level in Nigeria. Objective Assessment of knowledge and perception of antenatal clinic (ANC) attendees regarding Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) of HIV at primary health care facilities in south-west Nigeria. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst 400 antenatal attendees in a Primary Health Care centre in Ibadan, Nigeria. Results Known methods of PMTCT were: use of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) during pregnancy (75.0%), ART at birth (65.8%) and not breastfeeding (61.8%). Previous HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) was reported by 71%, significantly higher proportions of those who were married, in the third trimester of pregnancy or engaged in professional and/or skilled occupations had been tested. Regarding the HCT services provided, 92.2% understood the HIV-related health education provided, 89.7.2% reported that the timing was appropriate, 92.6% assessed the nurses’ approach as acceptable but 34.0% felt the test was forced upon them. Majority (79.6%) were aware of non-breastfeeding options of infant feeding, but only 3.5% were aware of exclusive breastfeeding for a stipulated period as an infant feeding option. Nevertheless, the majority of the women found the non-breast feeding option culturally unacceptable. Conclusion Women in this survey were knowledgeable about the methods of PMTCT, but had negative perceptions regarding certain aspects of the HCT services and the recommended non-breastfeeding infant feeding option. Health workers should provide client friendly services and infant feeding counselling that is based on current WHO recommendations and culturally acceptable.

  13. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  14. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health.…

  15. Reducing the health care burden for marginalised migrants: The potential role for primary care in Europe.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Catherine Agnes; Burns, Nicola; Mair, Frances Susanne; Dowrick, Christopher; Clissmann, Ciaran; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn; Lionis, Christos; Papadakaki, Maria; Saridaki, Aristoula; de Brun, Tomas; MacFarlane, Anne

    2016-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the health of migrants worldwide. Migrants, particularly those in marginalised situations, face significant barriers and inequities in entitlement and access to high quality health care. This study aimed to explore the potential role of primary care in mitigating such barriers and identify ways in which health care policies and systems can influence the ability of primary care to meet the needs of vulnerable and marginalised migrants. The study compared routinely available country-level data on health system structure and financing, policy support for language and communication, and barriers and facilitators to health care access reported in the published literature. These were then mapped to a framework of primary care systems to identify where the key features mitigating or amplifying barriers to access lay. Reflecting on the data generated, we argue that culturally-sensitive primary care can play a key role in delivering accessible, high-quality care to migrants in vulnerable situations. Policymakers and practitioners need to appreciate that both individual patient capacity, and the way health care systems are configured and funded, can constrain access to care and have a negative impact on the quality of care that practitioners can provide to such populations. Strategies to address these issues, from the level of policy through to practice, are urgently needed. PMID:27080344

  16. Unregulated access to health-care services is associated with overutilization—lessons from Austria

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The Austrian health-care system is characterized by free provider choice and uncontrolled access to all levels of care. Using primary data, the ECOHCARE study shows that hospitalization rates for the secondary and tertiary care levels in Austria are both 4.4 times higher than those reported from the USA using a similar methodology. At the same time, essential functions of the primary care sector are weak. We propose that regulating access to secondary and tertiary care and restricting free provider choice to the primary care level would both reverse over utilization and strengthen the primary care sector. PMID:25417940

  17. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education.

    PubMed

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students. PMID:27347257

  18. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education

    PubMed Central

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students. PMID:27347257

  19. Screening and Identification in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonian, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews issues related to behavioral screening in pediatric primary care settings. Structural-organizational issues affecting the use of pediatric primary care screening are discussed. This study also reviewed selected screening instruments that have utility for use in the primary care setting. Clinical and research issues related to…

  20. Psychopharmacology in Primary Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Benich, Joseph J; Bragg, Scott W; Freedy, John R

    2016-06-01

    Psychopharmacology requires clinicians to stay current on the latest guidelines and to use dynamic treatment strategies. Psychiatric conditions are prevalent in the primary care population. Choice of treatment with psychopharmacology should be based on controlling the patient's predominant symptoms while taking into consideration patient age, treatment compliance, patient past response to treatments, dosing frequency, patient preference, medication side effects, potential medication interactions, drug precautions/warnings, and cost. Response to therapy, as well as side effects, needs to be evaluated at regular intervals. The goal is to minimize symptoms and return patients to their maximal level of functioning. PMID:27262011

  1. The Australian experiment: how primary health care organizations supported the evolution of a primary health care system.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Caroline; Jackson, Claire L; Marley, John E; Wells, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Primary health care in Australia has undergone 2 decades of change. Starting with a vision for a national health strategy with general practice at its core, Australia established local meso-level primary health care organizations--Divisions of General Practice--moving from focus on individual practitioners to a professional collective local voice. The article identifies how these meso-level organizations have helped the Australian primary health care system evolve by supporting the roll-out of initiatives including national practice accreditation, a focus on quality improvement, expansion of multidisciplinary teams into general practice, regional integration, information technology adoption, and improved access to care. Nevertheless, there are still challenges to ensuring equitable access and the supply and distribution of a primary care workforce, addressing the increasing rates of chronic disease and obesity, and overcoming the fragmentation of funding and accountability in the Australian system. PMID:22403246

  2. 45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes... direct primary care medical homes. A QHP issuer may provide coverage through a direct primary...

  3. 45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes... direct primary care medical homes. A QHP issuer may provide coverage through a direct primary...

  4. 45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes... direct primary care medical homes. A QHP issuer may provide coverage through a direct primary...

  5. Improving Services for Women with Depression in Primary Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katon, Wayne J.; Ludman, Evette J.

    2003-01-01

    Women have a higher prevalence of depressive disorders compared to men. The current system of care for women with depressive disorders provides significant financial barriers for patients with lower incomes to access mental health services. Primary care systems are used extensively by women and have the potential to diagnose patients at early…

  6. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2016-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children’s health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children’s health. Nonetheless, they find that, on the whole, policies to improve access indeed improve children’s health, with the caveat that context plays a big role—medical care “matters more at some times, or for some children, than others.” Focusing on studies that can plausibly show a causal effect between policies to increase access and better health for children, and starting from an economic framework, they consider both the demand for and the supply of health care. On the demand side, they examine what happens when the government expands public insurance programs (such as Medicaid), or when parents are offered financial incentives to take their children to preventive appointments. On the supply side, they look at what happens when public insurance programs increase the payments that they offer to health-care providers, or when health-care providers are placed directly in schools where children spend their days. They also examine how the Affordable Care Act is likely to affect children’s access to medical care. Leininger and Levy reach three main conclusions. First, despite tremendous progress in recent decades, not all children have insurance coverage, and immigrant children are especially vulnerable. Second, insurance coverage alone doesn’t guarantee access to care, and insured children may still face barriers to getting the care they need. Finally, as this issue of Future of Children demonstrates, access to care is only one of the factors that policy makers should consider as they seek to make the nation’s children healthier. PMID:27516723

  7. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  8. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of antiretroviral therapy and improved access to care, the average life expectancy of patients with HIV infection receiving optimal treatment approaches that of patients in the general population. AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies are no longer the primary issues; instead, traditional age- and lifestyle-related conditions are a growing concern. Patients with HIV infection are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and some non-AIDS-related cancers than patients in the general population. Family physicians need to be knowledgeable about screening for and managing chronic comorbid conditions as this population ages. Health maintenance, including appropriate vaccinations, prophylaxis against opportunistic infections, and routine screening for sexually transmitted infections, remains an important part of care. As HIV infection becomes a chronic condition, emerging strategies in prevention, including preexposure prophylaxis, fall within the scope of practice of the family physician. PMID:27092565

  9. Ethical matters in rural integrated primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Daniel; Stenger, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    Integrated primary care is particularly valuable to rural communities. Behavioral health care is often in short supply, and small or close-knit communities can intensify the stigma of seeking specialty mental health in rural settings. These and other barriers result in reduced access to needed behavioral health care. Nonetheless, rural practice of integrated primary care presents unique challenges to practitioners of multiple disciplines, including issues of competence, confidentiality, and dual relationships. This article provides an illustrative vignette to describe ethical issues in the rural practice of integrated primary care. It will review discipline-specific guidance in approaching these challenges and will offer recommendations for addressing disparities in the approaches of various disciplines engaged in the practice of integrated primary care. PMID:23566130

  10. Metrics for assessing improvements in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Stange, Kurt C; Etz, Rebecca S; Gullett, Heidi; Sweeney, Sarah A; Miller, William L; Jaén, Carlos Roberto; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Nutting, Paul A; Glasgow, Russell E

    2014-01-01

    Metrics focus attention on what is important. Balanced metrics of primary health care inform purpose and aspiration as well as performance. Purpose in primary health care is about improving the health of people and populations in their community contexts. It is informed by metrics that include long-term, meaning- and relationship-focused perspectives. Aspirational uses of metrics inspire evolving insights and iterative improvement, using a collaborative, developmental perspective. Performance metrics assess the complex interactions among primary care tenets of accessibility, a whole-person focus, integration and coordination of care, and ongoing relationships with individuals, families, and communities; primary health care principles of inclusion and equity, a focus on people's needs, multilevel integration of health, collaborative policy dialogue, and stakeholder participation; basic and goal-directed health care, prioritization, development, and multilevel health outcomes. Environments that support reflection, development, and collaborative action are necessary for metrics to advance health and minimize unintended consequences. PMID:24641561

  11. Why Medical Students Choose Primary Care Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassler, William J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study of factors influencing medical students to choose primary care careers, in contrast with high-technology careers, found students attracted by opportunity to provide direct care, ambulatory care, continuity of care, and involvement in psychosocial aspects of care. Age, race, gender, marital status, and some attitudes were not influential.…

  12. The interface between primary and secondary care.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, P

    2001-01-01

    The interface between primary and secondary care in the UK has been affected by a number of recent changes, particularly in provision of out-of-hours care and advice. This paper reviews some current measures of healthcare quality and argues that many do not adequately measure contributions in primary care. To overcome these deficiencies the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) has published guidelines on issues of quality in primary care. PMID:11383431

  13. Education for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Drickey, R

    1985-07-01

    Postrevolutionary Nicaragua has developed a new health system in which primary health care is a central component. Great progress has been made in correcting the poor health conditions that existed prior to the revolution. As part of an interdisciplinary health team that emphasizes prevention and community service, physicians in the new system play a different role than they did previously. Training for health workers of all types has been expanded. However, scarce teaching and curricular resources have restrained progress in this area. The U.S. based Committee for Health Rights in Central America (CHRICA) has collaborated with the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health to organize two Colloquia on Health in Nicaragua in the past two years. These Colloquia brought together North American participants who provided current medical training and Nicaraguan participants who provided information about the new health system. The Colloquia, whose participants were eligible to receive CME credit from the UCSF School of Medicine, have led to continuing educational exchanges between health care personnel in the two countries. PMID:10272498

  14. A Rural Primary Care Pediatric Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kairys, Steven; Newell, Priscilla

    1985-01-01

    The primary care pediatric residency program at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has developed a training program in rural primary care. Residents experience the many facets of rural practice and are introduced to community-oriented approaches to child health care. (Author/MLW)

  15. A Primary Care Approach to Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Samiev, Djamshed; Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Armitage, Joel D.; Maness, Lori J

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are probably the most common hematologic malignancies in adults over the age of 60 and are a major source of morbidity and mortality among older age groups. Diagnosis and management of this chronic blood cancer has evolved significantly in recent years and there are Food and Drug Administration-approved therapies that can extend patients' life expectancy and improve quality of life. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are often involved in the process of diagnosis and follow-up of MDS patients, especially those in low-risk groups. They can therefore play an important role in improving patient care and quality of life by ensuring early referral and participating in supportive management. There is also a shortage of oncologists which increases the importance of the role of PCPs in management of MDS patients. In the face of limited resources, PCPs can improve access and quality of care in MDS patients. This article provides an overview of the common manifestations, diagnostic approaches, and therapeutic modalities of MDS for PCPs, with a focus on when to suspect MDS, when a referral is appropriate, and how to provide appropriate supportive care for patients diagnosed with MDS. PMID:24921029

  16. Building access to specialist care through e-consultation

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Rowan, Margo S; Afkham, Amir; Maranger, Julie; Keely, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited access to specialist care remains a major barrier to health care in Canada, affecting patients and primary care providers alike, in terms of both long wait times and inequitable availability. We developed an electronic consultation system, based on a secure web-based tool, as an alternative to face-to-face consultations, and ran a pilot study to evaluate its effectiveness and acceptability to practitioners. Methods In a pilot program conducted over 15 months starting in January 2010, the e-consultation system was tested with primary care providers and specialists in a large health region in Eastern Ontario, Canada. We collected utilization data from the electronic system itself (including quantitative data from satisfaction surveys) and qualitative information from focus groups and interviews with providers. Results Of 18 primary care providers in the pilot program, 13 participated in focus groups and 9 were interviewed; in addition, 10 of the 11 specialists in the program were interviewed. Results of our evaluation showed good uptake, high levels of satisfaction, improvement in the integration of referrals and consultations, and avoidance of unnecessary specialist visits. A total of 77 e-consultation requests were processed from 1 Jan. 2010 to 1 Apr. 2011. Less than 10% of the referrals required face-to-face follow-up. The most frequently noted benefits for patients (as perceived by providers) included improved access to specialist care and reduced wait times. Primary care providers valued the ability to assist with patient assessment and management by having access to a rapid response to clinical questions, clarifying the need for diagnostic tests or treatments, and confirming the need for a formal consultation. Specialists enjoyed the improved interaction with primary care providers, as well as having some control in the decision on which patients should be referred. Interpretation This low-cost referral system has potential for broader

  17. Primary care NPs: Leaders in population health.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Kathryn D

    2016-08-18

    A 2012 Institute of Medicine report calls primary and public healthcare workers to action, tasking them with working together to improve population health outcomes. A Practical Playbook released in 2014 enables this public health/primary care integration. Primary care NPs are in an excellent position to lead the charge and make this integration happen. PMID:27434390

  18. Retail health clinics drive innovation into primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A myriad of patient dissatisfaction issues stemming from antiquated approaches to primary care access are resulting in the establishment of retail health clinics (RHCs) throughout the country. RHCs are usually located within retail stores or stand-alone pharmacies and are staffed by nurse practitioners (NPs). They offer treatment for colds, coughs, skin rashes, and ear infections along with offering preventive care and physicals. As disruptive innovations, or innovations that offer services to ignored markets, these clinics are siphoning patient care visits away from primary care physicians because of their attention to quick access, affordable prices, and consumer-friendly approaches. In response, family and internal medicine physicians must follow three strategies to secure their patient population as well as attract new patients: build relationships with RHCs through referral networks and NP supervisory agreements, transform the provision of patient access through the development of physician-owned RHCs, and support the concept of the advanced medical home. PMID:18472612

  19. Public health care provisions: access and equity.

    PubMed

    Bin Juni, M H

    1996-09-01

    Within the current exercise of reforming the health care system, underlying all issues, is the reassessment of the role of government. It is a government's responsibility and concern that the health sector be accessible and equitable to the population, and more important that the health sector be more efficient and affordable. Many governments in the world attempt to provide universal health care services to their population through public health care provisions. This paper reviews and analyses the experience of the Malaysian health system, focusing on the performance of the system in relation to access and equity. The performance of the Malaysian health system has been impressive. At minimum cost it has achieved virtually accessible and equitable health care to the entire population. This is evident by analysing almost all the commonly used indicators. These clearly show that when matched to comparable countries, health outcome is even better than predicted value. PMID:8870140

  20. UK organisation of access care.

    PubMed

    Wilmink, Teun; Powers, Sarah; Baharani, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    National UK audits show that 73% of patients start renal replacement therapy (RRT) with haemodialysis (HD). However, 59% of those start HD on non-permanent access in the form of a tunnelled line (TL) or a non-tunnelled line (NTL), 40% on an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and 1% on an arteriovenous graft (AVG). After 3 months, the number of patients dialysing on AVF was only 41%. Late referrals, within 90 days of starting dialysis to the renal service, occur in one-fifth of all incident HD patients. Referral to a surgeon was an important determinant of mode of access at first dialysis. However, referral to a surgeon occurred in 67% of patients who were known to the nephrologist for over a year and in 46% of patients who were known to nephrology less than a year but more than 90 days. Best practice tariffs of the National Health Service (NHS) payment by results program have set a target of 75% of prevalent HD occurring via an AVF or AVG in 2011/2012, rising to 85% in 2013/2014. We suggest that this target is best achieved by increasing timely referral to a surgeon for creation of access before HD is needed. PMID:25751543

  1. THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS IN PRIMARY CARE SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Roderick S.; Everett, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Shortages of primary care doctors are occurring globally; one means of meeting this demand has been the use of physician assistants (PAs). Introduced in the United States in the late 1960s to address doctor shortages, the PA movement has grown to over 75,000 providers in 2011 and spread to Australia, Canada, Great Britain, The Netherlands, Germany, Ghana, and South Africa. A purposeful literature review was undertaken to assess the contribution of PAs to primary care systems. Contemporary studies suggest that PAs can contribute to the successful attainment of primary care functions, particularly the provision of comprehensive care, accessibility, and accountability. Employing PAs seems a reasonable strategy for providing primary care for diverse populations. PMID:21851446

  2. Traveling Towards Disease: Transportation Barriers to Health Care Access

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Ben S.; Sharp, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes. PMID:23543372

  3. Integrated primary care in Germany: the road ahead

    PubMed Central

    Schlette, Sophia; Lisac, Melanie; Blum, Kerstin

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement Health care delivery in Germany is highly fragmented, resulting in poor vertical and horizontal integration and a system that is focused on curing acute illness or single diseases instead of managing patients with more complex or chronic conditions, or managing the health of determined populations. While it is now widely accepted that a strong primary care system can help improve coordination and responsiveness in health care, primary care has so far not played this role in the German system. Primary care physicians traditionally do not have a gatekeeper function; patients can freely choose and directly access both primary and secondary care providers, making coordination and cooperation within and across sectors difficult. Description of policy development Since 2000, driven by the political leadership and initiative of the Federal Ministry of Health, the German Bundestag has passed several laws enabling new forms of care aimed to improve care coordination and to strengthen primary care as a key function in the German health care system. These include on the contractual side integrated care contracts, and on the delivery side disease management programmes, medical care centres, gatekeeping and ‘community medicine nurses’. Conclusion and discussion Recent policy reforms improved framework conditions for new forms of care. There is a clear commitment by the government and the introduction of selective contracting and financial incentives for stronger cooperation constitute major drivers for change. First evaluations, especially of disease management programmes, indicate that the new forms of care improve coordination and outcomes. Yet the process of strengthening primary care as a lever for better care coordination has only just begun. Future reforms need to address other structural barriers for change such as fragmented funding streams, inadequate payment systems, the lack of standardized IT systems and trans-sectoral education and training of

  4. Exploring dimensions of access to medical care.

    PubMed

    Andersen, R M; McCutcheon, A; Aday, L A; Chiu, G Y; Bell, R

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines the dimensions of the access concept with particular attention to the extent to which more parsimonious indicators of access can be developed. This process is especially useful to health policy makers, planners and researchers in need of cost-effective social indicators of access to monitor the need for and impact of innovative health care programs. Three stages of data reduction are used in the analysis, resulting in a reduced set of key indicators of the concept. Implication for subsequent data collection and measurement of access are discussed. PMID:6841113

  5. Increased access rate to a primary health-care centre by introducing a structured patient sorting system developed to make the most efficient use of the personnel: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Jörgen; Maun, Andy; Bornhöft, Lena; Kornbakk, Malena; Wedham, Sofia; Zaffar, Mona; Thanner, Cathrine

    2010-11-01

    The primary health-care centre (PHCC) participating in the study has had financial problems for several years and it has been particularly difficult to recruit general practitioners (GPs). As a result, the access rate to the PHCC was low. The purpose of this study was to increase the access rate to the PHCC and to make the most efficient use of the staff by introducing a structured patient sorting system. All personnel were involved in the implementation process and participated regularly in interdisciplinary work-groups. A variety of Drop-in receptions were created and a manual for sorting patients by condition was introduced. The main finding was that the total access rate to the PHCC increased by 27% and that each staff member increased their personal access rate by an average of 13%. Eighty-three percent of the patients who were initially treated by the rehabilitation team were treated solely by the team and did not need to see a GP. No medical backlashes were reported. These findings indicate a more efficient use of the personnel. Furthermore, both personnel and patients indicated an improvement in the possibility to book patient appointments after the introduction of the structured patient sorting system. PMID:21097727

  6. Withdrawing benzodiazepines in primary care.

    PubMed

    Lader, Malcolm; Tylee, Andre; Donoghue, John

    2009-01-01

    The use of benzodiazepine anxiolytics and hypnotics continues to excite controversy. Views differ from expert to expert and from country to country as to the extent of the problem, or even whether long-term benzodiazepine use actually constitutes a problem. The adverse effects of these drugs have been extensively documented and their effectiveness is being increasingly questioned. Discontinuation is usually beneficial as it is followed by improved psychomotor and cognitive functioning, particularly in the elderly. The potential for dependence and addiction have also become more apparent. The licensing of SSRIs for anxiety disorders has widened the prescribers' therapeutic choices (although this group of medications also have their own adverse effects). Melatonin agonists show promise in some forms of insomnia. Accordingly, it is now even more imperative that long-term benzodiazepine users be reviewed with respect to possible discontinuation. Strategies for discontinuation start with primary-care practitioners, who are still the main prescribers.This review sets out the stratagems that have been evaluated, concentrating on those of a pharmacological nature. Simple interventions include basic monitoring of repeat prescriptions and assessment by the doctor. Even a letter from the primary-care practitioner pointing out the continuing usage of benzodiazepines and questioning their need can result in reduction or cessation of use. Pharmacists also have a role to play in monitoring the use of benzodiazepines, although mobilizing their assistance is not yet routine. Such stratagems can avoid the use of specialist back-up services such as psychiatrists, home care, and addiction and alcohol misuse treatment facilities.Pharmacological interventions for benzodiazepine dependence have been reviewed in detail in a recent Cochrane review, but only eight studies proved adequate for analysis. Carbamazepine was the only drug that appeared to have any useful adjunctive properties for

  7. The strength of primary care in Europe: an international comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kringos, Dionne; Boerma, Wienke; Bourgueil, Yann; Cartier, Thomas; Dedeu, Toni; Hasvold, Toralf; Hutchinson, Allen; Lember, Margus; Oleszczyk, Marek; Pavlic, Danica Rotar; Svab, Igor; Tedeschi, Paolo; Wilm, Stefan; Wilson, Andrew; Windak, Adam; Van der Zee, Jouke; Groenewegen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background A suitable definition of primary care to capture the variety of prevailing international organisation and service-delivery models is lacking. Aim Evaluation of strength of primary care in Europe. Design and setting International comparative cross-sectional study performed in 2009–2010, involving 27 EU member states, plus Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, and Turkey. Method Outcome measures covered three dimensions of primary care structure: primary care governance, economic conditions of primary care, and primary care workforce development; and four dimensions of primary care service-delivery process: accessibility, comprehensiveness, continuity, and coordination of primary care. The primary care dimensions were operationalised by a total of 77 indicators for which data were collected in 31 countries. Data sources included national and international literature, governmental publications, statistical databases, and experts’ consultations. Results Countries with relatively strong primary care are Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, and the UK. Countries either have many primary care policies and regulations in place, combined with good financial coverage and resources, and adequate primary care workforce conditions, or have consistently only few of these primary care structures in place. There is no correlation between the access, continuity, coordination, and comprehensiveness of primary care of countries. Conclusion Variation is shown in the strength of primary care across Europe, indicating a discrepancy in the responsibility given to primary care in national and international policy initiatives and the needed investments in primary care to solve, for example, future shortages of workforce. Countries are consistent in their primary care focus on all important structure dimensions. Countries need to improve their primary care information infrastructure to facilitate primary care performance

  8. Strengthening of primary health care: key to deliver inclusive health care.

    PubMed

    Yeravdekar, Rajiv; Yeravdekar, Vidya Rajiv; Tutakne, M A; Bhatia, Neeta P; Tambe, Murlidhar

    2013-01-01

    Inequity and poverty are the root causes of ill health. Access to quality health services on an affordable and equitable basis in many parts of the country remains an unfulfilled aspiration. Disparity in health care is interpreted as compromise in 'Right to Life.' It is imperative to define 'essential health care,' which should be made available to all citizens to facilitate inclusivity in health care. The suggested methods for this include optimal utilization of public resources and increasing public spending on health care. Capacity building through training, especially training of paramedical personnel, is proposed as an essential ingredient, to reduce cost, especially in tertiary care. Another aspect which is considered very important is improvement in delivery system of health care. Increasing the role of 'family physician' in health care delivery system will improve preventive care and reduce cost of tertiary care. These observations underlie the relevance and role of Primary health care as a key to deliver inclusive health care. The advantages of a primary health care model for health service delivery are greater access to needed services; better quality of care; a greater focus on prevention; early management of health problems; and cumulative improvements in health and lower morbidity as a result of primary health care delivery. PMID:23873190

  9. Can Primary Care Sleep Medicine Integration Work?

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Thomas D.; Herr, Adam; Thuras, Paul; Cook, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders are common in the veteran population. There is an increasing need for sleep medicine services in returning veterans. Primary care providers are uncomfortable diagnosing and treating sleep disorders. Patients often have to wait several days before they can be seen by a sleep clinician. This pilot project evaluated the feasibility of providing sleep medicine services to patients in a primary care setting. Primary care providers were involved in decision-making, resulting in improved satisfaction with sleep medicine services among primary care clinicians. PMID:25133050

  10. Mild Hypertransaminasemia in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busafi, Said A.; Hilzenrat, Nir

    2013-01-01

    The liver enzymes, alanine transaminase (ALT) or aspartate transaminase (AST), are commonly used in clinical practice as screening as well as diagnostic tests for liver diseases. ALT is more specific for liver injury than AST and has been shown to be a good predictor of liver related and all-cause mortality. Asymptomatic mild hypertransaminasemia (i.e., less than five times normal) is a common finding in primary care and this could be attributed to serious underlying condition or has transient and benign cause. Unfortunately, there are no good literatures available on the cost-effectiveness of evaluating patients with asymptomatic mild hypertransaminasemia. However, if the history and physical examination do not suggest a clear cause, a stepwise approach should be initiated based on pretest probability of the underlying liver disease. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is becoming the most common cause of mild hypertransaminasemia worldwide. Other causes include alcohol abuse, medications, and hepatitis B and C. Less common causes include hemochromatosis, α1-antitrypsin deficiency, autoimmune hepatitis, and Wilson's disease. Nonhepatic causes such as celiac disease, thyroid, and muscle disorders should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Referral to a specialist and a possible liver biopsy should be considered if persistent hypertransaminasemia for six months or more of unclear etiology.

  11. Evaluating primary care research networks.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Evelyn; Harvey, Janet; Sturt, Jackie

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents a conceptual framework and tool kit, generated from the evaluation of five primary care research networks (PCRNs) funded by the then London, National Health Service (NHS) Executive. We employed qualitative methods designed to match the most important characteristics of PCRNs, conducting five contextualized case studies covering the five networks. A conceptual evaluation framework based on a review of the organization science literature was developed and comprised the broad, but inter-related organizational dimensions of structure, processes, boundaries and network self-evaluation as input factors and strategic emphasis as epitomized by network objectives. These dimensions were comprised of more detailed subdimensions designed to capture the potential of the networks to create ideas and knowledge, or intellectual capital, the key construct upon which our evaluation tool kit was based. We considered the congruence, or fit, between network objectives and input factors: greater congruence implied greater ability to achieve implicit and overt objectives. We conclude that network evaluation must take place, over time, recognizing stage of development and potential for long-term viability, but within a generic framework of inputs and outputs. If there is a good fit or congruence between their input factors and network objectives, networks will be internally coherent and able to operate at optimum effectiveness. PMID:17683655

  12. Integrating Behavioral Health into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    McGough, Peter M; Bauer, Amy M; Collins, Laura; Dugdale, David C

    2016-04-01

    Depression is one of the more common diagnoses encountered in primary care, and primary care in turn provides the majority of care for patients with depression. Many approaches have been tried in efforts to improve the outcomes of depression management. This article outlines the partnership between the University of Washington (UW) Neighborhood Clinics and the UW Department of Psychiatry in implementing a collaborative care approach to integrating the management of anxiety and depression in the ambulatory primary care setting. This program was built on the chronic care model, which utilizes a team approach to caring for the patient. In addition to the patient and the primary care provider (PCP), the team included a medical social worker (MSW) as care manager and a psychiatrist as team consultant. The MSW would manage a registry of patients with depression at a clinic with several PCPs, contacting the patients on a regular basis to assess their status, and consulting with the psychiatrist on a weekly basis to discuss patients who were not achieving the goals of care. Any recommendation (eg, a change in medication dose or class) made by the psychiatrist was communicated to the PCP, who in turn would work with the patient on the new recommendation. This collaborative care approach resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients who achieved care plan goals. The authors believe this is an effective method for health systems to integrate mental health services into primary care. (Population Health Management 2016;19:81-87). PMID:26348355

  13. Integrating Behavioral Health into Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Amy M.; Collins, Laura; Dugdale, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Depression is one of the more common diagnoses encountered in primary care, and primary care in turn provides the majority of care for patients with depression. Many approaches have been tried in efforts to improve the outcomes of depression management. This article outlines the partnership between the University of Washington (UW) Neighborhood Clinics and the UW Department of Psychiatry in implementing a collaborative care approach to integrating the management of anxiety and depression in the ambulatory primary care setting. This program was built on the chronic care model, which utilizes a team approach to caring for the patient. In addition to the patient and the primary care provider (PCP), the team included a medical social worker (MSW) as care manager and a psychiatrist as team consultant. The MSW would manage a registry of patients with depression at a clinic with several PCPs, contacting the patients on a regular basis to assess their status, and consulting with the psychiatrist on a weekly basis to discuss patients who were not achieving the goals of care. Any recommendation (eg, a change in medication dose or class) made by the psychiatrist was communicated to the PCP, who in turn would work with the patient on the new recommendation. This collaborative care approach resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients who achieved care plan goals. The authors believe this is an effective method for health systems to integrate mental health services into primary care. (Population Health Management 2016;19:81–87) PMID:26348355

  14. An opportunity for coordinated cancer care: intersection of health care reform, primary care providers, and cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lauren G; Wender, Richard; Altshuler, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The US health care system has become increasingly unsustainable, threatened by poor quality and spiraling costs. Many Americans are not receiving recommended preventive care, including cancer screening tests. Passage of the Affordable Care Act in March 2010 has the potential to reverse this course by increasing access to primary care providers, extending coverage and affordability of health insurance, and instituting proven quality measures. In order for health care reform to succeed, it will require a stronger primary care workforce, a new emphasis on patient-centered care, and payment incentives that reward quality over quantity. Innovations such as patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, and improved quality reporting methods are central features of a redesigned health care delivery system and will ultimately change the face of cancer care in the United States. PMID:21131791

  15. Primary care physician supply, physician compensation, and Medicare fees: what is the connection?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2008-11-01

    Primary care, a cornerstone of several health reform efforts, is believed by many to be in a crisis because of inadequate supply to meet future demand. This belief has focused attention on the adequacy of primary care physician supply and ways to boost access to primary care. One suggested approach is to raise Medicare fees for primary care services. Whether higher Medicare fees would increase physician interest in primary care specialties by reducing compensation disparities between primary care and other specialties has not been established. Further, many questions remain about the assumptions underlying these policy concerns. Is there really a primary care physician crisis? Why does compensation across physician specialties vary so widely? Can Medicare physician fee changes affect access to primary care? These questions defy simple answers. This issue brief lays out the latest information on physician workforce, compensation differences across physician specialties, and Medicare's physician fee-setting process. PMID:19048687

  16. Secondary Surge Capacity: A Framework for Understanding Long-Term Access to Primary Care for Medically Vulnerable Populations in Disaster Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Brock-Martin, Amy; Karmaus, Wilfried; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2012-01-01

    Disasters create a secondary surge in casualties because of the sudden increased need for long-term health care. Surging demands for medical care after a disaster place excess strain on an overtaxed health care system operating at maximum or reduced capacity. We have applied a health services use model to identify areas of vulnerability that perpetuate health disparities for at-risk populations seeking care after a disaster. We have proposed a framework to understand the role of the medical system in modifying the health impact of the secondary surge on vulnerable populations. Baseline assessment of existing needs and the anticipation of ballooning chronic health care needs following the acute response for at-risk populations are overlooked vulnerability gaps in national surge capacity plans. PMID:23078479

  17. Traveller health and primary care in Ireland: a consultative forum.

    PubMed

    Van Hout, Marie Claire

    2010-05-01

    Travellers in Ireland continue to experience health disparity, cultural fragmentation and a lack of visibility in health service provision. This paper reports on a pilot study exploring factors that affect Traveller health and the experiences of primary care services from the perspectives of key Traveller health stakeholders in Ireland. The study was designed as an initial consultative forum using a single focus group (n = 13) in order to yield specific recommendations for the development of a designated primary care service framework for Travellers. A thematic analysis of the narratives identified key areas of interest--emerging issues in Traveller health, recognition of Traveller culture and ethnic identity,Traveller uptake of primary care services, the role of the primary health care Traveller (PHCT) worker, and recommendations for a primary care service framework for Travellers in Ireland. The findings highlight the importance of consulting Traveller communities in the design of a primary care service framework within each local needs analysis. The promotion of Traveller advocacy, visible access and referral pathways can therefore be achieved, with PHCT workers acting as a 'bridge' between Travellers and the designated area primary care team. PMID:20503791

  18. Competition, gatekeeping, and health care access.

    PubMed

    Godager, Geir; Iversen, Tor; Ma, Ching-to Albert

    2015-01-01

    We study gatekeeping physicians' referrals of patients to specialty care. We derive theoretical results when competition in the physician market intensifies. First, due to competitive pressure, physicians refer patients to specialty care more often. Second, physicians earn more by treating patients themselves, so refer patients to specialty care less often. We assess empirically the overall effect of competition with data from a 2008-2009 Norwegian survey, National Health Insurance Administration, and Statistics Norway. From the data we construct three measures of competition: the number of open primary physician practices with and without population adjustment, and the Herfindahl-Hirschman index. The empirical results suggest that competition has negligible or small positive effects on referrals overall. Our results do not support the policy claim that increasing the number of primary care physicians reduces secondary care. PMID:25544400

  19. Taking care of your vascular access for hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood through the access. This is called stenosis. Day-to-day Care of Your Vascular Access Following these guidelines ... pulse (also called thrill) in your access every day. Your health care provider will show you how. ...

  20. Establishment of primary health care in Vietnam.

    PubMed Central

    Birt, C A

    1990-01-01

    Basic demographic and epidemiological data relevant to health problems in Vietnam are described in this paper. Existing health service arrangements are referred to, with particular emphasis on the strategy for development of primary health care. The establishment of the paediatric centre in Ho Chi Minh City is reported, and examples of its valuable work in primary health care development are described. PMID:2121182

  1. Teaching Primary Health Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezzina, Paul; Keogh, Johann J.; Keogh, Mariana

    1998-01-01

    Nursing and radiology students (n=15) at the University of Malta who completed an interdisciplinary module on primary health care reported they found the theoretical material applicable to practice; the module enabled them to learn about their potential role in primary health care. (SK)

  2. Primary Health Care and Narrative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Murphy, John W

    2015-01-01

    Primary health care has received a lot of attention since the Alma Ata Conference, convened by the World Health Organization in 1978. Key to the strategy to improve health care outlined at the Alma Ata conference is citizen participation in every phase of service delivery. Although the goals of primary health care have not been achieved, the addition of narrative medicine may facilitate these ends. But a new epistemology is necessary, one that is compatible with narrative medicine, so that local knowledge is elevated in importance and incorporated into the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health programs. In this way, relevant, sustainable, and affordable care can be provided. The aim of this article is to discuss how primary health care might be improved through the introduction of narrative medicine into planning primary health care delivery. PMID:26222094

  3. Primary Health Care and Narrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John W

    2015-01-01

    Primary health care has received a lot of attention since the Alma Ata Conference, convened by the World Health Organization in 1978. Key to the strategy to improve health care outlined at the Alma Ata conference is citizen participation in every phase of service delivery. Although the goals of primary health care have not been achieved, the addition of narrative medicine may facilitate these ends. But a new epistemology is necessary, one that is compatible with narrative medicine, so that local knowledge is elevated in importance and incorporated into the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health programs. In this way, relevant, sustainable, and affordable care can be provided. The aim of this article is to discuss how primary health care might be improved through the introduction of narrative medicine into planning primary health care delivery. PMID:26222094

  4. African Primary Care Research: Quality improvement cycles

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Improving the quality of clinical care and translating evidence into clinical practice is commonly a focus of primary care research. This article is part of a series on primary care research and outlines an approach to performing a quality improvement cycle as part of a research assignment at a Masters level. The article aims to help researchers design their quality improvement cycle and write their research project proposal. PMID:26245438

  5. Does the Primary Care Experience Influence the Cancer Diagnostic Process?

    PubMed

    Provost, Sylvie; Pineault, Raynald; Tousignant, Pierre; Roberge, Danièle; Tremblay, Dominique; Breton, Mylaine; Benhadj, Lynda; Diop, Mamadou; Fournier, Michel; Brousselle, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the impact of patients' experience of care at their usual source of primary care on their choice of point of entry into cancer investigation process, time to diagnosis, and presence of metastatic cancer at time of diagnosis. Method. A questionnaire was administered to 438 patients with cancer (breast, lung, and colorectal) between 2011 and 2013 in four oncology clinics of Quebec (Canada). Multiple regression analyses (logistic and Cox models) were conducted. Results. Among patients with symptoms leading to investigation of cancer (n = 307), 47% used their usual source of primary care as the point of entry for investigation. Greater comprehensiveness of care was associated with the decision to use this source as point of entry (OR = 1.25; CI 90% = 1.06-1.46), as well as with shorter times between first symptoms and investigation (HR = 1.11; p = 0.05), while greater accessibility was associated with shorter times between investigation and diagnosis (HR = 1.13; p < 0.01).  Conclusion. Experience of care at the usual source of primary care has a slight influence on the choice of point of entry for cancer investigation and on time to diagnosis. This influence appears to be more related to patients' perceptions of the accessibility and comprehensiveness of their usual source of primary care. PMID:26504599

  6. Does the Primary Care Experience Influence the Cancer Diagnostic Process?

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Sylvie; Pineault, Raynald; Tousignant, Pierre; Roberge, Danièle; Tremblay, Dominique; Breton, Mylaine; Benhadj, Lynda; Diop, Mamadou; Fournier, Michel; Brousselle, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the impact of patients' experience of care at their usual source of primary care on their choice of point of entry into cancer investigation process, time to diagnosis, and presence of metastatic cancer at time of diagnosis. Method. A questionnaire was administered to 438 patients with cancer (breast, lung, and colorectal) between 2011 and 2013 in four oncology clinics of Quebec (Canada). Multiple regression analyses (logistic and Cox models) were conducted. Results. Among patients with symptoms leading to investigation of cancer (n = 307), 47% used their usual source of primary care as the point of entry for investigation. Greater comprehensiveness of care was associated with the decision to use this source as point of entry (OR = 1.25; CI 90% = 1.06–1.46), as well as with shorter times between first symptoms and investigation (HR = 1.11; p = 0.05), while greater accessibility was associated with shorter times between investigation and diagnosis (HR = 1.13; p < 0.01).  Conclusion. Experience of care at the usual source of primary care has a slight influence on the choice of point of entry for cancer investigation and on time to diagnosis. This influence appears to be more related to patients' perceptions of the accessibility and comprehensiveness of their usual source of primary care. PMID:26504599

  7. The Experience of Working with Refugees: Counsellors in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Century, Gillian; Leavey, Gerard; Payne, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The provision of counselling services for refugee and asylum-seeking patients is relatively new in the UK and their complex needs may present considerable challenges within primary care, where access to specialist support resources is often limited. As far as we know, no previous research has attempted to look at the experiences of the counsellors…

  8. Improving Access to Health Care for Foster Children: The Illinois Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Bilaver, Lucy A.; Goerge, Robert M.; Masterson, James; Catania, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Children in foster care have lower health status than do their peers and limited access to health care. The Illinois Department of Children and Family Services developed HealthWorks, a separate primary care preferred provider system for children in foster care. This study compared claims data for children in HealthWorks with children not enrolled…

  9. 76 FR 61103 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care... announces a solicitation for health care payer organizations to participate in the Comprehensive Primary Care initiative (CPC), a multipayer model designed to improve primary care. DATES: Letter of...

  10. Affordable access to care for the undocumented.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    How do you tell a sick kid that nobody cares if he gets better? That's an exaggeration, of course, but it is the fundamental message our society sends when we tell him that, because he and his family are undocumented immigrants, we are unwilling to extend them access to affordable and reliable health insurance. One major shortcoming of the Affordable Care Act is its specific exclusion of the almost twelve million undocumented immigrants-including millions of children-in this country from access to the state and federal insurance exchanges where coverage can be purchased. It is true that providing undocumented immigrants access to the exchanges and subsidies mandated by the ACA would require additional funding. However, a recent analysis in California has found that the costs of expanding state-supported care to include undocumented immigrants would largely be offset by the increased state sales tax revenue paid by managed care organizations and by reduced spending at the county level on emergency-room and hospital care of the uninsured. PMID:25231664

  11. Primary Care Practice Development: A Relationship-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William L.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Nutting, Paul A.; Stange, Kurt C.; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Numerous primary care practice development efforts, many related to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), are emerging across the United States with few guides available to inform them. This article presents a relationship-centered practice development approach to understand practice and to aid in fostering practice development to advance key attributes of primary care that include access to first-contact care, comprehensive care, coordination of care, and a personal relationship over time. METHODS Informed by complexity theory and relational theories of organizational learning, we built on discoveries from the American Academy of Family Physicians’ National Demonstration Project (NDP) and 15 years of research to understand and improve primary care practice. RESULTS Primary care practices can fruitfully be understood as complex adaptive systems consisting of a core (a practice’s key resources, organizational structure, and functional processes), adaptive reserve (practice features that enhance resilience, such as relationships), and attentiveness to the local environment. The effectiveness of these attributes represents the practice’s internal capability. With adequate motivation, healthy, thriving practices advance along a pathway of slow, continuous developmental change with occasional rapid periods of transformation as they evolve better fits with their environment. Practice development is enhanced through systematically using strategies that involve setting direction and boundaries, implementing sensing systems, focusing on creative tensions, and fostering learning conversations. CONCLUSIONS Successful practice development begins with changes that strengthen practices’ core, build adaptive reserve, and expand attentiveness to the local environment. Development progresses toward transformation through enhancing primary care attributes. PMID:20530396

  12. The Outcomes of an Intervention Study to Reduce the Barriers Experienced by People with Intellectual Disabilities Accessing Primary Health Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, C. A.; Cooper, S.-A.; Morrison, J.; Finlayson, J.; Allan, L.; Robinson, N.; Burns, E.; Martin, G.

    2006-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities (IDs) experience significant health inequalities compared with the general population. The barriers people with IDs experience in accessing services contribute to these health inequalities. Professionals' significant unmet training needs are an important barrier to people with IDs accessing…

  13. Primary immune deficiencies - principles of care.

    PubMed

    Chapel, Helen; Prevot, Johan; Gaspar, Hubert Bobby; Español, Teresa; Bonilla, Francisco A; Solis, Leire; Drabwell, Josina

    2014-01-01

    Primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are a growing group of over 230 different disorders caused by ineffective, absent or an increasing number of gain of function mutations in immune components, mainly cells and proteins. Once recognized, these rare disorders are treatable and in some cases curable. Otherwise untreated PIDs are often chronic, serious, or even fatal. The diagnosis of PIDs can be difficult due to lack of awareness or facilities for diagnosis, and management of PIDs is complex. This document was prepared by a worldwide multi-disciplinary team of specialists; it aims to set out comprehensive principles of care for PIDs. These include the role of specialized centers, the importance of registries, the need for multinational research, the role of patient organizations, management and treatment options, the requirement for sustained access to all treatments including immunoglobulin therapies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, important considerations for developing countries and suggestions for implementation. A range of healthcare policies and services have to be put into place by government agencies and healthcare providers, to ensure that PID patients worldwide have access to appropriate and sustainable medical and support services. PMID:25566243

  14. Fundamental reform of payment for adult primary care: comprehensive payment for comprehensive care.

    PubMed

    Goroll, Allan H; Berenson, Robert A; Schoenbaum, Stephen C; Gardner, Laurence B

    2007-03-01

    Primary care is essential to the effective and efficient functioning of health care delivery systems, yet there is an impending crisis in the field due in part to a dysfunctional payment system. We present a fundamentally new model of payment for primary care, replacing encounter-based imbursement with comprehensive payment for comprehensive care. Unlike former iterations of primary care capitation (which simply bundled inadequate fee-for-service payments), our comprehensive payment model represents new investment in adult primary care, with substantial increases in payment over current levels. The comprehensive payment is directed to practices to include support for the modern systems and teams essential to the delivery of comprehensive, coordinated care. Income to primary physicians is increased commensurate with the high level of responsibility expected. To ensure optimal allocation of resources and the rewarding of desired outcomes, the comprehensive payment is needs/risk-adjusted and performance-based. Our model establishes a new social contract with the primary care community, substantially increasing payment in return for achieving important societal health system goals, including improved accessibility, quality, safety, and efficiency. Attainment of these goals should help offset and justify the costs of the investment. Field tests of this and other new models of payment for primary care are urgently needed. PMID:17356977

  15. Uncommon Caring: Primary Males and Implicit Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, James R.

    The caring and nurturing of children, which characterize primary education culture, have tended to shape a public perception of primary teaching as "women's work." Several social factors influence men's underrepresentation in the profession of primary education, such as parents not wanting their children exposed to "soft" males. Male primary…

  16. Primary care at the worksite: policy issues.

    PubMed

    Burgel, B J

    1996-05-01

    1. Primary care delivery at the worksite is a feasible reality. It is most feasible, however, for those large employers already assuming financial responsibility for providing employee health care benefits. 2. Ethical and legal questions arise with the delivery of worksite primary care services: how best to safeguard personal health information; and how best to manage the potential malpractice liability risks in a client-provider relationship at the worksite. 3. Primary care at the worksite requires primary care providers (a nurse practitioner and/or a physician) with generalist preparation in adult or family practice, in addition to specialty expertise in occupational health and safety. 4. Occupational health and safety must be a priority at all times, with the key goal to prevent work related injury and illness through engineering, administrative, and personal protective controls. PMID:8788399

  17. Assessing standards of vascular access device care.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Rose

    Vascular access devices (VADs) are essential in health care as they provide vital access for treatment including the infusion of medication, fluids, blood products and nutritional supplements. However, their invasive nature predisposes patients to potential complications, primarily bloodstream infections. This article examines the current standards of VAD care and assesses compliance with current guidelines (national and trust policy) in one hospital setting utilising a practice audit. The audit was conducted in a 500-bed district general hospital over 6 non-consecutive week days. The medical division where the audit took place had 13 wards with 288 beds. A total of 120 VADs were audited, averaging n=9.2 per ward (with a range of 4-18 on each ward). The results demonstrated a collective non-compliance rate of 48%. Although overall compliance was 52%, a poor standard of care was highlighted across the division for all components of the care elements. The post-insertion care of VADs is an essential component of a comprehensive strategy to prevent complications. Consequently, initiatives such as audit, education and feedback should be used in an effort to improve practice and maintain optimal care. PMID:25904534

  18. Access to care - an unmet need in headache management?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Access to care for headache sufferers is not always simple. A survey conducted in a large number of members of lay associations point to the existence of multiple barriers to care for headache in several European countries. Patients usually discover the existence of specialized structures with a delay of several years after the onset of their headache. Furthermore, a relevant portion of them are not satisfied with the management of their disease, partly because of the poor efficacy of treatments and partly because of the difficulty to get in touch with the specialist. Headache disorders, and primary headaches in particular, represent an important issue in public health, because they are common, disabling and treatable. A joint effort is required from the relevant stakeholders (scientists, lay organizations, decision-makers, healthcare policymakers, and others) to improve the access to care for headache sufferers. PMID:24742114

  19. [Evolution of primary health care in Spain].

    PubMed

    Martínez Riera, José Ramón

    2012-12-01

    Coinciding with the celebration of the 35th anniversary of the journal of nursing, invented in 1977, conducted a systematic review of all issues published (371) to identify items (222) and news (94) related to primary care health. Events are arranged temporarily and refer to accompanying the evolution of primary care model. The Analysis Shows the evolution of primary care, since its inception in 1978, has been reflected in the type of articles and the content of news published, be an excellent indicator of its development and contribution for the nurses. PMID:23390875

  20. The missing link – the role of primary care in global health

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mala; Pilot, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the role of primary care in the context of global health. Universal health coverage is a key priority for WHO and its member states, and provision of accessible and safe primary care is recognised as essential to meet this important international policy goal. Nevertheless, more than three decades after Alma Ata, the provision of primary health care remains inadequate, indicating that primary care has not received the priority it deserves, in many parts of the world. This is despite the proven health benefits that result from access to comprehensive primary health care. We highlight some examples of good practice and discuss the relevance of primary care in the context of health equity and cost-effectiveness. Challenges that influence the success of primary care include the availability of a qualified workforce, financing and system design and quality assurance and patient safety. PMID:24560266

  1. Integrated Primary Care Information Database (IPCI)

    Cancer.gov

    The Integrated Primary Care Information Database is a longitudinal observational database that was created specifically for pharmacoepidemiological and pharmacoeconomic studies, inlcuding data from computer-based patient records supplied voluntarily by general practitioners.

  2. Use of community-based participatory research in primary care to improve healthcare outcomes and disparities in care

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Hazel; White, Lauren; Steuerwald, Mark; Dulin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has emerged to bridge the gap between research and primary-care practice through community engagement and social action to increase health equity. It is widely acknowledged that access to high-quality primary care services is important to the overall health of a community. Here, CBPR studies in a primary care setting are reviewed to assess the use of CBPR associated with common health problems seen in primary care such as access to care and disparities in chronic disease management across vulnerable populations. CBPR involves building relationships with local communities, determining areas of need and establishing priorities for health concerns. Studies showing improved access to care for a Hispanic population, reduced asthma symptoms and weight loss are highlighted. PMID:24236682

  3. Root Doctors as Providers of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Van J.

    1983-01-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two “root doctors.” These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  4. Root doctors as providers of primary care.

    PubMed

    Stitt, V J

    1983-07-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two "root doctors." These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  5. Weight management practices among primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, G M; Reifsnider, E; Allan, J D

    2000-04-01

    This pilot study examined how primary care providers manage patients with weight problems, an important component of primary care. A convenience sample of 17 nurse practitioners and 15 physicians were surveyed about assessments and interventions used in practice for weight management along with perceived barriers to providing effective weight management. Practice patterns between gender, profession and practice setting of the nurse practitioners were compared. PMID:11930414

  6. Primary care groups: allies in the challenge.

    PubMed

    1998-07-01

    Date: 8 July 1998 PLACE:The Marriott Hotel, Bristol Date: 9 July 1998 PLACE: Manchester Conference Centre, Manchester Cost: £58.75 (Incl.VAT) These two events provide an opportunity to participate in an open exchange with people experienced in setting up and running primary care groups. There will also be information provided on the ME) Intranet which is a major source of information on primary care groups. PMID:27317113

  7. A New Path to Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-03-01

    The University of North Texas Health Science Center and the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine are partnering with Midland College and Midland Memorial Hospital to keep their own crop of future doctors in the area. The Primary Care Pathway identifies interested, high-achieving community college students likely to be successful in medical school and guarantees them an accelerated pathway to a doctor of osteopathic medicine degree, focusing earlier and more intensely on primary care. PMID:26928815

  8. Exploring primary care activities in ACT teams.

    PubMed

    Vanderlip, Erik R; Williams, Nancy A; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Katon, Wayne

    2014-05-01

    People with serious mental illness often receive inadequate primary and preventive care services. Federal healthcare reform endorses team-based care that provides high quality primary and preventive care to at risk populations. Assertive community treatment (ACT) teams offer a proven, standardized treatment approach effective in improving mental health outcomes for the seriously mentally ill. Much is known about the effectiveness of ACT teams in improving mental health outcomes, but the degree to which medical care needs are addressed is not established. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which ACT teams address the physical health of the population they serve. ACT team leaders were invited to complete an anonymous, web-based survey to explore attitudes and activities involving the primary care needs of their clients. Information was collected regarding the use of health screening tools, physical health assessments, provision of medical care and collaboration with primary care systems. Data was analyzed from 127 team leaders across the country, of which 55 completed the entire survey. Nearly every ACT team leader believed ACT teams have a role in identifying and managing the medical co-morbidities of their clientele. ACT teams report participation in many primary care activities. ACT teams are providing a substantial amount of primary and preventive services to their population. The survey suggests standardization of physical health identification, management or referral processes within ACT teams may result in improved quality of medical care. ACT teams are in a unique position to improve physical health care by virtue of having medically trained staff and frequent, close contact with their clients. PMID:24337472

  9. [Determinants of primary care specialty choice].

    PubMed

    Pawełczyk, Agnieszka; Pawełczyk, Tomasz; Bielecki, Jan

    2007-03-01

    This paper analyzes and synthesizes the literature on primary care specialty choice. Motivation for choosing medicine and its impact on recruitment to different types of medical work has been presented. Factors that influence medical students and young doctors to change specialty preference have also been explored. Variables, such as gender, martial status, age, income expectations and prestige, that affect medical students' specialty selection decisions for primary care, have been examined. Personality profiles of primary care physician have been evaluated and the influence of communication skills and knowledge of social psychology on his/her work have been analyzed. It is presented that other traits, such as patient-centeredness, needs to serve society and value orientation, is also associated with increases in numbers of students choosing primary care. The analyze shows that the preference for primary care is connected with being interested in diverse patients and health problems and also with being people-orientated. A survey conducted into Polish medical students' attitudes to primary care and family medicine is presented. There is a negative perception of family medicine among Polish students and doctors because of its long work hours and less time for family, insufficient diagnostic possibilities and monotony It is chosen because of lack of other possibilities, difficulties in employment and opportunity to become 'a specialist' in short time. PMID:17682684

  10. The Participatory Imperative in Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollnsteiner, Mary Racelis

    1982-01-01

    This article presents the major issues, trends, interpretations, and difficulties facing Primary Health Care (PHC) personnel in taking the drastic steps required to reform the health care system. The author argues that PHC aims to enable people to take responsibility for their own health and further the redistribution of resources. (SSH)

  11. Primary Care in Secondary Settings: Inherent Strains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Henry W.; Garfat, Thom

    2005-01-01

    There is an ever present struggle associated with reconciling "primary" care requirements for children and young people living in group care programs with "secondary" organizational demands imposed by external agency expectations and administrative requirements. That struggle finds its expression and potential balance in the daily work of staff.…

  12. Millennial transformation for primary care.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Michael

    2010-06-01

    We do not need a crystal ball to see the future. Our web-based future has already arrived in all other aspects of our lives--even our mobile phones. The tools for progress--Personal Health Records, Social Networks, and Online medical information--are widely available. The demand is at hand--Millennials are flexing consumer muscles as they enter the healthcare market. Real "Health Care Reform" requires fundamental changes in practice--which in turn requires effective use of information technologies and adaption to changing consumer expectations. The VHA and the MHS are uniquely capable of leveraging political, academic and technological forces to help move American health care through this millennial transformation. Federal health systems are positioned to demonstrate the value of innovation as America seeks healthcare reform. PMID:20572466

  13. Primary Care Physicians' Dementia Care Practices: Evidence of Geographic Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Zlateva, Ianita; Delaney, Colleen; Kleppinger, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores primary care physicians' (PCPs) self-reported approaches and barriers to management of patients with dementia, with a focus on comparisons in dementia care practices between PCPs in 2 states. Design and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were mailed to 600 randomly selected licensed PCPs in…

  14. Neighbourhoods and potential access to health care: the role of spatial and aspatial factors.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Laura; Wilson, Kathi; Bell, Scott; Shah, Tayyab Ikram

    2012-07-01

    The availability of, and access to, primary health care is one neighbourhood characteristic that has the potential to impact health thus representing an important area of focus for neighbourhood-health research. This research examines neighbourhood access to primary health care in the city of Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. A modification of the Two Step Floating Catchment Area method is used to measure multiple spatial and aspatial (social) dimensions of potential access to primary health care in natural neighbourhoods of Mississauga. The analysis reveals that neighbourhood-level potential access to primary care is dependant on spatial and aspatial dimensions of access selected for examination. The results also show that potential accessibility is reduced for linguistic minorities as well as for recent immigrant populations who appear, on the surface, to have better access to walk-in clinics than dedicated physicians. The research results reinforce the importance of focusing on intra-urban variations in access to care and demonstrate the utility of a new approach for studying neighbourhood impacts that better represents spatial variations in health care access and demand. PMID:22503565

  15. Eating Disorders in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Sangvai, Devdutta

    2016-06-01

    Eating disorders are a complex set of illnesses most commonly affecting white adolescent girls and young women. The most common eating disorders seen in the primary care setting are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Treatment in the primary care environment ideally involves a physician, therapist, and nutritionist, although complex cases may require psychiatric and other specialist care. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with improved outcomes, whereas the consequences of untreated eating disorders, particularly anorexia nervosa, can be devastating, including death. PMID:27262009

  16. Public finance policy strategies to increase access to preconception care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kay A

    2006-09-01

    Policy and finance barriers reduce access to preconception care and, reportedly, limit professional practice changes that would improve the availability of needed services. Millions of women of childbearing age (15-44) lack adequate health coverage (i.e., uninsured or underinsured), and others live in medically underserved areas. Service delivery fragmentation and lack of professional guidelines are additional barriers. This paper reviews barriers and opportunities for financing preconception care, based on a review and analysis of state and federal policies. We describe states' experiences with and opportunities to improve health coverage, through public programs such as Medicaid, Medicaid waivers, and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The potential role of Title V and of community health centers in providing primary and preventive care to women also is discussed. In these and other public health and health coverage programs, opportunities exist to finance preconception care for low-income women. Three major policy directions are discussed. To increase access to preconception care among women of childbearing age, the federal and state governments have opportunities to: (1) improve health care coverage, (2) increase the supply of publicly subsidized health clinics, and (3) direct delivery of preconception screening and interventions in the context of public health programs. PMID:16802188

  17. Public Finance Policy Strategies to Increase Access to Preconception Care

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Policy and finance barriers reduce access to preconception care and, reportedly, limit professional practice changes that would improve the availability of needed services. Millions of women of childbearing age (15–44) lack adequate health coverage (i.e., uninsured or underinsured), and others live in medically underserved areas. Service delivery fragmentation and lack of professional guidelines are additional barriers. This paper reviews barriers and opportunities for financing preconception care, based on a review and analysis of state and federal policies. We describe states’ experiences with and opportunities to improve health coverage, through public programs such as Medicaid, Medicaid waivers, and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The potential role of Title V and of community health centers in providing primary and preventive care to women also is discussed. In these and other public health and health coverage programs, opportunities exist to finance preconception care for low-income women. Three major policy directions are discussed. To increase access to preconception care among women of childbearing age, the federal and state governments have opportunities to: (1) improve health care coverage, (2) increase the supply of publicly subsidized health clinics, and (3) direct delivery of preconception screening and interventions in the context of public health programs. PMID:16802188

  18. Overview of anesthesia for primary care physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Potyk, D K; Raudaskoski, P

    1998-01-01

    Primary care physicians are frequently asked to evaluate patients before elective surgery. Familiarity with anesthetic technique and physiologic processes can help primary care physicians identify risk factors for perioperative complications, optimize patient care, and enhance communication with surgeons and anesthesiologists. To this end, we review the physiologic processes accompanying tracheal intubation and general and regional anesthesia. There is no convincing evidence that regional anesthesia is safer than general anesthesia. In addition to replacing fluid losses from the surgical field and insensible losses, intraoperative fluid administration may attenuate the cardiovascular and renal effects of anesthesia. Therefore, recommendations to limit fluids should be made with caution and should be tempered with an understanding of intraoperative fluid requirements. An understanding of the physiologic processes of anesthesia, combined with preoperative risk stratification strategies, will enhance a primary care physician's ability to provide meaningful preoperative evaluations. PMID:9655993

  19. A rural primary care pediatric residency program.

    PubMed

    Kairys, S; Newell, P

    1985-10-01

    Rural primary care is often reported in the medical literature as frustrating, lonely, and nonrewarding. Many graduating residents who choose small town practice become quickly disenchanted with the life-style and leave for a more populous territory or subspecialty training. Opportunities to learn how to take advantage of rural settings and establish rewarding community practices are few. The Primary Care Pediatric Residency Program at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has developed a training program in rural primary care. Residents experience over a three-year period the many facets of rural practice and are introduced to community-oriented approaches to child health care. Selected rural pediatric practices within a 45-mile radius of the medical center serve as teaching laboratories in which residents develop the skills necessary to manage children's problems related to school, behavioral disorders, and chronic diseases. PMID:4045973

  20. The ORIGINS of Primary Health Care and SELECTIVE Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Cueto, Marcos

    2004-01-01

    I present a historical study of the role played by the World Health Organization and UNICEF in the emergence and diffusion of the concept of primary health care during the late 1970s and early 1980s. I have analyzed these organizations’ political context, their leaders, the methodologies and technologies associated with the primary health care perspective, and the debates on the meaning of primary health care. These debates led to the development of an alternative, more restricted approach, known as selective primary health care. My study examined library and archival sources; I cite examples from Latin America. PMID:15514221

  1. Primary care--opportunities and threats. Developing prescribing in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, C. P.; Taylor, R. J.; Blenkinsopp, A.

    1997-01-01

    The latest white papers on the NHS focus on stimulating innovation in the delivery of primary care and removing barriers to further development. Some of this innovation relates directly to prescribing in primary care, and in this article the authors speculate on what might happen if the prescribing initiatives referred to in the white papers were extended and disseminated more widely. The initiatives which might have the biggest impact are those encouraging closer collaboration between general practitioners and community pharmacists and those aiding extension of the current nurse prescribing scheme in primary care. Both offer considerable opportunities to improve primary care, but both bear some potential risks. PMID:9116557

  2. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  3. 76 FR 12080 - TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project AGENCY: Department of Defense. ACTION..., entitled Department of Defense TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project. The demonstration project is intended to improve access to urgent care including minor illness or injury for Coast Guard...

  4. Access to care: leveraging dental education.

    PubMed

    Bertolami, Charles N; Berne, Robert

    2014-11-01

    If it is not a naïve expectation for dentists who have been beneficiaries of public generosity to share their good fortune with the public that made it possible, there may be a rational basis for enhancing the role of dental education in improving access to oral health care by promoting-but not requiring-a voluntary service commitment after graduation commensurate with the magnitude of the subsidy received. Such an approach would be in accordance with the Institute of Medicine's report Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations, but without the governmental coercion explicit in the report. A sustainable alternative proposal is made here, offering both greater options to students in the financing of their dental education and greater obligations for those students who accept state subsidies: providing tuition discounts for students of state-supported dental schools based not on past residency status but rather on a future commitment to public service. This arrangement could be good public policy that might also help to create a culture in which dental students are given authentic options as part of a profession-wide ideology of public service. The result could well contribute to improved oral health care for the underserved. PMID:25362688

  5. Humanization policy in primary health care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Junges, José Roque

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze humanization practices in primary health care in the Brazilian Unified Health System according to the principles of the National Humanization Policy. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was carried out, followed by a meta-synthesis, using the following databases: BDENF (nursing database), BDTD (Brazilian digital library of theses and dissertations), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to nursing and allied health literature), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean health care sciences literature), MedLine (International health care sciences literature), PAHO (Pan-American Health Care Organization Library) and SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online). The following descriptors were used: Humanization; Humanizing Health Care; Reception: Humanized care: Humanization in health care; Bonding; Family Health Care Program; Primary Care; Public Health and Sistema Único de Saúde (the Brazilian public health care system). Research articles, case studies, reports of experiences, dissertations, theses and chapters of books written in Portuguese, English or Spanish, published between 2003 and 2011, were included in the analysis. RESULTS Among the 4,127 publications found on the topic, 40 studies were evaluated and included in the analysis, producing three main categories: the first referring to the infrastructure and organization of the primary care service, made clear the dissatisfaction with the physical structure and equipment of the services and with the flow of attendance, which can facilitate or make difficult the access. The second, referring to the health work process, showed issues about the insufficient number of professionals, fragmentation of the work processes, the professional profile and responsibility. The third category, referring to the relational technologies, indicated the reception, bonding, listening, respect and dialog with the service users. CONCLUSIONS Although many practices were cited as humanizing they do not produce changes

  6. The Rise of Primary Care Physicians in the Provision of US Mental Health Care.

    PubMed

    Olfson, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Primary care physicians have assumed an increasingly important role in US outpatient mental health care. They are providing an increasing volume of outpatient mental health services, prescribing a growing number and variety of psychotropic medications, and treating patients with a broader array of mental health conditions. These trends, which run counter to a general trend toward specialization and subspecialization within US health care, place new strains on the clinical competencies of primary care physicians. They also underscore the importance of implementing more effective models of collaboration between primary care physicians and mental health specialists. Several elements of the Affordable Care Act provide options for financing and organizing the delivery of integrated general medical and behavioral services. Such integrated services have the potential to improve access and quality of outpatient mental health care for a range of psychiatric disorders. Because people with severe and persisting mental disorders commonly require a higher-level medical expertise than is readily available within primary care as well as a complex array of social services, separate specialized mental health will likely continue to play a vitally important role in caring for this population. PMID:27127264

  7. Large Independent Primary Care Medical Groups

    PubMed Central

    Casalino, Lawrence P.; Chen, Melinda A.; Staub, C. Todd; Press, Matthew J.; Mendelsohn, Jayme L.; Lynch, John T.; Miranda, Yesenia

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE In the turbulent US health care environment, many primary care physicians seek hospital employment. Large physician-owned primary care groups are an alternative, but few physicians or policy makers realize that such groups exist. We wanted to describe these groups, their advantages, and their challenges. METHODS We identified 21 groups and studied 5 that varied in size and location. We conducted interviews with group leaders, surveyed randomly selected group physicians, and interviewed external observers—leaders of a health plan, hospital, and specialty medical group that shared patients with the group. We triangulated responses from group leaders, group physicians, and external observers to identify key themes. RESULTS The groups’ physicians work in small practices, with the group providing economies of scale necessary to develop laboratory and imaging services, health information technology, and quality improvement infrastructure. The groups differ in their size and the extent to which they engage in value-based contracting, though all are moving to increase the amount of financial risk they take for their quality and cost performance. Unlike hospital-employed and multispecialty groups, independent primary care groups can aim to reduce health care costs without conflicting incentives to fill hospital beds and keep specialist incomes high. Each group was positively regarded by external observers. The groups are under pressure, however, to sell to organizations that can provide capital for additional infrastructure to engage in value-based contracting, as well as provide substantial income to physicians from the sale. CONCLUSIONS Large, independent primary care groups have the potential to make primary care attractive to physicians and to improve patient care by combining human scale advantages of physician autonomy and the small practice setting with resources that are important to succeed in value-based contracting. PMID:26755779

  8. Centralized care management support for "high utilizers" in primary care practices at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brent C; Paik, Jamie L; Haley, Laura L; Grammatico, Gina M

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence of effectiveness is limited, care management based outside primary care practices or hospitals is receiving increased attention. The University of Michigan (UM) Complex Care Management Program (CCMP) provides care management for uninsured and underinsured, high-utilizing patients in multiple primary care practices. To inform development of optimal care management models, we describe the CCMP model and characteristics and health care utilization patterns of its patients. Of a consecutive series of 49 patients enrolled at CCMP in 2011, the mean (SD) age was 48 (+/- 14); 23 (47%) were women; and 29 (59%) were White. Twenty-eight (57%) had two or more chronic medical conditions, 39 (80%) had one or more psychiatric condition, 28 (57%) had a substance abuse disorder, and 11 (22%) were homeless. Through phone, e-mail, and face-to-face contact with patients and primary care providers (PCPs), care managers coordinated health and social services and facilitated access to medical and mental health care. Patients had a mean (SD) number of hospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits in 6 months prior to enrollment of2.2 (2.5) and 4.2 (4.3), respectively, with a nonstatistically significant decrease in hospitalizations, hospital days, and emergency room visits in 6 months following enrollment in CCMP. Centralized care management support for primary care practices engages high-utilizing patients with complex medical and behavioral conditions in care management that would be difficult to provide through individual practices and may decrease health care utilization by these patients. PMID:24761538

  9. Genetic competencies essential for health care professionals in primary care.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Janet L; Sefton, Marlene G S; Matheson, Jolie Kim; Healy, Kristine M

    2005-01-01

    The completion of the sequencing of the human genome in 2003 signaled the onset of the genomic era in health care. The knowledge gleaned from the Human Genome Project has led to the understanding that every health problem has a genetic component and that clinicians should include the application of genetic information in all aspects of health care. This article describes the genetic competencies essential for all health care professionals in primary care. Health care professionals should augment their current practice by obtaining a multigenerational genetic family history for each patient, assessing all patients for potentially heritable conditions, providing referrals to genetic health professionals as needed, offering genetic testing when indicated, and considering an individual's genetic makeup in the selection of medications and treatments for that person. Finally, all health care professionals ought to be prepared to address the complex personal, cultural, theological, ethical, legal, and social issues associated with genetic testing and other genetic issues commonly encountered in clinical practice. PMID:15894994

  10. Rainbows: a primary health care initiative for primary schools.

    PubMed

    Munns, Ailsa; Forde, Karen A; Krouzecky, Miriam; Shields, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Within the current Australian health system is the understanding of a need to change from the predominate biomedical model to incorporate a comprehensive primary health care centred approach, embracing the social contexts of health and wellbeing. Recent research investigated the benefits of the primary health care philosophy and strategies in relation to the Rainbows programme which addresses grief and loss in primary school aged students in Western Australia. A multidisciplinary collaboration between the Western Australian Departments of Health and Education enabled community school health nurse coordinators to train teacher facilitators in the implementation of Rainbows, enabling support for students and their parents. The results of this qualitative study indicate that all participants regard Rainbows as effective, with many perceived benefits to students and their families. PMID:26281402

  11. Primary and specialist diabetes care three years after introduction of health care system reform in Poland.

    PubMed

    Mardarowicz, Grazyna; Łopatyński, Jerzy

    2002-01-01

    The authors discuss epidemics of diabetes in the world and in Poland. In the Lublin region (eastern Poland), for instance, they found type 2 diabetes (DM 2) in 15.6% of the examined aged over 35 (according to the WHO criteria of 1985). The health care system reform in Poland has made more difficult the access of the diabetic to a specialist that treats this disease. Therefore doctors and nurses of primary health care have become more responsible for diabcare than before. The authors believe that the systematic education of primary health care doctors by specialists so that they can treat patients according to the modern standards of practical diabetology as well as sharing of tasks and responsibilities between primary and specialist diabetologic care, are very important. Primary health care would be in charge of prevention and early diagnosis of DM 2 as well as prevention and early diagnosis of concomitant complications of the disease. Specialists would have consultation on the patients at the moment of diagnosis and then at least once a year. They would also take care of search for and diagnosis of remote diabetes complications. Primary health care doctors would still treat most of diabetics with DM 2; specialist centres doctors would treat most of diabetics with DM type 1, patients with complications and from special risk groups (e.g. women with gestational diabetes). PMID:12898974

  12. Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care looks forward to 2009.

    PubMed

    Licciardone, John C

    2009-01-01

    Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care, which enters its third year of operation in 2009 under the umbrella of BioMed Central, continues to promote and advance open access publishing through universal online access without charge, indexing in PubMed and archiving in PubMed Central, retention of authors' copyright, and expeditious peer review. Notable accomplishments during 2008 included a median lag time of four months from initial manuscript submission to publication, designation of eight articles as "highly accessed," and achievement of a balanced proportion of publications in our core topic areas of osteopathic medicine and primary care. In October 2008, Springer Science+Business Media, a major publisher of journals in science, technology, and medicine, acquired the BioMed Central Group. Our 2009 Editorial Board is presented herein, as well as a new mechanism for posting book reviews on the Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care website. We continue to encourage manuscript submissions and reader comments on our articles. Waivers or discounts of article processing charges are available via several mechanisms for eligible authors who submit qualified manuscripts. PMID:19193237

  13. A Primary Care Perspective on Keloids

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Steven; Aziz, Nasir; Rashid, Rashid M.; Khachemoune, Amor

    2009-01-01

    Keloids are a common presenting complaint in the primary care clinic. This condition presents a formidable challenge, as recurrence is often difficult to prevent despite use of multiple therapeutic interventions. Part of the reason for the absence of a definitive treatment is the incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of keloid formation, which creates a frustrating situation for both physician and patient. Here we review the most recent literature on the clinical features, pathogenesis, and management of keloids, with special emphasis on the unique challenges faced by primary care physicians. PMID:19295939

  14. Improving mental health through primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Dowrick, C

    1992-01-01

    The government white paper Health of the nation has highlighted mental health as a key issue for the next decade. Primary care is being encouraged to take a leading role in developing effective services for people with mental health problems. This paper reviews current research on key aspects of mental health in adults: the prevalence of mental health problems, improving detection and management of mental health problems, the role of counselling, and communication between primary and secondary care. Recommendations are made for initiatives in both research and service development. PMID:1457175

  15. [The scientific entertainer in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Santos, José Manuel; Lapetra, José

    2012-09-01

    The scientific method is capable of being applied in primary care. In this article we defend the role of the "scientific entertainer "as strategic and necessary in achieving this goal. The task has to include playful and light-hearted content. We explore some words in English that may help us to understand the concept of "scientific entertainer" from a semantic point of view (showman, master of ceremonies, entrepreneur, go-between) also in Spanish language (counsellor, mediator, methodologist) and finally in Latin and Greek (tripalium, negotium, chronos, kairos). We define the clinical, manager or research health-worker who is skilled in primary care as a "primarylogist". PMID:22018794

  16. [Thyroid dysfunction in primary care medicine].

    PubMed

    Wuerzner, Kaisa; Pasche, Olivier; Rodondi, Nicolas; Portmann, Luc

    2010-12-01

    Thyroid function tests include the measuring of the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (T4) in the case of abnormal TSH. These tests are frequently performed in primary care medicine since many clinical situations can be suggestive of dysthyroidism, as for example fatigue, depressive states or cardiac arthmia. In the case of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, the indications for treatment are controversial there being a lack of significant randomised studies. For primary care physicians faced with abnormal thyroid function tests we propose a diagnostic approach, clinical recommendations, and indications for referral to the specialist. PMID:21207724

  17. Bulimia Nervosa: A Primary Care Review

    PubMed Central

    Rushing, Jona M.; Jones, Laura E.; Carney, Caroline P.

    2003-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is a psychiatric condition that affects many adolescent and young adult women. The disorder is characterized by bingeing and purging behavior and can lead to medical complications. Thus, patients with bulimia nervosa commonly present in the primary care setting. Physical and laboratory examinations reveal markers of bulimia nervosa that are useful in making the diagnosis. Treatment is beneficial, and outcomes of early intervention are good. This article discusses the history, presentation, and tools needed for recognizing and treating bulimia nervosa in primary care. PMID:15213788

  18. [Rare disease at a primary care facility].

    PubMed

    Ortega Calvo, M; García de la Corte, F; Iglesias Bonilla, P

    2007-11-01

    A pragmatic classification. Rare diseases (RD) might be a research target on primary care because their gift of scientific knowledge building. A rational scheme would be necessary for clinical and scientific findings. Retrospective long-term report of the most important RD achieved for a ten years period by a general practitioner at a non-urban primary care facility (Andalusia-Spain). Our results are classified as: a) rare adverse drug reactions (RADR); b) accurate RD diagnosis (RDD); and c) RD prevalence study (RDP). PMID:18275262

  19. Chinese primary care physicians and work attitudes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Leiyu; Hung, Li-Mei; Song, Kuimeng; Rane, Sarika; Tsai, Jenna; Sun, Xiaojie; Li, Hui; Meng, Qingyue

    2013-01-01

    China passed a landmark health care reform in 2009, aimed at improving health care for all citizens by strengthening the primary care system, largely through improvements to infrastructure. However, research has shown that the work attitudes of primary care physicians (PCPs) can greatly affect the stability of the overall workforce and the quality and delivery of health care. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between reported work attitudes of PCPs and their personal, work, and educational characteristics. A multi-stage, complex sampling design was employed to select a sample of 434 PCPs practicing in urban and rural primary care settings, and a survey questionnaire was administered by researchers with sponsorship from the Ministry of Health. Four outcome measures describing work attitudes were used, as well as a number of personal-, work-, and practice-related factors. Findings showed that although most PCPs considered their work as important, a substantial number also reported large workloads, job pressure, and turnover intentions. Findings suggest that policymakers should focus on training and educational opportunities for PCPs and consider ways to ease workload pressures and improve salaries. These policy improvements must accompany reform efforts that are already underway before positive changes in reduced disparities and improved health outcomes can be realized in China. PMID:23527460

  20. Primary care for adults on the autism spectrum.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Christina; Kripke, Clarissa Calliope; Raymaker, Dora

    2014-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is defined by differences in social communication and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities. Skills and challenges can change depending on environmental stimuli, supports, and stressors. Quality of life can be improved by the use of accommodations, assistive technologies, therapies to improve adaptive function or communication, caregiver training, acceptance, access, and inclusion. This article focuses on the identification of ASD in adults, referrals for services, the recognition of associated conditions, strategies and accommodations to facilitate effective primary care services, and ethical issues related to caring for autistic adults. PMID:25134878

  1. Primary health care of the newborn baby.

    PubMed

    Bhakoo, O N; Kumar, R

    1990-01-01

    More than 50% of infant deaths in India occur during the neonatal period. High priority therefore needs to be given to improving the survival of newborns. A large number of neonatal deaths have their origin in the perinatal period and are mainly determined by the health and nutritional status of the mother, the quality of care during pregnancy and delivery, and the immediate care of the newborn at birth. Main causes of neonatal mortality are birth asphyxia, respiratory problems, and infections, especially tetanus. Most such deaths occur among low birthweight babies. Hypothermia, undernutrition, and mismanaged breast feeding may also indirectly contribute to neonatal mortality. Community-based studies have, however, demonstrated that most neonatal mortality can be affordably prevented through primary health care. Efforts are underway to expand the health care infrastructure, but the outreach of maternal and child health care remains unsatisfactory especially in rural areas. PMID:12319228

  2. Tobacco use disorder treatment in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Kunyk, Diane; Els, Charl; Papadakis, Sophia; Selby, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To test a team-based, site-specific, multicomponent clinical system pathway designed for enhancing tobacco use disorder treatment by primary care physicians. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting Sixty primary care sites in Alberta. Participants A convenience sample of 198 primary care physicians from the population of 2857. Main outcome measures Data collection occurred between September 2010 and February 2012 on 3 distinct measures. Twenty-four weeks after the intervention, audits of the primary care practices assessed the adoption and sustainability of 10 tobacco clinical system pathway components, a survey measured changes in physicians’ treatment intentions, and patient chart reviews examined changes in physicians’ consistency with the treatment algorithm. Results The completion rate by physicians was 89.4%. An intention-to-treat approach was undertaken for statistical analysis. Intervention uptake was demonstrated by positive changes at 4 weeks in how many of the 10 clinical system measures were performed (mean [SD] = 4.22 [1.60] vs 8.57 [1.46]; P < .001). Physicians demonstrated significant favourable changes in 9 of the 12 measures of treatment intention (P < .05). The 18 282 chart reviews documented significant increases in 6 of the 8 algorithm components. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the provision of a tobacco clinical system pathway that incorporates other members of the health care team and builds on existing office infrastructures will support positive and sustainable changes in tobacco use disorder treatment by physicians in primary care. This study reaffirms the substantive and important role of supporting how treatment is delivered in physicians’ practices. PMID:25022640

  3. Integrated working between residential care homes and primary care: a survey of care homes in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Older people living in care homes in England have complex health needs due to a range of medical conditions, mental health needs and frailty. Despite an increasing policy expectation that professionals should operate in an integrated way across organisational boundaries, there is a lack of understanding between care homes and the National Health Service (NHS) about how the two sectors should work together, meaning that residents can experience a poor "fit" between their needs, and services they can access. This paper describes a survey to establish the current extent of integrated working that exists between care homes and primary and community health and social services. Methods A self-completion, online questionnaire was designed by the research team. Items on the different dimensions of integration (funding, administrative, organisational, service delivery, clinical care) were included. The survey was sent to a random sample of residential care homes with more than 25 beds (n = 621) in England in 2009. Responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results The survey achieved an overall response rate of 15.8%. Most care homes (78.7%) worked with more than one general practice. Respondents indicated that a mean of 14.1 professionals/ services (other than GPs) had visited the care homes in the last six months (SD 5.11, median 14); a mean of .39 (SD.163) professionals/services per bed. The most frequent services visiting were district nursing, chiropody and community psychiatric nurses. Many (60%) managers considered that they worked with the NHS in an integrated way, including sharing documents, engaging in integrated care planning and joint learning and training. However, some care home managers cited working practices dictated by NHS methods of service delivery and priorities for care, rather than those of the care home or residents, a lack of willingness by NHS professionals to share information, and low levels of respect for

  4. Interlibrary loan in primary access libraries: challenging the traditional view

    PubMed Central

    Dudden, Rosalind Farnam; Coldren, Sue; Condon, Joyce Elizabeth; Katsh, Sara; Reiter, Catherine Morton; Roth, Pamela Lynn

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Primary access libraries serve as the foundation of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) interlibrary loan (ILL) hierarchy, yet few published reports directly address the important role these libraries play in the ILL system. This may reflect the traditional view that small, primary access libraries are largely users of ILL, rather than important contributors to the effectiveness and efficiency of the national ILL system. Objective: This study was undertaken to test several commonly held beliefs regarding ILL system use by primary access libraries. Hypotheses: Three hypotheses were developed. H1: Colorado and Wyoming primary access libraries comply with the recommended ILL guideline of adhering to a hierarchical structure, emphasizing local borrowing. H2: The closures of two Colorado Council of Medical Librarians (CCML) primary access libraries in 1996 resulted in twenty-three Colorado primary access libraries' borrowing more from their state resource library in 1997. H3: The number of subscriptions held by Colorado and Wyoming primary access libraries is positively correlated with the number of items they loan and negatively correlated with the number of items they borrow. Methods: The hypotheses were tested using the 1992 and 1997 DOCLINE and OCLC data of fifty-four health sciences libraries, including fifty primary access libraries, two state resource libraries, and two general academic libraries in Colorado and Wyoming. The ILL data were obtained electronically and analyzed using Microsoft Word 98, Microsoft Excel 98, and JMP 3.2.2. Results: CCML primary access libraries comply with the recommended guideline to emphasize local borrowing by supplying each other with the majority of their ILLs, instead of overburdening libraries located at higher levels in the ILL hierarchy (H1). The closures of two CCML primary access libraries appear to have affected the entire ILL system, resulting in a greater volume of ILL activity for the

  5. Parasitic Skin Infections for Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Dadabhoy, Irfan; Butts, Jessica F

    2015-12-01

    The 2 epidermal parasitic skin infections most commonly encountered by primary care physicians in developed countries are scabies and pediculosis. Pediculosis can be further subdivided into pediculosis capitis, corporis, and pubis. This article presents a summary of information and a review of the literature on clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of these commonly encountered parasitic skin infestations. PMID:26612378

  6. Primary care. Match of the day.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Lynne

    2007-10-11

    Preston North End's Deepdale redevelopment is a prime example of the new wave of partnerships between primary care trusts and sports clubs. Warrington Wolves rugby league club was a pioneer, with a 1.3m pound sterling PCT health centre at its ground since 2005. Financial issues include sports club business stability. Benefits include health promotion opportunities. PMID:18163265

  7. Organisation of Prevention in Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This report examines the possiblities of increasing the amount of preventive work being carried out by primary care workers in European communities. Before making practical recommendations about promoting prevention, an analysis is presented of the main present day problems. These center on the environment (not only physical but also social and…

  8. Primary care in the New Hebrides

    PubMed Central

    de Soldenhoff, R.

    1979-01-01

    The New Hebrides is a small Melanesian country in the South-West Pacific whose doctors are almost entirely recruited from France and Great Britain, the two countries which jointly administer the territory. This paper describes briefly the difficulties of providing primary health care for a fairly primitive island society. PMID:316455

  9. Primary Care in Dentistry - An Untapped Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Dentistry is neither an allied health profession nor a paramedical profession. It is the only anatomically focused health care profession that is university-based and for which primary care responsibility is maintained by the profession. Dentists must have a reliable knowledge of basic clinical medicine for safely and effectively treating individuals with chronic and other diseases, which make them biologically and pharmacologically compromised. With changes in the life expectancy of people and lifestyles, as well as rapid advancement in biomedical sciences, dentists should have similar knowledge like a physician in any other fields of medicine. There are number of primary care activities that can be conducted in the dental office like screening of diabetics, managing hypertension etc., The present review was conducted after doing extensive literature search of peer-reviewed journals. The review throws a spotlight on these activities and also suggests some the measures that can be adopted to modify dental education to turn dentists to oral physicians. PMID:25810982

  10. Opportunity Knocks: HIV Prevention in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Thrun, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    Expansions in health care coverage, a comprehensive framework for HIV prevention and care, electronic medical records, and novel HIV prevention modalities create a current opportunity to change the trajectory of the HIV epidemic in the United States. HIV is increasingly disproportionately found in populations historically at higher risk, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender women, injection drug users, and persons of color. This underscores the need for providers to identify persons at higher risk for HIV and assure the provision of screening and prevention services. In turn, universal screening for HIV-testing every adolescent and adult at least once in their lifetime-will increasingly be necessary to find the infrequent cases of HIV in lower risk populations. In both these domains, primary care providers will play a unique role in complementing traditional providers of HIV prevention and care services by increasing the proportion of their patients who have been screened for HIV, opening dialogues around sexual health, including asking about sexual orientation and gender identity, and prescribing antivirals as pre- and postexposure prophylaxis for their non-HIV-infected patients. Primary care providers must understand and embrace their importance along the HIV prevention and care continuum. PMID:26789615

  11. 78 FR 22527 - TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project AGENCY: Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice of Extension of the TRICARE South Region United States Coast Guard Access to Care Demonstration... fiscal year to TRICARE authorized Urgent Care Centers without obtaining an authorization from...

  12. STRUCTURAL AND HIDDEN BARRIERS TO A LOCAL PRIMARY HEALTH CARE INFRASTRUCTURE: AUTONOMY, DECISIONS ABOUT PRIMARY HEALTH CARE, AND THE CENTRALITY AND SIGNIFICANCE OF POWER

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Christopher R.; Hansberry, Shantisha T.; Arrieta, Martha I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine a local primary health care infrastructure and the reality of primary health care from the perspective of residents of a small, urban community in the southern United States. Methodology/approach: Data derive from 13 semi-structured focus groups, plus three semi-structured interviews, and were analyzed inductively consistent with a grounded theory approach. Findings: Structural barriers to the local primary health care infrastructure include transportation, clinic and appointment wait time, and co-payments and health insurance. Hidden barriers consist of knowledge about local health care services, non-physician gatekeepers, and fear of medical care. Community residents have used home remedies and the emergency department at the local academic medical center to manage these structural and hidden barriers. Research limitations/implications: Findings might not generalize to primary health care infrastructures in other communities, respondent perspectives can be biased, and the data are subject to various interpretations and conceptual and thematic frameworks. Nevertheless, the structural and hidden barriers to the local primary health care infrastructure have considerably diminished the autonomy community residents have been able to exercise over their decisions about primary health care, ultimately suggesting that efforts concerned with increasing the access of medically underserved groups to primary health care in local communities should recognize the centrality and significance of power. Originality/value: This study addresses a gap in the sociological literature regarding the impact of specific barriers to primary health care among medically underserved groups. PMID:24532864

  13. Access of primary and secondary literature by health personnel in an academic health center: implications for open access*

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ryan M.; Moorhead, Laura; O'Brien, Bridget; Willinsky, John

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The research sought to ascertain the types and quantity of research evidence accessed by health personnel through PubMed and UpToDate in a university medical center over the course of a year in order to better estimate the impact that increasing levels of open access to biomedical research can be expected to have on clinical practice in the years ahead. Methods: Web log data were gathered from the 5,042 health personnel working in the Stanford University Hospitals (SUH) during 2011. Data were analyzed for access to the primary literature (abstracts and full-text) through PubMed and UpToDate and to the secondary literature, represented by UpToDate (research summaries), to establish the frequency and nature of literature consulted. Results: In 2011, SUH health personnel accessed 81,851 primary literature articles and visited UpToDate 110,336 times. Almost a third of the articles (24,529) accessed were reviews. Twenty percent (16,187) of the articles viewed were published in 2011. Conclusion: When it is available, health personnel in a clinical care setting frequently access the primary literature. While further studies are needed, this preliminary finding speaks to the value of the National Institutes of Health public access policy and the need for medical librarians and educators to prepare health personnel for increasing public access to medical research. PMID:23930091

  14. Primary health care and the Midwest flood disaster.

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, C; Killam, P P; Gaston, M H; Stinson, N

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest flood disaster of 1993 ravaged communities across a 9-State area. Homes were destroyed, roads closed, and services disrupted. Economic costs, including loss of revenue from farming and loss of jobs, are estimated at more than $1 billion. Even as people continue to rebuild their lives 1 year later, renewed flooding has occurred in some areas. A community-based primary health care system can be described as a system of services that (a) offers all members of a family continuous, comprehensive, quality health services throughout their lives; (b) includes case management and coordinated referrals to other related services when necessary; (c) is usually provided by family practitioners, general internists, general pediatricians, obstetricians-gynecologists, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and physician assistants; and (d) has community involvement in the development and management of the system to assure that it meets the changing needs and the diversity of the people it is designed to serve. This paper uses the floods to describe the impact of a disaster on primary health care services and primary health care systems. This includes changes in the demand for services (as evidenced by the frequency and type of patient visits) and the ability of the system to respond to these changes. The effect of a disaster on access to primary health care is discussed. PMID:7938379

  15. Nurse Practitioner Mental Health Care in the Primary Context: A Californian Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Theophilos, Theane; Green, Roger; Cashin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In America, mental health needs surpass the availability of specialized providers. This vulnerable population also has other obstacles for comprehensive care including gaps in medical coverage, stigma, economic barriers, and a geographical mal-distribution of qualified mental health professionals. A wide availability of primary care providers, including primary care and family nurse practitioners, are well-positioned to deliver integrated mental and physical health care. A case study from a Southern California Coachella Valley primary care clinic with integrated services is used to demonstrate the much-needed approach of care to address health disparities that face low-income immigrants, migrant workers, and others without access to specialized care centers and providers. It is argued that mental health care should be part of all holistic treatment provided by primary care and family nurse practitioners. This has implications for curricula and practice development. PMID:27417754

  16. Family History in Primary Care Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    The family history has been called the first genetic test; it was a core element of primary care long before the current wave of genetics technologies and services became clinically relevant. Risk assessment based on family history allows providers to personalize and prioritize health messages, shifts the focus of health care from treatment to prevention, and can empower individuals and families to be stewards of their own health. In a world of rising health care costs, the family history is an important tool, with its primary cost being the clinician’s time. However, a recent National Institutes of Health conference highlighted the lack of substantive evidence to support the clinical utility of family histories. Annual collection of a comprehensive 3-generation family history has been held up as the gold standard for practice. However, interval family histories targeted to symptoms and family histories tailored to a child’s life stage (ie, age-based health) may be important and underappreciated methods of collecting family history that yield clinically actionable data and supplement existing family history information. In this article, we review the various applications, as well as capabilities and limitations, of the family history for primary care providers. PMID:24298128

  17. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Matthew Y.; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science. PMID:26114091

  18. Assessing the Proximity Relationship of Walk-in Clinics and Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alissa; Revere, Lee; Ramphul, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the spatial relationship between primary care provider clinics and walk-in clinics. Using ZIP code level data from Harris County, Texas, the results suggest that primary care physicians and walk-in clinics are similarly located at lower rates in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status. Although current clinic location choices effectively broaden the gap in primary care access for the lower income population, the growing number of newly insured individuals may make it increasingly attractive for walk-in clinics to locate in geographic areas with populations of lower socioeconomic status and less competition from primary care physicians. PMID:27576053

  19. Prediction of Dementia in Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Frank; Wiese, Birgitt; Bickel, Horst; Eiffländer-Gorfer, Sandra; Fuchs, Angela; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Köhler, Mirjam; Luck, Tobias; Mösch, Edelgard; Pentzek, Michael; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.; Wagner, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Maier, Wolfgang; van den Bussche, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Current approaches for AD prediction are based on biomarkers, which are however of restricted availability in primary care. AD prediction tools for primary care are therefore needed. We present a prediction score based on information that can be obtained in the primary care setting. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a longitudinal cohort study in 3.055 non-demented individuals above 75 years recruited via primary care chart registries (Study on Aging, Cognition and Dementia, AgeCoDe). After the baseline investigation we performed three follow-up investigations at 18 months intervals with incident dementia as the primary outcome. The best set of predictors was extracted from the baseline variables in one randomly selected half of the sample. This set included age, subjective memory impairment, performance on delayed verbal recall and verbal fluency, on the Mini-Mental-State-Examination, and on an instrumental activities of daily living scale. These variables were aggregated to a prediction score, which achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.84 for AD. The score was applied to the second half of the sample (test cohort). Here, the prediction accuracy was 0.79. With a cut-off of at least 80% sensitivity in the first cohort, 79.6% sensitivity, 66.4% specificity, 14.7% positive predictive value (PPV) and 97.8% negative predictive value of (NPV) for AD were achieved in the test cohort. At a cut-off for a high risk population (5% of individuals with the highest risk score in the first cohort) the PPV for AD was 39.1% (52% for any dementia) in the test cohort. Conclusions The prediction score has useful prediction accuracy. It can define individuals (1) sensitively for low cost-low risk interventions, or (2) more specific and with increased PPV for measures of prevention with greater costs or risks. As it is independent of technical aids, it may be used within large scale prevention programs. PMID:21364746

  20. Interprofessional student-run primary health care clinics

    PubMed Central

    Pammett, Robert; Landry, Eric; Jorgenson, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Interprofessional student-run primary health care clinics have been a flagship model of health professional education in Canada for many years. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is support for implementing this educational model in the United Kingdom and to highlight the implications for pharmacy education in Scotland. Method: A cross-sectional postal survey of 3000 randomly selected citizens of Aberdeen city and shire, Scotland, aged 18 years and older. Results: Of the 824 questionnaires that were returned (response rate 27.5%), more than half of the respondents (62.4%; n = 514) would consider accessing health care from a student-led, walk-in service. The range of services they expect to see includes general health checks (60%; n = 494), help for sexually transmitted diseases (57.5%; n = 474), weight management (56.8%; n = 468), smoking cessation (54.4%; n = 448) and drug misuse services (47.2%; n = 387). Concerns raised pertained to student ability, suitability for children and accessibility. Many comments pertained to the improvement of the current system by offering after-hours care. Discussion: The positive response from the general public towards an interprofessional student-run primary health care clinic in Aberdeen suggests that this Canadian model of interdisciplinary health professional education would likely be a successful addition to the pharmacy curriculum in Scotland. PMID:26150889

  1. The entrepreneurial role in primary care dentistry.

    PubMed

    Willcocks, S

    2012-03-01

    This paper explores the entrepreneurial role of dentists in primary care dentistry. It reviews the changing context of dentistry, not least the reforms being introduced by the health and social care bill. It suggests that this new context will reinforce the need to consider the business side of dental practice, in particular, the importance of quality, creativity and innovation, alongside the importance of meeting the needs of patients. An entrepreneurial approach will be required in order to sustain dental practice in an increasingly competitive environment. PMID:22402534

  2. Does practice size matter? Review of effects on quality of care in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Charis Wei Ling; Ng, Kok Ping

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a trend towards consolidating smaller primary care practices into larger practices worldwide. However, the effects of practice size on quality of care remain unclear. Aim This review aims to systematically appraise the effects of practice size on the quality of care in primary care. Design and setting A systematic review and narrative synthesis of studies examining the relationship between practice size and quality of care in primary care. Method Quantitative studies that focused on primary care practices or practitioners were identified through PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Library, CRD databases, ProQuest dissertations and theses, conference proceedings, and MedNar databases, as well as the reference lists of included studies. Independent variables were team or list size; outcome variables were measures of clinical processes, clinical outcomes, or patient-reported outcomes. A narrative synthesis of the results was conducted. Results The database search yielded 371 articles, of which 34 underwent quality assessment, and 17 articles (13 cross-sectional studies) were included. Ten studies examined the association of practice size and clinical processes, but only five found associations of larger practices with selected process measures such as higher specialist referral rates, better adherence to guidelines, higher mammography rates, and better monitoring of haemoglobin A1c. There were mixed results for cytology and pneumococcal coverage. Only one of two studies on clinical outcomes found an effect of larger practices on lower random haemoglobin A1 value. Of the three studies on patient-reported outcomes, smaller practices were consistently found to be associated with satisfaction with access, but evidence was inconsistent for other patient-reported outcomes evaluated. Conclusion There is limited evidence to support an association between practice size and quality of care in primary care. PMID:23998840

  3. The Primary Care Respiratory Society-UK Quality Award: development and piloting of quality standards for primary care respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Gruffydd-Jones, Kevin; Small, Iain; Fletcher, Monica; Bryant, Tricia

    2013-09-01

    In an attempt to improve the standards of primary respiratory care in the UK, the Primary Care Respiratory Society-UK (PCRS-UK), in conjunction with other leading respiratory-interested health professional and patient groups, has devised a General Practice Quality Award for Respiratory Medicine. The Award is divided into three modules separated into a total of seven clinical standards (in parentheses): 'Clinical' (prevention, early and accurate diagnosis, acute care, chronic care); 'Organisational' (equipment); and 'The Practice Team' (practice learning needs, educational strategy). Assessment is by submission of a written portfolio of 37 pieces of evidence including audit, reflective learning, patient feedback, and significant event analyses. The Award was piloted in five respiratory-interested practices across the UK. The practices reported improvements in practice organisation, practice teamwork, improved process measures such as improvement in quality of spirometry, and improved patient access to patient services. All practices in the UK are being invited to apply for the Award in 2013. It is hoped that it will provide a framework and stimulus for provision of high-quality primary respiratory care, not only in the UK, but also some aspects of the Award may be applicable on a wider international scale. PMID:23974675

  4. Implementing the role of the primary care mental health worker: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    England, Elizabeth; Lester, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Background Primary care mental health workers are a new role recently introduced into primary care in England to help manage patients with common mental health problems. Aim To explore the views of GPs, primary care teams and patients on the value and development of the new role of primary care mental health workers in practice. Design of study Qualitative study. Setting The Heart of Birmingham Primary Care Teaching Trust in the West Midlands, UK. Method Thirty-seven semi-structured interviews involving seven primary care mental health workers, 21 patients and 11 focus groups involving 38 members of primary care teams were held with six teams with a worker. Two teams asked for the worker to be removed. Six practice managers also took part in the study. Results A number of different approaches were used to implement this new role. Strategies that incorporated the views of primary care trust senior management, primary care teams and workers' views appeared most successful. Rapid access to a healthcare professional at times of stress and the befriending role of the worker were also highly valued. Workers felt that their role left them professionally isolated at times. A number of workers described tension around ownership of the role. Conclusion Primary care mental health workers appear to provide a range of skills valued by patients and the primary care teams and can increase patient access and choice in this area of health care. Successful implementation strategies highlighted in this study may be generalisable to other new roles in primary care. PMID:17359607

  5. Treatment resistant depression: strategies for primary care.

    PubMed

    Preston, Taylor C; Shelton, Richard C

    2013-07-01

    Depression is commonly diagnosed and treated in primary care. Recent evidence indicates that the majority of depressed patients will not fully recover with an initial antidepressant treatment. This paper reviews commonly used options for treatment after an inadequate initial antidepressant response. The alternatives range widely, and include escalating the dose of the initial antidepressant, switching to an alternative medication, combining two antidepressants with different mechanisms of action (e.g., bupropion + SSRI or mirtazapine + venlafaxine), adding other medications such as lithium or certain atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, aripiprazole, or quetiapine) to the antidepressant, adding a natural product such as l-methylfolate or s-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), or adding cognitive behavioral psychotherapy. What agent to be used will depend on the comfort level of the primary care practitioner and the availability of Psychiatry referral. However, it is reasonable to take one or more additional steps to attempt to achieve remission. PMID:23712721

  6. The productivity of primary care research networks.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, F; Wild, A; Harvey, J; Fenton, E

    2000-11-01

    Primary care research networks are being publicly funded in the United Kingdom to promote a culture of research and development in primary care. This paper discusses the organisational form of these networks and how their productivity can be evaluated, drawing on evidence from management science. An evaluation of a research network has to take account of the complexity of the organisation, the influence of its local context, and its stage of development. Output measures, such as number of research papers, and process measures, such as number of research meetings, may contribute to an evaluation. However, as networking relies on the development of informal, trust-based relationships, the quality of interactions within a network is of paramount importance for its success. Networks can audit and reflect on their success in promoting such relationships and a more formal qualitative evaluation by an independent observer can document their success to those responsible for funding. PMID:11141879

  7. Biofield therapies: energy medicine and primary care.

    PubMed

    Rindfleisch, J Adam

    2010-03-01

    Energy medicine modalities, also known as biofield therapies, are perhaps the most mysterious and controversial complementary alternative medicine therapies. Although many of these approaches have existed for millennia, scientific investigation of these techniques is in its early stages; much remains to be learned about mechanisms of action and efficacy. These techniques are increasingly used in clinical and hospital settings and can be incorporated into an integrative primary care practice. This article describes several energy medicine and biofield therapies and outlines key elements they hold in common. Several specific approaches are described. Research findings related to the efficacy of energy medicine are summarized, and proposed mechanisms of action and safety issues are discussed. Guidelines are offered for primary care providers wishing to advise patients about energy medicine or to integrate it into their practices, and Internet and other resources for obtaining additional information are provided. PMID:20189005

  8. Naturopathy and the Primary Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Sara A.; Gutknecht, Nancy C.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Naturopathy is a distinct type of primary care medicine that blends age-old healing traditions with scientific advances and current research. It is guided by a unique set of principles that recognize the body's innate healing capacity, emphasize disease prevention, and encourage individual responsibility to obtain optimal health. Naturopathic treatment modalities include diet and clinical nutrition, behavioral change, hydrotherapy, homeopathy, botanical medicine, physical medicine, pharmaceuticals, and minor surgery. Naturopathic physicians (NDs) are trained as primary care physicians in four-year, accredited doctoral-level naturopathic medical schools. Currently, there are 15 U.S. states, 2 U.S. territories, and a number of provinces in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand that recognize licensure for NDs. PMID:20189002

  9. [Nursing in primary care in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Soberón Acevedo, G; Herrera Lasso, F; Nájera, R M

    1984-01-01

    In keeping with the global goal of health for all, the National Development Plan of Mexico describes health as a social right. To give effect to this right it is felt that the health sector must be restructured so as, among other purposes, to improve the coverage of services and strengthen the coordination of education institutions and social security agencies with health establishments, and to make the training of health personnel responsive to the country's real needs. No profession is better suited than nursing to the diversity of tasks in primary care. The authors describe the key role of this personnel in extending the coverage of health services to the entire population. They enumerate the range of basic--technical, administrative and educational--functions performed by nurses, and some factors that reinforce and others that restrict the contribution of nursing to primary health care in Mexico. PMID:6714142

  10. African Primary Care Research: Participatory action research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of the series on African primary care research and focuses on participatory action research. The article gives an overview of the emancipatory-critical research paradigm, the key characteristics and different types of participatory action research. Following this it describes in detail the methodological issues involved in professional participatory action research and running a cooperative inquiry group. The article is intended to help students with writing their research proposal. PMID:26245439

  11. Surgeons weigh effects of primary care trend.

    PubMed

    Hales, D R

    1979-02-01

    Surgeons who attended the annual meeting of the American College of Surgeons questioned the future of their specialty in an era when government agencies are emphasizing primary care. What will the role of future surgeons be? Will they find themselves competing with family practitioners for hospital privileges? How much surgical training should be included in family practice residencies? These questions were posed, but answers were scarce. PMID:10318433

  12. Pharmacotherapy for Insomnia in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily; Narang, Puneet; Enja, Manasa; Lippmann, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy for insomnia in primary care settings can be challenging. Frequently, there are multiple coexisting medical and psychiatric conditions, drug interactions, concern regarding use of habit-forming sleep aids, and paucity of time in office visits to discuss management of sleep difficulties. This article reports the results of a literature search related to pharmacotherapy for insomnia and presents 4 clinical vignettes with corresponding treatment options. PMID:27486547

  13. Recognising Bipolar Disorders in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Dietch, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Bipolar disorder, previously called 'Manic-depression', is a complex group of conditions characterised by recurrent changes in mood and energy. Crucially, the intensity and duration of these changes go beyond normal fluctuations and personality traits. Bipolar Disorder is a mental health disorder, but physical health manifestations (Smith 2013, Westman 2013, Fagiolini 2008, Young 2013) and complications are just as important. GPs have a key role in the recognition and management, in conjunction with secondary care colleagues. Diagnosis is often difficult and may take several years (Smith 2011, Angst 2005, Manning 2010), because patients usually seek help for anxiety, depression or fatigue, not hypomania/mania, which they may not recognise. Individuals with a first episode of mania are more likely to present directly to secondary care, sometimes via a third party alerting the emergency services. There is also debate around the classification, diagnosis and treatment of individuals with brief and milder mood changes ('bipolar spectrum disorder') (Faravelli 2009, Spence 2011). In the UK, the recent NICE Guidelines (2014) 1 only included Bipolar I and Bipolar II for these reasons. A particular challenge for GPs is that whilst most people who have Bipolar Disorder (and especially Bipolar II) are depressed, most people with depression within a Primary Care setting do not have Bipolar Disorder. Thus, a brief pragmatic screen is recommended in Primary care: ask about a family history of Bipolar Disorder and screen for a history of mania/hypomania in individuals with anxiety, depression or irritability, especially if there are recurrent episodes, suicidal thoughts or a previous suicide attempt. For suspected cases, formal diagnosis should not be made within Primary Care but individuals should be referred for Psychiatric assessment, ideally to a Mood Disorders specialist. PMID:26417759

  14. Primary Care of the Prostate Cancer Survivor.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Erika M; Farrell, Timothy W

    2016-05-01

    This summary of the American Cancer Society Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines targets primary care physicians who coordinate care of prostate cancer survivors with subspecialists. Prostate cancer survivors should undergo prostate-specific antigen screening every six to 12 months and digital rectal examination annually. Surveillance of patients who choose watchful waiting for their prostate cancer should be conducted by a subspecialist. Any hematuria or rectal bleeding must be thoroughly evaluated. Prostate cancer survivors should be screened regularly for urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Patients with predominant urge incontinence symptoms, which can occur after surgical and radiation treatments, may benefit from an anticholinergic agent. If there is difficulty with bladder emptying, a trial of an alpha blocker may be considered. A phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor can effectively treat sexual dysfunction following treatment for prostate cancer. Osteoporosis screening should occur before initiation of androgen deprivation therapy, and patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy should be monitored for anemia, metabolic syndrome, and vasomotor symptoms. Healthy lifestyle choices should be encouraged, including weight management, regular physical activity, proper nutrition, and smoking cessation. Primary care physicians should be vigilant for psychosocial distress, including depression, among prostate cancer survivors, as well as the potential impact of this distress on patients' family members and partners. PMID:27175954

  15. Multidisciplinary teamwork in US primary health care.

    PubMed

    Solheim, Karen; McElmurry, Beverly J; Kim, Mi Ja

    2007-08-01

    Primary health care (PHC) is a systems perspective for examining the provision of essential health care for all. A multidisciplinary collaborative approach to health care delivery is associated with effective delivery and care providers' enrichment. Yet data regarding multidisciplinary practice within PHC are limited. The purpose of this exploratory qualitative descriptive study was to better understand team-based PHC practice in the US. Aims included (a) describing nursing faculty involvement in PHC, (b) analyzing ways that multidisciplinary work was enacted, and (c) recommending strategies for multidisciplinary PHC practice. After institutional review board (IRB) protocol approval, data collection occurred by: (a) surveying faculty/staff in a Midwestern nursing college (N=94) about their PHC practice, and (b) interviewing a purposive sample of nursing faculty/staff identified with PHC (n=10) and their health professional collaborators (n=10). Survey results (28% return rate) were summarized, interview notes were transcribed, and a systematic process of content analysis applied. Study findings show team practice is valued because health issues are complex, requiring different types of expertise; and because teams foster comprehensive care and improved resource use. Mission, membership attributes, and leadership influence teamwork. Though PHC is not a common term, nurses and their collaborators readily associated their practice with a PHC ethos. PHC practice requires understanding community complexity and engaging with community, family, and individual viewpoints. Though supports exist for PHC in the US, participants identified discord between their view of population needs and the health care system. The following interpretations arise from this study: PHC does not explicitly frame health care activity in the US, though some practitioners are committed to its ethics; and, teamwork within PHC is associated with better health care and rewarding professional

  16. Accessibility and use of primary healthcare for immigrants living in the Niagara Region.

    PubMed

    Lum, Irene D; Swartz, Rebecca H; Kwan, Matthew Y W

    2016-05-01

    Although the challenges of accessing and using primary healthcare for new immigrants to Canada have been fairly well documented, the focus has primarily been on large cities with significant immigrant populations. The experiences of immigrants living in smaller, less diverse urban centres remain largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the lived experiences of immigrants living in a small urban centre with regards to the primary healthcare system. A total of 13 immigrants living in the Greater Niagara Region participated in semi-structured interviews. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and then coded and analyzed for emergent themes using NVivo. Five factors were found to impact primary care access and use: lack of social contacts, lack of universal healthcare coverage during their initial arrival, language as a barrier, treatment preferences, and geographic distance to primary care. Overall findings suggest that immigrants moving to smaller areas such as the Niagara Region face similar barriers to primary care as those moving into large cities. Some barriers, however, appear to be specific to the context of smaller urban centres, further exacerbated by living in a small city due to a smaller immigrant population, fewer services for immigrants, and less diversity in practicing physicians. More research is required to understand the contextual factors inhibiting primary care access and use among immigrants moving to smaller urban centres, and determine effective strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27017093

  17. The Governor's Wellmobile: Maryland's mobile primary care clinic.

    PubMed

    Heller, Barbara R; Goldwater, Marilyn R

    2004-02-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of the Governor's Wellmobile program. Designed to increase access to community-based health care for uninsured, underserved populations and to provide innovative clinical practice, research, and education opportunities for students and faculty, this fleet of four full-service, primary care clinics "on wheels" is managed and operated by the University of Maryland School of Nursing, demonstrating that nurse-managed practice models are valuable to the state's health care delivery system. Issues of long-term financial sustainability are presented, as well as lessons learned about the importance of public, private, and philanthropic partnerships and political support in ensuring the success of such programs. PMID:14974519

  18. [Social inequalities in health and primary care. SESPAS Report 2012].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Aguado, Ildefonso; Santaolaya Cesteros, María; Campos Esteban, Pilar

    2012-03-01

    The health system is a social determinant of health. Although not the most important determinant of health, the health system's potential contribution to reducing social inequalities in health should not be underestimated. Due to its characteristics, primary health care is well placed to attain equity in health. To make progress in achieving this goal, the main measures to be considered are the removal of barriers to access to services, the provision of care proportionate to need, and engagement in intersectoral work. This article reviews the background and framework for action to tackle social inequalities in health and provides a summary of the primary health care actions that could help to reduce social inequalities in health and are mentioned in the most important national and international documents on health policy. We hope to stimulate debate, promote research in the field and encourage implementation. The proposals are grouped in the following five intervention lines: information systems; participation; training; intersectoral work; and reorientation of health care. Each intervention is ordered according to its targets (population and civil society; primary health team; health center and health area management; and health policy decision-makers). PMID:22321945

  19. General practitioners' perspectives on primary care consultations for suicidal patients.

    PubMed

    Saini, Pooja; Chantler, Khatidja; Kapur, Navneet

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about general practitioners' (GPs') perspectives, management of and interactions with suicidal patients prior to the patient's suicide. The aims of the study were to explore GPs' interpretations of patient communication and treatment in primary care leading up to suicide and to investigate the relationship between GPs and mental health services prior to a patient's suicide. Thirty-nine semi-structured interviews with GPs of people who had died by suicide were conducted as part of a retrospective study. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. The following themes emerged from GP interviews: (i) GP interpretations of suicide attempts or self-harm; (ii) professional isolation; and (iii) GP responsibilities versus patient autonomy. GPs recruited for the study may have different views from GPs who have never experienced a patient suicide or who have experienced the death of a patient by suicide who was not under the care of specialist services. Our findings may not be representative of the rest of the United Kingdom, although many of the issues identified are likely to apply across services. This study highlighted the following recommendations for future suicide prevention in general practice: increasing GP awareness of suicide-related issues and improving training and risk assessment skills; removing barriers to accessing therapies and treatments needed in primary care; improving liaison and collaboration between services to provide better patient outcomes; and increasing awareness in primary care about why patients may not want treatments offered by focusing on each individual's situational context. PMID:25661202

  20. Healthcare reform: implications for knowledge translation in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The primary care sector represents the linchpin of many health systems. However, the translation of evidence-based practices into patient care can be difficult, particularly during healthcare reform. This can have significant implications for patients, their communities, and the public purse. This is aptly demonstrated in the area of sexual health. The aim of this paper is to determine what works to facilitate evidence-based sexual healthcare within the primary care sector. Methods 431 clinicians (214 general practitioners and 217 practice nurses) in New South Wales, Australia, were surveyed about their awareness, their use, the perceived impact, and the factors that hindered the use of six resources to promote sexual healthcare. Descriptive statistics were calculated from the responses to the closed survey items, while responses to open-ended item were thematically analyzed. Results All six resources were reported to improve the delivery of evidence-based sexual healthcare. Two resources – both double-sided A4-placards – had the greatest reach and use. Barriers that hindered resource-use included limited time, limited perceived need, and limited access to, or familiarity with the resources. Furthermore, the reorganization of the primary care sector and the removal of particular medical benefits scheme items may have hampered clinician capacity to translate evidence-based practices into patient care. Conclusions Findings reveal: (1) the translation of evidence-based practices into patient care is viable despite reform; (2) the potential value of a multi-modal approach; (3) the dissemination of relatively inexpensive resources might influence clinical practices; and (4) reforms to governance and/or funding arrangements may widen the void between evidence-based practices and patient care. PMID:24274773

  1. Primary care evidence in clinical guidelines: a mixed methods study of practitioners’ views

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Asmaa; Howe, Amanda; Stokes, Tim; Qureshi, Nadeem; Steel, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines are widely used in primary care, yet are not always based on applicable research. Aim To explore primary care practitioners’ views on the applicability to primary care patients of evidence underpinning National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guideline recommendations. Design and setting Delphi survey and focus groups in primary care, England, UK. Method Delphi survey of the perceived applicability of 14 guideline recommendations rated before and after a description of their evidence base, followed by two focus groups. Results GPs significantly reduced scores for their perceived likelihood of pursuing recommendations after finding these were based on studies with low applicability to primary care, but maintained their scores for recommendations based on highly applicable research. GPs reported they were more likely to use guidelines where evidence was applicable to primary care, and less likely if the evidence base came from a secondary care population. Practitioners in the focus groups accepted that guideline developers would use the most relevant evidence available, but wanted clearer signposting of those recommendations particularly relevant for primary care patients. Their main need was for brief, clear, and accessible guidelines. Conclusion Guidelines should specify the extent to which the research evidence underpinning each recommendation is applicable to primary care. The relevance of guideline recommendations to primary care populations could be more explicitly considered at all three stages of guideline development: scoping and evidence synthesis, recommendation development, and publication. The relevant evidence base needs to be presented clearly and concisely, and in an easy to identify way. PMID:25348996

  2. Importance of community engagement in primary health care: the case of Afghan refugees.

    PubMed

    Cheng, I-Hao; Wahidi, Sayed; Vasi, Shiva; Samuel, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Refugees can experience problems accessing and utilising Australian primary health care services, resulting in suboptimal health outcomes. Little is known about the impact of their pre-migration health care experiences. This paper demonstrates how the Afghan pre-migration experiences of primary health care can affect engagement with Australian primary care services. It considers the implications for Australian primary health care policy, planning and delivery. This paper is based on the international experiences, insights and expert opinions of the authors, and is underpinned by literature on Afghan health-seeking behaviour. Importantly, Afghanistan and Australia have different primary health care strategies. In Afghanistan, health care is predominantly provided through a community-based outreach approach, namely through community health workers residing in the local community. In contrast, the Australian health care system requires client attendance at formal health service facilities. This difference contributes to service access and utilisation problems. Community engagement is essential to bridge the gap between the Afghan community and Australian primary health care services. This can be achieved through the health sector working to strengthen partnerships between Afghan individuals, communities and health services. Enhanced community engagement has the potential to improve the delivery of primary health care to the Afghan community in Australia. PMID:25102862

  3. Type of health insurance and the quality of primary care experience.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the association between type of health insurance coverage and quality of primary care as measured by its distinguishing attributes--first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. METHODS: The household component of the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey was used for this study. The analysis primarily focused on subjects aged younger than 65 years who identified a usual source of care. Logistic regressions were used to examine the independent effects of insurance status on primary care attributes while individual sociodemographic characteristics were controlled for. RESULTS: The experience of primary care varies according to insurance status. The insured are able to obtain better primary care than the uninsured, and the privately insured are able to obtain better primary care than the publicly insured. Those insured through fee-for-service coverage experience better longitudinal care and less of a barrier to access than those insured through health maintenance organizations (HMOs). CONCLUSIONS: While expanding insurance coverage is important for establishing access to care, efforts are needed to enhance the quality of primary health care, particularly for the publicly insured. Policymakers should closely monitor the quality of primary care provided by HMOs. PMID:11111255

  4. The breadth of primary care: a systematic literature review of its core dimensions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Even though there is general agreement that primary care is the linchpin of effective health care delivery, to date no efforts have been made to systematically review the scientific evidence supporting this supposition. The aim of this study was to examine the breadth of primary care by identifying its core dimensions and to assess the evidence for their interrelations and their relevance to outcomes at (primary) health system level. Methods A systematic review of the primary care literature was carried out, restricted to English language journals reporting original research or systematic reviews. Studies published between 2003 and July 2008 were searched in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, King's Fund Database, IDEAS Database, and EconLit. Results Eighty-five studies were identified. This review was able to provide insight in the complexity of primary care as a multidimensional system, by identifying ten core dimensions that constitute a primary care system. The structure of a primary care system consists of three dimensions: 1. governance; 2. economic conditions; and 3. workforce development. The primary care process is determined by four dimensions: 4. access; 5. continuity of care; 6. coordination of care; and 7. comprehensiveness of care. The outcome of a primary care system includes three dimensions: 8. quality of care; 9. efficiency care; and 10. equity in health. There is a considerable evidence base showing that primary care contributes through its dimensions to overall health system performance and health. Conclusions A primary care system can be defined and approached as a multidimensional system contributing to overall health system performance and health. PMID:20226084

  5. Children's Mental Health as a Primary Care and Concern

    PubMed Central

    Tolan, Patrick H.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    In response to the serious crisis in mental health care for children in the United States, this article proposes as a priority for psychology a comprehensive approach that treats mental health as a primary issue in child health and welfare. Consistent with the principles of a system of care and applying epidemiological, risk-development, and intervention-research findings, this approach emphasizes 4 components: easy access to effective professional clinical services for children exhibiting disorders; further development and application of sound prevention principles for high-risk youths; support for and access to short-term intervention in primary care settings; and greater recognition and promotion of mental health issues in common developmental settings and other influential systems. Integral to this approach is the need to implement these components simultaneously and to incorporate family-focused, culturally competent, evidence-based, and developmentally appropriate services. This comprehensive, simultaneous, and integrated approach is needed to achieve real progress in children's mental health in this country. PMID:16173893

  6. Clinical research in primary dental care.

    PubMed

    Heasman, P A; Macpherson, L E; Haining, S A; Breckons, M

    2015-08-28

    Many commissioning bodies for research expect that researchers will actively involve the public and patients in their projects. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), for example, involves members of the public in reviewing funding applications and making recommendations about research funding. The NIHR's portfolio is currently operating in 97% of NHS Trusts and this now includes research sited in primary dental care. This paper presents some case studies of these and other projects which are designed specifically for patient benefit in dental services in the community. This means there is no necessity to translate the outcomes of such research from a university or hospital base to the general population as the projects are undertaken in dental practices that provide primary dental care to (predominantly) NHS patients. The relevance of the outcomes to dental care is, therefore, likely to be of direct interest and importance to commissioners of healthcare funding in the UK who have a duty to use evidence bases for commissioning decisions. PMID:26315174

  7. Patient poverty and workload in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, Laura; Rayner, Jennifer; Dahrouge, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine if patient poverty is associated with increased workload for primary care providers (PCPs). Design Linkage of administrative data identifying patient poverty and comorbidity with survey data about the organizational structure of community health centres (CHCs). Setting Ontario’s 73 CHCs. Participants A total of 64 CHC sites (N = 63 included in the analysis). Main outcome measures Patient poverty was determined in 2 different ways: based on receipt of Ontario Drug Benefits (identifying recipients of welfare, provincial disability support, and low-income seniors’ benefits) or residence in low-income neighbourhoods. Patient comorbidities were determined through administrative diagnostic data from the CHCs and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Primary care workload was determined by examining PCP panel size (the number of patients cared for by a full-time-equivalent PCP during a 2-year interval). Results The CHCs with higher proportions of poor patients had smaller panel sizes. The smaller panel sizes were entirely explained by the medical comorbidity profile of the poor patients. Conclusion Poor patients generate a higher workload for PCPs in CHCs; however, this is principally because they are sicker than higher-income patients are. Further information is required about the spectrum of services used by poor patients in CHCs. PMID:23585609

  8. Revitalizing primary health care--another utopian goal?

    PubMed

    Marahatta, Sujan B

    2010-01-01

    The quest for greater efficiency, fairness and responsiveness to the expectation of the people that system serve have brought about three generations of health system reforms in the twentieth century. The first generation saw the founding of national health care systems and extension to middle income nations of social insurance systems in the 1940s and 1950s. By the late 1960s the rising costs of hospital based care, its usage by better off, inaccessibility by the poor and rural population of even the most basic services heralded second generation reforms promoting primary health care as a means of achieving the affordable universal coverage. It included the best public health strategy that is prevention and the highest ethical principle of public health that is equity. It was expected the best system for reaching households with essential and affordable care, and the best route towards universal coverage. The primary health care approach though adopted universally did not materialize its notion of translating ethos of Health for All by 2000. Overall, primary health care movement by the end of 20th century became lifeless. Since the Declaration of Alma-Ata, fundamental changes have occurred affecting health service delivery, such as economic development and financing approaches, globalization of trade and knowledge, and the shift to privatization. This is the time to develop a new vision, taking into consideration the many changes affecting global health and the strategic developments in health of recent years. With this recognition, the third generation of reforms now underway in many countries is driven by the idea of responding more to demand, assuring access for the poor and emphasizing financing rather than just provision within the public sector. The key concern is: how to translate ethos of revitalizing in the reality. Otherwise the revitalizing concept will turn into utopian goal so like HFA by 2000 strategy. PMID:22610741

  9. Practice Constraints, Behavioral Problems, and Dementia Care: Primary Care Physicians’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Ladson; Reddy, Geetha; Flores, Yvette; Kravitz, Richard L.; Barker, Judith C.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To examine how practice constraints contribute to barriers in the health care of persons with dementia and their families, particularly with respect to behavioral aspects of care. Design Cross-sectional qualitative interview study of primary care physicians. Setting Physicians’ offices. Participants Forty primary care physicians in Northern California. Measurements Open-ended interviews lasted 30–60 minutes and were structured by an interview guide covering clinician background and practice setting, clinical care of a particular patient, and general approach to managing patients with AD or dementia. Interviews were transcribed and themes reflecting constraints of practice were identified through a systematic coding process. Results Recurring themes (i.e., those present in ≥25% of physician interviews) included insufficient time, difficulty in accessing and communicating with specialists, low reimbursement, poor connections with community social service agencies, and lack of interdisciplinary teams. Physician narratives suggest that these constraints may lead to delayed detection of behavior problems, “reactive” as opposed to proactive management of dementia, and increased reliance on pharmacological rather than psychosocial approaches. Conclusion Physicians often feel challenged in caring for dementia patients, particularly those who are more behaviorally complex, because of time and reimbursement constraints as well as other perceived barriers. Our results suggest that more effective educational interventions (for families and physicians) and broader structural changes are needed to better meet the needs of the elderly with dementia and their families now and in the future. Without these changes, dementia care is likely to continue to fall short. PMID:17823840

  10. Shared Care: A Quality Improvement Initiative to Optimize Primary Care Management of Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Vernacchio, Louis; Trudell, Emily; Antonelli, Richard; Nurko, Samuel; Leichtner, Alan M.; Lightdale, Jenifer R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric constipation is commonly managed in the primary care setting, where there is much variability in management and specialty referral use. Shared Care is a collaborative quality improvement initiative between Boston Children’s Hospital and the Pediatric Physician’s Organization at Children’s (PPOC), through which subspecialists provide primary care providers with education, decision-support tools, pre-referral management recommendations, and access to advice. We investigated whether Shared Care reduces referrals and improves adherence to established clinical guidelines. METHODS: We reviewed the primary care management of patients 1 to 18 years old seen by a Boston Children’s Hospital gastroenterologist and diagnosed with constipation who were referred from PPOC practices in the 6 months before and after implementation of Shared Care. Charts were assessed for patient factors and key components of management. We also tracked referral rates for all PPOC patients for 29 months before implementation and 19 months after implementation. RESULTS: Fewer active patients in the sample were referred after implementation (61/27 365 [0.22%] vs 90/27 792 [0.36%], P = .003). The duration of pre-referral management increased, and the rate of fecal impaction decreased after implementation. No differences were observed in documentation of key management recommendations. Analysis of medical claims showed no statistically significant change in referrals. CONCLUSIONS: A multifaceted initiative to support primary care management of constipation can alter clinical care, but changes in referral behavior and pre-referral management may be difficult to detect and sustain. Future efforts may benefit from novel approaches to provider engagement and systems integration. PMID:25896837

  11. Health Literacy in Primary Care Practice.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Lauren; Salzman, Brooke; Snyderman, Danielle

    2015-07-15

    Health literacy includes a set of skills needed to make appropriate health decisions and successfully navigate the health care system. These skills include reading, writing, numeracy, communication, and, increasingly, the use of electronic technology. National data indicate that more than one-third of U.S. adults have limited health literacy, which contributes to poor health outcomes and affects patient safety, and health care access and quality. Although there are a number of tools that screen for limited health literacy, they are primarily used for research. Routinely screening patients for health literacy has not been shown to improve outcomes and is not recommended. Instead, multiple professional organizations recommend using universal health literacy precautions to provide understandable and accessible information to all patients, regardless of their literacy or education levels. This includes avoiding medical jargon, breaking down information or instructions into small concrete steps, limiting the focus of a visit to three key points or tasks, and assessing for comprehension. Additionally, printed information should be written at or below a fifth- to sixth-grade reading level. Visual aids, graphs, or pictures can enhance patient understanding, as can more concrete presentation of numerical information. PMID:26176370

  12. Primary Care Physicians’ Perceptions of Barriers To Preventive Reproductive Health Care In Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Cynthia H.; Hwang, Sandra W.; McCall-Hosenfeld, Jennifer S.; Rosenwasser, Lara; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Weisman, Carol S.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT Women residing in rural areas are less likely than urban women to receive preventive reproductive health care, but reasons for this disparity remain largely unexplored. METHODS In 2010, semistructured interviews were conducted with 19 rural primary care physicians in central Pennsylvania regarding their experiences in two domains of preventive reproductive health—contraceptive care and preconception care. Major themes were identified using a modified grounded theory approach. RESULTS Physicians perceived that they had a greater role in providing contraceptive care than did nonrural physicians and that contraceptives were widely accessible to patients in their communities; however, the scope of contraceptive services they provided varied widely. Participants were aware of the importance of optimal health prior to pregnancy, but most did not routinely initiate preconception counseling. Physicians perceived rural community norms of unintended pregnancies, large families, and indifference toward career and educational goals for young women as the biggest barriers to both contraceptive and preconception care, as these attitudes resulted in a lack of patient interest in family planning. Lack of time and resources were identified as additional barriers to providing preconception care. CONCLUSIONS Rural women’s low use of contraceptive and preconception care services may reflect that preventive reproductive health care is not a priority in rural communities, rather than that it is inaccessible. E3 orts to motivate rural women to engage in reproductive life planning, including more proactive counseling by providers, merit examination as ways to improve use of services. PMID:22681422

  13. Shoulder pain in primary care: frozen shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, Angela; Mohammed, Khalid D

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that follows a protracted clinical course. We aim to review the management of patients with a diagnosis of frozen shoulder who are referred for specialist orthopaedic evaluation against existing guidelines in primary care. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM Referrals and clinical records were reviewed for all patients referred for orthopaedic specialist assessment who received a specialist diagnosis of frozen shoulder. Diagnostic, investigation and management practices from a regional primary health care setting in New Zealand were compared with guideline-recommended management. RESULTS Eighty patients with frozen shoulder were referred for orthopaedic evaluation in the 13 month study period, mostly from general practice. Fifteen patients (19%) were identified as having a frozen shoulder in their medical referral. Most (99%) had received previous imaging. Seven patients (12%) had received guideline recommended treatment. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Education of all clinicians involved in patient management is important to ensure an understanding of the long natural history of frozen shoulder and provide reassurance that outcomes are generally excellent. HealthPathways now include more information regarding diagnosis, imaging and evidence-based management for frozen shoulder. LESSONS Frozen shoulder may be under-diagnosed among patients referred for orthopaedic review. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used and may identify occult and unrelated pathology in this age-group. When managed according to clinical guidelines, patients report significant clinical and functional improvement with most reporting 80% function compared with normal after 1 year. KEYWORDS Adhesive capsulitis; bursitis; injections; practice guideline; primary health care; ultrasound. PMID:27477374

  14. Access to patient-centered medical home among Ohio's Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Conrey, Elizabeth J; Seidu, Dazar; Ryan, Norma J; Chapman, Dj Sam

    2013-06-01

    Medical homes deliver primary care that is accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family centered, coordinated, compassionate and culturally effective. Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) require a wide range of support to maintain health, making medical home access particularly important. We sought to understand independent risk factors for lacking access. We analyzed Ohio, USA data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (2005-2006). Among CSHCN, 55.6% had medical home access. The proportion achieving each medical home component was highest for having a personal doctor/nurse and lowest for receiving coordinated care, family-centered care and referrals. Specific subsets of CSHCN were significantly and independently more likely to lack medical home access: Hispanic (AOR=3.08), moderate/high severity of difficulty (AOR=2.84), and any public insurance (AOR=1.60). Efforts to advance medical home access must give special attention to these CSHCN populations and improvements must be made to referral access, family-centered care, and care coordination. PMID:23242811

  15. Physician perspectives on care of individuals with severe mobility impairments in primary care in Southwestern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Colleen; Lee, Joseph; Milligan, James; Hillier, Loretta M; Bauman, Craig

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high health risks associated with severe mobility impairments, individuals with physical disabilities are less likely to receive the same level of primary care as able-bodied persons. This study explores family physicians' perspectives on primary care for individuals with mobility impairments to identify and better understand the challenges that prevent equitable service delivery to this group of patients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the autumn of 2012 with a purposeful sample of 20 family physicians practising in Southwestern Ontario to gather their perspectives of the personal and professional barriers to healthcare delivery for individuals with mobility impairments, including perceptions of challenges, contributing reasons and possible improvements. A thematic analysis was conducted on the transcripts generated from the interviews to identify perceptions of existing barriers and gaps in care, needs and existing opportunities for improving primary care for this patient population. Eight themes emerged from the interviews that contributed to understanding the perceived challenges of providing care to patients with mobility impairments: transportation barriers, knowledge gaps and practice constraints resulting in episodic care rather than preventive care, incongruence between perceived and actual accessibility to care, emergency departments used as centres for primary care, inattention to mobility issues among specialist and community services, lack of easily accessible practice tools, low patient volumes impact decision-making regarding building decreased motivation to expand clinical capacity due to low patient volume, and lastly, remuneration issues. Despite this patient population presenting with high healthcare needs and significant barriers and care gaps in primary care, low prevalence rates negatively impact the acquisition of necessary equipment and knowledge required to optimally care for these patients in typical primary care

  16. Gestational weight gain trajectories in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Piccinini-Vallis, Helena; Lee-Baggley, Dayna; Stewart, Moira; Ryan, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify gestational weight gain trajectories, stratified by prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), of women with singleton pregnancies who received prenatal care in a primary care setting, and to compare these trajectories with the 2009 Institute of Medicine gestational weight gain recommendations. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Halifax, NS. Participants Women who received prenatal care at the Dalhousie Family Medicine clinics in Halifax from 2009 to 2013. Main outcome measures For each prenatal visit, gestational age and weight measurements were obtained. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze the gestational weight gain trajectories. The upper limit of the guideline-recommended weekly gestational weight gain was compared with the 95% CI of the observed mean weekly gestational weight gain for each prepregnancy BMI category. Results A total of 280 women were included in the analyses. There was a significant interaction between prepregnancy BMI category and gestational weight gain over time (P < .001), with gestational weight gain being significantly lower among women with prepregnancy BMI of 30.0 kg/m2 or greater compared with those with BMI of 18.5 to less than 25.0 kg/m2 and 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2. When comparing women’s weight gain with the recommendations, women with prepregnancy BMI of 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2 had the most guideline discordance, deviating from the weight gain recommendations at 20 weeks’ gestation. Conclusion These results are relevant and of benefit to women and clinicians wishing to address excess gestational weight gain, and to researchers and policy makers developing interventions aimed at curbing gestational weight gain in primary care. Although our results showed women with prepregnancy BMI of 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2 gained the most excess, guideline-discordant weight, interventions should target all women planning or experiencing a pregnancy.

  17. Primary Care Clinician Expectations Regarding Aging

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melinda M.; Bond, Lynne A.; Howard, Alan; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Expectations regarding aging (ERA) in community-dwelling older adults are associated with personal health behaviors and health resource usage. Clinicians’ age expectations likely influence patients’ expectations and care delivery patterns; yet, limited research has explored clinicians’ age expectations. The Expectations Regarding Aging Survey (ERA-12) was used to assess (a) age expectations in a sample of primary care clinicians practicing in the United States and (b) clinician characteristics associated with ERA-12 scores. Design and Methods: This study was a cross-sectional survey of primary care clinicians affiliated with 5 practice-based research networks, October 2008 to June 2009. A total of 374 of the 1,510 distributed surveys were returned (24.8% response rate); 357 analyzed. Mean respondent age was 48.6 years (SD = 11.6; range 23–87 years); 88.0% physicians, 96.0% family medicine, 94.9% White, and 61.9% male. Results: Female clinicians reported higher ERA-12 scores; clinicians’ age expectations decreased with greater years in practice. Among the clinicians, higher ERA-12 scores were associated with higher clinician ratings of the importance of and personal skill in administering preventive counseling and the importance of delivering preventive services. Agreement with individual ERA-12 items varied widely. Implications: Unrealistically high or low ERA could negatively influence the quality of care provided to patients and patients’ own age expectations. Research should examine the etiology of clinicians’ age expectations and their association with older adult diagnoses and treatment. Medical education must incorporate strategies to promote clinician attitudes that facilitate successful patient aging. PMID:21430129

  18. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.168 Primary care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management...

  19. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Primary Care Update.

    PubMed

    Leung, Marcia A; Flaherty, Anna; Zhang, Julia A; Hara, Jared; Barber, Wayne; Burgess, Lawrence

    2016-06-01

    The primary care physician's role in recognizing sudden sensorineural hearing (SSNHL) loss and delivering initial treatment is critical in the management of the syndrome. This role involves recognizing its clinical symptoms, distinguishing it from conductive hearing loss with the Weber tuning fork or the Rauch hum test, and urgent administration of high dose oral corticosteroids. Diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed for audiometric testing or referral to otolaryngology. This paper provides an update on the initial evaluation and treatment of this syndrome based on the literature and clinical guideline recommendations. PMID:27413627

  20. [Experience in treating mucoceles in Primary Care].

    PubMed

    Sabando Carranza, J A; Cortés Martinez, M; Calvo Carrasco, D

    2016-03-01

    Several cases of mucocele have been treated in our Primary Health Care centre. These are benign lesions, relatively frequent (2.5/1000), which is caused by a retention of mucous from the minor salivary glands into the oral cavity, mainly at the level of the lower lip. The experience in their treatment in this centre is presented, along with a review of the literature to see if our treatment was correct. PMID:26163872

  1. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Primary Care Update

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Marcia A; Flaherty, Anna; Zhang, Julia A; Hara, Jared; Barber, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The primary care physician's role in recognizing sudden sensorineural hearing (SSNHL) loss and delivering initial treatment is critical in the management of the syndrome. This role involves recognizing its clinical symptoms, distinguishing it from conductive hearing loss with the Weber tuning fork or the Rauch hum test, and urgent administration of high dose oral corticosteroids. Diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed for audiometric testing or referral to otolaryngology. This paper provides an update on the initial evaluation and treatment of this syndrome based on the literature and clinical guideline recommendations. PMID:27413627

  2. Primary Care of the Patient with Asthma.

    PubMed

    Lenaeus, Michael J; Hirschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive lung disease includes asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because a previous issue of Medical Clinics of North America (2012;96[4]) was devoted to COPD, this article focuses on asthma in adults, and addresses some topics about COPD not addressed previously. Asthma is a heterogeneous disease marked by variable airflow obstruction and bronchial hyperreactivity. Onset is most common in early childhood, although many people develop asthma later in life. Adult-onset asthma presents a particular challenge in the primary care clinic because of incomplete understanding of the disorder, underreporting of symptoms, underdiagnosis, inadequate treatment, and high rate of comorbidity. PMID:26320041

  3. Nail Disease for the Primary Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Fleckman, Philip

    2015-11-01

    Nail disorders are a common presenting complaint for both the primary care physician and the dermatologist. Nail diagnoses are broad in scope and include infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic conditions. Onychomycosis is an especially common nail condition, and treatment should always be preceded by appropriate fungal studies for confirmation of diagnosis. Inflammatory conditions of the nail unit can mimic onychomycosis, and a dermatologist can assist with diagnosis and treatment recommendations. Likewise, subungual tumors often require biopsy, and should be evaluated by a dermatologist who is experienced in nail evaluation and treatment. PMID:26476249

  4. Delivery Complications Associated With Prenatal Care Access for Medicaid-Insured Mothers in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Bennett, Kevin J.; Probst, Janice C.

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy complications affect many women. It is likely that some complications can be avoided through routine primary and prenatal care of reasonable quality. The authors examined access to health care during pregnancy for mothers insured by Medicaid. The access indicator is potentially avoidable maternity complications (PAMCs). Potentially…

  5. Potential benefits of integrated COPD management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Kruis, A L; Chavannes, N H

    2010-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents a major and progressive cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, resulting in an important financial and health burden in coming decades. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has been proven to be the most effective treatment in all patients in whom respiratory symptoms are associated with diminished functional capacity or reduced quality of life. Nevertheless, despite wide recommendation and proven efficacy, the use of PR is limited in daily practice. Reasons for these include low accessibility and availability, high costs, and lack of motivation to continue a healthy life style after treatment. By contrast, it has been demonstrated that primary care patients can be reactivated by formulating personal targets and designing individualized treatment plans in collaboration with their general practitioner or practice nurse. Based on these personal plans and targets, specific education must be provided and development of self management skills should be actively encouraged. Ideally, elements of pulmonary rehabilitation are tailored into a comprehensive primary care integrated disease management program. In that way, the benefits of PR can be extended to a substantially larger part of the COPD population, to reach even those with milder stages of disease. Favorable long-term effects on exercise tolerance and quality of life in a number of studies have been demonstrated in recent years, but broad introduction in the primary care setting still needs further justification in the form of a proper cost effectiveness analysis. PMID:21214043

  6. Hospital-sponsored primary care: I. Organizational and financial effects.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M; Wickizer, T M; Wheeler, J R

    1984-01-01

    Findings are presented from a seven-year (1976-83) evaluation of the Community Hospital Program (CHP), a national demonstration program sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to assist 54 community hospitals in improving the organization of access to primary care. Upon grant expiration, 66 per cent of hospital-sponsored group practices continued under some form of hospital sponsorship; over 90 per cent developed or were planning to develop spin-off programs; and new physicians were recruited and retained in the community. About 9 per cent of hospital admissions were accounted for by group physicians and grantee hospitals experienced a greater annual increase in their market share of admissions than competing hospitals in the area. While only three of the groups generated sufficient revenue to cover expenses during the grant period, 21 additional groups broke even during the first post-grant year. Productivity and cost per visit compared favorably with most other forms of care. Hospitalization rates from the hospital-sponsored practices were somewhat lower than those for other forms of care. Medical director leadership and involvement and the organization design of the practice were among several key factors associated with higher performing practices. The ability of such joint hospital-physician ventures to meet the needs of the poor and elderly in a time of Medicare and Medicaid cutbacks is discussed along with suggestions for targeting future initiatives in primary care. PMID:6742268

  7. [Clinical case: Complicated grief in primary care. Care plan].

    PubMed

    Ruymán Brito-Brito, Pedro; Rodríguez-Ramos, Mercedes; Pérez-García-Talavera, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This is the case of a 61-year-old patient woman that visits her nurse in Primary Health Care to get the control of blood pressure and glycemia. In the last two years has suffered the loss of her husband and of two brothers beside having lived through other vital stressful events that have taken her to a situation of complicated grief. The care plan is realized using the M. Gordon assessment system and standardized languages NANDA, NOC and NIC. The principal aims were the improvement of the depression level and the improvement in the affliction resolution. As suggested interventions were proposed to facilitate the grief and the derivation to a mental health unit. A follow-up of the patient was realized in nursing consultation at Primary health care to weekly intervals, in the beginning, and monthly, later. The evaluation of the care plan reflects an improvement in the criteria of Prigerson's complicated grief; an increase of the recreative activities; the retreat of the mourning that still she was guarding; as well as an improvement in the control of the blood pressure numbers. The attention of nurses before a case of complicated grief turns out to be complex. Nevertheless the suitable accomplishment of certain interventions orientated to facilitating the grief, with a follow-up in consultation, shows the efficiency. The difficulty in the boarding of the psychosocial problems meets increased at the moment of are necessary the nursing diagnostics adapted for every individual case. The work in group between nurses could improves the consensus. PMID:19854088

  8. [Patient safety in primary care: PREFASEG project].

    PubMed

    Catalán, Arantxa; Borrell, Francesc; Pons, Angels; Amado, Ester; Baena, José Miguel; Morales, Vicente

    2014-07-01

    The Institut Català de la Salut (ICS) has designed and integrated in electronic clinical station of primary care a new software tool to support the prescription of drugs, which can detect on-line certain medication errors. The software called PREFASEG (stands for Secure drug prescriptions) aims to prevent adverse events related to medication use in the field of primary health care (PHC). This study was made on the computerized medical record called CPT, which is used by all PHC physicians in our institution -3,750- and prescribing physicians through it. PREFASEG integrated in eCAP in July 2010 and six months later we performed a cross-sectional study to evaluate their usefulness and refine their design. The software alerts on-line in 5 dimensions: drug interactions, redundant treatments, allergies, contraindications of drugs with disease, and advises against drugs in over 75 years. PREFASEG generated 1,162,765 alerts (1 per 10 high treatment), with the detection of therapeutic duplication (62%) the most alerted. The overall acceptance rate is 35%, redundancies pharmacological (43%) and allergies (26%) are the most accepted. A total of 10,808 professionals (doctors and nurses) have accepted some of the recommendations of the program. PREFASEG is a feasible and highly efficient strategy to achieve an objective of Quality Plan for the NHS. PMID:25128357

  9. Local Health Department Activities to Ensure Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huabin; Sotnikov, Sergey; Shah, Gulzar

    2016-01-01

    Background Local health departments (LHDs) can play an important role in linking people to personal health services and ensuring the provision of health care when it is otherwise unavailable. However, the extent to which LHDs are involved in ensuring access to health care in its jurisdictions is not well known. Purpose To provide nationally representative estimates of LHD involvement in specific activities to ensure access to healthcare services and to assess their association with macro-environment/community and LHD capacity and process characteristics. Methods Data used were from the 2010 National Profile of Local Health Departments Study, Area Resource Files, and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials’ 2010 Profile of State Public Health Agencies Survey. Data were analyzed in 2012. Results Approximately 66.0% of LHDs conducted activities to ensure access to medical care, 45.9% to dental care, and 32.0% to behavioral health care. About 28% of LHDs had not conducted activities to ensure access to health care in their jurisdictions in 2010. LHDs with higher per capita expenditures and larger jurisdiction population sizes were more likely to provide access to care services (p <0.05). Conclusions There is substantial variation in LHD engagement in activities to ensure access to care. Differences in LHD capacity and the needs of the communities in which they are located may account for this variation. Further research is needed to determine whether this variation is associated with adverse population health outcomes. PMID:24237913

  10. Role of the registered nurse in primary health care: meeting health care needs in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Smolowitz, Janice; Speakman, Elizabeth; Wojnar, Danuta; Whelan, Ellen-Marie; Ulrich, Suzan; Hayes, Carolyn; Wood, Laura

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread interest in the redesign of primary health care practice models to increase access to quality health care. Registered nurses (RNs) are well positioned to assume direct care and leadership roles based on their understanding of patient, family, and system priorities. This project identified 16 exemplar primary health care practices that used RNs to the full extent of their scope of practice in team-based care. Interviews were conducted with practice representatives. RN activities were performed within three general contexts: episodic and preventive care, chronic disease management, and practice operations. RNs performed nine general functions in these contexts including telephone triage, assessment and documentation of health status, chronic illness case management, hospital transition management, delegated care for episodic illness, health coaching, medication reconciliation, staff supervision, and quality improvement leadership. These functions improved quality and efficiency and decreased cost. Implications for policy, practice, and RN education are considered. PMID:25261382

  11. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs. PMID:26826073

  12. The Affordable Care Act and Access to Care for People Changing Coverage Sources

    PubMed Central

    Hula, Lauren; Barna, Michael; Hoag, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated how access to and continuity of care might be affected by transitions between health insurance coverage sources, including the Marketplace (also called the Exchange), Medicaid, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Methods. From January to February 2014 and from August to September 2014, we searched provider directories for networks of primary care physicians and selected pediatric specialists participating in Marketplace, Medicaid, and CHIP in 6 market areas of the United States and calculated the degree to which networks overlapped. Results. Networks of physicians in Medicaid and CHIP were nearly identical, meaning transitions between those programs may not result in much physician disruption. This was not the case for Marketplace and Medicaid and CHIP networks. Conclusions. Transitions from the Marketplace to Medicaid or CHIP may result in different degrees of physician disruption for consumers depending on where they live and what type of Marketplace product they purchase. PMID:26447919

  13. Primary care training and the evolving healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Peccoralo, Lauren A; Callahan, Kathryn; Stark, Rachel; DeCherrie, Linda V

    2012-01-01

    With growing numbers of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations, and the potential implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the provision of primary care in the United States is expanding and changing. Therefore, there is an urgent need to create more primary-care physicians and to train physicians to practice in this environment. In this article, we review the impact that the changing US healthcare system has on trainees, strategies to recruit and retain medical students and residents into primary-care internal medicine, and the preparation of trainees to work in the changing healthcare system. Recruitment methods for medical students include early preclinical exposure to patients in the primary-care setting, enhanced longitudinal patient experiences in clinical clerkships, and primary-care tracks. Recruitment methods for residents include enhanced ambulatory-care training and primary-care programs. Financial-incentive programs such as loan forgiveness may encourage trainees to enter primary care. Retaining residents in primary-care careers may be encouraged via focused postgraduate fellowships or continuing medical education to prepare primary-care physicians as both teachers and practitioners in the changing environment. Finally, to prepare primary-care trainees to effectively and efficiently practice within the changing system, educators should consider shifting ambulatory training to community-based practices, encouraging resident participation in team-based care, providing interprofessional educational experiences, and involving trainees in quality-improvement initiatives. Medical educators in primary care must think innovatively and collaboratively to effectively recruit and train the future generation of primary-care physicians. PMID:22786734

  14. Exploring the Patient and Staff Experience With the Process of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Elizabeth J.; Kangovi, Shreya; Sha, Christopher; Johnson, Sarah; Chanton, Casey; Carter, Tamala; Grande, David T.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Previous studies suggest that the highest-risk patients value accessible, coordinated primary care that they perceive to be of high technical quality. We have limited understanding, however, of how low-income, chronically ill patients and the staff who care for them experience each individual step in the primary care process. METHODS We conducted qualitative interviews with uninsured or Medicaid patients with chronic illnesses, as well as with primary care staff. We interviewed 21 patients and 30 staff members with a variety of job titles from 3 primary care practices (1 federally qualified health center and 2 academically affiliated clinics).] RESULTS The interviews revealed 3 major issues that were present at all stages of a primary care episode: (1) information flow throughout an episode of care is a frequent challenge, despite systems that are intended to improve communication; (2) misaligned goals and expectations among patients, clinicians, and staff members are often an impediment to providing and obtaining care; and (3) personal relationships are highly valued by both patients and staff. CONCLUSIONS Vulnerable populations and the primary care staff who work with them perceive some of the same challenges throughout the primary care process. Improving information flow, aligning goals and expectations, and developing personal relationships may improve the experience of both patients and staff. PMID:26195680

  15. A Conceptual Framework of Mapping Access to Health Care across EU Countries: The Patient Access Initiative.

    PubMed

    Souliotis, Kyriakos; Hasardzhiev, Stanimir; Agapidaki, Eirini

    2016-01-01

    Research evidence suggests that access to health care is the key influential factor for improved population health outcomes and health care system sustainability. Although the importance of addressing barriers in access to health care across European countries is well documented, little has been done to improve the situation. This is due to different definitions, approaches and policies, and partly due to persisting disparities in access within and between European countries. To bridge this gap, the Patient Access Partnership (PACT) developed (a) the '5As' definition of access, which details the five critical elements (adequacy, accessibility, affordability, appropriateness, and availability) of access to health care, (b) a multi-stakeholders' approach for mapping access, and (c) a 13-item questionnaire based on the 5As definition in an effort to address these obstacles and to identify best practices. These tools are expected to contribute effectively to addressing access barriers in practice, by suggesting a common framework and facilitating the exchange of knowledge and expertise, in order to improve access to health care between and within European countries. PMID:27237814

  16. Explaining the link between access-to-care factors and health care resource utilization among individuals with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minchul; Ren, Jinma; Tillis, William; Asche, Carl V; Kim, Inkyu K; Kirkness, Carmen S

    2016-01-01

    Background Limited accessibility to health care may be a barrier to obtaining good care. Few studies have investigated the association between access-to-care factors and COPD hospitalizations. The objective of this study is to estimate the association between access-to-care factors and health care utilization including hospital/emergency department (ED) visits and primary care physician (PCP) office visits among adults with COPD utilizing a nationally representative survey data. Methods We conducted a pooled cross-sectional analysis based upon a bivariate probit model, utilizing datasets from the 2011–2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System linked with the 2014 Area Health Resource Files among adults with COPD. Dichotomous outcomes were hospital/ED visits and PCP office visits. Key covariates were county-level access-to-care factors, including the population-weighted numbers of pulmonary care specialists, PCPs, hospitals, rural health centers, and federally qualified health centers. Results Among a total of 9,332 observations, proportions of hospital/ED visits and PCP office visits were 16.2% and 44.2%, respectively. Results demonstrated that access-to-care factors were closely associated with hospital/ED visits. An additional pulmonary care specialist per 100,000 persons serves to reduce the likelihood of a hospital/ED visit by 0.4 percentage points (pp) (P=0.028). In contrast, an additional hospital per 100,000 persons increases the likelihood of hospital/ED visit by 0.8 pp (P=0.008). However, safety net facilities were not related to hospital utilizations. PCP office visits were not related to access-to-care factors. Conclusion Pulmonary care specialist availability was a key factor in reducing hospital utilization among adults with COPD. The findings of our study implied that an increase in the availability of pulmonary care specialists may reduce hospital utilizations in counties with little or no access to pulmonary care specialists and that since

  17. 'Fried chicken' medicine: the business of primary care.

    PubMed

    Culley, G A

    1994-01-01

    The current environment of pressures for health care reform have created a renewed interest in primary health care delivery. In most health care reform scenarios, family physicians and other primary care doctors are the case managers for all health care delivery. At the same time, there are intense activities from investment banking firms, insurance companies, hospitals, and home health companies, directed toward the purchase of primary care practices and organizing primary care delivery systems. These organizations seek to profit either from ancillary services generated by primary care or from capitation for a population of managed-care patients. Based on personal employment experiences with a for-profit hospital company, the author illustrates the difficulty in developing and managing primary care as a business and the inevitable conflict between management and primary care physicians. The article has detailed advice for family physicians to aid them in carefully examining organizational culture, financial structuring, physician relations, and operational aspects of any for-profit or hospital primary care system before deciding to become part of it. PMID:8289054

  18. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in Iraq is undertaking a systematic programme to integrate mental health into primary care in order to increase population access to mental health care. This paper reports the evaluation of the delivery of a ten day interactive training programme to 20% of primary care centres across Iraq. The multistage evaluation included a pre- and post-test questionnaire to assess knowledge, attitudes and practice in health workers drawn from 143 health centres, a course evaluation questionnaire and, in a random sample of 41 clinics, direct observation of health workers skills and exit interviews of patients, comparing health workers who had received the training programme with those from the same clinics who had not received the training. Three hundred andseventeen health workersparticipated in the training, which achieved an improvement in test scores from 42.3% to 59%. Trained health workers were observed by research psychiatrists to have a higher level of excellent skills than the untrained health workers, and patient exit interviews also reported better skills in the trained rather than untrained health workers. The two week course has thus been able to achieve significant change, not only in knowledge, but also in subsequent demonstration of trained practitioners practical skills in the workplace. Furthermore, it has been possible to implement the course and the evaluation despite a complex conflict situation. PMID:22479291

  19. Appointment standardization evaluation in a primary care facility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Li

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance on standardizing appointment slot length in a primary care clinic to understand the impact of providers' preferences and practice differences. Design/methodology/approach - The treatment time data were collected for each provider. There were six patient types: emergency/urgent care (ER/UC), follow-up patient (FU), new patient, office visit (OV), physical exam, and well-child care. Simulation model was developed to capture patient flow and measure patient wait time, provider idle time, cost, overtime, finish time, and the number of patients scheduled. Four scheduling scenarios were compared: scheduled all patients at 20 minutes; scheduled ER/UC, FU, OV at 20 minutes and others at 40 minutes; scheduled patient types on individual provider preference; and scheduled patient types on combined provider preference. Findings - Standardized scheduling among providers increase cost by 57 per cent, patient wait time by 83 per cent, provider idle time by five minutes per patient, overtime by 22 minutes, finish time by 30 minutes, and decrease patient access to care by approximately 11 per cent. An individualized scheduling approach could save as much as 14 per cent on cost and schedule 1.5 more patients. The combined preference method could save about 8 per cent while the number of patients scheduled remained the same. Research limitations/implications - The challenge is to actually disseminate the findings to medical providers and adjust scheduling systems accordingly. Originality/value - This paper concluded standardization of providers' clinic preference and practice negatively impact clinic service quality and access to care. PMID:27298064

  20. Transplantation and the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    McGill, Rita L; Ko, Tina Y

    2011-11-01

    Increasing appreciation of the survival benefits of kidney transplantation, compared with chronic dialysis, has resulted in more patients with kidney disease being referred and receiving organs. The evolving disparity between a rapidly increasing pool of candidates and a smaller pool of available donors has created new issues for the physicians who care for kidney patients and their potential living donors. This article outlines current efforts to address the growing number of patients who await transplantation, including relaxation of traditional donation criteria, maximization of living donation, and donation schemas that permit incompatible donor-recipient pairs to participate through paired donation and transplantation chains. New ethical issues faced by donors and recipients are discussed. Surgical advances that reduce the morbidity of donors are also described, as is the role of the primary physician in medical issues of both donors and recipients. PMID:22098662

  1. Drinking Motives Among HIV Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jennifer C.; Aharonovich, Efrat; O’Leary, Ann; Wainberg, Milton; Hasin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Heavy drinking among individuals with HIV is associated with poor medication adherence and other health problems. Understanding reasons for drinking (drinking motives) in this population is therefore important and could inform intervention. Using concepts of drinking motives from previous alcohol research, we assessed these motives and drinking in 254 HIV-positive primary care patients (78.0% male; 94.5% African American or Hispanic) prior to their participation in an alcohol intervention trial. Three motives had good factor structure and internal consistency: “drinking to cope with negative affect”, “drinking for social facilitation” (both associated with heavier drinking), and “drinking due to social pressure” (associated with less drinking). Drinking motives may provide important content for alcohol intervention; clinical trials could indicate whether inclusion of such content improves intervention efficacy. Discussing motives in session could help providers assist clients in better managing psychological and social aspects of their lives without reliance on alcohol. PMID:24165984

  2. Disparities in Primary Care EHR Adoption Rates

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Dominic; Zhang, Shun; Douglas, Megan; Sow, Charles; Strothers, Harry; Rust, George

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates electronic health record (EHR) adoption by primary care providers in Georgia to assess adoption disparities according to practice size and type, payer mix, and community characteristics. Frequency variances of EHR “Go Live” status were estimated. Odds ratios were calculated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Large practices and community health centers (CHCs) were more likely to Go Live (>80% EHR adoption) than rural health clinics and other underserved settings (53%). A significantly lower proportion (68.9%) of Medicaid predominant providers had achieved Go Live status and had a 47% higher risk of not achieving Go Live status than private insurance predominant practices. Disparities in EHR adoption rates may exacerbate existing disparities in health outcomes of patients served by these practices. Targeted support such as that provided to CHCs would level the playing field for practices now at a disadvantage. PMID:27587942

  3. Depression and suicide ideation among students accessing campus health care.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Sara; Wiegel, Jennifer R; Mundt, Marlon; Brown, David; Saewyc, Elizabeth; Heiligenstein, Eric; Harahan, Brian; Fleming, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Depression and suicide are of increasing concern on college campuses. This article presents data from the College Health Intervention Projects on the frequency of depression and suicide ideation among 1,622 college students who accessed primary care services in 4 university clinics in the Midwest, Northwest, and Canada. Students completed the Beck Depression Inventory and other measures related to exercise patterns, alcohol use, sensation seeking, and violence. The frequency of depression was similar for men (25%) and women (26%). Thought of suicide was higher for men (13%) than women (10%). Tobacco use, emotional abuse, and unwanted sexual encounters were all associated with screening positive for depression. "Days of exercise per week" was inversely associated with screening positive for depression. Because the majority of students access campus-based student health centers, medical providers can serve a key role in early identification and intervention. With every 4th student reporting symptoms of depression and every 10th student having suicidal thoughts, such interventions are needed. PMID:21219281

  4. Primary care medicine in crisis: toward reconstruction and renewal.

    PubMed

    Moore, Gordon; Showstack, Jonathan

    2003-02-01

    Primary care is in crisis. Despite its proud history and theoretical advantages, the field has failed to hold its own among medical specialties. While the rest of medicine promises technology and sophistication, the basic model of primary care has changed little over the past half-century. Why has the transition from general practice to today's primary care been so difficult? Many of the causes of this struggle may lie within primary care itself, ranging from failure to articulate to the public (and insurers and policymakers) what value it, and it alone, can offer, to taking on an ever-broadening set of roles and responsibilities while all too often falling short of its promises. Perhaps most important, in the emerging health care system, the lack of a discrete definition of primary care has allowed managed care organizations and payers, among others, to define the role of primary care to suit their own interests. In response to a changing marketplace, political uncertainty, and shifting consumer expectations, primary care will need to reconstruct itself. The reconstruction will not be easy. Nevertheless, a process should begin that moves the field in the right direction. Building on its unique abilities, primary care can emerge as a redefined product that is attractive to patients, payers, and primary care practitioners alike. PMID:12558374

  5. 42 CFR 438.804 - Primary care provider payment increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care provider payment increases. 438.804... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Conditions for Federal Financial Participation § 438.804 Primary care provider payment increases. (a) For MCO, PIHP or PAHP contracts that...

  6. EBM in primary care: a qualitative multicenter study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence based medicine (EBM) has made a substantial impact on primary care in Spain over the last few years. However, little research has been done into family physicians (FPs)' attitudes related to EBM. The present study investigates FPs' perceptions of EBM in the primary care context. Methods This study used qualitative methodology. Information was obtained from 8 focus groups composed of 67 FPs from 47 health centers in 4 autonomous regions in Spain. Intentional sampling considered participants' previous education in EBM, and their experience as tutors in family medicine or working groups' members of the Spanish Society of Family Practice. Sociological discourse analysis was used with the support of the MAXqda software. Results were validated by means of triangulation among researchers and contrast with participants. Results Findings were grouped into three main areas: 1) The tug-of-war between the "science" of EBM and "experience" in the search for good clinical practice in primary care; 2) The development of EBM sensemaking as a reaction to contextual factors and interests; 3) The paradox of doubt and trust in the new EBM experts. The meaning of EBM was dynamically constructed within the primary care context. FPs did not consider good clinical practice was limited to the vision of science that EBM represents. Its use appeared to be conditioned by several factors that transcended the common concept of barriers. Along with concerns about its objectivity, participants showed a tendency to see EBM as the use of simplified guidelines developed by EBM experts. Conclusions The identification of science with EBM and its recognition as a useful but insufficient tool for the good clinical practice requires rethinking new meanings of evidence within the primary care reality. Beyond the barriers related to accessing and putting into practice the EBM, its reactive use can determine FPs' questions and EBM development in a direction not always centred on patients

  7. Health and access to care for undocumented migrants living in the European Union: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Aniek; Howard, Natasha; Wolffers, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Background Literature on health and access to care of undocumented migrants in the European Union (EU) is limited and heterogeneous in focus and quality. Authors conducted a scoping review to identify the extent, nature and distribution of existing primary research (1990–2012), thus clarifying what is known, key gaps, and potential next steps. Methods Authors used Arksey and O’Malley’s six-stage scoping framework, with Levac, Colquhoun and O’Brien’s revisions, to review identified sources. Findings were summarized thematically: (i) physical, mental and social health issues, (ii) access and barriers to care, (iii) vulnerable groups and (iv) policy and rights. Results Fifty-four sources were included of 598 identified, with 93% (50/54) published during 2005–2012. EU member states from Eastern Europe were under-represented, particularly in single-country studies. Most study designs (52%) were qualitative. Sampling descriptions were generally poor, and sampling purposeful, with only four studies using any randomization. Demographic descriptions were far from uniform and only two studies focused on undocumented children and youth. Most (80%) included findings on health-care access, with obstacles reported at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Major access barriers included fear, lack of awareness of rights, socioeconomics. Mental disorders appeared widespread, while obstetric needs and injuries were key reasons for seeking care. Pregnant women, children and detainees appeared most vulnerable. While EU policy supports health-care access for undocumented migrants, practices remain haphazard, with studies reporting differing interpretation and implementation of rights at regional, institutional and individual levels. Conclusions This scoping review is an initial attempt to describe available primary evidence on health and access to care for undocumented migrants in the European Union. It underlines the need for more and better-quality research, increased

  8. Comparing Quality of Public Primary Care between Hong Kong and Shanghai Using Validated Patient Assessment Tools

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaolin; Li, Haitao; Yang, Nan; Wong, Samuel Y. S.; Owolabi, Onikepe; Xu, Jianguang; Shi, Leiyu; Tang, Jinling; Li, Donald; Griffiths, Sian M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Primary care is the key element of health reform in China. The objective of this study was to compare patient assessed quality of public primary care between Hong Kong, a city with established primary care environment influenced by its colonial history, and Shanghai, a city leading primary care reform in Mainland China; and to measure the equity of care in the two cities. Methods Cross sectional stratified random sampling surveys were conducted in 2011. Data were collected from 1,994 respondents in Hong Kong and 811 respondents in Shanghai. A validated Chinese version of the primary care assessment tool was employed to assess perceived quality of primary care with respect to socioeconomic characteristics and health status. Results We analyzed 391 and 725 respondents in Hong Kong and Shanghai, respectively, who were regular public primary care users. Respondents in Hong Kong reported significant lower scores in first contact accessibility (1.59 vs. 2.15), continuity of care (2.33 vs. 3.10), coordination of information (2.84 vs. 3.64), comprehensiveness service availability (2.43 vs. 3.31), comprehensiveness service provided (2.11 vs. 2.40), and the total score (23.40 vs. 27.40), but higher scores in first contact utilization (3.15 vs. 2.54) and coordination of services (2.67 vs. 2.40) when compared with those in Shanghai. Respondents with higher income reported a significantly higher total primary care score in Hong Kong, but not in Shanghai. Conclusions Respondents in Shanghai reported better quality of public primary care than those in Hong Kong, while quality of public primary care tended to be more equitable in Shanghai. PMID:25826616

  9. Latino adults' access to mental health care: a review of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Zayas, Luis H; Hansen, Marissa C

    2006-05-01

    Since the early 1980s, epidemiological studies using state-of-the-art methodologies have documented the unmet mental health needs of Latinos adults in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This paper reviews 16 articles based on seven epidemiological studies, examines studies methodologies, and summarizes findings about how Latino adults access mental health services. Studies consistently report that, compared to non-Latino Whites, Latinos underutilize mental health services, are less likely to receive guideline congruent care, and rely more often on primary care for services. Structural, economic, psychiatric, and cultural factors influence Latinos' service access. In spite of the valuable information these studies provide, methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs, scarcity of mixed Latino group samples) constrict knowledge about Latinos access to mental health services. Areas for future research and development needed to improve Latinos' access and quality of mental health care are discussed. PMID:16598658

  10. The Development and Validation of a Rapid Assessment Tool of Primary Care in China.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jie; Liang, Yuan; Shi, LeiYu; Zhao, JingGe; Wang, YuTan; Kuang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. With Chinese health care reform increasingly emphasizing the importance of primary care, the need for a tool to evaluate primary care performance and service delivery is clear. This study presents a methodology for a rapid assessment of primary care organizations and service delivery in China. Methods. The study translated and adapted the Primary Care Assessment Tool-Adult Edition (PCAT-AE) into a Chinese version to measure core dimensions of primary care, namely, first contact, continuity, comprehensiveness, and coordination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess the validity and reliability of the Chinese Rapid Primary Care Assessment Tool (CR-PCAT). Eight community health centers in Guangdong province have been selected to participate in the survey. Results. A total of 1465 effective samples were included for data analysis. Eight items were eliminated following principal component analysis and reliability testing. The principal component analysis extracted five multiple-item scales (first contact utilization, first contact accessibility, ongoing care, comprehensiveness, and coordination). The tests of scaling assumptions were basically met. Conclusion. The standard psychometric evaluation indicates that the scales have achieved relatively good reliability and validity. The CR-PCAT provides a rapid and reliable measure of four core dimensions of primary care, which could be applied in various scenarios. PMID:26885509

  11. The Development and Validation of a Rapid Assessment Tool of Primary Care in China

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jie; Liang, Yuan; Shi, LeiYu; Zhao, JingGe; Wang, YuTan; Kuang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. With Chinese health care reform increasingly emphasizing the importance of primary care, the need for a tool to evaluate primary care performance and service delivery is clear. This study presents a methodology for a rapid assessment of primary care organizations and service delivery in China. Methods. The study translated and adapted the Primary Care Assessment Tool-Adult Edition (PCAT-AE) into a Chinese version to measure core dimensions of primary care, namely, first contact, continuity, comprehensiveness, and coordination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess the validity and reliability of the Chinese Rapid Primary Care Assessment Tool (CR-PCAT). Eight community health centers in Guangdong province have been selected to participate in the survey. Results. A total of 1465 effective samples were included for data analysis. Eight items were eliminated following principal component analysis and reliability testing. The principal component analysis extracted five multiple-item scales (first contact utilization, first contact accessibility, ongoing care, comprehensiveness, and coordination). The tests of scaling assumptions were basically met. Conclusion. The standard psychometric evaluation indicates that the scales have achieved relatively good reliability and validity. The CR-PCAT provides a rapid and reliable measure of four core dimensions of primary care, which could be applied in various scenarios. PMID:26885509

  12. Patient access innovations: integrating patients within the system of care.

    PubMed

    Marino, Daniel J; Faber, William; Duncan, Meredith

    2015-12-01

    Clinically integrated networks seeking to ensure in-network access and strengthen patient engagement should adopt five strategic areas of focus: Extend access beyond traditional models. Manage out-migration. Make it easy for patients to stay in the network. Build patient engagement into clinical care models. Explore innovative methods to engage patients. PMID:26793943

  13. Addressing the emotional barriers to access to reproductive care.

    PubMed

    Rich, Camilla W; Domar, Alice D

    2016-05-01

    Health care professionals make the medical care of infertility patients a priority, with the goal of achieving a singleton pregnancy for each. Patients who never seek out care, who do not return for treatment after the diagnostic workup, or who drop out of treatment are rarely noticed. Yet this is the outcome for the majority of patients, and the primary reason after financial for treatment termination is the emotional aspect. Attending to the psychological needs of our patients must become a higher priority, to provide all patients true access to care. PMID:27054306

  14. Android-based access to holistic emergency care record.

    PubMed

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Prentza, Andriana; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of an Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system which interfaces with a Holistic Emergency Care Record (HECR) that aims at managing emergency care holistically by supporting EMS processes and is accessible by Android-enabled mobile devices. PMID:23823406

  15. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access. PMID:25751545

  16. Primary Health Care in Canada: Systems in Motion

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Brian; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Strumpf, Erin; Coyle, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Context: During the 1980s and 1990s, innovations in the organization, funding, and delivery of primary health care in Canada were at the periphery of the system rather than at its core. In the early 2000s, a new policy environment emerged. Methods: This policy analysis examines primary health care reform efforts in Canada during the last decade, drawing on descriptive information from published and gray literature and from a series of semistructured interviews with informed observers of primary health care in Canada. Findings: Primary health care in Canada has entered a period of potentially transformative change. Key initiatives include support for interprofessional primary health care teams, group practices and networks, patient enrollment with a primary care provider, financial incentives and blended-payment schemes, development of primary health care governance mechanisms, expansion of the primary health care provider pool, implementation of electronic medical records, and quality improvement training and support. Conclusions: Canada's experience suggests that primary health care transformation can be achieved voluntarily in a pluralistic system of private health care delivery, given strong government and professional leadership working in concert. PMID:21676023

  17. Review of Integrated Psychological Services in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michele S

    2016-06-01

    Reviews the book, Integrated Psychological Services in Primary Care edited by William Scott Craig (see record 2016-01850-000). This book opens with an article by the editor, in which he outlines the behavioral health needs of primary care patients and the rationale behind integrating mental health services in primary care settings. Subsequent chapters address basic and practical information for a variety of practice locations, such as Patient Centered Medical Home clinics, the Veteran's Administration medical centers, and primary care settings where the concept of integrated health is new. This is an excellent primer for anyone planning to implement an integrated care program or for those considering moving from an independent practice, agency, or traditional health care/hospital environment into an integrated primary care environment. The authors' writing styles made difficult concepts easy to understand and their knowledge of the utility of integration was evident. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27270257

  18. The adoption of the Reference Framework for diabetes care among primary care physicians in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C.S.; Wang, Harry H.X.; Kwan, Mandy W.M.; Chan, Wai Man; Fan, Carmen K.M.; Liang, Miaoyin; Li, Shannon TS; Fung, Franklin D.H.; Yeung, Ming Sze; Chan, David K.L.; Griffiths, Sian M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has been increasing both globally and locally. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are in a privileged position to provide first contact and continuing care for diabetic patients. A territory-wide Reference Framework for Diabetes Care for Adults has been released by the Hong Kong Primary Care Office in 2010, with the aim to further enhance evidence-based and high quality care for diabetes in the primary care setting through wide adoption of the Reference Framework. A valid questionnaire survey was conducted among PCPs to evaluate the levels of, and the factors associated with, their adoption of the Reference Framework. A total of 414 completed surveys were received with the response rate of 13.0%. The average adoption score was 3.29 (SD 0.51) out of 4. Approximately 70% of PCPs highly adopted the Reference Framework in their routine practice. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that the PCPs perceptions on the inclusion of sufficient local information (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.748, 95%CI 1.597–14.115, P = 0.005) and reduction of professional autonomy of PCPs (aOR = 1.859, 95%CI 1.013–3.411, P = 0.045) were more likely to influence their adoption level of the Reference Framework for diabetes care in daily practices. The overall level of guideline adoption was found to be relatively high among PCPs for adult diabetes in primary care settings. The adoption barriers identified in this study should be addressed in the continuous updating of the Reference Framework. Strategies need to be considered to enhance the guideline adoption and implementation capacity. PMID:27495018

  19. Telestroke Centers as an Option for Addressing Geographical Disparities in Access to Stroke Care in South Carolina, 2013.

    PubMed

    Samson, Marsha; Trivedi, Tushar; Heidari, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    Telestroke centers can increase access to proper and timely diagnosis and treatment of stroke, especially for rural populations, thereby reducing disability and death. Census tract information was used to map primary stroke centers geographically and to identify areas that would benefit from additional access to medical care via telestroke centers (health care facilities that provide information on stroke care from a distance). Results indicate that in 2013, approximately half of the South Carolina population did not have access to a primary stroke center within a 30-minute drive of their home, and 30% did not have access within 60 minutes. Increasing access to prompt evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of stroke and improving long-term quality of life requires the addition of telestroke centers in areas without primary stroke centers and examination of the effects of these centers on stroke incidence and mortality in South Carolina. PMID:26704445

  20. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  1. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  2. Primary Care of the Solid Organ Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher J; Pagalilauan, Genevieve

    2015-09-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is one of the major advances in medicine. Care of the SOT recipient is complex and continued partnership with the transplant specialist is essential to manage and treat complications and maintain health. The increased longevity of SOT recipients will lead to their being an evolving part of primary care practice, with ever more opportunities for care, education, and research of this rewarding patient population. This review discusses the overall primary care management of adult SOT recipients. PMID:26320047

  3. International experts’ perspectives on a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care: implication for Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Setiyawati, Diana; Colucci, Erminia; Blashki, Grant; Wraith, Ruth; Minas, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing primary health care to incorporate mental health services is a key strategy for closing the treatment gap for people with mental disorders. The integration of psychological care into primary health care is a critical step in addressing poor access to mental health specialists. As the psychology profession is increasingly called upon to prepare psychologists for primary health care settings, an international experts' consensus is valuable in guiding the development of a high-quality curriculum for psychologists working in the primary health care context. A Delphi method was used to gain a consensus on the most appropriate roles and training for psychologists. Initial constructs and themes were derived from a detailed literature review and sent to 114 international experts in primary mental health care from five continents. Overall, 52 experts who participated agreed that psychologists should have wide-ranging roles and skills including clinical, health promotion and advocacy skills. This study has identified the specific roles and training needed by psychologists to enable them to work more effectively in primary health care settings. The consensus will inform the development of a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care in Indonesia, and is part of a broader suite of studies. PMID:25750818

  4. Development and Validation of the Tibetan Primary Care Assessment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Aitian; Lai, Youwen

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To develop a primary care assessment tool in Tibetan area and assess the primary care quality among different healthcare settings. Methods. Primary care assessment tool-Tibetan version (PCAT-T) was developed to measure seven primary care domains. Data from a cross-sectional survey of 1386 patients was used to conduct validity and reliability analysis of PCAT-T. Analysis of variance was used to conduct comparison of primary care quality among different healthcare settings. Results. A 28-item PCAT-T was constructed which included seven multi-item scales and two single-item scales. All of multi-item scales achieved good internal consistency and item-total correlations. Scaling assumptions tests were well satisfied. The full range of possible scores was observed for all scales, except first contact and continuity. Compared with prefecture hospital (77.42) and county hospital (82.01), township health center achieved highest primary care quality total score (86.64). Conclusions. PCAT-T is a valid and reliable tool to measure patients' experience of primary care in the Tibet Autonomous Region. Township health center has the best primary care performance compared with other healthcare settings, and township health center should play a key role in providing primary care in Tibet. PMID:24967349

  5. [Relations with emergency medical care and primary care doctor, home health care].

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kazunari; Ohta, Shoichi

    2016-02-01

    Medical care for an ultra-aging society has been shifted from hospital-centered to local community-based. This shift has yielded the so-called Integrated Community Care System. In the system, emergency medical care is considered important, as primary care doctors and home health care providers play a crucial role in coordinating with the department of emergency medicine. Since the patients move depending on their physical condition, a hospital and a community should collaborate in providing a circulating service. The revision of the medical payment system in 2014 clearly states the importance of "functional differentiation and strengthen and coordination of medical institutions, improvement of home health care". As part of the revision, the subacute care unit has been integrated into the community care unit, which is expected to have more than one role in community coordination. The medical fee has been set for the purpose of promoting the home medical care visit, and enhancing the capability of family doctors. In the section of end-of-life care for the elderly, there have been many issues such as reduction of the readmission rate and endorsement of a patient's decision-making, and judgment for active emergency medical care for patient admission. The concept of frailty as an indicator of prognosis has been introduced, which might be applied to the future of emergency medicine. As described above, the importance of a primary doctor and a family doctor should be identified more in the future; thereby it becomes essential for doctors to closely work with the hospital. Advancing the cooperation between a hospital and a community for seamless patient-centered care, the emergency medicine as an integrated community care will further develop by adapting to an ultra-aging society. PMID:26915240

  6. Residential Segregation and the Availability of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, Darrell J; Dinwiddie, Gniesha Y; Chan, Kitty S; McCleary, Rachael R

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between residential segregation and geographic access to primary care physicians (PCPs) in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). Data Sources We combined zip code level data on primary care physicians from the 2006 American Medical Association master file with demographic, socioeconomic, and segregation measures from the 2000 U.S. Census. Our sample consisted of 15,465 zip codes located completely or partially in an MSA. Methods We defined PCP shortage areas as those zip codes with no PCP or a population to PCP ratio of >3,500. Using logistic regressions, we estimated the association between a zip code's odds of being a PCP shortage area and its minority composition and degree of segregation in its MSA. Principal Findings We found that odds of being a PCP shortage area were 67 percent higher for majority African American zip codes but 27 percent lower for majority Hispanic zip codes. The association varied with the degree of segregation. As the degree of segregation increased, the odds of being a PCP shortage area increased for majority African American zip codes; however, the converse was true for majority Hispanic and Asian zip codes. Conclusions Efforts to address PCP shortages should target African American communities especially in segregated MSAs. PMID:22524264

  7. Two models on primary health care approach of Region VII.

    PubMed

    Ricana, C

    1981-01-01

    This article presents descriptions of 2 experiences with primary health care in Region VII of the Philippines: the Sudtonggan Human Resource Development Project and the Consolacion Integrated Baranguay Area Development Project. In the Sudtonggan project, a community assembly identified 3 priority activities--increased income, accessible schooling, and health services--and invited government agencies and private agencies such as the Institute of Cultural Affairs to assist. Government agencies delivered medical assistance, road improvements, school facility construction, and extension technical works, while private agencies extended capital loans and training grants, market development, and technical expertise. Today 3 locally based industries are operable in the community, and 20% of their income is targeted for support of social programs in the areas of health and education. A health clinic has been established, as well as a school and recreational facilities. In the 2nd experiment, the aranguay was divided into 3 development projects focusing on industrial development; residential, commercial, and institutional development; and agricultural development. Coalitions of agencies were formed to provide more comprehensive services in areas such as health and nutrition. Voluntary health workers, selected out of community assemblies, received training and assisted rural health midwives in baranguay health stations. These 2 experiences indicate that primary health care is most effective when it is based in a community that is cognizant of its needs and problems and has the resolve to protect the health of its members. PMID:12313221

  8. Access to care: the physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alan; Ruckle, Janessa E; Sultan, Omar S; Kemble, Stephen

    2011-02-01

    Private practice physicians in Hawaii were surveyed to better understand their impressions of different insurance plans and their willingness to care for patients with those plans. Physician experiences and perspectives were investigated in regard to reimbursement, formulary limitations, pre-authorizations, specialty referrals, responsiveness to problems, and patient knowledge of their plans. The willingness of physicians to accept new patients from specific insurance company programs clearly correlated with the difficulties and limitations physicians perceive in working with the companies (p<0.0012). Survey results indicate that providers in private practice were much more likely to accept University Health Alliance (UHA) and Hawaii Medical Services Association (HMSA) Commercial insurance than Aloha Care Advantage and Aloha Quest. This was likely related to the more favorable impressions of the services, payments, and lower administrative burden offered by those companies compared with others. PMID:21308645

  9. [Vulnerable populations and access to care].

    PubMed

    Castello, Christine; Michard-Lenoir, Anne-Pascale; Allemand, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Precariousness is a very complex concept that brings together a diverse and fragmented population. The interest in comparing views and opinions is clear for understanding of this phenomenon. A physician in the paediatric emergency unit of a hospital and the head of a "Medecins du Monde" branch evoke the different faces of precariousness. A difficult and sometimes poignant reality, which health care providers must try to cope with. PMID:23074804

  10. The effects of telemedicine on racial and ethnic disparities in access to acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, Michael J; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T; Albright, Karen C; Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K; Branas, Charles C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been previously reported in acute stroke care. We sought to determine the effect of telemedicine (TM) on access to acute stroke care for racial and ethnic minorities in the state of Texas. Data were collected from the US Census Bureau, The Joint Commission and the American Hospital Association. Access for racial and ethnic minorities was determined by summing the population that could reach a primary stroke centre (PSC) or telemedicine spoke within specified time intervals using validated models. TM extended access to stroke expertise by 1.5 million residents. The odds of providing 60-minute access via TM were similar in Blacks and Whites (prevalence odds ratios (POR) 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.001). The odds of providing access via TM were also similar for Hispanics and non-Hispanics (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000). We found that telemedicine increased access to acute stroke care for 1.5 million Texans. While racial and ethnic disparities exist in other components of stroke care, we did not find evidence of disparities in access to the acute stroke expertise afforded by telemedicine. PMID:26116854

  11. Nephrologists as primary care providers: a review of the issues.

    PubMed

    Holley, J L

    1998-04-01

    Considering the role of nephrologists as primary care providers for their chronic dialysis patients requires exploration of a number of factors. These factors include the definition of a primary care provider, the time and expertise needed to provide primary care, the expectations of nephrologists and dialysis patients who give and receive primary care, the appropriate preventive care for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, and the current and future roles of nephrologists within a changing health care environment. Unfortunately, few studies have addressed these issues, and there is little objective information on which to base guidelines and recommendations about nephrologist-directed primary care of ESRD patients. Most nephrologists spend a significant portion (30% to 35%) of their time caring for dialysis patients, and 90% report providing primary care to dialysis patients. Most dialysis patients view their nephrologist as their primary care provider. The increasingly aged and ill ESRD population will undoubtedly necessitate additional time and expertise for care from an understaffed nephrology work force. The increased use of advanced practice nurses and alliances with health care delivery systems under global capitation programs may develop into effective strategies to provide care for an increasing population of dialysis patients. The nonnephrologic health care needs, including specific and appropriate cancer screening and preventive health care protocols for ESRD patients whose life expectancies are significantly less than the general population, are unclear. The issues involved in considering nephrologists as primary caregivers for ESRD patients include these and other related factors, and will be discussed in this review. PMID:9531172

  12. Primary care--opportunities and threats. Developing professional knowledge: making primary care education and research more relevant.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, P.; Jones, K.

    1997-01-01

    The trio of recent government white papers heralds a new world for primary care. Many changes in the education of future primary health care professionals and in the research ethos of the discipline will be needed to realise this vision. New skills and attitudes, not least in multidisciplinary working; lifelong learning; and greater understanding of and participation in primary care research will have to emerge from educational efforts in the next few years. PMID:9081008

  13. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Furler, John; Cleland, Jennifer; Del Mar, Chris; Hanratty, Barbara; Kadam, Umesh; Lasserson, Daniel; McCowan, Colin; Magin, Parker; Mitchell, Caroline; Qureshi, Nadeem; Rait, Greta; Steel, Nick; van Driel, Mieke; Ward, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some countries. Emerging from this has been innovation in research design and focus, although less is known of the effect on research output. Conclusion Primary care research is now well placed to lead a broad re-vitalisation of academic medicine, answering questions of relevance to practitioners, patients, communities and Government. Key areas for future primary care research leaders to focus on include exposing undergraduates early to primary care research, integrating this early exposure with doctoral and postdoctoral research career support, further expanding cross disciplinary approaches, and developing useful measures of output for future primary care research investment. PMID:18822178

  14. Integrated Behavioral Health Services: Improving Access to Mental Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturm, Lynne A.; Perry, Deborah F.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes innovative service delivery models and clinical strategies that support the social-emotional development of young children and their families in the pediatric primary care setting. By understanding the trends affecting well-child care, early childhood providers will be better equipped to partner with their pediatric…

  15. [Primary health care and the millennium development goals].

    PubMed

    Faye, A; Bob, M; Fall, A; Fall, C

    2012-01-01

    Member countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) met in Alma Ata (8-12 September 1978) to define and advocate the implementation of primary health care (PHC) worldwide, above all, in developing countries, which had a real need to review their strategies for meeting the health needs of their populations. They did not suspect that 20 years later the vision they displayed would remain undeniably relevant. Here we examine the similarities and points of convergence of their declaration about PHC with the Millennium Development Goals that seek today to reduce poverty across the world. An exhaustive and analytic literature review was conducted to collect those similarities. Further analysis of the definitions, objectives, principles and recommendations of the Alma Ata Declaration and the Millennium Declaration reveals multiple dependencies and fundamental points of similarity between these two representations. Almost all states have pledged to achieve the eight MDG by 2015: to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, achieve universal primary education, promote gender equality and empower women, reduce child mortality, improve maternal health, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, ensure environmental sustainability, and develop a global partnership for development. The Alma Ata conference defined primary health care as essential health care, based on practical methods and techniques that are both scientifically sound and socially acceptable, universally accessible to all individuals and all families of the community, through their full participation and at a cost that the community and countries can afford at all stages of their development in the spirit of self-reliance and self-determination. It is an integral part of economic and social development. The following principles are involved in the achievement of both primary health care and the MDG: social equity, community participation, and intersectorality. Public health is an essential condition of poverty

  16. Access to care for children with emotional/behavioral difficulties.

    PubMed

    Henning-Smith, Carrie; Alang, Sirry

    2016-06-01

    Emotional/behavioral difficulties (EBDs) are increasingly diagnosed in children, constituting some of the most common chronic childhood conditions. Left untreated, EBDs pose long-term individual and population-level consequences. There is a growing evidence of disparities in EBD prevalence by various demographic characteristics. This article builds on this research by examining disparities in access to medical care for children with EBD. From 2008 to 2011, using data from the US National Health Interview Survey (N = 31,631) on sample children aged 4-17, we investigate (1) whether having EBD affects access to care (modeled as delayed care due to cost and difficulty making an appointment) and (2) the role demographic characteristics, health insurance coverage, and frequency of service use play in access to care for children with EBD. Results indicate that children with EBD experience issues in accessing care at more than twice the rate of children without EBD, even though they are less likely to be uninsured than their counterparts without EBD. In multivariable models, children with EBD are still more likely to experience delayed care due to cost and difficulty making a timely appointment, even after adjusting for frequency of health service use, insurance coverage, and demographic characteristics. PMID:25583944

  17. Envisioning a Learning Health Care System: The Electronic Primary Care Research Network, A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Brendan C.; Peterson, Kevin A.; Speedie, Stuart; Taweel, Adel; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Hobbs, F. D. Richard

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The learning health care system refers to the cycle of turning health care data into knowledge, translating that knowledge into practice, and creating new data by means of advanced information technology. The electronic Primary Care Research Network (ePCRN) was a project, funded by the US National Institutes of Health, with the aim to facilitate clinical research using primary care electronic health records (EHRs). METHODS We identified the requirements necessary to deliver clinical studies via a distributed electronic network linked to EHRs. After we explored a variety of informatics solutions, we constructed a functional prototype of the software. We then explored the barriers to adoption of the prototype software within US practice-based research networks. RESULTS We developed a system to assist in the identification of eligible cohorts from EHR data. To preserve privacy, counts and flagging were performed remotely, and no data were transferred out of the EHR. A lack of batch export facilities from EHR systems and ambiguities in the coding of clinical data, such as blood pressure, have so far prevented a full-scale deployment. We created an international consortium and a model for sharing further ePCRN development across a variety of ongoing projects in the United States and Europe. CONCLUSIONS A means of accessing health care data for research is not sufficient in itself to deliver a learning health care system. EHR systems need to use sophisticated tools to capture and preserve rich clinical context in coded data, and business models need to be developed that incentivize all stakeholders from clinicians to vendors to participate in the system. PMID:22230831

  18. The expanding role of primary care in cancer control.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Greg; Berendsen, Annette; Crawford, S Michael; Dommett, Rachel; Earle, Craig; Emery, Jon; Fahey, Tom; Grassi, Luigi; Grunfeld, Eva; Gupta, Sumit; Hamilton, Willie; Hiom, Sara; Hunter, David; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Macleod, Una; Mason, Robert; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Neal, Richard D; Peake, Michael; Roland, Martin; Seifert, Bohumil; Sisler, Jeff; Sussman, Jonathan; Taplin, Stephen; Vedsted, Peter; Voruganti, Teja; Walter, Fiona; Wardle, Jane; Watson, Eila; Weller, David; Wender, Richard; Whelan, Jeremy; Whitlock, James; Wilkinson, Clare; de Wit, Niek; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2015-09-01

    The nature of cancer control is changing, with an increasing emphasis, fuelled by public and political demand, on prevention, early diagnosis, and patient experience during and after treatment. At the same time, primary care is increasingly promoted, by governments and health funders worldwide, as the preferred setting for most health care for reasons of increasing need, to stabilise health-care costs, and to accommodate patient preference for care close to home. It is timely, then, to consider how this expanding role for primary care can work for cancer control, which has long been dominated by highly technical interventions centred on treatment, and in which the contribution of primary care has been largely perceived as marginal. In this Commission, expert opinion from primary care and public health professionals with academic and clinical cancer expertise—from epidemiologists, psychologists, policy makers, and cancer specialists—has contributed to a detailed consideration of the evidence for cancer control provided in primary care and community care settings. Ranging from primary prevention to end-of-life care, the scope for new models of care is explored, and the actions needed to effect change are outlined. The strengths of primary care—its continuous, coordinated, and comprehensive care for individuals and families—are particularly evident in prevention and diagnosis, in shared follow-up and survivorship care, and in end-of-life care. A strong theme of integration of care runs throughout, and its elements (clinical, vertical, and functional) and the tools needed for integrated working are described in detail. All of this change, as it evolves, will need to be underpinned by new research and by continuing and shared multiprofessional development. PMID:26431866

  19. The Social Implications of Health Care Reform: Reducing Access Barriers to Health Care Services for Uninsured Hispanic and Latino Americans in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Mitchell A.; Inguanzo, Marian M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is currently facing one of its most significant social challenges in decades in terms of its ability to provide access to primary care services to the millions of Americans who have lost their health insurance coverage in the recent economic recession. National statistics compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau for 2009…

  20. Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

  1. Psychiatric and Medical Comorbidity in the Primary Care Geriatric Patient-An Update.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gary J; Castro, Jack; Chang, Mason; Chauhan-James, Jaimini; Fishman, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The mental health needs of older primary care patients are now widely recognized if not widely addressed. The range of behavioral health approaches including co-locating psychiatrists and integrating mental health professionals as care managers into primary care sites is extensive and growing. Nonetheless the primary care provider remains the first line of defense against mental disorders, most commonly depression and anxiety that accompany and exacerbate common physical conditions. The excess, potentially avoidable disability that results from comorbidity makes it imperative that early recognition and evidence based intervention occur. Multi-morbidity and polypharmacy make intervention a challenge. Psychotherapy can help overcome comorbidity depression however the most accessible intervention would be an antidepressant FDA approved for both anxiety and depressive disorders. For all these reasons, a focus on physical conditions most commonly associated with mental disorders can foster early recognition before the older patient's care becomes overwhelmingly complicated. PMID:27222136

  2. Understanding the culture of primary health care: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Camillo, Pat

    2004-01-01

    A qualitative, ethnographic study was undertaken to determine whether older women experienced barriers to health care related to gender and power relations within biomedical culture. A feminist perspective was utilized, incorporating concepts from critical medical anthropology. Data collection methods included individual interviews, focus groups and participant observation. The participants were active in guiding the research and validating the findings. Barriers related to gender and age were observed during primary health care visits, although they were not always directly apparent to the women. There is evidence to suggest that older women's ability to access primary health care depends on the degree of cultural connectedness they encounter within their particular health care facility. Using the findings of this study, a theoretical model is proposed to understand the culture of primary health care within a critical and cultural context. PMID:15587545

  3. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health. PMID:26825100

  4. Correlates of asthma morbidity in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K. P.; Bain, D. J.; Middleton, M.; Mullee, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To explore the morbidity of patients diagnosed as asthmatic in general practice, to examine the determinants of this morbidity, and to derive a simple morbidity screening tool for use in primary care. DESIGN--Patient interviews, lung function measurements, and data extraction from general practice case notes. SUBJECTS--300 asthmatic patients aged 5 to 65 years randomly selected from the repeat prescribing registers of three general practices in the Southampton area. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Reported morbidity using a calculated index based on three questions (Are you in a wheezy or asthmatic condition at least once per week; Have you had time off work or school in the past year because of your asthma; Do you suffer from attacks of wheezing during the night?); mean forced expiratory volume in one second and mean peak expiratory flow (over a seven day period); diurnal variation in peak flow; and the relation of the morbidity index to lung function. RESULTS--Mean forced expiratory volume in one second was 67% predicted (SD 18.4), mean peak expiratory flow was 80% predicted (SD 18.9), and mean diurnal variation was 10% (SD 7.7). 76 subjects were classified as having low morbidity, 95 medium, and 125 high. The morbidity index was significantly associated with forced expiratory volume in one second, mean peak expiratory flow rate, and diurnal variation (p less than 0.05); it was not significantly associated with inhaler technique or use of prophylaxis. CONCLUSIONS--There was a large burden of persisting morbidity across all ages of patients diagnosed as asthmatic in the three well resourced practices studied. The use of the morbidity index may help to target the asthmatic patients needing more attention by concentrating on those reporting medium to high morbidity. PMID:1540736

  5. SGA Children in Pediatric Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Patrizia; Cioffi, Luigi; Limauro, Raffaele; Farris, Evelina; Bianco, Vincenzo; Sassi, Roberto; De Giovanni, Maria; Gallo, Valeria; D’Onofrio, Antonietta; Di Maio, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic evidences suggest a strong association between low birth weight and some diseases in adult life ( hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases).Aim of this study was to evaluate the obesity/overweight prevalence in a population of children born small for gestation age, SGA children 400, 208 males and 192 females compared to a population of children born appropriate for gestational age 6818 AGA children, 3502 males and 3316 females, during childhood. Our intention was also to build the natural history of weight gain during prepubertal age in children born SGA and AGA. Design and Methods: Observational prospective longitudinal study. We followed our patients from January2001 up to December 2010; weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were evaluated in all the SGA and AGA children. BMI z-score range for defining overweight and obesity was, respectively, 1.13 to 1.7 and >1.7 according to CDC growth charts. Results: In transversal evaluation, we prove that 10-year-old SGA females are twice obese and more overweight compared to equal age AGA females. In longitudinal evaluation, we highlight different observations: SGA children obese at 2 years are still obese at 10 years; the number of obese SGA children increases gradually until the age of 10; AGA children, appear to be less obese than SGA children at 10 years. Conclusion: SGA males and females are more obese at 5 and 10 years compared to the AGA population. Primary care pediatricians, through early detection of the children at risk, can carry out an effective obesity prevention project in SGA children. PMID:27583297

  6. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  7. In Defence of Care: Gilligan's Relevance for Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the main, writing about care seems to contrast the ethics of justice with the ethics of care. Whilst the former deploys objectivity, the latter holds that individuals are connected. Problematically, contemporary primary education seemingly holds a-personal, justice conceptions as its basis and rationale. In turn, primary education, in parts,…

  8. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  9. International sources of learning for the organisation of primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the potential to learn from emerging international models of primary care organisation. It examines a series of exemplars from Southern Europe and Latin America which may help support moves towards a ‘new localism’ in the public management of primary care. Six lessons for the UK are identified. PMID:26265949

  10. Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Planning Template for Primary Care Offices

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Plan Template for Primary Care Provider Offices is intended to assist primary care providers and office managers with preparing their offices for quickly putting a plan in place to handle an increase in patient calls and visits, whether during the 2009-2010 influenza season or future influenza seasons.

  11. Autism-Specific Primary Care Medical Home Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golnik, Allison; Scal, Peter; Wey, Andrew; Gaillard, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Forty-six subjects received primary medical care within an autism-specific medical home intervention (www.autismmedicalhome.com) and 157 controls received standard primary medical care. Subjects and controls had autism spectrum disorder diagnoses. Thirty-four subjects (74%) and 62 controls (40%) completed pre and post surveys. Controlling for…

  12. Primary Care of Adult Women: Common Dermatologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M; Mhlaba, Julie; Roman, Carly

    2016-06-01

    Dermatologic disease often presents in the primary care setting. Therefore, it is important for the primary care provider to be familiar with the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common skin conditions. This article provides an overview of acne, rosacea, melasma, vitiligo, alopecia, nonmelanoma, and melanoma skin cancer, dermatitis, and lichen sclerosus. PMID:27212088

  13. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168 Section 440.168 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.168 Primary care case management services. (a)...

  14. College Students' Reasons for Depression Nondisclosure in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, William J.; Morrison, Patrick; Lombardero, Anayansi; Swingle, Kelsey; Campbell, Duncan G.

    2016-01-01

    Unwillingness to share depression experiences with primary care physicians contributes to the undertreatment of depression. This project examined college students' reasons for depression nondisclosure to primary care providers (PCPs). Undergraduate participants read a vignette describing someone with depression and completed measures of disclosure…

  15. Enhancing Primary Health Care Services for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, C. A.; Finlayson, J.; Cooper, S.-A.; Allan, L.; Robinson, N.; Burns, E.; Martin, G.; Morrison, J.

    2005-01-01

    Primary health care teams have an important part to play in addressing the health inequalities and high levels of unmet health needs experienced by people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Practice nurses have an expanding role within primary health care teams. However, no previous studies have measured their attitudes, knowledge, training…

  16. Indonesian experts' perspectives on a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Setiyawati, Diana; Blashki, Grant; Wraith, Ruth; Colucci, Erminia; Minas, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Mental health is a critical issue in Indonesia, since its population ranks among the top five in the world and the prevalence of common mental disorders is 11.6% of the adult population. However, the need to build an effective mental health-care system that is accessible to the whole population has only been recently addressed. The Aceh tsunami in 2004 brought to the forefront an unexpected window of opportunity to build a mental health-care system. Integration of mental health care into primary health care is a key strategy to close the treatment gap for people with mental disorders. Existing integration of psychologists into primary health care is a big step to meet the shortage of mental health-care specialists. As primary mental health care is an emerging field, the perspectives of Indonesian experts on Indonesian mental health care are needed to develop a curriculum for training psychologists to work in primary health care. In this study, data have been collected through semi-structured interviews with 24 Indonesian mental health experts, and three focus group discussions with 26 psychologists. Overall, experts agreed that to be able to work in primary health-care psychologists should have roles and training ranging from clinical to advocacy skills. Participants also agreed that psychologists should work in the community and contribute to primary health care as service providers and that strong collaborations between psychologists and other primary health-care providers are the key; these can be developed partly through referral and by respecting each other's unique strengths. PMID:25750806

  17. Monitoring access to out-of-hours care services in Scotland – a review

    PubMed Central

    Godden, Sylvia; Hilton, Simon; Pollock, Allyson M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Changes in the contractual responsibilities of primary care practitioners and health boards have resulted in a plethora of arrangements relating to out-of-hours healthcare services. Rather than being guaranteed access to a GP (usually either their own or another through a local GP co-operative), patients have a number of alternative routes to services. Our objective was to identify and assess the availability and adequacy of relevant standards, responsibilities and information systems in Scotland to monitor the impact of contractual changes to out-of-hours healthcare services on equity of access. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting All providers of primary care out-of-hours services in Scotland. Participants Not applicable. Main outcome measures First, identification and policy review of current standards and performance monitoring systems, data and information, primarily through directly contacting national and local organizations responsible for monitoring out-of-hours care, supplemented by literature searches to highlight specific issues arising from the review; and second, mapping of data items by out-of-hours provider type to identify overlap and significant gaps. Results In Scotland, data monitoring systems have not kept pace with changes in the organization of out-of-hours care, so the impact on access to services for different population groups is unknown. There are significant gaps in information collected with respect to workforce, distribution of services, service utilisation and clinical outcomes. Conclusions Since 2004 there have been major changes to the way patients access out-of-hours healthcare in the UK. In Scotland, none of the current systems provide information on whether the new services satisfy the key NHS principle of equity of access. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive review of data standards and systems relating to out-of-hours care in order to monitor and evaluate inputs, processes and outcomes of care not least in

  18. The Importance of Evaluating Primary Midwifery Care for Improving the Health of Women and Infants

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Ank; de Vries, Raymond; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L. M.; Malata, Address; Declercq, Eugene; Downe, Soo; Hutton, Eileen K.

    2015-01-01

    In most countries, maternal and newborn care is fragmented and focused on identification and treatment of pathology that affects only the minority of women and babies. Recently, a framework for quality maternal and newborn care was developed, which encourages a system-level shift to provide skilled care for all. This care includes preventive and supportive care that works to strengthen women’s capabilities and focuses on promotion of normal reproductive processes while ensuring access to emergency treatment when needed. Midwifery care is pivotal in this framework, which contains several elements that resonate with the main dimensions of primary care. Primary health care is the first level of contact with the health system where most of the population’s curative and preventive health needs can be fulfilled as close as possible to where people live and work. In this paper, we argue that midwifery as described in the framework requires the application of a primary care philosophy for all childbearing women and infants. Evaluation of the implementation of the framework should therefore include tools to monitor the performance of primary midwifery care. PMID:25853136

  19. Evidence for integrating eye health into primary health care in Africa: a health systems strengthening approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of unmet eye care needs in sub-Saharan Africa is compounded by barriers to accessing eye care, limited engagement with communities, a shortage of appropriately skilled health personnel, and inadequate support from health systems. The renewed focus on primary health care has led to support for greater integration of eye health into national health systems. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate available evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care in sub-Saharan Africa from a health systems strengthening perspective. Methods A scoping review method was used to gather and assess information from published literature, reviews, WHO policy documents and examples of eye and health care interventions in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings were compiled using a health systems strengthening framework. Results Limited information is available about eye health from a health systems strengthening approach. Particular components of the health systems framework lacking evidence are service delivery, equipment and supplies, financing, leadership and governance. There is some information to support interventions to strengthen human resources at all levels, partnerships and community participation; but little evidence showing their successful application to improve quality of care and access to comprehensive eye health services at the primary health level, and referral to other levels for specialist eye care. Conclusion Evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care is currently weak, particularly when applying a health systems framework. A realignment of eye health in the primary health care agenda will require context specific planning and a holistic approach, with careful attention to each of the health system components and to the public health system as a whole. Documentation and evaluation of existing projects are required, as are pilot projects of systematic approaches to interventions and application of best practices

  20. Electronic health record functionality needed to better support primary care

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H; Beasley, John W; Crosson, Jesse C; Kibbe, David C; Klinkman, Michael S; Lehmann, Christoph U; Fox, Chester H; Mitchell, Jason M; Mold, James W; Pace, Wilson D; Peterson, Kevin A; Phillips, Robert L; Post, Robert; Puro, Jon; Raddock, Michael; Simkus, Ray; Waldren, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) must support primary care clinicians and patients, yet many clinicians remain dissatisfied with their system. This article presents a consensus statement about gaps in current EHR functionality and needed enhancements to support primary care. The Institute of Medicine primary care attributes were used to define needs and meaningful use (MU) objectives to define EHR functionality. Current objectives remain focused on disease rather than the whole person, ignoring factors such as personal risks, behaviors, family structure, and occupational and environmental influences. Primary care needs EHRs to move beyond documentation to interpreting and tracking information over time, as well as patient-partnering activities, support for team-based care, population-management tools that deliver care, and reduced documentation burden. While stage 3 MU's focus on outcomes is laudable, enhanced functionality is still needed, including EHR modifications, expanded use of patient portals, seamless integration with external applications, and advancement of national infrastructure and policies. PMID:24431335

  1. Rural-to-Urban Migrants' Experiences with Primary Care under Different Types of Medical Institutions in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jiazhi; Shi, Leiyu; Zou, Xia; Chen, Wen; Ling, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objectives China is facing the unprecedented challenge of rapidly increasing rural-to-urban migration. Migrants are in a vulnerable state when they attempt to access to primary care services. This study was designed to explore rural-to-urban migrants’ experiences in primary care, comparing their quality of primary care experiences under different types of medical institutions in Guangzhou, China. Methods The study employed a cross-sectional survey of 736 rural-to-urban migrants in Guangzhou, China in 2014. A validated Chinese version of Primary Care Assessment Tool—Adult Short Version (PCAT-AS), representing 10 primary care domains was used to collect information on migrants’ quality of primary care experiences. These domains include first contact (utilization), first contact (accessibility), ongoing care, coordination (referrals), coordination (information systems), comprehensiveness (services available), comprehensiveness (services provided), family-centeredness, community orientation and culturally competent. These measures were used to assess the quality of primary care performance as reported from patients’ perspective. Analysis of covariance was conducted for comparison on PCAT scores among migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals, municipal hospitals, community health centers/community health stations, and township health centers/rural health stations. Multiple linear regression models were used to explore factors associated with PCAT total scores. Results After adjustments were made, migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals (25.49) reported the highest PCAT total scores, followed by municipal hospitals (25.02), community health centers/community health stations (24.24), and township health centers/rural health stations (24.18). Tertiary hospital users reported significantly better performance in first contact (utilization), first contact (accessibility), coordination (information system), comprehensiveness (service

  2. Hearing Loss and Older Adults’ Perceptions of Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jessica R.; Barnett, Steven; Smith, Maureen A.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether hard-of-hearing older adults were more likely to report difficulties and delays in accessing care and decreased satisfaction with healthcare access than those without hearing loss. The Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2003–2006 wave, N = 6,524) surveyed respondents regarding hearing, difficulties/delays in accessing care, satisfaction with healthcare access, socio-demographics, chronic conditions, self-rated health, depression, and length of relationship with provider/site. We used multivariate regression to compare access difficulties/delays and satisfaction by respondents’ hearing status (hard-of-hearing or not). Hard-of-hearing individuals comprised 18% of the sample. Compared to those not hard-of-hearing, hard-of-hearing individuals were significantly more likely to be older, male and separated/divorced. They had a higher mean number of chronic conditions, including atherosclerotic vascular disease, diabetes and depression. After adjustment for potential confounders, hard-of-hearing individuals were more likely to report difficulties in accessing healthcare (Odds Ratio 1.85; 95% Confidence Interval 1.19–2.88). Satisfaction with healthcare access was similar in both groups. Our findings suggest healthcare access difficulties will be heightened for more of the population because of the increasing prevalence of hearing loss. The prevalence of hearing loss in this data is low and our findings from a telephone survey likely underestimate the magnitude of access difficulties experienced by hard-of-hearing older adults. Further research which incorporates accessible surveys is needed. In the meantime, clinicians should pay particular attention to assessing barriers in healthcare access for hard-of-hearing individuals. Resources should be made available to proactively address these issues for those who are hard-of-hearing and to educate providers about the specific needs of this population. PMID:21301940

  3. Using Quality Experts from Manufacturing to Transform Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Rose M.; Walsworth, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Improving Performance in Practice (IPIP) is an initiative convened by the American Board of Medical Specialties. It investigates the efficacy of coaches in helping primary-care practices improve the care of patients with diabetes and asthma. Most IPIP states use coaches who have a health care background, and are trained in quality…

  4. The Impact of Continuous Care and Primary Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Rhodes

    2003-01-01

    The University of New Mexico Child Care Center implemented a program for the care of infants and toddlers characterized by continuous care by primary caregivers. In addition to expected beneficial consequences for children, the program also produced two unexpected outcomes. Families developed a sense of community and mutual support, and teacher…

  5. Managing violence in primary care: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat M; Dixon, Cath A; Tompkins, Charlotte N

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the risk factors for violence can help primary care staff to evaluate and manage risk in the primary care setting. They will be able to acknowledge that risk factors are not static but can vary according to time, place, situation, and support networks. General practitioners (GPs) should not ignore their clinical acumen, but should use their knowledge of the patient to form part of a risk assessment. Managing violence in primary care should focus on the individual; for example, in the training of primary care staff. It should also involve an examination of the wider structure of primary care; for example, the safe design of buildings, avoiding long waiting times, and having 'no intoxication' policies for practices. There is a pressing need for primary care-based research in this area. We acknowledge that in our understanding of this topic there are two extremes that should be avoided. The first is that our perceived risk of violence often exceeds the real, absolute risk. Where our perceptions are overstated, patients run the risk of being excluded from primary care or of being inappropriately detained on psychiatric wards under the Mental Health Act. At the other extreme, where risk is understated, staff can play the 'hero' or the 'martyr' in an attempt to defuse a situation without support from other colleagues. Like many other situations in primary care, working in isolation carries real and important risks. Threats of violence are best managed in primary care by having a collaborative practice approach underpinned by a support ethos from primary care organisations. PMID:14694671

  6. Infusing Mental Health Services into Primary Care for Very Young Children and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan-Sanoff, Margot; Talmi, Ayelet; Augustyn, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Thinking beyond physical health to include mental health and emotional well-being offers the pediatric clinician different approaches to old challenges and a new lens through which to view infant and parent behavior. Because pediatric primary care is accessible, universally available, has no entrance criteria, and is nonstigmatizing, clinicians…

  7. Psychology and primary care: New collaborations for providing effective care for adults with chronic health conditions.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lawrence; Dickinson, W Perry

    2014-01-01

    The rapid transformation of primary care in the United States provides an opportunity for psychologists to become actively involved as integrated members of primary care teams in the provision of services for adults with chronic disease. The differences between primary care clinicians and psychologists with respect to education, culture, practice styles, reimbursement, and roles, however, pose notable barriers to effective integration. In this report we review models of collaboration, barriers to effective integration of services, and potential areas in which psychologists can make major contributions both to direct service delivery and to primary care practice, with special reference to the care of adults with chronic conditions. PMID:24820685

  8. [Differences and similarities of primary care in the German and Spanish health care systems].

    PubMed

    Salvador Comino, María Rosa; Krane, Sibylla; Schelling, Jörg; Regife García, Víctor

    2016-02-01

    An efficient primary care is of particular importance for any countries' health care system. Many differences exist on how distinctive countries try to obtain the goal of an efficient, cost-effective primary care for its population. In this article we conducted a selective literature review, which includes both scientific and socio-political publications. The findings are complemented with the experience of a Spanish physician from Seville in her last year of training in family medicine, who completed a four months long rotation in the German health care system. We highlighted different features by comparing both countries, including their health care expenditure, the relation between primary and secondary care, the organization in the academic field and the training of future primary care physicians. It is clear that primary care in both countries plays a central role, have to deal with shortcomings, and in some points one system can learn from the other. PMID:26363955

  9. Structural Characteristics of Migrant Farmworkers Reporting a Relationship with a Primary Care Physician.

    PubMed

    McCoy, H Virginia; Williams, Mark L; Atkinson, John S; Rubens, Muni

    2016-06-01

    Migrant farmworkers are disproportionately affected by many adverse health conditions, but access healthcare sparingly. This study of migrant farmworkers examined the distribution and general characteristics associated with having access to healthcare. Access to healthcare was measured by asking whether the participants (N = 413) had a primary care physician. Majority of participants did not have a primary care physician. Female migrant workers (AOR = 2.823 CI: 1.575-4.103) with insurance (AOR = 6.183 CI: 4.956-11.937) who lived at study site for more than 5 years (AOR = 2.728 CI: 1.936-7.837) and born in the United States (AOR = 2.648 CI: 1.373-3.338) had greater odds to have a primary care physician than recent male migrants without insurance who were born outside United States. There is a need to focus on Community Health Centers and Migrant Health Centers in tailoring their services and to widen the implementation and improve funding of Accountable Care Organizations to improve access to care of migrant farmworkers. PMID:26265029

  10. The Value of Continuity between Primary Care and Surgical Care in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving continuity between primary care and cancer care is critical for improving cancer outcomes and curbing cancer costs. A dimension of continuity, we investigated how regularly patients receive their primary care and surgical care for colon cancer from the same hospital and whether this affects mortality and costs. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Registry (SEER)-Medicare data, we performed a retrospective cohort study of stage I-III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. There were 23,305 stage I-III colon cancer patients who received primary care in the year prior to diagnosis and underwent operative care for colon cancer. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their surgery and to their primary care provider’s main hospital, and then classified according to whether these two hospitals were same or different. Outcomes examined were hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazard for colon cancer specific mortality, and generalized linear estimate for costs at 12 months, from propensity score matched models. Results Fifty-two percent of stage I-III colon patients received primary care and surgical care from the same hospital. Primary care and surgical care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality, but was associated with lower inpatient, outpatient, and total costs of care. Total cost difference was $8,836 (95% CI $2,746–$14,577), a 20% reduction in total median cost of care at 12 months. Conclusions Receiving primary care and surgical care at the same hospital, compared to different hospitals, was associated with lower costs but still similar survival among stage I-III colon cancer patients. Nonetheless, health care policy which encourages further integration between primary care and cancer care in order to improve outcomes and decrease costs will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving health care

  11. Primary care at Swiss universities - current state and perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that a strong primary care is a cornerstone of an efficient health care system. But Switzerland is facing a shortage of primary care physicians (PCPs). This pushed the Federal Council of Switzerland to introduce a multifaceted political programme to strengthen the position of primary care, including its academic role. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the situation of academic primary care at the five Swiss universities by the end of year 2012. Results Although primary care teaching activities have a long tradition at the five Swiss universities with activities starting in the beginning of the 1980ies; the academic institutes of primary care were only established in recent years (2005 – 2009). Only one of them has an established chair. Human and financial resources vary substantially. At all universities a broad variety of courses and lectures are offered, including teaching in private primary care practices with 1331 PCPs involved. Regarding research, differences among the institutes are tremendous, mainly caused by entirely different human resources and skills. Conclusion So far, the activities of the existing institutes at the Swiss Universities are mainly focused on teaching. However, for a complete academic institutionalization as well as an increased acceptance and attractiveness, more research activities are needed. In addition to an adequate basic funding of research positions, competitive research grants have to be created to establish a specialty-specific research culture. PMID:24885148

  12. Comparing Chronic Pain Treatment Seekers in Primary Care versus Tertiary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Fink-Miller, Erin L.; Long, Dustin M.; Gross, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients frequently seek treatment for chronic nonmalignant pain in primary care settings. Compared with physicians who have completed extensive specialization (eg, fellowships) in pain management, primary care physicians receive much less formal training in managing chronic pain. While chronic pain represents a complicated condition in its own right, the recent increase in opioid prescriptions further muddles treatment. It is unknown whether patients with chronic pain seeking treatment in primary care differ from those seeking treatment in tertiary care settings. This study sought to determine whether patients with chronic pain in primary care reported less pain, fewer psychological variables related to pain, and lower risk of medication misuse/abuse compared with those in tertiary care. Methods Data collected from patients with chronic pain in primary care settings and tertiary care settings were analyzed for significant differences using Wilcoxon rank sum tests, Fisher exact tests, and linear regression. A host of variables among populations, including demographics, self-reported pain severity, psychological variables related to pain, and risk for opioid misuse and abuse, were compared. Results Findings suggest that primary care patients with chronic pain were similar to those in tertiary care on a host of indices and reported more severe pain. There were no significant group differences for risk of medication misuse or abuse. Conclusion It seems that primary care physicians care for a complicated group of patients with chronic pain that rivals the complexity of those seen in specialized tertiary care pain management facilities. PMID:25201929

  13. Gaps In Primary Care And Health System Performance In Six Latin American And Caribbean Countries.

    PubMed

    Macinko, James; Guanais, Frederico C; Mullachery, Pricila; Jimenez, Geronimo

    2016-08-01

    The rapid demographic and epidemiological transitions occurring in Latin America and the Caribbean have led to high levels of noncommunicable diseases in the region. In addition to reduced risk factors for chronic conditions, a strong health system for managing chronic conditions is vital. This study assessed the extent to which populations in six Latin American and Caribbean countries receive high-quality primary care, and it examined the relationship between experiences with care and perceptions of health system performance. We applied a validated survey on access, use, and satisfaction with health care services to nationally representative samples of the populations of Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Mexico, and Panama. Respondents reported considerable gaps in the ways in which primary care is organized, financed, and delivered. Nearly half reported using the emergency department for a condition they considered treatable in a primary care setting. Reports of more primary care problems were associated with worse perceptions of health system performance and quality and less receipt of preventive care. Urgent attention to primary care performance is required as the region's population continues to age at an unprecedented rate. PMID:27503978

  14. Improving access to cancer guidelines: feedback from health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Sahota, I.S.; Kostaras, X.; Hagen, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined access to locally developed and other available clinical practice guidelines (cpgs) for the management of cancer and evaluated how to improve uptake. Methods A 12-question online survey was administered to 772 members of 12 multidisciplinary tumour teams in a Canadian provincial oncology program. The teams are composed of physicians, surgeons, nurses, allied health professionals, and researchers involved in the provision of cancer care across the province. Many of these individuals construct or provide input into the provincial cpgs. The questionnaires were administered online and were completed voluntarily. Results Responses were received from 232 individuals, a response rate of 30.1%. Most respondents (75.1%) indicated they actively referenced cpgs for cancer treatment. Of the 177 respondents who identified barriers to cpg access, 24.9% said that the cause was being too busy; 24.3% and 22.6% cited the user-unfriendliness of the Web site and a lack of awareness about the cpgs. When asked about innovative changes that could be made to improve access, the creation of cpg summary documents was identified as the most effective change (46.3%). The creation of summary documents was ranked highest by physicians, surgeons, and nurses. Conclusions Clinical practice guidelines are important tools for standardizing treatment protocols and improving outcomes in health care systems, but support for their use is variable among health care professionals. We have identified barriers to—and potential mitigating strategies for—more widespread access to cpgs by the various health professions involved in cancer care. Local creation of succinct and easily accessible cpgs was identified as the single most effective way to enhance access by health care professionals. PMID:26715871

  15. Low Recognition of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Anke; Gene-Cos, Nuri; Perrin, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common and disabling disorder that develops as a consequence of traumatic events and is characterised by distressing re-experiencing of parts of the trauma, avoidance of reminders, emotional numbing and hyperarousal. The NICE guidelines for PTSD (2005) recommend trauma-focused psychological therapy as the first-line treatment. A survey of 129 general practitioners in South London investigated the recognition and treatment of PTSD in primary care. The majority of GPs underestimated the prevalence of PTSD. Most PTSD patients seen in GP surgeries currently do not receive or are not referred for NICE recommended psychological treatments. Medications, especially SSRIs, appear to more commonly prescribed than recommended by NICE. Efforts to disseminate information about PTSD and effective treatments to both patients and GPs are needed to increase recognition rates and prompter access to treatment. The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme will make the NICE recommended treatments more widely available and will allow self-referral by adults with PTSD to trauma-focused psychological therapy. PMID:23814612

  16. Delays in Cancer Care Among Low-Income Minorities Despite Access

    PubMed Central

    Nonzee, Narissa J.; Ragas, Daiva M.; Ha Luu, Thanh; Phisuthikul, Ava M.; Tom, Laura; Dong, XinQi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Narrowing the racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in breast and cervical cancer requires an in-depth understanding of motivation for adherence to cancer screening and follow-up care. To inform patient-centered interventions, this study aimed to identify reasons why low-income women adhered to or delayed breast or cervical cancer screening, follow-up and treatment despite access to cancer care-related services. Methods: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted among women with access to cancer care-related services receiving care at an academic cancer center, federally qualified health centers, or free clinics in the Chicago metropolitan area. Transcripts were coded and analyzed for themes related to rationales for adherence. Results: Among 138 participants, most were African American (46%) or Hispanic (36%), English speaking (70%), and between ages 41 and 65 years (64%). Primary drivers of nonadherence included lack of knowledge of resources, denial or fear, competing obligations, and embarrassment. Facilitators included abnormality identification, patient activation, provider-initiated actions, and motivation from family or friends. Conclusions: Interventions targeting increased adherence to care among low-income and ethnic minority women should direct efforts to proactive, culturally and patient-informed education that enables patients to access resources and use the health care system, address misconceptions about cancer, ensure health care providers' communication of screening guidelines, and leverage the patient's social support network. PMID:26070037

  17. Continuity of care with general practitioners in New Zealand: results from SoFIE-Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Jatrana, Santosh; Crampton, Peter; Richardson, Ken

    2011-02-11

    Continuity of care has been defined as seeing the same health care provider over time, and has been shown to be associated with positive health outcomes, high quality care, high patient satisfaction with care and with lowering health care costs. While the benefits of continuity of care with a primary care provider are well documented, relatively little is known about those patients who receive or do not receive continuity of care. Using data from SoFIE-health, which is an add-on to the Statistics New Zealand-led Survey of Family, Income and Employment, this paper aims to construct a summary measure of continuity of care and to contribute to an enhanced understanding of the prevalence of continuity of care in New Zealand. We used the Primary Care Assessment Tools (PCAT) to create a mean score of continuity of care. We found continuity of care is high in New Zealand. Overall, our data provide some support for the hypothesis that people with high health needs have higher mean continuity of care scores (e.g. the elderly, Pacific and Asian ethnic groups, those in the low income tertile, and those with one or more chronic conditions). The authors propose that continued incentives to develop and sustain affiliation with a primary care provider and continuity of care are important for maintaining the quality and cost-effectiveness of primary health care. PMID:21475356

  18. Management of alcoholism in the primary care setting.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    Primary care physicians can play an important role in managing alcoholic patients. Identifying and treating alcoholism early, before it has interfered with patients' relationships and work, may increase the likelihood of prolonged recovery. Simple office interventions can help motivate patients to abstain and seek treatment. People who abuse alcohol and are unwilling to abstain can benefit from a recommendation to reduce their intake of alcohol. For alcohol-dependent patients who decide to stop drinking, primary care physicians often can manage withdrawal on an outpatient basis. Selecting an appropriate treatment program for each alcoholic patient is important, and referral to a specialist to assist in matching patients to treatments is often necessary. Primary care physicians also can help prevent relapse. Although disulfiram is of limited value, primary care physicians can support recovery by identifying coexistent psychosocial problems, helping patients to restructure their lives, and ensuring continuity of care. PMID:1595243

  19. America's Children: Health Insurance and Access to Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Margaret, Ed.; Coye, Molly Joel, Ed.

    The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Children, Health Insurance, and Access to Care was assembled to address questions about health insurance for children, evaluating the strengths and limitations of insurance as a means of improving children's health from a variety of approaches and policies. Meeting between March 1997 and January 1998,…

  20. Access to Care: Overcoming the Rural Physician Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes three state-initiated programs that address the challenge of providing access to health care for Appalachia's rural residents: a traveling pediatric diabetes clinic serving eastern Kentucky; a telemedicine program operated out of Knoxville, Tennessee; and a new medical school in Kentucky dedicated to training doctors from Appalachia for…

  1. Outness, Stigma, and Primary Health Care Utilization among Rural LGBT Populations

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, J.; Shaver, John; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies have noted significant health disadvantages experienced by LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) populations in the US. While several studies have identified that fears or experiences of stigma and disclosure of sexual orientation and/or gender identity to health care providers are significant barriers to health care utilization for LGBT people, these studies have concentrated almost exclusively on urban samples. Little is known about the impact of stigma specifically for rural LGBT populations, who may have less access to quality, LGBT-sensitive care than LGBT people in urban centers. Methodology LBGT individuals residing in rural areas of the United States were recruited online to participate in a survey examining the relationship between stigma, disclosure and “outness,” and utilization of primary care services. Data were collected and analyzed regarding LGBT individuals’ demographics, health care access, health risk factors, health status, outness to social contacts and primary care provider, and anticipated, internalized, and enacted stigmas. Results Higher scores on stigma scales were associated with lower utilization of health services for the transgender & non-binary group, while higher levels of disclosure of sexual orientation were associated with greater utilization of health services for cisgender men. Conclusions The results demonstrate the role of stigma in shaping access to primary health care among rural LGBT people and point to the need for interventions focused towards decreasing stigma in health care settings or increasing patients’ disclosure of orientation or gender identity to providers. Such interventions have the potential to increase utilization of primary and preventive health care services by LGBT people in rural areas. PMID:26731405

  2. Perceived access in a managed care environment: determinants of satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Akinci, F; Sinay, T

    2003-05-01

    With increasing competition in the local and regional healthcare markets, and growing interest in assessing the effectiveness of services and patient outcomes, satisfaction measures are becoming prominent in evaluating the performance of the healthcare system. This study examines the independent effect of predisposing, enabling and medical need factors on perceived access to care with particular focus on insurance plans. A survey questionnaire is developed to investigate access limitations at three levels: (1) the health plan, (2) the individual provider(s) and (3) the healthcare organization. In addition, shortage of providers, residents' perceptions of their health status, satisfaction with access to care and socio-demographic indicators are incorporated into the analysis. Multivariate logistic regression is used to assess the independent effects of the above factors on a dichotomous dependent variable--residents' overall satisfaction with access to healthcare services. The most salient determinants of overall satisfaction with access to care were the type of health insurance plan, cost of insurance premiums, co-payments, difficulty with obtaining referrals, self-rated general health, the opportunity cost of taking time to see a provider (measured by the loss of hourly wages), marital status and the age factor over 80 years. PMID:12803948

  3. Applying the guidelines for pharmacists integrating into primary care teams

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Arden R.; Pammett, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2013, Jorgenson et al. published guidelines for pharmacists integrating into primary care teams. These guidelines outlined 10 evidence-based recommendations designed to support pharmacists in successfully establishing practices in primary care environments. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed, practical approach to implementing these recommendations in real life, thereby aiding to validate their effectiveness. Methods: Both authors reviewed the guidelines independently and ranked the importance of each recommendation respective to their practice. Each author then provided feedback for each recommendation regarding the successes and challenges they encountered through implementation. This feedback was then consolidated into agreed upon statements for each recommendation. Results and Discussion: Focusing on building relationships (with an emphasis on face time) and demonstrating value to both primary care providers and patients were identified as key aspects in developing these new roles. Ensuring that the environment supports the practice, along with strategic positioning within the clinic, improves uptake and can maximize the usefulness of a pharmacist in primary care. Demonstrating consistent and competent clinical and documentation skills builds on the foundation of the other recommendations to allow for the effective provision of clinical pharmacy services. Additional recommendations include developing efficient ways (potentially provider specific) to communicate with primary care providers and addressing potential preconceived notions about the role of the pharmacist in primary care. Conclusion: We believe these guidelines hold up to real-life integration and emphatically recommend their use for new and existing primary care pharmacists. PMID:27540404

  4. Reducing CKD risks among vulnerable populations in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Raquel; Boulware, Ebony

    2014-01-01

    Ethnic/racial and socioeconomic status disparities in the health care and clinical outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease are pervasive. The vast majority of care to decrease incidence of CKD risk and progression occurs in primary care settings. High quality primary care therefore represents a key strategy through which disparities in the incidence and progression of CKD may be eliminated. The Chronic Care Model provides a framework for the delivery of high quality primary care for chronic diseases, and it is frequently used to guide health care quality improvement initiatives. Evidence suggests that Chronic Care Model constructs, including provider and organizational quality improvement initiatives focused on team approaches to chronic care (e.g., case management, community health workers), are effective in modifying patients’ CKD risks among ethnic minority and low income and patients. Other Chronic Care Model constructs, including clinical information systems (e.g., disease registries), decision support interventions, and the provision of patient centered care have been shown to improve processes related to CKD care but with limited and/or mixed effects on patient outcomes. Few studies have examined the effect of these approaches on reducing disparities. Research is needed to examine the effectiveness of these strategies to eliminate CKD disparities among vulnerable populations. PMID:25573516

  5. Reducing CKD risks among vulnerable populations in primary care.

    PubMed

    Greer, Raquel; Boulware, L Ebony

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic/racial and socioeconomic status disparities in the health-care and clinical outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are pervasive. The vast majority of care to decrease incidence of CKD risk and progression occurs in primary care settings. High-quality primary care, therefore, represents a key strategy through which disparities in the incidence and progression of CKD may be eliminated. The Chronic Care Model provides a framework for the delivery of high-quality primary care for chronic diseases, and it is frequently used to guide health-care quality improvement initiatives. Evidence suggests that Chronic Care Model constructs, including provider and organizational quality improvement initiatives focused on team approaches to chronic care (eg, case management, community health workers), are effective in modifying patients' CKD risks among ethnic minority and low-income patients. Other Chronic Care Model constructs, including clinical information systems (eg, disease registries), decision support interventions, and the provision of patient-centered care have been shown to improve processes related to CKD care but with limited and/or mixed effects on patient outcomes. Few studies have examined the effect of these approaches on reducing disparities. Research is needed to examine the effectiveness of these strategies to eliminate CKD disparities among vulnerable populations. PMID:25573516

  6. Primary care in Cuba: a public health approach.

    PubMed

    Swanson, K A; Swanson, J M; Gill, A E; Walter, C

    1995-01-01

    Cuba's primary health care model is presented. Unlike ambulatory care services, which are but one component of primary care, Cuba's model is a comprehensive public health approach that meets the World Health Organization's definition of primary care. The history of the development of Cuba's model is presented, including an update on the innovative neighborhood/home clinics. Achievements in health outcomes as a result of Cuba's model and the consequences for women's health care are discussed. Examples are presented of the effects on health care delivery of the economic hardship that Cuba has experienced since 1991 as a result of the loss of 85% of its trade with the former Soviet Union and the intensified U.S. embargo. A critique of Cuba's model concludes the article. PMID:7649887

  7. Negotiating candidacy: ethnic minority seniors’ access to care

    PubMed Central

    KOEHN, SHARON

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Barriers to Access to Care for Ethnic Minority Seniors ’ (BACEMS) study in Vancouver, British Columbia, found that immigrant families torn between changing values and the economic realities that accompany immigration cannot always provide optimal care for their elders. Ethnic minority seniors further identified language barriers, immigration status, and limited awareness of the roles of the health authority and of specific service providers as barriers to health care. The configuration and delivery of health services, and health-care providers’ limited knowledge of the seniors’ needs and confounded these problems. To explore the barriers to access, the BACEMS study relied primarily on focus group data collected from ethnic minority seniors and their families and from health and multicultural service providers. The applicability of the recently developed model of ‘candidacy’, which emphasises the dynamic, multi-dimensional and contingent character of health-care access to ethnic minority seniors, was assessed. The candidacy framework increased sensitivity to ethnic minority seniors’ issues and enabled organisation of the data into manageable conceptual units, which facilitated translation into recommendations for action, and revealed gaps that pose questions for future research. It has the potential to make Canadian research on the topic more co-ordinated. PMID:23814327

  8. Treatment of active duty military with PTSD in primary care: A follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A M; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette; Avila, Laura L; Bryan, Craig J; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    First-line trauma-focused therapies offered in specialty mental health clinics do not reach many veterans and active duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Primary care is an ideal environment to expand access to mental health care. Several promising clinical case series reports of brief PTSD therapies adapted for primary care have shown positive results, but the long-term effectiveness with military members is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of an open trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral primary care-delivered protocol developed specifically for deployment-related PTSD in a sample of 24 active duty military (15 men, 9 women). Measures of PTSD symptom severity showed statistically and clinically significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment that were maintained at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessments. Similar reductions were maintained in depressive symptoms and ratings of global mental health functioning. PMID:26519833

  9. Recent Developments in Alcohol Services Research on Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, only about 10 percent of people with an alcohol or drug use disorder receive care for the condition, pointing to a large treatment gap. Several personal characteristics influence whether a person will receive treatment; additionally, many people with an alcohol use disorder do not perceive the need for treatment. The extent of the treatment gap differs somewhat across different population subgroups, such as those based on gender, age, or race and ethnicity. Recent health care reforms, such as implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, likely will improve access to substance abuse treatment. In addition, new treatment approaches, service delivery systems, and payment innovations may facilitate access to substance abuse services. Nevertheless, efforts to bridge the treatment gap will continue to be needed to ensure that all people who need alcohol and drug abuse treatment can actually receive it. PMID:27159809

  10. Recent Developments in Alcohol Services Research on Access to Care.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Laura A

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, only about 10 percent of people with an alcohol or drug use disorder receive care for the condition, pointing to a large treatment gap. Several personal characteristics influence whether a person will receive treatment; additionally, many people with an alcohol use disorder do not perceive the need for treatment. The extent of the treatment gap differs somewhat across different population subgroups, such as those based on gender, age, or race and ethnicity. Recent health care reforms, such as implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, likely will improve access to substance abuse treatment. In addition, new treatment approaches, service delivery systems, and payment innovations may facilitate access to substance abuse services. Nevertheless, efforts to bridge the treatment gap will continue to be needed to ensure that all people who need alcohol and drug abuse treatment can actually receive it. PMID:27159809

  11. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume. PMID:22193182

  12. The interface of primary and oncology specialty care: from diagnosis through primary treatment.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Jonathan; Baldwin, Laura-Mae

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we review the challenges and opportunities related to developing effective, collaborative relationships between primary care and oncology providers during the initial cancer treatment period. This point in the cancer care continuum is complex and often represents the first major transition in care between primary care providers and oncology specialists. Patients often receive care from multiple providers in a number of different settings and are faced with making treatment decisions in a short, concentrated period of time. Patients consistently report having significant informational and emotional needs that are often unmet during this period. Using the published literature, we have identified a number of challenges during this part of the treatment continuum that may limit providers' ability to deliver effective care, including provider care discontinuities, information exchange problems, and gaps in provider role clarity that may be especially problematic within the context of managing comorbid health conditions. The limited published literature specific to this step in the cancer care trajectory supports the importance of ongoing primary care-specialist collaboration during this phase in the care continuum for both medical and psychosocial care. How to best achieve effective collaboration between providers requires further research in information exchange and tools to support it, evaluation of shared care models specific to the cancer context, and studies of the potential role of multidisciplinary case conferencing that include the primary care provider. PMID:20386050

  13. Commentary: primary care--medical students' unpopular choice.

    PubMed Central

    Petersdorf, R G

    1993-01-01

    Title VII funding to medical schools has not succeeded in correcting the shortage of primary care physicians. Although it is generally true that there is an inverse relationship between the amount of research funds awarded to a school and its success in producing primary care physicians, there are many exceptions. Neither Title VII, the amount of research funding, or Medicare's Direct Medical Education payments has had a substantial effect on the production of primary care physicians. These factors are comparatively insignificant when considered in the light of strong external incentives to specialize. Medical education cannot remedy the specialty imbalance unless the external environment becomes more friendly to generalists. PMID:8438967

  14. What Can Primary Care Learn From Sports Teams?

    PubMed

    Fiscella, Kevin; Fogarty, Colleen; Salas, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Teams are familiar to sports but relatively new to primary care. In this perspective, we use sports teams to illustrate key principles from team science and extract practical lessons for primary care teams. The most notable lessons include the need for continuous team learning based on presession planning and postsession debriefing, real-world team training focused on identified teamwork needs, and on-site team coaching. Implementation of these principles requires organizational commitment coupled with alignment of continuing medical education and recertification requirements with primary care teamwork competencies. PMID:27232689

  15. Enhancing Access to Primary Cultural Heritage Materials of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Peter M.; Hyman, Malcolm

    This chapter is about enhancing access to primary cultural heritage materials of India housed in academic libraries by integrating them with machine-readable texts, lexical resources, and linguistic software in a digital library. Integrating primary cultural materials with a digital library can enable broad use of Indic collections for research and education. For the purposes of illustrating this procedure, we outline here the development of a prototype using the collections of Sanskrit manuscripts in the libraries at Brown University and the University of Pennsylvania and integrating them with The Sanskrit Library. The result is extendable to collections of Indic materials throughout the world and can serve as a model for digitization projects of cultural materials in other major culture-bearing languages such as Greek, Latin, Arabic, Persian, and Chinese.

  16. Primary care groups in the United Kingdom: quality and accountability.

    PubMed

    Bindman, A B; Weiner, J P; Majeed, A

    2001-01-01

    With the introduction of primary care groups (PCGs), the British National Health Service has attempted to integrate delivery, finance, and quality improvement into a locally directed care system with a strong sense of community accountability. PCGs will eventually hold the budgets for primary care, specialist, hospital, and community-based services and have the flexibility to reapportion these budgets. Through clinical governance, PCGs are attempting to coordinate education, guidelines, audit and feedback, and other quality improvement approaches around health problems that are relevant to their patient panels and local communities. PCGs offer other nations attempting to improve the quality and accountability of health care an innovative approach that merits consideration. PMID:11585160

  17. Barriers to improving primary care of depression: perspectives of medical group leaders.

    PubMed

    Whitebird, Robin R; Solberg, Leif I; Margolis, Karen L; Asche, Stephen E; Trangle, Michael A; Wineman, Arthur P

    2013-06-01

    Using clinical trials, researchers have demonstrated effective methods for treating depression in primary care, but improvements based on these trials are not being implemented. This might be because these improvements require more systematic organizational changes than can be made by individual physicians. We interviewed 82 physicians and administrative leaders of 41 medical groups to learn what is preventing those organizational changes. The identified barriers to improving care included external contextual problems (reimbursement, scarce resources, and access to/communication with specialty mental health), individual attitudes (physician and patient resistance), and internal care process barriers (organizational and condition complexity, difficulty standardizing and measuring care). Although many of these barriers are challenging, we can overcome them by setting clear priorities for change and allocating adequate resources. We must improve primary care of depression if we are to reduce its enormous adverse social and economic impacts. PMID:23515301

  18. Improving access to health care for foster children: the Illinois model.

    PubMed

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Bilaver, Lucy A; Goerge, Robert M; Masterson, James; Catania, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Children in foster care have lower health status than do their peers and limited access to health care. The Illinois Department of Children and Family Services developed HealthWorks, a separate primary care preferred provider system for children in foster care. This study compared claims data for children in HealthWorks with children not enrolled in HealthWorks and with children in Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) who had never entered foster care. Children enrolled in HealthWorks were more likely than were other children to receive all of the services except general inpatient hospitalizations. They had greater odds of receiving general exams and physicians' services and were more likely to visit the emergency room than children who were not enrolled. They were more likely to receive all of the measured services when compared with children receiving Medicaid through AFDC. PMID:15202800

  19. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Gateway to Screening for Bipolar Disorder in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel-Gasparro, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this mixed methods descriptive study was to explore Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs’) knowledge of bipolar disorder (BPD) and their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to screening patients with known depression for BPD. Methods: A mixed method study design using surveys on BPD knowledge and screening practices as well as focus group data collection method for facilitators and barriers to screening. Results: 89 APRNs completed the survey and 12 APRNs participated in the focus groups. APRNs in any practice setting had low knowledge scores of BPD. No significant differences in screening for BPD for primary and non primary care APRNs. Qualitative findings revealed screening relates to tool availability; time, unsure of when to screen, fear of sigma, symptoms knowledge of BPD, accessible referral system, personal experiences with BPD, and therapeutic relationships with patients. Conclusion: Misdiagnosis of BPD as unipolar depression is common in primary care settings, leading to a long lag time to optimal diagnosis and treatment. The wait time to diagnosis and treatment could be reduced if APRNs in primary care settings screen patients with a diagnosis of depression by using validated screening tools. These results can inform APRN practice and further research on the effectiveness of screening for reducing the morbidity and mortality of BPDs in primary care settings; underscores the need for integration of mental health care into primary care as well as the need for more APRN education on the diagnosis and management of bipolar disorders. PMID:27347256

  20. A Morbidity Survey of South African Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob; Fairall, Lara; Adejayan, Olubunmi; Ikpefan, Omozuanvbo; Kumari, Jyoti; Mathee, Shaheed; Okun, Ronit; Yogolelo, Willy

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies have described the burden of disease in South Africa. However these studies do not tell us which of these conditions commonly present to primary care providers, how these conditions may present and how providers make sense of them in terms of their diagnoses. Clinical nurse practitioners are the main primary care providers and need to be better prepared for this role. This study aimed to determine the range and prevalence of reasons for encounter and diagnoses found among ambulatory patients attending public sector primary care facilities in South Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was a multi-centre prospective cross-sectional survey of consultations in primary care in four provinces of South Africa: Western Cape, Limpopo, Northern Cape and North West. Consultations were coded prior to analysis by using the International Classification of Primary Care-Version 2 in terms of reasons for encounter (REF) and diagnoses. Altogether 18856 consultations were included in the survey and generated 31451 reasons for encounter (RFE) and 24561 diagnoses. Women accounted for 12526 (66.6%) and men 6288 (33.4%). Nurses saw 16238 (86.1%) and doctors 2612 (13.9%) of patients. The top 80 RFE and top 25 diagnoses are reported and ongoing care for hypertension was the commonest RFE and diagnosis. The 20 commonest RFE and diagnoses by age group are also reported. Conclusions/Significance Ambulatory primary care is dominated by non-communicable chronic diseases. HIV/AIDS and TB are common, but not to the extent predicted by the burden of disease. Pneumonia and gastroenteritis are commonly seen especially in children. Women's health issues such as family planning and pregnancy related visits are also common. Injuries are not as common as expected from the burden of disease. Primary care providers did not recognise mental health problems. The results should guide the future training and assessment of primary care providers. PMID:22442666

  1. Implementing a patient centered medical home in the Veterans health administration: Perspectives of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Stewart, Kenda R; Stewart, Gregory L; Rosenthal, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of a patient centered medical home challenges primary care providers to change their scheduling practices to enhance patient access to care as well as to learn how to use performance metrics as part of a self-reflective practice redesign culture. As medical homes become more commonplace, health care administrators and primary care providers alike are eager to identify barriers to implementation. The objective of this study was to identify non-technological barriers to medical home implementation from the perspective of primary care providers. We conducted qualitative interviews with providers implementing the medical home model in Department of Veterans Affairs clinics-the most comprehensive rollout to date. Primary care providers reported favorable attitudes towards the model but discussed the importance of data infrastructure for practice redesign and panel management. Respondents emphasized the need for administrative leadership to support practice redesign by facilitating time for panel management and recognizing providers who utilize non-face-to-face ways of delivering clinical care. Health care systems considering adoption of the medical home model should ensure that they support both technological capacities and vertically aligned expectations for provider performance. PMID:26250631

  2. Improving delivery of primary care for vulnerable migrants

    PubMed Central

    Pottie, Kevin; Batista, Ricardo; Mayhew, Maureen; Mota, Lorena; Grant, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify and prioritize innovative strategies to address the health concerns of vulnerable migrant populations. Design Modified Delphi consensus process. Setting Canada. Participants Forty-one primary care practitioners, including family physicians and nurse practitioners, who provided care for migrant populations. Methods We used a modified Delphi consensus process to identify and prioritize innovative strategies that could potentially improve the delivery of primary health care for vulnerable migrants. Forty-one primary care practitioners from various centres across Canada who cared for migrant populations proposed strategies and participated in the consensus process. Main findings The response rate was 93% for the first round. The 3 most highly ranked practice strategies to address delivery challenges for migrants were language interpretation, comprehensive interdisciplinary care, and evidence-based guidelines. Training and mentorship for practitioners, intersectoral collaboration, and immigrant community engagement ranked fourth, fifth, and sixth, respectively, as strategies to address delivery challenges. These strategies aligned with strategies coming out of the United States, Europe, and Australia, with the exception of the proposed evidence-based guidelines. Conclusion Primary health care practices across Canada now need to evolve to address the challenges inherent in caring for vulnerable migrants. The selected strategies provide guidance for practices and health systems interested in improving health care delivery for migrant populations. PMID:24452576

  3. Weight loss counseling in primary care.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, E

    1989-01-01

    Caring for the overweight client requires a multifaceted approach. The nurse practitioner can help clients lose weight by providing them with strategies for reducing calorie intake, maintaining a healthy, balanced diet, exercising more, and developing positive behavioral and attitudinal changes. Weight reduction programs need to be individualized and clients should be periodically reassessed for changes in behaviors, eating patterns, and goals. Success in weight loss and maintenance requires a lifelong commitment to behavioral and nutritional changes. The goal of this article is to improve the clinician's understanding of the overweight person and to assist health care providers in counseling clients in weight reduction and maintenance. PMID:2631939

  4. Limitations and barriers in access to care for male factor infertility.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Akanksha; Nangia, Ajay K; Dupree, James M; Smith, James F

    2016-05-01

    The primary challenge to identifying and addressing barriers in access to care for male factor infertility is accurate measurement of the prevalence of male infertility. Current estimates are based on couples pursuing assisted reproduction, and likely underestimate the problem. These estimates also fail to account for the number of patients facing infertility due to cancer or cancer treatment. Lack of health insurance coverage for the diagnosis and treatment of infertility presents a major barrier for couples struggling with infertility. However, it is not the only barrier. Education level, household income, cultural norms, religious beliefs, geographic location, and the availability of specialty-trained reproductive urologists are all important factors in determining the ease with which patients access and obtain infertility care. Addressing each of these obstacles directly is imperative to improving reproductive care and outcomes for infertile couples in the United States. PMID:27054307

  5. Financial access to health care in Karuzi, Burundi: a household-survey based performance evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lambert-Evans, Sophie; Ponsar, Frederique; Reid, Tony; Bachy, Catherine; Van Herp, Michel; Philips, Mit

    2009-01-01

    Background In 2003, Médecins Sans Frontières, the provincial government, and the provincial health authority began a community project to guarantee financial access to primary health care in Karuzi province, Burundi. The project used a community-based assessment to provide exemption cards for indigent households and a reduced flat fee for consultations for all other households. Methods An evaluation was carried out in 2005 to assess the impact of this project. Primary data collection was through a cross-sectional household survey of the catchment areas of 10 public health centres. A questionnaire was used to determine the accuracy of the community-identification method, households' access to health care, and costs of care. Household socioeconomic status was determined by reported expenditures and access to land. Results Financial access to care at the nearest health centre was ensured for 70% of the population. Of the remaining 30%, half experienced financial barriers to access and the other half chose alternative sites of care. The community-based assessment increased the number of people of the population who qualified for fee exemptions to 8.6% but many people who met the indigent criteria did not receive a card. Eighty-eight percent of the population lived under the poverty threshold. Referring to the last sickness episode, 87% of households reported having no money available and 25% risked further impoverishment because of healthcare costs even with the financial support system in place. Conclusion The flat fee policy was found to reduce cost barriers for some households but, given the generalized poverty in the area, the fee still posed a significant financial burden. This report showed the limits of a programme of fee exemption for indigent households and a flat fee for others in a context of widespread poverty. PMID:19852830

  6. Team-based care: a critical element of primary care practice transformation.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Debora Goetz; Beeson, Tishra; Kuzel, Anton J; Love, Linda E; Carver, Mary C

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of how primary care practices in the United States are transforming their practice to deliver patient-centered care. The study used qualitative research methods to conduct case studies of small primary care practices in the state of Virginia. The research team collected data from practices using in-depth interviews, structured telephone questionnaires, observation, and document review. Team-based care stood out as the most critical method used to successfully transform practices to provide patient-centered care. This article presents 3 team-based care models that were utilized by the practices in this study. PMID:23405875

  7. Medicaid Managed Care and Health Care Access for Adult Beneficiaries with Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Marguerite E

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of Medicaid managed care organizations (MCO) on health care access for adults with disabilities (AWDs). Data Sources Mandatory and voluntary enrollment data for AWDs in Medicaid MCOs in each county were merged with the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and the Area Resource File for 1996–2004. Study Design I use logit regression and two evaluation perspectives to compare access and preventive care for AWDs in Medicaid MCOs with FFS. From the state's perspective, I compare AWDs in counties with mandatory, voluntary, and no MCOs. From the enrollee's perspective, I compare AWDs who must enroll in an MCO or FFS to those who may choose between them. Principal Findings Mandatory MCO enrollees are 24.9 percent more likely to wait >30 minutes to see a provider, 32 percent more likely to report a problem accessing a specialist, and 10 percent less likely to receive a flu shot within the past year. These differences persist from the state evaluation perspective. Conclusions States should not expect a dramatic change in health care access when they implement Medicaid MCOs to deliver care to the adult disabled population. However, continued attention to specialty care access is warranted for mandatory MCO enrollees. PMID:19555397

  8. Experience of Primary Care among Homeless Individuals with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chrystal, Joya G.; Glover, Dawn L.; Young, Alexander S.; Whelan, Fiona; Austin, Erika L.; Johnson, Nancy K.; Pollio, David E.; Holt, Cheryl L.; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J.; Kim, Theresa A.; Daigle, Shanette G.; Steward, Jocelyn L.; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of primary care to homeless individuals with mental health conditions presents unique challenges. To inform healthcare improvement, we studied predictors of favorable primary care experience among homeless persons with mental health conditions treated at sites that varied in degree of homeless-specific service tailoring. This was a multi-site, survey-based comparison of primary care experiences at three mainstream primary care clinics of the Veterans Administration (VA), one homeless-tailored VA clinic, and one tailored non-VA healthcare program. Persons who accessed primary care service two or more times from July 2008 through June 2010 (N = 366) were randomly sampled. Predictor variables included patient and organization characteristics suggested by the patient perception model developed by Sofaer and Firminger (2005), with an emphasis on mental health. The primary care experience was assessed with the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) questionnaire, a validated survey instrument. Multiple regression identified predictors of positive experiences (i.e. higher PCQ-H total score). Significant predictors of a positive experience included a site offering tailored service design, perceived choice among providers, and currently domiciled status. There was an interaction effect between site and severe psychiatric symptoms. For persons with severe psychiatric symptoms, a homeless-tailored service design was significantly associated with a more favorable primary care experience. For persons without severe psychiatric symptoms, this difference was not significant. This study supports the importance of tailored healthcare delivery designed for homeless persons’ needs, with such services potentially holding special relevance for persons with mental health conditions. To improve patient experience among the homeless, organizations may want to deliver services that are tailored to homelessness and offer a choice of providers. PMID:25659142

  9. Students' Knowledge of and Attitudes towards Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, Karen I.; Luker, Karen A.; Bramadat, Ina J.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 427 British nursing students found that all had been exposed to primary health care (PHC) concepts; most had positive attitudes about PHC; and differences in knowledge appeared among degree, health visitor, and district nursing students. (SK)

  10. Tobacco use treatment in primary care patients with psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Cerimele, Joseph M; Halperin, Abigail C; Saxon, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking is higher in patients with psychiatric illness compared with the general population. Smoking causes chronic illnesses, which lead to premature mortality in those with psychiatric illness, is associated with greater burden of psychiatric symptoms, and contributes to the social isolation experienced by individuals with psychiatric disorders. Most patients with a psychiatric illness present initially to primary care rather than specialty care settings, and some patients receive care exclusively in the primary care setting. Therefore, family physicians and other primary care clinicians have an important role in the recognition and treatment of tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illnesses. In this article we review common myths associated with smoking and psychiatric illness, techniques for implementing evidence-based tobacco use treatments, the evidence base for tobacco use treatment for patients with specific psychiatric diagnoses, and factors to consider when treating tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:24808119

  11. Guideline for primary care management of headache in adults

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Werner J.; Findlay, Ted; Moga, Carmen; Scott, N. Ann; Harstall, Christa; Taenzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To increase the use of evidence-informed approaches to diagnosis, investigation, and treatment of headache for patients in primary care. Quality of evidence A comprehensive search was conducted for relevant guidelines and systematic reviews published between January 2000 and May 2011. The guidelines were critically appraised using the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool, and the 6 highest-quality guidelines were used as seed guidelines for the guideline adaptation process. Main message A multidisciplinary guideline development group of primary care providers and other specialists crafted 91 specific recommendations using a consensus process. The recommendations cover diagnosis, investigation, and management of migraine, tension-type, medication-overuse, and cluster headache. Conclusion A clinical practice guideline for the Canadian health care context was created using a guideline adaptation process to assist multidisciplinary primary care practitioners in providing evidence-informed care for patients with headache. PMID:26273080

  12. Availability and Primary Health Care Orientation of Dementia-Related Services in Rural Saskatchewan, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Debra G.; Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Stewart, Norma J.; O’Connell, Megan E.; Kirk, Andrew; Crossley, Margaret; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Forbes, Dorothy; Innes, Anthea

    2015-01-01

    Community-based services are important for improving outcomes for individuals with dementia and their caregivers. This study examined: (a) availability of rural dementia-related services in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan, and (b) orientation of services toward six key attributes of primary health care (i.e., information/education, accessibility, population orientation, coordinated care, comprehensiveness, quality of care). Data were collected from 71 rural Home Care Assessors via cross-sectional survey. Basic health services were available in most communities (e.g., pharmacists, family physicians, palliative care, adult day programs, home care, long-term care facilities). Dementia-specific services typically were unavailable (e.g., health promotion, counseling, caregiver support groups, transportation, week-end/night respite). Mean scores on the primary health care orientation scales were low (range 12.4 to 17.5/25). Specific services to address needs of rural individuals with dementia and their caregivers are limited in availability and fit with primary health care attributes. PMID:26496646

  13. The impact of primary care organization on avoidable hospital admissions for diabetes in 23 countries

    PubMed Central

    Van Loenen, Tessa; Faber, Marjan J.; Westert, Gert P.; Van den Berg, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diabetes is a so-called ambulatory care sensitive condition. It is assumed that by appropriate and timely primary care, hospital admissions for complications of such conditions can be avoided. This study examines whether differences between countries in diabetes-related hospitalization rates can be attributed to differences in the organization of primary care in these countries. Design Data on characteristics of primary care systems were obtained from the QUALICOPC study that includes surveys held among general practitioners and their patients in 34 countries. Data on avoidable hospitalizations were obtained from the OECD Health Care Quality Indicator project. Negative binomial regressions were carried out to investigate the association between characteristics of primary care and diabetes-related hospitalizations. Setting A total of 23 countries. Subjects General practitioners and patients. Main outcome measures Diabetes-related avoidable hospitalizations. Results Continuity of care was associated with lower rates of diabetes-related hospitalization. Broader task profiles for general practitioners and more medical equipment in general practice were associated with higher rates of admissions for uncontrolled diabetes. Countries where patients perceive better access to care had higher rates of hospital admissions for long-term diabetes complications. There was no association between disease management programmes and rates of diabetes-related hospitalization. Hospital bed supply was strongly associated with admission rates for uncontrolled diabetes and long-term complications. Conclusions Countries with elements of strong primary care do not necessarily have lower rates of diabetes-related hospitalizations. Hospital bed supply appeared to be a very important factor in this relationship. Apparently, it takes more than strong primary care to avoid hospitalizations. Key pointsCountries with elements of strong primary care do not necessarily have lower rates of

  14. Depression in Older Adults in Primary Care: An Integrative Approach to Care.

    PubMed

    Lill, Sheila

    2015-09-01

    Depression in older adults is a problem often encountered in primary care. While depression is evident in all populations in the primary care setting, assessment and care are more complicated in the older adult due to factors such as comorbidities, clinical presentation, adverse drug effects and drug interactions, and psychosocial factors. Due to these complications, it is essential to incorporate both conventional and alternative methods in assessment and treatment. This article aims to define depression in older adults, present the epidemiology, discuss clinical presentation and screening, and offer an integrative approach to intervention, including both pharmacological and nonpharmacological methods. Providing holistic and integrative care to older adults diagnosed with depression in the primary care setting is essential to promote healing and recovery. This article aims to provide insight for nurses, nurse practitioners, and other providers regarding the holistic and integrative care of depression in older adults in the primary care setting. PMID:25673577

  15. Reducing health disparities through primary care reform: the New Zealand experiment.

    PubMed

    Hefford, Martin; Crampton, Peter; Foley, Jon

    2005-04-01

    New Zealand experiences significant health disparities related to both ethnicity and deprivation; the average life expectancy for Maori New Zealanders is 9 years less than for other New Zealanders. The government recently introduced a set of primary care reforms aimed at improving health and reducing disparities by reducing co-payments, moving from fee-for-service to capitation, promoting population health management and developing a not for profit infrastructure with community involvement to deliver primary care. Funding for primary care visits will increase by some 43% over 3 years. This paper reviews policy documents and enrollment and payment data for the first 15 months to assess the likely impact on health disparities. The policy has been successfully introduced; over half the New Zealand population (of four million) enrolled in new Primary Health Organizations within 15 months. Over 400,000 people (half of them in vulnerable groups) gained improved access to primary care subsidies in the first 15 months. The combined effect of new payment rules and the deprived nature of the minority populations was that the average per person payment to PHOs on behalf of Maori and Pacific enrollees was more than 70% greater than the per person amount for other ethnicities for the period. The policy is consistent with the principles of the Alma Alta Declaration. Barriers to successful implementation include the risk of middle class capture of the additional funding; the risk that co-payments are not low enough to improve access for the poor; PHO inexperience; and the small size of many PHOs. Transitional equity and efficiency issues with the use of aggregate population characteristics to target higher subsidies are being ameliorated by the introduction of low cost access based on age. A tension between the twin policy goals of low cost access for all, and very low cost access for the most vulnerable populations is identified as a continuing and unresolved policy issue. PMID

  16. Primary Care Clinician Expectations Regarding Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Melinda M.; Bond, Lynne A.; Howard, Alan; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Expectations regarding aging (ERA) in community-dwelling older adults are associated with personal health behaviors and health resource usage. Clinicians' age expectations likely influence patients' expectations and care delivery patterns; yet, limited research has explored clinicians' age expectations. The Expectations Regarding Aging…

  17. Promoting Physical Activity in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Joel; Lindsay, Elizabeth A.; Wilson, Douglas M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The principle barriers preventing health care professionals from promoting physical activity include an incomplete understanding of the evidence linking physical activity and health, difficulty in translating research findings into a feasible and efficacious clinical intervention, resistance to adopting a preventive orientation, and concerns about the risks of physical activity. Low level activities likely provide benefit with little risk. PMID:21229089

  18. Curing and Caring: The Work of Primary Care Physicians With Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    CarolinaApesoa-Varano, Ester; Barker, Judith C.; Hinton, Ladson

    2013-01-01

    The symbolic framework guiding primary care physicians’ (PCPs) practice is crucial in shaping the quality of care for those with degenerative dementia. Examining the relationship between the cure and care models in primary care offers a unique opportunity for exploring change toward a more holistic approach to health care. The aims of this study were to (a) explore how PCPs approach the care of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and (b) describe how this care unfolds from the physicians’ perspectives. This was a cross-sectional study of 40 PCPs who completed semistructured interviews as part of a dementia caregiving study. Findings show that PCPs recognize the limits of the cure paradigm and articulate a caring, more holistic model that addresses the psychosocial needs of dementia patients. However, caring is difficult to uphold because of time constraints, emotional burden, and jurisdictional issues. Thus, the care model remains secondary and temporary. PMID:21685311

  19. A literature review: polypharmacy protocol for primary care.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to critically evaluate published protocols on polypharmacy in adults ages 65 and older that are currently used in primary care settings that may potentially lead to fewer adverse drug events. A review of OVID, CINAHL, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, Medline, and PubMed databases was completed using the following key words: protocol, guideline, geriatrics, elderly, older adult, polypharmacy, and primary care. Inclusion criteria were: articles in medical, nursing, and pharmacology journals with an intervention, protocol, or guideline addressing polypharmacy that lead to fewer adverse drug events. Qualitative and quantitative studies were included. Exclusion criteria were: publications prior to the year 1992. A gap exists in the literature. No standardized protocol for addressing polypharmacy in the primary care setting was found. Mnemonics, algorithms, clinical practice guidelines, and clinical strategies for addressing polypharmacy in a variety of health care settings were found throughout the literature. Several screening instruments for use in primary care to assess potentially inappropriate prescription of medications in the elderly, such as the Beers Criteria and the STOPP screening tool, were identified. However, these screening instruments were not included in a standardized protocol to manage polypharmacy in primary care. Polypharmacy in the elderly is a critical problem that may result in adverse drug events such as falls, hospitalizations, and increased expenditures for both the patient and the health care system. No standardized protocols to address polypharmacy specific to the primary care setting were identified in this review of the literature. Given the growing population of elderly in this country and the high number of medications they consume, it is critical to focus on the utilization of a standardized protocol to address the potential harm of polypharmacy in the primary care setting and evaluate its effects on

  20. Screening for depression in the primary care population.

    PubMed

    Deneke, D Edward; Schultz, Heather E; Fluent, Thomas E

    2015-03-01

    Despite strong efforts, the diagnosis and treatment of depression bring many challenges in the primary care setting. Screening for depression has been shown to be effective only if reliable systems of care are in place to ensure appropriate treatment by clinicians and adherence by patients. New evidence-based models of care for depression exist, but spread has been slow because of inadequate funding structures and conflicts within current clinical culture. The Affordable Care Act introduces potential opportunities to reorganize funding structures, conceivably leading to increased adoption of these collaborative care models. Suicide screening remains controversial. PMID:25725567

  1. Primary care management of depression in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Judy

    2016-06-19

    Depression is the most common mental health disorder in children and adolescents, and primary care is often the first point of contact for children and adolescents with depression. Depression impacts all areas of life, impairing academics and interactions with family and friends. The purpose of this article is to help NPs identify and treat children and adolescents presenting with depression in the primary care setting. PMID:27214067

  2. [Clinical bioethics for primary health care].

    PubMed

    González-de Paz, L

    2013-01-01

    The clinical decision making process with ethical implications in the area of primary healthcare differs from other healthcare areas. From the ethical perspective it is important to include these issues in the decision making model. This dissertation explains the need for a process of bioethical deliberation for Primary Healthcare, as well as proposing a method for doing so. The decision process method, adapted to this healthcare area, is flexible and requires a more participative Healthcare System. This proposal involves professionals and the patient population equally, is intended to facilitate the acquisition of responsibility for personal and community health. PMID:23608158

  3. The ethics of complex relationships in primary care behavioral health.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Jeff; Runyan, Christine

    2013-03-01

    Primary care settings are particularly prone to complex relationships that can be ethically challenging. This is due in part to three of the distinctive attributes of primary care: a whole family orientation; team-based care; and a longitudinal care delivery model. In addition, the high patient volume of primary care means that the likelihood of encountering ethically challenging relationships is probably greater than in a specialty setting. This article argues that one ethical standard of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2010, Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct, www.apa.org/ethics/code) (10.02, Therapy Involving Couples or Families) should be revised to better accommodate the work of psychologists in primary care. The corresponding Principles of Medical Ethics from the American Medical Association (AMA, 2012, Code of medical ethics: Current opinions with annotations, 2012-2013, Washington, DC: Author), most notably the principle regarding a physician's duty to "respect the rights of patients, colleagues, and other health professionals as well as safeguard privacy" are also noted. In addition, the article details how the three attributes of primary care often result in complex relationships, and provides suggestions for handling such relationships ethically. PMID:23566124

  4. [Research and the recent evolution of primary health care].

    PubMed

    Palomo, L

    2002-01-01

    Primary care in Spain has undergone a burgeoning phase in the 80's, followed by a decade of stagnation in the 90's, with little creativity, a routinisation of tasks, and the set up of service port-folios and program-contracts. On the other hand, the recent changes in the orientation of the research promoted by the health administration, in favor of basic research, at the expense of health services research and clinical epidemiology, are in contrast with the importance of primary care as a natural setting for the management of many causal agents and risk factors for health. Despite such limitations, the culture of research has become present in many primary care centres and pharmacies, and primary care research is increasingly present in scientific journals. Nevertheless, it is necessary, also for the case of primary care, to manage research, in differentiated and specific ways, favoring priorization, evaluation and responsibility through flexible organisational formulas and information systems. This should include contracting procedures allowing for at least part-time research, as well as professional career models acknowledging research and teaching activities. Scientific and professional associations in primary care face the challenge of maintaning research projects, of increasing their presence among professionals, of formulating opinions regarding the problems of their sector, as well as of reinforcing their organizational and communication capabilities. PMID:11958755

  5. Nurse practitioners, canaries in the mine of primary care reform.

    PubMed

    Contandriopoulos, Damien; Brousselle, Astrid; Breton, Mylaine; Sangster-Gormley, Esther; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Dubois, Carl-Ardy; Brault, Isabelle; Perroux, Mélanie

    2016-06-01

    A strong and effective primary care capacity has been demonstrated to be crucial for controlling costs, improving outcomes, and ultimately enhancing the performance and sustainability of healthcare systems. However, current challenges are such that the future of primary care is unlikely to be an extension of the current dominant model. Profound environmental challenges are accumulating and are likely to drive significant transformation in the field. In this article we build upon the concept of "disruptive innovations" to analyze data from two separate research projects conducted in Quebec (Canada). Results from both projects suggest that introducing nurse practitioners into primary care teams has the potential to disrupt the status quo. We propose three scenarios for the future of primary care and for nurse practitioners' potential contribution to reforming primary care delivery models. In conclusion, we suggest that, like the canary in the coal mine, nurse practitioners' place in primary care will be an indicator of the extent to which healthcare system reforms have actually occurred. PMID:27085958

  6. Assessing the potential for improvement of primary care in 34 countries: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, Wienke GW; Murante, Anna M; Sixma, Herman JM; Schellevis, François G; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate patients’ perceptions of improvement potential in primary care in 34 countries. Methods We did a cross-sectional survey of 69 201 patients who had just visited general practitioners at primary-care facilities. Patients rated five features of person-focused primary careaccessibility/availability, continuity, comprehensiveness, patient involvement and doctor–patient communication. One tenth of the patients ranked the importance of each feature on a scale of one to four, and nine tenths of patients scored their experiences of care received. We calculated the potential for improvement by multiplying the proportion of negative patient experiences with the mean importance score in each country. Scores were divided into low, medium and high improvement potential. Pair-wise correlations were made between improvement scores and three dimensions of the structure of primary care – governance, economic conditions and workforce development. Findings In 26 countries, one or more features of primary care had medium or high improvement potentials. Comprehensiveness of care had medium to high improvement potential in 23 of 34 countries. In all countries, doctor–patient communication had low improvement potential. An overall stronger structure of primary care was correlated with a lower potential for improvement of continuity and comprehensiveness of care. In countries with stronger primary care governance patients perceived less potential to improve the continuity of care. Countries with better economic conditions for primary care had less potential for improvement of all features of person-focused care. Conclusion In countries with a stronger primary care structure, patients perceived that primary care had less potential for improvement. PMID:25883409

  7. Kansas Primary Care Weighs In: A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Chronic Care Model Program for Obesity in 3 Rural Kansas Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Andrea C.; Banitt, Angela; Befort, Christie; Hou, Qing; Rhode, Paula C.; Grund, Chrysanne; Greiner, Allen; Jeffries, Shawn; Ellerbeck, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Context: Obesity is a chronic disease of epidemic proportions in the United States. Primary care providers are critical to timely diagnosis and treatment of obesity, and need better tools to deliver effective obesity care. Purpose: To conduct a pilot randomized trial of a chronic care model (CCM) program for obesity care in rural Kansas primary…

  8. Chronic Disease Patients’ Experiences With Accessing Health Care in Rural and Remote Areas

    PubMed Central

    Brundisini, F; Giacomini, M; DeJean, D; Vanstone, M; Winsor, S; Smith, A

    2013-01-01

    Background Rurality can contribute to the vulnerability of people with chronic diseases. Qualitative research can identify a wide range of health care access issues faced by patients living in a remote or rural setting. Objective To systematically review and synthesize qualitative research on the advantages and disadvantages rural patients with chronic diseases face when accessing both rural and distant care. Data Sources This report synthesizes 12 primary qualitative studies on the topic of access to health care for rural patients with chronic disease. Included studies were published between 2002 and 2012 and followed adult patients in North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Review Methods Qualitative meta-synthesis was used to integrate findings across primary research studies. Results Three major themes were identified: geography, availability of health care professionals, and rural culture. First, geographic distance from services poses access barriers, worsened by transportation problems or weather conditions. Community supports and rurally located services can help overcome these challenges. Second, the limited availability of health care professionals (coupled with low education or lack of peer support) increases the feeling of vulnerability. When care is available locally, patients appreciate long-term relationships with individual clinicians and care personalized by familiarity with the patient as a person. Finally, patients may feel culturally marginalized in the urban health care context, especially if health literacy is low. A culture of self-reliance and community belonging in rural areas may incline patients to do without distant care and may mitigate feelings of vulnerability. Limitations Qualitative research findings are not intended to generalize directly to populations, although meta-synthesis across a number of qualitative studies builds an increasingly robust understanding that is more likely to be transferable. Selected studies

  9. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. A...

  10. Patient Acceptance, Initiation, and Engagement in Tele-psychotherapy in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Deen, Tisha; Fortney, John; Schroeder, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine factors associated with the utilization of psychotherapy offered in primary care over interactive video (tele-psychotherapy). Methods Primary care patients with depression (N=179) recruited from five Federally Qualified Health Centers were randomized to a telemedicine-based collaborative care intervention and offered free tele-psychotherapy in the primary care setting. Independent variables included measures of access and need for depression treatment. Logistic regression indentified variables associated with acceptability, initiation and engagement in tele-psychotherapy. Results 76% of patients reported that psychotherapy was acceptable, 38% scheduled a tele-psychology session, 17% attended a session and 8% engaged in treatment (≥8 sessions). Because the intervention was designed to minimize treatment barriers, access was not a significant predictor of utilization. However, use of tele-psychotherapy was significantly associated with measures of perceived need. Conclusions Even when psychotherapy is delivered in the primary care setting over interactive video to minimize barriers, few patients initiate or engage in tele-psychotherapy. PMID:23370530

  11. Primary Mental Health Care in Disasters: Armero, Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima, Bruno R.

    This paper focuses on the mental health consequences of the disaster in Armero, Colombia which resulted from a volcanic eruption and mudslide, and highlights the role of the primary care worker in delivering mental health care to disaster victims. Eight characteristics of disasters that are closely related to their psychopathogenetic potential…

  12. Crossing the divide: primary care and mental health integration.

    PubMed

    Upshur, Carole C

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes the views of primary care providers about treating depression among adult Medicaid patients and their experiences with managed behavioral health care. It also shows the outcomes of an intervention project that provides a care manager to facilitate connections among PCPs, patients, and behavioral health providers. Despite widespread initiatives to improve depression management in primary care and to manage behavioral health services, it appears that links between the two systems and the use of evidence-based approaches to managing patients are rare. A pilot project to initiate practice redesign, the use of a care manager to assist in patient support, and compliance with both medical and behavioral health treatment has been shown to improve communication and results in positive patient outcomes. Managed behavioral health care can result in incentive structures that create gaps between primary care and behavioral health systems. This project illustrates an initiative co-sponsored by the Massachusetts behavioral health program designed to strengthen links between behavioral health and primary care, and increase rates and effectiveness of depression treatment. PMID:15844853

  13. Assessing Health Literacy in Diverse Primary Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Renee L.

    2010-01-01

    Patient health literacy skills are critical to effective healthcare communication and safe care delivery in primary care settings. Methods and strategies to identify patient health literacy (HL) capabilities and provider/staff knowledge, attitudes and beliefs (KAB) regarding HL must be known before addressing provider/staff communication skills.…

  14. Primary health care in rural areas: an agenda for research.

    PubMed Central

    DeFriese, G H; Ricketts, T C

    1989-01-01

    The confluence of forces slowing the growth of the physician supply despite a continued shortage of primary care physicians, the encouragement of competitive medical practices that centralize resources in larger places, and the changing of the rural population's character to one of more dependence on medical care may bring on another "rural health crisis" in the decade ahead. PMID:2645252

  15. Primary Health Care in Africa: Implications for Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambo, Leke I.

    1991-01-01

    Delivery of primary health care (PHC) programs is critical to rural African health care. The paper explores the school's role in PHC delivery and indicates ways that professional health personnel and teacher educators can cooperate in preparing teachers with necessary knowledge and skills to participate meaningfully in PHC delivery. (SM)

  16. New reproductive technologies: Equity and access to reproductive health care.

    PubMed

    Henifin, M S

    1993-01-01

    While attention has focused on the promise of new reproductive technologies to provide cures for infertility, efforts aimed at preventing infertility have languished, and the major cause of infant morbidity and morality--lack of prenatal care--has worsened. This article explores the social and ethical issues arising out of the uses of three new reproductive technologies: surrogacy, in vitro fertilization, and prenatal screening. In addition, coerced medical interventions during pregnancy are described. Examination of the social circumstances surrounding the use of these medical technologies supports the conclusion that new reproductive technologies have increased, rather than decreased, inequities in access to and allocation of health care resources. PMID:17165238

  17. Effectively Communicating Colorectal Cancer Screening Information to Primary Care Providers: Application for State, Tribe or Territory Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Jennifer; Vanderpool, Robin; McClung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients are more likely to be screened for colorectal cancer if it is recommended by a health care provider. Therefore, it is imperative that providers have access to the latest screening guidelines. Purpose: This practice-based project sought to identify Kentucky primary care providers' preferred sources and methods of receiving…

  18. Utilization of nurse practitioners to increase patient access to primary healthcare in Canada--thinking outside the box.

    PubMed

    DiCenso, Alba; Bourgeault, Ivy; Abelson, Julia; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Carter, Nancy; Harbman, Patricia; Donald, Faith; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2010-12-01

    In the past decade, all Canadian provinces and territories have launched various team-based primary healthcare initiatives designed to improve access and continuity of care. Nurse practitioners (NPs) are increasingly becoming integral members of primary healthcare teams across the country. This paper draws on the results of a scoping review of the literature and qualitative key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis about advanced practice nursing in Canada. We describe and analyze two novel approaches to NP integration designed to address the gap in patient access to primary healthcare: (1) the integration of NPs in traditional fee-for-service practices in British Columbia, and (2) the creation of NP-led clinics in Ontario. Although fee-for-service remuneration has been a barrier to collaborative practice, the integration of government-salaried NPs into fee-for-service practices in British Columbia has enabled the creation of inter-professional teams, and based on early evaluation findings, has increased patient access to care and patient and provider satisfaction. NP-led clinics are designed to provide inter-professional care in communities with high numbers of patients who do not have a regular primary healthcare provider. Given the shortage of physicians in communities where these clinics are being introduced, the ratio of physicians to NPs is lower than in other primary healthcare delivery models, and physicians function in more of a consulting role. Initial evaluation of the first of 26 NP-led clinics indicates increased access to care and high levels of patient and provider satisfaction. Implementing a creative mosaic of collaborative primary healthcare models that are responsive to patient needs challenges traditional assumptions about professional roles and responsibilities. To address this challenge, we endorse a recommendation that governments establish a mechanism to bring together both physician and non-physician primary

  19. Changes in Family Life and Challenges in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Fragmentation of the postmodern family affects several aspects of primary care. In prevention, the physician-patient relationship is most important in forestalling abuse. In morbidity and diagnosis, single or socially isolated patients are more vulnerable to diseases, such as total allergy syndrome. In acute care, fragmentation increases the number of elderly patients in hospital. And in rehabilitation, the two-career family is no longer able to supplement hospital nursing care as it once did. PMID:21229053

  20. Utilization of the Primary Health Care Services in the Tshwane Region of Gauteng Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Nteta, Thembi P.; Mokgatle-Nthabu, Matilda; Oguntibeju, Oluwafemi O.

    2010-01-01

    Background In South Africa, the provision of primary health care is a basic service designed to be cost effective and bring healthcare as close as possible to the population, particularly to those people of low economic status. It is a service which is provided free of charge by the South African government and as part of the millennium health goals, it is intended that the service should be accessible to the populace and be effectively utilized. Objective This study was designed to investigate the accessibility and utilization of the primary health care services in three community health care centres in the Tshwane of the Gauteng Province, South Africa. Methodology Data were obtained from participants attending three Community Health Care Centres in the Tshwane Region using self-administered structured questionnaires. A document review of the Community Health Care Centres records was conducted to investigate the utilization trends of the services provided and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data obtained. Results The results showed that the Community Health Care Centres in the Tshwane Region are accessible to most participants who lived within 5 km of such centres and who traveled 30 minutes or less to the clinic. Using a taxi or walking were found to be the most common means of transport used to gain access to such a clinic. The findings showed that generally, participants were satisfied with the services provided. Conclusion Participants of this study have access to the community health care centres in the Tshwane Region and there seems to be effective utilization by patients attending them. PMID:21085475

  1. Quality and effectiveness of different approaches to primary care delivery in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Harzheim, Erno; Duncan, Bruce B; Stein, Airton T; Cunha, Carlo RH; Goncalves, Marcelo R; Trindade, Thiago G; Oliveira, Mônica MC; Pinto, Maria Eugênia B

    2006-01-01

    Background Since 1994, Brazil has developed a primary care system based on multidisciplinary teams which include not only a physician and a nurse, but also 4–6 lay community health workers. This system now consists of 26,650 teams, covering 46% of the Brazilian population. Yet relatively few investigations have examined its effectiveness, especially in contrast with that of the traditional multi-specialty physician team approach it is replacing, or that of other existing family medicine approaches placing less emphasis on lay community health workers. Primary health care can be defined through its domains of access to first contact, continuity, coordination, comprehensiveness, community orientation and family orientation. These attributes can be ascertained via instruments such as the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCATool), and correlated with the effectiveness of care. The objectives of our study are to validate the adult version of this instrument in Portuguese, identify the extent (quality) of primary care present in different models of primary care services, and correlate this extent with measures of process and outcomes in patients with diabetes, hypertension and coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods/Design We are conducting a population-based cross-sectional study of primary care in the municipality of Porto Alegre. We will interview a random sample totaling 3000 adults residing in geographic areas covered by four distinct models of primary care of the Brazilian national health system or, alternatively, by one nationally prominent complementary health care service, as well as the physicians and nurses of the health teams of these services. Interviews query perceived quality of care (PCATool-Adult Version), patient satisfaction, and process indicators of management of diabetes, hypertension and known CHD. We are measuring blood pressure, anthropometrics and, in adults with known diabetes, glycated hemoglobin. Discussion We hope to contribute not only by

  2. Medical students' attitudes toward underserved populations: changing associations with choice of primary care versus non-primary care residency.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Sharon; Timm, Craig; Serna, Lisa; Solan, Brian; Kalishman, Summers

    2010-05-01

    The number of medical students entering primary care residencies continues to decrease. The association between student attitudes toward underserved populations and residency choice has received little attention even though primary care physicians see a larger proportion of underserved patients than most other specialists. We evaluated attitudes toward underserved populations in 826 medical students using a standardized survey, and used logistic regression to assess the effect of attitudes, along with other variables, on selection of a primary care residency. We compared results between two groups defined by year of entry to medical school (1993-99 and 2000-05) to determine whether associations differed by time period. Students' attitudes regarding professional responsibility toward underserved populations remained high over the study period; however, there was a statistically. significant association between positive attitudes and primary care residency in the early cohort only. This association was not found in the more recent group. PMID:20453348

  3. Coordinating Mental Health Care across Primary Care and Schools: ADHD as a Case Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Thomas J.; Blum, Nathan J.; Guevara, James P.; Jones, Heather A.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2013-01-01

    Although primary care practices and schools are major venues for the delivery of mental health services to children, these systems are disconnected, contributing to fragmentation in service delivery. This paper describes barriers to collaboration across the primary care and school systems, including administrative and fiscal pressures, conceptual…

  4. "There's No Big Book on How to Care": Primary Pre-Service Teachers' Experiences of Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Hellen R.; Reupert, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated primary, pre-service teachers' experiences regarding their caring role, and the barriers they face when caring for students. Thirteen Australian primary pre-service teachers were individually interviewed. Within a qualitative framework, transcripts were thematically analysed, alongside member checks. While results indicated…

  5. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  6. Emergency access authorization for personally controlled online health care data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingting; Zhong, Sheng

    2012-02-01

    Personally controlled health records (PCHR) systems have emerged to allow patients to control their own medical data. In a PCHR system, all the access privileges to a patient's data are granted by the patient. However, in many emergency cases, it is impossible for the patient to participate in access authorization on site when immediate medical treatment is needed. To solve the emergency access authorization problem in the absence of patients, we consider two cases: a) the requester is already in the PCHR system but has not obtained the access privilege of the patient's health records, and b) the requester does not even have an account in the PCHR system to submit its request. For each of the two cases, we present a method for emergency access authorization, utilizing the weighted voting and source authentication cryptographic techniques. Our methods provide an effective, secure and private solution for emergency access authorization, that makes the existing PCHR system frameworks more practical and thus improves the patients' experiences of health care when using PCHR systems. We have implemented a prototype system as a proof of concept. PMID:20703719

  7. Understanding delayed access to antenatal care: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed access to antenatal care ('late booking’) has been linked to increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand why some women are late to access antenatal care. Methods 27 women presenting after 19 completed weeks gestation for their first hospital booking appointment were interviewed, using a semi-structured format, in community and maternity hospital settings in South Yorkshire, United Kingdom. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and entered onto NVivo 8 software. An interdisciplinary, iterative, thematic analysis was undertaken. Results The late booking women were diverse in terms of: age (15–37 years); parity (0–4); socioeconomic status; educational attainment and ethnicity. Three key themes relating to late booking were identified from our data: 1) 'not knowing’: realisation (absence of classic symptoms, misinterpretation); belief (age, subfertility, using contraception, lay hindrance); 2) 'knowing’: avoidance (ambivalence, fear, self-care); postponement (fear, location, not valuing care, self-care); and 3) 'delayed’ (professional and system failures, knowledge/empowerment issues). Conclusions Whilst vulnerable groups are strongly represented in this study, women do not always fit a socio-cultural stereotype of a 'late booker’. We report a new taxonomy of more complex reasons for late antenatal booking than the prevalent concepts of denial, concealment and disadvantage. Explanatory sub-themes are also discussed, which relate to psychological, empowerment and socio-cultural factors. These include poor reproductive health knowledge and delayed recognition of pregnancy, the influence of a pregnancy 'mindset’ and previous pregnancy experience, and the perceived value of antenatal care. The study also highlights deficiencies in early pregnancy diagnosis and service organisation. These issues should be considered by practitioners and service commissioners in order to promote

  8. A Patient-Centered Understanding of the Referral System in Ethiopian Primary Health Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Abrahim, Orit; Linnander, Erika; Mohammed, Halima; Fetene, Netsanet; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa have undergone substantial development in an effort to expand access to appropriate facilities through a well-functioning referral system. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current patterns of seeking prior care before arriving at a health center or a hospital as a key aspect of the referral system of the primary health care unit (PHCU) in three regions in Ethiopia. We examined what percentage of patients had either sought prior care or had been referred to the present facility and identified demographic and clinical factors associated with having sought prior care or having been referred. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study using face-to-face interviews in the local language with 796 people (99% response rate) seeking outpatient care in three primary health care units serving approximately 100,000 people each and reflecting regional and ethnic diversity; 53% (N = 418) of the sample was seeking care at hospital outpatient departments, and 47% of the sample was seeking care at health centers (N = 378). We used unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression to identify factors associated with having been referred or sought prior care. Our findings indicated that only 10% of all patients interviewed had been referred to their current place of care. Among those in the hospital population, 14% had been referred; among those in the health center population, only 6% had been referred. Of those who had been referred to the hospital, most (74%) had been referred by a health center. Among those who were referred to the health center, the plurality portion (32%) came from a nearby hospital (most commonly for continued HIV treatment or early childhood vaccinations); only 18% had come from a health post. Among patients who had not been formally referred, an additional 25% in the hospital sample and 10% in the health center sample had accessed some prior source of care for their present

  9. Reply to "transforming oncology care": advancing value, accessing innovation.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Alternative payment models in oncology are already successfully standardizing care, curbing costs, and improving the patient experience. Yet, it is unclear whether decision makers are adequately considering patient access to innovation when creating these models, which could have severe consequences for a robust innovation ecosystem and the lives of afflicted patients. The suggested chart includes recommendations on: Allowing for the adoption of new, promising therapies; Promoting the measurement of patient-centered outcomes; and Providing support for personalized medicine. PMID:26618436

  10. Deported Mexican migrants: health status and access to care

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Niño, Julián Alfredo; Ramírez-Valdés, Carlos Jacobo; Cerecero-Garcia, Diego; Bojorquez-Chapela, Ietza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the health status and access to care of forced-return Mexican migrants deported through the Mexico-United States border and to compare it with the situation of voluntary-return migrants. METHODS Secondary data analysis from the Survey on Migration in Mexico’s Northern Border from 2012. This is a continuous survey, designed to describe migration flows between Mexico and the United States, with a mobile-population sampling design. We analyzed indicators of health and access to care among deported migrants, and compare them with voluntary-return migrants. Our analysis sample included 2,680 voluntary-return migrants, and 6,862 deportees. We employ an ordinal multiple logistic regression model, to compare the adjusted odds of having worst self-reported health between the studied groups. RESULTS As compared to voluntary-return migrants, deportees were less likely to have medical insurance in the United States (OR = 0.05; 95%CI 0.04;0.06). In the regression model a poorer self-perceived health was found to be associated with having been deported (OR = 1.71, 95%CI 1.52;1.92), as well as age (OR = 1.03, 95%CI 1.02;1.03) and years of education (OR = 0.94 95%CI 0.93;0.95). CONCLUSIONS According to our results, deportees had less access to care while in the United States, as compared with voluntary-return migrants. Our results also showed an independent and statistically significant association between deportation and having poorer self-perceived health. To promote the health and access to care of deported Mexican migrants coming back from the United States, new health and social policies are required. PMID:25119943

  11. Assessment and treatment of addictions in primary care.

    PubMed

    Ravetti, L M

    2000-01-01

    Most clinicians are faced with the challenge of providing care and treatment for patients who experience the chronic relapsing brain disease known as addiction. The purpose of this article is to increase awareness of techniques and tools available to primary care clinicians (PCCs) for assessing and treating addictions in the office or clinic setting. A review of the history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and diagnostics relevant to addictive illness will help PCCs to hone their skills in addiction management. Addiction screening instruments and brief interventions used in primary care are presented. Adjunct therapies designed to promote the biopsychosocial and spiritual well-being of patients who are addicted have shown promise. PMID:11271125

  12. The Chronic Care Model and Diabetes Management in US Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Stellefson, Michael; Stopka, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Care Model (CCM) uses a systematic approach to restructuring medical care to create partnerships between health systems and communities. The objective of this study was to describe how researchers have applied CCM in US primary care settings to provide care for people who have diabetes and to describe outcomes of CCM implementation. Methods We conducted a literature review by using the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition and the following search terms: “chronic care model” (and) “diabet*.” We included articles published between January 1999 and October 2011. We summarized details on CCM application and health outcomes for 16 studies. Results The 16 studies included various study designs, including 9 randomized controlled trials, and settings, including academic-affiliated primary care practices and private practices. We found evidence that CCM approaches have been effective in managing diabetes in US primary care settings. Organizational leaders in health care systems initiated system-level reorganizations that improved the coordination of diabetes care. Disease registries and electronic medical records were used to establish patient-centered goals, monitor patient progress, and identify lapses in care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) were trained to deliver evidence-based care, and PCP office–based diabetes self-management education improved patient outcomes. Only 7 studies described strategies for addressing community resources and policies. Conclusion CCM is being used for diabetes care in US primary care settings, and positive outcomes have been reported. Future research on integration of CCM into primary care settings for diabetes management should measure diabetes process indicators, such as self-efficacy for disease management and clinical decision making. PMID:23428085

  13. Primary Care Physician Panel Size and Quality of Care: A Population-Based Study in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William; Younger, Jaime; Muggah, Elizabeth; Russell, Grant; Glazier, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the number of patients under a primary care physician’s care (panel size) and primary care quality indicators. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study of fee-for-service and capitated interprofessional and non-interprofessional primary health care practices in Ontario, Canada between April 2008 and March 2010, encompassing 4,195 physicians with panel sizes ≥1,200 serving 8.3 million patients. Data was extracted from multiple linked, health-related administrative databases and covered 16 quality indicators spanning 5 dimensions of care: access, continuity, comprehensiveness, and evidence-based indicators of cancer screening and chronic disease management. RESULTS The likelihood of being up-to-date on cervical, colorectal, and breast cancer screening showed relative decreases of 7.9% (P <.001), 5.9% (P = .01), and 4.6% (P <.001), respectively, with increasing panel size (from 1,200 to 3,900). Eight chronic care indicators (4 medication-based and 4 screening-based) showed no significant association with panel size. The likelihood of individuals with a new diagnosis of congestive heart failure having an echocardiogram, however, increased by a relative 8.1% (P <.001) with higher panel size. Increasing panel size was also associated with a 10.8% relative increase in hospitalization rates for ambulatory-care–sensitive conditions (P = .04) and a 10.8% decrease in non-urgent emergency department visits (P = .004). Continuity was highest with medium panel sizes (P <.001), and comprehensiveness had a small decrease (P = .03) with increasing panel size. CONCLUSIONS Increasing panel size was associated with small decreases in cancer screening, continuity, and comprehensiveness, but showed no consistent relationships with chronic disease management or access indicators. We found no panel size threshold above which quality of care suffered. PMID:26755780

  14. Patient satisfaction with primary health care services in two districts in Lower and Upper Egypt.

    PubMed

    Gadallah, M; Zaki, B; Rady, M; Anwer, W; Sallam, I

    2003-05-01

    This study compares patient satisfaction with primary health care services and identifies factors associated with patient satisfaction in two health districts in Egypt where a project for upgrading primary health care services had been running for three years. An exit interview was conducted for 1108 patients using a structured questionnaire. The results revealed that most clients using primary health care services were females. Patient satisfaction was high for accessibility, waiting area conditions and performance of doctors and nurses. The main complaints centred on the availability of prescribed drugs and laboratory investigations. Additionally, level of privacy in the consultation room was described as unsatisfactory by 33% of patients. There was no association between overall patient satisfaction and age, gender, education level or type of service received. PMID:15751936

  15. Improving opioid prescription practices and reducing patient risk in the primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    Cheatle, Martin D; Barker, Cody

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is complex, and the patient suffering from chronic pain frequently experiences concomitant medical and psychiatric disorders, including mood and anxiety disorders, and in some cases substance use disorders. Ideally these patients would be referred to an interdisciplinary pain program staffed by pain medicine, behavioral health, and addiction specialists. In practice, the majority of patients with chronic pain are managed in the primary care setting. The primary care clinician typically has limited time, training, or access to resources to effectively and efficiently evaluate, treat, and monitor these patients, particularly when there is the added potential liability of prescribing opioids. This paper reviews the role of opioids in managing chronic noncancer pain, including efficacy and risk for misuse, abuse, and addiction, and discusses several models employing novel technologies and health delivery systems for risk assessment, intervention, and monitoring of patients receiving opioids in a primary care setting. PMID:24966692

  16. Pressure and Friction Injuries in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Shawn; Seiverling, Elizabeth; Silvis, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Pressure and friction injuries are common throughout the lifespan. A detailed history of the onset and progression of friction and pressure injuries is key to aiding clinicians in determining the underlying mechanism behind the development of the injury. Modifying or removing the forces that are creating pressure or friction is the key to both prevention and healing of these injuries. Proper care of pressure and friction injuries to the skin is important to prevent the development of infection. Patient education on positioning and ergonomics can help to prevent recurrence of pressure and friction injuries. PMID:26612376

  17. Coordinating Mental Health Care Across Primary Care and Schools: ADHD as a Case Example

    PubMed Central

    Power, Thomas J.; Blum, Nathan J.; Guevara, James P.; Jones, Heather A.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2012-01-01

    Although primary care practices and schools are major venues for the delivery of mental health services to children, these systems are disconnected, contributing to fragmentation in service delivery. This paper describes barriers to collaboration across the primary care and school systems, including administrative and fiscal pressures, conceptual and linguistic differences between healthcare and educational professionals, role restrictions among professionals, and privacy laws. Strategies for overcoming these barriers that can be applied in both primary care and school settings are described. The paper has a primary focus on children with ADHD, but the principles and strategies described are applicable to children with a range of mental health and health conditions. PMID:23459527

  18. Overcoming barriers to health care access for medically underserved children.

    PubMed

    Redlener, I

    1993-01-01

    The NYCHP was designed to serve the special needs of medically underserved, extremely disadvantaged children in New York City. As a model, and as the flagship program of a national network, the NYCHP demonstrates that it is possible to provide a medical home for children in a variety of challenging situations where access to traditional providers is limited. It is clear, however, that mobile units or other creative ways to overcome barriers to access to care are an insufficient long-term answer. Ultimately, the public sector must take steps to ensure that all American children have regular access to a true medical home regardless of their social or economic situation. In the interim, special initiatives such as the NYCHP must continue to fill the gap. PMID:10123427

  19. Diagnosis and management of dementia in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Jasneet; Dobbs, Bonnie; McKay, Rhianne; Kirwan, Catherine; Cooper, Tim; Marin, Alexandra; Gupta, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the current identification and management of patients with dementia in a primary care setting; to determine the accuracy of identification of dementia by primary care physicians; to examine reasons (triggers) for referral of patients with suspected dementia to the geriatric assessment team (GAT) from the primary care setting; and to compare indices of identification and management of dementia between the GAT and primary care network (PCN) physicians and between the GAT and community care (CC). Design Retrospective chart review and comparisons, based on quality indicators of dementia care as specified in the Third Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia, were conducted from matching charts obtained from 3 groups of health care providers. Setting Semirural region in the province of Alberta involving a PCN, CC, and a GAT. Participants One hundred patients who had been assessed by the GAT randomly selected from among those diagnosed with dementia or mild cognitive impairment by the GAT. Main outcome measures Diagnosis of dementia and indications of high-quality dementia care listed in PCN, CC, and GAT charts. Results Only 59% of the patients diagnosed with dementia by the GAT had a documented diagnosis of dementia in their PCN charts. None of the 12 patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment by the GAT had been diagnosed by the PCN. Memory decline was the most common reason for referral to the GAT. There were statistically significant differences between the PCN and the GAT on all quality indicators of dementia, with underuse of diagnostic and functional assessment tools and lack of attention to wandering, driving, medicolegal, and caregiver issues, and underuse of community supports in the PCN. There was higher congruence between CC and the GAT on assessment and care indices. Conclusion Dementia care remains a challenge in primary care. Within our primary care setting, there are opportunities for

  20. Integrating care for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and primary care for HIV for injection drug users coinfected with HIV and HCV.

    PubMed

    Kresina, Thomas F; Bruce, R Douglas; Cargill, Victoria A; Cheever, Laura W

    2005-07-01

    Injection drug use accounts for most of the incident infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and for at least one-third of new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. Coinfection with HCV and HIV presents complex and challenging medical conditions. Ensuring access to and maintaining care for HIV and HCV for drug users presents special challenges to the health care team that require a nonjudgmental attitude, experience, and patience. Care for HCV infection, however, can be used as an instrument to engage drug-using persons in ongoing primary care relationships. Common elements to both care for HCV infection and primary care for HIV infection are testing for and counseling about HCV and HIV, substance abuse and mental health services, social support, and subspecialty referral. These elements, in particular treatment for substance abuse, can be focal points for model care systems that provide integrative care for both HCV and HIV infections. PMID:16265621

  1. Patient safety in primary care dentistry: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Bailey, E; Tickle, M; Campbell, S

    2014-10-01

    In contemporary healthcare settings, ensuring patient safety must be an underlying principal through which systems, teams, individuals and environments work in tandem to strive for. The adoption of a culture in the NHS where patient safety is given greater priority is key to improvement. Recent events at Mid-Staffordshire hospitals among others have brought patient safety into the minds of the public and it increasingly demands attention from clinicians, the press and governments. However, much of the work into patient safety has been completed in the secondary care field with very little work completed in primary care settings. In primary care dentistry, improving patient safety is a relatively new concept with a distinct lack of evidence base. In this article, we discuss what patient safety is and debate its relevance to primary care dentistry. We also look at previous work completed in this field and make recommendations for future work to address the current lack of research. PMID:25303580

  2. [A general practitioners' program for primary care in Chile].

    PubMed

    Bass del Campo, Germán Camilo

    2015-01-01

    The public health system in Chile does not have a comprehensive development policy for physician resources in primary care, so there is currently a significant deficit of hours for medical care. The article contains a proposal for a "General Program for Primary Care Physicians", which aims to reduce the gap of general practitioners and specialists in primary care. The program proposes to integrate newly graduated physicians to work in the public medical offices with the subsequent possibility of applying for a scholarship specialty, and consecutively a return period as a specialist in the public health network. The immediate implementation of this program is perfectly feasible given the current availability of doctors, over 1400 medical graduates from universities. PMID:25826371

  3. The roles of primary care PAs and NPs caring for older adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everett, Christine M; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Palta, Mari; Carayon, Pascale; Gilchrist, Valerie J; Smith, Maureen A

    2014-04-01

    Electronic health record data linked with Medicare data from an academic physician group were used to propose a multidimensional characterization of PA and NP roles on panels of primary care patients with diabetes. Seven PA and NP roles were defined based on level of involvement, visits with complex patients, and delivery of chronic care. Findings suggest that PAs and NPs in primary care perform a variety of roles and frequently perform multiple roles within a clinic. PMID:24662258

  4. Improving Access to Noninstitutional Long-Term Care for American Indian Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Betty Jo (Josea); Creekmur, Beth; Cote, Sarah; Saliba, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Home-based primary care (HBPC) is an effective model of noninstitutional long-term care developed in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide ongoing care to homebound persons. Significant rural populations of American Indians have limited access to services designed for frail older adults. Fourteen Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs) initiated efforts to expand access to HBPC in concert with local tribes and Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities. This study characterizes the resulting emerging models of HBPC and co-management. Using an observational design, key respondent telephone interviews (n = 37) were conducted with stakeholders representing the 14 VAMCs to describe these HBPC programs, and HBPC models were evaluated in relation to VAMC organizational culture as revealed on the annual VA All Employee Survey. Twelve VAMCs independently developed HBPC expansion programs for American Indian veterans, and six different program models were implemented. Two models were unique to collaborations between VAMCs and tribes; in these collaborations, the tribes retained primary care responsibilities. VAMC used the other four models for delivery of care in remote rural areas to all veteran populations, American Indians and non-Indians alike. Strategies to improve access by reducing geographic barriers occur in all models. Comparing mean VAMC organizational culture ratings, as defined in the Competing Values Framework, revealed significant group differences for one of these six models. Findings from this study illustrate the flexibility of the HBPC program and opportunities for co-management and expansion of healthcare access for American Indians and non-Indians, particularly in rural areas. PMID:25854124

  5. Implementation and evaluation of Google Glass for visualizing real-time image and patient data in the primary care office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroy, Guillermo L.; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Nolan, Ryan M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-02-01

    Primary care physicians must conduct a staggering number of comprehensive physical exams and medical record reviews, resulting in demanding daily schedules. Few commercial technologies have been marketed towards the primary care market, which has stifled improvements in disease screening and detection, work flow, and records management, taking time away from interactions with patients. In efforts to improve the quality of care in primary care medicine, we integrated our handheld primary care optical imaging system with Google Glass©, a commercial heads-up display (HUD). The integration of a HUD allows the physician to focus on the patient during the medical history review and during the patient exam, resulting in potential improvements to the quality of care and efficient access to real-time data for display and analysis.

  6. Potential of physician assistants to support primary care

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Sarah; Botting, Ingrid; Huebner, Lori-Anne; Wright, Brock; Beaupre, Beth; Permack, Sheldon; Jones, Ian; Mihlachuk, Ainslie; Edwards, Jeanette; Rhule, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine effective strategies for introducing physician assistants (PAs) in primary care settings and provide guidance to support ongoing provincial planning for PA roles in primary care. Design Time-series research design using multiple qualitative methods. Setting Manitoba. Participants Physician assistants, supervising family physicians, clinic staff, members of the Introducing Physician Assistants into Primary Care Steering Committee, and patients receiving care from PAs. Methods The PA role was evaluated at 6 health care sites between 2012 and 2014; sites varied in size, funding models, geographic locations (urban or rural), specifics of the PA role, and setting type (clinic or hospital). Semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted; patient feedback on quality improvement was retrieved; observational methods were employed; and documents were reviewed. A baseline assessment was conducted before PA placement. In 2013, there was a series of interviews and focus groups about the introduction of PAs at the 3 initial sites; in 2014 interviews and focus groups included all 6 sites. Main findings The concerns that were expressed during baseline interviews about the introduction of PAs (eg, community and patient acceptance) informed planning. Most concerns that were identified did not materialize. Supervising family physicians, site staff, and patients were enthusiastic about the introduction of PAs. There were a few challenges experienced at the site level (eg, front-desk scheduling), but they were perceived as manageable. Unanticipated challenges at the provincial level were identified (eg, diagnostic test ordering). Increased attachment and improved access—the goals of introducing PAs to primary care—were only some of the positive effects that were reported. Conclusion This first systematic multisite evaluation of PAs in primary care in Canada demonstrated that with appropriate collaborative planning, PAs can effectively

  7. Physician-assisted death with limited access to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Barutta, Joaquín; Vollmann, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    Even among advocates of legalising physician-assisted death, many argue that this should be done only once palliative care has become widely available. Meanwhile, according to them, physician-assisted death should be banned. Four arguments are often presented to support this claim, which we call the argument of lack of autonomy, the argument of existing alternatives, the argument of unfair inequalities and the argument of the antagonism between physician-assisted death and palliative care. We argue that although these arguments provide strong reasons to take appropriate measures to guarantee access to good quality palliative care to everyone who needs it, they do not justify a ban on physician-assisted death until we have achieved this goal. PMID:25614156

  8. [Chronicity and primary care: the role of prison health].

    PubMed

    Morral-Parente, R

    2015-10-01

    The Prison Primary Health Care Teams in Catalonia have been integrated into the Catalan Health Institute. This integration shall facilitate¹ training and updating, while eliminating the existing differences between the health services belonging to prison institutions and those of the Catalan Health Service. It shall enable team work and coordination between Primary Health Care Teams in the community and the PHCTs in prisons within the same geographical area by sharing ongoing training, multi-sector work teams and territory-based relations, thereby facilitating continuance in care and complete and integrated treatment of chronicity. The existing information systems in Primary Health Care and the shared clinical history in Catalonia are key factors for this follow up process. Support tools for clinical decision making shall also be shared, which shall contribute towards an increase in quality and clinical safety. These tools include electronic clinical practice guides, therapeutic guides, prescription alert systems, etc. This shall be an opportunity for Prison Health Care Teams to engage in teaching and research, which in turn shall have an indirect effect on improvements in health care quality and the training of professionals in this sector. The critical factor for success is the fact that a unique chronicity health care model shall be shared, where measures for health promotion prevention can be taken, along with multi-sector monitoring of pathologies and with health care information shared between professionals and levels throughout the patient's life, both in and out of the prison environment. PMID:26191790

  9. The self-help component of primary health care.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D

    1980-10-01

    The target of "health for all by 2000," to be achieved through primary health care, is discussed. The author states that the goal entails reorganization of health care and community participation at the local level. Self-help groups are proposed as an effective and efficient vehicle for participation by the people in their own health care, and the strong points of such groups, including emotional and psychological support, and orientation toward action and progress, are described. Another major feature is that participants become their own health care personnel, achieving some expertise in the management of their particular illness or disability. Clubs for hypertensives, wherein participants learn to monitor and control their blood pressure, are used as an example of the self-help group. The author suggests that self-help could be a basic component of primary health care, and contribute to "health for all." PMID:7444489

  10. Sex-related differences in access to care among patients with premature acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Roxanne; Humphries, Karin H.; Shimony, Avi; Bacon, Simon L.; Lavoie, Kim L.; Rabi, Doreen; Karp, Igor; Tsadok, Meytal Avgil; Pilote, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Background: Access to care may be implicated in disparities between men and women in death after acute coronary syndrome, especially among younger adults. We aimed to assess sex-related differences in access to care among patients with premature acute coronary syndrome and to identify clinical and gender-related determinants of access to care. Methods: We studied 1123 patients (18–55 yr) admitted to hospital for acute coronary syndrome and enrolled in the GENESIS-PRAXY cohort study. Outcome measures were door-to-electrocardiography, door-to-needle and door-to-balloon times, as well as proportions of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization, reperfusion or nonprimary percutaneous coronary intervention. We performed univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify clinical and gender-related determinants of timely procedures and use of invasive procedures. Results: Women were less likely than men to receive care within benchmark times for electrocardiography (≤ 10 min: 29% v. 38%, p = 0.02) or fibrinolysis (≤ 30 min: 32% v. 57%, p = 0.01). Women with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) were less likely than men to undergo reperfusion therapy (primary percutaneous coronary intervention or fibrinolysis) (83% v. 91%, p = 0.01), and women with non–ST-segment elevation MI or unstable angina were less likely to undergo nonprimary percutaneous coronary intervention (48% v. 66%, p < 0.001). Clinical determinants of poorer access to care included anxiety, increased number of risk factors and absence of chest pain. Gender-related determinants included feminine traits of personality and responsibility for housework. Interpretation: Among younger adults with acute coronary syndrome, women and men had different access to care. Moreover, fewer than half of men and women with ST-segment elevation MI received timely primary coronary intervention. Our results also highlight that men and women with no chest pain and those with anxiety

  11. Providing primary health care through integrated microfinance and health services in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Kimberley H; Leatherman, Sheila

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous burdens of communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality in middle-income countries. The poor are at particular risk, with lower access to health care and higher rates of avoidable mortality. Integrating health-related services with microfinance has been shown to improve health knowledge, behaviors, and access to appropriate health care. However, limited evidence is available on effects of fully integrating clinical health service delivery alongside microfinance services through large scale and sustained long-term programs. Using a conceptual model of health services access, we examine supply- and demand-side factors in a microfinance client population receiving integrated services. We conduct a case study using data from 2010 to 2012 of the design of a universal screening program and primary care services provided in conjunction with microfinance loans by Pro Mujer, a women's development organization in Latin America. The program operates in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru. We analyze descriptive reports and administrative data for measures related to improving access to primary health services and management of chronic diseases. We find provision of preventive care is substantial, with an average of 13% of Pro Mujer clients being screened for cervical cancer each year, 21% receiving breast exams, 16% having a blood glucose measurement, 39% receiving a blood pressure measurement, and 46% having their body mass index calculated. This population, with more than half of those screened being overweight or obese and 9% of those screened having elevated glucose measures, has major risk factors for diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease without intervention. The components of the Pro Mujer health program address four dimensions of healthcare access: geographic accessibility, availability, affordability, and acceptability. Significant progress has been made to meet basic

  12. Case finding for COPD in primary care: a qualitative study of the views of health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Shamil; Jordan, Rachel E; Fitzmaurice, David A; Adab, Peymane

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is common but largely underdiagnosed. Case-finding initiatives have been evaluated in primary care, but few studies have explored the views of service providers on implementing them in practice. Aim To explore the views of primary health care providers on case finding for COPD. Methods A total of 20 semi-structured interviews were conducted from March 2014 to September 2014 among general practitioners, nurses, and managers from practices participating in a large COPD case-finding trial based in primary care in the West Midlands, UK. Participants’ views were sought to explore perceived benefits, harms, barriers, and facilitators to implementing COPD case finding in practice. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using the framework method. Results Participants felt that case finding improves patient care but also acknowledged potential harms to providers (increase in workload) and to patients (overdiagnosis). Insufficient resources, poor knowledge of COPD, and limited access to diagnostic services were viewed as barriers to diagnosis, while provision of community respiratory services, including COPD specialist nurses, and support from secondary care were thought to be facilitators. Participants also expressed a need for more education on COPD for both patients and clinicians. Conclusion Care providers believe that early detection of COPD improves patient care but also has accompanying harms. Barriers to diagnosing COPD, such as insufficient expertise in primary care and limited access to diagnostic services in the community, should be explored and addressed. The knowledge and attitudes of the public about COPD and its symptoms should also be investigated to inform future education and awareness-raising strategies. PMID:26357469

  13. Was access to health care easy for immigrants in Spain? The perspectives of health personnel in Catalonia and Andalusia.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, María-Luisa; Vargas, Ingrid; Jaramillo, Daniel López; Porthé, Victoria; López-Fernández, Luis Andrés; Vargas, Hernán; Bosch, Lola; Hernández, Silvia S; Azarola, Ainhoa Ruiz

    2016-04-01

    Until April 2012, all Spanish citizens were entitled to health care and policies had been developed at national and regional level to remove potential barriers of access, however, evidence suggested problems of access for immigrants. In order to identify factors affecting immigrants' access to health care, we conducted a qualitative study based on individual interviews with healthcare managers (n=27) and professionals (n=65) in Catalonia and Andalusia, before the policy change that restricted access for some groups. A thematic analysis was carried out. Health professionals considered access to health care "easy" for immigrants and similar to access for autochthons in both regions. Clear barriers were identified to enter the health system (in obtaining the health card) and in using services, indicating a mismatch between the characteristics of services and those of immigrants. Results did not differ among regions, except for in Catalonia, where access to care was considered harder for users without a health card, due to the fees charged, and in general, because of the distance to primary health care in rural areas. In conclusion, despite the universal coverage granted by the Spanish healthcare system and developed health policies, a number of barriers in access emerged that would require implementing the existing policies. However, the measures taken in the context of the economic crisis are pointing in the opposite direction, towards maintaining or increasing barriers. PMID:26898401

  14. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care Access and Utilization Under the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Mortensen, Karoline; Ortega, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine racial and ethnic disparities in health care access and utilization after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) health insurance mandate was fully implemented in 2014. Research Design: Using the 2011–2014 National Health Interview Survey, we examine changes in health care access and utilization for the nonelderly US adult population. Multivariate linear probability models are estimated to adjust for demographic and sociodemographic factors. Results: The implementation of the ACA (year indicator 2014) is associated with significant reductions in the probabilities of being uninsured (coef=−0.03, P<0.001), delaying any necessary care (coef=−0.03, P<0.001), forgoing any necessary care (coef=−0.02, P<0.001), and a significant increase in the probability of having any physician visits (coef=0.02, P<0.001), compared with the reference year 2011. Interaction terms between the 2014 year indicator and race/ethnicity demonstrate that uninsured rates decreased more substantially among non-Latino African Americans (African Americans) (coef=−0.04, P<0.001) and Latinos (coef=−0.03, P<0.001) compared with non-Latino whites (whites). Latinos were less likely than whites to delay (coef=−0.02, P<0.001) or forgo (coef=−0.02, P<0.001) any necessary care and were more likely to have physician visits (coef=0.03, P<0.005) in 2014. The association between year indicator of 2014 and the probability of having any emergency department visits is not significant. Conclusions: Health care access and insurance coverage are major factors that contributed to racial and ethnic disparities before the ACA implementation. Our results demonstrate that racial and ethnic disparities in access have been reduced significantly during the initial years of the ACA implementation that expanded access and mandated that individuals obtain health insurance. PMID:26595227

  15. The Voices of Limited English Proficiency Latina Mothers on Pediatric Primary Care: Lessons for the Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Lisa Ross; Kieffer, Edith; Zickafoose, Joseph S.; DeMonner, Sonya; Valbuena, Felix; Davis, Matthew M.; Heisler, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to inform medical home implementation in practices serving limited English proficiency Latino families by exploring limited English proficiency Latina mothers’ experiences with, and expectations for, pediatric primary care. In partnership with a federally-qualified community health center in an urban Latino neighborhood, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 38 low-income Latina mothers. Eligible participants identified a pediatric primary care provider for their child and had at least one child 3 years old or younger, to increase the probability of frequent recent interactions with health care providers. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed through an iterative and collaborative process to identify participants’ satisfaction with and expectations for pediatric primary care. About half of the mothers interviewed were satisfied with their primary care experiences. Mothers suggested many ways to improve the quality of pediatric primary care for their children to better meet the needs of their families. These included: encouraging providers to invest more in their relationship with families, providing reliable same-day sick care, expanding hours, improving access to language services, and improving care coordination services. Limited English proficiency Latina mothers expect high-quality pediatric primary care consistent with the medical home model. Current efforts to improve primary care quality through application of the medical home model are thus relevant to this population, but should focus on the parent-provider relationship and timely access to care. Promoting this model among practices that serve limited English proficiency Latino families could improve engagement and satisfaction with primary care. PMID:22350630

  16. The Role of Emergency Medical Services in Geriatrics: Bridging the Gap between Primary and Acute Care.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Judah; McVey, Jennifer; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Caring for older adults is a major function of emergency medical services (EMS). Traditional EMS systems were designed to treat single acute conditions; this approach contrasts with best practices for the care of frail older adults. Care might be improved by the early identification of those who are frail and at highest risk for adverse outcomes. Paramedics are well positioned to play an important role via a more thorough evaluation of frailty (or vulnerability). These findings may inform both pre-hospital and subsequent emergency department (ED) based decisions. Innovative programs involving EMS, the ED, and primary care could reduce the workload on EDs while improving patient access to care, and ultimately patient outcomes. Some frail older adults will benefit from the resources and specialized knowledge provided by the ED, while others may be better helped in alternative ways, usually in coordination with primary care. Discerning between these groups is a challenge worthy of further inquiry. In either case, care should be timely, with a focus on identifying emergent or acute care needs, frailty evaluation, mobility assessments, identifying appropriate goals for treatment, promoting functional independence, and striving to have the patient return to their usual place of residence if this can be done safely. Paramedics are uniquely positioned to play a larger role in the care of our aging population. Improving paramedic education as it pertains to geriatrics is a critical next step. PMID:26282932

  17. Academic medicine: a key partner in strengthening the primary care infrastructure via teaching health centers.

    PubMed

    Rieselbach, Richard E; Crouse, Byron J; Neuhausen, Katherine; Nasca, Thomas J; Frohna, John G

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, a worsening shortage of primary care physicians, along with structural deficiencies in their training, threaten the primary care system that is essential to ensuring access to high-quality, cost-effective health care. Community health centers (CHCs) are an underused resource that could facilitate rapid expansion of the primary care workforce and simultaneously prepare trainees for 21st-century practice. The Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program, currently funded by the Affordable Care Act, uses CHCs as training sites for primary-care-focused graduate medical education (GME).The authors propose that the goals of the THCGME program could be amplified by fostering partnerships between CHCs and teaching hospitals (academic medical centers [AMCs]). AMCs would encourage their primary care residency programs to expand by establishing teaching health center (THC) tracks. Modifications to the current THCGME model, facilitated by formal CHC and academic medicine partnerships (CHAMPs), would address the primary care physician shortage, produce physicians prepared for 21st-century practice, expose trainees to interprofessional education in a multidisciplinary environment, and facilitate the rapid expansion of CHC capacity.To succeed, CHAMP THCs require a comprehensive consortium agreement designed to ensure equity between the community and academic partners; conforming with this agreement will provide the high-quality GME necessary to ensure residency accreditation. CHAMP THCs also require a federal mechanism to ensure stable, long-term funding. CHAMP THCs would develop in select CHCs that desire a partnership with AMCs and have capacity for providing a community-based setting for both GME and health services research. PMID:24128617

  18. Comparing and improving chronic illness primary care in Sweden and the USA.

    PubMed

    Øvretveit, John; Ramsay, Patricia; Shortell, Stephen M; Brommels, Mats

    2016-06-13

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify opportunities for improving primary care services for people with chronic illnesses by comparing how Sweden and US services use evidence-based practices (EBPs), including digital health technologies (DHTs). Design/methodology/approach - A national primary healthcare center (PHCC) heads surveys in 2012-2013 carried out in both countries in 2006. Findings - There are large variations between the two countries. The largest, regarding effective DHT use in primary care centers, were that few Swedish primary healthcare compared to US heads reported having reminders or prompts at the point of care (38 percent Sweden vs 84 percent USA), despite Sweden's established electronic medical records (EMR). Swedish heads also reported 30 percent fewer centers receiving laboratory results (67 percent Sweden vs 97 percent USA). Regarding following other EBPs, 70 percent of Swedish center heads reported their physicians had easy access to diabetic patient lists compared to 14 percent in the USA. Most Swedish PHCC heads (96 percent) said they offered same day appointment compared to 36 percent in equivalent US practices. Practical implications - There are opportunities for improvement based on significant differences in effective practices between the countries, which demonstrates to primary care leaders that their peers elsewhere potentially provide better care for people with chronic illnesses. Some improvements are under primary care center control and can be made quickly. There is evidence that people with chronic illnesses in these two countries are suffering unnecessarily owing to primary care staff failing to provide proven EBP, which would better meet patient needs. Public finance has been invested in DHT, which are not being used to their full potential. Originality/value - The study shows the gaps between current and potential proven effective EBPs for services to patients with chronic conditions. Findings suggest possible

  19. Primary Palliative Care for the General Internist: Integrating Goals of Care Discussions into the Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ahia, Chad L.; Blais, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary palliative care consists of the palliative care competencies required of all primary care clinicians. Included in these competencies is the ability to assist patients and their families in establishing appropriate goals of care. Goals of care help patients and their families understand the patient's illness and its trajectory and facilitate medical care decisions consistent with the patient's values and goals. General internists and family medicine physicians in primary care are central to getting patients to articulate their goals of care and to have these documented in the medical record. Case Report Here we present the case of a 71-year-old male patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, congestive heart failure, and newly diagnosed Alzheimer dementia to model pertinent end-of-life care communication and discuss practical tips on how to incorporate it into practice. Conclusion General internists and family medicine practitioners in primary care are central to eliciting patients' goals of care and achieving optimal end-of-life outcomes for their patients. PMID:25598737

  20. Optical coherence tomography for advanced screening in the primary care office

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Ryan L.; Jung, Woonggyu; Sayegh, Samir I.; McCormick, Daniel T.; Kim, Jeehyun; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has long been used as a diagnostic tool in the field of ophthalmology. The ability to observe microstructural changes in the tissues of the eye has proved very effective in diagnosing ocular disease. However, this technology has yet to be introduced into the primary care office, where indications of disease are first encountered. We have developed a portable, handheld imaging probe for use in the primary care setting and evaluated its tissue site accessibility, ability to observe diseased tissue, and screening capabilities in in vivo human patients, particularly for pathologies related to the eye, ear and skin. Various stages of diabetic retinopathy were investigated using the handheld probe and early-stage diabetic retinopathy was flagged as abnormal from the OCT images. At such early stages of disease, it is difficult to observe abnormalities with the limited tools that are currently available to primary care physicians. These results indicate that OCT shows promise to transform from being a diagnostic technology in the medical and surgical specialities to a screening technology in the primary care office and at the front-line of healthcare. In vivo cross-sectional images of four examples of common pathologies in humans encountered by a primary care physician. All images were taken using a novel handheld OCT imaging probe. (A) Human cornea after LASIK surgery. (B) Advanced diabetic retinopathy. (C) Tympanic membrane with accompanying biofilm. (D) Skin abscess showing layer separation and fluid-filled pockets. PMID:23606343

  1. Health and Beyond... Strategies for a Better India: Concept Paper on Primary Health Care in India

    PubMed Central

    Bhaumik, Soumyadeep

    2014-01-01

    Background: India is one of the fastest growing economies of the world, and is posed to overtake China in terms of being the most populous nation of the world. The very essential components of primary health care – promotion of food supply, proper nutrition, safe water and basic sanitation and provision for quality health information concerning the prevailing health problems – is largely ignored. Access to healthcare services, provision of essential medicines and scarcity of doctors are other bottlenecks in the primary health care scenario. Complete absence of evidence-based guidelines on clinical scenarios and treatment plans in the primary health care sector, together with overburdening of the secondary and tertiary care sectors, has substantially lowered the quality of care in the nation. Aim: To discuss a strategy for a better primary healthcare model. Methods: This is a concept paper with an exploratory view of various problems and a suggested strategy to counter it. Results: This concept paper suggests a triad of strategies (technology, accountability and ink-blot strategy) that can be adapted to various problems in the primary healthcare scenario. Discussion: The concept paper is a preliminary document on a suggested model that needs to be worked out on a broader basis across all stakeholders with operational definitions, standards of procedure and protocols finalised. PMID:25161962

  2. Verbal Communication among Alzheimer’s Disease Patients, their Caregivers, and Primary Care Physicians during Primary Care Office Visits

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Karen L.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Schulz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Objective Primary care visits of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) often involve communication among patients, family caregivers, and primary care physicians (PCPs). The objective of this study was to understand the nature of each individual’s verbal participation in these triadic interactions. Methods To define the verbal communication dynamics of AD care triads, we compared verbal participation (percent of total visit speech) by each participant in patient/caregiver/PCP triads. Twenty three triads were audio taped during a routine primary care visit. Rates of verbal participation were described and effects of patient cognitive status (MMSE score, verbal fluency) on verbal participation were assessed. Results PCP verbal participation was highest at 53% of total visit speech, followed by caregivers (31%) and patients (16%). Patient cognitive measures were related to patient and caregiver verbal participation, but not to PCP participation. Caregiver satisfaction with interpersonal treatment by PCP was positively related to caregiver’s own verbal participation. Conclusion Caregivers of AD patients and PCPs maintain active, coordinated verbal participation in primary care visits while patients participate less. Practice Implications Encouraging verbal participation by AD patients and their caregivers may increase the AD patient’s active role and caregiver satisfaction with primary care visits. PMID:19395224

  3. Efficiency of primary care in rural Burkina Faso. A two-stage DEA analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Providing health care services in Africa is hampered by severe scarcity of personnel, medical supplies and financial funds. Consequently, managers of health care institutions are called to measure and improve the efficiency of their facilities in order to provide the best possible services with their resources. However, very little is known about the efficiency of health care facilities in Africa and instruments of performance measurement are hardly applied in this context. Objective This study determines the relative efficiency of primary care facilities in Nouna, a rural health district in Burkina Faso. Furthermore, it analyses the factors influencing the efficiency of these institutions. Methodology We apply a two-stage Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) based on data from a comprehensive provider and household information system. In the first stage, the relative efficiency of each institution is calculated by a traditional DEA model. In the second stage, we identify the reasons for being inefficient by regression technique. Results The DEA projections suggest that inefficiency is mainly a result of poor utilization of health care facilities as they were either too big or the demand was too low. Regression results showed that distance is an important factor influencing the efficiency of a health care institution Conclusions Compared to the findings of existing one-stage DEA analyses of health facilities in Africa, the share of relatively efficient units is slightly higher. The difference might be explained by a rather homogenous structure of the primary care facilities in the Burkina Faso sample. The study also indicates that improving the accessibility of primary care facilities will have a major impact on the efficiency of these institutions. Thus, health decision-makers are called to overcome the demand-side barriers in accessing health care. PMID:22828358

  4. Incentive-Based Primary Care: Cost and Utilization Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Marcus J; Kadlec, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Context: In its fee-for-service funding model for primary care, British Columbia, Canada, introduced incentive payments to general practitioners as pay for performance for providing enhanced, guidelines-based care to patients with chronic conditions. Evaluation of the program was conducted at the health care system level. Objective: To examine the impact of the incentive payments on annual health care costs and hospital utilization patterns in British Columbia. Design: The study used Ministry of Health administrative data for Fiscal Year 2010–2011 for patients with diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and/or hypertension. In each disease group, cost and utilization were compared across patients who did, and did not, receive incentive-based care. Main Outcome Measures: Health care costs (eg, primary care, hospital) and utilization measures (eg, hospital days, readmissions). Results: After controlling for patients’ age, sex, service needs level, and continuity of care (defined as attachment to a general practice), the incentives reduced the net annual health care costs, in Canadian dollars, for patients with hypertension (by approximately Can$308 per patient), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (by Can$496), and congestive heart failure (by Can$96), but not diabetes (incentives cost about Can$148 more per patient). The incentives were also associated with fewer hospital days, fewer admissions and readmissions, and shorter lengths of hospital stays for all 4 groups. Conclusion: Although the available literature on pay for performance shows mixed results, we showed that the funding model used in British Columbia using incentive payments for primary care might reduce health care costs and hospital utilization. PMID:26263389

  5. Multimorbidity and Quality of Preventive Care in Swiss University Primary Care Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Sven; da Costa, Bruno R.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Weiler, Stefan; Zimmerli, Lukas; Frey, Peter; Cornuz, Jacques; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Battegay, Edouard; Kerr, Eve; Aujesky, Drahomir; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Background Caring for patients with multimorbidity is common for generalists, although such patients are often excluded from clinical trials, and thus such trials lack of generalizability. Data on the association between multimorbidity and preventive care are limited. We aimed to assess whether comorbidity number, severity and type were associated with preventive care among patients receiving care in Swiss University primary care settings. Methods We examined a retrospective cohort composed of a random sample of 1,002 patients aged 50–80 years attending four Swiss university primary care settings. Multimorbidity was defined according to the literature and the Charlson index. We assessed the quality of preventive care and cardiovascular preventive care with RAND’s Quality Assessment Tool indicators. Aggregate scores of quality of provided care were calculated by taking into account the number of eligible patients for each indicator. Results Participants (mean age 63.5 years, 44% women) had a mean of 2.6 (SD 1.9) comorbidities and 67.5% had 2 or more comorbidities. The mean Charlson index was 1.8 (SD 1.9). Overall, participants received 69% of recommended preventive care and 84% of cardiovascular preventive care. Quality of care was not associated with higher numbers of comorbidities, both for preventive care and for cardiovascular preventive care. Results were similar in analyses using the Charlson index and after adjusting for age, gender, occupation, center and number of visits. Some patients may receive less preventive care including those with dementia (47%) and those with schizophrenia (35%). Conclusions In Swiss university primary care settings, two thirds of patients had 2 or more comorbidities. The receipt of preventive and cardiovascular preventive care was not affected by comorbidity count or severity, although patients with certain comorbidities may receive lower levels of preventive care. PMID:24760077

  6. Busting the bureaucracy: lessons from research governance in primary care.

    PubMed

    Appleton, Jane; Caan, Woody; Cowley, Sarah; Kendall, Sally

    2007-02-01

    This paper provides a critical discussion of the research governance approval processes faced in a nationally-funded primary care health service survey. The study is investigating how a range of English primary care organisations are addressing child protection and safeguarding children responsibilities in the light of a wealth of policy directives following publication of the report of Lord Laming's inquiry into the death of Victoria Climbié in 2003. The principal investigator is a member of a local research ethics committee and has a good working knowledge of the Research Governance Framework. However, following multi-centre research ethics committee approval, a whole catalogue of difficulties emerged in gaining research governance approval for this study from primary care organisations. These challenges and our lessons for primary care are outlined in an organisational case study with the intention of generating debate around this fundamental stage in the research process. With the current restructuring of primary care, we believe the time is right to streamline research governance procedures. PMID:17330671

  7. Primary health care assessment tools: a literature review and metasynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fracolli, Lislaine Aparecida; Gomes, Maria Fernanda Pereira; Nabão, Fabiana Rodrigues Zequini; Santos, Mariana Souza; Cappellini, Verusca Kelly; de Almeida, Ana Cláudia Correa

    2014-12-01

    This study comprises a systematic review and metasynthesis of qualitative literature on national and international databases to identify the main tools used to assess Primary Health Care (PHC). A total of 3,048 results were returned for literature written in Portuguese, Spanish and English published between 1979 and 2013. Thirty-three articles/studies were selected after thorough reading and analysis. Eight of these studies addressed the use of one or more of the following validated PHC assessment tools: the WHO Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCET); the ADHD Questionnaire for Primary Care Providers (AQ-PCP); the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire (GPAQ), PACOTAPS (primary health care software); and the PCAT (Primary Care Assessment Tool). The study showed that the majority of these tools were used internationally. The PCAT and EUROPEP were used in Brazil and the most commonly used tool in this country was the PCAT. The results show that the use of research tools to assess PHC may assist in the creation of new proposals to improve family healthcare and that PCAT is the most adequate tool for this purpose. PMID:25388193

  8. [Indicators in primary care: reality or desire. SESPAS report 2012].

    PubMed

    Ichaso Hernández-Rubio, M A de los Santos; García Armesto, Sandra

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this article is two-fold: firstly, to illustrate international experiences of assessing primary care performance by using examples of both cross-country comparisons and national assessment efforts and, secondly, to describe the progress achieved to date in the articulation of the Spanish Primary Care Information System. The central role assigned to primary care in conceptual frameworks clashes with the severe limitations in the quality and availability of the data required to construct the indicators. The lack of systematic and standardized databases covering diagnosis, procedures and intermediate results in individual patients is endemic across countries. Filling this gap has become a priority in most countries, especially during the last decade. In Spain, the concept of the Primary Care Information System appeared in 2003 and the first data/results were published in 2006. Since then, distinct elements have been progressively incorporated with the involvement of the various autonomous regions in Spain. Currently, the system includes various aspects such as the population assigned, the available resources, a national catalogue of primary care centers, and activity. The next challenge in this work in progress is to build a database of clinical information. PMID:22152924

  9. Primary Care Endocrinology in the Adult Woman.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Celeste C; Zeytinoglu, Meltem

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders, and osteoporosis are endocrine conditions affecting a significant proportion of women presenting to the obstetrician-gynecologist. Obstetrician-gynecologists are often the first health-care providers that young women see in adulthood, and thus, have a critical opportunity to identify women at risk for gestational and overt diabetes and manage the condition in those who have developed it. The obstetrician-gynecologist should be aware of the appropriate therapeutic options and treatment goals (eg, hemoglobin A1c) for women with diabetes. Thyroid disorders often present with menstrual irregularities or infertility, can affect pregnancy outcomes, and contribute to cardiovascular and bone disorders as women age. Finally, osteoporosis and low bone mineral density affect a substantial proportion of older women and some younger women with risk factors for secondary osteoporosis. The morbidity and mortality of osteoporotic fractures is substantial. There are many lifestyle interventions and therapeutic options available for these conditions, and the gynecologist plays a key role in optimizing risk factor assessment, screening, and providing treatment when appropriate. PMID:27212095

  10. Multiple sclerosis: a primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Saguil, Aaron; Kane, Shawn; Farnell, Edwin

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common permanently disabling disorder of the central nervous system in young adults. Relapsing remitting MS is the most common type, and typical symptoms include sensory disturbances, Lhermitte sign, motor weakness, optic neuritis, impaired coordination, and fatigue. The course of disease is highly variable. The diagnosis is clinical and involves two neurologic deficits or objective attacks separated in time and space. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful in confirming the diagnosis and excluding mimics. Symptom exacerbations affect 85% of patients with MS. Corticosteroids are the treatment of choice for patients with acute, significant symptoms. Disease-modifying agents should be initiated early in the treatment of MS to forestall disease and preserve function. Two immunomodulatory agents (interferon beta and glatiramer) and five immunosuppressive agents (fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, natalizumab, and mitoxantrone) are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of MS, each with demonstrated effectiveness and unique adverse effect profiles. Symptom management constitutes a large part of care; neurogenic bladder and bowel, sexual dysfunction, pain, spasticity, and fatigue are best treated with a multidisciplinary approach to improve quality of life. PMID:25368924

  11. Common tongue conditions in primary care.

    PubMed

    Reamy, Brian V; Derby, Richard; Bunt, Christopher W

    2010-03-01

    Although easily examined, abnormalities of the tongue can present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma for physicians. Recognition and diagnosis require a thorough history, including onset and duration, antecedent symptoms, and tobacco and alcohol use. Examination of tongue morphology and a careful assessment for lymphadenopathy are also important. Geographic tongue, fissured tongue, and hairy tongue are the most common tongue problems and do not require treatment. Median rhomboid glossitis is usually associated with a candidal infection and responds to topical antifungals. Atrophic glossitis is often linked to an underlying nutritional deficiency of iron, folic acid, vitamin B12, riboflavin, or niacin and resolves with correction of the underlying condition. Oral hairy leukoplakia, which can be a marker for underlying immunodeficiency, is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus and is treated with oral antivirals. Tongue growths usually require biopsy to differentiate benign lesions (e.g., granular cell tumors, fibromas, lymphoepithelial cysts) from premalignant leukoplakia or squamous cell carcinoma. Burning mouth syndrome often involves the tongue and has responded to treatment with alpha-lipoic acid, clonazepam, and cognitive behavior therapy in controlled trials. Several trials have also confirmed the effectiveness of surgical division of tongue-tie (ankyloglossia), in the context of optimizing the success of breastfeeding compared with education alone. Tongue lesions of unclear etiology may require biopsy or referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, head and neck surgeon, or a dentist experienced in oral pathology. PMID:20187599

  12. Professional competencies and training needs of professional social workers in integrated behavioral health in primary care.

    PubMed

    Horevitz, Elizabeth; Manoleas, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act has led to a widespread movement to integrate behavioral health services into primary care settings. Integrated behavioral health (IBH) holds promise for treating mild to moderate psychiatric disorders in a manner that more fully addresses the biopsychosocial spectrum of needs of individuals and families in primary care, and for reducing disparities in accessing behavioral health care. For behavioral health practitioners, IBH requires a shift to a brief, outcome-driven, and team-based model of care. Despite the fact that social workers comprise the majority of behavioral health providers in IBH settings, little research has been done to assess the extent to which social workers are prepared for effective practice in fast-paced primary care. We conducted a survey of social workers (N = 84) in IBH settings to assess the following: (1) Key competency areas for social work practice in IBH settings and (2) Self-rated preparedness for effective practice in IBH settings. Online snowball sampling methods were used over a period of 1 month. Results indicate that social workers feel prepared for general practice in IBH settings, but would benefit from additional training in IBH-specific competency areas identified in the survey. Findings can help guide social work training to improve workforce preparedness for practice in IBH settings in the wake of health care reform. PMID:24028739

  13. Development and Validation of the Primary Care Team Dynamics Survey

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hummy; Chien, Alyna T; Fisher, Josephine; Martin, Julia; Peters, Antoinette S; Hacker, Karen; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Singer, Sara J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a survey instrument designed to measure team dynamics in primary care. Data Sources/Study Setting We studied 1,080 physician and nonphysician health care professionals working at 18 primary care practices participating in a learning collaborative aimed at improving team-based care. Study Design We developed a conceptual model and administered a cross-sectional survey addressing team dynamics, and we assessed reliability and discriminant validity of survey factors and the overall survey's goodness-of-fit using structural equation modeling. Data Collection We administered the survey between September 2012 and March 2013. Principal Findings Overall response rate was 68 percent (732 respondents). Results support a seven-factor model of team dynamics, suggesting that conditions for team effectiveness, shared understanding, and three supportive processes are associated with acting and feeling like a team and, in turn, perceived team effectiveness. This model demonstrated adequate fit (goodness-of-fit index: 0.91), scale reliability (Cronbach's alphas: 0.71–0.91), and discriminant validity (average factor correlations: 0.49). Conclusions It is possible to measure primary care team dynamics reliably using a 29-item survey. This survey may be used in ambulatory settings to study teamwork and explore the effect of efforts to improve team-based care. Future studies should demonstrate the importance of team dynamics for markers of team effectiveness (e.g., work satisfaction, care quality, clinical outcomes). PMID:25423886

  14. An assessment of primary care attributes from the perspective of female healthcare users1

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Eliane de Fátima Almeida; Sousa, Ana Inês; Primo, Cândida Caniçali; Leite, Francielie Marabotti Costa; Lima, Rita de Cassia Duarte; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Nóia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: this study sought to assess the quality of the Family Health Strategy (FHS) and investigated the association between primary care attributes (PCAs) and the sociodemographic characteristics of users. METHOD: a total of 215 female FHS users were interviewed for this descriptive and cross-sectional study. The Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCATool), Adult Edition was used, and the results were analyzed using Fisher's exact tests, Pearson's chi-square tests and logistic regressions. RESULTS: the lowest average score corresponded to the dimension "accessibility" (1.80), and the highest score corresponded to "access" (8.76). The results corresponding to the attributes "longitudinality", "coordination", "comprehensiveness", and "orientation" were not significant. No association was found between the participants' sociodemographic characteristics and the essential, derivative, and general attributes (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: several attributes must be improved across all the investigated services from the perspective of female FHS users. PMID:26155006

  15. Primary Care Quality among Different Health Care Structures in Tibet, China

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Aitian; Mao, Zongfu; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the primary care quality among different health care structures in Tibet, China. Methods. A self-administered questionnaire survey including Primary Care Assessment Tool-Tibetan version was used to obtain data from a total of 1386 patients aged over 18 years in the sampling sites in two prefectures in Tibet. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the association between health care structures and primary care quality while controlling for sociodemographic and health care characteristics. Results. The services provided by township health centers were more often used by a poor, less educated, and healthy population. Compared with prefecture (77.42) and county hospitals (82.01), township health centers achieved highest total score of primary care quality (86.64). Factors that were positively and significantly associated with higher total assessment scores included not receiving inpatient service in the past year, less frequent health care visits, good self-rated health status, lower education level, and marital status. Conclusions. This study showed that township health centers patients reported better primary care quality than patients visiting prefecture and county hospitals. Government health reforms should pay more attention to THC capacity building in Tibet, especially in the area of human resource development. PMID:25861619

  16. Utilizing clinical pharmacists to improve delivery of evidence-based care for depression and anxiety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Amanda; Kamo, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Access to mental health providers has become an increasingly common challenge for many patients with depression and anxiety disorders. Primary care providers often manage this gap in care and currently provide solo care without the assistance of other team members. In order to provide quality care that aligns with best practice, we developed a depression and anxiety disorder treatment pathway utilizing a multidisciplinary team based on each members' individual skill set, or skill-task alignment. The main change to treatment implemented by the pathway was the addition of a clinical pharmacist in the management of patient care. This pathway was trialed over five months targeting two adult primary care teams (approximately 34 physicians and Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners [ARNPs]) while the other five teams continued with current practice standards. Post-implementation metrics indicated that clinical pharmacists successfully contacted 55% (406 of 738) of patients started on medication or who had a medication changed. Of these patients reached, 82 (20%) had an intervention completed. In addition, all physician leaders on the planning team (n=6) stated the new pathway was well received and delivered positive feedback from team members. PMID:27493753

  17. Utilizing clinical pharmacists to improve delivery of evidence-based care for depression and anxiety in primary care.

    PubMed

    Locke, Amanda; Kamo, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Access to mental health providers has become an increasingly common challenge for many patients with depression and anxiety disorders. Primary care providers often manage this gap in care and currently provide solo care without the assistance of other team members. In order to provide quality care that aligns with best practice, we developed a depression and anxiety disorder treatment pathway utilizing a multidisciplinary team based on each members' individual skill set, or skill-task alignment. The main change to treatment implemented by the pathway was the addition of a clinical pharmacist in the management of patient care. This pathway was trialed over five months targeting two adult primary care teams (approximately 34 physicians and Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners [ARNPs]) while the other five teams continued with current practice standards. Post-implementation metrics indicated that clinical pharmacists successfully contacted 55% (406 of 738) of patients started on medication or who had a medication changed. Of these patients reached, 82 (20%) had an intervention completed. In addition, all physician leaders on the planning team (n=6) stated the new pathway was well received and delivered positive feedback from team members. PMID:27493753

  18. The strategy, cost, and progress of primary health care.

    PubMed

    Boland, R G; Young, M E

    1982-01-01

    Since the 1978 Alma-Alta International Conference on Primary Health Care, investments in primary health care projects throughout the world have been increasing. However, with the exception of China, no national projects have demonstrated the ability to provide longterm comprehensive primary health care in conditions of chronic proverty with local resources. Programs in China, Cuba, and Tanzania have achieved primary health care coverage for 100% of their populations. These countries have in common strong governments that have been able to implement radical changes in the health system. Individual freedoms in these societies have been restricted in favor of improved health. Programs in Nigeria, India, and Afghanistan have been less successful, although some progress has been made in projects using external funds, inspite of a strong committment by the governments. Efforts to reorganize the health care system have lacked needed political strength. Currently, these systems have resulted in less than complete coverage, without the prospect of attaining acceptable levels of infant mortality, life expectancy and net population growth. Economic, political, and cultural costs may be high as for example, national security or traditional practices are traded to achieve primary health care with 100% coverage. WHO has devised a global strategy which, when translated into operational policies will need to address several unresolved issues. These include recognizing that the goal of comprehensive primary health care may not be justified given the lack of progress to date and that effective, selective primary health care focused on nutrition, immunization, control of endemic diseases, and health education may be a more realistic goal; and that a system of international social security may be an effective means of assuring that the poorest countries are able to provide care. In addition, questions concerning continued funding of programs that can never be locally funded, the role

  19. The emerging primary care workforce: preliminary observations from the primary care team: learning from effective ambulatory practices project.

    PubMed

    Ladden, Maryjoan D; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Fishman, Nancy W; Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Parchman, Michael; Wagner, Edward H

    2013-12-01

    Many primary care practices are changing the roles played by the members of their health care teams. The purpose of this article is to describe some of these new roles, using the authors' preliminary observations from 25 site visits to high-performing primary care practices across the United States in 2012-2013. These sites visits, to practices using their workforce creatively, were part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded initiative, The Primary Care Team: Learning From Effective Ambulatory Practices.Examples of these new roles that the authors observed on their site visits include medical assistants reviewing patient records before visits to identify care gaps, ordering and administering immunizations using protocols, making outreach calls to patients, leading team huddles, and coaching patients to set self-management goals. The registered nurse role has evolved from an emphasis on triage to a focus on uncomplicated acute care, chronic care management, and hospital-to-home transitions. Behavioral health providers (licensed clinical social workers, psychologists, or licensed counselors) were colocated and integrated within practices and were readily available for immediate consults and brief interventions. Physicians have shifted from lone to shared responsibility for patient panels, with other team members empowered to provide significant portions of chronic and preventive care.An innovative team-based primary care workforce is emerging. Spreading and sustaining these changes will require training both health professionals and nonprofessionals in new ways. Without clinical experiences that model this new team-based care and role models who practice it, trainees will not be prepared to practice as a team. PMID:24128622

  20. Involving deprived communities in improving the quality of primary care services: does participatory action research work?

    PubMed Central

    Cawston, Peter G; Mercer, Stewart W; Barbour, Rosaline S

    2007-01-01

    Background Participation by communities in improving the quality of health services has become a feature of government policy in the United Kingdom. The a