Science.gov

Sample records for access server las

  1. The Live Access Server Scientific Product Generation Through Workflow Orchestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, S.; Calahan, J.; Li, J.; Manke, A.; O'Brien, K.; Schweitzer, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Live Access Server (LAS) is a well-established Web-application for display and analysis of geo-science data sets. The software, which can be downloaded and installed by anyone, gives data providers an easy way to establish services for their on-line data holdings, so their users can make plots; create and download data sub-sets; compare (difference) fields; and perform simple analyses. Now at version 7.0, LAS has been in operation since 1994. The current "Armstrong" release of LAS V7 consists of three components in a tiered architecture: user interface, workflow orchestration and Web Services. The LAS user interface (UI) communicates with the LAS Product Server via an XML protocol embedded in an HTTP "get" URL. Libraries (APIs) have been developed in Java, JavaScript and perl that can readily generate this URL. As a result of this flexibility it is common to find LAS user interfaces of radically different character, tailored to the nature of specific datasets or the mindset of specific users. When a request is received by the LAS Product Server (LPS -- the workflow orchestration component), business logic converts this request into a series of Web Service requests invoked via SOAP. These "back- end" Web services perform data access and generate products (visualizations, data subsets, analyses, etc.). LPS then packages these outputs into final products (typically HTML pages) via Jakarta Velocity templates for delivery to the end user. "Fine grained" data access is performed by back-end services that may utilize JDBC for data base access; the OPeNDAP "DAPPER" protocol; or (in principle) the OGC WFS protocol. Back-end visualization services are commonly legacy science applications wrapped in Java or Python (or perl) classes and deployed as Web Services accessible via SOAP. Ferret is the default visualization application used by LAS, though other applications such as Matlab, CDAT, and GrADS can also be used. Other back-end services may include generation of Google

  2. Video 2 of 4: Navigating the Live Access Server

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn how to navigate the MY NASA DATA website and server using the NASA Explorer Schools lesson, Analyzing Solar Energy Graphs. The video also shows you how to access, filter and manipulate the da...

  3. The Live Access Server - A Web-Services Framework for Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, R.; Hankin, S. C.; Callahan, J. S.; O'Brien, K.; Manke, A.; Wang, X. Y.

    2005-12-01

    The Live Access Server (LAS) is a general purpose Web-server for delivering services related to geo-science data sets. Data providers can use the LAS architecture to build custom Web interfaces to their scientific data. Users and client programs can then access the LAS site to search the provider's on-line data holdings, make plots of data, create sub-sets in a variety of formats, compare data sets and perform analysis on the data. The Live Access server software has continued to evolve by expanding the types of data (in-situ observations and curvilinear grids) it can serve and by taking advantages of advances in software infrastructure both in the earth sciences community (THREDDS, the GrADS Data Server, the Anagram framework and Java netCDF 2.2) and in the Web community (Java Servlet and the Apache Jakarta frameworks). This presentation will explore the continued evolution of the LAS architecture towards a complete Web-services-based framework. Additionally, we will discuss the redesign and modernization of some of the support tools available to LAS installers. Soon after the initial implementation, the LAS architecture was redesigned to separate the components that are responsible for the user interaction (the User Interface Server) from the components that are responsible for interacting with the data and producing the output requested by the user (the Product Server). During this redesign, we changed the implementation of the User Interface Server from CGI and JavaScript to the Java Servlet specification using Apache Jakarta Velocity backed by a database store for holding the user interface widget components. The User Interface server is now quite flexible and highly configurable because we modernized the components used for the implementation. Meanwhile, the implementation of the Product Server has remained a Perl CGI-based system. Clearly, the time has come to modernize this part of the LAS architecture. Before undertaking such a modernization it is

  4. EPICS Channel Access Server for LabVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, Alexander P.

    2016-10-01

    It can be challenging to interface National Instruments LabVIEW (http://www.ni.com/labview/) with EPICS (http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics/). Such interface is required when an instrument control program was developed in LabVIEW but it also has to be part of global control system. This is frequently useful in big accelerator facilities. The Channel Access Server is written in LabVIEW, so it works on any hardware/software platform where LabVIEW is available. It provides full server functionality, so any EPICS client can communicate with it.

  5. CORAL Server and CORAL Server Proxy: Scalable Access to Relational Databases from CORAL Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Valassi, A.; Bartoldus, R.; Kalkhof, A.; Salnikov, A.; Wache, M.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.

    2012-04-19

    The CORAL software is widely used at CERN by the LHC experiments to access the data they store on relational databases, such as Oracle. Two new components have recently been added to implement a model involving a middle tier 'CORAL server' deployed close to the database and a tree of 'CORAL server proxies', providing data caching and multiplexing, deployed close to the client. A first implementation of the two new components, released in the summer 2009, is now deployed in the ATLAS online system to read the data needed by the High Level Trigger, allowing the configuration of a farm of several thousand processes. This paper reviews the architecture of the software, its development status and its usage in ATLAS.

  6. mzServer: web-based programmatic access for mass spectrometry data analysis.

    PubMed

    Askenazi, Manor; Webber, James T; Marto, Jarrod A

    2011-05-01

    Continued progress toward systematic generation of large-scale and comprehensive proteomics data in the context of biomedical research will create project-level data sets of unprecedented size and ultimately overwhelm current practices for results validation that are based on distribution of native or surrogate mass spectrometry files. Moreover, the majority of proteomics studies leverage discovery-mode MS/MS analyses, rendering associated data-reduction efforts incomplete at best, and essentially ensuring future demand for re-analysis of data as new biological and technical information become available. Based on these observations, we propose to move beyond the sharing of interpreted spectra, or even the distribution of data at the individual file or project level, to a system much like that used in high-energy physics and astronomy, whereby raw data are made programmatically accessible at the site of acquisition. Toward this end we have developed a web-based server (mzServer), which exposes our common API (mzAPI) through very intuitive (RESTful) uniform resource locators (URL) and provides remote data access and analysis capabilities to the research community. Our prototype mzServer provides a model for lab-based and community-wide data access and analysis.

  7. Use Cases for Server Operators Extending the Open-Source Data-Access Protocol (DAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. H. R.; Fulker, D. W.; Blanton, B.; Businger, S.; Cornillon, P.

    2014-12-01

    On the premise that EarthCube must incorporate data-access (Web) services that are effective even in big-data contexts, we articulate three use cases where a common form of data reduction, namely array-subset selection, falls short. These cases—addressing climate-model downscaling for native-Hawaiian use, real-time storm-surge prediction for U.S. coastal areas, and analysis of sea-surface-temperature (SST) fronts using satellite imagery—share three traits: a) each requires access to vast and remote volumes of source data, though the end-user applications need much less (by orders of magnitude); b) the volume reduction cannot be realized solely via subsetting, especially if limited to subarray-specification via index constraints; c) each data-reduction need can be met by extending a well-used data-access protocol (DAP) to embrace new data-proximate (I.e., pre-retrieval) server functions; and d) the required new functions will be useful across many geoscience (EarthCube) domains. Reflecting OpenDAP progress on designing this extension—dubbed ODSIP for Open Data-Services Protocol, to be prototyped under an NSF/EarthCube award—this talk sketches the near-source operations needed for the three use-cases, highlighting potential for abstraction and thus broad applicability.

  8. A novel user authentication and key agreement protocol for accessing multi-medical server usable in TMIS.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Biswas, G P

    2015-03-01

    Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) makes an efficient and convenient connection between patient(s)/user(s) at home and doctor(s) at a clinical center. To ensure secure connection between the two entities (patient(s)/user(s), doctor(s)), user authentication is enormously important for the medical server. In this regard, many authentication protocols have been proposed in the literature only for accessing single medical server. In order to fix the drawbacks of the single medical server, we have primarily developed a novel architecture for accessing several medical services of the multi-medical server, where a user can directly communicate with the doctor of the medical server securely. Thereafter, we have developed a smart card based user authentication and key agreement security protocol usable for TMIS system using cryptographic one-way hash function. We have analyzed the security of our proposed authentication scheme through both formal and informal security analysis. Furthermore, we have simulated the proposed scheme for the formal security verification using the widely-accepted AVISPA (Automated Validation of Internet Security Protocols and Applications) tool and showed that the scheme is secure against the replay and man-in-the-middle attacks. The informal security analysis is also presented which confirms that the protocol has well security protection on the relevant security attacks. The security and performance comparison analysis confirm that the proposed protocol not only provides security protection on the above mentioned attacks, but it also achieves better complexities along with efficient login and password change phase.

  9. The Time Series Data Server (TSDS) for Standards-Compliant, Convenient, and Efficient Access to Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindholm, D. M.; Weigel, R. S.; Wilson, A.; Ware Dewolfe, A.

    2009-12-01

    Data analysis in the physical sciences is often plagued by the difficulty in acquiring the desired data. A great deal of work has been done in the area of metadata and data discovery, however, many such discoveries simply provide links that lead directly to a data file. Often these files are impractically large, containing more time samples or variables than desired, and are slow to access. Once these files are downloaded, format issues further complicate using the data. Some data servers have begun to address these problems by improving data virtualization and ease of use. However, these services often don't scale to large datasets. Also, the generic nature of the data models used by these servers, while providing greater flexibility, may complicate setting up such a service for data providers and limit sufficient semantics that would otherwise simplify use for clients, machine or human. The Time Series Data Server (TSDS) aims to address these problems within the limited, yet common, domain of time series data. With the simplifying assumption that all data products served are a function of time, the server can optimize for data access based on time subsets, a common use case. The server also supports requests for specific variables, which can be of type scalar, structure, or sequence. It also supports data types with higher level semantics, such as "spectrum." The TSDS is implemented using Java Servlet technology and can be dropped into any servlet container and customized for a data provider's needs. The interface is based on OPeNDAP (http://opendap.org) and conforms to the Data Acces Protocol (DAP) 2.0, a NASA standard (ESDS-RFC-004), which defines a simple HTTP request and response paradigm. Thus a TSDS server instance is a compliant OPeNDAP server that can be accessed by any OPeNDAP client or directly via RESTful web service requests. The TSDS reads the data that it serves into a common data model via the NetCDF Markup Language (NcML, http

  10. MO/DSD online information server and global information repository access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Diem; Ghaffarian, Kam; Hogie, Keith; Mackey, William

    1994-01-01

    Often in the past, standards and new technology information have been available only in hardcopy form, with reproduction and mailing costs proving rather significant. In light of NASA's current budget constraints and in the interest of efficient communications, the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD) New Technology and Data Standards Office recognizes the need for an online information server (OLIS). This server would allow: (1) dissemination of standards and new technology information throughout the Directorate more quickly and economically; (2) online browsing and retrieval of documents that have been published for and by MO&DSD; and (3) searching for current and past study activities on related topics within NASA before issuing a task. This paper explores a variety of available information servers and searching tools, their current capabilities and limitations, and the application of these tools to MO&DSD. Most importantly, the discussion focuses on the way this concept could be easily applied toward improving dissemination of standards and new technologies and improving documentation processes.

  11. BioExtract server--an integrated workflow-enabling system to access and analyze heterogeneous, distributed biomolecular data.

    PubMed

    Lushbough, Carol; Bergman, Michael K; Lawrence, Carolyn J; Jennewein, Doug; Brendel, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Many in silico investigations in bioinformatics require access to multiple, distributed data sources and analytic tools. The requisite data sources may include large public data repositories, community databases, and project databases for use in domain-specific research. Different data sources frequently utilize distinct query languages and return results in unique formats, and therefore researchers must either rely upon a small number of primary data sources or become familiar with multiple query languages and formats. Similarly, the associated analytic tools often require specific input formats and produce unique outputs which make it difficult to utilize the output from one tool as input to another. The BioExtract Server (http://bioextract.org) is a Web-based data integration application designed to consolidate, analyze, and serve data from heterogeneous biomolecular databases in the form of a mash-up. The basic operations of the BioExtract Server allow researchers, via their Web browsers, to specify data sources, flexibly query data sources, apply analytic tools, download result sets, and store query results for later reuse. As a researcher works with the system, their "steps" are saved in the background. At any time, these steps can be preserved long-term as a workflow simply by providing a workflow name and description.

  12. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, A.M.

    1997-12-09

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user`s local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service. 16 figs.

  13. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, A.M.

    1996-08-06

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user`s local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service. 16 figs.

  14. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1997-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  15. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1999-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  16. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1996-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  17. Real-Time Access to Altimetry and Operational Oceanography Products via OPeNDAP/LAS Technologies : the Example of Aviso, Mercator and Mersea Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudel, S.; Blanc, F.; Jolibois, T.; Rosmorduc, V.

    2004-12-01

    The Products and Services (P&S) department in the Space Oceanography Division at CLS is in charge of diffusing and promoting altimetry and operational oceanography data. P&S is so involved in Aviso satellite altimetry project, in Mercator ocean operational forecasting system, and in the European Godae /Mersea ocean portal. Aiming to a standardisation and a common vision and management of all these ocean data, these projects led to the implementation of several OPeNDAP/LAS Internet servers. OPeNDAP allows the user to extract via a client software (like IDL, Matlab or Ferret) the data he is interested in and only this data, avoiding him to download full information files. OPeNDAP allows to extract a geographic area, a period time, an oceanic variable, and an output format. LAS is an OPeNDAP data access web server whose special feature consists in the facility for unify in a single vision the access to multiple types of data from distributed data sources. The LAS can make requests to different remote OPeNDAP servers. This enables to make comparisons or statistics upon several different data types. Aviso is the CNES/CLS service which distributes altimetry products since 1993. The Aviso LAS distributes several Ssalto/Duacs altimetry products such as delayed and near-real time mean sea level anomaly, absolute dynamic topography, absolute geostrophic velocities, gridded significant wave height and gridded wind speed modulus. Mercator-Ocean is a French operational oceanography centre which distributes its products by several means among them LAS/OPeNDAP servers as part of Mercator Mersea-strand1 contribution. 3D ocean description (temperature, salinity, current and other oceanic variables) of the North Atlantic and Mediterranean are real-time available and weekly updated. LAS special feature consisting in the possibility of making requests to several remote data centres with same OPeNDAP configurations particularly fitted to Mersea strand-1 problematics. This European

  18. E-mail access to NetCME: implementation of server push paradigm.

    PubMed

    McEnery, K W; Grossman, J E

    1997-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a Continuing Medical Education project which utilizes e-mail delivery of HTML documents to facilitate participant access to case material. HTML e-mail is displayed directly within the e-mail reader of the Netscape browser. This system of proactive educational content delivery ensures simultaneous distribution to all participants. Although a more effective method of content distribution, the system preserves user confidentiality and maintains security. HTML e-mail is non-proprietary and could be integrated into existing Internet-based educational projects to facilitate user access.

  19. THttpServer class in ROOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, Joern; Linev, Sergey

    2015-12-01

    The new THttpServer class in ROOT implements HTTP server for arbitrary ROOT applications. It is based on Civetweb embeddable HTTP server and provides direct access to all objects registered for the server. Objects data could be provided in different formats: binary, XML, GIF/PNG, and JSON. A generic user interface for THttpServer has been implemented with HTML/JavaScript based on JavaScript ROOT development. With any modern web browser one could list, display, and monitor objects available on the server. THttpServer is used in Go4 framework to provide HTTP interface to the online analysis.

  20. Bringing it All Together: NODC's Geoportal Server as an Integration Tool for Interoperable Data Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, K. S.; Li, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The US National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) has implemented numerous interoperable data technologies in recent years to enhance the discovery, understanding, and use of the vast quantities of data in the NODC archives. These services include OPeNDAP's Hyrax server, Unidata's THREDDS Data Server (TDS), NOAA's Live Access Server (LAS), and most recently the ESRI ArcGIS Server. Combined, these technologies enable NODC to provide access to its data holdings and products through most of the commonly-used standardized web services like the Data Access Protocol (DAP) and the Open Geospatial Consortium suite of services such as the Web Mapping Service (WMS) and Web Coverage Service (WCS). Despite the strong demand for and use of these services, the acronym-rich environment of services can also result in confusion for producers of data to the NODC archives, for consumers of data from the NODC archives, and for the data stewards at the archives as well. The situation is further complicated by the fact that NODC also maintains some ad hoc services like WODselect, and that not all services can be applied to all of the tens of thousands of collections in the NODC archive; where once every data set was available only through FTP and HTTP servers, now many are also available from the LAS, TDS, Hyrax, and ArcGIS Server. To bring order and clarity to this potentially confusing collection of services, NODC deployed the Geoportal Server into its Archive Management System as an integrating technology that brings together its various data access, visualization, and discovery services as well as its overall metadata management workflows. While providing an enhanced web-based interface for more integrated human-to-machine discovery and access, the deployment also enables NODC for the first time to support a robust set of machine-to-machine discovery services such as the Catalog Service for the Web (CS/W), OpenSearch, and Search and Retrieval via URL (SRU) . This approach allows NODC

  1. BioExtract Server - An integrated workflow-enabling system to access and analyze heterogeneous, distributed biomolecular data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many computational workflows in bioinformatics require access to multiple, distributed data sources and analytic tools. The requisite data sources may include large public data repositories, community databases, and project databases for use in domain-specific research. Because different data source...

  2. Secure IRC Server

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia

    2003-08-25

    The IRCD is an IRC server that was originally distributed by the IRCD Hybrid developer team for use as a server in IRC message over the public Internet. By supporting the IRC protocol defined in the IRC RFC, IRCD allows the users to create and join channels for group or one-to-one text-based instant messaging. It stores information about channels (e.g., whether it is public, secret, or invite-only, the topic set, membership) and users (who is online and what channels they are members of). It receives messages for a specific user or channel and forwards these messages to the targeted destination. Since server-to-server communication is also supported, these targeted destinations may be connected to different IRC servers. Messages are exchanged over TCP connections that remain open between the client and the server. The IRCD is being used within the Pervasive Computing Collaboration Environment (PCCE) as the 'chat server' for message exchange over public and private channels. After an LBNLSecureMessaging(PCCE chat) client has been authenticated, the client connects to IRCD with its assigned nickname or 'nick.' The client can then create or join channels for group discussions or one-to-one conversations. These channels can have an initial mode of public or invite-only and the mode may be changed after creation. If a channel is public, any one online can join the discussion; if a channel is invite-only, users can only join if existing members of the channel explicity invite them. Users can be invited to any type of channel and users may be members of multiple channels simultaneously. For use with the PCCE environment, the IRCD application (which was written in C) was ported to Linux and has been tested and installed under Linux Redhat 7.2. The source code was also modified with SSL so that all messages exchanged over the network are encrypted. This modified IRC server also verifies with an authentication server that the client is who he or she claims to be and that

  3. WMS Server 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian; Wood, James F.

    2012-01-01

    This software is a simple, yet flexible server of raster map products, compliant with the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) 1.1.1 protocol. The server is a full implementation of the OGC WMS 1.1.1 as a fastCGI client and using Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) for data access. The server can operate in a proxy mode, where all or part of the WMS requests are done on a back server. The server has explicit support for a colocated tiled WMS, including rapid response of black (no-data) requests. It generates JPEG and PNG images, including 16-bit PNG. The GDAL back-end support allows great flexibility on the data access. The server is a port to a Linux/GDAL platform from the original IRIX/IL platform. It is simpler to configure and use, and depending on the storage format used, it has better performance than other available implementations. The WMS server 2.0 is a high-performance WMS implementation due to the fastCGI architecture. The use of GDAL data back end allows for great flexibility. The configuration is relatively simple, based on a single XML file. It provides scaling and cropping, as well as blending of multiple layers based on layer transparency.

  4. Volume server: A scalable high speed and high capacity magnetic tape archive architecture with concurrent multi-host access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybczynski, Fred

    1993-01-01

    A major challenge facing data processing centers today is data management. This includes the storage of large volumes of data and access to it. Current media storage for large data volumes is typically off line and frequently off site in warehouses. Access to data archived in this fashion can be subject to long delays, errors in media selection and retrieval, and even loss of data through misplacement or damage to the media. Similarly, designers responsible for architecting systems capable of continuous high-speed recording of large volumes of digital data are faced with the challenge of identifying technologies and configurations that meet their requirements. Past approaches have tended to evaluate the combination of the fastest tape recorders with the highest capacity tape media and then to compromise technology selection as a consequence of cost. This paper discusses an architecture that addresses both of these challenges and proposes a cost effective solution based on robots, high speed helical scan tape drives, and large-capacity media.

  5. Report: EPA Needs to Improve Physical Security at Its Offices in Las Vegas, Nevada

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #10-P-0059, February 3, 2010. EPA needs to improve physical security at its Las Vegas facilities. The Las Vegas Finance Center’s (LVFC’s) server room and other key areas are susceptible to unauthorized access by personnel not a part of LVFC.

  6. LASP Time Series Server (LaTiS): Overcoming Data Access Barriers via a Common Data Model in the Middle Tier (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindholm, D. M.; Wilson, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado has developed an Open Source, OPeNDAP compliant, Java Servlet based, RESTful web service to serve time series data. In addition to handling OPeNDAP style requests and returning standard responses, existing modules for alternate output formats can be reused or customized. It is also simple to reuse or customize modules to directly read various native data sources and even to perform some processing on the server. The server is built around a common data model based on the Unidata Common Data Model (CDM) which merges the NetCDF, HDF, and OPeNDAP data models. The server framework features a modular architecture that supports pluggable Readers, Writers, and Filters via the common interface to the data, enabling a workflow that reads data from their native form, performs some processing on the server, and presents the results to the client in its preferred form. The service is currently being used operationally to serve time series data for the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center (LISIRD, http://lasp.colorado.edu/lisird/) and as part of the Time Series Data Server (TSDS, http://tsds.net/). I will present the data model and how it enables reading, writing, and processing concerns to be separated into loosely coupled components. I will also share thoughts for evolving beyond the time series abstraction and providing a general purpose data service that can be orchestrated into larger workflows.

  7. Optimizing the NASA Technical Report Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maa, Ming-Hokng

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), a World Wide Web report distribution NASA technical publications service, is modified for performance enhancement, greater protocol support, and human interface optimization. Results include: Parallel database queries, significantly decreasing user access times by an average factor of 2.3; access from clients behind firewalls and/ or proxies which truncate excessively long Uniform Resource Locators (URLs); access to non-Wide Area Information Server (WAIS) databases and compatibility with the 239-50.3 protocol; and a streamlined user interface.

  8. Configuring Battalion File Servers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    AGM Server 2008 to load on a Dell D630 laptop. Though not ideal, it did allow the battalion staff and command group to share...and install the AGM Microsoft Server 2008. The final contract included two Dell R610 1U servers with RAID 5 comprising of three 1 TB hard drives...continuity in data between garrison and deployment environ- ments. With the usage of AGM Server operating systems, the Army is

  9. Surfing for Data: A Gathering Trend in Data Storage Is the Use of Web-Based Applications that Make It Easy for Authorized Users to Access Hosted Server Content with Just a Computing Device and Browser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the widespread availability of networks and the flexibility of Web browsers have shifted the industry from a client-server model to a Web-based one. In the client-server model of computing, clients run applications locally, with the servers managing storage, printing functions, and network traffic. Because every client is…

  10. Design of a distributed CORBA based image processing server.

    PubMed

    Giess, C; Evers, H; Heid, V; Meinzer, H P

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a distributed image processing server based on CORBA. Existing image processing tools were encapsulated in a common way with this server. Data exchange and conversion is done automatically inside the server, hiding these tasks from the user. The different image processing tools are visible as one large collection of algorithms and due to the use of CORBA are accessible via intra-/internet.

  11. SCRATCH: a protein structure and structural feature prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, J.; Randall, A. Z.; Sweredoski, M. J.; Baldi, P.

    2005-01-01

    SCRATCH is a server for predicting protein tertiary structure and structural features. The SCRATCH software suite includes predictors for secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, disordered regions, domains, disulfide bridges, single mutation stability, residue contacts versus average, individual residue contacts and tertiary structure. The user simply provides an amino acid sequence and selects the desired predictions, then submits to the server. Results are emailed to the user. The server is available at . PMID:15980571

  12. Recent improvements in the NASA technical report server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maa, Ming-Hokng; Nelson, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), a World Wide Web (WWW) report distribution service, has been modified to allow parallel database queries, significantly decreasing user access time by an average factor of 2.3, access from clients behind firewalls and/or proxies which truncate excessively long Uniform Resource Locators (URL's), access to non-Wide Area Information Server (WAIS) databases, and compatibility with the Z39-50.3 protocol.

  13. Triple-server blind quantum computation using entanglement swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Wu, Chunhui; Wen, Zhonghua

    2014-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client who does not have enough quantum resources or technologies to achieve quantum computation on a remote quantum server such that the client's input, output, and algorithm remain unknown to the server. Up to now, single- and double-server blind quantum computation have been considered. In this work, we propose a triple-server blind computation protocol where the client can delegate quantum computation to three quantum servers by the use of entanglement swapping. Furthermore, the three quantum servers can communicate with each other and the client is almost classical since one does not require any quantum computational power, quantum memory, and the ability to prepare any quantum states and only needs to be capable of getting access to quantum channels.

  14. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  15. GrayStarServer: Stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    GrayStarServer is a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a timescale of a few seconds.

  16. PEM public key certificate cache server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, T.

    1993-12-01

    Privacy Enhanced Mail (PEM) provides privacy enhancement services to users of Internet electronic mail. Confidentiality, authentication, message integrity, and non-repudiation of origin are provided by applying cryptographic measures to messages transferred between end systems by the Message Transfer System. PEM supports both symmetric and asymmetric key distribution. However, the prevalent implementation uses a public key certificate-based strategy, modeled after the X.509 directory authentication framework. This scheme provides an infrastructure compatible with X.509. According to RFC 1422, public key certificates can be stored in directory servers, transmitted via non-secure message exchanges, or distributed via other means. Directory services provide a specialized distributed database for OSI applications. The directory contains information about objects and then provides structured mechanisms for accessing that information. Since directory services are not widely available now, a good approach is to manage certificates in a centralized certificate server. This document describes the detailed design of a centralized certificate cache serve. This server manages a cache of certificates and a cache of Certificate Revocation Lists (CRL's) for PEM applications. PEMapplications contact the server to obtain/store certificates and CRL's. The server software is programmed in C and ELROS. To use this server, ISODE has to be configured and installed properly. The ISODE library 'libisode.a' has to be linked together with this library because ELROS uses the transport layer functions provided by 'libisode.a.' The X.500 DAP library that is included with the ELROS distribution has to be linked in also, since the server uses the DAP library functions to communicate with directory servers.

  17. Interfaces for Distributed Systems of Information Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahle, Brewster M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes five interfaces to remote, full-text databases accessed through distributed systems of servers. These are WAIStation for the Macintosh, XWAIS for X-Windows, GWAIS for Gnu-Emacs; SWAIS for dumb terminals, and Rosebud for the Macintosh. Sixteen illustrations provide examples of display screens. Problems and needed improvements are…

  18. HexServer: an FFT-based protein docking server powered by graphics processors.

    PubMed

    Macindoe, Gary; Mavridis, Lazaros; Venkatraman, Vishwesh; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Ritchie, David W

    2010-07-01

    HexServer (http://hexserver.loria.fr/) is the first Fourier transform (FFT)-based protein docking server to be powered by graphics processors. Using two graphics processors simultaneously, a typical 6D docking run takes approximately 15 s, which is up to two orders of magnitude faster than conventional FFT-based docking approaches using comparable resolution and scoring functions. The server requires two protein structures in PDB format to be uploaded, and it produces a ranked list of up to 1000 docking predictions. Knowledge of one or both protein binding sites may be used to focus and shorten the calculation when such information is available. The first 20 predictions may be accessed individually, and a single file of all predicted orientations may be downloaded as a compressed multi-model PDB file. The server is publicly available and does not require any registration or identification by the user.

  19. A Server-Based Mobile Coaching System

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Arnold; Kornfeind, Philipp; Preuschl, Emanuel; Bichler, Sebastian; Tampier, Martin; Novatchkov, Hristo

    2010-01-01

    A prototype system for monitoring, transmitting and processing performance data in sports for the purpose of providing feedback has been developed. During training, athletes are equipped with a mobile device and wireless sensors using the ANT protocol in order to acquire biomechanical, physiological and other sports specific parameters. The measured data is buffered locally and forwarded via the Internet to a server. The server provides experts (coaches, biomechanists, sports medicine specialists etc.) with remote data access, analysis and (partly automated) feedback routines. In this way, experts are able to analyze the athlete’s performance and return individual feedback messages from remote locations. PMID:22163490

  20. The NASA Technical Report Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Gottlich, Gretchen L.; Bianco, David J.; Paulson, Sharon S.; Binkley, Robert L.; Kellogg, Yvonne D.; Beaumont, Chris J.; Schmunk, Robert B.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Accomazzi, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 established NASA and charged it to "provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information concerning its activities and the results thereof." The search for innovative methods to distribute NASA's information lead a grass-roots team to create the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), which uses the World Wide Web and other popular Internet-based information systems as search engines. The NTRS is an inter-center effort which provides uniform access to various distributed publication servers residing on the Internet. Users have immediate desktop access to technical publications from NASA centers and institutes. The NTRS is comprised of several units, some constructed especially for inclusion in NTRS, and others that are existing NASA publication services that NTRS reuses. This paper presents the NTRS architecture, usage metrics, and the lessons learned while implementing and maintaining the service. The NTRS is largely constructed with freely available software running on existing hardware. NTRS builds upon existing hardware and software, and the resulting additional exposure for the body of literature contained ensures that NASA's institutional knowledge base will continue to receive the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination.

  1. Remote diagnosis server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deb, Somnath (Inventor); Ghoshal, Sudipto (Inventor); Malepati, Venkata N. (Inventor); Kleinman, David L. (Inventor); Cavanaugh, Kevin F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A network-based diagnosis server for monitoring and diagnosing a system, the server being remote from the system it is observing, comprises a sensor for generating signals indicative of a characteristic of a component of the system, a network-interfaced sensor agent coupled to the sensor for receiving signals therefrom, a broker module coupled to the network for sending signals to and receiving signals from the sensor agent, a handler application connected to the broker module for transmitting signals to and receiving signals therefrom, a reasoner application in communication with the handler application for processing, and responding to signals received from the handler application, wherein the sensor agent, broker module, handler application, and reasoner applications operate simultaneously relative to each other, such that the present invention diagnosis server performs continuous monitoring and diagnosing of said components of the system in real time. The diagnosis server is readily adaptable to various different systems.

  2. Remote Patron Validation: Posting a Proxy Server at the Digital Doorway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of remote access to library services focuses on proxy servers as a method for remote access, based on experiences at Saint Mary's University (Halifax). Topics include Internet protocol user validation; browser-directed proxies; server software proxies; vendor alternatives for validating remote users; and Internet security issues. (LRW)

  3. Data Access Tools And Services At The Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (GDAAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, L. B.; Eng, E.; Sweatman, P.

    2003-12-01

    As one of the largest providers of Earth Science data from the Earth Observing System, GDAAC provides the latest data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) data products via GDAAC's data pool (50TB of disk cache). In order to make this huge volume of data more accessible to the public and science communities, the GDAAC offers multiple data access tools and services: Open Source Project for Network Data Access Protocol (OPeNDAP), Grid Analysis and Display System (GrADS/DODS) (GDS), Live Access Server (LAS), OpenGIS Web Map Server (WMS) and Near Archive Data Mining (NADM). The objective is to assist users in retrieving electronically a smaller, usable portion of data for further analysis. The OPeNDAP server, formerly known as the Distributed Oceanographic Data System (DODS), allows the user to retrieve data without worrying about the data format. OPeNDAP is capable of server-side subsetting of HDF, HDF-EOS, netCDF, JGOFS, ASCII, DSP, FITS and binary data formats. The GrADS/DODS server is capable of serving the same data formats as OPeNDAP. GDS has an additional feature of server-side analysis. Users can analyze the data on the server there by decreasing the computational load on their client's system. The LAS is a flexible server that allows user to graphically visualize data on the fly, to request different file formats and to compare variables from distributed locations. Users of LAS have options to use other available graphics viewers such as IDL, Matlab or GrADS. WMS is based on the OPeNDAP for serving geospatial information. WMS supports OpenGIS protocol to provide data in GIS-friendly formats for analysis and visualization. NADM is another access to the GDAAC's data pool. NADM gives users the capability to use a browser to upload their C, FORTRAN or IDL algorithms, test the algorithms, and mine data in the data pool. With NADM, the GDAAC provides an

  4. Data Access Tools And Services At The Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (GDAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Long; Eng, Eunice; Sweatman, Paul

    2003-01-01

    As one of the largest providers of Earth Science data from the Earth Observing System, GDAAC provides the latest data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) data products via GDAAC's data pool (50TB of disk cache). In order to make this huge volume of data more accessible to the public and science communities, the GDAAC offers multiple data access tools and services: Open Source Project for Network Data Access Protocol (OPeNDAP), Grid Analysis and Display System (GrADS/DODS) (GDS), Live Access Server (LAS), OpenGlS Web Map Server (WMS) and Near Archive Data Mining (NADM). The objective is to assist users in retrieving electronically a smaller, usable portion of data for further analysis. The OPeNDAP server, formerly known as the Distributed Oceanographic Data System (DODS), allows the user to retrieve data without worrying about the data format. OPeNDAP is capable of server-side subsetting of HDF, HDF-EOS, netCDF, JGOFS, ASCII, DSP, FITS and binary data formats. The GrADS/DODS server is capable of serving the same data formats as OPeNDAP. GDS has an additional feature of server-side analysis. Users can analyze the data on the server there by decreasing the computational load on their client's system. The LAS is a flexible server that allows user to graphically visualize data on the fly, to request different file formats and to compare variables from distributed locations. Users of LAS have options to use other available graphics viewers such as IDL, Matlab or GrADS. WMS is based on the OPeNDAP for serving geospatial information. WMS supports OpenGlS protocol to provide data in GIs-friendly formats for analysis and visualization. NADM is another access to the GDAAC's data pool. NADM gives users the capability to use a browser to upload their C, FORTRAN or IDL algorithms, test the algorithms, and mine data in the data pool. With NADM, the GDAAC provides an

  5. Virtual venue management users manual : access grid toolkit documentation, version 2.3.

    SciTech Connect

    Judson, I. R.; Lefvert, S.; Olson, E.; Uram, T. D.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-10-24

    An Access Grid Venue Server provides access to individual Virtual Venues, virtual spaces where users can collaborate using the Access Grid Venue Client software. This manual describes the Venue Server component of the Access Grid Toolkit, version 2.3. Covered here are the basic operations of starting a venue server, modifying its configuration, and modifying the configuration of the individual venues.

  6. HDF-EOS Web Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Bane, Bob; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    A shell script has been written as a means of automatically making HDF-EOS-formatted data sets available via the World Wide Web. ("HDF-EOS" and variants thereof are defined in the first of the two immediately preceding articles.) The shell script chains together some software tools developed by the Data Usability Group at Goddard Space Flight Center to perform the following actions: Extract metadata in Object Definition Language (ODL) from an HDF-EOS file, Convert the metadata from ODL to Extensible Markup Language (XML), Reformat the XML metadata into human-readable Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Publish the HTML metadata and the original HDF-EOS file to a Web server and an Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol (OPeN-DAP) server computer, and Reformat the XML metadata and submit the resulting file to the EOS Clearinghouse, which is a Web-based metadata clearinghouse that facilitates searching for, and exchange of, Earth-Science data.

  7. Cybersecurity, massive data processing, community interaction, and other developments at WWW-based computational X-ray Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Sergey

    2013-03-01

    X-Ray Server (x-server.gmca.aps.anl.gov) is a WWW-based computational server for modeling of X-ray diffraction, reflection and scattering data. The modeling software operates directly on the server and can be accessed remotely either from web browsers or from user software. In the later case the server can be deployed as a software library or a data fitting engine. As the server recently surpassed the milestones of 15 years online and 1.5 million calculations, it accumulated a number of technical solutions that are discussed in this paper. The developed approaches to detecting physical model limits and user calculations failures, solutions to spam and firewall problems, ways to involve the community in replenishing databases and methods to teach users automated access to the server programs may be helpful for X-ray researchers interested in using the server or sharing their own software online.

  8. Intelligence Data Object Server (IDOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Doug J.; Barth, Stephen W.

    2002-07-01

    The Intelligence Data Object Server (IDOS) has been developed under the Air Force Research Laboratory Global Information Base Branch (AFRL/IFED) Global Awareness Virtual Testbed project to provide automated mechanisms for using Military Intelligence Data in modeling and simulation experiments. The IDOS software allows information from multiple data sources to be published in exercises using the High Level Architecture (HLA) or other object-oriented formats. IDOS uses the AFRL/IFEB Broadsword Gatekeeper for data source access. IDOS has been used in simulation-based acquisition experiments designed and carried out among distributed AFRL sites. This paper describes the IDOS architecture and capabilities including the use of the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) to provide a common representation for data objects, and application of IDOS to visualization of Intelligence Information.

  9. Dali server update

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Liisa; Laakso, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    The Dali server (http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali) is a network service for comparing protein structures in 3D. In favourable cases, comparing 3D structures may reveal biologically interesting similarities that are not detectable by comparing sequences. The Dali server has been running in various places for over 20 years and is used routinely by crystallographers on newly solved structures. The latest update of the server provides enhanced analytics for the study of sequence and structure conservation. The server performs three types of structure comparisons: (i) Protein Data Bank (PDB) search compares one query structure against those in the PDB and returns a list of similar structures; (ii) pairwise comparison compares one query structure against a list of structures specified by the user; and (iii) all against all structure comparison returns a structural similarity matrix, a dendrogram and a multidimensional scaling projection of a set of structures specified by the user. Structural superimpositions are visualized using the Java-free WebGL viewer PV. The structural alignment view is enhanced by sequence similarity searches against Uniprot. The combined structure-sequence alignment information is compressed to a stack of aligned sequence logos. In the stack, each structure is structurally aligned to the query protein and represented by a sequence logo. PMID:27131377

  10. Dali server update.

    PubMed

    Holm, Liisa; Laakso, Laura M

    2016-07-08

    The Dali server (http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali) is a network service for comparing protein structures in 3D. In favourable cases, comparing 3D structures may reveal biologically interesting similarities that are not detectable by comparing sequences. The Dali server has been running in various places for over 20 years and is used routinely by crystallographers on newly solved structures. The latest update of the server provides enhanced analytics for the study of sequence and structure conservation. The server performs three types of structure comparisons: (i) Protein Data Bank (PDB) search compares one query structure against those in the PDB and returns a list of similar structures; (ii) pairwise comparison compares one query structure against a list of structures specified by the user; and (iii) all against all structure comparison returns a structural similarity matrix, a dendrogram and a multidimensional scaling projection of a set of structures specified by the user. Structural superimpositions are visualized using the Java-free WebGL viewer PV. The structural alignment view is enhanced by sequence similarity searches against Uniprot. The combined structure-sequence alignment information is compressed to a stack of aligned sequence logos. In the stack, each structure is structurally aligned to the query protein and represented by a sequence logo.

  11. The HydroServer Platform for Sharing Hydrologic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Schreuders, K.; Maidment, D. R.; Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) is an internet based system that supports sharing of hydrologic data. HIS consists of databases connected using the Internet through Web services, as well as software for data discovery, access, and publication. The HIS system architecture is comprised of servers for publishing and sharing data, a centralized catalog to support cross server data discovery and a desktop client to access and analyze data. This paper focuses on HydroServer, the component developed for sharing and publishing space-time hydrologic datasets. A HydroServer is a computer server that contains a collection of databases, web services, tools, and software applications that allow data producers to store, publish, and manage the data from an experimental watershed or project site. HydroServer is designed to permit publication of data as part of a distributed national/international system, while still locally managing access to the data. We describe the HydroServer architecture and software stack, including tools for managing and publishing time series data for fixed point monitoring sites as well as spatially distributed, GIS datasets that describe a particular study area, watershed, or region. HydroServer adopts a standards based approach to data publication, relying on accepted and emerging standards for data storage and transfer. CUAHSI developed HydroServer code is free with community code development managed through the codeplex open source code repository and development system. There is some reliance on widely used commercial software for general purpose and standard data publication capability. The sharing of data in a common format is one way to stimulate interdisciplinary research and collaboration. It is anticipated that the growing, distributed network of HydroServers will facilitate cross-site comparisons and large scale studies that synthesize information from diverse settings, making the network as a whole greater than the sum of its

  12. Creating a GIS data server on the World Wide Web: The GISST example

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, P.J.; Evers, T.K.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to facilitate user access to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data, the GIS and Computer Modeling Group from the Computational Physics and Engineering Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (TN), has developed a World Wide Web server named GISST. The server incorporates a highly interactive and dynamic forms-based interface to browse and download a variety of GIS data types. This paper describes the server`s design considerations, development, resulting implementation and future enhancements.

  13. Linguistic competence/language access services (LAS) in end-of-life and palliative care: a social work leadership imperative.

    PubMed

    Le Sage, Margie Rodríguez

    2006-01-01

    Despite the mandated and moral imperative to advance linguistic competence in all health care contexts, leadership that addresses this area of practice and study in end-of-life and palliative care is not readily obvious. Because social work is ideally suited to lead efforts to advance linguistically-accessible end-of-life and palliative care, social workers are encouraged to assume the challenge. This article focuses on topics that are elementary yet central to discussions on language diversity and leadership initiatives to advance language access in end-of-life and palliative care contexts: importance and function of language, extent of language diversity, inequity related to language diversity, mandates and standards related to language access, and approaches and competencies that contribute positively to language access.

  14. Remote Sensing Data Analytics for Planetary Science with PlanetServer/EarthServer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Angelo Pio; Figuera, Ramiro Marco; Flahaut, Jessica; Martinot, Melissa; Misev, Dimitar; Baumann, Peter; Pham Huu, Bang; Besse, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Planetary Science datasets, beyond the change in the last two decades from physical volumes to internet-accessible archives, still face the problem of large-scale processing and analytics (e.g. Rossi et al., 2014, Gaddis and Hare, 2015). PlanetServer, the Planetary Science Data Service of the EC-funded EarthServer-2 project (#654367) tackles the planetary Big Data analytics problem with an array database approach (Baumann et al., 2014). It is developed to serve a large amount of calibrated, map-projected planetary data online, mainly through Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) (e.g. Rossi et al., 2014; Oosthoek et al., 2013; Cantini et al., 2014). The focus of the H2020 evolution of PlanetServer is still on complex multidimensional data, particularly hyperspectral imaging and topographic cubes and imagery. In addition to hyperspectral and topographic from Mars (Rossi et al., 2014), the use of WCPS is applied to diverse datasets on the Moon, as well as Mercury. Other Solar System Bodies are going to be progressively available. Derived parameters such as summary products and indices can be produced through WCPS queries, as well as derived imagery colour combination products, dynamically generated and accessed also through OGC Web Coverage Service (WCS). Scientific questions translated into queries can be posed to a large number of individual coverages (data products), locally, regionally or globally. The new PlanetServer system uses the the Open Source Nasa WorldWind (e.g. Hogan, 2011) virtual globe as visualisation engine, and the array database Rasdaman Community Edition as core server component. Analytical tools and client components of relevance for multiple communities and disciplines are shared across service such as the Earth Observation and Marine Data Services of EarthServer. The Planetary Science Data Service of EarthServer is accessible on http://planetserver.eu. All its code base is going to be available on GitHub, on

  15. A Predictive Performance Model to Evaluate the Contention Cost in Application Servers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiping; Gorton, Ian )

    2002-12-04

    In multi-tier enterprise systems, application servers are key components that implement business logic and provide application services. To support a large number of simultaneous accesses from clients over the Internet and intranet, most application servers use replication and multi-threading to handle concurrent requests. While multiple processes and multiple threads enhance the processing bandwidth of servers, they also increase the contention for resources in application servers. This paper investigates this issue empirically based on a middleware benchmark. A cost model is proposed to estimate the overall performance of application servers, including the contention overhead. This model is then used to determine the optimal degree of the concurrency of application servers for a specific client load. A case study based on CORBA is presented to validate our model and demonstrate its application.

  16. A Web Server for MACCS Magnetometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG5-3719 was provided to Augsburg College to support the development of a web server for the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS), a two-dimensional array of fluxgate magnetometers located at cusp latitudes in Arctic Canada. MACCS was developed as part of the National Science Foundation's GEM (Geospace Environment Modeling) Program, which was designed in part to complement NASA's Global Geospace Science programs during the decade of the 1990s. This report describes the successful use of these grant funds to support a working web page that provides both daily plots and file access to any user accessing the worldwide web. The MACCS home page can be accessed at http://space.augsburg.edu/space/MaccsHome.html.

  17. The SDSS data archive server

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Archive Server (DAS) provides public access to data files produced by the SDSS data reduction pipeline. This article discusses challenges in public distribution of data of this volume and complexity, and how the project addressed them. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)1 is an astronomical survey of covering roughly one quarter of the night sky. It contains images of this area, a catalog of almost 300 million objects detected in those images, and spectra of more than a million of these objects. The catalog of objects includes a variety of data on each object. These data include not only basic information but also fit parameters for a variety of models, classifications by sophisticated object classification algorithms, statistical parameters, and more. If the survey contains the spectrum of an object, the catalog includes a variety of other parameters derived from its spectrum. Data processing and catalog generation, described more completely in the SDSS Early Data Release2 paper, consists of several stages: collection of imaging data, processing of imaging data, selection of spectroscopic targets from catalogs generated from the imaging data, collection of spectroscopic data, processing of spectroscopic data, and loading of processed data into a database. Each of these stages is itself a complex process. For example, the software that processes the imaging data determines and removes some instrumental signatures in the raw images to create 'corrected frames', models the point spread function, models and removes the sky background, detects objects, measures object positions, measures the radial profile and other morphological parameters for each object, measures the brightness of each object using a variety of methods, classifies the objects, calibrates the brightness measurements against survey standards, and produces a variety of quality assurance plots and diagnostic tables. The complexity of the spectroscopic data

  18. Server-side Filtering and Aggregation within a Distributed Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currey, J. C.; Bartle, A.

    2015-12-01

    Intercalibration, validation, and data mining use cases require more efficient access to the massive volumes of observation data distributed across multiple agency data centers. The traditional paradigm of downloading large volumes of data to a centralized server or desktop computer for analysis is no longer viable. More analysis should be performed within the host data centers using server-side functions. Many comparative analysis tasks require far less than 1% of the available observation data. The Multi-Instrument Intercalibration (MIIC) Framework provides web services to find, match, filter, and aggregate multi-instrument observation data. Matching measurements from separate spacecraft in time, location, wavelength, and viewing geometry is a difficult task especially when data are distributed across multiple agency data centers. Event prediction services identify near coincident measurements with matched viewing geometries near orbit crossings using complex orbit propagation and spherical geometry calculations. The number and duration of event opportunities depend on orbit inclinations, altitude differences, and requested viewing conditions (e.g., day/night). Event observation information is passed to remote server-side functions to retrieve matched data. Data may be gridded, spatially convolved onto instantaneous field-of-views, or spectrally resampled or convolved. Narrowband instruments are routinely compared to hyperspectal instruments such as AIRS and CRIS using relative spectral response (RSR) functions. Spectral convolution within server-side functions significantly reduces the amount of hyperspectral data needed by the client. This combination of intelligent selection and server-side processing significantly reduces network traffic and data to process on local servers. OPeNDAP is a mature networking middleware already deployed at many of the Earth science data centers. Custom OPeNDAP server-side functions that provide filtering, histogram analysis (1D

  19. A client/server approach to telemedicine.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, B. J.; Torok, K. E.; Kelly, L. M.; Ewing, D. J.; Andrews, L. T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Medical College of Ohio's efforts in developing a client/server telemedicine system. Telemedicine vastly improves the ability of a medical center physician or specialist to interactively consult with a physician at a remote health care facility. The patient receives attention more quickly, he and his family do not need to travel long distances to obtain specialists' services, and the primary care physician can be involved in diagnosis and developing a treatment program [1, 2]. Telemedicine consultations are designed to improve access to health services in underserved urban and rural communities and reduce isolation of rural practitioners [3]. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8563396

  20. PDS: A Performance Database Server

    DOE PAGES

    Berry, Michael W.; Dongarra, Jack J.; Larose, Brian H.; ...

    1994-01-01

    The process of gathering, archiving, and distributing computer benchmark data is a cumbersome task usually performed by computer users and vendors with little coordination. Most important, there is no publicly available central depository of performance data for all ranges of machines from personal computers to supercomputers. We present an Internet-accessible performance database server (PDS) that can be used to extract current benchmark data and literature. As an extension to the X-Windows-based user interface (Xnetlib) to the Netlib archival system, PDS provides an on-line catalog of public domain computer benchmarks such as the LINPACK benchmark, Perfect benchmarks, and the NAS parallelmore » benchmarks. PDS does not reformat or present the benchmark data in any way that conflicts with the original methodology of any particular benchmark; it is thereby devoid of any subjective interpretations of machine performance. We believe that all branches (research laboratories, academia, and industry) of the general computing community can use this facility to archive performance metrics and make them readily available to the public. PDS can provide a more manageable approach to the development and support of a large dynamic database of published performance metrics.« less

  1. NEOS server 4.0 administrative guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, E. D.

    2001-07-13

    The NEOS Server 4.0 provides a general Internet-based client/server as a link between users and software applications. The administrative guide covers the fundamental principals behind the operation of the NEOS Server, installation and trouble-shooting of the Server software, and implementation details of potential interest to a NEOS Server administrator. The guide also discusses making new software applications available through the Server, including areas of concern to remote solver administrators such as maintaining security, providing usage instructions, and enforcing reasonable restrictions on jobs. The administrative guide is intended both as an introduction to the NEOS Server and as a reference for use when running the Server.

  2. Design of Accelerator Online Simulator Server Using Structured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Guobao; Chu, Chungming; Wu, Juhao; Kraimer, Martin; /Argonne

    2012-07-06

    Model based control plays an important role for a modern accelerator during beam commissioning, beam study, and even daily operation. With a realistic model, beam behaviour can be predicted and therefore effectively controlled. The approach used by most current high level application environments is to use a built-in simulation engine and feed a realistic model into that simulation engine. Instead of this traditional monolithic structure, a new approach using a client-server architecture is under development. An on-line simulator server is accessed via network accessible structured data. With this approach, a user can easily access multiple simulation codes. This paper describes the design, implementation, and current status of PVData, which defines the structured data, and PVAccess, which provides network access to the structured data.

  3. Client-Side Image Maps: Achieving Accessibility and Section 508 Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, William; Jarvis, Moana

    2004-01-01

    Image maps are a means of making a picture "clickable", so that different portions of the image can be hyperlinked to different URLS. There are two basic types of image maps: server-side and client-side. Besides requiring access to a CGI on the server, server-side image maps are undesirable from the standpoint of accessibility--creating…

  4. [Design and development of a secure DICOM-Network Attached Server].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hidenobu; Omatsu, Masahiko; Higuchi, Ko; Umeda, Tokuo

    2006-04-20

    It is not easy to connect a Web-based server with an existing DICOM server, and using a Web-based server on the Internet has risks. In this study, we designed and developed a secure DICOM-Network Attached Server (DICOM-NAS) through which the DICOM server in a hospital LAN was connected to the Internet. After receiving a client's image export request, the DICOM-NAS sent it to the DICOM server using the DICOM protocol. The server then provided DICOM images to the DICOM-NAS, which transferred them to the client, using HTTP. The DICOM-NAS plays an important role between the DICOM protocol and HTTP, and stores the requested images only temporarily. The DICOM server keeps all of the original DICOM images. If an unauthorized user attempts to access the DICOM-NAS, medical images cannot be accessed because images are not stored in the DICOM-NAS. Furthermore, the DICOM-NAS has features related to reporting and MPR. Therefore, the DICOM-NAS does not require a large storage capacity, but can greatly improve information security.

  5. Server-Controlled Identity-Based Authenticated Key Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hua; Mu, Yi; Zhang, Xiyong; Li, Zhoujun

    We present a threshold identity-based authenticated key exchange protocol that can be applied to an authenticated server-controlled gateway-user key exchange. The objective is to allow a user and a gateway to establish a shared session key with the permission of the back-end servers, while the back-end servers cannot obtain any information about the established session key. Our protocol has potential applications in strong access control of confidential resources. In particular, our protocol possesses the semantic security and demonstrates several highly-desirable security properties such as key privacy and transparency. We prove the security of the protocol based on the Bilinear Diffie-Hellman assumption in the random oracle model.

  6. RNAiFold: a web server for RNA inverse folding and molecular design.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter; Dotu, Ivan

    2013-07-01

    Synthetic biology and nanotechnology are poised to make revolutionary contributions to the 21st century. In this article, we describe a new web server to support in silico RNA molecular design. Given an input target RNA secondary structure, together with optional constraints, such as requiring GC-content to lie within a certain range, requiring the number of strong (GC), weak (AU) and wobble (GU) base pairs to lie in a certain range, the RNAiFold web server determines one or more RNA sequences, whose minimum free-energy secondary structure is the target structure. RNAiFold provides access to two servers: RNA-CPdesign, which applies constraint programming, and RNA-LNSdesign, which applies the large neighborhood search heuristic; hence, it is suitable for larger input structures. Both servers can also solve the RNA inverse hybridization problem, i.e. given a representation of the desired hybridization structure, RNAiFold returns two sequences, whose minimum free-energy hybridization is the input target structure. The web server is publicly accessible at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold, which provides access to two specialized servers: RNA-CPdesign and RNA-LNSdesign. Source code for the underlying algorithms, implemented in COMET and supported on linux, can be downloaded at the server website.

  7. Advancing the Power and Utility of Server-Side Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulker, Dave; Gallagher, James

    2016-01-01

    During the upcoming Summer 2016 meeting of the ESIP Federation (July 19-22), OpenDAP will hold a Developers and Users Workshop. While a broad set of topics will be covered, a key focus is capitalizing on recent EOSDIS-sponsored advances in Hyrax, OPeNDAPs own software for server-side realization of the DAP2 and DAP4 protocols. These Hyrax advances are as important to data users as to data providers, and the workshop will include hands-on experiences of value to both. Specifically, a balanced set of presentations and hands-on tutorials will address advances in1.server installation,2.server configuration,3.Hyrax aggregation capabilities,4.support for data-access from clients that are HTTP-based, JSON-based or OGC-compliant (especially WCS and WMS),5.support for DAP4,6.use and extension of server-side computational capabilities, and7.several performance-affecting matters.Topics 2 through 7 will be relevant to data consumers, data providers andnotably, due to the open-source nature of all OPeNDAP softwareto developers wishing to extend Hyrax, to build compatible clients and servers, andor to employ Hyrax as middleware that enables interoperability across a variety of end-user and source-data contexts. A session for contributed talks will elaborate the topics listed above and embrace additional ones.

  8. Design of SIP transformation server for efficient media negotiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Sangheon; Paik, Eun Kyoung; Choi, Yanghee

    2001-07-01

    Voice over IP (VoIP) is one of the advanced services supported by the next generation mobile communication. VoIP should support various media formats and terminals existing together. This heterogeneous environment may prevent diverse users from establishing VoIP sessions among them. To solve the problem an efficient media negotiation mechanism is required. In this paper, we propose the efficient media negotiation architecture using the transformation server and the Intelligent Location Server (ILS). The transformation server is an extended Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) proxy server. It can modify an unacceptable session INVITE message into an acceptable one using the ILS. The ILS is a directory server based on the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) that keeps userí*s location information and available media information. The proposed architecture can eliminate an unnecessary response and re-INVITE messages of the standard SIP architecture. It takes only 1.5 round trip times to negotiate two different media types while the standard media negotiation mechanism takes 2.5 round trip times. The extra processing time in message handling is negligible in comparison to the reduced round trip time. The experimental results show that the session setup time in the proposed architecture is less than the setup time in the standard SIP. These results verify that the proposed media negotiation mechanism is more efficient in solving diversity problems.

  9. APPRIS WebServer and WebServices.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Carro, Angel; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-07-01

    This paper introduces the APPRIS WebServer (http://appris.bioinfo.cnio.es) and WebServices (http://apprisws.bioinfo.cnio.es). Both the web servers and the web services are based around the APPRIS Database, a database that presently houses annotations of splice isoforms for five different vertebrate genomes. The APPRIS WebServer and WebServices provide access to the computational methods implemented in the APPRIS Database, while the APPRIS WebServices also allows retrieval of the annotations. The APPRIS WebServer and WebServices annotate splice isoforms with protein structural and functional features, and with data from cross-species alignments. In addition they can use the annotations of structure, function and conservation to select a single reference isoform for each protein-coding gene (the principal protein isoform). APPRIS principal isoforms have been shown to agree overwhelmingly with the main protein isoform detected in proteomics experiments. The APPRIS WebServer allows for the annotation of splice isoforms for individual genes, and provides a range of visual representations and tools to allow researchers to identify the likely effect of splicing events. The APPRIS WebServices permit users to generate annotations automatically in high throughput mode and to interrogate the annotations in the APPRIS Database. The APPRIS WebServices have been implemented using REST architecture to be flexible, modular and automatic.

  10. TJ-II data retrieving by means of a client/server model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, J.; Sánchez, E.; Crémy, C.; Portas, A.; Dulya, C. M.; Nilsson, J.

    1999-01-01

    The database of the TJ-II flexible heliac is centralized in a Unix server. This computer also commands the on-line processes related to data acquisition during TJ-II discharges: programming of measurement systems, connectivity with control systems, data visualization, and computations. The server has to provide access to the data so that signal analysis can be performed by local users or even from remote hosts. Data retrieving is accomplished by means of a client/server architecture in which two data servers are permanently running in the background of the Unix computer. One of them serves data requests from local clients and the other one sends data to remote clients. The communication protocol in both cases has been developed by using TCP/IP and Berkeley sockets. The client part consists of a set of routines (FORTRAN and C callable), which, in a transparent way, provide connectivity with the servers. This structure allows access to TJ-II data exactly in the same way from any computer, hiding not only specific aspects of the database, but hardware architecture of the server computer as well. In addition, the remote access makes it possible to distribute computations and to reduce the load on the Unix server from analysis and visualization tasks. At present, this software is running in four different environments: the Unix server itself, various types of Unix workstations, a CRAY J90 and a CRAY T3E. Finally, due to the fact that visualization is essential for TJ-II data analysis, a powerful and a very flexible visualization tool has been developed. It is a point and click application based on X Window/Motif. Data access is carried out through the client/server processes mentioned above and the software runs in the client computer.

  11. Web server for priority ordered multimedia services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet; Godavari, Rakesh K.; Vetnes, Vermund

    2001-10-01

    In this work, our aim is to provide finer priority levels in the design of a general-purpose Web multimedia server with provisions of the CM services. The type of services provided include reading/writing a web page, downloading/uploading an audio/video stream, navigating the Web through browsing, and interactive video teleconferencing. The selected priority encoding levels for such operations follow the order of admin read/write, hot page CM and Web multicasting, CM read, Web read, CM write and Web write. Hot pages are the most requested CM streams (e.g., the newest movies, video clips, and HDTV channels) and Web pages (e.g., portal pages of the commercial Internet search engines). Maintaining a list of these hot Web pages and CM streams in a content addressable buffer enables a server to multicast hot streams with lower latency and higher system throughput. Cold Web pages and CM streams are treated as regular Web and CM requests. Interactive CM operations such as pause (P), resume (R), fast-forward (FF), and rewind (RW) have to be executed without allocation of extra resources. The proposed multimedia server model is a part of the distributed network with load balancing schedulers. The SM is connected to an integrated disk scheduler (IDS), which supervises an allocated disk manager. The IDS follows the same priority handling as the SM, and implements a SCAN disk-scheduling method for an improved disk access and a higher throughput. Different disks are used for the Web and CM services in order to meet the QoS requirements of CM services. The IDS ouput is forwarded to an Integrated Transmission Scheduler (ITS). The ITS creates a priority ordered buffering of the retrieved Web pages and CM data streams that are fed into an auto regressive moving average (ARMA) based traffic shaping circuitry before being transmitted through the network.

  12. ModelTest Server: a web-based tool for the statistical selection of models of nucleotide substitution online.

    PubMed

    Posada, David

    2006-07-01

    ModelTest server is a web-based application for the selection of models of nucleotide substitution using the program ModelTest. The server takes as input a text file with likelihood scores for the set of candidate models. Models can be selected with hierarchical likelihood ratio tests, or with the Akaike or Bayesian information criteria. The output includes several statistics for the assessment of model selection uncertainty, for model averaging or to estimate the relative importance of model parameters. The server can be accessed at http://darwin.uvigo.es/software/modeltest_server.html.

  13. Opportunities for the Mashup of Heterogenous Data Server via Semantic Web Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschel, Bernd; Seelus, Christoph; Neher, Günther; Iyemori, Toshihiko; Koyama, Yukinobu; Yatagai, Akiyo; Murayama, Yasuhiro; King, Todd; Hughes, John; Fung, Shing; Galkin, Ivan; Hapgood, Michael; Belehaki, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Opportunities for the Mashup of Heterogenous Data Server via Semantic Web Technology European Union ESPAS, Japanese IUGONET and GFZ ISDC data server are developed for the ingestion, archiving and distributing of geo and space science domain data. Main parts of the data -managed by the mentioned data server- are related to near earth-space and geomagnetic field data. A smart mashup of the data server would allow a seamless browse and access to data and related context information. However the achievement of a high level of interoperability is a challenge because the data server are based on different data models and software frameworks. This paper is focused on the latest experiments and results for the mashup of the data server using the semantic Web approach. Besides the mashup of domain and terminological ontologies, especially the options to connect data managed by relational databases using D2R server and SPARQL technology will be addressed. A successful realization of the data server mashup will not only have a positive impact to the data users of the specific scientific domain but also to related projects, such as e.g. the development of a new interoperable version of NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) or ICUS's World Data System alliance. ESPAS data server: https://www.espas-fp7.eu/portal/ IUGONET data server: http://search.iugonet.org/iugonet/ GFZ ISDC data server (semantic Web based prototype): http://rz-vm30.gfz-potsdam.de/drupal-7.9/ NASA PDS: http://pds.nasa.gov ICSU-WDS: https://www.icsu-wds.org

  14. Design and development of a secure DICOM-Network Attached Server.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hidenobu; Omatsu, Masahiko; Higuchi, Ko; Umeda, Tokuo

    2006-03-01

    It is not easy to connect a web-based server with an existing DICOM server, and using a web-based server on the INTERNET has risks. In this study, we designed and developed the secure DICOM-Network Attached Server (DICOM-NAS) through which the DICOM server in a hospital-Local Area Network (LAN) was connected to the INTERNET. After receiving a Client's image export request, the DICOM-NAS sent it to the DICOM server with DICOM protocol. The server then provided DICOM images to the DICOM-NAS, which transferred them to the Client using HTTP. The DICOM-NAS plays an important role between DICOM protocol and HTTP, and only temporarily stores the requested images. The DICOM server keeps all of the original DICOM images. When unwanted outsiders attempt to get into the DICOM-NAS, they cannot access any medical images because these images are not stored in the DICOM-NAS. Therefore, the DICOM-NAS does not require large storage, but can greatly improve information security.

  15. One Server Fits All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2006-01-01

    The benefits of deploying a communications system that runs over the Internet Protocol are well documented. Sending voice over the Internet, a process commonly known as VoIP, has been shown to save money on long distance calls, make voice mail more accessible, and enable users to answer their phones from anywhere. The technology also makes adding…

  16. Generic OPC UA Server Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiel, Piotr P.; Farnham, Benjamin; Filimonov, Viatcheslav; Schlenker, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a new approach for generic design and efficient development of OPC UA servers. Development starts with creation of a design file, in XML format, describing an object-oriented information model of the target system or device. Using this model, the framework generates an executable OPC UA server application, which exposes the per-design OPC UA address space, without the developer writing a single line of code. Furthermore, the framework generates skeleton code into which the developer adds the necessary logic for integration to the target system or device. This approach allows both developers unfamiliar with the OPC UA standard, and advanced OPC UA developers, to create servers for the systems they are experts in while greatly reducing design and development effort as compared to developments based purely on COTS OPC UA toolkits. Higher level software may further benefit from the explicit OPC UA server model by using the XML design description as the basis for generating client connectivity configuration and server data representation. Moreover, having the XML design description at hand facilitates automatic generation of validation tools. In this contribution, the concept and implementation of this framework is detailed along with examples of actual production-level usage in the detector control system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN and beyond.

  17. Fault-tolerant PACS server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.; Zhou, Michael Z.; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, X. C.; Mogel, Greg T.

    2002-05-01

    Failure of a PACS archive server could cripple an entire PACS operation. Last year we demonstrated that it was possible to design a fault-tolerant (FT) server with 99.999% uptime. The FT design was based on a triple modular redundancy with a simple majority vote to automatically detect and mask a faulty module. The purpose of this presentation is to report on its continuous developments in integrating with external mass storage devices, and to delineate laboratory failover experiments. An FT PACS Simulator with generic PACS software has been used in the experiment. To simulate a PACS clinical operation, image examinations are transmitted continuously from the modality simulator to the DICOM gateway and then to the FT PACS server and workstations. The hardware failures in network, FT server module, disk, RAID, and DLT are manually induced to observe the failover recovery of the FT PACS to resume its normal data flow. We then test and evaluate the FT PACS server in its reliability, functionality, and performance.

  18. The web server of IBM's Bioinformatics and Pattern Discovery group.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tien; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Parida, Laxmi; Platt, Daniel; Shibuya, Tetsuo

    2003-07-01

    We herein present and discuss the services and content which are available on the web server of IBM's Bioinformatics and Pattern Discovery group. The server is operational around the clock and provides access to a variety of methods that have been published by the group's members and collaborators. The available tools correspond to applications ranging from the discovery of patterns in streams of events and the computation of multiple sequence alignments, to the discovery of genes in nucleic acid sequences and the interactive annotation of amino acid sequences. Additionally, annotations for more than 70 archaeal, bacterial, eukaryotic and viral genomes are available on-line and can be searched interactively. The tools and code bundles can be accessed beginning at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/Tspd.html whereas the genomics annotations are available at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/Annotations/.

  19. Identifying and Analyzing Web Server Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Christian; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.; Frincke, Deborah A.; Komisarczuk, Peter; Muschevici, Radu; Welch, Ian D.

    2008-08-29

    Abstract: Client honeypots can be used to identify malicious web servers that attack web browsers and push malware to client machines. Merely recording network traffic is insufficient to perform comprehensive forensic analyses of such attacks. Custom tools are required to access and analyze network protocol data. Moreover, specialized methods are required to perform a behavioral analysis of an attack, which helps determine exactly what transpired on the attacked system. This paper proposes a record/replay mechanism that enables forensic investigators to extract application data from recorded network streams and allows applications to interact with this data in order to conduct behavioral analyses. Implementations for the HTTP and DNS protocols are presented and their utility in network forensic investigations is demonstrated.

  20. Earth science big data at users' fingertips: the EarthServer Science Gateway Mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Roberto; Bruno, Riccardo; Calanducci, Antonio; Fargetta, Marco; Pappalardo, Marco; Rundo, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The EarthServer project (www.earthserver.eu), funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Program, aims at establishing open access and ad-hoc analytics on extreme-size Earth Science data, based on and extending leading-edge Array Database technology. The core idea is to use database query languages as client/server interface to achieve barrier-free "mix & match" access to multi-source, any-size, multi-dimensional space-time data -- in short: "Big Earth Data Analytics" - based on the open standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Coverage Processing Service (OGC WCPS) and the W3C XQuery. EarthServer combines both, thereby achieving a tight data/metadata integration. Further, the rasdaman Array Database System (www.rasdaman.com) is extended with further space-time coverage data types. On server side, highly effective optimizations - such as parallel and distributed query processing - ensure scalability to Exabyte volumes. In this contribution we will report on the EarthServer Science Gateway Mobile, an app for both iOS and Android-based devices that allows users to seamlessly access some of the EarthServer applications using SAML-based federated authentication and fine-grained authorisation mechanisms.

  1. Parallel Computing Using Web Servers and "Servlets".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Alfred; Bloor, Chris; Choi, Y. K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes parallel computing and presents inexpensive ways to implement a virtual parallel computer with multiple Web servers. Highlights include performance measurement of parallel systems; models for using Java and intranet technology including single server, multiple clients and multiple servers, single client; and a comparison of CGI (common…

  2. CCTOP: a Consensus Constrained TOPology prediction web server.

    PubMed

    Dobson, László; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2015-07-01

    The Consensus Constrained TOPology prediction (CCTOP; http://cctop.enzim.ttk.mta.hu) server is a web-based application providing transmembrane topology prediction. In addition to utilizing 10 different state-of-the-art topology prediction methods, the CCTOP server incorporates topology information from existing experimental and computational sources available in the PDBTM, TOPDB and TOPDOM databases using the probabilistic framework of hidden Markov model. The server provides the option to precede the topology prediction with signal peptide prediction and transmembrane-globular protein discrimination. The initial result can be recalculated by (de)selecting any of the prediction methods or mapped experiments or by adding user specified constraints. CCTOP showed superior performance to existing approaches. The reliability of each prediction is also calculated, which correlates with the accuracy of the per protein topology prediction. The prediction results and the collected experimental information are visualized on the CCTOP home page and can be downloaded in XML format. Programmable access of the CCTOP server is also available, and an example of client-side script is provided.

  3. Hybrid metrology implementation: server approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Carmen; Timoney, Padraig; Vaid, Alok; Elia, Alex; Kang, Charles; Bozdog, Cornel; Yellai, Naren; Grubner, Eyal; Ikegami, Toru; Ikeno, Masahiko

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid metrology (HM) is the practice of combining measurements from multiple toolset types in order to enable or improve metrology for advanced structures. HM is implemented in two phases: Phase-1 includes readiness of the infrastructure to transfer processed data from the first toolset to the second. Phase-2 infrastructure allows simultaneous transfer and optimization of raw data between toolsets such as spectra, images, traces - co-optimization. We discuss the extension of Phase-1 to include direct high-bandwidth communication between toolsets using a hybrid server, enabling seamless fab deployment and further laying the groundwork for Phase-2 high volume manufacturing (HVM) implementation. An example of the communication protocol shows the information that can be used by the hybrid server, differentiating its capabilities from that of a host-based approach. We demonstrate qualification and production implementation of the hybrid server approach using CD-SEM and OCD toolsets for complex 20nm and 14nm applications. Finally we discuss the roadmap for Phase-2 HM implementation through use of the hybrid server.

  4. High-Performance Tiled WMS and KML Web Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2007-01-01

    This software is an Apache 2.0 module implementing a high-performance map server to support interactive map viewers and virtual planet client software. It can be used in applications that require access to very-high-resolution geolocated images, such as GIS, virtual planet applications, and flight simulators. It serves Web Map Service (WMS) requests that comply with a given request grid from an existing tile dataset. It also generates the KML super-overlay configuration files required to access the WMS image tiles.

  5. Remote Data Access with IDL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A tool based on IDL (Interactive Data Language) and DAP (Data Access Protocol) has been developed for user-friendly remote data access. A difficulty for many NASA researchers using IDL is that often the data to analyze are located remotely and are too large to transfer for local analysis. Researchers have developed a protocol for accessing remote data, DAP, which is used for both SOHO and STEREO data sets. Server-side side analysis via IDL routine is available through DAP.

  6. The SAMGrid database server component: its upgraded infrastructure and future development path

    SciTech Connect

    Loebel-Carpenter, L.; White, S.; Baranovski, A.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; Burgon-Lyon, M.; St. Denis, R.; Belforte, S.; Kerzel, U.; Bartsch, V.; Leslie, M.; /Oxford U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Texas Tech.

    2004-12-01

    The SAMGrid Database Server encapsulates several important services, such as accessing file metadata and replica catalog, keeping track of the processing information, as well as providing the runtime support for SAMGrid station services. Recent deployment of the SAMGrid system for CDF has resulted in unification of the database schema used by CDF and D0, and the complexity of changes required for the unified metadata catalog has warranted a complete redesign of the DB Server. We describe here the architecture and features of the new server. In particular, we discuss the new CORBA infrastructure that utilizes python wrapper classes around IDL structs and exceptions. Such infrastructure allows us to use the same code on both server and client sides, which in turn results in significantly improved code maintainability and easier development. We also discuss future integration of the new server with an SBIR II project which is directed toward allowing the DB Server to access distributed databases, implemented in different DB systems and possibly using different schema.

  7. A distributed clients/distributed servers model for STARCAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirenne, B.; Albrecht, M. A.; Durand, D.; Gaudet, S.

    1992-01-01

    STARCAT, the Space Telescope ARchive and CATalogue user interface has been along for a number of years already. During this time it has been enhanced and augmented in a number of different fields. This time, we would like to dwell on a new capability allowing geographically distributed user interfaces to connect to geographically distributed data servers. This new concept permits users anywhere on the internet running STARCAT on their local hardware to access e.g., whichever of the 3 existing HST archive sites is available, or get information on the CFHT archive through a transparent connection to the CADC in BC or to get the La Silla weather by connecting to the ESO database in Munich during the same session. Similarly PreView (or quick look) images and spectra will also flow directly to the user from wherever it is available. Moving towards an 'X'-based STARCAT is another goal being pursued: a graphic/image server and a help/doc server are currently being added to it. They should further enhance the user independence and access transparency.

  8. Mining the SDSS SkyServer SQL queries log

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Vitor M.; Santos, Rafael; Raddick, Jordan; Thakar, Ani

    2016-05-01

    SkyServer, the Internet portal for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) astronomic catalog, provides a set of tools that allows data access for astronomers and scientific education. One of SkyServer data access interfaces allows users to enter ad-hoc SQL statements to query the catalog. SkyServer also presents some template queries that can be used as basis for more complex queries. This interface has logged over 330 million queries submitted since 2001. It is expected that analysis of this data can be used to investigate usage patterns, identify potential new classes of queries, find similar queries, etc. and to shed some light on how users interact with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data and how scientists have adopted the new paradigm of e-Science, which could in turn lead to enhancements on the user interfaces and experience in general. In this paper we review some approaches to SQL query mining, apply the traditional techniques used in the literature and present lessons learned, namely, that the general text mining approach for feature extraction and clustering does not seem to be adequate for this type of data, and, most importantly, we find that this type of analysis can result in very different queries being clustered together.

  9. Federated healthcare record server--the Synapses paradigm.

    PubMed

    Grimson, W; Berry, D; Grimson, J; Stephens, G; Felton, E; Given, P; O'Moore, R

    1998-01-01

    The delivery of healthcare relies on the sharing of patient information between those who are providing for the care of the patient and this information is increasingly being expressed in terms of a 'record'. Further, it is desirable that these records are available in electronic form as Electronic HealthCare Records. As it is likely that patient records or parts of records will be stored in many different information systems and in the form of disparate record architectures, uniform access to patient records would be problematic. This paper presents an overview of the Synapses computing environment in which a Federated Healthcare Record Server provides uniform access to patient information stored in connected heterogeneous autonomous information systems and other Synapses servers. The Synapses record architecture is based on the architecture proposed by the Technical Committee 251 of the European Committee for Standardisation and the interfaces to the Synapses server are specified in the ISO standard Interface Definition Language. Synapses is a pan-European project involving a number of hospitals, software companies, universities and research institutes and is partly funded by the EU Health Telematics Programme. The overview is described in terms of the Open Distributed Processing Reference Model.

  10. SciServer Compute brings Analysis to Big Data in the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddick, Jordan; Medvedev, Dmitry; Lemson, Gerard; Souter, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    accessing a range of datasets and showing the data flow between storage and compute components.Demos, documentation, and more information can be found at www.sciserver.org.SciServer is funded by the National Science Foundation Award ACI-1261715.

  11. Rankprop: a web server for protein remote homology detection

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Iain; Weston, Jason; Leslie, Christina; Noble, William Stafford

    2009-01-01

    Summary: We present a large-scale implementation of the Rankprop protein homology ranking algorithm in the form of an openly accessible web server. We use the NRDB40 PSI-BLAST all-versus-all protein similarity network of 1.1 million proteins to construct the graph for the Rankprop algorithm, whereas previously, results were only reported for a database of 108 000 proteins. We also describe two algorithmic improvements to the original algorithm, including propagation from multiple homologs of the query and better normalization of ranking scores, that lead to higher accuracy and to scores with a probabilistic interpretation. Availability: The Rankprop web server and source code are available at http://rankprop.gs.washington.edu Contact: iain@nec-labs.com; noble@gs.washington.edu PMID:18990723

  12. Parmodel: a web server for automated comparative modeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Uchôa, Hugo Brandão; Jorge, Guilherme Eberhart; Freitas Da Silveira, Nelson José; Camera, João Carlos; Canduri, Fernanda; De Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2004-12-24

    Parmodel is a web server for automated comparative modeling and evaluation of protein structures. The aim of this tool is to help inexperienced users to perform modeling, assessment, visualization, and optimization of protein models as well as crystallographers to evaluate structures solved experimentally. It is subdivided in four modules: Parmodel Modeling, Parmodel Assessment, Parmodel Visualization, and Parmodel Optimization. The main module is the Parmodel Modeling that allows the building of several models for a same protein in a reduced time, through the distribution of modeling processes on a Beowulf cluster. Parmodel automates and integrates the main softwares used in comparative modeling as MODELLER, Whatcheck, Procheck, Raster3D, Molscript, and Gromacs. This web server is freely accessible at .

  13. The NASA Technical Report Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, M. L.; Gottlich, G. L.; Bianco, D. J.; Paulson, S. S.; Binkley, R. L.; Kellogg, Y. D.; Beaumont, C. J.; Schmunk, R. B.; Kurtz, M. J.; Accomazzi, A.; Syed, O.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 established the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and charged it to "provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information concerning...its activities and the results thereof". The search for innovative methods to distribute NASA's information led a grass-roots team to create the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), which uses the World Wide Web and other popular Internet-based information systems .

  14. ISPIDER Central: an integrated database web-server for proteomics.

    PubMed

    Siepen, Jennifer A; Belhajjame, Khalid; Selley, Julian N; Embury, Suzanne M; Paton, Norman W; Goble, Carole A; Oliver, Stephen G; Stevens, Robert; Zamboulis, Lucas; Martin, Nigel; Poulovassillis, Alexandra; Jones, Philip; Côté, Richard; Hermjakob, Henning; Pentony, Melissa M; Jones, David T; Orengo, Christine A; Hubbard, Simon J

    2008-07-01

    Despite the growing volumes of proteomic data, integration of the underlying results remains problematic owing to differences in formats, data captured, protein accessions and services available from the individual repositories. To address this, we present the ISPIDER Central Proteomic Database search (http://www.ispider.manchester.ac.uk/cgi-bin/ProteomicSearch.pl), an integration service offering novel search capabilities over leading, mature, proteomic repositories including PRoteomics IDEntifications database (PRIDE), PepSeeker, PeptideAtlas and the Global Proteome Machine. It enables users to search for proteins and peptides that have been characterised in mass spectrometry-based proteomics experiments from different groups, stored in different databases, and view the collated results with specialist viewers/clients. In order to overcome limitations imposed by the great variability in protein accessions used by individual laboratories, the European Bioinformatics Institute's Protein Identifier Cross-Reference (PICR) service is used to resolve accessions from different sequence repositories. Custom-built clients allow users to view peptide/protein identifications in different contexts from multiple experiments and repositories, as well as integration with the Dasty2 client supporting any annotations available from Distributed Annotation System servers. Further information on the protein hits may also be added via external web services able to take a protein as input. This web server offers the first truly integrated access to proteomics repositories and provides a unique service to biologists interested in mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

  15. ISPIDER Central: an integrated database web-server for proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Siepen, Jennifer A.; Belhajjame, Khalid; Selley, Julian N.; Embury, Suzanne M.; Paton, Norman W.; Goble, Carole A.; Oliver, Stephen G.; Stevens, Robert; Zamboulis, Lucas; Martin, Nigel; Poulovassillis, Alexandra; Jones, Philip; Côté, Richard; Hermjakob, Henning; Pentony, Melissa M.; Jones, David T.; Orengo, Christine A.; Hubbard, Simon J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the growing volumes of proteomic data, integration of the underlying results remains problematic owing to differences in formats, data captured, protein accessions and services available from the individual repositories. To address this, we present the ISPIDER Central Proteomic Database search (http://www.ispider.manchester.ac.uk/cgi-bin/ProteomicSearch.pl), an integration service offering novel search capabilities over leading, mature, proteomic repositories including PRoteomics IDEntifications database (PRIDE), PepSeeker, PeptideAtlas and the Global Proteome Machine. It enables users to search for proteins and peptides that have been characterised in mass spectrometry-based proteomics experiments from different groups, stored in different databases, and view the collated results with specialist viewers/clients. In order to overcome limitations imposed by the great variability in protein accessions used by individual laboratories, the European Bioinformatics Institute's Protein Identifier Cross-Reference (PICR) service is used to resolve accessions from different sequence repositories. Custom-built clients allow users to view peptide/protein identifications in different contexts from multiple experiments and repositories, as well as integration with the Dasty2 client supporting any annotations available from Distributed Annotation System servers. Further information on the protein hits may also be added via external web services able to take a protein as input. This web server offers the first truly integrated access to proteomics repositories and provides a unique service to biologists interested in mass spectrometry-based proteomics. PMID:18440977

  16. GrayStarServer: Server-side Spectrum Synthesis with a Browser-based Client-side User Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. Ian

    2016-10-01

    We present GrayStarServer (GSS), a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a timescale of a few seconds. The addition of spectrum synthesis annotated with line identifications extends the functionality and pedagogical applicability of GSS beyond that of its predecessor, GrayStar3 (GS3). The spectrum synthesis is based on a line list acquired from the NIST atomic spectra database, and the GSS post-processing and user interface client allows the user to inspect the plain text ASCII version of the line list, as well as to apply macroscopic broadening. Unlike GS3, GSS carries out the physical modeling on the server side in Java, and communicates with the JavaScript and HTML client via an asynchronous HTTP request. We also describe other improvements beyond GS3 such as a more physical treatment of background opacity and atmospheric physics, the comparison of key results with those of the Phoenix code, and the use of the HTML < {canvas}> element for higher quality plotting and rendering of results. We also present LineListServer, a Java code for converting custom ASCII line lists in NIST format to the byte data type file format required by GSS so that users can prepare their own custom line lists. We propose a standard for marking up and packaging model atmosphere and spectrum synthesis output for data transmission and storage that will facilitate a web-based approach to stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis. We describe some pedagogical demonstrations and exercises enabled by easily accessible, on-demand, responsive spectrum synthesis. GSS may serve as a research support tool by providing quick spectroscopic reconnaissance. GSS may be found at www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/OpenStars/GrayStarServer/grayStarServer.html, and source tarballs for local installations of both GSS and LineListServer may be found at www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/OpenStars/.

  17. Distributed PACS using distributed file system with hierarchical meta data servers.

    PubMed

    Hiroyasu, Tomoyuki; Minamitani, Yoshiyuki; Miki, Mitsunori; Yokouchi, Hisatake; Yoshimi, Masato

    2012-01-01

    In this research, we propose a new distributed PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication Systems) which is available to integrate several PACSs that exist in each medical institution. The conventional PACS controls DICOM file into one data-base. On the other hand, in the proposed system, DICOM file is separated into meta data and image data and those are stored individually. Using this mechanism, since file is not always accessed the entire data, some operations such as finding files, changing titles, and so on can be performed in high-speed. At the same time, as distributed file system is utilized, accessing image files can also achieve high-speed access and high fault tolerant. The introduced system has a more significant point. That is the simplicity to integrate several PACSs. In the proposed system, only the meta data servers are integrated and integrated system can be constructed. This system also has the scalability of file access with along to the number of file numbers and file sizes. On the other hand, because meta-data server is integrated, the meta data server is the weakness of this system. To solve this defect, hieratical meta data servers are introduced. Because of this mechanism, not only fault--tolerant ability is increased but scalability of file access is also increased. To discuss the proposed system, the prototype system using Gfarm was implemented. For evaluating the implemented system, file search operating time of Gfarm and NFS were compared.

  18. R3D Align web server for global nucleotide to nucleotide alignments of RNA 3D structures

    PubMed Central

    Rahrig, Ryan R.; Petrov, Anton I.; Leontis, Neocles B.; Zirbel, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    The R3D Align web server provides online access to ‘RNA 3D Align’ (R3D Align), a method for producing accurate nucleotide-level structural alignments of RNA 3D structures. The web server provides a streamlined and intuitive interface, input data validation and output that is more extensive and easier to read and interpret than related servers. The R3D Align web server offers a unique Gallery of Featured Alignments, providing immediate access to pre-computed alignments of large RNA 3D structures, including all ribosomal RNAs, as well as guidance on effective use of the server and interpretation of the output. By accessing the non-redundant lists of RNA 3D structures provided by the Bowling Green State University RNA group, R3D Align connects users to structure files in the same equivalence class and the best-modeled representative structure from each group. The R3D Align web server is freely accessible at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3dalign/. PMID:23716643

  19. National Medical Terminology Server in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungin; Song, Seung-Jae; Koh, Soonjeong; Lee, Soo Kyoung; Kim, Hong-Gee

    Interoperable EHR (Electronic Health Record) necessitates at least the use of standardized medical terminologies. This paper describes a medical terminology server, LexCare Suite, which houses terminology management applications, such as a terminology editor, and a terminology repository populated with international standard terminology systems such as Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED). The server is to satisfy the needs of quality terminology systems to local primary to tertiary hospitals. Our partner general hospitals have used the server to test its applicability. This paper describes the server and the results of the applicability test.

  20. UniTree Name Server internals

    SciTech Connect

    Mecozzi, D.; Minton, J.

    1996-01-01

    The UniTree Name Server (UNS) is one of several servers which make up the UniTree storage system. The Name Server is responsible for mapping names to capabilities Names are generally human readable ASCII strings of any length. Capabilities are unique 256-bit identifiers that point to files, directories, or symbolic links. The Name Server implements a UNIX style hierarchical directory structure to facilitate name-to-capability mapping. The principal task of the Name Server is to manage the directories which make up the UniTree directory structure. The principle clients of the Name Server are the FTP Daemon, NFS and a few UniTree utility routines. However, the Name Server is a generalized server and will accept messages from any client. The purpose of this paper is to describe the internal workings of the UniTree Name Server. In cases where it seems appropriate, the motivation for a particular choice of algorithm as description of the algorithm itself will be given.

  1. Interfacing a high performance disk array file server to a Gigabit LAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshan, Srinivasan; Katz, Randy H.

    1993-01-01

    Our previous prototype, RAID-1, identified several bottlenecks in typical file server architectures. The most important bottleneck was the lack of a high-bandwidth path between disk, memory, and the network. Workstation servers, such as the Sun-4/280, have very slow access to peripherals on busses far from the CPU. For the RAID-2 system, we addressed this problem by designing a crossbar interconnect, Xbus board, that provides a 40MB/s path between disk, memory, and the network interfaces. However, this interconnect does not provide the system CPU with low latency access to control the various interfaces. To provide a high data rate to clients on the network, we were forced to carefully and efficiently design the network software. A block diagram of the system hardware architecture is given. In the following subsections, we describe pieces of the RAID-2 file server hardware that had a significant impact on the design of the network interface.

  2. An efficient biometric and password-based remote user authentication using smart card for Telecare Medical Information Systems in multi-server environment.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Tanmoy; Giri, Debasis

    2014-12-01

    The medical organizations have introduced Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) to provide a reliable facility by which a patient who is unable to go to a doctor in critical or urgent period, can communicate to a doctor through a medical server via internet from home. An authentication mechanism is needed in TMIS to hide the secret information of both parties, namely a server and a patient. Recent research includes patient's biometric information as well as password to design a remote user authentication scheme that enhances the security level. In a single server environment, one server is responsible for providing services to all the authorized remote patients. However, the problem arises if a patient wishes to access several branch servers, he/she needs to register to the branch servers individually. In 2014, Chuang and Chen proposed an remote user authentication scheme for multi-server environment. In this paper, we have shown that in their scheme, an non-register adversary can successfully logged-in into the system as a valid patient. To resist the weaknesses, we have proposed an authentication scheme for TMIS in multi-server environment where the patients can register to a root telecare server called registration center (RC) in one time to get services from all the telecare branch servers through their registered smart card. Security analysis and comparison shows that our proposed scheme provides better security with low computational and communication cost.

  3. DBCP: a web server for disulfide bonding connectivity pattern prediction without the prior knowledge of the bonding state of cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsuan-Hung; Tseng, Lin-Yu

    2010-01-01

    The proper prediction of the location of disulfide bridges is efficient in helping to solve the protein folding problem. Most of the previous works on the prediction of disulfide connectivity pattern use the prior knowledge of the bonding state of cysteines. The DBCP web server provides prediction of disulfide bonding connectivity pattern without the prior knowledge of the bonding state of cysteines. The method used in this server improves the accuracy of disulfide connectivity pattern prediction (Qp) over the previous studies reported in the literature. This DBCP server can be accessed at http://120.107.8.16/dbcp or http://140.120.14.136/dbcp. PMID:20530534

  4. ModelTest Server: a web-based tool for the statistical selection of models of nucleotide substitution online

    PubMed Central

    Posada, David

    2006-01-01

    ModelTest server is a web-based application for the selection of models of nucleotide substitution using the program ModelTest. The server takes as input a text file with likelihood scores for the set of candidate models. Models can be selected with hierarchical likelihood ratio tests, or with the Akaike or Bayesian information criteria. The output includes several statistics for the assessment of model selection uncertainty, for model averaging or to estimate the relative importance of model parameters. The server can be accessed at . PMID:16845102

  5. 3Drefine: an interactive web server for efficient protein structure refinement

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Nowotny, Jackson; Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    3Drefine is an interactive web server for consistent and computationally efficient protein structure refinement with the capability to perform web-based statistical and visual analysis. The 3Drefine refinement protocol utilizes iterative optimization of hydrogen bonding network combined with atomic-level energy minimization on the optimized model using a composite physics and knowledge-based force fields for efficient protein structure refinement. The method has been extensively evaluated on blind CASP experiments as well as on large-scale and diverse benchmark datasets and exhibits consistent improvement over the initial structure in both global and local structural quality measures. The 3Drefine web server allows for convenient protein structure refinement through a text or file input submission, email notification, provided example submission and is freely available without any registration requirement. The server also provides comprehensive analysis of submissions through various energy and statistical feedback and interactive visualization of multiple refined models through the JSmol applet that is equipped with numerous protein model analysis tools. The web server has been extensively tested and used by many users. As a result, the 3Drefine web server conveniently provides a useful tool easily accessible to the community. The 3Drefine web server has been made publicly available at the URL: http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/3Drefine/. PMID:27131371

  6. EarthServer - 3D Visualization on the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sebastian; Herzig, Pasquale; Bockholt, Ulrich; Jung, Yvonne; Behr, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    EarthServer (www.earthserver.eu), funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Program, is a project to enable the management, access and exploration of massive, multi-dimensional datasets using Open GeoSpatial Consortium (OGC) query and processing language standards like WCS 2.0 and WCPS. To this end, a server/client architecture designed to handle Petabyte/Exabyte volumes of multi-dimensional data is being developed and deployed. As an important part of the EarthServer project, six Lighthouse Applications, major scientific data exploitation initiatives, are being established to make cross-domain, Earth Sciences related data repositories available in an open and unified manner, as service endpoints based on solutions and infrastructure developed within the project. Clients technology developed and deployed in EarthServer ranges from mobile and web clients to immersive virtual reality systems, all designed to interact with a physically and logically distributed server infrastructure using exclusively OGC standards. In this contribution, we would like to present our work on a web-based 3D visualization and interaction client for Earth Sciences data using only technology found in standard web browsers without requiring the user to install plugins or addons. Additionally, we are able to run the earth data visualization client on a wide range of different platforms with very different soft- and hardware requirements such as smart phones (e.g. iOS, Android), different desktop systems etc. High-quality, hardware-accelerated visualization of 3D and 4D content in standard web browsers can be realized now and we believe it will become more and more common to use this fast, lightweight and ubiquitous platform to provide insights into big datasets without requiring the user to set up a specialized client first. With that in mind, we will also point out some of the limitations we encountered using current web technologies. Underlying the EarthServer web client

  7. SARA: a server for function annotation of RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Emidio; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2009-07-01

    Recent interest in non-coding RNA transcripts has resulted in a rapid increase of deposited RNA structures in the Protein Data Bank. However, a characterization and functional classification of the RNA structure and function space have only been partially addressed. Here, we introduce the SARA program for pair-wise alignment of RNA structures as a web server for structure-based RNA function assignment. The SARA server relies on the SARA program, which aligns two RNA structures based on a unit-vector root-mean-square approach. The likely accuracy of the SARA alignments is assessed by three different P-values estimating the statistical significance of the sequence, secondary structure and tertiary structure identity scores, respectively. Our benchmarks, which relied on a set of 419 RNA structures with known SCOR structural class, indicate that at a negative logarithm of mean P-value higher or equal than 2.5, SARA can assign the correct or a similar SCOR class to 81.4% and 95.3% of the benchmark set, respectively. The SARA server is freely accessible via the World Wide Web at http://sgu.bioinfo.cipf.es/services/SARA/.

  8. Quartet decomposition server: a platform for analyzing phylogenetic trees

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The frequent exchange of genetic material among prokaryotes means that extracting a majority or plurality phylogenetic signal from many gene families, and the identification of gene families that are in significant conflict with the plurality signal is a frequent task in comparative genomics, and especially in phylogenomic analyses. Decomposition of gene trees into embedded quartets (unrooted trees each with four taxa) is a convenient and statistically powerful technique to address this challenging problem. This approach was shown to be useful in several studies of completely sequenced microbial genomes. Results We present here a web server that takes a collection of gene phylogenies, decomposes them into quartets, generates a Quartet Spectrum, and draws a split network. Users are also provided with various data download options for further analyses. Each gene phylogeny is to be represented by an assessment of phylogenetic information content, such as sets of trees reconstructed from bootstrap replicates or sampled from a posterior distribution. The Quartet Decomposition server is accessible at http://quartets.uga.edu. Conclusions The Quartet Decomposition server presented here provides a convenient means to perform Quartet Decomposition analyses and will empower users to find statistically supported phylogenetic conflicts. PMID:22676320

  9. CTserver: A Computational Thermodynamics Server for the Geoscience Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, V. C.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2006-12-01

    The CTserver platform is an Internet-based computational resource that provides on-demand services in Computational Thermodynamics (CT) to a diverse geoscience user base. This NSF-supported resource can be accessed at ctserver.ofm-research.org. The CTserver infrastructure leverages a high-quality and rigorously tested software library of routines for computing equilibrium phase assemblages and for evaluating internally consistent thermodynamic properties of materials, e.g. mineral solid solutions and a variety of geological fluids, including magmas. Thermodynamic models are currently available for 167 phases. Recent additions include Duan, Møller and Weare's model for supercritical C-O-H-S, extended to include SO2 and S2 species, and an entirely new associated solution model for O-S-Fe-Ni sulfide liquids. This software library is accessed via the CORBA Internet protocol for client-server communication. CORBA provides a standardized, object-oriented, language and platform independent, fast, low-bandwidth interface to phase property modules running on the server cluster. Network transport, language translation and resource allocation are handled by the CORBA interface. Users access server functionality in two principal ways. Clients written as browser- based Java applets may be downloaded which provide specific functionality such as retrieval of thermodynamic properties of phases, computation of phase equilibria for systems of specified composition, or modeling the evolution of these systems along some particular reaction path. This level of user interaction requires minimal programming effort and is ideal for classroom use. A more universal and flexible mode of CTserver access involves making remote procedure calls from user programs directly to the server public interface. The CTserver infrastructure relieves the user of the burden of implementing and testing the often complex thermodynamic models of real liquids and solids. A pilot application of this distributed

  10. BPROMPT: A consensus server for membrane protein prediction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul D; Attwood, Teresa K; Flower, Darren R

    2003-07-01

    Protein structure prediction is a cornerstone of bioinformatics research. Membrane proteins require their own prediction methods due to their intrinsically different composition. A variety of tools exist for topology prediction of membrane proteins, many of them available on the Internet. The server described in this paper, BPROMPT (Bayesian PRediction Of Membrane Protein Topology), uses a Bayesian Belief Network to combine the results of other prediction methods, providing a more accurate consensus prediction. Topology predictions with accuracies of 70% for prokaryotes and 53% for eukaryotes were achieved. BPROMPT can be accessed at http://www.jenner.ac.uk/BPROMPT.

  11. PlanetServer: Innovative approaches for the online analysis of hyperspectral satellite data from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosthoek, J. H. P.; Flahaut, J.; Rossi, A. P.; Baumann, P.; Misev, D.; Campalani, P.; Unnithan, V.

    2014-06-01

    PlanetServer is a WebGIS system, currently under development, enabling the online analysis of Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer (CRISM) hyperspectral data from Mars. It is part of the EarthServer project which builds infrastructure for online access and analysis of huge Earth Science datasets. Core functionality consists of the rasdaman Array Database Management System (DBMS) for storage, and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) for data querying. Various WCPS queries have been designed to access spatial and spectral subsets of the CRISM data. The client WebGIS, consisting mainly of the OpenLayers javascript library, uses these queries to enable online spatial and spectral analysis. Currently the PlanetServer demonstration consists of two CRISM Full Resolution Target (FRT) observations, surrounding the NASA Curiosity rover landing site. A detailed analysis of one of these observations is performed in the Case Study section. The current PlanetServer functionality is described step by step, and is tested by focusing on detecting mineralogical evidence described in earlier Gale crater studies. Both the PlanetServer methodology and its possible use for mineralogical studies will be further discussed. Future work includes batch ingestion of CRISM data and further development of the WebGIS and analysis tools.

  12. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Lunar Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMoon server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Lunar images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of the Moon. The OnMoon server implements the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server protocol and supports Moon-specific extensions. Unlike other Internet map servers that provide Lunar data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMoon server supports encoding of data in Moon-specific coordinate systems. The OnMoon server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Lunar image and elevation data. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF) or the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. Full-precision spectral arithmetic processing is also available, by use of a custom SLD extension. This server can dynamically add shaded relief based on the Lunar elevation to any image layer. This server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  13. You're a What? Process Server

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the role and functions of a process server. The job of a process server is to hand deliver legal documents to the people involved in court cases. These legal documents range from a summons to appear in court to a subpoena for producing evidence. Process serving can involve risk, as some people take out their…

  14. Server-Side Includes Made Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2002-01-01

    Describes server-side include (SSI) codes which allow Webmasters to insert content into Web pages without programming knowledge. Explains how to enable the codes on a Web server, provides a step-by-step process for implementing them, discusses tags and syntax errors, and includes examples of their use on the Web site for Southern Illinois…

  15. Optimizing the NASA Technical Report Server.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maa, Ming-Hokng

    1996-01-01

    Modifying the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), a World Wide Web report distribution NASA technical publications service, has enhanced its performance, protocol support, and human interfacing. This article discusses the original and revised NTRS architecture, sequential and parallel query methods, and wide area information server (WAIS) uniform…

  16. Home media server content management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmakoff, Andrew A.; van Vliet, Harry

    2001-07-01

    With the advent of set-top boxes, the convergence of TV (broadcasting) and PC (Internet) is set to enter the home environment. Currently, a great deal of activity is occurring in developing standards (TV-Anytime Forum) and devices (TiVo) for local storage on Home Media Servers (HMS). These devices lie at the heart of convergence of the triad: communications/networks - content/media - computing/software. Besides massive storage capacity and being a communications 'gateway', the home media server is characterised by the ability to handle metadata and software that provides an easy to use on-screen interface and intelligent search/content handling facilities. In this paper, we describe a research prototype HMS that is being developed within the GigaCE project at the Telematica Instituut . Our prototype demonstrates advanced search and retrieval (video browsing), adaptive user profiling and an innovative 3D component of the Electronic Program Guide (EPG) which represents online presence. We discuss the use of MPEG-7 for representing metadata, the use of MPEG-21 working draft standards for content identification, description and rights expression, and the use of HMS peer-to-peer content distribution approaches. Finally, we outline explorative user behaviour experiments that aim to investigate the effectiveness of the prototype HMS during development.

  17. SciServer: An Online Collaborative Environment for Big Data in Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddick, Jordan; Souter, Barbara; Lemson, Gerard; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr

    2017-01-01

    For the past year, SciServer Compute (http://compute.sciserver.org) has offered access to big data resources running within server-side Docker containers. Compute has allowed thousands of researchers to bring advanced analysis to big datasets like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and others, while keeping the analysis close to the data for better performance and easier read/write access. SciServer Compute is just one part of the SciServer system being developed at Johns Hopkins University, which provides an easy-to-use collaborative research environment for astronomy and many other sciences.SciServer enables these collaborative research strategies using Jupyter notebooks, in which users can write their own Python and R scripts and execute them on the same server as the data. We have written special-purpose libraries for querying, reading, and writing data. Intermediate results can be stored in large scratch space (hundreds of TBs) and analyzed directly from within Python or R with state-of-the-art visualization and machine learning libraries. Users can store science-ready results in their permanent allocation on SciDrive, a Dropbox-like system for sharing and publishing files.SciServer Compute’s virtual research environment has grown with the addition of task management and access control functions, allowing collaborators to share both data and analysis scripts securely across the world. These features also open up new possibilities for education, allowing instructors to share datasets with students and students to write analysis scripts to share with their instructors. We are leveraging these features into a new system called “SciServer Courseware,” which will allow instructors to share assignments with their students, allowing students to engage with big data in new ways.SciServer has also expanded to include more datasets beyond the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A part of that growth has been the addition of the SkyQuery component, which allows for simple, fast

  18. Guide to the Secure Configuration and Administration of Microsoft ISA Server 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Rule to Publish POP3 ............................................................................. 76 Figure 55 -- Specifying Published E - mail Server...screener and the H.323 gatekeeper service – warrant discussion. The message screener is a required component if one desires to filter SMTP /POP e - mail ...users who are members of the corresponding group can access mail ( POP3 / SMTP ), newsgroups (NNTP), or browse the web (HTTP, HTTPS). Managing access is

  19. Vocabulary metadata service for terminology servers to handle variations in design of various biomedical terminologies.

    PubMed

    Nachimuthu, Senthil K

    2008-11-06

    Terminology servers provide access to various biomedical terminologies for authoring and maintenance, in addition to automated use by various clinical and administrative applications and interface engines. HL7 Common Terminology Services (CTS) intends to provide standard interfaces for accessing terminology services within and across organizations. However, variations in designs of different terminologies make this hard to achieve. We describe a novel solution to this issue, and hope to integrate this into the HL7 CTS2 standard.

  20. The FELICIA bulletin board system and the IRBIS anonymous FTP server: Computer security information sources for the DOE community. CIAC-2302

    SciTech Connect

    Orvis, W.J.

    1993-11-03

    The Computer Incident Advisory Capability (CIAC) operates two information servers for the DOE community, FELICIA (formerly FELIX) and IRBIS. FELICIA is a computer Bulletin Board System (BBS) that can be accessed by telephone with a modem. IRBIS is an anonymous ftp server that can be accessed on the Internet. Both of these servers contain all of the publicly available CIAC, CERT, NIST, and DDN bulletins, virus descriptions, the VIRUS-L moderated virus bulletin board, copies of public domain and shareware virus- detection/protection software, and copies of useful public domain and shareware utility programs. This guide describes how to connect these systems and obtain files from them.

  1. InfoServerPlus: providing a medical library as application service.

    PubMed

    Pschichholz, Holger; Boeker, Martin; Gaudes, Ralf; Schulz, Stefan; Klar, Rüdiger

    2002-01-01

    Clinical decision making necessitates convenient access to high-quality content. The advanced requirements for a multipurpose application must be met technologically by an appropriate system design in the form of a client-server architecture which demonstrates a functional view in differentiating three tiers: presentation, application and data supply. The technical realisation has been accomplished by an application server which serves thin clients on several platforms. Despite considerable expenditures, this solution represents a promising way of disseminating information and knowledge via Intra- and Internet. The requirements and the accompanying system architecture could be satisfactorily implemented.

  2. The Argonne Voyager multimedia server

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.; Judson, I.; Olson, R.; Stevens, R.

    1997-07-01

    With the growing presence of multimedia-enabled systems, one will see an integration of collaborative computing concepts into the everyday environments of future scientific and technical workplaces. Desktop teleconferencing is in common use today, while more complex desktop teleconferencing technology that relies on the availability of multipoint (greater than two nodes) enabled tools is now starting to become available on PCs. A critical problem when using these collaboration tools is the inability to easily archive multistream, multipoint meetings and make the content available to others. Ideally one would like the ability to capture, record, playback, index, annotate and distribute multimedia stream data as easily as one currently handles text or still image data. While the ultimate goal is still some years away, the Argonne Voyager project is aimed at exploring and developing media server technology needed to provide a flexible virtual multipoint recording/playback capability. In this article the authors describe the motivating requirements, architecture implementation, operation, performance, and related work.

  3. The widest practicable dissemination: The NASA technical report server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Gottlich, Gretchen L.; Bianco, David J.; Binkley, Robert L.; Kellogg, Yvonne D.; Paulson, Sharon S.; Beaumont, Chris J.; Schmunk, Robert B.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Accomazzi, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 established NASA and charged it to 'provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information concerning...its activities and the results thereof.' The search for innovative methods to distribute NASA's information lead a grass-roots team to create the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), which uses the World Wide Web and other popular Internet-based information systems as search engines. The NTRS is an inter-center effort which provides uniform access to various distributed publication servers residing on the Internet. Users have immediate desktop access to technical publications from NASA centers and institutes. The NTRS is comprised of several units, some constructed especially for inclusion in NTRS, and others that are existing NASA publication services that NTRS reuses. This paper presents the NTRS architecture, usage metrics, and the lessons learned while implementing and maintaining the services over the initial six-month period. The NTRS is largely constructed with freely available software running on existing hardware. NTRS builds upon existing hardware and software, and the resulting additional exposure for the body of literature contained will allow NASA to ensure that its institutional knowledge base will continue to receive the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination.

  4. The Widest Practicable Dissemination: The NASA Technical Report Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Gottlich, Gretchen L.; Bianco, David J.; Binkley, Robert L.; Kellogg, Yvonne D.; Paulson, Sharon S.; Beaumont, Chris J.; Schmunk, Robert B.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Accomazzi, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 established NASA and charged it to "provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information concerning [...] its activities and the results thereof." The search for innovative methods to distribute NASA s information lead a grass-roots team to create the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), which uses the World Wide Web and other popular Internet-based information systems as search engines. The NTRS is an inter-center effort which provides uniform access to various distributed publication servers residing on the Internet. Users have immediate desktop access to technical publications from NASA centers and institutes. The NTRS is comprised of several units, some constructed especially for inclusion in NTRS, and others that are existing NASA publication services that NTRS reuses. This paper presents the NTRS architecture, usage metrics, and the lessons learned while implementing and maintaining the services over the initial 6-month period. The NTRS is largely constructed with freely available software running on existing hardware. NTRS builds upon existing hardware and software, and the resulting additional exposure for the body of literature contained will allow NASA to ensure that its institutional knowledge base will continue to receive the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination.

  5. Web server with ATMEGA 2560 microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Răduca, E.; Ungureanu-Anghel, D.; Nistor, L.; Haţiegan, C.; Drăghici, S.; Chioncel, C.; Spunei, E.; Lolea, R.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the design and building of a Web Server to command, control and monitor at a distance lots of industrial or personal equipments and/or sensors. The server works based on a personal software. The software can be written by users and can work with many types of operating system. The authors were realized the Web server based on two platforms, an UC board and a network board. The source code was written in "open source" language Arduino 1.0.5.

  6. The Matpar Server on the HP Exemplar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Paul

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews the design of Matlab for parallel processing on a parallel system. Matlab was found to be too slow on many large problems, and with the Next Generation Space Telescope requiring greater capability, the work was begun in early 1996 on parallel extensions to Matlab, called Matpar. This presentation reviews the architecture, the functionality, and the design of MatPar. The design utilizes a client server strategy, with the client code written in C, and the object-oriented server code written in C++. The client/server approach for Matpar provides ease of use an good speed.

  7. Catalytic site identification--a web server to identify catalytic site structural matches throughout PDB.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Daniel A; Nilmeier, Jerome P; Lightstone, Felice C

    2013-07-01

    The catalytic site identification web server provides the innovative capability to find structural matches to a user-specified catalytic site among all Protein Data Bank proteins rapidly (in less than a minute). The server also can examine a user-specified protein structure or model to identify structural matches to a library of catalytic sites. Finally, the server provides a database of pre-calculated matches between all Protein Data Bank proteins and the library of catalytic sites. The database has been used to derive a set of hypothesized novel enzymatic function annotations. In all cases, matches and putative binding sites (protein structure and surfaces) can be visualized interactively online. The website can be accessed at http://catsid.llnl.gov.

  8. EarthServer: Information Retrieval and Query Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perperis, Thanassis; Koltsida, Panagiota; Kakaletris, George

    2013-04-01

    Establishing open, unified, seamless, access and ad-hoc analytics on cross-disciplinary, multi-source, multi-dimensional, spatiotemporal Earth Science data of extreme-size and their supporting metadata are the main challenges of the EarthServer project (www.earthserver.eu), funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Program. One of EarthServer's main objectives is to provide users with higher level coverage and metadata search, retrieval and processing capabilities to multi-disciplinary Earth Science data. Six Lighthouse Applications are being established, each one providing access to Cryospheric, Airborne, Atmospheric, Geology, Oceanography and Planetary science raster data repositories through strictly WCS 2.0 standard based service endpoints. EarthServers' information retrieval subsystem aims towards exploiting the WCS endpoints through a physically and logically distributed service oriented architecture, foreseeing the collaboration of several standard compliant services, capable of exploiting modern large grid and cloud infrastructures and of dynamically responding to availability and capabilities of underlying resources. Towards furthering technology for integrated, coherent service provision based on WCS and WCPS the concept of a query language (QL), unifying coverage and metadata processing and retrieval is introduced. EarthServer's information retrieval subsystem receives QL requests involving high volumes of all Earth Science data categories, executes them on the services that reside on the infrastructure and sends the results back to the requester through a high performance pipeline. In this contribution we briefly discuss EarthServer's service oriented coverage data and metadata search and retrieval architecture and further elaborate on the potentials of EarthServer's Query Language, called xWCPS (XQuery compliant WCPS). xWCPS aims towards merging the path that the two widely adopted standards (W3C XQuery, OGC WCPS) have paved, into a

  9. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Mars Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMars server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Mars images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of Mars. The OnMars server is an implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server. Unlike other Mars Internet map servers that provide Martian data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMars WMS server supports encoding of data in Mars-specific coordinate systems. The OnMars server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Martian image and elevation data, including an 8-meter-per-pixel uncontrolled mosaic of most of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera Narrow Angle (MOCNA) image collection, which is not available elsewhere. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF), Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. The OnMars server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  10. SledgeHMMER: a web server for batch searching the Pfam database.

    PubMed

    Chukkapalli, Giridhar; Guda, Chittibabu; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2004-07-01

    The SledgeHMMER web server is intended for genome-scale searching of the Pfam database without having to install this database and the HMMER software locally. The server implements a parallelized version of hmmpfam, the program used for searching the Pfam HMM database. Pfam search results have been calculated for the entire Swiss-Prot and TrEmbl database sequences (approximately 1.2 million) on 256 processors of IA64-based teragrid machines. The Pfam database can be searched in local, glocal or merged mode, using either gathering or E-value thresholds. Query sequences are first matched against the pre-calculated entries to retrieve results, and those without matches are processed through a new search process. Results are emailed in a space-delimited tabular format upon completion of the search. While most other Pfam-searching web servers set a limit of one sequence per query, this server processes batch sequences with no limit on the number of input sequences. The web server and downloadable data are accessible from http://SledgeHmmer.sdsc.edu.

  11. VfoldCPX Server: Predicting RNA-RNA Complex Structure and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    RNA-RNA interactions are essential for genomic RNA dimerization, mRNA splicing, and many RNA-related gene expression and regulation processes. The prediction of the structure and folding stability of RNA-RNA complexes is a problem of significant biological importance and receives substantial interest in the biological community. The VfoldCPX server provides a new web interface to predict the two-dimensional (2D) structures of RNA-RNA complexes from the nucleotide sequences. The VfoldCPX server has several novel advantages including the ability to treat RNAs with tertiary contacts (crossing base pairs) such as loop-loop kissing interactions and the use of physical loop entropy parameters. Based on a partition function-based algorithm, the server enables prediction for structure with and without tertiary contacts. Furthermore, the server outputs a set of energetically stable structures, ranked by their stabilities. The results allow users to gain extensive physical insights into RNA-RNA interactions and their roles in RNA function. The web server is freely accessible at “http://rna.physics.missouri.edu/vfoldCPX”. PMID:27657918

  12. Secure data aggregation in heterogeneous and disparate networks using stand off server architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimalathithan, S.; Sudarsan, S. D.; Seker, R.; Lenin, R. B.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2009-04-01

    The emerging global reach of technology presents myriad challenges and intricacies as Information Technology teams aim to provide anywhere, anytime and anyone access, for service providers and customers alike. The world is fraught with stifling inequalities, both from an economic as well as socio-political perspective. The net result has been large capability gaps between various organizational locations that need to work together, which has raised new challenges for information security teams. Similar issues arise, when mergers and acquisitions among and between organizations take place. While integrating remote business locations with mainstream operations, one or more of the issues including the lack of application level support, computational capabilities, communication limitations, and legal requirements cause a serious impediment thereby complicating integration while not violating the organizations' security requirements. Often resorted techniques like IPSec, tunneling, secure socket layer, etc. may not be always techno-economically feasible. This paper addresses such security issues by introducing an intermediate server between corporate central server and remote sites, called stand-off-server. We present techniques such as break-before-make connection, break connection after transfer, multiple virtual machine instances with different operating systems using the concept of a stand-off-server. Our experiments show that the proposed solution provides sufficient isolation for the central server/site from attacks arising out of weak communication and/or computing links and is simple to implement.

  13. Conversation Threads Hidden within Email Server Logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palus, Sebastian; Kazienko, Przemysław

    Email server logs contain records of all email Exchange through this server. Often we would like to analyze those emails not separately but in conversation thread, especially when we need to analyze social network extracted from those email logs. Unfortunately each mail is in different record and those record are not tided to each other in any obvious way. In this paper method for discussion threads extraction was proposed together with experiments on two different data sets - Enron and WrUT..

  14. USING SERVERS TO ENHANCE CONTROL SYSTEM CAPABILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    BICKLEY,M.; BOWLING,B.A.; BRYAN,D.A.; ZEIJTS,J.; WHITE,K.S.; WITHERSPOON,S.

    1999-03-29

    Many traditional control systems include a distributed collection of front end machines to control hardware. Back end tools are used to view, modify, and record the signals generated by these front end machines. Software servers, which are a middleware layer between the front and back ends, can improve a control system in several ways. Servers can enable on-line processing of raw data, and consolidation of functionality. In many cases data retrieved from the front end must be processed in order to convert the raw data into useful information. These calculations are often redundantly performed by different programs, frequently offline. Servers can monitor the raw data and rapidly perform calculations, producing new signals which can be treated like any other control system signal, and can be used by any back end application. Algorithms can be incorporated to actively modify signal values in the control system based upon changes of other signals, essentially producing feedback in a control system. Servers thus increase the flexibility of a control system. Lastly, servers running on inexpensive UNIX workstations can relay or cache frequently needed information, reducing the load on front end hardware by functioning as concentrators. Rather than many back end tools connecting directly to the front end machines, increasing the work load of these machines, they instead connect to the server. Servers like those discussed above have been used successfully at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility to provide functionality such as beam steering, fault monitoring, storage of machine parameters, and on-line data processing. The authors discuss the potential uses of such, servers, and share the results of work performed to date.

  15. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  16. RaptorX-Property: a web server for protein structure property prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shiwang; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    RaptorX Property (http://raptorx2.uchicago.edu/StructurePropertyPred/predict/) is a web server predicting structure property of a protein sequence without using any templates. It outperforms other servers, especially for proteins without close homologs in PDB or with very sparse sequence profile (i.e. carries little evolutionary information). This server employs a powerful in-house deep learning model DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) to predict secondary structure (SS), solvent accessibility (ACC) and disorder regions (DISO). DeepCNF not only models complex sequence–structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent property labels. Our experimental results show that, tested on CASP10, CASP11 and the other benchmarks, this server can obtain ∼84% Q3 accuracy for 3-state SS, ∼72% Q8 accuracy for 8-state SS, ∼66% Q3 accuracy for 3-state solvent accessibility, and ∼0.89 area under the ROC curve (AUC) for disorder prediction. PMID:27112573

  17. RaptorX-Property: a web server for protein structure property prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shiwang; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-07-08

    RaptorX Property (http://raptorx2.uchicago.edu/StructurePropertyPred/predict/) is a web server predicting structure property of a protein sequence without using any templates. It outperforms other servers, especially for proteins without close homologs in PDB or with very sparse sequence profile (i.e. carries little evolutionary information). This server employs a powerful in-house deep learning model DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) to predict secondary structure (SS), solvent accessibility (ACC) and disorder regions (DISO). DeepCNF not only models complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent property labels. Our experimental results show that, tested on CASP10, CASP11 and the other benchmarks, this server can obtain ∼84% Q3 accuracy for 3-state SS, ∼72% Q8 accuracy for 8-state SS, ∼66% Q3 accuracy for 3-state solvent accessibility, and ∼0.89 area under the ROC curve (AUC) for disorder prediction.

  18. Hierarchical storage of large volume of multidector CT data using distributed servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman; Rosset, Antoine; Heuberger, Joris; Bandon, David

    2006-03-01

    Multidector scanners and hybrid multimodality scanners have the ability to generate large number of high-resolution images resulting in very large data sets. In most cases, these datasets are generated for the sole purpose of generating secondary processed images and 3D rendered images as well as oblique and curved multiplanar reformatted images. It is therefore not essential to archive the original images after they have been processed. We have developed an architecture of distributed archive servers for temporary storage of large image datasets for 3D rendering and image processing without the need for long term storage in PACS archive. With the relatively low cost of storage devices it is possible to configure these servers to hold several months or even years of data, long enough for allowing subsequent re-processing if required by specific clinical situations. We tested the latest generation of RAID servers provided by Apple computers with a capacity of 5 TBytes. We implemented a peer-to-peer data access software based on our Open-Source image management software called OsiriX, allowing remote workstations to directly access DICOM image files located on the server through a new technology called "bonjour". This architecture offers a seamless integration of multiple servers and workstations without the need for central database or complex workflow management tools. It allows efficient access to image data from multiple workstation for image analysis and visualization without the need for image data transfer. It provides a convenient alternative to centralized PACS architecture while avoiding complex and time-consuming data transfer and storage.

  19. RS-WebPredictor: a server for predicting CYP-mediated sites of metabolism on drug-like molecules

    PubMed Central

    Zaretzki, Jed; Bergeron, Charles; Huang, Tao-wei; Rydberg, Patrik; Swamidass, S. Joshua; Breneman, Curt M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Regioselectivity-WebPredictor (RS-WebPredictor) is a server that predicts isozyme-specific cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated sites of metabolism (SOMs) on drug-like molecules. Predictions may be made for the promiscuous 2C9, 2D6 and 3A4 CYP isozymes, as well as CYPs 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C19 and 2E1. RS-WebPredictor is the first freely accessible server that predicts the regioselectivity of the last six isozymes. Server execution time is fast, taking on average 2s to encode a submitted molecule and 1s to apply a given model, allowing for high-throughput use in lead optimization projects. Availability: RS-WebPredictor is accessible for free use at http://reccr.chem.rpi.edu/Software/RS-WebPredictor/ Contact: brenec@rpi.edu PMID:23242264

  20. Engineering Proteins for Thermostability with iRDP Web Server

    PubMed Central

    Ghanate, Avinash; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Suresh, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    Engineering protein molecules with desired structure and biological functions has been an elusive goal. Development of industrially viable proteins with improved properties such as stability, catalytic activity and altered specificity by modifying the structure of an existing protein has widely been targeted through rational protein engineering. Although a range of factors contributing to thermal stability have been identified and widely researched, the in silico implementation of these as strategies directed towards enhancement of protein stability has not yet been explored extensively. A wide range of structural analysis tools is currently available for in silico protein engineering. However these tools concentrate on only a limited number of factors or individual protein structures, resulting in cumbersome and time-consuming analysis. The iRDP web server presented here provides a unified platform comprising of iCAPS, iStability and iMutants modules. Each module addresses different facets of effective rational engineering of proteins aiming towards enhanced stability. While iCAPS aids in selection of target protein based on factors contributing to structural stability, iStability uniquely offers in silico implementation of known thermostabilization strategies in proteins for identification and stability prediction of potential stabilizing mutation sites. iMutants aims to assess mutants based on changes in local interaction network and degree of residue conservation at the mutation sites. Each module was validated using an extensively diverse dataset. The server is freely accessible at http://irdp.ncl.res.in and has no login requirements. PMID:26436543

  1. System level traffic shaping in disk servers with heterogeneous protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Eric; Kruse, Daniele Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Disk access and tape migrations compete for network bandwidth in CASTORs disk servers, over various protocols: RFIO, Xroot, root and GridFTP. As there are a limited number of tape drives, it is important to keep them busy all the time, at their nominal speed. With potentially 100s of user read streams per server, the bandwidth for the tape migrations has to be guaranteed to a controlled level, and not the fair share the system gives by default. Xroot provides a prioritization mechanism, but using it implies moving exclusively to the Xroot protocol, which is not possible in short to mid-term time frame, as users are equally using all protocols. The greatest commonality of all those protocols is not more than the usage of TCP/IP. We investigated the Linux kernel traffic shaper to control TCP/ IP bandwidth. The performance and limitations of the traffic shaper have been understood in test environment, and satisfactory working point has been found for production. Notably, TCP offload engines' negative impact on traffic shaping, and the limitations of the length of the traffic shaping rules were discovered and measured. A suitable working point has been found and the traffic shaping is now successfully deployed in the CASTOR production systems at CERN. This system level approach could be transposed easily to other environments.

  2. Engineering Proteins for Thermostability with iRDP Web Server.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Sule, Manas; Ghanate, Avinash; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Suresh, C G

    2015-01-01

    Engineering protein molecules with desired structure and biological functions has been an elusive goal. Development of industrially viable proteins with improved properties such as stability, catalytic activity and altered specificity by modifying the structure of an existing protein has widely been targeted through rational protein engineering. Although a range of factors contributing to thermal stability have been identified and widely researched, the in silico implementation of these as strategies directed towards enhancement of protein stability has not yet been explored extensively. A wide range of structural analysis tools is currently available for in silico protein engineering. However these tools concentrate on only a limited number of factors or individual protein structures, resulting in cumbersome and time-consuming analysis. The iRDP web server presented here provides a unified platform comprising of iCAPS, iStability and iMutants modules. Each module addresses different facets of effective rational engineering of proteins aiming towards enhanced stability. While iCAPS aids in selection of target protein based on factors contributing to structural stability, iStability uniquely offers in silico implementation of known thermostabilization strategies in proteins for identification and stability prediction of potential stabilizing mutation sites. iMutants aims to assess mutants based on changes in local interaction network and degree of residue conservation at the mutation sites. Each module was validated using an extensively diverse dataset. The server is freely accessible at http://irdp.ncl.res.in and has no login requirements.

  3. mtDNA-Server: next-generation sequencing data analysis of human mitochondrial DNA in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Weissensteiner, Hansi; Forer, Lukas; Fuchsberger, Christian; Schöpf, Bernd; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Specht, Günther; Kronenberg, Florian; Schönherr, Sebastian

    2016-07-08

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows investigating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) characteristics such as heteroplasmy (i.e. intra-individual sequence variation) to a higher level of detail. While several pipelines for analyzing heteroplasmies exist, issues in usability, accuracy of results and interpreting final data limit their usage. Here we present mtDNA-Server, a scalable web server for the analysis of mtDNA studies of any size with a special focus on usability as well as reliable identification and quantification of heteroplasmic variants. The mtDNA-Server workflow includes parallel read alignment, heteroplasmy detection, artefact or contamination identification, variant annotation as well as several quality control metrics, often neglected in current mtDNA NGS studies. All computational steps are parallelized with Hadoop MapReduce and executed graphically with Cloudgene. We validated the underlying heteroplasmy and contamination detection model by generating four artificial sample mix-ups on two different NGS devices. Our evaluation data shows that mtDNA-Server detects heteroplasmies and artificial recombinations down to the 1% level with perfect specificity and outperforms existing approaches regarding sensitivity. mtDNA-Server is currently able to analyze the 1000G Phase 3 data (n = 2,504) in less than 5 h and is freely accessible at https://mtdna-server.uibk.ac.at.

  4. mtDNA-Server: next-generation sequencing data analysis of human mitochondrial DNA in the cloud

    PubMed Central

    Weissensteiner, Hansi; Forer, Lukas; Fuchsberger, Christian; Schöpf, Bernd; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Specht, Günther; Kronenberg, Florian; Schönherr, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows investigating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) characteristics such as heteroplasmy (i.e. intra-individual sequence variation) to a higher level of detail. While several pipelines for analyzing heteroplasmies exist, issues in usability, accuracy of results and interpreting final data limit their usage. Here we present mtDNA-Server, a scalable web server for the analysis of mtDNA studies of any size with a special focus on usability as well as reliable identification and quantification of heteroplasmic variants. The mtDNA-Server workflow includes parallel read alignment, heteroplasmy detection, artefact or contamination identification, variant annotation as well as several quality control metrics, often neglected in current mtDNA NGS studies. All computational steps are parallelized with Hadoop MapReduce and executed graphically with Cloudgene. We validated the underlying heteroplasmy and contamination detection model by generating four artificial sample mix-ups on two different NGS devices. Our evaluation data shows that mtDNA-Server detects heteroplasmies and artificial recombinations down to the 1% level with perfect specificity and outperforms existing approaches regarding sensitivity. mtDNA-Server is currently able to analyze the 1000G Phase 3 data (n = 2,504) in less than 5 h and is freely accessible at https://mtdna-server.uibk.ac.at. PMID:27084948

  5. CNA web server: rigidity theory-based thermal unfolding simulations of proteins for linking structure, (thermo-)stability, and function

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Dennis M.; Rathi, Prakash Chandra; Pfleger, Christopher; Gohlke, Holger

    2013-01-01

    The Constraint Network Analysis (CNA) web server provides a user-friendly interface to the CNA approach developed in our laboratory for linking results from rigidity analyses to biologically relevant characteristics of a biomolecular structure. The CNA web server provides a refined modeling of thermal unfolding simulations that considers the temperature dependence of hydrophobic tethers and computes a set of global and local indices for quantifying biomacromolecular stability. From the global indices, phase transition points are identified where the structure switches from a rigid to a floppy state; these phase transition points can be related to a protein’s (thermo-)stability. Structural weak spots (unfolding nuclei) are automatically identified, too; this knowledge can be exploited in data-driven protein engineering. The local indices are useful in linking flexibility and function and to understand the impact of ligand binding on protein flexibility. The CNA web server robustly handles small-molecule ligands in general. To overcome issues of sensitivity with respect to the input structure, the CNA web server allows performing two ensemble-based variants of thermal unfolding simulations. The web server output is provided as raw data, plots and/or Jmol representations. The CNA web server, accessible at http://cpclab.uni-duesseldorf.de/cna or http://www.cnanalysis.de, is free and open to all users with no login requirement. PMID:23609541

  6. PiRaNhA: a server for the computational prediction of RNA-binding residues in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yoichi; Spriggs, Ruth V.; Nakamura, Haruki; Jones, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The PiRaNhA web server is a publicly available online resource that automatically predicts the location of RNA-binding residues (RBRs) in protein sequences. The goal of functional annotation of sequences in the field of RNA binding is to provide predictions of high accuracy that require only small numbers of targeted mutations for verification. The PiRaNhA server uses a support vector machine (SVM), with position-specific scoring matrices, residue interface propensity, predicted residue accessibility and residue hydrophobicity as features. The server allows the submission of up to 10 protein sequences, and the predictions for each sequence are provided on a web page and via email. The prediction results are provided in sequence format with predicted RBRs highlighted, in text format with the SVM threshold score indicated and as a graph which enables users to quickly identify those residues above any specific SVM threshold. The graph effectively enables the increase or decrease of the false positive rate. When tested on a non-redundant data set of 42 protein sequences not used in training, the PiRaNhA server achieved an accuracy of 85%, specificity of 90% and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.41 and outperformed other publicly available servers. The PiRaNhA prediction server is freely available at http://www.bioinformatics.sussex.ac.uk/PIRANHA. PMID:20507911

  7. ISSA-PS, The Postage Stamp Server for IRAS Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buren, D.; Ebert, R.; Egret, D.

    The \\htmllink{ISSA Postage Stamp Server}{http://astrovr.ipac.caltech.edu:8888/ISSA-PS} is a Web-accessible service that delivers IRAS images to users with a minimum of effort. It is unique in that it will operate by object name as well as celestial position. Users can connect using custom clients to automatically make requests and fetch images for local use.

  8. Network time synchronization servers at the US Naval Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    Responding to an increased demand for reliable, accurate time on the Internet and Milnet, the U.S. Naval Observatory Time Service has established the network time servers, tick.usno.navy.mil and tock.usno.navy.mil. The system clocks of these HP9000/747i industrial work stations are synchronized to within a few tens of microseconds of USNO Master Clock 2 using VMEbus IRIG-B interfaces. Redundant time code is available from a VMEbus GPS receiver. UTC(USNO) is provided over the network via a number of protocols, including the Network Time Protocol (NTP) (DARPA Network Working Group Report RFC-1305), the Daytime Protocol (RFC-867), and the Time protocol (RFC-868). Access to USNO network time services is presently open and unrestricted. An overview of USNO time services and results of LAN and WAN time synchronization tests will be presented.

  9. Workload Characterization and Performance Implications of Large-Scale Blog Servers

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Myeongjae; Kim, Youngjae; Hwang, Jeaho; Lee, Joonwon; Seo, Euiseong

    2012-11-01

    With the ever-increasing popularity of social network services (SNSs), an understanding of the characteristics of these services and their effects on the behavior of their host servers is critical. However, there has been a lack of research on the workload characterization of servers running SNS applications such as blog services. To fill this void, we empirically characterized real-world web server logs collected from one of the largest South Korean blog hosting sites for 12 consecutive days. The logs consist of more than 96 million HTTP requests and 4.7 TB of network traffic. Our analysis reveals the followings: (i) The transfer size of non-multimedia files and blog articles can be modeled using a truncated Pareto distribution and a log-normal distribution, respectively; (ii) User access for blog articles does not show temporal locality, but is strongly biased towards those posted with image or audio files. We additionally discuss the potential performance improvement through clustering of small files on a blog page into contiguous disk blocks, which benefits from the observed file access patterns. Trace-driven simulations show that, on average, the suggested approach achieves 60.6% better system throughput and reduces the processing time for file access by 30.8% compared to the best performance of the Ext4 file system.

  10. A Video Broadcast Architecture with Server Placement Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Ma, Xiangjie; Zhang, Weili; Guo, Yunfei; Liu, Wenbo

    We propose a hybrid architecture MTreeTV to support fast channel switching. MTreeTV combines the use of P2P networks with dedicated streaming servers, and was proposed to build on the advantages of both P2P and CDN paradigms. We study the placement of the servers with constraints on the client to server paths and evaluate the effect of the server parameters. Through analysis and simulation, we show that MTreeTV supports fast channel switching (<4s).

  11. Network characteristics for server selection in online games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claypool, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Online gameplay is impacted by the network characteristics of players connected to the same server. Unfortunately, the network characteristics of online game servers are not well-understood, particularly for groups that wish to play together on the same server. As a step towards a remedy, this paper presents analysis of an extensive set of measurements of game servers on the Internet. Over the course of many months, actual Internet game servers were queried simultaneously by twenty-five emulated game clients, with both servers and clients spread out on the Internet. The data provides statistics on the uptime and populations of game servers over a month long period an an in-depth look at the suitability for game servers for multi-player server selection, concentrating on characteristics critical to playability--latency and fairness. Analysis finds most game servers have latencies suitable for third-person and omnipresent games, such as real-time strategy, sports and role-playing games, providing numerous server choices for game players. However, far fewer game servers have the low latencies required for first-person games, such as shooters or race games. In all cases, groups that wish to play together have a greatly reduced set of servers from which to choose because of inherent unfairness in server latencies and server selection is particularly limited as the group size increases. These results hold across different game types and even across different generations of games. The data should be useful for game developers and network researchers that seek to improve game server selection, whether for single or multiple players.

  12. Optimal allocation of file servers in a local network environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodside, C. M.; Tripathi, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Files associated with workstations in a local area network are to be allocated among two or more file servers. Assuming statistically identical workstations and file servers and a performance model which is a closed multiclass separable queueing network, an optimal allocation is found. It is shown that all the files of each workstation should be placed on one file server, with the workstations divided as equally as possible among the file servers.

  13. ARCAS (ACACIA Regional Climate-data Access System) -- a Web Access System for Climate Model Data Access, Visualization and Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkarinen, C.; Brown, D.; Callahan, J.; hankin, S.; de Koningh, M.; Middleton-Link, D.; Wigley, T.

    2001-05-01

    A Web-based access system to climate model output data sets for intercomparison and analysis has been produced, using the NOAA-PMEL developed Live Access Server software as host server and Ferret as the data serving and visualization engine. Called ARCAS ("ACACIA Regional Climate-data Access System"), and publicly accessible at http://dataserver.ucar.edu/arcas, the site currently serves climate model outputs from runs of the NCAR Climate System Model for the 21st century, for Business as Usual and Stabilization of Greenhouse Gas Emission scenarios. Users can select, download, and graphically display single variables or comparisons of two variables from either or both of the CSM model runs, averaged for monthly, seasonal, or annual time resolutions. The time length of the averaging period, and the geographical domain for download and display, are fully selectable by the user. A variety of arithmetic operations on the data variables can be computed "on-the-fly", as defined by the user. Expansions of the user-selectable options for defining analysis options, and for accessing other DOD-compatible ("Distributed Ocean Data System-compatible") data sets, residing at locations other than the NCAR hardware server on which ARCAS operates, are planned for this year. These expansions are designed to allow users quick and easy-to-operate web-based access to the largest possible selection of climate model output data sets available throughout the world.

  14. World Wide Web Server Standards and Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Keith M.

    This document defines the specific standards and general guidelines which the U.S. Department of Education (ED) will use to make information available on the World Wide Web (WWW). The purpose of providing such guidance is to ensure high quality and consistent content, organization, and presentation of information on ED WWW servers, in order to…

  15. Implementing bioinformatic workflows within the bioextract server

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computational workflows in bioinformatics are becoming increasingly important in the achievement of scientific advances. These workflows typically require the integrated use of multiple, distributed data sources and analytic tools. The BioExtract Server (http://bioextract.org) is a distributed servi...

  16. Implementing Adaptive Performance Management in Server Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Gorton, Ian

    2007-06-11

    Performance and scalability are critical quality attributes for server applications in Internet-facing business systems. These applications operate in dynamic environments with rapidly fluctuating user loads and resource levels, and unpredictable system faults. Adaptive (autonomic) systems research aims to augment such server applications with intelligent control logic that can detect and react to sudden environmental changes. However, developing this adaptive logic is complex in itself. In addition, executing the adaptive logic consumes processing resources, and hence may (paradoxically) adversely affect application performance. In this paper we describe an approach for developing high-performance adaptive server applications and the supporting technology. The Adaptive Server Framework (ASF) is built on standard middleware services, and can be used to augment legacy systems with adaptive behavior without needing to change the application business logic. Crucially, ASF provides built-in control loop components to optimize the overall application performance, which comprises both the business and adaptive logic. The control loop is based on performance models and allows systems designers to tune the performance levels simply by modifying high level declarative policies. We demonstrate the use of ASF in a case study.

  17. LigSearch: a knowledge-based web server to identify likely ligands for a protein target

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Tjaart A. P. de; Laskowski, Roman A.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Chan, A. W. Edith; Anderson, Wayne F.; Thornton, Janet M.

    2013-12-01

    LigSearch is a web server for identifying ligands likely to bind to a given protein. Identifying which ligands might bind to a protein before crystallization trials could provide a significant saving in time and resources. LigSearch, a web server aimed at predicting ligands that might bind to and stabilize a given protein, has been developed. Using a protein sequence and/or structure, the system searches against a variety of databases, combining available knowledge, and provides a clustered and ranked output of possible ligands. LigSearch can be accessed at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/LigSearch.

  18. SARA-Coffee web server, a tool for the computation of RNA sequence and structure multiple alignments

    PubMed Central

    Di Tommaso, Paolo; Bussotti, Giovanni; Kemena, Carsten; Capriotti, Emidio; Chatzou, Maria; Prieto, Pablo; Notredame, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the SARA-Coffee web server; a service allowing the online computation of 3D structure based multiple RNA sequence alignments. The server makes it possible to combine sequences with and without known 3D structures. Given a set of sequences SARA-Coffee outputs a multiple sequence alignment along with a reliability index for every sequence, column and aligned residue. SARA-Coffee combines SARA, a pairwise structural RNA aligner with the R-Coffee multiple RNA aligner in a way that has been shown to improve alignment accuracy over most sequence aligners when enough structural data is available. The server can be accessed from http://tcoffee.crg.cat/apps/tcoffee/do:saracoffee. PMID:24972831

  19. Client/server approach to image capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris; Stokes, Earle

    1998-01-01

    The diversity of the digital image capturing devices on the market today is quite astonishing and ranges from low-cost CCD scanners to digital cameras (for both action and stand-still scenes), mid-end CCD scanners for desktop publishing and pre- press applications and high-end CCD flatbed scanners and drum- scanners with photo multiplier technology. Each device and market segment has its own specific needs which explains the diversity of the associated scanner applications. What all those applications have in common is the need to communicate with a particular device to import the digital images; after the import, additional image processing might be needed as well as color management operations. Although the specific requirements for all of these applications might differ considerably, a number of image capturing and color management facilities as well as other services are needed which can be shared. In this paper, we propose a client/server architecture for scanning and image editing applications which can be used as a common component for all these applications. One of the principal components of the scan server is the input capturing module. The specification of the input jobs is based on a generic input device model. Through this model we make abstraction of the specific scanner parameters and define the scan job definitions by a number of absolute parameters. As a result, scan job definitions will be less dependent on a particular scanner and have a more universal meaning. In this context, we also elaborate on the interaction of the generic parameters and the color characterization (i.e., the ICC profile). Other topics that are covered are the scheduling and parallel processing capabilities of the server, the image processing facilities, the interaction with the ICC engine, the communication facilities (both in-memory and over the network) and the different client architectures (stand-alone applications, TWAIN servers, plug-ins, OLE or Apple-event driven

  20. PRince: a web server for structural and physicochemical analysis of Protein-RNA interface

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Amita; Mishra, Abhishek; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a web server, PRince, which analyzes the structural features and physicochemical properties of the protein–RNA interface. Users need to submit a PDB file containing the atomic coordinates of both the protein and the RNA molecules in complex form (in ‘.pdb’ format). They should also mention the chain identifiers of interacting protein and RNA molecules. The size of the protein–RNA interface is estimated by measuring the solvent accessible surface area buried in contact. For a given protein–RNA complex, PRince calculates structural, physicochemical and hydration properties of the interacting surfaces. All these parameters generated by the server are presented in a tabular format. The interacting surfaces can also be visualized with software plug-in like Jmol. In addition, the output files containing the list of the atomic coordinates of the interacting protein, RNA and interface water molecules can be downloaded. The parameters generated by PRince are novel, and users can correlate them with the experimentally determined biophysical and biochemical parameters for better understanding the specificity of the protein–RNA recognition process. This server will be continuously upgraded to include more parameters. PRince is publicly accessible and free for use. Available at http://www.facweb.iitkgp.ernet.in/~rbahadur/prince/home.html. PMID:22689640

  1. ORION: a web server for protein fold recognition and structure prediction using evolutionary hybrid profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ghouzam, Yassine; Postic, Guillaume; Guerin, Pierre-Edouard; de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure prediction based on comparative modeling is the most efficient way to produce structural models when it can be performed. ORION is a dedicated webserver based on a new strategy that performs this task. The identification by ORION of suitable templates is performed using an original profile-profile approach that combines sequence and structure evolution information. Structure evolution information is encoded into profiles using structural features, such as solvent accessibility and local conformation —with Protein Blocks—, which give an accurate description of the local protein structure. ORION has recently been improved, increasing by 5% the quality of its results. The ORION web server accepts a single protein sequence as input and searches homologous protein structures within minutes. Various databases such as PDB, SCOP and HOMSTRAD can be mined to find an appropriate structural template. For the modeling step, a protein 3D structure can be directly obtained from the selected template by MODELLER and displayed with global and local quality model estimation measures. The sequence and the predicted structure of 4 examples from the CAMEO server and a recent CASP11 target from the ‘Hard’ category (T0818-D1) are shown as pertinent examples. Our web server is accessible at http://www.dsimb.inserm.fr/ORION/. PMID:27319297

  2. Bringing Ad-Hoc Analytics to Big Earth Data: the EarthServer Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    From the commonly accepted Vs defining the Big Data challenge - volume, velocity, variety - we more and more learn that the sheer volume is not the only, and often not even the decisive factor inhibiting access and analytics. In particular variety of data is a frequent core issue, posing manifold issues. Based on this observation we claim that a key aspect to analytics is the freedom to ask any questions, simple or complex, anytime and combining any choice of data structures, whatever diverging they may be. Actually, techniques for such "ad-hoc queries" we can learn from classical databases. Their concept of high-level query languages brings along several benefits: a uniform semantic, allowing machine-to-machine communication, including automatic generation of queries; massive server-side optimization and parallelization; and building attractive client interfaces hiding the query syntax from casual users while allowing power users to utilize it. However, these benefits used to be available only on tabular and set oriented data, text, and - more recently - graph data. With the advent of Array Databases, they become available on large multidimensional raster data assets as well, getting one step closer to the Holy Grail of itnegrated, uniform retrieval for users. ErthServer is a transatlantic initiative setting up operationa linfrastructures based on this paradigm. In our talk, we present core EarthServer technology concepts as well as a spectrum of Earth Science applications utilizing the EarthServer platform for versatile, visualisation supported analytics services. Further, we discuss the substantial impact EarthServer is having on Big Geo Data standardization in OGC and ISO. Time and Internet connection permitting a live demo can be presented.

  3. SAS: A Secure Aglet Server

    SciTech Connect

    Jean, Evens; Jiao, Yu; Hurson, Ali R.; Potok, Thomas E

    2007-01-01

    Despite the fact that mobile agents have received increasing attention in various research efforts, the use of the paradigm in practical applications has yet to fully emerge. With the presence of infrastructure to support the development of mobile agent applications, security concerns act as the primary deterrent against such trends. Numerous studies have been conducted to address the security issues of mobile agents with a strong focus on the theoretical aspect of the problem. This work attempts to bridge the gap from theory to practice by analyzing the security mechanisms available in Aglet. We herein propose several mechanisms, stemming from theoretical advancements, intended to protect both agents and hosts in order to foster the development of business applications that fully exploit the benefits of agent technology. The proposed mechanisms lay the foundation for implementation of application specific protocols dotted with access control, secured communication and ability to detect tampering of agent data. We demonstrate our contribution through application scenarios of a prototyped Information Retrieval system.

  4. HMMER web server: 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Finn, Robert D; Clements, Jody; Arndt, William; Miller, Benjamin L; Wheeler, Travis J; Schreiber, Fabian; Bateman, Alex; Eddy, Sean R

    2015-07-01

    The HMMER website, available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/Tools/hmmer/, provides access to the protein homology search algorithms found in the HMMER software suite. Since the first release of the website in 2011, the search repertoire has been expanded to include the iterative search algorithm, jackhmmer. The continued growth of the target sequence databases means that traditional tabular representations of significant sequence hits can be overwhelming to the user. Consequently, additional ways of presenting homology search results have been developed, allowing them to be summarised according to taxonomic distribution or domain architecture. The taxonomy and domain architecture representations can be used in combination to filter the results according to the needs of a user. Searches can also be restricted prior to submission using a new taxonomic filter, which not only ensures that the results are specific to the requested taxonomic group, but also improves search performance. The repertoire of profile hidden Markov model libraries, which are used for annotation of query sequences with protein families and domains, has been expanded to include the libraries from CATH-Gene3D, PIRSF, Superfamily and TIGRFAMs. Finally, we discuss the relocation of the HMMER webserver to the European Bioinformatics Institute and the potential impact that this will have.

  5. Remotely accessible laboratory for MEMS testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, Ganapathy; Mulsow, Matthew; Melinger, Aaron; Lacouture, Shelby; Dallas, Tim E.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the construction of a remotely accessible and interactive laboratory for testing microdevices (aka: MicroElectroMechancial Systems - MEMS). Enabling expanded utilization of microdevices for research, commercial, and educational purposes is very important for driving the creation of future MEMS devices and applications. Unfortunately, the relatively high costs associated with MEMS devices and testing infrastructure makes widespread access to the world of MEMS difficult. The creation of a virtual lab to control and actuate MEMS devices over the internet helps spread knowledge to a larger audience. A host laboratory has been established that contains a digital microscope, microdevices, controllers, and computers that can be logged into through the internet. The overall layout of the tele-operated MEMS laboratory system can be divided into two major parts: the server side and the client side. The server-side is present at Texas Tech University, and hosts a server machine that runs the Linux operating system and is used for interfacing the MEMS lab with the outside world via internet. The controls from the clients are transferred to the lab side through the server interface. The server interacts with the electronics required to drive the MEMS devices using a range of National Instruments hardware and LabView Virtual Instruments. An optical microscope (100 ×) with a CCD video camera is used to capture images of the operating MEMS. The server broadcasts the live video stream over the internet to the clients through the website. When the button is pressed on the website, the MEMS device responds and the video stream shows the movement in close to real time.

  6. MyDas, an extensible Java DAS server.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Gustavo A; García, Leyla J; Jones, Philip; Jimenez, Rafael C; Quinn, Antony F; Jenkinson, Andrew M; Mulder, Nicola; Martin, Maria; Hunter, Sarah; Hermjakob, Henning

    2012-01-01

    A large number of diverse, complex, and distributed data resources are currently available in the Bioinformatics domain. The pace of discovery and the diversity of information means that centralised reference databases like UniProt and Ensembl cannot integrate all potentially relevant information sources. From a user perspective however, centralised access to all relevant information concerning a specific query is essential. The Distributed Annotation System (DAS) defines a communication protocol to exchange annotations on genomic and protein sequences; this standardisation enables clients to retrieve data from a myriad of sources, thus offering centralised access to end-users.We introduce MyDas, a web server that facilitates the publishing of biological annotations according to the DAS specification. It deals with the common functionality requirements of making data available, while also providing an extension mechanism in order to implement the specifics of data store interaction. MyDas allows the user to define where the required information is located along with its structure, and is then responsible for the communication protocol details.

  7. miRClassify: an advanced web server for miRNA family classification and annotation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Quan; Mao, Yaozong; Hu, Lingling; Wu, Yunfeng; Ji, Zhiliang

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) family is a group of miRNAs that derive from the common ancestor. Normally, members from the same miRNA family have similar physiological functions; however, they are not always conserved in primary sequence or secondary structure. Proper family prediction from primary sequence will be helpful for accurate identification and further functional annotation of novel miRNA. Therefore, we introduced a novel machine learning-based web server, the miRClassify, which can rapidly identify miRNA from the primary sequence and classify it into a miRNA family regardless of similarity in sequence and structure. Additionally, the medical implication of the miRNA family is also provided when it is available in PubMed. The web server is accessible at the link http://datamining.xmu.edu.cn/software/MIR/home.html.

  8. More Effective Distributed ML via a Stale Synchronous Parallel Parameter Server

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Qirong; Cipar, James; Cui, Henggang; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Seunghak; Gibbons, Phillip B.; Gibson, Garth A.; Ganger, Gregory R.; Xing, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a parameter server system for distributed ML, which follows a Stale Synchronous Parallel (SSP) model of computation that maximizes the time computational workers spend doing useful work on ML algorithms, while still providing correctness guarantees. The parameter server provides an easy-to-use shared interface for read/write access to an ML model’s values (parameters and variables), and the SSP model allows distributed workers to read older, stale versions of these values from a local cache, instead of waiting to get them from a central storage. This significantly increases the proportion of time workers spend computing, as opposed to waiting. Furthermore, the SSP model ensures ML algorithm correctness by limiting the maximum age of the stale values. We provide a proof of correctness under SSP, as well as empirical results demonstrating that the SSP model achieves faster algorithm convergence on several different ML problems, compared to fully-synchronous and asynchronous schemes. PMID:25400488

  9. Dali server: conservation mapping in 3D.

    PubMed

    Holm, Liisa; Rosenström, Päivi

    2010-07-01

    Our web site (http://ekhidna.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali_server) runs the Dali program for protein structure comparison. The web site consists of three parts: (i) the Dali server compares newly solved structures against structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), (ii) the Dali database allows browsing precomputed structural neighbourhoods and (iii) the pairwise comparison generates suboptimal alignments for a pair of structures. Each part has its own query form and a common format for the results page. The inputs are either PDB identifiers or novel structures uploaded by the user. The results pages are hyperlinked to aid interactive analysis. The web interface is simple and easy to use. The key purpose of interactive analysis is to check whether conserved residues line up in multiple structural alignments and how conserved residues and ligands cluster together in multiple structure superimpositions. In favourable cases, protein structure comparison can lead to evolutionary discoveries not detected by sequence analysis.

  10. PSSweb: protein structural statistics web server.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Thomas; Stote, Roland H; Dejaegere, Annick

    2016-07-08

    With the increasing number of protein structures available, there is a need for tools capable of automating the comparison of ensembles of structures, a common requirement in structural biology and bioinformatics. PSSweb is a web server for protein structural statistics. It takes as input an ensemble of PDB files of protein structures, performs a multiple sequence alignment and computes structural statistics for each position of the alignment. Different optional functionalities are proposed: structure superposition, Cartesian coordinate statistics, dihedral angle calculation and statistics, and a cluster analysis based on dihedral angles. An interactive report is generated, containing a summary of the results, tables, figures and 3D visualization of superposed structures. The server is available at http://pssweb.org.

  11. PSSweb: protein structural statistics web server

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Thomas; Stote, Roland H.; Dejaegere, Annick

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of protein structures available, there is a need for tools capable of automating the comparison of ensembles of structures, a common requirement in structural biology and bioinformatics. PSSweb is a web server for protein structural statistics. It takes as input an ensemble of PDB files of protein structures, performs a multiple sequence alignment and computes structural statistics for each position of the alignment. Different optional functionalities are proposed: structure superposition, Cartesian coordinate statistics, dihedral angle calculation and statistics, and a cluster analysis based on dihedral angles. An interactive report is generated, containing a summary of the results, tables, figures and 3D visualization of superposed structures. The server is available at http://pssweb.org. PMID:27174930

  12. Energy Servers Deliver Clean, Affordable Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    K.R. Sridhar developed a fuel cell device for Ames Research Center, that could use solar power to split water into oxygen for breathing and hydrogen for fuel on Mars. Sridhar saw the potential of the technology, when reversed, to create clean energy on Earth. He founded Bloom Energy, of Sunnyvale, California, to advance the technology. Today, the Bloom Energy Server is providing cost-effective, environmentally friendly energy to a host of companies such as eBay, Google, and The Coca-Cola Company. Bloom's NASA-derived Energy Servers generate energy that is about 67-percent cleaner than a typical coal-fired power plant when using fossil fuels and 100-percent cleaner with renewable fuels.

  13. SPEER-SERVER: a web server for prediction of protein specificity determining sites

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Mandloi, Sapan; Lanczycki, Christopher J.; Panchenko, Anna R.; Chakrabarti, Saikat

    2012-01-01

    Sites that show specific conservation patterns within subsets of proteins in a protein family are likely to be involved in the development of functional specificity. These sites, generally termed specificity determining sites (SDS), might play a crucial role in binding to a specific substrate or proteins. Identification of SDS through experimental techniques is a slow, difficult and tedious job. Hence, it is very important to develop efficient computational methods that can more expediently identify SDS. Herein, we present Specificity prediction using amino acids’ Properties, Entropy and Evolution Rate (SPEER)-SERVER, a web server that predicts SDS by analyzing quantitative measures of the conservation patterns of protein sites based on their physico-chemical properties and the heterogeneity of evolutionary changes between and within the protein subfamilies. This web server provides an improved representation of results, adds useful input and output options and integrates a wide range of analysis and data visualization tools when compared with the original standalone version of the SPEER algorithm. Extensive benchmarking finds that SPEER-SERVER exhibits sensitivity and precision performance that, on average, meets or exceeds that of other currently available methods. SPEER-SERVER is available at http://www.hpppi.iicb.res.in/ss/. PMID:22689646

  14. JCID Compliant Thin Server for Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    JCID SST Insertion Project (JSP) is a team effort between a group at Penn State’s Applied Research Lab and Lattice/RTI of Herndon, VA to integrate a...Applied Research Lab and Lattice/RTI of Herndon, VA to integrate a flexible table-based sensor configuration capability into the the JCID/JWARN...ARO JCID Compliant Thin Server for Sensors D.C. Swanson The Applied Research Laboratory The Pennsylvania State University POB 30 State College

  15. Energy Efficiency in Small Server Rooms: Field Surveys and Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Iris; Greenberg, Steve; Mahdavi, Roozbeh; Brown, Richard; Tschudi, William

    2014-08-11

    Fifty-seven percent of US servers are housed in server closets, server rooms, and localized data centers, in what are commonly referred to as small server rooms, which comprise 99percent of all server spaces in the US. While many mid-tier and enterprise-class data centers are owned by large corporations that consider energy efficiency a goal to minimize business operating costs, small server rooms typically are not similarly motivated. They are characterized by decentralized ownership and management and come in many configurations, which creates a unique set of efficiency challenges. To develop energy efficiency strategies for these spaces, we surveyed 30 small server rooms across eight institutions, and selected four of them for detailed assessments. The four rooms had Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) values ranging from 1.5 to 2.1. Energy saving opportunities ranged from no- to low-cost measures such as raising cooling set points and better airflow management, to more involved but cost-effective measures including server consolidation and virtualization, and dedicated cooling with economizers. We found that inefficiencies mainly resulted from organizational rather than technical issues. Because of the inherent space and resource limitations, the most effective measure is to operate servers through energy-efficient cloud-based services or well-managed larger data centers, rather than server rooms. Backup power requirement, and IT and cooling efficiency should be evaluated to minimize energy waste in the server space. Utility programs are instrumental in raising awareness and spreading technical knowledge on server operation, and the implementation of energy efficiency measures in small server rooms.

  16. PubServer: literature searches by homology.

    PubMed

    Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Koska, Laszlo; Sedova, Mayya; Godzik, Adam

    2014-07-01

    PubServer, available at http://pubserver.burnham.org/, is a tool to automatically collect, filter and analyze publications associated with groups of homologous proteins. Protein entries in databases such as Entrez Protein database at NCBI contain information about publications associated with a given protein. The scope of these publications varies a lot: they include studies focused on biochemical functions of individual proteins, but also reports from genome sequencing projects that introduce tens of thousands of proteins. Collecting and analyzing publications related to sets of homologous proteins help in functional annotation of novel protein families and in improving annotations of well-studied protein families or individual genes. However, performing such collection and analysis manually is a tedious and time-consuming process. PubServer automatically collects identifiers of homologous proteins using PSI-Blast, retrieves literature references from corresponding database entries and filters out publications unlikely to contain useful information about individual proteins. It also prepares simple vocabulary statistics from titles, abstracts and MeSH terms to identify the most frequently occurring keywords, which may help to quickly identify common themes in these publications. The filtering criteria applied to collected publications are user-adjustable. The results of the server are presented as an interactive page that allows re-filtering and different presentations of the output.

  17. MARSIS data and simulation exploited using array databases: PlanetServer/EarthServer for sounding radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantini, Federico; Pio Rossi, Angelo; Orosei, Roberto; Baumann, Peter; Misev, Dimitar; Oosthoek, Jelmer; Beccati, Alan; Campalani, Piero; Unnithan, Vikram

    2014-05-01

    MARSIS is an orbital synthetic aperture radar for both ionosphere and subsurface sounding on board ESA's Mars Express (Picardi et al. 2005). It transmits electromagnetic pulses centered at 1.8, 3, 4 or 5 MHz that penetrate below the surface and are reflected by compositional and/or structural discontinuities in the subsurface of Mars. MARSIS data are available as a collection of single orbit data files. The availability of tools for a more effective access to such data would greatly ease data analysis and exploitation by the community of users. For this purpose, we are developing a database built on the raster database management system RasDaMan (e.g. Baumann et al., 1994), to be populated with MARSIS data and integrated in the PlanetServer/EarthServer (e.g. Oosthoek et al., 2013; Rossi et al., this meeting) project. The data (and related metadata) are stored in the db for each frequency used by MARSIS radar. The capability of retrieving data belonging to a certain orbit or to multiple orbit on the base of latitute/longitude boundaries is a key requirement of the db design, allowing, besides the "classical" radargram representation of the data, and in area with sufficiently hight orbit density, a 3D data extraction, subset and analysis of subsurface structures. Moreover the use of the OGC WCPS (Web Coverage Processing Service) standard can allow calculations on database query results for multiple echoes and/or subsets of a certain data product. Because of the low directivity of its dipole antenna, MARSIS receives echoes from portions of the surface of Mars that are distant from nadir and can be mistakenly interpreted as subsurface echoes. For this reason, methods have been developed to simulate surface echoes (e.g. Nouvel et al., 2004), to reveal the true origin of an echo through comparison with instrument data. These simulations are usually time-consuming, and so far have been performed either on a case-by-case basis or in some simplified form. A code for

  18. Web Server. Security Technical Implementation Guide. Version 6, Release 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-11

    deployment, and operational maintenance of the web server lifecycle. Specific security configuration guidance for the Netscape /iPlanet/Sun JAVA...required security standards of this document. For example, a default installation setting for Netscape web servers is that automatic directory indexing...users with third-party confirmation of authenticity. Most web browsers perform server authentication automatically; the user is notified only if the

  19. The EarthServer project: Exploiting Identity Federations, Science Gateways and Social and Mobile Clients for Big Earth Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Roberto; Bruno, Riccardo; Calanducci, Antonio; Messina, Antonio; Pappalardo, Marco; Passaro, Gianluca

    2013-04-01

    The EarthServer project (www.earthserver.eu), funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Program, aims at establishing open access and ad-hoc analytics on extreme-size Earth Science data, based on and extending leading-edge Array Database technology. The core idea is to use database query languages as client/server interface to achieve barrier-free "mix & match" access to multi-source, any-size, multi-dimensional space-time data -- in short: "Big Earth Data Analytics" - based on the open standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Coverage Processing Service (OGC WCPS) and the W3C XQuery. EarthServer combines both, thereby achieving a tight data/metadata integration. Further, the rasdaman Array Database System (www.rasdaman.com) is extended with further space-time coverage data types. On server side, highly effective optimizations - such as parallel and distributed query processing - ensure scalability to Exabyte volumes. Six Lighthouse Applications are being established in EarthServer, each of which poses distinct challenges on Earth Data Analytics: Cryospheric Science, Airborne Science, Atmospheric Science, Geology, Oceanography, and Planetary Science. Altogether, they cover all Earth Science domains; the Planetary Science use case has been added to challenge concepts and standards in non-standard environments. In addition, EarthLook (maintained by Jacobs University) showcases use of OGC standards in 1D through 5D use cases. In this contribution we will report on the first applications integrated in the EarthServer Science Gateway and on the clients for mobile appliances developed to access them. We will also show how federated and social identity services can allow Big Earth Data Providers to expose their data in a distributed environment keeping a strict and fine-grained control on user authentication and authorisation. The degree of fulfilment of the EarthServer implementation with the recommendations made in the recent TERENA Study on

  20. The CAD-score web server: contact area-based comparison of structures and interfaces of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes.

    PubMed

    Olechnovič, Kliment; Venclovas, Ceslovas

    2014-07-01

    The Contact Area Difference score (CAD-score) web server provides a universal framework to compute and analyze discrepancies between different 3D structures of the same biological macromolecule or complex. The server accepts both single-subunit and multi-subunit structures and can handle all the major types of macromolecules (proteins, RNA, DNA and their complexes). It can perform numerical comparison of both structures and interfaces. In addition to entire structures and interfaces, the server can assess user-defined subsets. The CAD-score server performs both global and local numerical evaluations of structural differences between structures or interfaces. The results can be explored interactively using sortable tables of global scores, profiles of local errors, superimposed contact maps and 3D structure visualization. The web server could be used for tasks such as comparison of models with the native (reference) structure, comparison of X-ray structures of the same macromolecule obtained in different states (e.g. with and without a bound ligand), analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural ensemble or structures obtained in the course of molecular dynamics simulation. The web server is freely accessible at: http://www.ibt.lt/bioinformatics/cad-score.

  1. Secure Web-Site Access with Tickets and Message-Dependent Digests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, David I.

    2008-01-01

    Although there are various methods for restricting access to documents stored on a World Wide Web (WWW) site (a Web site), none of the widely used methods is completely suitable for restricting access to Web applications hosted on an otherwise publicly accessible Web site. A new technique, however, provides a mix of features well suited for restricting Web-site or Web-application access to authorized users, including the following: secure user authentication, tamper-resistant sessions, simple access to user state variables by server-side applications, and clean session terminations. This technique, called message-dependent digests with tickets, or MDDT, maintains secure user sessions by passing single-use nonces (tickets) and message-dependent digests of user credentials back and forth between client and server. Appendix 2 provides a working implementation of MDDT with PHP server-side code and JavaScript client-side code.

  2. Electronic document distribution: Design of the anonymous FTP Langley Technical Report Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Gottlich, Gretchen L.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental electronic dissemination project, the Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS), has been undertaken to determine the feasibility of delivering Langley technical reports directly to the desktops of researchers worldwide. During the first six months, over 4700 accesses occurred and over 2400 technical reports were distributed. This usage indicates the high level of interest that researchers have in performing literature searches and retrieving technical reports at their desktops. The initial system was developed with existing resources and technology. The reports are stored as files on an inexpensive UNIX workstation and are accessible over the Internet. This project will serve as a foundation for ongoing projects at other NASA centers that will allow for greater access to NASA technical reports.

  3. QuickSNP: an automated web server for selection of tagSNPs

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Deepak; Woodfield, Alonzo S.; Verma, Ranjana; Zandi, Peter P.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Potash, James B.

    2007-01-01

    Although large-scale genetic association studies involving hundreds to thousands of SNPs have become feasible, the associated cost is substantial. Even with the increased efficiency introduced by the use of tagSNPs, researchers are often seeking ways to maximize resource utilization given a set of SNP-based gene-mapping goals. We have developed a web server named QuickSNP in order to provide cost-effective selection of SNPs, and to fill in some of the gaps in existing SNP selection tools. One useful feature of QuickSNP is the option to select only gene-centric SNPs from a chromosomal region in an automated fashion. Other useful features include automated selection of coding non-synonymous SNPs, SNP filtering based on inter-SNP distances and information regarding the availability of genotyping assays for SNPs and whether they are present on whole genome chips. The program produces user-friendly summary tables and results, and a link to a UCSC Genome Browser track illustrating the position of the selected tagSNPs in relation to genes and other genomic features. We hope the unique combination of features of this server will be useful for researchers aiming to select markers for their genotyping studies. The server is freely available and can be accessed at the URL http://bioinformoodics.jhmi.edu/quickSNP.pl. PMID:17517769

  4. DNA barcode goes two-dimensions: DNA QR code web server.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Shi, Linchun; Xu, Xiaolan; Li, Huan; Xing, Hang; Liang, Dong; Jiang, Kun; Pang, Xiaohui; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    The DNA barcoding technology uses a standard region of DNA sequence for species identification and discovery. At present, "DNA barcode" actually refers to DNA sequences, which are not amenable to information storage, recognition, and retrieval. Our aim is to identify the best symbology that can represent DNA barcode sequences in practical applications. A comprehensive set of sequences for five DNA barcode markers ITS2, rbcL, matK, psbA-trnH, and CO1 was used as the test data. Fifty-three different types of one-dimensional and ten two-dimensional barcode symbologies were compared based on different criteria, such as coding capacity, compression efficiency, and error detection ability. The quick response (QR) code was found to have the largest coding capacity and relatively high compression ratio. To facilitate the further usage of QR code-based DNA barcodes, a web server was developed and is accessible at http://qrfordna.dnsalias.org. The web server allows users to retrieve the QR code for a species of interests, convert a DNA sequence to and from a QR code, and perform species identification based on local and global sequence similarities. In summary, the first comprehensive evaluation of various barcode symbologies has been carried out. The QR code has been found to be the most appropriate symbology for DNA barcode sequences. A web server has also been constructed to allow biologists to utilize QR codes in practical DNA barcoding applications.

  5. ProTox: a web server for the in silico prediction of rodent oral toxicity.

    PubMed

    Drwal, Malgorzata N; Banerjee, Priyanka; Dunkel, Mathias; Wettig, Martin R; Preissner, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Animal trials are currently the major method for determining the possible toxic effects of drug candidates and cosmetics. In silico prediction methods represent an alternative approach and aim to rationalize the preclinical drug development, thus enabling the reduction of the associated time, costs and animal experiments. Here, we present ProTox, a web server for the prediction of rodent oral toxicity. The prediction method is based on the analysis of the similarity of compounds with known median lethal doses (LD50) and incorporates the identification of toxic fragments, therefore representing a novel approach in toxicity prediction. In addition, the web server includes an indication of possible toxicity targets which is based on an in-house collection of protein-ligand-based pharmacophore models ('toxicophores') for targets associated with adverse drug reactions. The ProTox web server is open to all users and can be accessed without registration at: http://tox.charite.de/tox. The only requirement for the prediction is the two-dimensional structure of the input compounds. All ProTox methods have been evaluated based on a diverse external validation set and displayed strong performance (sensitivity, specificity and precision of 76, 95 and 75%, respectively) and superiority over other toxicity prediction tools, indicating their possible applicability for other compound classes.

  6. ProTox: a web server for the in silico prediction of rodent oral toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Drwal, Malgorzata N.; Banerjee, Priyanka; Dunkel, Mathias; Wettig, Martin R.; Preissner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Animal trials are currently the major method for determining the possible toxic effects of drug candidates and cosmetics. In silico prediction methods represent an alternative approach and aim to rationalize the preclinical drug development, thus enabling the reduction of the associated time, costs and animal experiments. Here, we present ProTox, a web server for the prediction of rodent oral toxicity. The prediction method is based on the analysis of the similarity of compounds with known median lethal doses (LD50) and incorporates the identification of toxic fragments, therefore representing a novel approach in toxicity prediction. In addition, the web server includes an indication of possible toxicity targets which is based on an in-house collection of protein–ligand-based pharmacophore models (‘toxicophores’) for targets associated with adverse drug reactions. The ProTox web server is open to all users and can be accessed without registration at: http://tox.charite.de/tox. The only requirement for the prediction is the two-dimensional structure of the input compounds. All ProTox methods have been evaluated based on a diverse external validation set and displayed strong performance (sensitivity, specificity and precision of 76, 95 and 75%, respectively) and superiority over other toxicity prediction tools, indicating their possible applicability for other compound classes. PMID:24838562

  7. Pre-main-sequence isochrones - III. The Cluster Collaboration isochrone server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Cameron P. M.; Rees, Jon M.; Naylor, Tim; Mayne, N. J.; Jeffries, R. D.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Rowe, John

    2014-12-01

    We present an isochrone server for semi-empirical pre-main-sequence model isochrones in the following systems: Johnson-Cousins, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Two-Micron All-Sky Survey, Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) Wide-Field Camera and INT Photometric Hα Survey (IPHAS)/UV-Excess Survey (UVEX). The server can be accessed via the Cluster Collaboration webpage http://www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/timn/isochrones/. To achieve this, we have used the observed colours of member stars in young clusters with well-established age, distance and reddening to create fiducial loci in the colour-magnitude diagram. These empirical sequences have been used to quantify the discrepancy between the models and data arising from uncertainties in both the interior and atmospheric models, resulting in tables of semi-empirical bolometric corrections (BCs) in the various photometric systems. The model isochrones made available through the server are based on existing stellar interior models coupled with our newly derived semi-empirical BCs. As part of this analysis, we also present new cluster parameters for both the Pleiades and Praesepe, yielding ages of 135^{+20}_{-11} and 665^{+14}_{-7} {Myr} as well as distances of 132 ± 2 and 184 ± 2 pc, respectively (statistical uncertainty only).

  8. NAFlex: a web server for the study of nucleic acid flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Faustino, Ignacio; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; González, Carlos; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; Orozco, Modesto

    2013-01-01

    We present NAFlex, a new web tool to study the flexibility of nucleic acids, either isolated or bound to other molecules. The server allows the user to incorporate structures from protein data banks, completing gaps and removing structural inconsistencies. It is also possible to define canonical (average or sequence-adapted) nucleic acid structures using a variety of predefined internal libraries, as well to create specific nucleic acid conformations from the sequence. The server offers a variety of methods to explore nucleic acid flexibility, such as a colorless wormlike-chain model, a base-pair resolution mesoscopic model and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with a wide variety of protocols and force fields. The trajectories obtained by simulations, or imported externally, can be visualized and analyzed using a large number of tools, including standard Cartesian analysis, essential dynamics, helical analysis, local and global stiffness, energy decomposition, principal components and in silico NMR spectra. The server is accessible free of charge from the mmb.irbbarcelona.org/NAFlex webpage. PMID:23685436

  9. PROTEUS2: a web server for comprehensive protein structure prediction and structure-based annotation.

    PubMed

    Montgomerie, Scott; Cruz, Joseph A; Shrivastava, Savita; Arndt, David; Berjanskii, Mark; Wishart, David S

    2008-07-01

    PROTEUS2 is a web server designed to support comprehensive protein structure prediction and structure-based annotation. PROTEUS2 accepts either single sequences (for directed studies) or multiple sequences (for whole proteome annotation) and predicts the secondary and, if possible, tertiary structure of the query protein(s). Unlike most other tools or servers, PROTEUS2 bundles signal peptide identification, transmembrane helix prediction, transmembrane beta-strand prediction, secondary structure prediction (for soluble proteins) and homology modeling (i.e. 3D structure generation) into a single prediction pipeline. Using a combination of progressive multi-sequence alignment, structure-based mapping, hidden Markov models, multi-component neural nets and up-to-date databases of known secondary structure assignments, PROTEUS is able to achieve among the highest reported levels of predictive accuracy for signal peptides (Q2 = 94%), membrane spanning helices (Q2 = 87%) and secondary structure (Q3 score of 81.3%). PROTEUS2's homology modeling services also provide high quality 3D models that compare favorably with those generated by SWISS-MODEL and 3D JigSaw (within 0.2 A RMSD). The average PROTEUS2 prediction takes approximately 3 min per query sequence. The PROTEUS2 server along with source code for many of its modules is accessible a http://wishart.biology.ualberta.ca/proteus2.

  10. PELE web server: atomistic study of biomolecular systems at your fingertips.

    PubMed

    Madadkar-Sobhani, Armin; Guallar, Victor

    2013-07-01

    PELE, Protein Energy Landscape Exploration, our novel technology based on protein structure prediction algorithms and a Monte Carlo sampling, is capable of modelling the all-atom protein-ligand dynamical interactions in an efficient and fast manner, with two orders of magnitude reduced computational cost when compared with traditional molecular dynamics techniques. PELE's heuristic approach generates trial moves based on protein and ligand perturbations followed by side chain sampling and global/local minimization. The collection of accepted steps forms a stochastic trajectory. Furthermore, several processors may be run in parallel towards a collective goal or defining several independent trajectories; the whole procedure has been parallelized using the Message Passing Interface. Here, we introduce the PELE web server, designed to make the whole process of running simulations easier and more practical by minimizing input file demand, providing user-friendly interface and producing abstract outputs (e.g. interactive graphs and tables). The web server has been implemented in C++ using Wt (http://www.webtoolkit.eu) and MySQL (http://www.mysql.com). The PELE web server, accessible at http://pele.bsc.es, is free and open to all users with no login requirement.

  11. Testing an Open Source installation and server provisioning tool for the INFN CNAF Tierl Storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, M.; Favaro, M.; Gregori, D.; Ricci, P. P.; Sapunenko, V.

    2014-06-01

    In large computing centers, such as the INFN CNAF Tier1 [1], is essential to be able to configure all the machines, depending on use, in an automated way. For several years at the Tier1 has been used Quattor[2], a server provisioning tool, which is currently used in production. Nevertheless we have recently started a comparison study involving other tools able to provide specific server installation and configuration features and also offer a proper full customizable solution as an alternative to Quattor. Our choice at the moment fell on integration between two tools: Cobbler [3] for the installation phase and Puppet [4] for the server provisioning and management operation. The tool should provide the following properties in order to replicate and gradually improve the current system features: implement a system check for storage specific constraints such as kernel modules black list at boot time to avoid undesired SAN (Storage Area Network) access during disk partitioning; a simple and effective mechanism for kernel upgrade and downgrade; the ability of setting package provider using yum, rpm or apt; easy to use Virtual Machine installation support including bonding and specific Ethernet configuration; scalability for managing thousands of nodes and parallel installations. This paper describes the results of the comparison and the tests carried out to verify the requirements and the new system suitability in the INFN-T1 environment.

  12. Access Control of Web- and Java-Based Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tso, Kam S.; Pajevski, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cybersecurity has become a great concern as threats of service interruption, unauthorized access, stealing and altering of information, and spreading of viruses have become more prevalent and serious. Application layer access control of applications is a critical component in the overall security solution that also includes encryption, firewalls, virtual private networks, antivirus, and intrusion detection. An access control solution, based on an open-source access manager augmented with custom software components, was developed to provide protection to both Web-based and Javabased client and server applications. The DISA Security Service (DISA-SS) provides common access control capabilities for AMMOS software applications through a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) and network- accessible security services for authentication, single sign-on, authorization checking, and authorization policy management. The OpenAM access management technology designed for Web applications can be extended to meet the needs of Java thick clients and stand alone servers that are commonly used in the JPL AMMOS environment. The DISA-SS reusable components have greatly reduced the effort for each AMMOS subsystem to develop its own access control strategy. The novelty of this work is that it leverages an open-source access management product that was designed for Webbased applications to provide access control for Java thick clients and Java standalone servers. Thick clients and standalone servers are still commonly used in businesses and government, especially for applications that require rich graphical user interfaces and high-performance visualization that cannot be met by thin clients running on Web browsers

  13. GeoDADIS: A framework for the development of geographic data acquisition and dissemination servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarroya, S.; Viqueira, J. R. R.; Cotos, J. M.; Flores, J. C.

    2013-03-01

    The homogeneous access to sensor data in data monitoring and analysis applications is gaining much interest nowadays. To tackle this problem from an application independent perspective, the design and implementation of a framework called GeoDADIS for the development of data acquisition and dissemination servers is discussed in the present paper. Those servers are of common use in monitoring applications as they perform as gateways between decision support and data visualization technologies used in application developments and the heterogeneous collection of protocols and interfaces available in the industrial area for sensor data access. To achieve its objective, the architecture of GeoDADIS consists of: (i) a bottommost data acquisition layer that communicates with sensors, (ii) a middle kernel layer that provides general purpose functionality related to data management and system control and (iii) a topmost external interaction layer that enables the access from applications. The frameworks design does extensive use of the adapter (wrapper) design pattern to ease the incorporation of new data acquisition channels at the data acquisition layer and new data and remote control services in the external interaction layer. This makes GeoDADIS a very flexible and general purpose tool with broad application in many data monitoring domains.

  14. Arteriovenous Access

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Yilmaz, Serdar; Lok, Charmaine; Leung, Kelvin; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Complications of vascular access lead to morbidity and may reduce quality of life. In this module, we review both infectious and noninfectious arteriovenous access complications including neuropathy, aneurysm, and high-output access. For the challenging patients who have developed many complications and are now nearing their last vascular access, we highlight some potentially novel approaches. PMID:28270919

  15. Collectives for Multiple Resource Job Scheduling Across Heterogeneous Servers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, K.; Lawson, J.

    2003-01-01

    Efficient management of large-scale, distributed data storage and processing systems is a major challenge for many computational applications. Many of these systems are characterized by multi-resource tasks processed across a heterogeneous network. Conventional approaches, such as load balancing, work well for centralized, single resource problems, but breakdown in the more general case. In addition, most approaches are often based on heuristics which do not directly attempt to optimize the world utility. In this paper, we propose an agent based control system using the theory of collectives. We configure the servers of our network with agents who make local job scheduling decisions. These decisions are based on local goals which are constructed to be aligned with the objective of optimizing the overall efficiency of the system. We demonstrate that multi-agent systems in which all the agents attempt to optimize the same global utility function (team game) only marginally outperform conventional load balancing. On the other hand, agents configured using collectives outperform both team games and load balancing (by up to four times for the latter), despite their distributed nature and their limited access to information.

  16. Client-Server Connection Status Monitoring Using Ajax Push Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamongie, Julien R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how simple client-server connection status monitoring can be implemented using Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML), JSF (Java Server Faces) and ICEfaces technologies. This functionality is required for NASA LCS (Launch Control System) displays used in the firing room for the Constellation project. Two separate implementations based on two distinct approaches are detailed and analyzed.

  17. Dynamic Web Pages: Performance Impact on Web Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kothari, Bhupesh; Claypool, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of Web servers and requests for dynamic pages focuses on experimentally measuring and analyzing the performance of the three dynamic Web page generation technologies: CGI, FastCGI, and Servlets. Develops a multivariate linear regression model and predicts Web server performance under some typical dynamic requests. (Author/LRW)

  18. TogoDoc Server/Client System: Smart Recommendation and Efficient Management of Life Science Literature

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Toshihisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a server/client literature management system specialized for the life science domain, the TogoDoc system (Togo, pronounced Toe-Go, is a romanization of a Japanese word for integration). The server and the client program cooperate closely over the Internet to provide life scientists with an effective literature recommendation service and efficient literature management. The content-based and personalized literature recommendation helps researchers to isolate interesting papers from the “tsunami” of literature, in which, on average, more than one biomedical paper is added to MEDLINE every minute. Because researchers these days need to cover updates of much wider topics to generate hypotheses using massive datasets obtained from public databases or omics experiments, the importance of having an effective literature recommendation service is rising. The automatic recommendation is based on the content of personal literature libraries of electronic PDF papers. The client program automatically analyzes these files, which are sometimes deeply buried in storage disks of researchers' personal computers. Just saving PDF papers to the designated folders makes the client program automatically analyze and retrieve metadata, rename file names, synchronize the data to the server, and receive the recommendation lists of newly published papers, thus accomplishing effortless literature management. In addition, the tag suggestion and associative search functions are provided for easy classification of and access to past papers (researchers who read many papers sometimes only vaguely remember or completely forget what they read in the past). The TogoDoc system is available for both Windows and Mac OS X and is free. The TogoDoc Client software is available at http://tdc.cb.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp/, and the TogoDoc server is available at https://docman.dbcls.jp/pubmed_recom. PMID:21179453

  19. Automated Computer Access Request System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snook, Bryan E.

    2010-01-01

    The Automated Computer Access Request (AutoCAR) system is a Web-based account provisioning application that replaces the time-consuming paper-based computer-access request process at Johnson Space Center (JSC). Auto- CAR combines rules-based and role-based functionality in one application to provide a centralized system that is easily and widely accessible. The system features a work-flow engine that facilitates request routing, a user registration directory containing contact information and user metadata, an access request submission and tracking process, and a system administrator account management component. This provides full, end-to-end disposition approval chain accountability from the moment a request is submitted. By blending both rules-based and rolebased functionality, AutoCAR has the flexibility to route requests based on a user s nationality, JSC affiliation status, and other export-control requirements, while ensuring a user s request is addressed by either a primary or backup approver. All user accounts that are tracked in AutoCAR are recorded and mapped to the native operating system schema on the target platform where user accounts reside. This allows for future extensibility for supporting creation, deletion, and account management directly on the target platforms by way of AutoCAR. The system s directory-based lookup and day-today change analysis of directory information determines personnel moves, deletions, and additions, and automatically notifies a user via e-mail to revalidate his/her account access as a result of such changes. AutoCAR is a Microsoft classic active server page (ASP) application hosted on a Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS).

  20. HMMER web server: interactive sequence similarity searching.

    PubMed

    Finn, Robert D; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R

    2011-07-01

    HMMER is a software suite for protein sequence similarity searches using probabilistic methods. Previously, HMMER has mainly been available only as a computationally intensive UNIX command-line tool, restricting its use. Recent advances in the software, HMMER3, have resulted in a 100-fold speed gain relative to previous versions. It is now feasible to make efficient profile hidden Markov model (profile HMM) searches via the web. A HMMER web server (http://hmmer.janelia.org) has been designed and implemented such that most protein database searches return within a few seconds. Methods are available for searching either a single protein sequence, multiple protein sequence alignment or profile HMM against a target sequence database, and for searching a protein sequence against Pfam. The web server is designed to cater to a range of different user expertise and accepts batch uploading of multiple queries at once. All search methods are also available as RESTful web services, thereby allowing them to be readily integrated as remotely executed tasks in locally scripted workflows. We have focused on minimizing search times and the ability to rapidly display tabular results, regardless of the number of matches found, developing graphical summaries of the search results to provide quick, intuitive appraisement of them.

  1. Enhanced networked server management with random remote backups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Kyoo

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, the model is focused on available server management in network environments. The (remote) backup servers are hooked up by VPN (Virtual Private Network) and replace broken main severs immediately. A virtual private network (VPN) is a way to use a public network infrastructure and hooks up long-distance servers within a single network infrastructure. The servers can be represent as "machines" and then the system deals with main unreliable and random auxiliary spare (remote backup) machines. When the system performs a mandatory routine maintenance, auxiliary machines are being used for backups during idle periods. Unlike other existing models, the availability of auxiliary machines is changed for each activation in this enhanced model. Analytically tractable results are obtained by using several mathematical techniques and the results are demonstrated in the framework of optimized networked server allocation problems.

  2. Improvements to the NIST network time protocol servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Judah

    2008-12-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) operates 22 network time servers at various locations. These servers respond to requests for time in a number of different formats and provide time stamps that are directly traceable to the NIST atomic clock ensemble in Boulder. The link between the servers at locations outside of the NIST Boulder Laboratories and the atomic clock ensemble is provided by the Automated Computer Time Service (ACTS) system, which has a direct connection to the clock ensemble and which transmits time information over dial-up telephone lines with a two-way protocol to measure the transmission delay. I will discuss improvements to the ACTS servers and to the time servers themselves. These improvements have resulted in an improvement of almost an order of magnitude in the performance of the system.

  3. Recommendations for a service framework to access astronomical archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travisano, J. J.; Pollizzi, J.

    1992-01-01

    There are a large number of astronomical archives and catalogs on-line for network access, with many different user interfaces and features. Some systems are moving towards distributed access, supplying users with client software for their home sites which connects to servers at the archive site. Many of the issues involved in defining a standard framework of services that archive/catalog suppliers can use to achieve a basic level of interoperability are described. Such a framework would simplify the development of client and server programs to access the wide variety of astronomical archive systems. The primary services that are supplied by current systems include: catalog browsing, dataset retrieval, name resolution, and data analysis. The following issues (and probably more) need to be considered in establishing a standard set of client/server interfaces and protocols: Archive Access - dataset retrieval, delivery, file formats, data browsing, analysis, etc.; Catalog Access - database management systems, query languages, data formats, synchronous/asynchronous mode of operation, etc.; Interoperability - transaction/message protocols, distributed processing mechanisms (DCE, ONC/SunRPC, etc), networking protocols, etc.; Security - user registration, authorization/authentication mechanisms, etc.; Service Directory - service registration, lookup, port/task mapping, parameters, etc.; Software - public vs proprietary, client/server software, standard interfaces to client/server functions, software distribution, operating system portability, data portability, etc. Several archive/catalog groups, notably the Astrophysics Data System (ADS), are already working in many of these areas. In the process of developing StarView, which is the user interface to the Space Telescope Data Archive and Distribution Service (ST-DADS), these issues and the work of others were analyzed. A framework of standard interfaces for accessing services on any archive system which would benefit

  4. Dynamic Server-Based KML Code Generator Method for Level-of-Detail Traversal of Geospatial Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxes, Gregory; Mixon, Brian; Linger, TIm

    2013-01-01

    Web-based geospatial client applications such as Google Earth and NASA World Wind must listen to data requests, access appropriate stored data, and compile a data response to the requesting client application. This process occurs repeatedly to support multiple client requests and application instances. Newer Web-based geospatial clients also provide user-interactive functionality that is dependent on fast and efficient server responses. With massively large datasets, server-client interaction can become severely impeded because the server must determine the best way to assemble data to meet the client applications request. In client applications such as Google Earth, the user interactively wanders through the data using visually guided panning and zooming actions. With these actions, the client application is continually issuing data requests to the server without knowledge of the server s data structure or extraction/assembly paradigm. A method for efficiently controlling the networked access of a Web-based geospatial browser to server-based datasets in particular, massively sized datasets has been developed. The method specifically uses the Keyhole Markup Language (KML), an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGS) standard used by Google Earth and other KML-compliant geospatial client applications. The innovation is based on establishing a dynamic cascading KML strategy that is initiated by a KML launch file provided by a data server host to a Google Earth or similar KMLcompliant geospatial client application user. Upon execution, the launch KML code issues a request for image data covering an initial geographic region. The server responds with the requested data along with subsequent dynamically generated KML code that directs the client application to make follow-on requests for higher level of detail (LOD) imagery to replace the initial imagery as the user navigates into the dataset. The approach provides an efficient data traversal path and mechanism that can be

  5. [A Terahertz Spectral Database Based on Browser/Server Technique].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-yong; Song, Yue

    2015-09-01

    With the solution of key scientific and technical problems and development of instrumentation, the application of terahertz technology in various fields has been paid more and more attention. Owing to the unique characteristic advantages, terahertz technology has been showing a broad future in the fields of fast, non-damaging detections, as well as many other fields. Terahertz technology combined with other complementary methods can be used to cope with many difficult practical problems which could not be solved before. One of the critical points for further development of practical terahertz detection methods depends on a good and reliable terahertz spectral database. We developed a BS (browser/server) -based terahertz spectral database recently. We designed the main structure and main functions to fulfill practical requirements. The terahertz spectral database now includes more than 240 items, and the spectral information was collected based on three sources: (1) collection and citation from some other abroad terahertz spectral databases; (2) collected from published literatures; and (3) spectral data measured in our laboratory. The present paper introduced the basic structure and fundament functions of the terahertz spectral database developed in our laboratory. One of the key functions of this THz database is calculation of optical parameters. Some optical parameters including absorption coefficient, refractive index, etc. can be calculated based on the input THz time domain spectra. The other main functions and searching methods of the browser/server-based terahertz spectral database have been discussed. The database search system can provide users convenient functions including user registration, inquiry, displaying spectral figures and molecular structures, spectral matching, etc. The THz database system provides an on-line searching function for registered users. Registered users can compare the input THz spectrum with the spectra of database, according to

  6. File Access Optimization with the Lustre Filesystem at Florida CMS T2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Fu, Y.; Kim, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Florida CMS Tier2 center, one of the CMS Tier2 centers, has been using the Lustre filesystem for its data storage backend system since 2004. Recently, the data access pattern at our site has changed greatly due to various new access methods that include file transfers through the GridFTP servers, read access from the worker nodes, and the remote read access through the xrootd servers. In order to optimize the file access performance, we have to consider all the possible access patterns and each pattern needs to be studied separately. In this presentation, we report on our work to optimize file access with the Lustre filesystem at the Florida CMS T2 using an approach based on analyzing these access patterns.

  7. NeuroTerrain – a client-server system for browsing 3D biomedical image data sets

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Carl; Bug, William J; Nissanov, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Background Three dimensional biomedical image sets are becoming ubiquitous, along with the canonical atlases providing the necessary spatial context for analysis. To make full use of these 3D image sets, one must be able to present views for 2D display, either surface renderings or 2D cross-sections through the data. Typical display software is limited to presentations along one of the three orthogonal anatomical axes (coronal, horizontal, or sagittal). However, data sets precisely oriented along the major axes are rare. To make fullest use of these datasets, one must reasonably match the atlas' orientation; this involves resampling the atlas in planes matched to the data set. Traditionally, this requires the atlas and browser reside on the user's desktop; unfortunately, in addition to being monolithic programs, these tools often require substantial local resources. In this article, we describe a network-capable, client-server framework to slice and visualize 3D atlases at off-axis angles, along with an open client architecture and development kit to support integration into complex data analysis environments. Results Here we describe the basic architecture of a client-server 3D visualization system, consisting of a thin Java client built on a development kit, and a computationally robust, high-performance server written in ANSI C++. The Java client components (NetOStat) support arbitrary-angle viewing and run on readily available desktop computers running Mac OS X, Windows XP, or Linux as a downloadable Java Application. Using the NeuroTerrain Software Development Kit (NT-SDK), sophisticated atlas browsing can be added to any Java-compatible application requiring as little as 50 lines of Java glue code, thus making it eminently re-useable and much more accessible to programmers building more complex, biomedical data analysis tools. The NT-SDK separates the interactive GUI components from the server control and monitoring, so as to support development of non

  8. Web-based Access to Locally Developed Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mischo, William H.; Schlembach, Mary C.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Web-based technologies employed by the Grainger Engineering Library Information Center at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in implementing access to local information resources. Discusses Microsoft Active Server Pages (ASP) technologies and the associated local database structure and format, as well as the general…

  9. Design and Analysis of an Enhanced Patient-Server Mutual Authentication Protocol for Telecare Medical Information System.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Islam, S K Hafizul; Biswas, G P; Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Obaidat, Mohammad S

    2015-11-01

    In order to access remote medical server, generally the patients utilize smart card to login to the server. It has been observed that most of the user (patient) authentication protocols suffer from smart card stolen attack that means the attacker can mount several common attacks after extracting smart card information. Recently, Lu et al.'s proposes a session key agreement protocol between the patient and remote medical server and claims that the same protocol is secure against relevant security attacks. However, this paper presents several security attacks on Lu et al.'s protocol such as identity trace attack, new smart card issue attack, patient impersonation attack and medical server impersonation attack. In order to fix the mentioned security pitfalls including smart card stolen attack, this paper proposes an efficient remote mutual authentication protocol using smart card. We have then simulated the proposed protocol using widely-accepted AVISPA simulation tool whose results make certain that the same protocol is secure against active and passive attacks including replay and man-in-the-middle attacks. Moreover, the rigorous security analysis proves that the proposed protocol provides strong security protection on the relevant security attacks including smart card stolen attack. We compare the proposed scheme with several related schemes in terms of computation cost and communication cost as well as security functionalities. It has been observed that the proposed scheme is comparatively better than related existing schemes.

  10. An Improvement of Robust Biometrics-Based Authentication and Key Agreement Scheme for Multi-Server Environments Using Smart Cards.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jongho; Choi, Younsung; Jung, Jaewook; Won, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    In multi-server environments, user authentication is a very important issue because it provides the authorization that enables users to access their data and services; furthermore, remote user authentication schemes for multi-server environments have solved the problem that has arisen from user's management of different identities and passwords. For this reason, numerous user authentication schemes that are designed for multi-server environments have been proposed over recent years. In 2015, Lu et al. improved upon Mishra et al.'s scheme, claiming that their remote user authentication scheme is more secure and practical; however, we found that Lu et al.'s scheme is still insecure and incorrect. In this paper, we demonstrate that Lu et al.'s scheme is vulnerable to outsider attack and user impersonation attack, and we propose a new biometrics-based scheme for authentication and key agreement that can be used in multi-server environments; then, we show that our proposed scheme is more secure and supports the required security properties.

  11. GalaxyHomomer: a web server for protein homo-oligomer structure prediction from a monomer sequence or structure.

    PubMed

    Baek, Minkyung; Park, Taeyong; Heo, Lim; Park, Chiwook; Seok, Chaok

    2017-04-06

    Homo-oligomerization of proteins is abundant in nature, and is often intimately related with the physiological functions of proteins, such as in metabolism, signal transduction or immunity. Information on the homo-oligomer structure is therefore important to obtain a molecular-level understanding of protein functions and their regulation. Currently available web servers predict protein homo-oligomer structures either by template-based modeling using homo-oligomer templates selected from the protein structure database or by ab initio docking of monomer structures resolved by experiment or predicted by computation. The GalaxyHomomer server, freely accessible at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/homomer, carries out template-based modeling, ab initio docking or both depending on the availability of proper oligomer templates. It also incorporates recently developed model refinement methods that can consistently improve model quality. Moreover, the server provides additional options that can be chosen by the user depending on the availability of information on the monomer structure, oligomeric state and locations of unreliable/flexible loops or termini. The performance of the server was better than or comparable to that of other available methods when tested on benchmark sets and in a recent CASP performed in a blind fashion.

  12. SMPBS: Web server for computing biomolecular electrostatics using finite element solvers of size modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yang; Ying, Jinyong; Xie, Dexuan

    2017-03-30

    SMPBS (Size Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Solvers) is a web server for computing biomolecular electrostatics using finite element solvers of the size modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation (SMPBE). SMPBE not only reflects ionic size effects but also includes the classic Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) as a special case. Thus, its web server is expected to have a broader range of applications than a PBE web server. SMPBS is designed with a dynamic, mobile-friendly user interface, and features easily accessible help text, asynchronous data submission, and an interactive, hardware-accelerated molecular visualization viewer based on the 3Dmol.js library. In particular, the viewer allows computed electrostatics to be directly mapped onto an irregular triangular mesh of a molecular surface. Due to this functionality and the fast SMPBE finite element solvers, the web server is very efficient in the calculation and visualization of electrostatics. In addition, SMPBE is reconstructed using a new objective electrostatic free energy, clearly showing that the electrostatics and ionic concentrations predicted by SMPBE are optimal in the sense of minimizing the objective electrostatic free energy. SMPBS is available at the URL: smpbs.math.uwm.edu © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. An Improvement of Robust Biometrics-Based Authentication and Key Agreement Scheme for Multi-Server Environments Using Smart Cards

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jongho; Choi, Younsung; Jung, Jaewook; Won, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    In multi-server environments, user authentication is a very important issue because it provides the authorization that enables users to access their data and services; furthermore, remote user authentication schemes for multi-server environments have solved the problem that has arisen from user’s management of different identities and passwords. For this reason, numerous user authentication schemes that are designed for multi-server environments have been proposed over recent years. In 2015, Lu et al. improved upon Mishra et al.’s scheme, claiming that their remote user authentication scheme is more secure and practical; however, we found that Lu et al.’s scheme is still insecure and incorrect. In this paper, we demonstrate that Lu et al.’s scheme is vulnerable to outsider attack and user impersonation attack, and we propose a new biometrics-based scheme for authentication and key agreement that can be used in multi-server environments; then, we show that our proposed scheme is more secure and supports the required security properties. PMID:26709702

  14. "Just Another Tool for Online Studies” (JATOS): An Easy Solution for Setup and Management of Web Servers Supporting Online Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Kristian; Kühn, Simone; Filevich, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    We present here “Just Another Tool for Online Studies” (JATOS): an open source, cross-platform web application with a graphical user interface (GUI) that greatly simplifies setting up and communicating with a web server to host online studies that are written in JavaScript. JATOS is easy to install in all three major platforms (Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux), and seamlessly pairs with a database for secure data storage. It can be installed on a server or locally, allowing researchers to try the application and feasibility of their studies within a browser environment, before engaging in setting up a server. All communication with the JATOS server takes place via a GUI (with no need to use a command line interface), making JATOS an especially accessible tool for researchers without a strong IT background. We describe JATOS’ main features and implementation and provide a detailed tutorial along with example studies to help interested researchers to set up their online studies. JATOS can be found under the Internet address: www.jatos.org. PMID:26114751

  15. Las Vegas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of Las Vegas, NV was acquired on August, 2000 and covers an area 42 km (25 miles) wide and 30 km (18 miles) long. The image displays three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region, with a spatial resolution of 15 m. McCarran International Airport to the south and Nellis Air Force Base to the NE are the two major airports visible. Golf courses appear as bright red areas of worms. The first settlement in Las Vegas (which is Spanish for The Meadows) was recorded back in the early 1850s when the Mormon church, headed by Brigham Young, sent a mission of 30 men to construct a fort and teach agriculture to the Indians. Las Vegas became a city in 1905 when the railroad announced this city was to be a major division point. Prior to legalized gambling in 1931, Las Vegas was developing as an agricultural area. Las Vegas' fame as a resort area became prominent after World War II. The image is located at 36.1 degrees north latitude and 115.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  16. Oceanotron, Scalable Server for Marine Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubrieu, T.; Bregent, S.; Blower, J. D.; Griffiths, G.

    2013-12-01

    Ifremer, French marine institute, is deeply involved in data management for different ocean in-situ observation programs (ARGO, OceanSites, GOSUD, ...) or other European programs aiming at networking ocean in-situ observation data repositories (myOcean, seaDataNet, Emodnet). To capitalize the effort for implementing advance data dissemination services (visualization, download with subsetting) for these programs and generally speaking water-column observations repositories, Ifremer decided to develop the oceanotron server (2010). Knowing the diversity of data repository formats (RDBMS, netCDF, ODV, ...) and the temperamental nature of the standard interoperability interface profiles (OGC/WMS, OGC/WFS, OGC/SOS, OpeNDAP, ...), the server is designed to manage plugins: - StorageUnits : which enable to read specific data repository formats (netCDF/OceanSites, RDBMS schema, ODV binary format). - FrontDesks : which get external requests and send results for interoperable protocols (OGC/WMS, OGC/SOS, OpenDAP). In between a third type of plugin may be inserted: - TransformationUnits : which enable ocean business related transformation of the features (for example conversion of vertical coordinates from pressure in dB to meters under sea surface). The server is released under open-source license so that partners can develop their own plugins. Within MyOcean project, University of Reading has plugged a WMS implementation as an oceanotron frontdesk. The modules are connected together by sharing the same information model for marine observations (or sampling features: vertical profiles, point series and trajectories), dataset metadata and queries. The shared information model is based on OGC/Observation & Measurement and Unidata/Common Data Model initiatives. The model is implemented in java (http://www.ifremer.fr/isi/oceanotron/javadoc/). This inner-interoperability level enables to capitalize ocean business expertise in software development without being indentured to

  17. STRAW: Species TRee Analysis Web server

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Timothy I.; Ruan, Zheng; Glenn, Travis C.; Liu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The coalescent methods for species tree reconstruction are increasingly popular because they can accommodate coalescence and multilocus data sets. Herein, we present STRAW, a web server that offers workflows for reconstruction of phylogenies of species using three species tree methods—MP-EST, STAR and NJst. The input data are a collection of rooted gene trees (for STAR and MP-EST methods) or unrooted gene trees (for NJst). The output includes the estimated species tree, modified Robinson-Foulds distances between gene trees and the estimated species tree and visualization of trees to compare gene trees with the estimated species tree. The web sever is available at http://bioinformatics.publichealth.uga.edu/SpeciesTreeAnalysis/. PMID:23661681

  18. CENTROIDFOLD: a web server for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kengo; Hamada, Michiaki; Asai, Kiyoshi; Mituyama, Toutai

    2009-07-01

    The CENTROIDFOLD web server (http://www.ncrna.org/centroidfold/) is a web application for RNA secondary structure prediction powered by one of the most accurate prediction engine. The server accepts two kinds of sequence data: a single RNA sequence and a multiple alignment of RNA sequences. It responses with a prediction result shown as a popular base-pair notation and a graph representation. PDF version of the graph representation is also available. For a multiple alignment sequence, the server predicts a common secondary structure. Usage of the server is quite simple. You can paste a single RNA sequence (FASTA or plain sequence text) or a multiple alignment (CLUSTAL-W format) into the textarea then click on the 'execute CentroidFold' button. The server quickly responses with a prediction result. The major advantage of this server is that it employs our original CentroidFold software as its prediction engine which scores the best accuracy in our benchmark results. Our web server is freely available with no login requirement.

  19. Understanding Customer Dissatisfaction with Underutilized Distributed File Servers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, Erik; Gibson, Garth

    1996-01-01

    An important trend in the design of storage subsystems is a move toward direct network attachment. Network-attached storage offers the opportunity to off-load distributed file system functionality from dedicated file server machines and execute many requests directly at the storage devices. For this strategy to lead to better performance, as perceived by users, the response time of distributed operations must improve. In this paper we analyze measurements of an Andrew file system (AFS) server that we recently upgraded in an effort to improve client performance in our laboratory. While the original server's overall utilization was only about 3%, we show how burst loads were sufficiently intense to lead to period of poor response time significant enough to trigger customer dissatisfaction. In particular, we show how, after adjusting for network load and traffic to non-project servers, 50% of the variation in client response time was explained by variation in server central processing unit (CPU) use. That is, clients saw long response times in large part because the server was often over-utilized when it was used at all. Using these measures, we see that off-loading file server work in a network-attached storage architecture has to potential to benefit user response time. Computational power in such a system scales directly with storage capacity, so the slowdown during burst period should be reduced.

  20. Secure entanglement distillation for double-server blind quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2013-07-12

    Blind quantum computation is a new secure quantum computing protocol where a client, who does not have enough quantum technologies at her disposal, can delegate her quantum computation to a server, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that the server cannot learn anything about the client's input, output, and program. If the client interacts with only a single server, the client has to have some minimum quantum power, such as the ability of emitting randomly rotated single-qubit states or the ability of measuring states. If the client interacts with two servers who share Bell pairs but cannot communicate with each other, the client can be completely classical. For such a double-server scheme, two servers have to share clean Bell pairs, and therefore the entanglement distillation is necessary in a realistic noisy environment. In this Letter, we show that it is possible to perform entanglement distillation in the double-server scheme without degrading the security of blind quantum computing.

  1. PIQMIe: a web server for semi-quantitative proteomics data management and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuzniar, Arnold; Kanaar, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We present the Proteomics Identifications and Quantitations Data Management and Integration Service or PIQMIe that aids in reliable and scalable data management, analysis and visualization of semi-quantitative mass spectrometry based proteomics experiments. PIQMIe readily integrates peptide and (non-redundant) protein identifications and quantitations from multiple experiments with additional biological information on the protein entries, and makes the linked data available in the form of a light-weight relational database, which enables dedicated data analyses (e.g. in R) and user-driven queries. Using the web interface, users are presented with a concise summary of their proteomics experiments in numerical and graphical forms, as well as with a searchable protein grid and interactive visualization tools to aid in the rapid assessment of the experiments and in the identification of proteins of interest. The web server not only provides data access through a web interface but also supports programmatic access through RESTful web service. The web server is available at http://piqmie.semiqprot-emc.cloudlet.sara.nl or http://www.bioinformatics.nl/piqmie. This website is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement. PMID:24861615

  2. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Jamie J.; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Gutell, Robin R.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-01-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  3. The Waveform Server: A Web-based Interactive Seismic Waveform Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, R. L.; Clemesha, A.; Lindquist, K. G.; Reyes, J.; Steidl, J. H.; Vernon, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic waveform data has traditionally been displayed on machines that are either local area networked to, or directly host, a seismic networks waveform database(s). Typical seismic data warehouses allow online users to query and download data collected from regional networks passively, without the scientist directly visually assessing data coverage and/or quality. Using a suite of web-based protocols, we have developed an online seismic waveform interface that directly queries and displays data from a relational database through a web-browser. Using the Python interface to Datascope and the Python-based Twisted network package on the server side, and the jQuery Javascript framework on the client side to send and receive asynchronous waveform queries, we display broadband seismic data using the HTML Canvas element that is globally accessible by anyone using a modern web-browser. The system is used to display data from the USArray experiment, a US continent-wide migratory transportable seismic array. We are currently creating additional interface tools to create a rich-client interface for accessing and displaying seismic data that can be deployed to any system running Boulder Real Time Technology's (BRTT) Antelope Real Time System (ARTS). The software is freely available from the Antelope contributed code Git repository. Screenshot of the web-based waveform server interface

  4. FAF-Drugs3: a web server for compound property calculation and chemical library design.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, David; Sperandio, Olivier; Baell, Jonathan B; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2015-07-01

    Drug attrition late in preclinical or clinical development is a serious economic problem in the field of drug discovery. These problems can be linked, in part, to the quality of the compound collections used during the hit generation stage and to the selection of compounds undergoing optimization. Here, we present FAF-Drugs3, a web server that can be used for drug discovery and chemical biology projects to help in preparing compound libraries and to assist decision-making during the hit selection/lead optimization phase. Since it was first described in 2006, FAF-Drugs has been significantly modified. The tool now applies an enhanced structure curation procedure, can filter or analyze molecules with user-defined or eight predefined physicochemical filters as well as with several simple ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) rules. In addition, compounds can be filtered using an updated list of 154 hand-curated structural alerts while Pan Assay Interference compounds (PAINS) and other, generally unwanted groups are also investigated. FAF-Drugs3 offers access to user-friendly html result pages and the possibility to download all computed data. The server requires as input an SDF file of the compounds; it is open to all users and can be accessed without registration at http://fafdrugs3.mti.univ-paris-diderot.fr.

  5. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server.

    PubMed

    Cannone, Jamie J; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Gutell, Robin R; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-07-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa.

  6. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Sahraeian, Sayed M.; Luo, Kevin R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access to precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. The SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded. PMID:25979264

  7. The web server of IBM's Bioinformatics and Pattern Discovery group: 2004 update.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tien; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2004-07-01

    In this report, we provide an update on the services and content which are available on the web server of IBM's Bioinformatics and Pattern Discovery group. The server, which is operational around the clock, provides access to a large number of methods that have been developed and published by the group's members. There is an increasing number of problems that these tools can help tackle; these problems range from the discovery of patterns in streams of events and the computation of multiple sequence alignments, to the discovery of genes in nucleic acid sequences, the identification--directly from sequence--of structural deviations from alpha-helicity and the annotation of amino acid sequences for antimicrobial activity. Additionally, annotations for more than 130 archaeal, bacterial, eukaryotic and viral genomes are now available on-line and can be searched interactively. The tools and code bundles continue to be accessible from http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/Tspd.html whereas the genomics annotations are available at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/Annotations/.

  8. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahraeian, Sayed M.; Luo, Kevin R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-05-15

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access to precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. Lastly, the SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded.

  9. SIFTER search: a web server for accurate phylogeny-based protein function prediction

    DOE PAGES

    Sahraeian, Sayed M.; Luo, Kevin R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-05-15

    We are awash in proteins discovered through high-throughput sequencing projects. As only a minuscule fraction of these have been experimentally characterized, computational methods are widely used for automated annotation. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web interface for accurate protein function prediction using the SIFTER algorithm. SIFTER is a state-of-the-art sequence-based gene molecular function prediction algorithm that uses a statistical model of function evolution to incorporate annotations throughout the phylogenetic tree. Due to the resources needed by the SIFTER algorithm, running SIFTER locally is not trivial for most users, especially for large-scale problems. The SIFTER web server thus provides access tomore » precomputed predictions on 16 863 537 proteins from 232 403 species. Users can explore SIFTER predictions with queries for proteins, species, functions, and homologs of sequences not in the precomputed prediction set. Lastly, the SIFTER web server is accessible at http://sifter.berkeley.edu/ and the source code can be downloaded.« less

  10. FAF-Drugs3: a web server for compound property calculation and chemical library design

    PubMed Central

    Lagorce, David; Sperandio, Olivier; Baell, Jonathan B.; Miteva, Maria A.; Villoutreix, Bruno O.

    2015-01-01

    Drug attrition late in preclinical or clinical development is a serious economic problem in the field of drug discovery. These problems can be linked, in part, to the quality of the compound collections used during the hit generation stage and to the selection of compounds undergoing optimization. Here, we present FAF-Drugs3, a web server that can be used for drug discovery and chemical biology projects to help in preparing compound libraries and to assist decision-making during the hit selection/lead optimization phase. Since it was first described in 2006, FAF-Drugs has been significantly modified. The tool now applies an enhanced structure curation procedure, can filter or analyze molecules with user-defined or eight predefined physicochemical filters as well as with several simple ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) rules. In addition, compounds can be filtered using an updated list of 154 hand-curated structural alerts while Pan Assay Interference compounds (PAINS) and other, generally unwanted groups are also investigated. FAF-Drugs3 offers access to user-friendly html result pages and the possibility to download all computed data. The server requires as input an SDF file of the compounds; it is open to all users and can be accessed without registration at http://fafdrugs3.mti.univ-paris-diderot.fr. PMID:25883137

  11. Accessing multimedia content from mobile applications using semantic web technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutel, Jörn; Gerlach, Andrea; Klekamp, Stefanie; Schulz, Kristin

    2014-02-01

    We describe the ideas and results of an applied research project that aims at leveraging the expressive power of semantic web technologies as a server-side backend for mobile applications that provide access to location and multimedia data and allow for a rich user experience in mobile scenarios, ranging from city and museum guides to multimedia enhancements of any kind of narrative content, including e-book applications. In particular, we will outline a reusable software architecture for both server-side functionality and native mobile platforms that is aimed at significantly decreasing the effort required for developing particular applications of that kind.

  12. MY NASA DATA: Making Earth Science Data Accessible to the K-12 Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Alston, E. J.; Diones, D. D.; Moore, S. W.; Oots, P. C.; Phelps, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    In 2004, the Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and Earth science for Teachers and Amateurs (MY NASA DATA) project began. The goal of this project is to enable K-12 and citizen science communities to make use of the large volume of Earth System Science data that NASA has collected and archived. One major outcome is to allow students to select a problem of real-life importance, and to explore it using high quality data sources without spending months looking for and then learning how to use a dataset. The key element of the MY NASA DATA project is the implementation of a Live Access Server (LAS). The LAS is an open source software tool, developed by NOAA, that provides access to a variety of data sources through a single, fairly simple, point- and- click interface. This tool truly enables use of the available data - more than 100 parameters are offered so far - in an inquiry-based educational setting. It readily gives students the opportunity to browse images for times and places they define, and also provides direct access to the underlying data values - a key feature of this educational effort. The team quickly discovered, however, that even a simple and fairly intuitive tool is not enough to make most teachers comfortable with data exploration. User feedback has led us to create a friendly LAS Introduction page, which uses the analogy of a restaurant to explain to our audience the basic concept of an LAS. In addition, we have created a "Time Coverage at a Glance" chart to show what data are available when. This keeps our audience from being too confused by the patchwork of data availability caused by the start and end of individual missions. Finally, we have found it necessary to develop a substantial amount of age appropriate documentation, including topical pages and a science glossary, to help our audience understand the parameters they are exploring and how these parameters fit into the larger picture of Earth System Science. MY NASA DATA

  13. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  14. How to secure your servers, code and data

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Oral presentation in English, slides in English. Advice and best practices regarding the security of your servers, code and data will be presented. We will also describe how the Computer Security Team can help you reduce the risks.

  15. Comparing Server Energy Use and Efficiency Using Small Sample Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Henry C.; Qin, Yong; Price, Phillip N.

    2014-11-01

    This report documents a demonstration that compared the energy consumption and efficiency of a limited sample size of server-type IT equipment from different manufacturers by measuring power at the server power supply power cords. The results are specific to the equipment and methods used. However, it is hoped that those responsible for IT equipment selection can used the methods described to choose models that optimize energy use efficiency. The demonstration was conducted in a data center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. It was performed with five servers of similar mechanical and electronic specifications; three from Intel and one each from Dell and Supermicro. Server IT equipment is constructed using commodity components, server manufacturer-designed assemblies, and control systems. Server compute efficiency is constrained by the commodity component specifications and integration requirements. The design freedom, outside of the commodity component constraints, provides room for the manufacturer to offer a product with competitive efficiency that meets market needs at a compelling price. A goal of the demonstration was to compare and quantify the server efficiency for three different brands. The efficiency is defined as the average compute rate (computations per unit of time) divided by the average energy consumption rate. The research team used an industry standard benchmark software package to provide a repeatable software load to obtain the compute rate and provide a variety of power consumption levels. Energy use when the servers were in an idle state (not providing computing work) were also measured. At high server compute loads, all brands, using the same key components (processors and memory), had similar results; therefore, from these results, it could not be concluded that one brand is more efficient than the other brands. The test results show that the power consumption variability caused by the key components as a

  16. EarthServer: an Intercontinental Collaboration on Petascale Datacubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, P.; Rossi, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    With the unprecedented increase of orbital sensor, in-situ measurement, and simulation data there is a rich, yet not leveraged potential for getting insights from dissecting datasets and rejoining them with other datasets. Obviously, the goal is to allow users to "ask any question, any time" thereby enabling them to "build their own product on the go".One of the most influential initiatives in Big Geo Data is EarthServer which has demonstrated new directions for flexible, scalable EO services based on innovative NewSQL technology. Researchers from Europe, the US and recently Australia have teamed up to rigourously materialize the concept of the datacube. Such a datacube may have spatial and temporal dimensions (such as a satellite image time series) and may unite an unlimited number of scenes. Independently from whatever efficient data structuring a server network may perform internally, users will always see just a few datacubes they can slice and dice. EarthServer has established client and server technology for such spatio-temporal datacubes. The underlying scalable array engine, rasdaman, enables direct interaction, including 3-D visualization, what-if scenarios, common EO data processing, and general analytics. Services exclusively rely on the open OGC "Big Geo Data" standards suite, the Web Coverage Service (WCS) including the Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). Conversely, EarthServer has significantly shaped and advanced the OGC Big Geo Data standards landscape based on the experience gained.Phase 1 of EarthServer has advanced scalable array database technology into 100+ TB services; in phase 2, Petabyte datacubes will be built in Europe and Australia to perform ad-hoc querying and merging. Standing between EarthServer phase 1 (from 2011 through 2014) and phase 2 (from 2015 through 2018) we present the main results and outline the impact on the international standards landscape; effectively, the Big Geo Data standards established through initiative of

  17. The Most Popular Astronomical Web Server in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chenzhou; Zhao, Yongheng

    Affected by the consistent depressibility of IT economy free homepage space is becoming less and less. It is more and more difficult to construct websites for amateur astronomers who do not have ability to pay for commercial space. In last May with the support of Chinese National Astronomical Observatory and Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope project we setup a special web server (amateur.lamost.org) to provide free huge stable and no-advertisement homepage space to Chinese amateur astronomers and non-professional organizations. After only one year there has been more than 80 websites hosted on the server. More than 10000 visitors from nearly 40 countries visit the server and the amount of data downloaded by them exceeds 4 Giga-Bytes per day. The server has become the most popular amateur astronomical web server in China. It stores the most abundant Chinese amateur astronomical resources. Because of the extremely success our service has been drawing tremendous attentions from related institutions. Recently Chinese National Natural Science Foundation shows great interest to support the service. In the paper the emergence of the thought construction of the server and its present utilization and our future plan are introduced

  18. Using a centralised database system and server in the European Union Framework Programme 7 project SEPServer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heynderickx, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    The main objective of the SEPServer project (EU FP7 project 262773) is to produce a new tool, which greatly facilitates the investigation of solar energetic particles (SEPs) and their origin: a server providing SEP data, related electromagnetic (EM) observations and analysis methods, a comprehensive catalogue of the observed SEP events, and educational/outreach material on solar eruptions. The project is coordinated by the University of Helsinki. The project will combine data and knowledge from 11 European partners and several collaborating parties from Europe and US. The datasets provided by the consortium partners are collected in a MySQL database (using the ESA Open Data Interface under licence) on a server operated by DH Consultancy, which also hosts a web interface providing browsing, plotting and post-processing and analysis tools developed by the consortium, as well as a Solar Energetic Particle event catalogue. At this stage of the project, a prototype server has been established, which is presently undergoing testing by users inside the consortium. Using a centralized database has numerous advantages, including: homogeneous storage of the data, which eliminates the need for dataset specific file access routines once the data are ingested in the database; a homogeneous set of metadata describing the datasets on both a global and detailed level, allowing for automated access to and presentation of the various data products; standardised access to the data in different programming environments (e.g. php, IDL); elimination of the need to download data for individual data requests. SEPServer will, thus, add value to several space missions and Earth-based observations by facilitating the coordinated exploitation of and open access to SEP data and related EM observations, and promoting correct use of these data for the entire space research community. This will lead to new knowledge on the production and transport of SEPs during solar eruptions and facilitate the

  19. Web Server Security on Open Source Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkoutzelis, Dimitrios X.; Sardis, Manolis S.

    Administering critical resources has never been more difficult that it is today. In a changing world of software innovation where major changes occur on a daily basis, it is crucial for the webmasters and server administrators to shield their data against an unknown arsenal of attacks in the hands of their attackers. Up until now this kind of defense was a privilege of the few, out-budgeted and low cost solutions let the defender vulnerable to the uprising of innovating attacking methods. Luckily, the digital revolution of the past decade left its mark, changing the way we face security forever: open source infrastructure today covers all the prerequisites for a secure web environment in a way we could never imagine fifteen years ago. Online security of large corporations, military and government bodies is more and more handled by open source application thus driving the technological trend of the 21st century in adopting open solutions to E-Commerce and privacy issues. This paper describes substantial security precautions in facing privacy and authentication issues in a totally open source web environment. Our goal is to state and face the most known problems in data handling and consequently propose the most appealing techniques to face these challenges through an open solution.

  20. CRONOS: the cross-reference navigation server

    PubMed Central

    Waegele, Brigitte; Dunger-Kaltenbach, Irmtraud; Fobo, Gisela; Montrone, Corinna; Mewes, H.-Werner; Ruepp, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Cross-mapping of gene and protein identifiers between different databases is a tedious and time-consuming task. To overcome this, we developed CRONOS, a cross-reference server that contains entries from five mammalian organisms presented by major gene and protein information resources. Sequence similarity analysis of the mapped entries shows that the cross-references are highly accurate. In total, up to 18 different identifier types can be used for identification of cross-references. The quality of the mapping could be improved substantially by exclusion of ambiguous gene and protein names which were manually validated. Organism-specific lists of ambiguous terms, which are valuable for a variety of bioinformatics applications like text mining are available for download. Availability: CRONOS is freely available to non-commercial users at http://mips.gsf.de/genre/proj/cronos/index.html, web services are available at http://mips.gsf.de/CronosWSService/CronosWS?wsdl. Contact: brigitte.waegele@helmholtz-muenchen.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. The online Supplementary Material contains all figures and tables referenced by this article. PMID:19010804

  1. Anonymization server system for DICOM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Amano, M.; Kubo, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nishitani, H.

    2007-03-01

    We have developed an anonymization system for DICOM images. It requires consent from the patient to use the DICOM images for research or education. However, providing the DICOM image to the other facilities is not safe because it contains a lot of personal data. Our system is a server that provides anonymization service of DICOM images for users in the facility. The distinctive features of the system are, input interface, flexible anonymization policy, and automatic body part identification. In the first feature, we can use the anonymization service on the existing DICOM workstations. In the second feature, we can select a best policy fitting for the Protection of personal data that is ruled by each medical facility. In the third feature, we can identify the body parts that are included in the input image set, even if the set lacks the body part tag in DICOM header. We installed the system for the first time to a hospital in December 2005. Currently, the system is working in other four facilities. In this paper we describe the system and how it works.

  2. PredPlantPTS1: A Web Server for the Prediction of Plant Peroxisomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reumann, Sigrun; Buchwald, Daniela; Lingner, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of subcellular protein localization is essential to correctly assign unknown proteins to cell organelle-specific protein networks and to ultimately determine protein function. For metazoa, several computational approaches have been developed in the past decade to predict peroxisomal proteins carrying the peroxisome targeting signal type 1 (PTS1). However, plant-specific PTS1 protein prediction methods have been lacking up to now, and pre-existing methods generally were incapable of correctly predicting low-abundance plant proteins possessing non-canonical PTS1 patterns. Recently, we presented a machine learning approach that is able to predict PTS1 proteins for higher plants (spermatophytes) with high accuracy and which can correctly identify unknown targeting patterns, i.e., novel PTS1 tripeptides and tripeptide residues. Here we describe the first plant-specific web server PredPlantPTS1 for the prediction of plant PTS1 proteins using the above-mentioned underlying models. The server allows the submission of protein sequences from diverse spermatophytes and also performs well for mosses and algae. The easy-to-use web interface provides detailed output in terms of (i) the peroxisomal targeting probability of the given sequence, (ii) information whether a particular non-canonical PTS1 tripeptide has already been experimentally verified, and (iii) the prediction scores for the single C-terminal 14 amino acid residues. The latter allows identification of predicted residues that inhibit peroxisome targeting and which can be optimized using site-directed mutagenesis to raise the peroxisome targeting efficiency. The prediction server will be instrumental in identifying low-abundance and stress-inducible peroxisomal proteins and defining the entire peroxisomal proteome of Arabidopsis and agronomically important crop plants. PredPlantPTS1 is freely accessible at ppp.gobics.de. PMID:22969783

  3. DEPTH: a web server to compute depth and predict small-molecule binding cavities in proteins.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kuan Pern; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Madhusudhan, M S

    2011-07-01

    Depth measures the extent of atom/residue burial within a protein. It correlates with properties such as protein stability, hydrogen exchange rate, protein-protein interaction hot spots, post-translational modification sites and sequence variability. Our server, DEPTH, accurately computes depth and solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) values. We show that depth can be used to predict small molecule ligand binding cavities in proteins. Often, some of the residues lining a ligand binding cavity are both deep and solvent exposed. Using the depth-SASA pair values for a residue, its likelihood to form part of a small molecule binding cavity is estimated. The parameters of the method were calibrated over a training set of 900 high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of single-domain proteins bound to small molecules (molecular weight <1.5  KDa). The prediction accuracy of DEPTH is comparable to that of other geometry-based prediction methods including LIGSITE, SURFNET and Pocket-Finder (all with Matthew's correlation coefficient of ∼0.4) over a testing set of 225 single and multi-chain protein structures. Users have the option of tuning several parameters to detect cavities of different sizes, for example, geometrically flat binding sites. The input to the server is a protein 3D structure in PDB format. The users have the option of tuning the values of four parameters associated with the computation of residue depth and the prediction of binding cavities. The computed depths, SASA and binding cavity predictions are displayed in 2D plots and mapped onto 3D representations of the protein structure using Jmol. Links are provided to download the outputs. Our server is useful for all structural analysis based on residue depth and SASA, such as guiding site-directed mutagenesis experiments and small molecule docking exercises, in the context of protein functional annotation and drug discovery.

  4. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  5. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  6. The Land Analysis System (LAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yun-Chi; Irani, Fred M.

    1991-01-01

    The Land Analysis System (LAS) is an interactive software system, available in the public domain, for the analysis, display, and management of multispectral and other digital image data. The system was developed to support earth sciences research and development activities. LAS provides over 240 applications functions and utilities, a flexible user interface, complete on-line and hardcopy documentation, extensive image data file management, reformatting, and conversion utilities, and high level device independent access to image display hardware. The capabilities are summarized of the latest release of the system (version 5). Emphasis is given to the system portability and the isolation of hardware and software dependencies in this release.

  7. MetaboAnalyst: a web server for metabolomic data analysis and interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jianguo; Psychogios, Nick; Young, Nelson; Wishart, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolomics is a newly emerging field of ‘omics’ research that is concerned with characterizing large numbers of metabolites using NMR, chromatography and mass spectrometry. It is frequently used in biomarker identification and the metabolic profiling of cells, tissues or organisms. The data processing challenges in metabolomics are quite unique and often require specialized (or expensive) data analysis software and a detailed knowledge of cheminformatics, bioinformatics and statistics. In an effort to simplify metabolomic data analysis while at the same time improving user accessibility, we have developed a freely accessible, easy-to-use web server for metabolomic data analysis called MetaboAnalyst. Fundamentally, MetaboAnalyst is a web-based metabolomic data processing tool not unlike many of today's web-based microarray analysis packages. It accepts a variety of input data (NMR peak lists, binned spectra, MS peak lists, compound/concentration data) in a wide variety of formats. It also offers a number of options for metabolomic data processing, data normalization, multivariate statistical analysis, graphing, metabolite identification and pathway mapping. In particular, MetaboAnalyst supports such techniques as: fold change analysis, t-tests, PCA, PLS-DA, hierarchical clustering and a number of more sophisticated statistical or machine learning methods. It also employs a large library of reference spectra to facilitate compound identification from most kinds of input spectra. MetaboAnalyst guides users through a step-by-step analysis pipeline using a variety of menus, information hyperlinks and check boxes. Upon completion, the server generates a detailed report describing each method used, embedded with graphical and tabular outputs. MetaboAnalyst is capable of handling most kinds of metabolomic data and was designed to perform most of the common kinds of metabolomic data analyses. MetaboAnalyst is accessible at http://www.metaboanalyst.ca PMID:19429898

  8. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiuhong

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, some remote-sensing applications require advanced airborne multi-sensor systems to provide high performance reflective and emissive spectral imaging measurement rapidly over large areas. The key or unique problem of characteristics is associated with a black box back-end system that operates a suite of cutting-edge imaging sensors to collect simultaneously the high throughput reflective and emissive spectral imaging data with precision georeference. This back-end system needs to be portable, easy-to-use, and reliable with advanced onboard processing. The innovation of the black box backend is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS integrates a complex embedded system of systems with dedicated power and signal electronic circuits inside to serve a suite of configurable cutting-edge electro- optical (EO), long-wave infrared (LWIR), and medium-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras, a hyperspectral imaging scanner, and a GPS and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for atmospheric and surface remote sensing. Its compatible sensor packages include NASA s 1,024 1,024 pixel LWIR quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) imager; a 60.5 megapixel BuckEye EO camera; and a fast (e.g. 200+ scanlines/s) and wide swath-width (e.g., 1,920+ pixels) CCD/InGaAs imager-based visible/near infrared reflectance (VNIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometer. MAICSS records continuous precision georeferenced and time-tagged multisensor throughputs to mass storage devices at a high aggregate rate, typically 60 MB/s for its LWIR/EO payload. MAICSS is a complete stand-alone imaging server instrument with an easy-to-use software package for either autonomous data collection or interactive airborne operation. Advanced multisensor data acquisition and onboard processing software features have been implemented for MAICSS. With the onboard processing for real time image development, correction, histogram-equalization, compression, georeference, and

  9. Security mechanism based on Hospital Authentication Server for secure application of implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Seop

    2014-01-01

    After two recent security attacks against implantable medical devices (IMDs) have been reported, the privacy and security risks of IMDs have been widely recognized in the medical device market and research community, since the malfunctioning of IMDs might endanger the patient's life. During the last few years, a lot of researches have been carried out to address the security-related issues of IMDs, including privacy, safety, and accessibility issues. A physician accesses IMD through an external device called a programmer, for diagnosis and treatment. Hence, cryptographic key management between IMD and programmer is important to enforce a strict access control. In this paper, a new security architecture for the security of IMDs is proposed, based on a 3-Tier security model, where the programmer interacts with a Hospital Authentication Server, to get permissions to access IMDs. The proposed security architecture greatly simplifies the key management between IMDs and programmers. Also proposed is a security mechanism to guarantee the authenticity of the patient data collected from IMD and the nonrepudiation of the physician's treatment based on it. The proposed architecture and mechanism are analyzed and compared with several previous works, in terms of security and performance.

  10. Security Mechanism Based on Hospital Authentication Server for Secure Application of Implantable Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    After two recent security attacks against implantable medical devices (IMDs) have been reported, the privacy and security risks of IMDs have been widely recognized in the medical device market and research community, since the malfunctioning of IMDs might endanger the patient's life. During the last few years, a lot of researches have been carried out to address the security-related issues of IMDs, including privacy, safety, and accessibility issues. A physician accesses IMD through an external device called a programmer, for diagnosis and treatment. Hence, cryptographic key management between IMD and programmer is important to enforce a strict access control. In this paper, a new security architecture for the security of IMDs is proposed, based on a 3-Tier security model, where the programmer interacts with a Hospital Authentication Server, to get permissions to access IMDs. The proposed security architecture greatly simplifies the key management between IMDs and programmers. Also proposed is a security mechanism to guarantee the authenticity of the patient data collected from IMD and the nonrepudiation of the physician's treatment based on it. The proposed architecture and mechanism are analyzed and compared with several previous works, in terms of security and performance. PMID:25276797

  11. Design and implementation of streaming media server cluster based on FFMpeg.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Chun-long; Jin, Bao-zhao

    2015-01-01

    Poor performance and network congestion are commonly observed in the streaming media single server system. This paper proposes a scheme to construct a streaming media server cluster system based on FFMpeg. In this scheme, different users are distributed to different servers according to their locations and the balance among servers is maintained by the dynamic load-balancing algorithm based on active feedback. Furthermore, a service redirection algorithm is proposed to improve the transmission efficiency of streaming media data. The experiment results show that the server cluster system has significantly alleviated the network congestion and improved the performance in comparison with the single server system.

  12. Design and Implementation of Streaming Media Server Cluster Based on FFMpeg

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Chun-long; Jin, Bao-zhao

    2015-01-01

    Poor performance and network congestion are commonly observed in the streaming media single server system. This paper proposes a scheme to construct a streaming media server cluster system based on FFMpeg. In this scheme, different users are distributed to different servers according to their locations and the balance among servers is maintained by the dynamic load-balancing algorithm based on active feedback. Furthermore, a service redirection algorithm is proposed to improve the transmission efficiency of streaming media data. The experiment results show that the server cluster system has significantly alleviated the network congestion and improved the performance in comparison with the single server system. PMID:25734187

  13. RNAex: an RNA secondary structure prediction server enhanced by high-throughput structure-probing data

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Qu, Rihao; Huang, Yiming; Shi, Binbin; Liu, Mengrong; Li, Yang; Lu, Zhi John

    2016-01-01

    Several high-throughput technologies have been developed to probe RNA base pairs and loops at the transcriptome level in multiple species. However, to obtain the final RNA secondary structure, extensive effort and considerable expertise is required to statistically process the probing data and combine them with free energy models. Therefore, we developed an RNA secondary structure prediction server that is enhanced by experimental data (RNAex). RNAex is a web interface that enables non-specialists to easily access cutting-edge structure-probing data and predict RNA secondary structures enhanced by in vivo and in vitro data. RNAex annotates the RNA editing, RNA modification and SNP sites on the predicted structures. It provides four structure-folding methods, restrained MaxExpect, SeqFold, RNAstructure (Fold) and RNAfold that can be selected by the user. The performance of these four folding methods has been verified by previous publications on known structures. We re-mapped the raw sequencing data of the probing experiments to the whole genome for each species. RNAex thus enables users to predict secondary structures for both known and novel RNA transcripts in human, mouse, yeast and Arabidopsis. The RNAex web server is available at http://RNAex.ncrnalab.org/. PMID:27137891

  14. iSARST: an integrated SARST web server for rapid protein structural similarity searches

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Lee, Che-Yu; Lee, Chi-Ching; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2009-01-01

    iSARST is a web server for efficient protein structural similarity searches. It is a multi-processor, batch-processing and integrated implementation of several structural comparison tools and two database searching methods: SARST for common structural homologs and CPSARST for homologs with circular permutations. iSARST allows users submitting multiple PDB/SCOP entry IDs or an archive file containing many structures. After scanning the target database using SARST/CPSARST, the ordering of hits are refined with conventional structure alignment tools such as FAST, TM-align and SAMO, which are run in a PC cluster. In this way, iSARST achieves a high running speed while preserving the high precision of refinement engines. The final outputs include tables listing co-linear or circularly permuted homologs of the query proteins and a functional summary of the best hits. Superimposed structures can be examined through an interactive and informative visualization tool. iSARST provides the first batch mode structural comparison web service for both co-linear homologs and circular permutants. It can serve as a rapid annotation system for functionally unknown or hypothetical proteins, which are increasing rapidly in this post-genomics era. The server can be accessed at http://sarst.life.nthu.edu.tw/iSARST/. PMID:19420060

  15. iSARST: an integrated SARST web server for rapid protein structural similarity searches.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Lee, Che-Yu; Lee, Chi-Ching; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2009-07-01

    iSARST is a web server for efficient protein structural similarity searches. It is a multi-processor, batch-processing and integrated implementation of several structural comparison tools and two database searching methods: SARST for common structural homologs and CPSARST for homologs with circular permutations. iSARST allows users submitting multiple PDB/SCOP entry IDs or an archive file containing many structures. After scanning the target database using SARST/CPSARST, the ordering of hits are refined with conventional structure alignment tools such as FAST, TM-align and SAMO, which are run in a PC cluster. In this way, iSARST achieves a high running speed while preserving the high precision of refinement engines. The final outputs include tables listing co-linear or circularly permuted homologs of the query proteins and a functional summary of the best hits. Superimposed structures can be examined through an interactive and informative visualization tool. iSARST provides the first batch mode structural comparison web service for both co-linear homologs and circular permutants. It can serve as a rapid annotation system for functionally unknown or hypothetical proteins, which are increasing rapidly in this post-genomics era. The server can be accessed at http://sarst.life.nthu.edu.tw/iSARST/.

  16. The EarthServer Federation: State, Role, and Contribution to GEOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merticariu, Vlad; Baumann, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The intercontinental EarthServer initiative has established a European datacube platform with proven scalability: known databases exceed 100 TB, and single queries have been split across more than 1,000 cloud nodes. Its service interface being rigorously based on the OGC "Big Geo Data" standards, Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS), a series of clients can dock into the services, ranging from open-source OpenLayers and QGIS over open-source NASA WorldWind to proprietary ESRI ArcGIS. Datacube fusion in a "mix and match" style is supported by the platform technolgy, the rasdaman Array Database System, which transparently federates queries so that users simply approach any node of the federation to access any data item, internally optimized for minimal data transfer. Notably, rasdaman is part of GEOSS GCI. NASA is contributing its Web WorldWind virtual globe for user-friendly data extraction, navigation, and analysis. Integrated datacube / metadata queries are contributed by CITE. Current federation members include ESA (managed by MEEO sr.l.), Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML), the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF), Australia's National Computational Infrastructure, and Jacobs University (adding in Planetary Science). Further data centers have expressed interest in joining. We present the EarthServer approach, discuss its underlying technology, and illustrate the contribution this datacube platform can make to GEOSS.

  17. deepTools2: a next generation web server for deep-sequencing data analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Fidel; Ryan, Devon P; Grüning, Björn; Bhardwaj, Vivek; Kilpert, Fabian; Richter, Andreas S; Heyne, Steffen; Dündar, Friederike; Manke, Thomas

    2016-07-08

    We present an update to our Galaxy-based web server for processing and visualizing deeply sequenced data. Its core tool set, deepTools, allows users to perform complete bioinformatic workflows ranging from quality controls and normalizations of aligned reads to integrative analyses, including clustering and visualization approaches. Since we first described our deepTools Galaxy server in 2014, we have implemented new solutions for many requests from the community and our users. Here, we introduce significant enhancements and new tools to further improve data visualization and interpretation. deepTools continue to be open to all users and freely available as a web service at deeptools.ie-freiburg.mpg.de The new deepTools2 suite can be easily deployed within any Galaxy framework via the toolshed repository, and we also provide source code for command line usage under Linux and Mac OS X. A public and documented API for access to deepTools functionality is also available.

  18. OPM database and PPM web server: resources for positioning of proteins in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lomize, Mikhail A.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Joo, Hyeon; Mosberg, Henry I.; Lomize, Andrei L.

    2012-01-01

    The Orientations of Proteins in Membranes (OPM) database is a curated web resource that provides spatial positions of membrane-bound peptides and proteins of known three-dimensional structure in the lipid bilayer, together with their structural classification, topology and intracellular localization. OPM currently contains more than 1200 transmembrane and peripheral proteins and peptides from approximately 350 organisms that represent approximately 3800 Protein Data Bank entries. Proteins are classified into classes, superfamilies and families and assigned to 21 distinct membrane types. Spatial positions of proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer are optimized by the PPM 2.0 method that accounts for the hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions of the proteins with the anisotropic water-lipid environment described by the dielectric constant and hydrogen-bonding profiles. The OPM database is freely accessible at http://opm.phar.umich.edu. Data can be sorted, searched or retrieved using the hierarchical classification, source organism, localization in different types of membranes. The database offers downloadable coordinates of proteins and peptides with membrane boundaries. A gallery of protein images and several visualization tools are provided. The database is supplemented by the PPM server (http://opm.phar.umich.edu/server.php) which can be used for calculating spatial positions in membranes of newly determined proteins structures or theoretical models. PMID:21890895

  19. PlasMapper: a web server for drawing and auto-annotating plasmid maps.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoli; Stothard, Paul; Forsythe, Ian J; Wishart, David S

    2004-07-01

    PlasMapper is a comprehensive web server that automatically generates and annotates high-quality circular plasmid maps. Taking only the plasmid/vector DNA sequence as input, PlasMapper uses sequence pattern matching and BLAST alignment to automatically identify and label common promoters, terminators, cloning sites, restriction sites, reporter genes, affinity tags, selectable marker genes, replication origins and open reading frames. PlasMapper then presents the identified features in textual form and as high-resolution, multicolored graphical output. The appearance and contents of the output can be customized in numerous ways using several supplied options. Further, PlasMapper images can be rendered in both rasterized (PNG and JPG) and vector graphics (SVG) formats to accommodate a variety of user needs or preferences. The images and textual output are of sufficient quality that they may be used directly in publications or presentations. The PlasMapper web server is freely accessible at http://wishart.biology.ualberta.ca/PlasMapper.

  20. ASEB: a web server for KAT-specific acetylation site prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Likun; Du, Yipeng; Lu, Ming; Li, Tingting

    2012-07-01

    Protein lysine acetylation plays an important role in the normal functioning of cells, including gene expression regulation, protein stability and metabolism regulation. Although large amounts of lysine acetylation sites have been identified via large-scale mass spectrometry or traditional experimental methods, the lysine (K)-acetyl-transferase (KAT) responsible for the acetylation of a given protein or lysine site remains largely unknown due to the experimental limitations of KAT substrate identification. Hence, the in silico prediction of KAT-specific acetylation sites may provide direction for further experiments. In our previous study, we developed the acetylation set enrichment based (ASEB) computer program to predict which KAT-families are responsible for the acetylation of a given protein or lysine site. In this article, we provide KAT-specific acetylation site prediction as a web service. This web server not only provides the online tool and R package for the method in our previous study, but several useful services are also included, such as the integration of protein-protein interaction information to enhance prediction accuracy. This web server can be freely accessed at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/huac.

  1. SERVER DEVELOPMENT FOR NSLS-II PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Kraimer, M.

    2011-03-28

    The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. The server software under development is available via an open source sourceforge project named epics-pvdata, which consists of modules pvData, pvAccess, pvIOC, and pvService. Examples of two services that already exist in the pvService module are itemFinder, and gather. Each service uses pvData to store in-memory transient data, pvService to transfer data over the network, and pvIOC as the service engine. The performance benchmarking for pvAccess and both gather service and item finder service are presented in this paper. The performance comparison between pvAccess and Channel Access are presented also. For an ultra low emittance synchrotron radiation light source like NSLS II, the control system requirements, especially for beam control are tight. To control and manipulate the beam effectively, a use case study has been performed to satisfy the requirement and theoretical evaluation has been performed. The analysis shows that model based control is indispensable for beam commissioning and routine operation. However, there are many challenges such as how to re-use a design model for on-line model based control, and how to combine the numerical methods for modeling of a realistic lattice with the analytical techniques for analysis of its properties. To satisfy the requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture for the software framework for beam commissioning and operation is critical. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating and plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service

  2. ArachnoServer: a database of protein toxins from spiders

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Venomous animals incapacitate their prey using complex venoms that can contain hundreds of unique protein toxins. The realisation that many of these toxins may have pharmaceutical and insecticidal potential due to their remarkable potency and selectivity against target receptors has led to an explosion in the number of new toxins being discovered and characterised. From an evolutionary perspective, spiders are the most successful venomous animals and they maintain by far the largest pool of toxic peptides. However, at present, there are no databases dedicated to spider toxins and hence it is difficult to realise their full potential as drugs, insecticides, and pharmacological probes. Description We have developed ArachnoServer, a manually curated database that provides detailed information about proteinaceous toxins from spiders. Key features of ArachnoServer include a new molecular target ontology designed especially for venom toxins, the most up-to-date taxonomic information available, and a powerful advanced search interface. Toxin information can be browsed through dynamic trees, and each toxin has a dedicated page summarising all available information about its sequence, structure, and biological activity. ArachnoServer currently manages 567 protein sequences, 334 nucleic acid sequences, and 51 protein structures. Conclusion ArachnoServer provides a single source of high-quality information about proteinaceous spider toxins that will be an invaluable resource for pharmacologists, neuroscientists, toxinologists, medicinal chemists, ion channel scientists, clinicians, and structural biologists. ArachnoServer is available online at http://www.arachnoserver.org. PMID:19674480

  3. RosettaAntibody: antibody variable region homology modeling server.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Aroop; Kim, Eric T; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2009-07-01

    The RosettaAntibody server (http://antibody.graylab.jhu.edu) predicts the structure of an antibody variable region given the amino-acid sequences of the respective light and heavy chains. In an initial stage, the server identifies and displays the most sequence homologous template structures for the light and heavy framework regions and each of the complementarity determining region (CDR) loops. Subsequently, the most homologous templates are assembled into a side-chain optimized crude model, and the server returns a picture and coordinate file. For users requesting a high-resolution model, the server executes the full RosettaAntibody protocol which additionally models the hyper-variable CDR H3 loop. The high-resolution protocol also relieves steric clashes by optimizing the CDR backbone torsion angles and by simultaneously perturbing the relative orientation of the light and heavy chains. RosettaAntibody generates 2000 independent structures, and the server returns pictures, coordinate files, and detailed scoring information for the 10 top-scoring models. The 10 models enable users to use rational judgment in choosing the best model or to use the set as an ensemble for further studies such as docking. The high-resolution models generated by RosettaAntibody have been used for the successful prediction of antibody-antigen complex structures.

  4. SWISS-MODEL: an automated protein homology-modeling server

    PubMed Central

    Schwede, Torsten; Kopp, Jürgen; Guex, Nicolas; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2003-01-01

    SWISS-MODEL (http://swissmodel.expasy.org) is a server for automated comparative modeling of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures. It pioneered the field of automated modeling starting in 1993 and is the most widely-used free web-based automated modeling facility today. In 2002 the server computed 120 000 user requests for 3D protein models. SWISS-MODEL provides several levels of user interaction through its World Wide Web interface: in the ‘first approach mode’ only an amino acid sequence of a protein is submitted to build a 3D model. Template selection, alignment and model building are done completely automated by the server. In the ‘alignment mode’, the modeling process is based on a user-defined target-template alignment. Complex modeling tasks can be handled with the ‘project mode’ using DeepView (Swiss-PdbViewer), an integrated sequence-to-structure workbench. All models are sent back via email with a detailed modeling report. WhatCheck analyses and ANOLEA evaluations are provided optionally. The reliability of SWISS-MODEL is continuously evaluated in the EVA-CM project. The SWISS-MODEL server is under constant development to improve the successful implementation of expert knowledge into an easy-to-use server. PMID:12824332

  5. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  6. VIDARS: Towards Painless Access to Space Physics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, B.; Vega, R.; Raeder, J.

    2006-12-01

    Space physics data sets are notoriously difficult to access, in particular if one wants to combine data sets from different sources. Part of the problem is finding the data. A myriad of different formats and containers poses another problem. Attempts to consolidate data in centers has not solved the problem. We present the prototype of a system (VIDARS, virtual data access and retrieval system) that addresses these issues. Data remain with their originators, but data sets are given unique names, called UDI (Universal Data Identifier), akin to Internet host names or e-mail addresses. The UDIs are known (registered) to one central server where they and associated meta data can be searched. Data access occurs completely transparent to a user such that for a requested UDI the central server returns the IP address of the data provider where the data can be retrieved using simple XML based protocols. This requires some cooperation from the data providers who need to register their data and implement the data server protocol, which is, however, very simple. The data access API allows for a wide variety of clients, ranging from simple ASCII dumps to sophisticated graphical and data mining applications, where the client never needs to know where the data actually reside.

  7. You Can't Get There from Here: Issues in Remote Access to Electronic Journals for a Health Sciences Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieb, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Discusses experiences of the Saint Louis University's Health Sciences Center Library in providing access to electronic journals to a dispersed constituency. Topics include IP (institutional password) filtering, how publishers and aggregators establish access control, credential-based authentication, and proxy servers. (Author/LRW)

  8. BindUP: a web server for non-homology-based prediction of DNA and RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Paz, Inbal; Kligun, Efrat; Bengad, Barak; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2016-07-08

    Gene expression is a multi-step process involving many layers of regulation. The main regulators of the pathway are DNA and RNA binding proteins. While over the years, a large number of DNA and RNA binding proteins have been identified and extensively studied, it is still expected that many other proteins, some with yet another known function, are awaiting to be discovered. Here we present a new web server, BindUP, freely accessible through the website http://bindup.technion.ac.il/, for predicting DNA and RNA binding proteins using a non-homology-based approach. Our method is based on the electrostatic features of the protein surface and other general properties of the protein. BindUP predicts nucleic acid binding function given the proteins three-dimensional structure or a structural model. Additionally, BindUP provides information on the largest electrostatic surface patches, visualized on the server. The server was tested on several datasets of DNA and RNA binding proteins, including proteins which do not possess DNA or RNA binding domains and have no similarity to known nucleic acid binding proteins, achieving very high accuracy. BindUP is applicable in either single or batch modes and can be applied for testing hundreds of proteins simultaneously in a highly efficient manner.

  9. DPDR-CPI, a server that predicts Drug Positioning and Drug Repositioning via Chemical-Protein Interactome.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Zhang, Ping; Cao, Xi Hang; Du, Dizheng; Ye, Hao; Huang, Hui; Li, Can; Qin, Shengying; Wan, Chunling; Shi, Leming; He, Lin; Yang, Lun

    2016-11-02

    The cost of developing a new drug has increased sharply over the past years. To ensure a reasonable return-on-investment, it is useful for drug discovery researchers in both industry and academia to identify all the possible indications for early pipeline molecules. For the first time, we propose the term computational "drug candidate positioning" or "drug positioning", to describe the above process. It is distinct from drug repositioning, which identifies new uses for existing drugs and maximizes their value. Since many therapeutic effects are mediated by unexpected drug-protein interactions, it is reasonable to analyze the chemical-protein interactome (CPI) profiles to predict indications. Here we introduce the server DPDR-CPI, which can make real-time predictions based only on the structure of the small molecule. When a user submits a molecule, the server will dock it across 611 human proteins, generating a CPI profile of features that can be used for predictions. It can suggest the likelihood of relevance of the input molecule towards ~1,000 human diseases with top predictions listed. DPDR-CPI achieved an overall AUROC of 0.78 during 10-fold cross-validations and AUROC of 0.76 for the independent validation. The server is freely accessible via http://cpi.bio-x.cn/dpdr/.

  10. DPDR-CPI, a server that predicts Drug Positioning and Drug Repositioning via Chemical-Protein Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Zhang, Ping; Cao, Xi Hang; Du, Dizheng; Ye, Hao; Huang, Hui; Li, Can; Qin, Shengying; Wan, Chunling; Shi, Leming; He, Lin; Yang, Lun

    2016-01-01

    The cost of developing a new drug has increased sharply over the past years. To ensure a reasonable return-on-investment, it is useful for drug discovery researchers in both industry and academia to identify all the possible indications for early pipeline molecules. For the first time, we propose the term computational “drug candidate positioning” or “drug positioning”, to describe the above process. It is distinct from drug repositioning, which identifies new uses for existing drugs and maximizes their value. Since many therapeutic effects are mediated by unexpected drug-protein interactions, it is reasonable to analyze the chemical-protein interactome (CPI) profiles to predict indications. Here we introduce the server DPDR-CPI, which can make real-time predictions based only on the structure of the small molecule. When a user submits a molecule, the server will dock it across 611 human proteins, generating a CPI profile of features that can be used for predictions. It can suggest the likelihood of relevance of the input molecule towards ~1,000 human diseases with top predictions listed. DPDR-CPI achieved an overall AUROC of 0.78 during 10-fold cross-validations and AUROC of 0.76 for the independent validation. The server is freely accessible via http://cpi.bio-x.cn/dpdr/. PMID:27805045

  11. DDI-CPI, a server that predicts drug-drug interactions through implementing the chemical-protein interactome.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Zhang, Ping; Huang, Hui; Huang, Jialiang; Kao, Emily; Shi, Leming; He, Lin; Yang, Lun

    2014-07-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may cause serious side-effects that draw great attention from both academia and industry. Since some DDIs are mediated by unexpected drug-human protein interactions, it is reasonable to analyze the chemical-protein interactome (CPI) profiles of the drugs to predict their DDIs. Here we introduce the DDI-CPI server, which can make real-time DDI predictions based only on molecular structure. When the user submits a molecule, the server will dock user's molecule across 611 human proteins, generating a CPI profile that can be used as a feature vector for the pre-constructed prediction model. It can suggest potential DDIs between the user's molecule and our library of 2515 drug molecules. In cross-validation and independent validation, the server achieved an AUC greater than 0.85. Additionally, by investigating the CPI profiles of predicted DDI, users can explore the PK/PD proteins that might be involved in a particular DDI. A 3D visualization of the drug-protein interaction will be provided as well. The DDI-CPI is freely accessible at http://cpi.bio-x.cn/ddi/.

  12. Implementation of an Embedded Web Server Application for Wireless Control of Brain Computer Interface Based Home Environments.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Eda Akman; Bay, Ömer Faruk; Güler, İnan

    2016-01-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based environment control systems could facilitate life of people with neuromuscular diseases, reduces dependence on their caregivers, and improves their quality of life. As well as easy usage, low-cost, and robust system performance, mobility is an important functionality expected from a practical BCI system in real life. In this study, in order to enhance users' mobility, we propose internet based wireless communication between BCI system and home environment. We designed and implemented a prototype of an embedded low-cost, low power, easy to use web server which is employed in internet based wireless control of a BCI based home environment. The embedded web server provides remote access to the environmental control module through BCI and web interfaces. While the proposed system offers to BCI users enhanced mobility, it also provides remote control of the home environment by caregivers as well as the individuals in initial stages of neuromuscular disease. The input of BCI system is P300 potentials. We used Region Based Paradigm (RBP) as stimulus interface. Performance of the BCI system is evaluated on data recorded from 8 non-disabled subjects. The experimental results indicate that the proposed web server enables internet based wireless control of electrical home appliances successfully through BCIs.

  13. CVTree3 Web Server for Whole-genome-based and Alignment-free Prokaryotic Phylogeny and Taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Guanghong; Hao, Bailin

    2015-10-01

    A faithful phylogeny and an objective taxonomy for prokaryotes should agree with each other and ultimately follow the genome data. With the number of sequenced genomes reaching tens of thousands, both tree inference and detailed comparison with taxonomy are great challenges. We now provide one solution in the latest Release 3.0 of the alignment-free and whole-genome-based web server CVTree3. The server resides in a cluster of 64 cores and is equipped with an interactive, collapsible, and expandable tree display. It is capable of comparing the tree branching order with prokaryotic classification at all taxonomic ranks from domains down to species and strains. CVTree3 allows for inquiry by taxon names and trial on lineage modifications. In addition, it reports a summary of monophyletic and non-monophyletic taxa at all ranks as well as produces print-quality subtree figures. After giving an overview of retrospective verification of the CVTree approach, the power of the new server is described for the mega-classification of prokaryotes and determination of taxonomic placement of some newly-sequenced genomes. A few discrepancies between CVTree and 16S rRNA analyses are also summarized with regard to possible taxonomic revisions. CVTree3 is freely accessible to all users at http://tlife.fudan.edu.cn/cvtree3/ without login requirements.

  14. SteinerNet: a web server for integrating 'omic' data to discover hidden components of response pathways.

    PubMed

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; McCallum, Scott; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2012-07-01

    High-throughput technologies including transcriptional profiling, proteomics and reverse genetics screens provide detailed molecular descriptions of cellular responses to perturbations. However, it is difficult to integrate these diverse data to reconstruct biologically meaningful signaling networks. Previously, we have established a framework for integrating transcriptional, proteomic and interactome data by searching for the solution to the prize-collecting Steiner tree problem. Here, we present a web server, SteinerNet, to make this method available in a user-friendly format for a broad range of users with data from any species. At a minimum, a user only needs to provide a set of experimentally detected proteins and/or genes and the server will search for connections among these data from the provided interactomes for yeast, human, mouse, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. More advanced users can upload their own interactome data as well. The server provides interactive visualization of the resulting optimal network and downloadable files detailing the analysis and results. We believe that SteinerNet will be useful for researchers who would like to integrate their high-throughput data for a specific condition or cellular response and to find biologically meaningful pathways. SteinerNet is accessible at http://fraenkel.mit.edu/steinernet.

  15. CVTree3 Web Server for Whole-genome-based and Alignment-free Prokaryotic Phylogeny and Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Guanghong; Hao, Bailin

    2015-01-01

    A faithful phylogeny and an objective taxonomy for prokaryotes should agree with each other and ultimately follow the genome data. With the number of sequenced genomes reaching tens of thousands, both tree inference and detailed comparison with taxonomy are great challenges. We now provide one solution in the latest Release 3.0 of the alignment-free and whole-genome-based web server CVTree3. The server resides in a cluster of 64 cores and is equipped with an interactive, collapsible, and expandable tree display. It is capable of comparing the tree branching order with prokaryotic classification at all taxonomic ranks from domains down to species and strains. CVTree3 allows for inquiry by taxon names and trial on lineage modifications. In addition, it reports a summary of monophyletic and non-monophyletic taxa at all ranks as well as produces print-quality subtree figures. After giving an overview of retrospective verification of the CVTree approach, the power of the new server is described for the mega-classification of prokaryotes and determination of taxonomic placement of some newly-sequenced genomes. A few discrepancies between CVTree and 16S rRNA analyses are also summarized with regard to possible taxonomic revisions. CVTree3 is freely accessible to all users at http://tlife.fudan.edu.cn/cvtree3/ without login requirements. PMID:26563468

  16. Performance measurements of single server fuzzy queues with unreliable server using left and right method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueen, Zeina; Ramli, Razamin; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2015-12-01

    There are a number of real life systems that can be described as a queuing system, and this paper presents a queuing system model applied in a manufacturing system example. The queuing model considered is depicted in a fuzzy environment with retrial queues and unreliable server. The stability condition state of this model is investigated and the performance measurement is obtained by adopting the left and right method. The new approach adopted in this study merges the existing α-cut interval and nonlinear programming techniques and a numerical example was considered to explain the methodology of this technique. From the numerical example, the flexibility of the method was shown graphically showing the exact real mean value of customers in the system and also the expected waiting times.

  17. A client/server database system for project evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brule, M.R.; Fair, W.B.; Jiang, J.; Sanvido, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    PETS (Project Evaluation Tool Set) is a networked client/server system that provides a full set of decision-support tools for evaluating the business potential of onshore and offshore development projects. This distributed workgroup computing system combines and streamlines preliminary design, routine cost estimation, economic evaluation, and risk analysis for conceptual developments as well as for ongoing projects and operations. A flexible and extendible client/server integration framework links in-house and third-party software applications with a database and an expert-system knowledgebase, and, where appropriate, links the applications among themselves. The capability and richness of inexpensive commercial operating systems and off-the-shelf applications have made building a client/server system like PETS possible in a relatively short time and at low cost. We will discuss the object-oriented design of the PETS system, detail its capabilities, and outline the methods used to integrate applications from other domains.

  18. Mathematical defense method of networked servers with controlled remote backups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Kyoo

    2006-05-01

    The networked server defense model is focused on reliability and availability in security respects. The (remote) backup servers are hooked up by VPN (Virtual Private Network) with high-speed optical network and replace broken main severs immediately. The networked server can be represent as "machines" and then the system deals with main unreliable, spare, and auxiliary spare machine. During vacation periods, when the system performs a mandatory routine maintenance, auxiliary machines are being used for back-ups; the information on the system is naturally delayed. Analog of the N-policy to restrict the usage of auxiliary machines to some reasonable quantity. The results are demonstrated in the network architecture by using the stochastic optimization techniques.

  19. LassoProt: server to analyze biopolymers with lassos

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Niemyska, Wanda; Pasznik, Pawel; Sulkowska, Joanna I.

    2016-01-01

    The LassoProt server, http://lassoprot.cent.uw.edu.pl/, enables analysis of biopolymers with entangled configurations called lassos. The server offers various ways of visualizing lasso configurations, as well as their time trajectories, with all the results and plots downloadable. Broad spectrum of applications makes LassoProt a useful tool for biologists, biophysicists, chemists, polymer physicists and mathematicians. The server and our methods have been validated on the whole PDB, and the results constitute the database of proteins with complex lassos, supported with basic biological data. This database can serve as a source of information about protein geometry and entanglement-function correlations, as a reference set in protein modeling, and for many other purposes. PMID:27131383

  20. LassoProt: server to analyze biopolymers with lassos.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Niemyska, Wanda; Pasznik, Pawel; Sulkowska, Joanna I

    2016-07-08

    The LassoProt server, http://lassoprot.cent.uw.edu.pl/, enables analysis of biopolymers with entangled configurations called lassos. The server offers various ways of visualizing lasso configurations, as well as their time trajectories, with all the results and plots downloadable. Broad spectrum of applications makes LassoProt a useful tool for biologists, biophysicists, chemists, polymer physicists and mathematicians. The server and our methods have been validated on the whole PDB, and the results constitute the database of proteins with complex lassos, supported with basic biological data. This database can serve as a source of information about protein geometry and entanglement-function correlations, as a reference set in protein modeling, and for many other purposes.

  1. The State of Energy and Performance Benchmarking for Enterprise Servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanara, Andrew; Haines, Evan; Howard, Arthur

    To address the server industry’s marketing focus on performance, benchmarking organizations have played a pivotal role in developing techniques to determine the maximum achievable performance level of a system. Generally missing has been an assessment of energy use to achieve that performance. The connection between performance and energy consumption is becoming necessary information for designers and operators as they grapple with power constraints in the data center. While industry and policy makers continue to strategize about a universal metric to holistically measure IT equipment efficiency, existing server benchmarks for various workloads could provide an interim proxy to assess the relative energy efficiency of general servers. This paper discusses ideal characteristics a future energy-performance benchmark might contain, suggests ways in which current benchmarks might be adapted to provide a transitional step to this end, and notes the need for multiple workloads to provide a holistic proxy for a universal metric.

  2. KOBAS 2.0: a web server for annotation and identification of enriched pathways and diseases.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chen; Mao, Xizeng; Huang, Jiaju; Ding, Yang; Wu, Jianmin; Dong, Shan; Kong, Lei; Gao, Ge; Li, Chuan-Yun; Wei, Liping

    2011-07-01

    High-throughput experimental technologies often identify dozens to hundreds of genes related to, or changed in, a biological or pathological process. From these genes one wants to identify biological pathways that may be involved and diseases that may be implicated. Here, we report a web server, KOBAS 2.0, which annotates an input set of genes with putative pathways and disease relationships based on mapping to genes with known annotations. It allows for both ID mapping and cross-species sequence similarity mapping. It then performs statistical tests to identify statistically significantly enriched pathways and diseases. KOBAS 2.0 incorporates knowledge across 1327 species from 5 pathway databases (KEGG PATHWAY, PID, BioCyc, Reactome and Panther) and 5 human disease databases (OMIM, KEGG DISEASE, FunDO, GAD and NHGRI GWAS Catalog). KOBAS 2.0 can be accessed at http://kobas.cbi.pku.edu.cn.

  3. The HHpred interactive server for protein homology detection and structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Söding, Johannes; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N.

    2005-01-01

    HHpred is a fast server for remote protein homology detection and structure prediction and is the first to implement pairwise comparison of profile hidden Markov models (HMMs). It allows to search a wide choice of databases, such as the PDB, SCOP, Pfam, SMART, COGs and CDD. It accepts a single query sequence or a multiple alignment as input. Within only a few minutes it returns the search results in a user-friendly format similar to that of PSI-BLAST. Search options include local or global alignment and scoring secondary structure similarity. HHpred can produce pairwise query-template alignments, multiple alignments of the query with a set of templates selected from the search results, as well as 3D structural models that are calculated by the MODELLER software from these alignments. A detailed help facility is available. As a demonstration, we analyze the sequence of SpoVT, a transcriptional regulator from Bacillus subtilis. HHpred can be accessed at . PMID:15980461

  4. [Relevance of the hemovigilance regional database for the shared medical file identity server].

    PubMed

    Doly, A; Fressy, P; Garraud, O

    2008-11-01

    The French Health Products Safety Agency coordinates the national initiative of computerization of blood products traceability within regional blood banks and public and private hospitals. The Auvergne-Loire Regional French Blood Service, based in Saint-Etienne, together with a number of public hospitals set up a transfusion data network named EDITAL. After four years of progressive implementation and experimentation, a software enabling standardized data exchange has built up a regional nominative database, endorsed by the Traceability Computerization National Committee in 2004. This database now provides secured web access to a regional transfusion history enabling biologists and all hospital and family practitioners to take in charge the patient follow-up. By running independently from the softwares of its partners, EDITAL database provides reference for the regional identity server.

  5. The NERC Vocabulary Server: Version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leadbetter, A.; Lowry, R.; Clements, O.

    2012-04-01

    The NERC Vocabulary Server (NVS) has been used to publish controlled vocabularies of terms relevant to the marine environmental sciences domain since 2006 (version 0) with version 1 being introduced in 2007. It has been used for • metadata mark-up with verifiable content • populating dynamic drop down lists • semantic cross-walk between metadata schemata • so-called smart search • and the semantic enablement of Open Geospatial Consortium Web Processing Services in projects including: the NERC Data Grid; SeaDataNet; Geo-Seas; and the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet). The NVS is based on the Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) model and following a version change for SKOS in 2009 there was a desire to upgrade the NVS to incorporate the changes in this standard. SKOS is based on the "concept", which it defines as a "unit of thought", that is an idea or notion such as "oil spill". The latest version of SKOS introduces the ability to aggregate concepts in both collections and schemes. The design of version 2 of the NVS uses both types of aggregation: schemes for the discovery of content through hierarchical thesauri and collections for the publication and addressing of content. Other desired changes from version 1 of the NVS included: • the removal of the potential for multiple Uniform Resource Names for the same concept to ensure consistent identification of concepts • the addition of content and technical governance information in the payload documents to provide an audit trail to users of NVS content • the removal of XML snippets from concept definitions in order to correctly validate XML serializations of the SKOS • the addition of the ability to map into external knowledge organization systems in order to extend the knowledge base • a more truly RESTful approach URL access to the NVS to make the development of applications on top of the NVS easier • and support for multiple human languages to increase the user

  6. Towards Direct Manipulation and Remixing of Massive Data: The EarthServer Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, P.

    2012-04-01

    Complex analytics on "big data" is one of the core challenges of current Earth science, generating strong requirements for on-demand processing and fil tering of massive data sets. Issues under discussion include flexibility, performance, scalability, and the heterogeneity of the information types invo lved. In other domains, high-level query languages (such as those offered by database systems) have proven successful in the quest for flexible, scalable data access interfaces to massive amounts of data. However, due to the lack of support for many of the Earth science data structures, database systems are only used for registries and catalogs, but not for the bulk of spatio-temporal data. One core information category in this field is given by coverage data. ISO 19123 defines coverages, simplifying, as a representation of a "space-time varying phenomenon". This model can express a large class of Earth science data structures, including rectified and non-rectified rasters, curvilinear grids, point clouds, TINs, general meshes, trajectories, surfaces, and solids. This abstract definition, which is too high-level to establish interoperability, is concretized by the OGC GML 3.2.1 Application Schema for Coverages Standard into an interoperable representation. The OGC Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) Standard defines a declarative query language on multi-dimensional raster-type coverages, such as 1D in-situ sensor timeseries, 2D EO imagery, 3D x/y/t image time series and x/y/z geophysical data, 4D x/y/z/t climate and ocean data. Hence, important ingredients for versatile coverage retrieval are given - however, this potential has not been fully unleashed by service architectures up to now. The EU FP7-INFRA project EarthServer, launched in September 2011, aims at enabling standards-based on-demand analytics over the Web for Earth science data based on an integration of W3C XQuery for alphanumeric data and OGC-WCPS for raster data. Ultimately, EarthServer will support

  7. Report: Results of Technical Vulnerability Assessment: EPA’s Directory Service System Authentication and Authorization Servers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #11-P-0597, September 9, 2011. Vulnerability testing of EPA’s directory service system authentication and authorization servers conducted in March 2011 identified authentication and authorization servers with numerous vulnerabilities.

  8. Performance model of the Argonne Voyager multimedia server

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.; Olson, R.; Stevens, R.

    1997-07-01

    The Argonne Voyager Multimedia Server is being developed in the Futures Lab of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. As a network-based service for recording and playing multimedia streams, it is important that the Voyager system be capable of sustaining certain minimal levels of performance in order for it to be a viable system. In this article, the authors examine the performance characteristics of the server. As they examine the architecture of the system, they try to determine where bottlenecks lie, show actual vs potential performance, and recommend areas for improvement through custom architectures and system tuning.

  9. Web-Accessible Scientific Workflow System for Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Roelof Versteeg; Roelof Versteeg; Trevor Rowe

    2006-03-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a web accessible scientific workflow system for environmental monitoring. This workflow environment integrates distributed, automated data acquisition with server side data management and information visualization through flexible browser based data access tools. Component technologies include a rich browser-based client (using dynamic Javascript and HTML/CSS) for data selection, a back-end server which uses PHP for data processing, user management, and result delivery, and third party applications which are invoked by the back-end using webservices. This environment allows for reproducible, transparent result generation by a diverse user base. It has been implemented for several monitoring systems with different degrees of complexity.

  10. 75 FR 8400 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld Devices... server software, wireless handheld devices and battery packs by reason of infringement of certain claims... importation of certain wireless communications system server software, wireless handheld devices or...

  11. ASPEN--A Web-Based Application for Managing Student Server Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandvig, J. Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The growth of the Internet has greatly increased the demand for server-side programming courses at colleges and universities. Students enrolled in such courses must be provided with server-based accounts that support the technologies that they are learning. The process of creating, managing and removing large numbers of student server accounts is…

  12. Web servers and services for electrostatics calculations with APBS and PDB2PQR

    SciTech Connect

    Unni, Samir; Huang, Yong; Hanson, Robert M.; Tobias, Malcolm; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred; Nielsen, Jens E.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-04-02

    APBS and PDB2PQR are widely utilized free software packages for biomolecular electrostatics calculations. Using the Opal toolkit, we have developed a web services framework for these software packages that enables the use of APBS and PDB2PQR by users who do not have local access to the necessary amount of computational capabilities. This not only increases accessibility of the software to a wider range of scientists, educators, and students but it also increases the availability of electrostatics calculations on portable computing platforms. Users can access this new functionality in two ways. First, an Opal-enabled version of APBS is provided in current distributions, available freely on the web. Second, we have extended the PDB2PQR web server to provide an interface for the setup, execution, and visualization electrostatics potentials as calculated by APBS. This web interface also uses the Opal framework which ensures the scalability needed to support the large APBS user community. Both of these resources are available from the APBS/PDB2PQR website: http://www.poissonboltzmann.org/.

  13. AthMethPre: a web server for the prediction and query of mRNA m(6)A sites in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shunian; Yan, Zhangming; Liu, Ke; Zhang, Yaou; Sun, Zhirong

    2016-10-18

    N(6)-Methyladenosine (m(6)A) is the most prevalent and abundant modification in mRNA that has been linked to many key biological processes. High-throughput experiments have generated m(6)A-peaks across the transcriptome of A. thaliana, but the specific methylated sites were not assigned, which impedes the understanding of m(6)A functions in plants. Therefore, computational prediction of mRNA m(6)A sites becomes emergently important. Here, we present a method to predict the m(6)A sites for A. thaliana mRNA sequence(s). To predict the m(6)A sites of an mRNA sequence, we employed the support vector machine to build a classifier using the features of the positional flanking nucleotide sequence and position-independent k-mer nucleotide spectrum. Our method achieved good performance and was applied to a web server to provide service for the prediction of A. thaliana m(6)A sites. The server also provides a comprehensive database of predicted transcriptome-wide m(6)A sites and curated m(6)A-seq peaks from the literature for query and visualization. The AthMethPre web server is the first web server that provides a user-friendly tool for the prediction and query of A. thaliana mRNA m(6)A sites, which is freely accessible for public use at .

  14. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  15. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  16. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  17. EarthServer - Opportunities and challenges of serving ECMWF's peta-sized archive through OGC web-services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemann, Julia; Siemen, Stephan; Lamy-Thepaut, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    ECMWF is partner of the EU-funded (Horizon2020) EarthServer-2 project and is setting up a web service that facilitates climate data access, exploration, analysis and visualisation based on Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. By doing this, ECMWF data shall become easier accessible to researchers and decision-makers of the MetOcean and GIS community. MARS is ECMWF's Meteorological Archive and Retrieval System, the world's largest archive of meteorological data. In November 2015, the MARS archive held ~87 PB of data and grew by additional ~3 PB every month. In order for users to fully benefit from the potential of a data volume beyond the PB, it is in the interest of ECMWF as a data provider to minimize the necessary data transport and yet, to provide access to the full range of data and information. The aim of the three-year project is to establish a connection between the rasdaman server technology and ECMWF's MARS archive and thus, provide access to more than 1 PB of global reanalysis served by the OGC-based standard data access protocols Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). By presenting first results of serving meteorological data, the presentation will show opportunities for data users using OGC web services. A further focus will be set on current challenges of serving climate data from ECMWF's archive and specific requirements of the MetOcean community, e.g. related to the support of GRIB and netCDF data, in order to collectively work on mature Big Data standards across all Earth Science disciplines.

  18. The EarthServer Geology Service: web coverage services for geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxton, John; Sen, Marcus; Passmore, James

    2014-05-01

    The EarthServer FP7 project is implementing web coverage services using the OGC WCS and WCPS standards for a range of earth science domains: cryospheric; atmospheric; oceanographic; planetary; and geological. BGS is providing the geological service (http://earthserver.bgs.ac.uk/). Geoscience has used remote sensed data from satellites and planes for some considerable time, but other areas of geosciences are less familiar with the use of coverage data. This is rapidly changing with the development of new sensor networks and the move from geological maps to geological spatial models. The BGS geology service is designed initially to address two coverage data use cases and three levels of data access restriction. Databases of remote sensed data are typically very large and commonly held offline, making it time-consuming for users to assess and then download data. The service is designed to allow the spatial selection, editing and display of Landsat and aerial photographic imagery, including band selection and contrast stretching. This enables users to rapidly view data, assess is usefulness for their purposes, and then enhance and download it if it is suitable. At present the service contains six band Landsat 7 (Blue, Green, Red, NIR 1, NIR 2, MIR) and three band false colour aerial photography (NIR, green, blue), totalling around 1Tb. Increasingly 3D spatial models are being produced in place of traditional geological maps. Models make explicit spatial information implicit on maps and thus are seen as a better way of delivering geosciences information to non-geoscientists. However web delivery of models, including the provision of suitable visualisation clients, has proved more challenging than delivering maps. The EarthServer geology service is delivering 35 surfaces as coverages, comprising the modelled superficial deposits of the Glasgow area. These can be viewed using a 3D web client developed in the EarthServer project by Fraunhofer. As well as remote sensed

  19. Computers in Small Libraries: Learning Server-Side Scripting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Gary

    2005-01-01

    In this column, the author compares and contrasts the most popular scripting languages that are used to create truly dynamic service-oriented Web sites, building a conceptual framework that be can used as a starting point for specific server-side library projects.

  20. Microsoft SQL Server 6.0{reg_sign} Workbook

    SciTech Connect

    Augustenborg, E.C.

    1996-09-01

    This workbook was prepared for introductory training in the use of Microsoft SQL Server Version 6.0. The examples are all taken from the PUBS database that Microsoft distributes for training purposes or from the Microsoft Online Documentation. The merits of the relational database are presented.

  1. Two-Cloud-Servers-Assisted Secure Outsourcing Multiparty Computation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Hua; Jin, Zhengping; Li, Wenmin

    2014-01-01

    We focus on how to securely outsource computation task to the cloud and propose a secure outsourcing multiparty computation protocol on lattice-based encrypted data in two-cloud-servers scenario. Our main idea is to transform the outsourced data respectively encrypted by different users' public keys to the ones that are encrypted by the same two private keys of the two assisted servers so that it is feasible to operate on the transformed ciphertexts to compute an encrypted result following the function to be computed. In order to keep the privacy of the result, the two servers cooperatively produce a custom-made result for each user that is authorized to get the result so that all authorized users can recover the desired result while other unauthorized ones including the two servers cannot. Compared with previous research, our protocol is completely noninteractive between any users, and both of the computation and the communication complexities of each user in our solution are independent of the computing function. PMID:24982949

  2. Training to Increase Safe Tray Carrying among Cocktail Servers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherrer, Megan D.; Wilder, David A.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of training on proper carrying techniques among 3 cocktail servers to increase safe tray carrying on the job and reduce participants' risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders. As participants delivered drinks to their tables, their finger, arm, and neck positions were observed and recorded. Each participant received…

  3. Perspectives of IT Professionals on Employing Server Virtualization Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sligh, Darla

    2010-01-01

    Server virtualization enables a physical computer to support multiple applications logically by decoupling the application from the hardware layer, thereby reducing operational costs and competitive in delivering IT services to their enterprise organizations. IT organizations continually examine the efficiency of their internal IT systems and…

  4. Migrating from Mainframes to Client-Server Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    The prevailing trend within the computer industry is to downsize information systems. This quite often entails migrating an application from a...centralized mainframe environment to a distributed client-server system. Navy IS managers are often given the mandate to downsize all information systems

  5. Distributed control system for demand response by servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Joseph Edward

    Within the broad topical designation of smart grid, research in demand response, or demand-side management, focuses on investigating possibilities for electrically powered devices to adapt their power consumption patterns to better match generation and more efficiently integrate intermittent renewable energy sources, especially wind. Devices such as battery chargers, heating and cooling systems, and computers can be controlled to change the time, duration, and magnitude of their power consumption while still meeting workload constraints such as deadlines and rate of throughput. This thesis presents a system by which a computer server, or multiple servers in a data center, can estimate the power imbalance on the electrical grid and use that information to dynamically change the power consumption as a service to the grid. Implementation on a testbed demonstrates the system with a hypothetical but realistic usage case scenario of an online video streaming service in which there are workloads with deadlines (high-priority) and workloads without deadlines (low-priority). The testbed is implemented with real servers, estimates the power imbalance from the grid frequency with real-time measurements of the live outlet, and uses a distributed, real-time algorithm to dynamically adjust the power consumption of the servers based on the frequency estimate and the throughput of video transcoder workloads. Analysis of the system explains and justifies multiple design choices, compares the significance of the system in relation to similar publications in the literature, and explores the potential impact of the system.

  6. Two-cloud-servers-assisted secure outsourcing multiparty computation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Wen, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Yudong; Zhang, Hua; Jin, Zhengping; Li, Wenmin

    2014-01-01

    We focus on how to securely outsource computation task to the cloud and propose a secure outsourcing multiparty computation protocol on lattice-based encrypted data in two-cloud-servers scenario. Our main idea is to transform the outsourced data respectively encrypted by different users' public keys to the ones that are encrypted by the same two private keys of the two assisted servers so that it is feasible to operate on the transformed ciphertexts to compute an encrypted result following the function to be computed. In order to keep the privacy of the result, the two servers cooperatively produce a custom-made result for each user that is authorized to get the result so that all authorized users can recover the desired result while other unauthorized ones including the two servers cannot. Compared with previous research, our protocol is completely noninteractive between any users, and both of the computation and the communication complexities of each user in our solution are independent of the computing function.

  7. An incremental database access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, Nicholas; Sellis, Timos

    1994-01-01

    We investigated a number of design and performance issues of interoperable database management systems (DBMS's). The major results of our investigation were obtained in the areas of client-server database architectures for heterogeneous DBMS's, incremental computation models, buffer management techniques, and query optimization. We finished a prototype of an advanced client-server workstation-based DBMS which allows access to multiple heterogeneous commercial DBMS's. Experiments and simulations were then run to compare its performance with the standard client-server architectures. The focus of this research was on adaptive optimization methods of heterogeneous database systems. Adaptive buffer management accounts for the random and object-oriented access methods for which no known characterization of the access patterns exists. Adaptive query optimization means that value distributions and selectives, which play the most significant role in query plan evaluation, are continuously refined to reflect the actual values as opposed to static ones that are computed off-line. Query feedback is a concept that was first introduced to the literature by our group. We employed query feedback for both adaptive buffer management and for computing value distributions and selectivities. For adaptive buffer management, we use the page faults of prior executions to achieve more 'informed' management decisions. For the estimation of the distributions of the selectivities, we use curve-fitting techniques, such as least squares and splines, for regressing on these values.

  8. Accessing Heliophysics Timeseries Data Through a Single Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandegriff, J. D.; Brown, L. E.; Bazell, D.; Faden, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a simple interface for digital access to tabular time series data. The intended use for this interface is to provide a standard access mechanism for existing holdings of Heliophysics data from NASA missions. Furthermore, the interface is not intended to target any particular tool, but is intended as low-level infrastructure allowing any tool to use a single interface to access the digital content of all Heliophysics timeseries data. The interface addresses only data access, not data discovery. The query structure itself is very simple, taking only a few inputs: dataset name, time range, parameter list, and output format. The result of the query is a stream of data that is independent of the storage format on the server. Currently, most data centers offer some type of computer-to-computer access mechanism, but each has unique features and usage patterns (some give files in a specific format, some stream data, etc.) so that they all require different client code to extract data. A single, simple, lowest common denominator solution is clearly still needed. We present a prototype implementation of a service implementing our basic interface, and discuss similarities and differences between our interface and other similar existing data access mechanisms, including the web services at CDAWeb, OPeNDAP, the Das2Server mechanism of Autoplot, and options based on the VOTable mechanism from the astronomy community.URL: http://datashop.elasticbeanstalk.com/

  9. The Public-Access Computer Systems Forum: A Computer Conference on BITNET.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Charles W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the Public Access Computer Systems Forum (PACS), a computer conference that deals with all computer systems that libraries make available to patrons. Areas discussed include how to subscribe to PACS, message distribution and retrieval capabilities, subscriber lists, documentation, generic list server capabilities, and other…

  10. Challenges in providing general access to digitized x rays over the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Lewis E.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    1995-01-01

    As part of a collaborative project with other government agencies, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is engaged in the development of an electronic archive of digitized cervical and lumbar spine xrays taken in the course of nationwide health and nutrition examination surveys. One goal of the project is to provide access to the images via a client/server system specifically designed to enable radiologists located anywhere on the Internet to read them and enter their readings into a database at the server located at NLM. Another key goal is to provide general (public) access to these images, the radiologists' readings, and other collateral data taken during the survey. The system developed for such general access is based on a public domain server, the World Wide Web (WWW), and NCSA Mosaic, a distributed hypermedia client system designed for information retrieval over the Internet. This paper describes the design of the client/server software, the storage environment for the x-ray archive, the user interface, the communications software, and the public access archive. Design issues include file format, image resolution (both spatial and contrast), compression alternatives, linking collateral data with images, and the role of staging and prefetching.

  11. Experimental parametric study of servers cooling management in data centers buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nada, S. A.; Elfeky, K. E.; Attia, Ali M. A.; Alshaer, W. G.

    2017-01-01

    A parametric study of air flow and cooling management of data centers servers is experimentally conducted for different design conditions. A physical scale model of data center accommodating one rack of four servers was designed and constructed for testing purposes. Front and rear rack and server's temperatures distributions and supply/return heat indices (SHI/RHI) are used to evaluate data center thermal performance. Experiments were conducted to parametrically study the effects of perforated tiles opening ratio, servers power load variation and rack power density. The results showed that (1) perforated tile of 25% opening ratio provides the best results among the other opening ratios, (2) optimum benefit of cold air in servers cooling is obtained at uniformly power loading of servers (3) increasing power density decrease air re-circulation but increase air bypass and servers temperature. The present results are compared with previous experimental and CFD results and fair agreement was found.

  12. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis ...

  13. Unifying access to services: ESO's user portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, A. M.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Peron, M.; Sogni, F.; Canavan, T.; Nass, P.

    2006-06-01

    The European Southern Observatory (ESO) is in the process of creating a central access point for all services offered to its user community via the Web. That gateway, called the User Portal, will provide registered users with a personalized set of service access points, the actual set depending on each user's privileges. Correspondence between users and ESO will take place by way of "profiles", that is, contact information. Each user may have several active profiles, so that an investigator may choose, for instance, whether their data should be delivered to their own address or to a collaborator. To application developers, the portal will offer authentication and authorization services, either via database queries or an LDAP server. The User Portal is being developed as a Web application using Java-based technology, including servlets and JSPs.

  14. [A Java class library for accessing Cadplan data].

    PubMed

    Zagler, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    A Java class library was developed to be able to access the data of the treatment planning system Varian Cad-plan which was decommissioned in 2005. The library reads and encapsulates the most important patient data. It facilitates creating viewing software for CT slices, contours and isodoses. Keeping alive old Cadplan hardware is no longer necessary. The files can be stored on any server in the network of a department and they can be accessed from any workstation capable of running Java software.

  15. Climate Data Service in the FP7 EarthServer Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani, Simone; Natali, Stefano; Barboni, Damiano; Grazia Veratelli, Maria

    2013-04-01

    EarthServer is a European Framework Program project that aims at developing and demonstrating the usability of open standards (OGC and W3C) in the management of multi-source, any-size, multi-dimensional spatio-temporal data - in short: "Big Earth Data Analytics". In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, six thematic Lighthouse Applications (Cryospheric Science, Airborne Science, Atmospheric/ Climate Science, Geology, Oceanography, and Planetary Science), each with 100+ TB, are implemented. Scope of the Atmospheric/Climate lighthouse application (Climate Data Service) is to implement the system containing global to regional 2D / 3D / 4D datasets retrieved either from satellite observations, from numerical modelling and in-situ observations. Data contained in the Climate Data Service regard atmospheric profiles of temperature / humidity, aerosol content, AOT, and cloud properties provided by entities such as the European Centre for Mesoscale Weather Forecast (ECMWF), the Austrian Meteorological Service (Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik - ZAMG), the Italian National Agency for new technologies, energies and sustainable development (ENEA), and the Sweden's Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (Sveriges Meteorologiska och Hydrologiska Institut -- SMHI). The system, through an easy-to-use web application permits to browse the loaded data, visualize their temporal evolution on a specific point with the creation of 2D graphs of a single field, or compare different fields on the same point (e.g. temperatures from different models and satellite observations), and visualize maps of specific fields superimposed with high resolution background maps. All data access operations and display are performed by means of OGC standard operations namely WMS, WCS and WCPS. The EarthServer project has just started its second year over a 3-years development plan: the present status the system contains subsets of the final database, with the scope of

  16. DeepBlue epigenomic data server: programmatic data retrieval and analysis of epigenome region sets

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Felipe; List, Markus; Bock, Christoph; Lengauer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Large amounts of epigenomic data are generated under the umbrella of the International Human Epigenome Consortium, which aims to establish 1000 reference epigenomes within the next few years. These data have the potential to unravel the complexity of epigenomic regulation. However, their effective use is hindered by the lack of flexible and easy-to-use methods for data retrieval. Extracting region sets of interest is a cumbersome task that involves several manual steps: identifying the relevant experiments, downloading the corresponding data files and filtering the region sets of interest. Here we present the DeepBlue Epigenomic Data Server, which streamlines epigenomic data analysis as well as software development. DeepBlue provides a comprehensive programmatic interface for finding, selecting, filtering, summarizing and downloading region sets. It contains data from four major epigenome projects, namely ENCODE, ROADMAP, BLUEPRINT and DEEP. DeepBlue comes with a user manual, examples and a well-documented application programming interface (API). The latter is accessed via the XML-RPC protocol supported by many programming languages. To demonstrate usage of the API and to enable convenient data retrieval for non-programmers, we offer an optional web interface. DeepBlue can be openly accessed at http://deepblue.mpi-inf.mpg.de. PMID:27084938

  17. Prototype client/server application for biomedical text/image retrieval on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Berman, Lewis E.; Thoma, George R.

    1996-03-01

    At the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a research and development division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), a prototype image database retrieval system has been built. This medical information retrieval system (MIRS) is a client/server application which provides Internet access to biomedical databases, including both text search/retrieval and retrieval/display of medical images associated with the text records. The MIRS graphical user interface (GUI) allows a user to formulate queries by simple, intuitive interactions with screen buttons, list boxes, and edit boxes; these interactions create structured query language (SQL) queries, which are submitted to a database manager running at NLM. The result of a MIRS query is a display showing both scrollable text records and scrollable images returned for all of the 'hits' of the query. MIRS is designed as an information-delivery vehicle intended to provide access to multiple collections of medical text and image data. The database used for initial MIRS evaluation consists of national survey data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics, including 17,000 spinal x-ray images. This survey, conducted on a sample of 27,801 persons, collected demographic, socioeconomic, and medical information, including both interview results and results acquired by direct examination by physician.

  18. DeepBlue epigenomic data server: programmatic data retrieval and analysis of epigenome region sets.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Felipe; List, Markus; Bock, Christoph; Lengauer, Thomas

    2016-07-08

    Large amounts of epigenomic data are generated under the umbrella of the International Human Epigenome Consortium, which aims to establish 1000 reference epigenomes within the next few years. These data have the potential to unravel the complexity of epigenomic regulation. However, their effective use is hindered by the lack of flexible and easy-to-use methods for data retrieval. Extracting region sets of interest is a cumbersome task that involves several manual steps: identifying the relevant experiments, downloading the corresponding data files and filtering the region sets of interest. Here we present the DeepBlue Epigenomic Data Server, which streamlines epigenomic data analysis as well as software development. DeepBlue provides a comprehensive programmatic interface for finding, selecting, filtering, summarizing and downloading region sets. It contains data from four major epigenome projects, namely ENCODE, ROADMAP, BLUEPRINT and DEEP. DeepBlue comes with a user manual, examples and a well-documented application programming interface (API). The latter is accessed via the XML-RPC protocol supported by many programming languages. To demonstrate usage of the API and to enable convenient data retrieval for non-programmers, we offer an optional web interface. DeepBlue can be openly accessed at http://deepblue.mpi-inf.mpg.de.

  19. The NERC Vocabulary Server: Version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leadbetter, A. M.; Lowry, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Vocabulary Server (NVS) has been used to publish controlled vocabularies of terms relevant to marine environmental sciences since 2006 (version 0) with version 1 being introduced in 2007. It has been used for - metadata mark-up with verifiable content - populating dynamic drop down lists - semantic cross-walk between metadata schemata - so-called smart search - and the semantic enablement of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Processing Services in the NERC Data Grid and the European Commission SeaDataNet, Geo-Seas, and European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet) projects. The NVS is based on the Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) model. SKOS is based on the "concept", which it defines as a "unit of thought", that is an idea or notion such as "oil spill". Following a version change for SKOS in 2009 there was a desire to upgrade the NVS to incorporate the changes. This version of SKOS introduces the ability to aggregate concepts in both collections and schemes. The design of version 2 of the NVS uses both types of aggregation: schemes for the discovery of content through hierarchical thesauri and collections for the publication and addressing of content. Other desired changes from version 1 of the NVS included: - the removal of the potential for multiple identifiers for the same concept to ensure consistent addressing of concepts - the addition of content and technical governance information in the payload documents to provide an audit trail to users of NVS content - the removal of XML snippets from concept definitions in order to correctly validate XML serializations of the SKOS - the addition of the ability to map into external knowledge organization systems in order to extend the knowledge base - a more truly RESTful approach URL access to the NVS to make the development of applications on top of the NVS easier - and support for multiple human languages to increase the user base of the NVS

  20. TFmiR: a web server for constructing and analyzing disease-specific transcription factor and miRNA co-regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Spaniol, Christian; Nazarieh, Maryam; Helms, Volkhard

    2015-07-01

    TFmiR is a freely available web server for deep and integrative analysis of combinatorial regulatory interactions between transcription factors, microRNAs and target genes that are involved in disease pathogenesis. Since the inner workings of cells rely on the correct functioning of an enormously complex system of activating and repressing interactions that can be perturbed in many ways, TFmiR helps to better elucidate cellular mechanisms at the molecular level from a network perspective. The provided topological and functional analyses promote TFmiR as a reliable systems biology tool for researchers across the life science communities. TFmiR web server is accessible through the following URL: http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/tfmir.

  1. User Evaluation of the NASA Technical Report Server Recommendation Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bollen, Johan; Calhoun, JoAnne R.; Mackey, Calvin E.

    2004-01-01

    We present the user evaluation of two recommendation server methodologies implemented for the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). One methodology for generating recommendations uses log analysis to identify co-retrieval events on full-text documents. For comparison, we used the Vector Space Model (VSM) as the second methodology. We calculated cosine similarities and used the top 10 most similar documents (based on metadata) as recommendations . We then ran an experiment with NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) staff members to gather their feedback on which method produced the most quality recommendations. We found that in most cases VSM outperformed log analysis of co-retrievals. However, analyzing the data revealed the evaluations may have been structurally biased in favor of the VSM generated recommendations. We explore some possible methods for combining log analysis and VSM generated recommendations and suggest areas of future work.

  2. DSP: a protein shape string and its profile prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangming; Tang, Shengnan; Xiong, Wenwei; Cong, Peisheng; Li, Tonghua

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that shape string is an extremely important structure representation, since it is more complete than the classical secondary structure. The shape string provides detailed information also in the regions denoted random coil. But few services are provided for systematic analysis of protein shape string. To fill this gap, we have developed an accurate shape string predictor based on two innovative technologies: a knowledge-driven sequence alignment and a sequence shape string profile method. The performance on blind test data demonstrates that the proposed method can be used for accurate prediction of protein shape string. The DSP server provides both predicted shape string and sequence shape string profile for each query sequence. Using this information, the users can compare protein structure or display protein evolution in shape string space. The DSP server is available at both http://cheminfo.tongji.edu.cn/dsp/ and its main mirror http://chemcenter.tongji.edu.cn/dsp/. PMID:22553364

  3. Peptiderive server: derive peptide inhibitors from protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sedan, Yuval; Marcu, Orly; Lyskov, Sergey; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2016-01-01

    The Rosetta Peptiderive protocol identifies, in a given structure of a protein–protein interaction, the linear polypeptide segment suggested to contribute most to binding energy. Interactions that feature a ‘hot segment’, a linear peptide with significant binding energy compared to that of the complex, may be amenable for inhibition and the peptide sequence and structure derived from the interaction provide a starting point for rational drug design. Here we present a web server for Peptiderive, which is incorporated within the ROSIE web interface for Rosetta protocols. A new feature of the protocol also evaluates whether derived peptides are good candidates for cyclization. Fast computation times and clear visualization allow users to quickly assess the interaction of interest. The Peptiderive server is available for free use at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/peptiderive. PMID:27141963

  4. Fact Sheet: Improving Energy Efficiency for Server Rooms and Closets

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Hoi Ying; Mahdavi, Rod; Greenberg, Steve; Brown, Rich; Tschudi, William; Delforge, Pierre; Dickerson, Joyce

    2012-09-01

    Is there a ghost in your IT closet? If your building has one or more IT rooms or closets containing between 5 and 50 servers, chances are that they account for a significant share of the building’s energy use (in some cases, over half!). Servers, data storage arrays, networking equipment, and the cooling and power conditioning that support them tend to draw large amounts of energy 24/7, in many cases using more energy annually than traditional building loads such as HVAC and lighting. The good news is that there are many cost-effective actions, ranging from simple to advanced, that can dramatically reduce that energy use, helping you to save money and reduce pollution.

  5. Experience of public procurement of Open Compute servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bärring, Olof; Guerri, Marco; Bonfillou, Eric; Valsan, Liviu; Grigore, Alexandru; Dore, Vincent; Gentit, Alain; Clement, Benoît; Grossir, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    The Open Compute Project. OCP (http://www.opencompute.org/). was launched by Facebook in 2011 with the objective of building efficient computing infrastructures at the lowest possible cost. The technologies are released as open hardware. with the goal to develop servers and data centres following the model traditionally associated with open source software projects. In 2013 CERN acquired a few OCP servers in order to compare performance and power consumption with standard hardware. The conclusions were that there are sufficient savings to motivate an attempt to procure a large scale installation. One objective is to evaluate if the OCP market is sufficiently mature and broad enough to meet the constraints of a public procurement. This paper summarizes this procurement. which started in September 2014 and involved the Request for information (RFI) to qualify bidders and Request for Tender (RFT).

  6. User Evaluation of the NASA Technical Report Server Recommendation Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bollen, Johan; Calhoun, JoAnne R.; Mackey, Calvin E.

    2004-01-01

    We present the user evaluation of two recommendation server methodologies implemented for the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). One methodology for generating recommendations uses log analysis to identify co-retrieval events on full-text documents. For comparison, we used the Vector Space Model (VSM) as the second methodology. We calculated cosine similarities and used the top 10 most similar documents (based on metadata) as 'recommendations'. We then ran an experiment with NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) staff members to gather their feedback on which method produced the most 'quality' recommendations. We found that in most cases VSM outperformed log analysis of co-retrievals. However, analyzing the data revealed the evaluations may have been structurally biased in favor of the VSM generated recommendations. We explore some possible methods for combining log analysis and VSM generated recommendations and suggest areas of future work.

  7. Berkeley Phylogenomics Group web servers: resources for structural phylogenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Glanville, Jake Gunn; Kirshner, Dan; Krishnamurthy, Nandini; Sjölander, Kimmen

    2007-07-01

    Phylogenomic analysis addresses the limitations of function prediction based on annotation transfer, and has been shown to enable the highest accuracy in prediction of protein molecular function. The Berkeley Phylogenomics Group provides a series of web servers for phylogenomic analysis: classification of sequences to pre-computed families and subfamilies using the PhyloFacts Phylogenomic Encyclopedia, FlowerPower clustering of proteins sharing the same domain architecture, MUSCLE multiple sequence alignment, SATCHMO simultaneous alignment and tree construction and SCI-PHY subfamily identification. The PhyloBuilder web server provides an integrated phylogenomic pipeline starting with a user-supplied protein sequence, proceeding to homolog identification, multiple alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, subfamily identification and structure prediction. The Berkeley Phylogenomics Group resources are available at http://phylogenomics.berkeley.edu.

  8. DSP: a protein shape string and its profile prediction server.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiangming; Tang, Shengnan; Xiong, Wenwei; Cong, Peisheng; Li, Tonghua

    2012-07-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that shape string is an extremely important structure representation, since it is more complete than the classical secondary structure. The shape string provides detailed information also in the regions denoted random coil. But few services are provided for systematic analysis of protein shape string. To fill this gap, we have developed an accurate shape string predictor based on two innovative technologies: a knowledge-driven sequence alignment and a sequence shape string profile method. The performance on blind test data demonstrates that the proposed method can be used for accurate prediction of protein shape string. The DSP server provides both predicted shape string and sequence shape string profile for each query sequence. Using this information, the users can compare protein structure or display protein evolution in shape string space. The DSP server is available at both http://cheminfo.tongji.edu.cn/dsp/ and its main mirror http://chemcenter.tongji.edu.cn/dsp/.

  9. An empirical performance analysis of commodity memories in commodity servers

    SciTech Connect

    Kerbyson, D. J.; Lang, M. K.; Patino, G.

    2004-01-01

    This work details a performance study of six different commodity memories in two commodity server nodes on a number of microbenchmarks, that measure low-level performance characteristics, as well as on two applications representative of the ASCI workload. Thc memories vary both in terms of performance, including latency and bandwidths, and also in terms of their physical properties and manufacturer. Two server nodes were used; one Itanium-II Madison based system, and one Xeon based system. All the memories examined can be used within both processing nodes. This allows the performance of the memories to be directly examined while keeping all other factors within a processing node the same (processor, motherboard, operating system etc.). The results of this study show that there can be a significant difference in application performance from the different memories - by as much as 20%. Thus, by choosing the most appropriate memory for a processing node at a minimal cost differential, significant improved performance may be achievable.

  10. Introducing djatoka: a reuse friendly, open source JPEG image server

    SciTech Connect

    Chute, Ryan M; Van De Sompel, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The ISO-standardized JPEG 2000 image format has started to attract significant attention. Support for the format is emerging in major consumer applications, and the cultural heritage community seriously considers it a viable format for digital preservation. So far, only commercial image servers with JPEG 2000 support have been available. They come with significant license fees and typically provide the customers with limited extensibility capabilities. Here, we introduce djatoka, an open source JPEG 2000 image server with an attractive basic feature set, and extensibility under control of the community of implementers. We describe djatoka, and point at demonstrations that feature digitized images of marvelous historical manuscripts from the collections of the British Library and the University of Ghent. We also caIl upon the community to engage in further development of djatoka.

  11. The Photometric Classification Server of PanSTARRS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglia, R. P.

    2008-12-01

    The Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (PanSTARRS1) project is on his way to start science operations early 2009. In the next 3.5 years it will produce a grizy survey of 3/4 of the sky, 2 mag deeper than Sloan. The Photometric Classification Server is responsibile for the object classification as star, galaxy or quasar, based on multiband photometry. Accordingly, it t should also deliver accurate and timely stellar parameters or photometric redshifts. Several science projects rely on the output of the server, from transit planet search, to transient detections, the structure of the Milky Way, high redshift Quasars, galaxy evolution, cosmological shear, baryonic oscillations and galaxy cluster searches.

  12. NESDIS OSPO Data Access Policy and CRM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seybold, M. G.; Donoho, N. A.; McNamara, D.; Paquette, J.; Renkevens, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Office of Satellite and Product Operations (OSPO) is the NESDIS office responsible for satellite operations, product generation, and product distribution. Access to and distribution of OSPO data was formally established in a Data Access Policy dated February, 2011. An extension of the data access policy is the OSPO Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Database, which has been in development since 2008 and is reaching a critical level of maturity. This presentation will provide a summary of the data access policy and standard operating procedure (SOP) for handling data access requests. The tangential CRM database will be highlighted including the incident tracking system, reporting and notification capabilities, and the first comprehensive portfolio of NESDIS satellites, instruments, servers, applications, products, user organizations, and user contacts. Select examples of CRM data exploitation will show how OSPO is utilizing the CRM database to more closely satisfy the user community's satellite data needs with new product promotions, as well as new data and imagery distribution methods in OSPO's Environmental Satellite Processing Center (ESPC). In addition, user services and outreach initiatives from the Satellite Products and Services Division will be highlighted.

  13. Mobile object retrieval in server-based image databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manger, D.; Pagel, F.; Widak, H.

    2013-05-01

    The increasing number of mobile phones equipped with powerful cameras leads to huge collections of user-generated images. To utilize the information of the images on site, image retrieval systems are becoming more and more popular to search for similar objects in an own image database. As the computational performance and the memory capacity of mobile devices are constantly increasing, this search can often be performed on the device itself. This is feasible, for example, if the images are represented with global image features or if the search is done using EXIF or textual metadata. However, for larger image databases, if multiple users are meant to contribute to a growing image database or if powerful content-based image retrieval methods with local features are required, a server-based image retrieval backend is needed. In this work, we present a content-based image retrieval system with a client server architecture working with local features. On the server side, the scalability to large image databases is addressed with the popular bag-of-word model with state-of-the-art extensions. The client end of the system focuses on a lightweight user interface presenting the most similar images of the database highlighting the visual information which is common with the query image. Additionally, new images can be added to the database making it a powerful and interactive tool for mobile contentbased image retrieval.

  14. From honeybees to Internet servers: biomimicry for distributed management of Internet hosting centers.

    PubMed

    Nakrani, Sunil; Tovey, Craig

    2007-12-01

    An Internet hosting center hosts services on its server ensemble. The center must allocate servers dynamically amongst services to maximize revenue earned from hosting fees. The finite server ensemble, unpredictable request arrival behavior and server reallocation cost make server allocation optimization difficult. Server allocation closely resembles honeybee forager allocation amongst flower patches to optimize nectar influx. The resemblance inspires a honeybee biomimetic algorithm. This paper describes details of the honeybee self-organizing model in terms of information flow and feedback, analyzes the homology between the two problems and derives the resulting biomimetic algorithm for hosting centers. The algorithm is assessed for effectiveness and adaptiveness by comparative testing against benchmark and conventional algorithms. Computational results indicate that the new algorithm is highly adaptive to widely varying external environments and quite competitive against benchmark assessment algorithms. Other swarm intelligence applications are briefly surveyed, and some general speculations are offered regarding their various degrees of success.

  15. US Astronomers Access to SIMBAD in Strasbourg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Eichhorn, Guenther

    2004-01-01

    During the last year the US SIMBAD Gateway Project continued to provide services like user registration to the US users of the SIMBAD database in France. Currently there are over 4500 US users registered. We also provided user support by answering questions from users and handling requests for lost passwords when still necessary. Even though almost all users now access SIMBAD without a password, based on hostnames/IP addresses, there are still some users that need individual passwords. We continued to maintain the mirror copy of the SIMBAD database on a server at SAO. This allows much faster access for the US users. During the past year we again moved this mirror to a faster server to improve access for the US users. We again supported a demonstration of the SIMBAD database at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society in January. We provided support for the demonstration activities at the SIMBAD booth. We paid part of the fee for the SIMBAD demonstration. We continued to improve the cross-linking between the SIMBAD project and the Astrophysics Data System. This cross-linking between these systems is very much appreciated by the users of both the SIMBAD database and the ADS Abstract Service. The mirror of the SIMBAD database at SA0 makes this connection faster for the US astronomers. We exchange information between the ADS and SIMBAD on a daily basis. During the last year we also installed a mirror copy of the Vizier system from the CDS, in addition to the SIMBAD mirror.

  16. Secure Dynamic access control scheme of PHR in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Liu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chen, Chin-Sheng; Bau, Jian-Guo; Lin, Tzu-Ching

    2012-12-01

    With the development of information technology and medical technology, medical information has been developed from traditional paper records into electronic medical records, which have now been widely applied. The new-style medical information exchange system "personal health records (PHR)" is gradually developed. PHR is a kind of health records maintained and recorded by individuals. An ideal personal health record could integrate personal medical information from different sources and provide complete and correct personal health and medical summary through the Internet or portable media under the requirements of security and privacy. A lot of personal health records are being utilized. The patient-centered PHR information exchange system allows the public autonomously maintain and manage personal health records. Such management is convenient for storing, accessing, and sharing personal medical records. With the emergence of Cloud computing, PHR service has been transferred to storing data into Cloud servers that the resources could be flexibly utilized and the operation cost can be reduced. Nevertheless, patients would face privacy problem when storing PHR data into Cloud. Besides, it requires a secure protection scheme to encrypt the medical records of each patient for storing PHR into Cloud server. In the encryption process, it would be a challenge to achieve accurately accessing to medical records and corresponding to flexibility and efficiency. A new PHR access control scheme under Cloud computing environments is proposed in this study. With Lagrange interpolation polynomial to establish a secure and effective PHR information access scheme, it allows to accurately access to PHR with security and is suitable for enormous multi-users. Moreover, this scheme also dynamically supports multi-users in Cloud computing environments with personal privacy and offers legal authorities to access to PHR. From security and effectiveness analyses, the proposed PHR access

  17. A Smartphone Client-Server Teleradiology System for Primary Diagnosis of Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent advances in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke have made rapid acquisition, visualization, and interpretation of images a key factor for positive patient outcomes. We have developed a new teleradiology system based on a client-server architecture that enables rapid access to interactive advanced 2-D and 3-D visualization on a current generation smartphone device (Apple iPhone or iPod Touch, or an Android phone) without requiring patient image data to be stored on the device. Instead, a server loads and renders the patient images, then transmits a rendered frame to the remote device. Objective Our objective was to determine if a new smartphone client-server teleradiology system is capable of providing accuracies and interpretation times sufficient for diagnosis of acute stroke. Methods This was a retrospective study. We obtained 120 recent consecutive noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) brain scans and 70 computed tomography angiogram (CTA) head scans from the Calgary Stroke Program database. Scans were read by two neuroradiologists, one on a medical diagnostic workstation and an iPod or iPhone (hereafter referred to as an iOS device) and the other only on an iOS device. NCCT brain scans were evaluated for early signs of infarction, which includes early parenchymal ischemic changes and dense vessel sign, and to exclude acute intraparenchymal hemorrhage and stroke mimics. CTA brain scans were evaluated for any intracranial vessel occlusion. The interpretations made on an iOS device were compared with those made at a workstation. The total interpretation times were recorded for both platforms. Interrater agreement was assessed. True positives, true negatives, false positives, and false negatives were obtained, and sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of detecting the abnormalities on the iOS device were computed. Results The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of detecting intraparenchymal hemorrhage were 100% using the iOS device with a

  18. BioMart Central Portal--unified access to biological data.

    PubMed

    Haider, Syed; Ballester, Benoit; Smedley, Damian; Zhang, Junjun; Rice, Peter; Kasprzyk, Arek

    2009-07-01

    BioMart Central Portal (www.biomart.org) offers a one-stop shop solution to access a wide array of biological databases. These include major biomolecular sequence, pathway and annotation databases such as Ensembl, Uniprot, Reactome, HGNC, Wormbase and PRIDE; for a complete list, visit, http://www.biomart.org/biomart/martview. Moreover, the web server features seamless data federation making cross querying of these data sources in a user friendly and unified way. The web server not only provides access through a web interface (MartView), it also supports programmatic access through a Perl API as well as RESTful and SOAP oriented web services. The website is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement.

  19. Adventures in the evolution of a high-bandwidth network for central servers

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, K.L.; Cottrell, L.; Dart, M.

    1994-08-01

    In a small network, clients and servers may all be connected to a single Ethernet without significant performance concerns. As the number of clients on a network grows, the necessity of splitting the network into multiple sub-networks, each with a manageable number of clients, becomes clear. Less obvious is what to do with the servers. Group file servers on subnets and multihomed servers offer only partial solutions -- many other types of servers do not lend themselves to a decentralized model, and tend to collect on another, well-connected but overloaded Ethernet. The higher speed of FDDI seems to offer an easy solution, but in practice both expense and interoperability problems render FDDI a poor choice. Ethernet switches appear to permit cheaper and more reliable networking to the servers while providing an aggregate network bandwidth greater than a simple Ethernet. This paper studies the evolution of the server networks at SLAC. Difficulties encountered in the deployment of FDDI are described, as are the tools and techniques used to characterize the traffic patterns on the server network. Performance of Ethernet, FDDI, and switched Ethernet networks is analyzed, as are reliability and maintainability issues for these alternatives. The motivations for re-designing the SLAC general server network to use a switched Ethernet instead of FDDI are described, as are the reasons for choosing FDDI for the farm and firewall networks at SLAC. Guidelines are developed which may help in making this choice for other networks.

  20. Asynchronous data change notification between database server and accelerator controls system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.

    2011-10-10

    Database data change notification (DCN) is a commonly used feature. Not all database management systems (DBMS) provide an explicit DCN mechanism. Even for those DBMS's which support DCN (such as Oracle and MS SQL server), some server side and/or client side programming may be required to make the DCN system work. This makes the setup of DCN between database server and interested clients tedious and time consuming. In accelerator control systems, there are many well established software client/server architectures (such as CDEV, EPICS, and ADO) that can be used to implement data reflection servers that transfer data asynchronously to any client using the standard SET/GET API. This paper describes a method for using such a data reflection server to set up asynchronous DCN (ADCN) between a DBMS and clients. This method works well for all DBMS systems which provide database trigger functionality. Asynchronous data change notification (ADCN) between database server and clients can be realized by combining the use of a database trigger mechanism, which is supported by major DBMS systems, with server processes that use client/server software architectures that are familiar in the accelerator controls community (such as EPICS, CDEV or ADO). This approach makes the ADCN system easy to set up and integrate into an accelerator controls system. Several ADCN systems have been set up and used in the RHIC-AGS controls system.

  1. Group-oriented coordination models for distributed client-server computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.; Hughes, Craig S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes group-oriented control models for distributed client-server interactions. These models transparently coordinate requests for services that involve multiple servers, such as queries across distributed databases. Specific capabilities include: decomposing and replicating client requests; dispatching request subtasks or copies to independent, networked servers; and combining server results into a single response for the client. The control models were implemented by combining request broker and process group technologies with an object-oriented communication middleware tool. The models are illustrated in the context of a distributed operations support application for space-based systems.

  2. 75 FR 43206 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... and Battery Packs: Notice of Commission Determination Not To Review An Initial Determination... communications system server software, wireless handheld devices and battery packs by reason of infringement...

  3. SurvNet: a web server for identifying network-based biomarkers that most correlate with patient survival data.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Roebuck, Paul; Grünewald, Stefan; Liang, Han

    2012-07-01

    An important task in biomedical research is identifying biomarkers that correlate with patient clinical data, and these biomarkers then provide a critical foundation for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Conventionally, such an analysis is based on individual genes, but the results are often noisy and difficult to interpret. Using a biological network as the searching platform, network-based biomarkers are expected to be more robust and provide deep insights into the molecular mechanisms of disease. We have developed a novel bioinformatics web server for identifying network-based biomarkers that most correlate with patient survival data, SurvNet. The web server takes three input files: one biological network file, representing a gene regulatory or protein interaction network; one molecular profiling file, containing any type of gene- or protein-centred high-throughput biological data (e.g. microarray expression data or DNA methylation data); and one patient survival data file (e.g. patients' progression-free survival data). Given user-defined parameters, SurvNet will automatically search for subnetworks that most correlate with the observed patient survival data. As the output, SurvNet will generate a list of network biomarkers and display them through a user-friendly interface. SurvNet can be accessed at http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/main/SurvNet.

  4. Smart cloud system with image processing server in diagnosing brain diseases dedicated for hospitals with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Fahmi; Nasution, Tigor H

    2017-01-19

    The use of medical imaging in diagnosing brain disease is growing. The challenges are related to the big size of data and complexity of the image processing. High standard of hardware and software are demanded, which can only be provided in big hospitals. Our purpose was to provide a smart cloud system to help diagnosing brain diseases for hospital with limited infrastructure. The expertise of neurologists was first implanted in cloud server to conduct an automatic diagnosis in real time using image processing technique developed based on ITK library and web service. Users upload images through website and the result, in this case the size of tumor was sent back immediately. A specific image compression technique was developed for this purpose. The smart cloud system was able to measure the area and location of tumors, with average size of 19.91 ± 2.38 cm2 and an average response time 7.0 ± 0.3 s. The capability of the server decreased when multiple clients accessed the system simultaneously: 14 ± 0 s (5 parallel clients) and 27 ± 0.2 s (10 parallel clients). The cloud system was successfully developed to process and analyze medical images for diagnosing brain diseases in this case for tumor.

  5. Intro and Recent Advances: Remote Data Access via OPeNDAP Web Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulker, David

    2016-01-01

    During the upcoming Summer 2016 meeting of the ESIP Federation (July 19-22), OpenDAP will hold a Developers and Users Workshop. While a broad set of topics will be covered, a key focus is capitalizing on recent EOSDIS-sponsored advances in Hyrax, OPeNDAPs own software for server-side realization of the DAP2 and DAP4 protocols. These Hyrax advances are as important to data users as to data providers, and the workshop will include hands-on experiences of value to both. Specifically, a balanced set of presentations and hands-on tutorials will address advances in1.server installation,2.server configuration,3.Hyrax aggregation capabilities,4.support for data-access from clients that are HTTP-based, JSON-based or OGC-compliant (especially WCS and WMS),5.support for DAP4,6.use and extension of server-side computational capabilities, and7.several performance-affecting matters. Topics 2 through 7 will be relevant to data consumers, data providers and notably, due to the open-source nature of all OPeNDAP software to developers wishing to extend Hyrax, to build compatible clients and servers, and/or to employ Hyrax as middleware that enables interoperability across a variety of end-user and source-data contexts. A session for contributed talks will elaborate the topics listed above and embrace additional ones.

  6. EarthServer - an FP7 project to enable the web delivery and analysis of 3D/4D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxton, John; Sen, Marcus; Passmore, James

    2013-04-01

    EarthServer aims at open access and ad-hoc analytics on big Earth Science data, based on the OGC geoservice standards Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The WCS model defines "coverages" as a unifying paradigm for multi-dimensional raster data, point clouds, meshes, etc., thereby addressing a wide range of Earth Science data including 3D/4D models. WCPS allows declarative SQL-style queries on coverages. The project is developing a pilot implementing these standards, and will also investigate the use of GeoSciML to describe coverages. Integration of WCPS with XQuery will in turn allow coverages to be queried in combination with their metadata and GeoSciML description. The unified service will support navigation, extraction, aggregation, and ad-hoc analysis on coverage data from SQL. Clients will range from mobile devices to high-end immersive virtual reality, and will enable 3D model visualisation using web browser technology coupled with developing web standards. EarthServer is establishing open-source client and server technology intended to be scalable to Petabyte/Exabyte volumes, based on distributed processing, supercomputing, and cloud virtualization. Implementation will be based on the existing rasdaman server technology developed. Services using rasdaman technology are being installed serving the atmospheric, oceanographic, geological, cryospheric, planetary and general earth observation communities. The geology service (http://earthserver.bgs.ac.uk/) is being provided by BGS and at present includes satellite imagery, superficial thickness data, onshore DTMs and 3D models for the Glasgow area. It is intended to extend the data sets available to include 3D voxel models. Use of the WCPS standard allows queries to be constructed against single or multiple coverages. For example on a single coverage data for a particular area can be selected or data with a particular range of pixel values. Queries on multiple surfaces can be

  7. Client/Server data serving for high performance computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Chris

    1994-01-01

    This paper will attempt to examine the industry requirements for shared network data storage and sustained high speed (10's to 100's to thousands of megabytes per second) network data serving via the NFS and FTP protocol suite. It will discuss the current structural and architectural impediments to achieving these sorts of data rates cost effectively today on many general purpose servers and will describe and architecture and resulting product family that addresses these problems. The sustained performance levels that were achieved in the lab will be shown as well as a discussion of early customer experiences utilizing both the HIPPI-IP and ATM OC3-IP network interfaces.

  8. Deploying Server-side File System Monitoring at NERSC

    SciTech Connect

    Uselton, Andrew

    2009-05-01

    The Franklin Cray XT4 at the NERSC center was equipped with the server-side I/O monitoring infrastructure Cerebro/LMT, which is described here in detail. Insights gained from the data produced include a better understanding of instantaneous data rates during file system testing, file system behavior during regular production time, and long-term average behaviors. Information and insights gleaned from this monitoring support efforts to proactively manage the I/O infrastructure on Franklin. A simple model for I/O transactions is introduced and compared with the 250 million observations sent to the LMT database from August 2008 to February 2009.

  9. Evolution of the Data Access Protocol in Response to Community Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J.; Caron, J. L.; Davis, E.; Fulker, D.; Heimbigner, D.; Holloway, D.; Howe, B.; Moe, S.; Potter, N.

    2012-12-01

    Under the aegis of the OPULS (OPeNDAP-Unidata Linked Servers) Project, funded by NOAA, version 2 of OPeNDAP's Data Access Protocol (DAP2) is being updated to version 4. DAP4 is the first major upgrade in almost two decades and will embody three main areas of advancement. First, the data-model extensions developed by the OPULS team focus on three areas: Better support for coverages, access to HDF5 files and access to relational databases. DAP2 support for coverages (defined as a sampled functions) was limited to simple rectangular coverages that work well for (some) model outputs and processed satellite data but that cannot represent trajectories or satellite swath data, for example. We have extended the coverage concept in DAP4 to remove these limitations. These changes are informed by work at Unidata on the Common Data Model and also by the OGC's abstract coverages specification. In a similar vein, we have extended DAP2's support for relations by including the concept of foreign keys, so that tables can be explicitly related to one another. Second, the web interfaces - web services - that provides access to data using via DAP will be more clearly defined and use other (, orthogonal), standards where they are appropriate. An important case is the XML interface, which provides a cleaner way to build other response media types such as JSON and RDF (for metadata) and to build support for Atom, thus simplify the integration of DAP servers with tools that support OpenSearch. Input from the ESIP federation and work performed with IOOS have informed our choices here. Last, DAP4-compliant servers will support richer data-processing capabilities than DAP2, enabling a wider array of server functions that manipulate data before returning values. Two projects currently are exploring just what can be done even with DAP2's server-function model: The MIIC project at LARC and OPULS itself (with work performed at the University of Washington). Both projects have demonstrated that

  10. Justifying the need for forensically ready protocols: A case study of identifying malicious web servers using client honeypots

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Christian; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.; Frincke, Deborah A.; Komisarczuk, Peter; Muschevici, Radu; Welch, Ian D.

    2008-01-03

    Abstract: Client honeypot technology can find malicious web servers that attack web browsers and push malware, so called drive-by-downloads, to the client machine. Merely recording the network traffic is insufficient to perform an efficient forensic analysis of the attack. Custom tools need to be developed to access and examine the embedded data of the network protocols. Once the information is extracted from the network data, it cannot be used to perform a behavioral analysis on the attack, therefore limiting the ability to answer what exactly happened on the attacked system. Implementation of a record/ replay mechanism is proposed that allows the forensic examiner to easily extract application data from recorded network streams and allows applications to interact with such data for behavioral analysis purposes. A concrete implementation of such a setup for HTTP and DNS protocols using the HTTP proxy Squid and DNS proxy pdnsd is presented and its effect on digital forensic analysis demonstrated.

  11. Application-Defined Decentralized Access Control

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Dunn, Alan M.; Hofmann, Owen S.; Lee, Michael Z.; Mehdi, Syed Akbar; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    DCAC is a practical OS-level access control system that supports application-defined principals. It allows normal users to perform administrative operations within their privilege, enabling isolation and privilege separation for applications. It does not require centralized policy specification or management, giving applications freedom to manage their principals while the policies are still enforced by the OS. DCAC uses hierarchically-named attributes as a generic framework for user-defined policies such as groups defined by normal users. For both local and networked file systems, its execution time overhead is between 0%–9% on file system microbenchmarks, and under 1% on applications. This paper shows the design and implementation of DCAC, as well as several real-world use cases, including sandboxing applications, enforcing server applications’ security policies, supporting NFS, and authenticating user-defined sub-principals in SSH, all with minimal code changes. PMID:25426493

  12. The Pan-STARRS data server and integrated data query tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jhen-Kuei; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Ying-Tung; Lin, Hsing-Wen

    2013-06-01

    The Pan-STARRS project is operated by an international consortium. Located in Haleakala, Hawaii, the Pan-STARRS telescope system patrols the entire visible sky several times a month, with an aim to identify and characterize varying celestial objects of phenomena or in brightness (supernovae, novae, variable stars, etc) or in position (comets, asteroids, near-earth objects, X-planet etc.) PS1 science mission has started officially from May, 2010 and expects to end in the end of 2013. As of early 2012, every patch of sky observable from Hawaii has been observed in at least 5 bands (g', r', i', z', y') for 5 to 40 epochs. We have set up a data depository at NCU to serve the users in Taiwan. The massive amounts of Pan-STARRS data are downloaded via Internet from the Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii whenever new observations are obtained and processed. So far we have stored a total of 200 TB worth of data. In addition to star/galaxy catalogs, a postage stamp server provides access to FITS images. The Pan-STARRS Published Science Products Subsystem (PSPS) has recently passed its operational readiness, that provides users to query individual PS1 measurements. Here we present the data query tool to interface with the PS1 catalogs and postage stamp images, together with other complementary databases such as 2MASS and other data at IRSA (NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive).

  13. PhyleasProg: a user-oriented web server for wide evolutionary analyses.

    PubMed

    Busset, Joël; Cabau, Cédric; Meslin, Camille; Pascal, Géraldine

    2011-07-01

    Evolutionary analyses of biological data are becoming a prerequisite in many fields of biology. At a time of high-throughput data analysis, phylogenetics is often a necessary complementary tool for biologists to understand, compare and identify the functions of sequences. But available bioinformatics tools are frequently not easy for non-specialists to use. We developed PhyleasProg (http://phyleasprog.inra.fr), a user-friendly web server as a turnkey tool dedicated to evolutionary analyses. PhyleasProg can help biologists with little experience in evolutionary methodologies by analysing their data in a simple and robust way, using methods corresponding to robust standards. Via a very intuitive web interface, users only need to enter a list of Ensembl protein IDs and a list of species as inputs. After dynamic computations, users have access to phylogenetic trees, positive/purifying selection data (on site and branch-site models), with a display of these results on the protein sequence and on a 3D structure model, and the synteny environment of related genes. This connection between different domains of phylogenetics opens the way to new biological analyses for the discovery of the function and structure of proteins.

  14. Mining genomic patterns in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv using a web server Tuber-Gene.

    PubMed

    Rishishwar, Lavanya; Pant, Bhasker; Pant, Kumud; Pardasani, Kamal R

    2011-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), causative agent of tuberculosis, is one of the most dreaded diseases of the century. It has long been studied by researchers throughout the world using various wet-lab and dry-lab techniques. In this study, we focus on mining useful patterns at genomic level that can be applied for in silico functional characterization of genes from the MTB complex. The model developed on the basis of the patterns found in this study can correctly identify 99.77% of the input genes from the genome of MTB strain H37Rv. The model was tested against four other MTB strains and the homologue M. bovis to further evaluate its generalization capability. The mean prediction accuracy was 85.76%. It was also observed that the GC content remained fairly constant throughout the genome, implicating the absence of any pathogenicity island transferred from other organisms. This study reveals that dinucleotide composition is an efficient functional class discriminator for MTB complex. To facilitate the application of this model, a web server Tuber-Gene has been developed, which can be freely accessed at http://www.bifmanit.org/tb2/.

  15. g:Profiler-a web server for functional interpretation of gene lists (2016 update).

    PubMed

    Reimand, Jüri; Arak, Tambet; Adler, Priit; Kolberg, Liis; Reisberg, Sulev; Peterson, Hedi; Vilo, Jaak

    2016-07-08

    Functional enrichment analysis is a key step in interpreting gene lists discovered in diverse high-throughput experiments. g:Profiler studies flat and ranked gene lists and finds statistically significant Gene Ontology terms, pathways and other gene function related terms. Translation of hundreds of gene identifiers is another core feature of g:Profiler. Since its first publication in 2007, our web server has become a popular tool of choice among basic and translational researchers. Timeliness is a major advantage of g:Profiler as genome and pathway information is synchronized with the Ensembl database in quarterly updates. g:Profiler supports 213 species including mammals and other vertebrates, plants, insects and fungi. The 2016 update of g:Profiler introduces several novel features. We have added further functional datasets to interpret gene lists, including transcription factor binding site predictions, Mendelian disease annotations, information about protein expression and complexes and gene mappings of human genetic polymorphisms. Besides the interactive web interface, g:Profiler can be accessed in computational pipelines using our R package, Python interface and BioJS component. g:Profiler is freely available at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gprofiler/.

  16. g:Profiler—a web server for functional interpretation of gene lists (2016 update)

    PubMed Central

    Reimand, Jüri; Arak, Tambet; Adler, Priit; Kolberg, Liis; Reisberg, Sulev; Peterson, Hedi; Vilo, Jaak

    2016-01-01

    Functional enrichment analysis is a key step in interpreting gene lists discovered in diverse high-throughput experiments. g:Profiler studies flat and ranked gene lists and finds statistically significant Gene Ontology terms, pathways and other gene function related terms. Translation of hundreds of gene identifiers is another core feature of g:Profiler. Since its first publication in 2007, our web server has become a popular tool of choice among basic and translational researchers. Timeliness is a major advantage of g:Profiler as genome and pathway information is synchronized with the Ensembl database in quarterly updates. g:Profiler supports 213 species including mammals and other vertebrates, plants, insects and fungi. The 2016 update of g:Profiler introduces several novel features. We have added further functional datasets to interpret gene lists, including transcription factor binding site predictions, Mendelian disease annotations, information about protein expression and complexes and gene mappings of human genetic polymorphisms. Besides the interactive web interface, g:Profiler can be accessed in computational pipelines using our R package, Python interface and BioJS component. g:Profiler is freely available at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gprofiler/. PMID:27098042

  17. CPred: a web server for predicting viable circular permutations in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Li-Fen; Liu, Yen-Yi; Dai, Tian; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2012-01-01

    Circular permutation (CP) is a protein structural rearrangement phenomenon, through which nature allows structural homologs to have different locations of termini and thus varied activities, stabilities and functional properties. It can be applied in many fields of protein research and bioengineering. The limitation of applying CP lies in its technical complexity, high cost and uncertainty of the viability of the resulting protein variants. Not every position in a protein can be used to create a viable circular permutant, but there is still a lack of practical computational tools for evaluating the positional feasibility of CP before costly experiments are carried out. We have previously designed a comprehensive method for predicting viable CP cleavage sites in proteins. In this work, we implement that method into an efficient and user-friendly web server named CPred (CP site predictor), which is supposed to be helpful to promote fundamental researches and biotechnological applications of CP. The CPred is accessible at http://sarst.life.nthu.edu.tw/CPred. PMID:22693212

  18. A batch arrival queue under randomised multi-vacation policy with unreliable server and repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jau-Chuan; Huang, Kai-Bin; Pearn, Wen Lea

    2012-03-01

    This article examines an M[x]/G/1 queueing system with an unreliable server and a repair, in which the server operates a randomised vacation policy with multiple available vacations. Upon the system being found to be empty, the server immediately takes a vacation. If there is at least one customer found waiting in the queue upon returning from a vacation, the server will be activated for service. Otherwise, if no customers are waiting for service at the end of a vacation, the server either remains idle with probability p or leaves for another vacation with probability 1 - p. When one or more customers arrive when the server is idle, the server immediately starts providing service for the arrivals. It is possible that an unpredictable breakdown may occur in the server, in which case a repair time is requested. For such a system, we derive the distributions of several important system characteristics, such as the system size distribution at a random epoch and at a departure epoch, the system size distribution at the busy period initiation epoch, and the distribution of the idle and busy periods. We perform a numerical analysis for changes in the system characteristics, along with changes in specific values of the system parameters. A cost effectiveness maximisation model is constructed to show the benefits of such a queueing system.

  19. Developing Server-Side Infrastructure for Large-Scale E-Learning of Web Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpkins, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The growth of E-business has made experience in server-side technology an increasingly important area for educators. Server-side skills are in increasing demand and recognised to be of relatively greater value than comparable client-side aspects (Ehie, 2002). In response to this, many educational organisations have developed E-business courses,…

  20. Design and Delivery of Multiple Server-Side Computer Languages Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shouhong; Wang, Hai

    2011-01-01

    Given the emergence of service-oriented architecture, IS students need to be knowledgeable of multiple server-side computer programming languages to be able to meet the needs of the job market. This paper outlines the pedagogy of an innovative course of multiple server-side computer languages for the undergraduate IS majors. The paper discusses…

  1. Usage of Thin-Client/Server Architecture in Computer Aided Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimen, Caghan; Kavurucu, Yusuf; Aydin, Halit

    2014-01-01

    With the advances of technology, thin-client/server architecture has become popular in multi-user/single network environments. Thin-client is a user terminal in which the user can login to a domain and run programs by connecting to a remote server. Recent developments in network and hardware technologies (cloud computing, virtualization, etc.)…

  2. Characterizing and Managing Intrusion Detection System (IDS) Alerts with Multi-Server/Multi-Priority Queuing Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-26

    CHARACTERIZING AND MANAGING INTRUSION DETECTION SYSTEM (IDS) ALERTS WITH MULTI-SERVER/MULTI-PRIORITY...subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENV-MS-14-D-24 CHARACTERIZING AND MANAGING INTRUSION DETECTION SYSTEM (IDS) ALERTS WITH...IDS) ALERTS WITH MULTI-SERVER/MULTI-PRIORITY QUEUING THEORY Christopher C. Olsen, BS Captain, USAF Approved

  3. Design and implementation of web server soft load balancing in small and medium-sized enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liu

    2011-12-01

    With the expansion of business scale, small and medium-sized enterprises began to use information platform to improve their management and competition ability, the server becomes the core factor which restricts the enterprise's infomationization construction. This paper puts forward a suitable design scheme for small and medium-sized enterprise web server soft load balancing, and proved it effective through experiment.

  4. Selection of Server-Side Technologies for an E-Business Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandvig, J. Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The rapid growth of e-business and e-commerce has made server-side programming an increasingly important topic in information systems (IS) and computer science (CS) curricula. This article presents an overview of the major features of several popular server-side programming technologies and discusses the factors that influence the selection of…

  5. Minimizing Thermal Stress for Data Center Servers through Thermal-Aware Relocation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, T. C.; Hussain, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A rise in inlet air temperature may lower the rate of heat dissipation from air cooled computing servers. This introduces a thermal stress to these servers. As a result, the poorly cooled active servers will start conducting heat to the neighboring servers and giving rise to hotspot regions of thermal stress, inside the data center. As a result, the physical hardware of these servers may fail, thus causing performance loss, monetary loss, and higher energy consumption for cooling mechanism. In order to minimize these situations, this paper performs the profiling of inlet temperature sensitivity (ITS) and defines the optimum location for each server to minimize the chances of creating a thermal hotspot and thermal stress. Based upon novel ITS analysis, a thermal state monitoring and server relocation algorithm for data centers is being proposed. The contribution of this paper is bringing the peak outlet temperatures of the relocated servers closer to average outlet temperature by over 5 times, lowering the average peak outlet temperature by 3.5% and minimizing the thermal stress. PMID:24987743

  6. CTLPScanner: a web server for chromothripsis-like pattern detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Liu, Jixiang; Ouyang, Liang; Chen, Yi; Liu, Bo; Cai, Haoyang

    2016-01-01

    Chromothripsis is a recently observed phenomenon in cancer cells in which one or several chromosomes shatter into pieces with subsequent inaccurate reassembly and clonal propagation. This type of event generates a potentially vast number of mutations within a relatively short-time period, and has been considered as a new paradigm in cancer development. Despite recent advances, much work is still required to better understand the molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon, and thus an easy-to-use tool is in urgent need for automatically detecting and annotating chromothripsis. Here we present CTLPScanner, a web server for detection of chromothripsis-like pattern (CTLP) in genomic array data. The output interface presents intuitive graphical representations of detected chromosome pulverization region, as well as detailed results in table format. CTLPScanner also provides additional information for associated genes in chromothripsis region to help identify the potential candidates involved in tumorigenesis. To assist in performing meta-data analysis, we integrated over 50 000 pre-processed genomic arrays from The Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus into CTLPScanner. The server allows users to explore the presence of chromothripsis signatures from public data resources, without carrying out any local data processing. CTLPScanner is freely available at http://cgma.scu.edu.cn/CTLPScanner/. PMID:27185889

  7. GEMS: a web server for biclustering analysis of expression data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Jiun; Kasif, Simon

    2005-07-01

    The advent of microarray technology has revolutionized the search for genes that are differentially expressed across a range of cell types or experimental conditions. Traditional clustering methods, such as hierarchical clustering, are often difficult to deploy effectively since genes rarely exhibit similar expression pattern across a wide range of conditions. Biclustering of gene expression data (also called co-clustering or two-way clustering) is a non-trivial but promising methodology for the identification of gene groups that show a coherent expression profile across a subset of conditions. Thus, biclustering is a natural methodology as a screen for genes that are functionally related, participate in the same pathways, affected by the same drug or pathological condition, or genes that form modules that are potentially co-regulated by a small group of transcription factors. We have developed a web-enabled service called GEMS (Gene Expression Mining Server) for biclustering microarray data. Users may upload expression data and specify a set of criteria. GEMS then performs bicluster mining based on a Gibbs sampling paradigm. The web server provides a flexible and an useful platform for the discovery of co-expressed and potentially co-regulated gene modules. GEMS is an open source software and is available at http://genomics10.bu.edu/terrence/gems/.

  8. WAMI: a web server for the analysis of minisatellite maps

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Minisatellites are genomic loci composed of tandem arrays of short repetitive DNA segments. A minisatellite map is a sequence of symbols that represents the tandem repeat array such that the set of symbols is in one-to-one correspondence with the set of distinct repeats. Due to variations in repeat type and organization as well as copy number, the minisatellite maps have been widely used in forensic and population studies. In either domain, researchers need to compare the set of maps to each other, to build phylogenetic trees, to spot structural variations, and to study duplication dynamics. Efficient algorithms for these tasks are required to carry them out reliably and in reasonable time. Results In this paper we present WAMI, a web-server for the analysis of minisatellite maps. It performs the above mentioned computational tasks using efficient algorithms that take the model of map evolution into account. The WAMI interface is easy to use and the results of each analysis task are visualized. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, WAMI is the first server providing all these computational facilities to the minisatellite community. The WAMI web-interface and the source code of the underlying programs are available at http://www.nubios.nileu.edu.eg/tools/wami. PMID:20525398

  9. Conopeptide characterization and classifications: an analysis using ConoServer.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Quentin; Westermann, Jan-Christoph; Craik, David J

    2010-07-01

    Cone snails are carnivorous marine gastropods that have evolved potent venoms to capture their prey. These venoms comprise a rich and diverse cocktail of peptide toxins, or conopeptides, whose high diversity has arisen from an efficient hypermutation mechanism, combined with a high frequency of post-translational modifications. Conopeptides bind with high specificity to distinct membrane receptors, ion channels, and transporters of the central and muscular nervous system. As well as serving their natural function in prey capture, conopeptides have been utilized as versatile tools in neuroscience and have proven valuable as drug leads that target the nervous system in humans. This paper examines current knowledge on conopeptide sequences based on an analysis of gene and peptide sequences in ConoServer (http://www.conoserver.org), a specialized database of conopeptide sequences and three-dimensional structures. We describe updates to the content and organization of ConoServer and discuss correlations between gene superfamilies, cysteine frameworks, pharmacological families targeted by conopeptides, and the phylogeny, habitat, and diet of cone snails. The study identifies gaps in current knowledge of conopeptides and points to potential directions for future research.

  10. Berkeley PHOG: PhyloFacts orthology group prediction web server.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ruchira S; Meacham, Christopher; Samad, Bushra; Neyer, Christoph; Sjölander, Kimmen

    2009-07-01

    Ortholog detection is essential in functional annotation of genomes, with applications to phylogenetic tree construction, prediction of protein-protein interaction and other bioinformatics tasks. We present here the PHOG web server employing a novel algorithm to identify orthologs based on phylogenetic analysis. Results on a benchmark dataset from the TreeFam-A manually curated orthology database show that PHOG provides a combination of high recall and precision competitive with both InParanoid and OrthoMCL, and allows users to target different taxonomic distances and precision levels through the use of tree-distance thresholds. For instance, OrthoMCL-DB achieved 76% recall and 66% precision on this dataset; at a slightly higher precision (68%) PHOG achieves 10% higher recall (86%). InParanoid achieved 87% recall at 24% precision on this dataset, while a PHOG variant designed for high recall achieves 88% recall at 61% precision, increasing precision by 37% over InParanoid. PHOG is based on pre-computed trees in the PhyloFacts resource, and contains over 366 K orthology groups with a minimum of three species. Predicted orthologs are linked to GO annotations, pathway information and biological literature. The PHOG web server is available at http://phylofacts.berkeley.edu/orthologs/.

  11. AISMIG--an interactive server-side molecule image generator.

    PubMed

    Bohne-Lang, Andreas; Groch, Wolf-Dieter; Ranzinger, René

    2005-07-01

    Using a web browser without additional software and generating interactive high quality and high resolution images of bio-molecules is no longer a problem. Interactive visualization of 3D molecule structures by Internet browsers normally is not possible without additional software and the disadvantage of browser-based structure images (e.g. by a Java applet) is their low resolution. Scientists who want to generate 3D molecular images with high quality and high resolution (e.g. for publications or to render a molecule for a poster) therefore require separately installed software that is often not easy to use. The alternative concept is an interactive server-side rendering application that can be interfaced with any web browser. Thus it combines the advantage of the web application with the high-end rendering of a raytracer. This article addresses users who want to generate high quality images from molecular structures and do not have software installed locally for structure visualization. Often people do not have a structure viewer, such as RasMol or Chime (or even Java) installed locally but want to visualize a molecule structure interactively. AISMIG (An Interactive Server-side Molecule Image Generator) is a web service that provides a visualization of molecule structures in such cases. AISMIG-URL: http://www.dkfz-heidelberg.de/spec/aismig/.

  12. AISMIG—an interactive server-side molecule image generator

    PubMed Central

    Bohne-Lang, Andreas; Groch, Wolf-Dieter; Ranzinger, René

    2005-01-01

    Using a web browser without additional software and generating interactive high quality and high resolution images of bio-molecules is no longer a problem. Interactive visualization of 3D molecule structures by Internet browsers normally is not possible without additional software and the disadvantage of browser-based structure images (e.g. by a Java applet) is their low resolution. Scientists who want to generate 3D molecular images with high quality and high resolution (e.g. for publications or to render a molecule for a poster) therefore require separately installed software that is often not easy to use. The alternative concept is an interactive server-side rendering application that can be interfaced with any web browser. Thus it combines the advantage of the web application with the high-end rendering of a raytracer. This article addresses users who want to generate high quality images from molecular structures and do not have software installed locally for structure visualization. Often people do not have a structure viewer, such as RasMol or Chime (or even Java) installed locally but want to visualize a molecule structure interactively. AISMIG (An Interactive Server-side Molecule Image Generator) is a web service that provides a visualization of molecule structures in such cases. AISMIG-URL: . PMID:15980568

  13. A web-server of cell type discrimination system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anyou; Zhong, Yan; Wang, Yanhua; He, Qianchuan

    2014-01-01

    Discriminating cell types is a daily request for stem cell biologists. However, there is not a user-friendly system available to date for public users to discriminate the common cell types, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and somatic cells (SCs). Here, we develop WCTDS, a web-server of cell type discrimination system, to discriminate the three cell types and their subtypes like fetal versus adult SCs. WCTDS is developed as a top layer application of our recent publication regarding cell type discriminations, which employs DNA-methylation as biomarkers and machine learning models to discriminate cell types. Implemented by Django, Python, R, and Linux shell programming, run under Linux-Apache web server, and communicated through MySQL, WCTDS provides a friendly framework to efficiently receive the user input and to run mathematical models for analyzing data and then to present results to users. This framework is flexible and easy to be expended for other applications. Therefore, WCTDS works as a user-friendly framework to discriminate cell types and subtypes and it can also be expended to detect other cell types like cancer cells.

  14. iMODS: internal coordinates normal mode analysis server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Aliaga, José I.; Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S.; Chacón, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) in internal (dihedral) coordinates naturally reproduces the collective functional motions of biological macromolecules. iMODS facilitates the exploration of such modes and generates feasible transition pathways between two homologous structures, even with large macromolecules. The distinctive internal coordinate formulation improves the efficiency of NMA and extends its applicability while implicitly maintaining stereochemistry. Vibrational analysis, motion animations and morphing trajectories can be easily carried out at different resolution scales almost interactively. The server is versatile; non-specialists can rapidly characterize potential conformational changes, whereas advanced users can customize the model resolution with multiple coarse-grained atomic representations and elastic network potentials. iMODS supports advanced visualization capabilities for illustrating collective motions, including an improved affine-model-based arrow representation of domain dynamics. The generated all-heavy-atoms conformations can be used to introduce flexibility for more advanced modeling or sampling strategies. The server is free and open to all users with no login requirement at http://imods.chaconlab.org. PMID:24771341

  15. A General Purpose Connections type CTI Server Based on SIP Protocol and Its Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Toru; Koizumi, Hisao

    In this paper, we propose a general purpose connections type CTI (Computer Telephony Integration) server that provides various CTI services such as voice logging where the CTI server communicates with IP-PBX using the SIP (Session Initiation Protocol), and accumulates voice packets of external line telephone call flowing between an IP telephone for extension and a VoIP gateway connected to outside line networks. The CTI server realizes CTI services such as voice logging, telephone conference, or IVR (interactive voice response) with accumulating and processing voice packets sampled. Furthermore, the CTI server incorporates a web server function which can provide various CTI services such as a Web telephone directory via a Web browser to PCs, cellular telephones or smart-phones in mobile environments.

  16. Access Control of Web and Java Based Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tso, Kam S.; Pajevski, Michael J.; Johnson, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Cyber security has gained national and international attention as a result of near continuous headlines from financial institutions, retail stores, government offices and universities reporting compromised systems and stolen data. Concerns continue to rise as threats of service interruption, and spreading of viruses become ever more prevalent and serious. Controlling access to application layer resources is a critical component in a layered security solution that includes encryption, firewalls, virtual private networks, antivirus, and intrusion detection. In this paper we discuss the development of an application-level access control solution, based on an open-source access manager augmented with custom software components, to provide protection to both Web-based and Java-based client and server applications.

  17. NASA Access Mechanism - Graphical user interface information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy F.; Generous, Curtis; Duncan, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Access to online information sources of aerospace, scientific, and engineering data, a mission focus for NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program, has always been limited by factors such as telecommunications, query language syntax, lack of standardization in the information, and the lack of adequate tools to assist in searching. Today, the NASA STI Program's NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype offers a solution to these problems by providing the user with a set of tools that provide a graphical interface to remote, heterogeneous, and distributed information in a manner adaptable to both casual and expert users. Additionally, the NAM provides access to many Internet-based services such as Electronic Mail, the Wide Area Information Servers system, Peer Locating tools, and electronic bulletin boards.

  18. NASA access mechanism: Graphical user interface information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy; Generous, Curtis; Duncan, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Access to online information sources of aerospace, scientific, and engineering data, a mission focus for NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program, has always been limited to factors such as telecommunications, query language syntax, lack of standardization in the information, and the lack of adequate tools to assist in searching. Today, the NASA STI Program's NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype offers a solution to these problems by providing the user with a set of tools that provide a graphical interface to remote, heterogeneous, and distributed information in a manner adaptable to both casual and expert users. Additionally, the NAM provides access to many Internet-based services such as Electronic Mail, the Wide Area Information Servers system, Peer Locating tools, and electronic bulletin boards.

  19. Accessing Wind Tunnels From NASA's Information Power Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Jeff; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames wind tunnel customers are one of the first users of the Information Power Grid (IPG) storage system at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division. We wanted to be able to store their data on the IPG so that it could be accessed remotely in a secure but timely fashion. In addition, incorporation into the IPG allows future use of grid computational resources, e.g., for post-processing of data, or to do side-by-side CFD validation. In this paper, we describe the integration of grid data access mechanisms with the existing DARWIN web-based system that is used to access wind tunnel test data. We also show that the combined system has reasonable performance: wind tunnel data may be retrieved at 50Mbits/s over a 100 base T network connected to the IPG storage server.

  20. Accessing NASA Technology with the World Wide Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bianco, David J.

    1995-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began using the World Wide Web (WWW) in the summer of 1993, becoming the first NASA installation to provide a Center-wide home page. This coincided with a reorganization of LaRC to provide a more concentrated focus on technology transfer to both aerospace and non-aerospace industry. Use of WWW and NCSA Mosaic not only provides automated information dissemination, but also allows for the implementation, evolution and integration of many technology transfer and technology awareness applications. This paper describes several of these innovative applications, including the on-line presentation of the entire Technology OPportunities Showcase (TOPS), an industrial partnering showcase that exists on the Web long after the actual 3-day event ended. The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS) provides uniform access to many logically similar, yet physically distributed NASA report servers. WWW is also the foundation of the Langley Software Server (LSS), an experimental software distribution system which will distribute LaRC-developed software. In addition to the more formal technology distribution projects, WWW has been successful in connecting people with technologies and people with other people.

  1. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... returned to your body. Usually the access is put in your arm but it can also go ... A surgeon will put the access in. There are 3 types of access. Fistula: The surgeon joins an artery and vein under the ...

  2. A World Wide Web accessible multi-species ECG database.

    PubMed

    Hammann, H P; Suedmeyer, W K; Hahn, A W

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a system for remotely accessible secure electronic storage of electrocardiographic (ECG) and other associated data. It allows entry of data from any authorized remote user and is specifically built to accommodate the ECGs of multiple species. The present system is implemented on a Sun Sparc Solaris 2.5 platform using Oracle 7.3.2, and the Oracle 7.3.2 Web server. It may be easily ported to any other UNIX or Windows NT platform. No client is needed other than an Internet Protocol connected computer using a web browser such as Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Internet Explorer.

  3. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines and standards for the built environment, transportation, communication, medical diagnostic equipment, and information technology. ...

  4. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... use requirements for Critical Access Hospitals related to Electronic Health Records (EHRs)? Critical Access Hospital (CAH) are eligible for Electronic Health Record (EHR) incentive payments and can receive ...

  5. EarthServer: Use of Rasdaman as a data store for use in visualisation of complex EO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Oliver; Walker, Peter; Grant, Mike

    2013-04-01

    The European Commission FP7 project EarthServer is establishing open access and ad-hoc analytics on extreme-size Earth Science data, based on and extending cutting-edge Array Database technology. EarthServer is built around the Rasdaman Raster Data Manager which extends standard relational database systems with the ability to store and retrieve multi-dimensional raster data of unlimited size through an SQL style query language. Rasdaman facilitates visualisation of data by providing several Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standard interfaces through its web services wrapper, Petascope. These include the well established standards, Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Map Service (WMS) as well as the emerging standard, Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The WCPS standard allows the running of ad-hoc queries on the data stored within Rasdaman, creating an infrastructure where users are not restricted by bandwidth when manipulating or querying huge datasets. Here we will show that the use of EarthServer technologies and infrastructure allows access and visualisation of massive scale data through a web client with only marginal bandwidth use as opposed to the current mechanism of copying huge amounts of data to create visualisations locally. For example if a user wanted to generate a plot of global average chlorophyll for a complete decade time series they would only have to download the result instead of Terabytes of data. Firstly we will present a brief overview of the capabilities of Rasdaman and the WCPS query language to introduce the ways in which it is used in a visualisation tool chain. We will show that there are several ways in which WCPS can be utilised to create both standard and novel web based visualisations. An example of a standard visualisation is the production of traditional 2d plots, allowing users the ability to plot data products easily. However, the query language allows the creation of novel/custom products, which can then immediately be

  6. Distributed Digital Survey Logbook Built on GeoServer and PostGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovicic, Aleksandar; Castelli, Ana; Kljajic, Zoran

    2013-04-01

    display of ship position. If vessel is equipped with Internet link, real-time situation can be distributed to expert on land, who can monitor progress and advise chief-scientist how to overcome issues. Each scientist can setup own pre-defined events, and trigger it by one click, or use free-text button and write-down note. Timestamp of event is recorded and in case that triggering was delayed (e.g. person was occupied with equipment preparation), time-delay modifier is available. Position of event is marked based on recorded timestamp, so all events that happens at single station can be shown on chart. Events can be filtered by contributor, so each team can get view of own stations only. ETA at next station and planned activities there are also shown, so crew can better estimate moment when need to start preparing equipment. Presented solution shows benefits that free software (e.g. GeoServer, PostGIS, OpenLayers, Geotools) produced according to OGC standards, brings to oceanographic community especially in decreasing of development time and providing multi-platform access. Applicability of such solutions is not limited only to on-board operations but can be easily extended to any task involving geospatial data.

  7. EarthServer: Visualisation and use of uncertainty as a data exploration tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Peter; Clements, Oliver; Grant, Mike

    2013-04-01

    The Ocean Science/Earth Observation community generates huge datasets from satellite observation. Until recently it has been difficult to obtain matching uncertainty information for these datasets and to apply this to their processing. In order to make use of uncertainty information when analysing "Big Data" we need both the uncertainty itself (attached to the underlying data) and a means of working with the combined product without requiring the entire dataset to be downloaded. The European Commission FP7 project EarthServer (http://earthserver.eu) is addressing the problem of accessing and ad-hoc analysis of extreme-size Earth Science data using cutting-edge Array Database technology. The core software (Rasdaman) and web services wrapper (Petascope) allow huge datasets to be accessed using Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standard interfaces including the well established standards, Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Map Service (WMS) as well as the emerging standard, Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The WCPS standard allows the running of ad-hoc queries on any of the data stored within Rasdaman, creating an infrastructure where users are not restricted by bandwidth when manipulating or querying huge datasets. The ESA Ocean Colour - Climate Change Initiative (OC-CCI) project (http://www.esa-oceancolour-cci.org/), is producing high-resolution, global ocean colour datasets over the full time period (1998-2012) where high quality observations were available. This climate data record includes per-pixel uncertainty data for each variable, based on an analytic method that classifies how much and which types of water are present in a pixel, and assigns uncertainty based on robust comparisons to global in-situ validation datasets. These uncertainty values take two forms, Root Mean Square (RMS) and Bias uncertainty, respectively representing the expected variability and expected offset error. By combining the data produced through the OC-CCI project with the

  8. GI-axe: an access broker framework for the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Nativi, S.; Santoro, M.; Papeschi, F.; Mazzetti, P.

    2012-12-01

    The efficient and effective discovery of heterogeneous geospatial resources (e.g. data and services) is currently addressed by implementing "Discovery Brokering components"—such as GI-cat which is successfully used by the GEO brokering framework. A related (and subsequent) problem is the access of discovered resources. As for the discovery case, there exists a clear challenge: the geospatial Community makes use of heterogeneous access protocols and data models. In fact, different standards (and best practices) are defined and used by the diverse Geoscience domains and Communities of practice. Besides, through a client application, Users want to access diverse data to be jointly used in a common Geospatial Environment (CGE): a geospatial environment characterized by a spatio-temporal CRS (Coordinate Reference System), resolution, and extension. Users want to define a CGE and get the selected data ready to be used in such an environment. Finally, they want to download data according to a common encoding (either binary or textual). Therefore, it is possible to introduce the concept of "Access Brokering component" which addresses all these intermediation needs, in a transparent way for both clients (i.e. Users) and access servers (i.e. Data Providers). This work presents GI-axe: a flexible Access Broker which is capable to intermediate the different access standards and to get data according to a CGE, previously specified by the User. In doing that, GI-axe complements the capabilities of the brokered access servers, in keeping with the brokering principles. Let's consider a sample use case of a User needing to access a global temperature dataset available online on a THREDDS Data Server and a rainfall dataset accessible through a WFS—she/he may have obtained the datasets as a search result from a discovery broker. Distribution information metadata accompanying the temperature dataset further indicate that a given OPeNDAP service has to be accessed to retrieve it

  9. World wide web implementation of the Langley technical report server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Gottlich, Gretchen L.; Bianco, David J.

    1994-01-01

    On January 14, 1993, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) made approximately 130 formal, 'unclassified, unlimited' technical reports available via the anonymous FTP Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS). LaRC was the first organization to provide a significant number of aerospace technical reports for open electronic dissemination. LTRS has been successful in its first 18 months of operation, with over 11,000 reports distributed and has helped lay the foundation for electronic document distribution for NASA. The availability of World Wide Web (WWW) technology has revolutionized the Internet-based information community. This paper describes the transition of LTRS from a centralized FTP site to a distributed data model using the WWW, and suggests how the general model for LTRS can be applied to other similar systems.

  10. Fault tolerant system with imperfect coverage, reboot and server vacation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Madhu; Meena, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-12-01

    This study is concerned with the performance modeling of a fault tolerant system consisting of operating units supported by a combination of warm and cold spares. The on-line as well as warm standby units are subject to failures and are send for the repair to a repair facility having single repairman which is prone to failure. If the failed unit is not detected, the system enters into an unsafe state from which it is cleared by the reboot and recovery action. The server is allowed to go for vacation if there is no failed unit present in the system. Markov model is developed to obtain the transient probabilities associated with the system states. Runge-Kutta method is used to evaluate the system state probabilities and queueing measures. To explore the sensitivity and cost associated with the system, numerical simulation is conducted.

  11. GlusterFS One Storage Server to Rule Them All

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Eric B.; Broomfield, Matthew C.; Perrotti, Terrell A.

    2012-07-30

    GlusterFS is a Linux based distributed file system, designed to be highly scalable and serve many clients. Some reasons to use GlusterFS are: No centralized metadata server, Scalability, Open Source, Dynamic and live service modifications, Can be used over Infiniband or Ethernet, Can be tuned for speed and/or resilience and Flexible administration. It's useful for enterprise environments - virtualization; high performance computing (HPC) and it works with Mac, Linux and Windows clients. Conclusions are: (1) GlusterFS proved to have widespread capabilities as a virtual file system; (2) Scalability is very dependent upon the underlying hardware; (3) Lack of built-in encryption and security paradigm; and (4) Best suited in a general purpose computing environment.

  12. Optimal routing of IP packets to multi-homed servers

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, K.L.

    1992-08-01

    Multi-homing, or direct attachment to multiple networks, offers both performance and availability benefits for important servers on busy networks. Exploiting these benefits to their fullest requires a modicum of routing knowledge in the clients. Careful policy control must also be reflected in the routing used within the network to make best use of specialized and often scarce resources. While relatively straightforward in theory, this problem becomes much more difficult to solve in a real network containing often intractable implementations from a variety of vendors. This paper presents an analysis of the problem and proposes a useful solution for a typical campus network. Application of this solution at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is studied and the problems and pitfalls encountered are discussed, as are the workarounds used to make the system work in the real world.

  13. Utilization of Virtual Server Technology in Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felton, Larry; Lankford, Kimberly; Pitts, R. Lee; Pruitt, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Virtualization provides the opportunity to continue to do "more with less"---more computing power with fewer physical boxes, thus reducing the overall hardware footprint, power and cooling requirements, software licenses, and their associated costs. This paper explores the tremendous advantages and any disadvantages of virtualization in all of the environments associated with software and systems development to operations flow. It includes the use and benefits of the Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) specification, and identifies lessons learned concerning hardware and network configurations. Using the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center as an example, we demonstrate that deploying virtualized servers as a means of managing computing resources is applicable and beneficial to many areas of application, up to and including flight operations.

  14. Optimal routing in general finite multi-server queueing networks.

    PubMed

    van Woensel, Tom; Cruz, Frederico R B

    2014-01-01

    The design of general finite multi-server queueing networks is a challenging problem that arises in many real-life situations, including computer networks, manufacturing systems, and telecommunication networks. In this paper, we examine the optimal routing problem in arbitrary configured acyclic queueing networks. The performance of the finite queueing network is evaluated with a known approximate performance evaluation method and the optimization is done by means of a heuristics based on the Powell algorithm. The proposed methodology is then applied to determine the optimal routing probability vector that maximizes the throughput of the queueing network. We show numerical results for some networks to quantify the quality of the routing vector approximations obtained.

  15. ArrayPlex: distributed, interactive and programmatic access to genome sequence, annotation, ontology, and analytical toolsets

    PubMed Central

    Killion, Patrick J; Iyer, Vishwanath R

    2008-01-01

    ArrayPlex is a software package that centrally provides a large number of flexible toolsets useful for functional genomics, including microarray data storage, quality assessments, data visualization, gene annotation retrieval, statistical tests, genomic sequence retrieval and motif analysis. It uses a client-server architecture based on open source components, provides graphical, command-line, and programmatic access to all needed resources, and is extensible by virtue of a documented application programming interface. ArrayPlex is available at . PMID:19014503

  16. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  17. Rail Access to Yucca Mountain: Critical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.; Moore, R. C.

    2003-02-25

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository site currently lacks rail access. The nearest mainline railroad is almost 100 miles away. Absence of rail access could result in many thousands of truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Direct rail access to the repository could significantly reduce the number of truck shipments and total shipments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identified five potential rail access corridors, ranging in length from 98 miles to 323 miles, in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Yucca Mountain. The FEIS also considers an alternative to rail spur construction, heavy-haul truck (HHT) delivery of rail casks from one of three potential intermodal transfer stations. The authors examine the feasibility and cost of the five rail corridors, and DOE's alternative proposal for HHT transport. The authors also address the potential for rail shipments through the Las Vegas metropolitan area.

  18. Real-Time Robust Adaptive Modeling and Scheduling for an Electronic Commerce Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bing; Ruan, Chun

    With the increasing importance and pervasiveness of Internet services, it is becoming a challenge for the proliferation of electronic commerce services to provide performance guarantees under extreme overload. This paper describes a real-time optimization modeling and scheduling approach for performance guarantee of electronic commerce servers. We show that an electronic commerce server may be simulated as a multi-tank system. A robust adaptive server model is subject to unknown additive load disturbances and uncertain model matching. Overload control techniques are based on adaptive admission control to achieve timing guarantees. We evaluate the performance of the model using a complex simulation that is subjected to varying model parameters and massive overload.

  19. Implementing a Physician's Workstation using client/server technology and the distributed computing environment.

    PubMed

    Pham, T Q; Young, C Y; Tang, P C; Suermondt, H J; Annevelink, J

    1994-01-01

    PWS is a physician's workstation research prototype developed to explore the use of information management tools by physicians in the context of patient care. The original prototype was implemented in a client/server architecture using a broadcast message server. As we expanded the scope of the prototyping activities, we identified the limitations of the broadcast message server in the areas of scalability, security, and interoperability. To address these issues, we reimplemented PWS using the Open Software Foundation's Distributed Computing Environment (DCE). We describe the rationale for using DCE, the migration process, and the benefits achieved. Future work and recommendations are discussed.

  20. Developing and Marketing a Client/Server-Based Data Warehouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Michele; And Others

    1993-01-01

    To provide better access to information, the University of Arizona information technology center has designed a data warehouse accessible from the desktop computer. A team approach has proved successful in introducing and demonstrating a prototype to the campus community. (Author/MSE)

  1. Integration of EGA secure data access into Galaxy

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Youri; Zhang, Chao; Senf, Alexander; Bijlard, Jochem; Hiltemann, Saskia; van Enckevort, David; Repo, Susanna; Heringa, Jaap; Jenster, Guido; J.A. Fijneman, Remond; Boiten, Jan-Willem; A. Meijer, Gerrit; Stubbs, Andrew; Rambla, Jordi; Spalding, Dylan; Abeln, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput molecular profiling techniques are routinely generating vast amounts of data for translational medicine studies. Secure access controlled systems are needed to manage, store, transfer and distribute these data due to its personally identifiable nature. The European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) was created to facilitate access and management to long-term archival of bio-molecular data. Each data provider is responsible for ensuring a Data Access Committee is in place to grant access to data stored in the EGA. Moreover, the transfer of data during upload and download is encrypted. ELIXIR, a European research infrastructure for life-science data, initiated a project (2016 Human Data Implementation Study) to understand and document the ELIXIR requirements for secure management of controlled-access data. As part of this project, a full ecosystem was designed to connect archived raw experimental molecular profiling data with interpreted data and the computational workflows, using the CTMM Translational Research IT (CTMM-TraIT) infrastructure http://www.ctmm-trait.nl as an example. Here we present the first outcomes of this project, a framework to enable the download of EGA data to a Galaxy server in a secure way. Galaxy provides an intuitive user interface for molecular biologists and bioinformaticians to run and design data analysis workflows. More specifically, we developed a tool -- ega_download_streamer - that can download data securely from EGA into a Galaxy server, which can subsequently be further processed. This tool will allow a user within the browser to run an entire analysis containing sensitive data from EGA, and to make this analysis available for other researchers in a reproducible manner, as shown with a proof of concept study.  The tool ega_download_streamer is available in the Galaxy tool shed: https://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/view/yhoogstrate/ega_download_streamer. PMID:28232859

  2. Integration of EGA secure data access into Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Hoogstrate, Youri; Zhang, Chao; Senf, Alexander; Bijlard, Jochem; Hiltemann, Saskia; van Enckevort, David; Repo, Susanna; Heringa, Jaap; Jenster, Guido; J A Fijneman, Remond; Boiten, Jan-Willem; A Meijer, Gerrit; Stubbs, Andrew; Rambla, Jordi; Spalding, Dylan; Abeln, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput molecular profiling techniques are routinely generating vast amounts of data for translational medicine studies. Secure access controlled systems are needed to manage, store, transfer and distribute these data due to its personally identifiable nature. The European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) was created to facilitate access and management to long-term archival of bio-molecular data. Each data provider is responsible for ensuring a Data Access Committee is in place to grant access to data stored in the EGA. Moreover, the transfer of data during upload and download is encrypted. ELIXIR, a European research infrastructure for life-science data, initiated a project (2016 Human Data Implementation Study) to understand and document the ELIXIR requirements for secure management of controlled-access data. As part of this project, a full ecosystem was designed to connect archived raw experimental molecular profiling data with interpreted data and the computational workflows, using the CTMM Translational Research IT (CTMM-TraIT) infrastructure http://www.ctmm-trait.nl as an example. Here we present the first outcomes of this project, a framework to enable the download of EGA data to a Galaxy server in a secure way. Galaxy provides an intuitive user interface for molecular biologists and bioinformaticians to run and design data analysis workflows. More specifically, we developed a tool -- ega_download_streamer - that can download data securely from EGA into a Galaxy server, which can subsequently be further processed. This tool will allow a user within the browser to run an entire analysis containing sensitive data from EGA, and to make this analysis available for other researchers in a reproducible manner, as shown with a proof of concept study.  The tool ega_download_streamer is available in the Galaxy tool shed: https://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/view/yhoogstrate/ega_download_streamer.

  3. NOAA Operational Model Archive Distribution System (NOMADS): High Availability Applications for Reliable Real Time Access to Operational Model Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, J. C.; Wang, J.

    2009-12-01

    To reduce the impact of natural hazards and environmental changes, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) provide first alert and a preferred partner for environmental prediction services, and represents a critical national resource to operational and research communities affected by climate, weather and water. NOMADS is now delivering high availability services as part of NOAA’s official real time data dissemination at its Web Operations Center (WOC) server. The WOC is a web service used by organizational units in and outside NOAA, and acts as a data repository where public information can be posted to a secure and scalable content server. A goal is to foster collaborations among the research and education communities, value added retailers, and public access for science and development efforts aimed at advancing modeling and GEO-related tasks. The user (client) executes what is efficient to execute on the client and the server efficiently provides format independent access services. Client applications can execute on the server, if it is desired, but the same program can be executed on the client side with no loss of efficiency. In this way this paradigm lends itself to aggregation servers that act as servers of servers listing, searching catalogs of holdings, data mining, and updating information from the metadata descriptions that enable collections of data in disparate places to be simultaneously accessed, with results processed on servers and clients to produce a needed answer. The services used to access the operational model data output are the Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol (OPeNDAP), implemented with the Grid Analysis and Display System (GrADS) Data Server (GDS), and applications for slicing, dicing and area sub-setting the large matrix of real time model data holdings. This approach insures an efficient use of computer resources because users transmit/receive only the data necessary for their tasks including

  4. Prototype of Multifunctional Full-text Library in the Architecture Web-browser / Web-server / SQL-server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapin, Sergey; Kukovyakin, Alexey

    Within the framework of the research program "Textaurus" an operational prototype of multifunctional library T-Libra v.4.1. has been created which makes it possible to carry out flexible parametrizable search within a full-text database. The information system is realized in the architecture Web-browser / Web-server / SQL-server. This allows to achieve an optimal combination of universality and efficiency of text processing, on the one hand, and convenience and minimization of expenses for an end user (due to applying of a standard Web-browser as a client application), on the other one. The following principles underlie the information system: a) multifunctionality, b) intelligence, c) multilingual primary texts and full-text searching, d) development of digital library (DL) by a user ("administrative client"), e) multi-platform working. A "library of concepts", i.e. a block of functional models of semantic (concept-oriented) searching, as well as a subsystem of parametrizable queries to a full-text database, which is closely connected with the "library", serve as a conceptual basis of multifunctionality and "intelligence" of the DL T-Libra v.4.1. An author's paragraph is a unit of full-text searching in the suggested technology. At that, the "logic" of an educational / scientific topic or a problem can be built in a multilevel flexible structure of a query and the "library of concepts", replenishable by the developers and experts. About 10 queries of various level of complexity and conceptuality are realized in the suggested version of the information system: from simple terminological searching (taking into account lexical and grammatical paradigms of Russian) to several kinds of explication of terminological fields and adjustable two-parameter thematic searching (a [set of terms] and a [distance between terms] within the limits of an author's paragraph are such parameters correspondingly).

  5. A secure network access system for mobile IPv6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Yuan, Man; He, Rui; Jiang, Luliang; Ma, Jian; Qian, Hualin

    2004-03-01

    With the fast development of Internet and wireless and mobile communication technology, the Mobile Internet Age is upcoming. For those providing Mobile Internet services, especially from the view of ISP (Internet Service Provider), current mobile IP protocol is insufficient. Since the Mobile IPv6 protocol will be popular in near future, how to provide a secure mobile IPv6 service is important. A secure mobile IPv6 network access system is highly needed for mobile IPv6 deployment. Current methods and systems are still inadequate, including EAP, PANA, 802.1X, RADIUS, Diameter, etc. In this paper, we describe main security goals for a secure mobile IPv6 access system, and propose a secure network access system to achieve them. This access system consists of access router, attendant and authentication servers. The access procedure is divided into three phases, which are initial phase, authentication and registration phase and termination phase. This system has many advantages, including layer two independent, flexible and extensible, no need to modify current IPv6 address autoconfiguration protocols, binding update optimization, etc. Finally, the security of the protocol in this system is analyzed and proved with Extended BAN logic method, and a brief introduction of system implementation is given.

  6. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  7. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohardt, Robert; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan; Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Electronic, software-managed mechanisms using, for example, radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards, enable great flexibility in specifying access control policies to physical spaces. For example, access rights may vary based on time of day or could differ in normal versus emergency situations. With such fine-grained control, understanding and reasoning about what a policy permits becomes surprisingly difficult requiring knowledge of permission levels, spatial layout, and time. In this paper, we present a formal modeling framework, called AccessNets, suitable for describing a combination of access permissions, physical spaces, and temporal constraints. Furthermore, we provide evidence that model checking techniques are effective in reasoning about physical access control policies. We describe our results from a tool that uses reachability analysis to validate security policies.

  8. Deterministic entanglement distillation for secure double-server blind quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Yu-Bo; Zhou, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) provides an efficient method for the client who does not have enough sophisticated technology and knowledge to perform universal quantum computation. The single-server BQC protocol requires the client to have some minimum quantum ability, while the double-server BQC protocol makes the client's device completely classical, resorting to the pure and clean Bell state shared by two servers. Here, we provide a deterministic entanglement distillation protocol in a practical noisy environment for the double-server BQC protocol. This protocol can get the pure maximally entangled Bell state. The success probability can reach 100% in principle. The distilled maximally entangled states can be remaind to perform the BQC protocol subsequently. The parties who perform the distillation protocol do not need to exchange the classical information and they learn nothing from the client. It makes this protocol unconditionally secure and suitable for the future BQC protocol. PMID:25588565

  9. Tank waste remediation system year 2000 dedicated file server project HNF-3418 project plan

    SciTech Connect

    SPENCER, S.G.

    1999-04-26

    The Server Project is to ensure that all TWRS supporting hardware (fileservers and workstations) will not cause a system failure because of the BIOS or Operating Systems cannot process Year 2000 dates.

  10. An Open Source Web Map Server Implementation For California and the Digital Earth: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. V.; Sheffner, E. J.; Skiles, J. W.; Brass, J. A.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes an Open Source implementation of the Open GIS Consortium's Web Map interface. It is based on the very popular Apache WWW Server, the Sun Microsystems Java ServIet Development Kit, and a C language shared library interface to a spatial datastore. This server was initially written as a proof of concept, to support a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Digital Earth test bed demonstration. It will also find use in the California Land Science Information Partnership (CaLSIP), a joint program between NASA and the state of California. At least one WebMap enabled server will be installed in every one of the state's 58 counties. This server will form a basis for a simple, easily maintained installation for those entities that do not yet require one of the larger, more expensive, commercial offerings.

  11. Using personal digital assistants to access drug information.

    PubMed

    McCreadie, Scott R; Stevenson, James G; Sweet, Burgunda V; Kramer, Mike

    2002-07-15

    The use of personal digital assistants (PDAs) to access drug information in a health system is described. Given the widespread use of PDAs at an 872-bed university health system, an opportunity existed to provide current drug information to physicians via these devices. As part of the health system's intranet, extensive online content had been made available through a browser; extension to PDAs was a natural next step. There were two primary requirements: the ability to synchronize information with the database server when a PDA was used and the development of content and applications by using existing staff. Mobile enterprise software was chosen that supports multiple PDA platforms, is easy to use, and does not require programming skills. The software works through customized "channels," or collections of information from a content provider. The customized channel service works over the Internet. Two channels of content were created, an ambulatory care channel and an inpatient care channel. The ambulatory care channel contains a list of preferred ambulatory care agents, poison control information, the locations of outpatient pharmacies, drug information, and safety tips for prescribing. The inpatient channel contains the inpatient formulary, current news and events, information on currrent drug shortages and recalls, pharmacy contact information, and medication safety tips. When a user synchronizes his or her PDA, the software contacts the department's intranet servers and processes the request. The data are compressed and downloaded to the user's PDA. A university health system successfully used PDAs to access drug and other information.

  12. myPhyloDB: a local web server for the storage and analysis of metagenomic data

    PubMed Central

    Manter, Daniel K.; Korsa, Matthew; Tebbe, Caleb; Delgado, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    myPhyloDB v.1.1.2 is a user-friendly personal database with a browser-interface designed to facilitate the storage, processing, analysis, and distribution of microbial community populations (e.g. 16S metagenomics data). MyPhyloDB archives raw sequencing files, and allows for easy selection of project(s)/sample(s) of any combination from all available data in the database. The data processing capabilities of myPhyloDB are also flexible enough to allow the upload and storage of pre-processed data, or use the built-in Mothur pipeline to automate the processing of raw sequencing data. myPhyloDB provides several analytical (e.g. analysis of covariance, t-tests, linear regression, differential abundance (DESeq2), and principal coordinates analysis (PCoA)) and normalization (rarefaction, DESeq2, and proportion) tools for the comparative analysis of taxonomic abundance, species richness and species diversity for projects of various types (e.g. human-associated, human gut microbiome, air, soil, and water) for any taxonomic level(s) desired. Finally, since myPhyloDB is a local web-server, users can quickly distribute data between colleagues and end-users by simply granting others access to their personal myPhyloDB database. myPhyloDB is available at http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/software/download.htm?softwareid=472 and more information along with tutorials can be found on our website http://www.myphylodb.org. Database URL: http://www.myphylodb.org PMID:27022159

  13. [Radiology information system using HTML, JavaScript, and Web server].

    PubMed

    Sone, M; Sasaki, M; Oikawa, H; Yoshioka, K; Ehara, S; Tamakawa, Y

    1997-12-01

    We have developed a radiology information system using intranet techniques, including hypertext markup language, JavaScript, and Web server. JavaScript made it possible to develop an easy-to-use application, as well as to reduce network traffic and load on the server. The system we have developed is inexpensive and flexible, and its development and maintenance are much easier than with the previous system.

  14. Comparison of approaches for mobile document image analysis using server supported smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozarslan, Suleyman; Eren, P. Erhan

    2014-03-01

    With the recent advances in mobile technologies, new capabilities are emerging, such as mobile document image analysis. However, mobile phones are still less powerful than servers, and they have some resource limitations. One approach to overcome these limitations is performing resource-intensive processes of the application on remote servers. In mobile document image analysis, the most resource consuming process is the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) process, which is used to extract text in mobile phone captured images. In this study, our goal is to compare the in-phone and the remote server processing approaches for mobile document image analysis in order to explore their trade-offs. For the inphone approach, all processes required for mobile document image analysis run on the mobile phone. On the other hand, in the remote-server approach, core OCR process runs on the remote server and other processes run on the mobile phone. Results of the experiments show that the remote server approach is considerably faster than the in-phone approach in terms of OCR time, but adds extra delays such as network delay. Since compression and downscaling of images significantly reduce file sizes and extra delays, the remote server approach overall outperforms the in-phone approach in terms of selected speed and correct recognition metrics, if the gain in OCR time compensates for the extra delays. According to the results of the experiments, using the most preferable settings, the remote server approach performs better than the in-phone approach in terms of speed and acceptable correct recognition metrics.

  15. Integration of MPEG-4 streaming server with remote control webcam in a GPRS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiede, Oliver; Dummann, Uwe; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the conception, implementation and integration of a streaming server for the GSM/GPRS test network of the SIEMENS Wireless Modules Research & Development (WMRD) division. We describe a client server application for broadcast of MPEG-4 live streams with possibility of position and direction control of the camera using a web interface at the client. The implementation and test in the GPRS network is described.

  16. System Evaluation of Hardware and Software for a Streaming Multimedia Server Using the Multicasting Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    web disabled. Software used for live streaming : QuickTime Broadcaster Software used for recorded streaming: QuickTime Streaming Server Price of...testing. The Video Furnace Server was only tested in a live streaming environment. The future released versions will incorporate a recorded streaming...testing. The VBrick 3200 was only tested in a live streaming environment. The multimedia content is inputted into the unit from a VCR, DVD Player

  17. An NTP Stratum-One Server Farm Fed By IEEE-1588

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    42 nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 111 AN NTP STRATUM-ONE SERVER FARM FED BY IEEE-1588 Richard E...Schmidt and Blair Fonville Time Service Department, U.S. Naval Observatory 3450 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20392, USA rich.schmidt...usno.navy.mil, blair.fonville@usno.navy.mil Abstract For the past 16 years, USNO’s Network Time Protocol (NTP) stratum-1 servers have been

  18. Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web Application Server Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    ARL-TN-0688 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web...Laboratory Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web Application Server Technologies by Jacob C Randall and Jeffrey O...COVERED (From - To) May–Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web Application Server

  19. The Land Analysis System (LAS) for multispectral image processing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wharton, S. W.; Lu, Y. C.; Quirk, Bruce K.; Oleson, Lyndon R.; Newcomer, J. A.; Irani, Frederick M.

    1988-01-01

    The Land Analysis System (LAS) is an interactive software system available in the public domain for the analysis, display, and management of multispectral and other digital image data. LAS provides over 240 applications functions and utilities, a flexible user interface, complete online and hard-copy documentation, extensive image-data file management, reformatting, conversion utilities, and high-level device independent access to image display hardware. The authors summarize the capabilities of the current release of LAS (version 4.0) and discuss plans for future development. Particular emphasis is given to the issue of system portability and the importance of removing and/or isolating hardware and software dependencies.

  20. Creating Bioinformatic Workflows within the BioExtract Server

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computational workflows in bioinformatics are becoming increasingly important in the achievement of scientific advances. These workflows generally require access to multiple, distributed data sources and analytic tools. The requisite data sources may include large public data repositories, community...

  1. Access control and privacy in large distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, B. M.; Bishop, M.

    1986-01-01

    Large scale distributed systems consists of workstations, mainframe computers, supercomputers and other types of servers, all connected by a computer network. These systems are being used in a variety of applications including the support of collaborative scientific research. In such an environment, issues of access control and privacy arise. Access control is required for several reasons, including the protection of sensitive resources and cost control. Privacy is also required for similar reasons, including the protection of a researcher's proprietary results. A possible architecture for integrating available computer and communications security technologies into a system that meet these requirements is described. This architecture is meant as a starting point for discussion, rather that the final answer.

  2. Study on an agricultural environment monitoring server system using Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeonghwan; Shin, Changsun; Yoe, Hyun

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes an agricultural environment monitoring server system for monitoring information concerning an outdoors agricultural production environment utilizing Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) technology. The proposed agricultural environment monitoring server system collects environmental and soil information on the outdoors through WSN-based environmental and soil sensors, collects image information through CCTVs, and collects location information using GPS modules. This collected information is converted into a database through the agricultural environment monitoring server consisting of a sensor manager, which manages information collected from the WSN sensors, an image information manager, which manages image information collected from CCTVs, and a GPS manager, which processes location information of the agricultural environment monitoring server system, and provides it to producers. In addition, a solar cell-based power supply is implemented for the server system so that it could be used in agricultural environments with insufficient power infrastructure. This agricultural environment monitoring server system could even monitor the environmental information on the outdoors remotely, and it could be expected that the use of such a system could contribute to increasing crop yields and improving quality in the agricultural field by supporting the decision making of crop producers through analysis of the collected information.

  3. Performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR.

    PubMed

    van der Schot, Gijs; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-08-01

    We present here the performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR, the critical assessment of automated structure determination by NMR. The CS-Rosetta server uses only chemical shifts for structure prediction, in combination, when available, with a post-scoring procedure based on unassigned NOE lists (Huang et al. in J Am Chem Soc 127:1665-1674, 2005b, doi: 10.1021/ja047109h). We compare the original submissions using a previous version of the server based on Rosetta version 2.6 with recalculated targets using the new R3FP fragment picker for fragment selection and implementing a new annotation of prediction reliability (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR 57:27-35, 2013, doi: 10.1007/s10858-013-9762-6), both implemented in the CS-Rosetta3 WeNMR server. In this second round of CASD-NMR, the WeNMR CS-Rosetta server has demonstrated a much better performance than in the first round since only converged targets were submitted. Further, recalculation of all CASD-NMR targets using the new version of the server demonstrates that our new annotation of prediction quality is giving reliable results. Predictions annotated as weak are often found to provide useful models, but only for a fraction of the sequence, and should therefore only be used with caution.

  4. Symmetric Data Objects and Remote Memory Access Communication for Fortran 95-Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Nieplocha, Jarek; Baxter, Douglas J.; Tipparaju, Vinod; Rasmussen, Craig; Numrich, Robert W.

    2005-08-01

    Symmetric data objects have been introduced by Cray Inc. in context of SHMEM remote memory access communication on Cray T3D/E systems and later adopted by SGI for their Origin servers. Symmetric data objects greatly simplify parallel programming by allowing to reference remote instance of a data structure by specifying address of the local counterpart. The current paper describes how symmetric data objects and remote memory access communication could be implemented in Fortran-95 without requiring specialized hardware or compiler support. NAS Multi-Grid parallel benchmark was used as an application example and demonstrated competitive performance to the standard MPI implementation

  5. Primary vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C P

    2006-05-01

    Primary vascular access is usually achievable by a distal autogenous arterio-venous fistula (AVF). This article describes the approach to vascular access planning, the usual surgical options and the factors affecting patency.

  6. Enhancing Access to Drought Information Using the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreuders, K. A.; Tarboton, D. G.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Sen Gupta, A.; Reeder, S.

    2011-12-01

    The National Drought Information System (NIDIS) Upper Colorado River Basin pilot study is investigating and establishing capabilities for better dissemination of drought information for early warning and management. As part of this study we are using and extending functionality from the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) Hydrologic Information System (HIS) to provide better access to drought-related data in the Upper Colorado River Basin. The CUAHSI HIS is a federated system for sharing hydrologic data. It is comprised of multiple data servers, referred to as HydroServers, that publish data in a standard XML format called Water Markup Language (WaterML), using web services referred to as WaterOneFlow web services. HydroServers can also publish geospatial data using Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) web map, feature and coverage services and are capable of hosting web and map applications that combine geospatial datasets with observational data served via web services. HIS also includes a centralized metadata catalog that indexes data from registered HydroServers and a data access client referred to as HydroDesktop. For NIDIS, we have established a HydroServer to publish drought index values as well as the input data used in drought index calculations. Primary input data required for drought index calculation include streamflow, precipitation, reservoir storages, snow water equivalent, and soil moisture. We have developed procedures to redistribute the input data to the time and space scales chosen for drought index calculation, namely half monthly time intervals for HUC 10 subwatersheds. The spatial redistribution approaches used for each input parameter are dependent on the spatial linkages for that parameter, i.e., the redistribution procedure for streamflow is dependent on the upstream/downstream connectivity of the stream network, and the precipitation redistribution procedure is dependent on elevation to account

  7. I-COMS: Interprotein-COrrelated Mutations Server

    PubMed Central

    Iserte, Javier; Simonetti, Franco L.; Zea, Diego J.; Teppa, Elin; Marino-Buslje, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Interprotein contact prediction using multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) is a useful approach to help detect protein–protein interfaces. Different computational methods have been developed in recent years as an approximation to solve this problem. However, as there are discrepancies in the results provided by them, there is still no consensus on which is the best performing methodology. To address this problem, I-COMS (interprotein COrrelated Mutations Server) is presented. I-COMS allows to estimate covariation between residues of different proteins by four different covariation methods. It provides a graphical and interactive output that helps compare results obtained using different methods. I-COMS automatically builds the required MSA for the calculation and produces a rich visualization of either intraprotein and/or interprotein covariating positions in a circos representation. Furthermore, comparison between any two methods is available as well as the overlap between any or all four methodologies. In addition, as a complementary source of information, a matrix visualization of the corresponding scores is made available and the density plot distribution of the inter, intra and inter+intra scores are calculated. Finally, all the results can be downloaded (including MSAs, scores and graphics) for comparison and visualization and/or for further analysis. PMID:26032772

  8. A single-photon server with just one atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijlkema, Markus; Weber, Bernhard; Specht, Holger P.; Webster, Simon C.; Kuhn, Axel; Rempe, Gerhard

    2007-04-01

    Neutral atoms are ideal objects for the deterministic processing of quantum information. Entanglement operations have been carried out by photon exchange or controlled collisions, and atom-photon interfaces have been realized with single atoms in free space or strongly coupled to an optical cavity. A long-standing challenge with neutral atoms, however, is to overcome the limited observation time. Without exception, quantum effects appeared only after ensemble averaging. Here, we report on a single-photon source with one, and only one, atom quasi-permanently coupled to a high-finesse cavity. `Quasi-permanent' refers to our ability to keep the atom long enough to, first, quantify the photon-emission statistics and, second, guarantee the subsequent performance as a single-photon server delivering up to 300,000 photons for up to 30s. This is achieved by a unique combination of single-photon generation and atom cooling. Our scheme brings deterministic protocols of quantum information science with light and matter closer to realization.

  9. KNBD: A Remote Kernel Block Server for Linux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    I am developing a prototype of a Linux remote disk block server whose purpose is to serve as a lower level component of a parallel file system. Parallel file systems are an important component of high performance supercomputers and clusters. Although supercomputer vendors such as SGI and IBM have their own custom solutions, there has been a void and hence a demand for such a system on Beowulf-type PC Clusters. Recently, the Parallel Virtual File System (PVFS) project at Clemson University has begun to address this need (1). Although their system provides much of the functionality of (and indeed was inspired by) the equivalent file systems in the commercial supercomputer market, their system is all in user-space. Migrating their 10 services to the kernel could provide a performance boost, by obviating the need for expensive system calls. Thanks to Pavel Machek, the Linux kernel has provided the network block device (2) with kernels 2.1.101 and later. You can configure this block device to redirect reads and writes to a remote machine's disk. This can be used as a building block for constructing a striped file system across several nodes.

  10. Software development guidelines for Visual Basic and SQL Server

    SciTech Connect

    IBSEN, T.G.

    2000-07-26

    Development Guidelines are programming directions that focus not on the logic of the program but on its physical structure and appearance. These directions make the code easier to read, understand, and maintain. These guidelines are put in place to create a consistent set of conventions to follow that will standardize the development process. With these guidelines in place the readability and understanding others have when reviewing the code is greatly enhanced. Use these guidelines as a general rule when writing any set of logical statements. Development Guidelines are put into place in an effort to standardize the structure and style of the development process. They are not intended to limit or channel the developer's own creativity and flexibility. These guidelines will cover general development syntax, organization and documentation. The general information covers the high level areas of development, no matter what the environment. This guide will detail specific Visual Basic guidelines, following the same standard naming conventions set by Microsoft, with some minor additions. The guideline will finish with conventions specific to a Database or Microsoft's SQL Server specific environment.

  11. Integrating Quality Management Into a 3d Geospatial Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coors, V.; Krämer, M.

    2011-08-01

    In recent years the technology and workflow for producing and management of large 3D urban models has been established and widely been used. Standards such as CityGML enable the modelling and exchange of semantically enriched multi-purpose 3D urban models for applications like urban planning, public participation, environmental simulation and navigation. However, data quality management is essential to control and enhance the quality of these models in order to be able to meet the needs of the aforementioned applications. Quality management should be performed throughout the whole lifecycle of geospatial datasets - from data acquisition to processing, analysis and visualisation. In this paper, we therefore focus on the integration of a quality management software module into a 3D geospatial data server. First results of a prototype system developed at HFT Stuttgart together with Fraunhofer IGD will be presented in this paper as a starting point for further research into the field of quality management of 3D city models.

  12. New Web Server - the Java Version of Tempest - Produced

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, David W.; Ponyik, Joseph G.

    2000-01-01

    A new software design and development effort has produced a Java (Sun Microsystems, Inc.) version of the award-winning Tempest software (refs. 1 and 2). In 1999, the Embedded Web Technology (EWT) team received a prestigious R&D 100 Award for Tempest, Java Version. In this article, "Tempest" will refer to the Java version of Tempest, a World Wide Web server for desktop or embedded systems. Tempest was designed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to run on any platform for which a Java Virtual Machine (JVM, Sun Microsystems, Inc.) exists. The JVM acts as a translator between the native code of the platform and the byte code of Tempest, which is compiled in Java. These byte code files are Java executables with a ".class" extension. Multiple byte code files can be zipped together as a "*.jar" file for more efficient transmission over the Internet. Today's popular browsers, such as Netscape (Netscape Communications Corporation) and Internet Explorer (Microsoft Corporation) have built-in Virtual Machines to display Java applets.

  13. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  14. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  15. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  16. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  17. J2ME implementation of system for storing and accessing of sensitive data on patient's mobile device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabołotny, Wojciech M.; Wielgórski, Radosław; Nowik, Marcin

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a system allowing to use a patient's mobile phone or PDA for storing of biomedical data, which then, during medical consultation or intervention may be used by the medical staff. The presented solution is aimed on providing both: reliable protection to sensitive patient's data, and easy access to information for authorized medical staff. In the presented system, data are stored in an encrypted form, and the encryption key is available only for authorized persons. The central authentication server verifies the current access rights of the person trying to obtain the information, before providing him or her with the key needed to access the patient's data. The key provided by the server is valid only for the particular device, which minimizes the risk of its misuse. For rare situations when no connection to the authentication server is available (e.g. intervention in the mountains or rural area), system assures an additional "emergency" method to access the encryption key in controlled, registered way. The system has been implemented in Java language and tested in the simulated environment provided by Sun Java Wireless Toolkit for CLDC.

  18. A novel IPTV program multiplex access system to EPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xian; Liu, Deming; He, Wei; Lu, Xi

    2007-11-01

    With the rapid development of high speed networks, such as Ethernet Passive Optical Network (EPON), traffic patterns in access networks have evolved from traditional text-oriented service to the mixed text-, voice- and video- based services, leading to so called "Triple Play". For supporting IPTV service in EPON access network infrastructure, in this article we propose a novel IPTV program multiplex access system to EPON, which enables multiple IPTV program source servers to seamlessly access to IPTV service access port of optical line terminal (OLT) in EPON. There are two multiplex schemes, namely static multiplex scheme and dynamic multiplex scheme, in implementing the program multiplexing. Static multiplex scheme is to multiplex all the IPTV programs and forward them to the OLT, regardless of the need of end-users. While dynamic multiplex scheme can dynamically multiplex and forward IPTV programs according to what the end-users actually demand and those watched by no end-user would not be multiplexed. By comparing these two schemes, a reduced traffic of EPON can be achieved by using dynamic multiplex scheme, especially when most end-users are watching the same few IPTV programs. Both schemes are implemented in our system, with their hardware and software designs described.

  19. Fermi Science Support Center Data Servers and Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reustle, Alexander; FSSC, LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) provides the scientific community with access to Fermi data and other products. The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data is stored at NASA's High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and is accessible through their searchable Browse web interface. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) data is distributed through a custom FSSC interface where users can request all photons detected from a region on the sky over a specified time and energy range. Through its website the FSSC also provides planning and scheduling products, such as long and short term observing timelines, spacecraft position and attitude histories, and exposure maps. We present an overview of the different data products provided by the FSSC, how they can be accessed, and statistics on the archive usage since launch.

  20. Toward server-side, high performance climate change data analytics in the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) eco-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Sandro; Williams, Dean; Aloisio, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In many scientific domains such as climate, data is often n-dimensional and requires tools that support specialized data types and primitives to be properly stored, accessed, analysed and visualized. Moreover, new challenges arise in large-scale scenarios and eco-systems where petabytes (PB) of data can be available and data can be distributed and/or replicated (e.g., the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) serving the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5) experiment, providing access to 2.5PB of data for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Most of the tools currently available for scientific data analysis in the climate domain fail at large scale since they: (1) are desktop based and need the data locally; (2) are sequential, so do not benefit from available multicore/parallel machines; (3) do not provide declarative languages to express scientific data analysis tasks; (4) are domain-specific, which ties their adoption to a specific domain; and (5) do not provide a workflow support, to enable the definition of complex "experiments". The Ophidia project aims at facing most of the challenges highlighted above by providing a big data analytics framework for eScience. Ophidia provides declarative, server-side, and parallel data analysis, jointly with an internal storage model able to efficiently deal with multidimensional data and a hierarchical data organization to manage large data volumes ("datacubes"). The project relies on a strong background of high performance database management and OLAP systems to manage large scientific data sets. It also provides a native workflow management support, to define processing chains and workflows with tens to hundreds of data analytics operators to build real scientific use cases. With regard to interoperability aspects, the talk will present the contribution provided both to the RDA Working Group on Array Databases, and the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF

  1. Distributing digital imaging and communications in medicine data and optimizing access over satellite networks.

    PubMed

    Ernst, R D; Kawashima, A; Shepherd, W; Tamm, E P; Sandler, C M

    1999-05-01

    To improve radiology access to full uncompressed Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data sets, we evaluated satellite access to a DICOM server. Radiologists' home computers were connected by satellite to a Medweb DICOM server (Medweb, San Francisco, CA). A 10.2-kb data set containing a 19-image head computed tomography (CT) scan was transferred using DirecPC (Hughes Electronics Corp, Arlington, VA) at three different times of the day; 6 AM, 3 PM, and 8 PM. The average transfer time for all 19 images from the DICOM server was 4 minutes and 17 seconds (257 seconds). The slowest transfer rate of 670 seconds (121 kbps) was obtained at 8 PM. The best transfer rate of 2 minutes, 54 seconds (467 kbps) was obtained at 6 AM. The full 16-bit DICOM images were viewed with bone, brain, and soft tissue windows. The Medweb plug-in viewer loaded the first image within 30 seconds of selecting the case for satellite transfer. In conclusion, satellite internet transfer of radiology studies is suitable for timely review of full DICOM data sets and can expand the range of teleradiology consultation.

  2. A CORBA server for the Radiation Hybrid DataBase.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Tomé, P; Helgesen, C; Lijnzaad, P; Jungfer, K

    1997-01-01

    Modern biology depends on a wide range of software interacting with a large number of data sources, varying both in size, complexity and structure. The range of important databases in molecular biology and genetics makes it crucial to overcome the problems which this multiplicity presents. At EMBL-EBI we have started to use CORBA technology to support interoperability between a variety of databases, as well as to facilitate the integration of tools that access these databases. Within the Radiation Hybrid DataBase project we are confronted daily with the interoperation and linking issues. In this paper we present a CORBA infrastructure implemented to access the Radiation Hybrid DataBase.

  3. Land Analysis System (LAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, P. B.

    1989-01-01

    Version 4.1 of LAS provides flexible framework for algorithm development and processing and analysis of image data. Over 500,000 lines of code enable image repair, clustering, classification, film processing, geometric registration, radiometric correction, and manipulation of image statistics.

  4. Virtualizing access to scientific applications with the Application Hosting Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasada, S. J.; Coveney, P. V.

    2009-12-01

    The growing power and number of high performance computing resources made available through computational grids present major opportunities as well as a number of challenges to the user. At issue is how these resources can be accessed and how their power can be effectively exploited. In this paper we first present our views on the usability of contemporary high-performance computational resources. We introduce the concept of grid application virtualization as a solution to some of the problems with grid-based HPC usability. We then describe a middleware tool that we have developed to realize the virtualization of grid applications, the Application Hosting Environment (AHE), and describe the features of the new release, AHE 2.0, which provides access to a common platform of federated computational grid resources in standard and non-standard ways. Finally, we describe a case study showing how AHE supports clinical use of whole brain blood flow modelling in a routine and automated fashion. Program summaryProgram title: Application Hosting Environment 2.0 Catalogue identifier: AEEJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU Public Licence, Version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: not applicable No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 685 603 766 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Perl (server), Java (Client) Computer: x86 Operating system: Linux (Server), Linux/Windows/MacOS (Client) RAM: 134 217 728 (server), 67 108 864 (client) bytes Classification: 6.5 External routines: VirtualBox (server), Java (client) Nature of problem: The middleware that makes grid computing possible has been found by many users to be too unwieldy, and presents an obstacle to use rather than providing assistance [1,2]. Such problems are compounded when one attempts to harness the

  5. SEPPA 2.0—more refined server to predict spatial epitope considering species of immune host and subcellular localization of protein antigen

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Tao; Qiu, Tianyi; Zhang, Qingchen; Tang, Kailin; Fan, Yangyang; Qiu, Jingxuan; Wu, Dingfeng; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Yanan; Gao, Jun; Zhu, Ruixin; Cao, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Spatial Epitope Prediction server for Protein Antigens (SEPPA) has received lots of feedback since being published in 2009. In this improved version, relative ASA preference of unit patch and consolidated amino acid index were added as further classification parameters in addition to unit-triangle propensity and clustering coefficient which were previously reported. Then logistic regression model was adopted instead of the previous simple additive one. Most importantly, subcellular localization of protein antigen and species of immune host were fully taken account to improve prediction. The result shows that AUC of 0.745 (5-fold cross-validation) is almost the baseline performance with no differentiation like all the other tools. Specifying subcellular localization of protein antigen and species of immune host will generally push the AUC up. Secretory protein immunized to mouse can push AUC to 0.823. In this version, the false positive rate has been largely decreased as well. As the first method which has considered the subcellular localization of protein antigen and species of immune host, SEPPA 2.0 shows obvious advantages over the other popular servers like SEPPA, PEPITO, DiscoTope-2, B-pred, Bpredictor and Epitopia in supporting more specific biological needs. SEPPA 2.0 can be accessed at http://badd.tongji.edu.cn/seppa/. Batch query is also supported. PMID:24838566

  6. Distributed analysis with CRAB: The client-server architecture evolution and commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Codispoti, G.; Cinquilli, M.; Fanfani, A.; Fanzago, F.; Farina, F.; Lacaprara, S.; Miccio, V.; Spiga, D.; Vaandering, E.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    CRAB (CMS Remote Analysis Builder) is the tool used by CMS to enable running physics analysis in a transparent manner over data distributed across many sites. It abstracts out the interaction with the underlying batch farms, grid infrastructure and CMS workload management tools, such that it is easily usable by non-experts. CRAB can be used as a direct interface to the computing system or can delegate the user task to a server. Major efforts have been dedicated to the client-server system development, allowing the user to deal only with a simple and intuitive interface and to delegate all the work to a server. The server takes care of handling the users jobs during the whole lifetime of the users task. In particular, it takes care of the data and resources discovery, process tracking and output handling. It also provides services such as automatic resubmission in case of failures, notification to the user of the task status, and automatic blacklisting of sites showing evident problems beyond what is provided by existing grid infrastructure. The CRAB Server architecture and its deployment will be presented, as well as the current status and future development. In addition the experience in using the system for initial detector commissioning activities and data analysis will be summarized.

  7. HorA web server to infer homology between proteins using sequence and structural similarity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong-Hyun; Cheng, Hua; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    The biological properties of proteins are often gleaned through comparative analysis of evolutionary relatives. Although protein structure similarity search methods detect more distant homologs than purely sequence-based methods, structural resemblance can result from either homology (common ancestry) or analogy (similarity without common ancestry). While many existing web servers detect structural neighbors, they do not explicitly address the question of homology versus analogy. Here, we present a web server named HorA (Homology or Analogy) that identifies likely homologs for a query protein structure. Unlike other servers, HorA combines sequence information from state-of-the-art profile methods with structure information from spatial similarity measures using an advanced computational technique. HorA aims to identify biologically meaningful connections rather than purely 3D-geometric similarities. The HorA method finds ∼90% of remote homologs defined in the manually curated database SCOP. HorA will be especially useful for finding remote homologs that might be overlooked by other sequence or structural similarity search servers. The HorA server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/horaserver. PMID:19417074

  8. Admission control and quality adaptation in the distributed multimedia server system (DMSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Mohammad M.; Manning, Eric G.; Shoja, Gholamali C.

    2001-07-01

    Transmission of the real-time components, such as video and voice of multimedia streams over internets requires pre-allocation of network bandwidth from source to destination, as well as CPU cycles, I/O bandwidth, etc. in the server and in the client providing multimedia services. This paper presents a distributed version of the Utility Model for admission control and Quality of Service (QoS) adaptation of a multi server multimedia service provider. We propose a broker for managing the resources of the servers. This version of the Utility Model is quasi-distributed, meaning that computations for resource allocation are done at a single site (the broker), but the resources considered are distributed over multiple servers. This paper presents the architecture of the broker and the algorithm used by the broker to select the sessions, so that the QoS requirements are met while revenue is maximized. The QoS adaptation policy used to achieve fault tolerance during server failure is described.

  9. US Astronomers Access to SIMBAD in Strasbourg, France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Oliverson, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    During the last year the US SIMBAD Gateway Project continued to provide services like user registration to the US users of the SIMBAD database in France. Currently there are over 4300 US users registered. We also provided user support by answering questions from users and handling requests for lost passwords when still necessary. Even though almost all users now access SIMBAD without a password, based on hostnames/IP addresses, there are still some users that need individual passwords. We continued to maintain the mirror copy of the SIMBAD database on a server at SAO. This allows much faster access for the US users. During the past year we moved this mirror to a faster server to improve access for the US users. We again supported a demonstration of the SIMBAD database at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society in January. We provided support for the demonstration activities at the SIMBAD booth. We paid part of the fee for the SIMBAD demonstration. We continued to improve the cross-linking between the SIMBAD project and the Astrophysics Data System. This cross-linking between these systems is very much appreciated by the users of both the SIMBAD database and the ADS Abstract Service. The mirror of the SIMBAD database at SAO makes this connection faster for the US astronomers. We exchange information between the ADS and SIMBAD on a daily basis. The close cooperation between the CDS in Strasbourg and SAO, facilitated by this project, is an important part of the astronomy-wide digital library initiative. It has proven to be a model in how different data centers can collaborate and enhance the value of their products by linking with other data centers. We continue this collaboration in order to provide better services to both the US and European astronomical community. This collaboration is even more important in light of the developments for the Virtual Observatory projects in the different countries.

  10. Channel Access in Erlang

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.

    2013-10-13

    We have developed an Erlang language implementation of the Channel Access protocol. Included are low-level functions for encoding and decoding Channel Access protocol network packets as well as higher level functions for monitoring or setting EPICS process variables. This provides access to EPICS process variables for the Fermilab Acnet control system via our Erlang-based front-end architecture without having to interface to C/C++ programs and libraries. Erlang is a functional programming language originally developed for real-time telecommunications applications. Its network programming features and list management functions make it particularly well-suited for the task of managing multiple Channel Access circuits and PV monitors.

  11. Web Accessibility and Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz

    Access to, and movement around, complex online environments, of which the World Wide Web (Web) is the most popular example, has long been considered an important and major issue in the Web design and usability field. The commonly used slang phrase ‘surfing the Web’ implies rapid and free access, pointing to its importance among designers and users alike. It has also been long established that this potentially complex and difficult access is further complicated, and becomes neither rapid nor free, if the user is disabled. There are millions of people who have disabilities that affect their use of the Web. Web accessibility aims to help these people to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with, as well as contribute to, the Web, and thereby the society in general. This accessibility is, in part, facilitated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) currently moving from version one to two. These guidelines are intended to encourage designers to make sure their sites conform to specifications, and in that conformance enable the assistive technologies of disabled users to better interact with the page content. In this way, it was hoped that accessibility could be supported. While this is in part true, guidelines do not solve all problems and the new WCAG version two guidelines are surrounded by controversy and intrigue. This chapter aims to establish the published literature related to Web accessibility and Web accessibility guidelines, and discuss limitations of the current guidelines and future directions.

  12. AccessAbility @ Cleveland Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mates, Barbara T.

    2003-01-01

    Describes several programs that were developed by staff at the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Library to be accessible to users with disabilities. Highlights include a Braille reading program; sensory garden; poetry club; book club based on talking books; wheelchair athletics; touching museum artifacts; and a mobile library for users who could not visit…

  13. Concept of a PACS and imaging informatics-based server for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Law, Maria Y Y; Huang, H K

    2003-01-01

    Radiation Therapy (RT) is an image-based treatment. It requires images from projection X-rays, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography, Linear Accelerator for tumor localization, treatment planning and verification of treatment plans. During the treatment process, patient's images are transmitted to every necessary station in the RT department. However, images of the same patient are generally scattered and there is no permanent home base for them due to the nature and traditional organization of the RT department. The advance in diagnostic picture archiving and communication system and the establishment of RT DICOM Standard provide an opportunity to define and design an RT server as a means to organize RT images and related data. This paper describes the RT workflow and the concept of the DICOM RT server. An example of RT treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma based on the RT server concept is given.

  14. CentiServer: A Comprehensive Resource, Web-Based Application and R Package for Centrality Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Mahdi; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Asgari, Yazdan; Arab, Seyed Shahriar; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Alimoghaddam, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Various disciplines are trying to solve one of the most noteworthy queries and broadly used concepts in biology, essentiality. Centrality is a primary index and a promising method for identifying essential nodes, particularly in biological networks. The newly created CentiServer is a comprehensive online resource that provides over 110 definitions of different centrality indices, their computational methods, and algorithms in the form of an encyclopedia. In addition, CentiServer allows users to calculate 55 centralities with the help of an interactive web-based application tool and provides a numerical result as a comma separated value (csv) file format or a mapped graphical format as a graph modeling language (GML) file. The standalone version of this application has been developed in the form of an R package. The web-based application (CentiServer) and R package (centiserve) are freely available at http://www.centiserver.org/ PMID:26571275

  15. Optimal Resource Allocation under Fair QoS in Multi-tier Server Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akai, Hirokazu; Ushio, Toshimitsu; Hayashi, Naoki

    Recent development of network technology realizes multi-tier server systems, where several tiers perform functionally different processing requested by clients. It is an important issue to allocate resources of the systems to clients dynamically based on their current requests. On the other hand, Q-RAM has been proposed for resource allocation in real-time systems. In the server systems, it is important that execution results of all applications requested by clients are the same QoS(quality of service) level. In this paper, we extend Q-RAM to multi-tier server systems and propose a method for optimal resource allocation with fairness of the QoS levels of clients’ requests. We also consider an assignment problem of physical machines to be sleep in each tier sothat the energy consumption is minimized.

  16. Paying for express checkout: competition and price discrimination in multi-server queuing systems.

    PubMed

    Deck, Cary; Kimbrough, Erik O; Mongrain, Steeve

    2014-01-01

    We model competition between two firms selling identical goods to customers who arrive in the market stochastically. Shoppers choose where to purchase based upon both price and the time cost associated with waiting for service. One seller provides two separate queues, each with its own server, while the other seller has a single queue and server. We explore the market impact of the multi-server seller engaging in waiting cost-based-price discrimination by charging a premium for express checkout. Specifically, we analyze this situation computationally and through the use of controlled laboratory experiments. We find that this form of price discrimination is harmful to sellers and beneficial to consumers. When the two-queue seller offers express checkout for impatient customers, the single queue seller focuses on the patient shoppers thereby driving down prices and profits while increasing consumer surplus.

  17. Quadfinder: server for identification and analysis of quadruplex-forming motifs in nucleotide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scaria, Vinod; Hariharan, Manoj; Arora, Amit; Maiti, Souvik

    2006-01-01

    G-quadruplex secondary structures, which play a structural role in repetitive DNA such as telomeres, may also play a functional role at other genomic locations as targetable regulatory elements which control gene expression. The recent interest in application of quadruplexes in biological systems prompted us to develop a tool for the identification and analysis of quadruplex-forming nucleotide sequences especially in the RNA. Here we present Quadfinder, an online server for prediction and bioinformatics of uni-molecular quadruplex-forming nucleotide sequences. The server is designed to be user-friendly and needs minimal intervention by the user, while providing flexibility of defining the variants of the motif. The server is freely available at URL . PMID:16845097

  18. Data decomposition of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations via tally servers

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Paul K.; Siegel, Andrew R.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord

    2013-11-01

    An algorithm for decomposing large tally data in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations is developed, analyzed, and implemented in a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, OpenMC. The algorithm is based on a non-overlapping decomposition of compute nodes into tracking processors and tally servers. The former are used to simulate the movement of particles through the domain while the latter continuously receive and update tally data. A performance model for this approach is developed, suggesting that, for a range of parameters relevant to LWR analysis, the tally server algorithm should perform with minimal overhead on contemporary supercomputers. An implementation of the algorithm in OpenMC is then tested on the Intrepid and Titan supercomputers, supporting the key predictions of the model over a wide range of parameters. We thus conclude that the tally server algorithm is a successful approach to circumventing classical on-node memory constraints en route to unprecedentedly detailed Monte Carlo reactor simulations.

  19. An ECG storage and retrieval system embedded in client server HIS utilizing object-oriented DB.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Ohe, K; Sakurai, T; Nagase, T; Kaihara, S

    1996-02-01

    In the University of Tokyo Hospital, the improved client server HIS has been applied to clinical practice and physicians can order prescription, laboratory examination, ECG examination and radiographic examination, etc. directly by themselves and read results of these examinations, except medical signal waves, schema and image, on UNIX workstations. Recently, we designed and developed an ECG storage and retrieval system embedded in the client server HIS utilizing object-oriented database to take the first step in dealing with digitized signal, schema and image data and show waves, graphics, and images directly to physicians by the client server HIS. The system was developed based on object-oriented analysis and design, and implemented with object-oriented database management system (OODMS) and C++ programming language. In this paper, we describe the ECG data model, functions of the storage and retrieval system, features of user interface and the result of its implementation in the HIS.

  20. RNATOPS-W: a web server for RNA structure searches of genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingfeng; Huang, Zhibin; Wu, Yong; Malmberg, Russell L; Cai, Liming

    2009-04-15

    RNATOPS-W is a web server to search sequences for RNA secondary structures including pseudoknots. The server accepts an annotated RNA multiple structural alignment as a structural profile and genomic or other sequences to search. It is built upon RNATOPS, a command line C++ software package for the same purpose, in which filters to speed up search are manually selected. RNATOPS-W improves upon RNATOPS by adding the function of automatic selection of a hidden Markov model (HMM) filter and also a friendly user interface for selection of a substructure filter by the user. In addition, RNATOPS-W complements existing RNA secondary structure search web servers that either use built-in structure profiles or are not able to detect pseudoknots. RNATOPS-W inherits the efficiency of RNATOPS in detecting large, complex RNA structures.

  1. A Rich Client-Server Based Framework for Convenient Security and Management of Mobile Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badan, Stephen; Probst, Julien; Jaton, Markus; Vionnet, Damien; Wagen, Jean-Frédéric; Litzistorf, Gérald

    Contact lists, Emails, SMS or custom applications on a professional smartphone could hold very confidential or sensitive information. What could happen in case of theft or accidental loss of such devices? Such events could be detected by the separation between the smartphone and a Bluetooth companion device. This event should typically block the applications and delete personal and sensitive data. Here, a solution is proposed based on a secured framework application running on the mobile phone as a rich client connected to a security server. The framework offers strong and customizable authentication and secured connectivity. A security server manages all security issues. User applications are then loaded via the framework. User data can be secured, synchronized, pushed or pulled via the framework. This contribution proposes a convenient although secured environment based on a client-server architecture using external authentications. Several features of the proposed system are exposed and a practical demonstrator is described.

  2. Paying for Express Checkout: Competition and Price Discrimination in Multi-Server Queuing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Deck, Cary; Kimbrough, Erik O.; Mongrain, Steeve

    2014-01-01

    We model competition between two firms selling identical goods to customers who arrive in the market stochastically. Shoppers choose where to purchase based upon both price and the time cost associated with waiting for service. One seller provides two separate queues, each with its own server, while the other seller has a single queue and server. We explore the market impact of the multi-server seller engaging in waiting cost-based-price discrimination by charging a premium for express checkout. Specifically, we analyze this situation computationally and through the use of controlled laboratory experiments. We find that this form of price discrimination is harmful to sellers and beneficial to consumers. When the two-queue seller offers express checkout for impatient customers, the single queue seller focuses on the patient shoppers thereby driving down prices and profits while increasing consumer surplus. PMID:24667809

  3. THE PHOTOMETRIC CLASSIFICATION SERVER FOR Pan-STARRS1

    SciTech Connect

    Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Seitz, S.; Senger, R.; Snigula, J.; Phleps, S.; Wilman, D.; Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Heasley, J. N.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S.; Greisel, N.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Klement, R. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Smith, K.; Green, P. J.; and others

    2012-02-20

    The Pan-STARRS1 survey is obtaining multi-epoch imaging in five bands (g{sub P1} r{sub P1} i{sub P1} z{sub P1} y{sub P1}) over the entire sky north of declination -30 deg. We describe here the implementation of the Photometric Classification Server (PCS) for Pan-STARRS1. PCS will allow the automatic classification of objects into star/galaxy/quasar classes based on colors and the measurement of photometric redshifts for extragalactic objects, and will constrain stellar parameters for stellar objects, working at the catalog level. We present tests of the system based on high signal-to-noise photometry derived from the Medium-Deep Fields of Pan-STARRS1, using available spectroscopic surveys as training and/or verification sets. We show that the Pan-STARRS1 photometry delivers classifications and photometric redshifts as good as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry to the same magnitude limits. In particular, our preliminary results, based on this relatively limited data set down to the SDSS spectroscopic limits, and therefore potentially improvable, show that stars are correctly classified as such in 85% of cases, galaxies in 97%, and QSOs in 84%. False positives are less than 1% for galaxies, Almost-Equal-To 19% for stars, and Almost-Equal-To 28% for QSOs. Moreover, photometric redshifts for 1000 luminous red galaxies up to redshift 0.5 are determined to 2.4% precision (defined as 1.48 Multiplication-Sign Median|z{sub phot} - z{sub spec}|/(1 + z)) with just 0.4% catastrophic outliers and small (-0.5%) residual bias. For bluer galaxies up to the same redshift, the residual bias (on average -0.5%) trend, percentage of catastrophic failures (1.2%), and precision (4.2%) are higher, but still interestingly small for many science applications. Good photometric redshifts (to 5%) can be obtained for at most 60% of the QSOs of the sample. PCS will create a value-added catalog with classifications and photometric redshifts for eventually many millions of sources.

  4. Fast-earth: A global image caching architecture for fast access to remote-sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, B. G.; Talbot, L. M.

    We introduce Fast-Earth, a novel server architecture that enables rapid access to remote sensing data. Fast-Earth subdivides a WGS-84 model of the earth into small 400 × 400 meter regions with fixed locations, called plats. The resulting 3,187,932,913 indexed plats are accessed with a rapid look-up algorithm. Whereas many traditional databases store large original images as a series by collection time, requiring long searches and slow access times for user queries, the Fast-Earth architecture enables rapid access. We have prototyped a system in conjunction with a Fast-Responder mobile app to demonstrate and evaluate the concepts. We found that new data could be indexed rapidly in about 10 minutes/terabyte, high-resolution images could be chipped in less than a second, and 250 kB image chips could be delivered over a 3G network in about 3 seconds. The prototype server implemented on a very small computer could handle 100 users, but the concept is scalable. Fast-Earth enables dramatic advances in rapid dissemination of remote sensing data for mobile platforms as well as desktop enterprises.

  5. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  6. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan; Jersey Inst Ansari, New; Jersey Inst, New

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  7. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  8. IKey+: a new single-access key generation web service.

    PubMed

    Burguiere, Thomas; Causse, Florian; Ung, Visotheary; Vignes-Lebbe, Régine

    2013-01-01

    Single-access keys are a major tool for biologists who need to identify specimens. The construction process of these keys is particularly complex (especially if the input data set is large) so having an automatic single-access key generation tool is essential. As part of the European project ViBRANT, our aim was to develop such a tool as a web service, thus allowing end-users to integrate it directly into their workflow. IKey+generates single-access keys on demand, for single users or research institutions. It receives user input data (using the standard SDD format), accepts several key-generation parameters (affecting the key topology and representation), and supports several output formats. IKey+is freely available (sources and binary packages) at www.identificationkey.fr. Furthermore, it is deployed on our server and can be queried (for testing purposes) through a simple web client also available at www.identificationkey.fr (last accessed 13 August 2012). Finally, a client plugin will be integrated to the Scratchpads biodiversity networking tool (scratchpads.eu).

  9. Experimental demonstration of an OpenFlow/PCE integrated control plane for IP over translucent WSON with the assistance of a per-request-based dynamic topology server.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Casellas, Ramon; Tsuritani, Takehiro; Morita, Itsuro; Martínez, Ricardo; Muñoz, Raül

    2013-02-25

    To mitigate the potential scalability issues of an OpenFlow-based control plane, a seamless OpenFlow and Path Computation Element (PCE) integrated control plane is proposed, by means of an architecture in which the path computation function is formally decoupled from the controller so the controller can off-load the task to one or more dedicated PCEs using an open and standard interface and protocol, and where the PCE obtains its topology database by means of a dedicated dynamic topology server, which is accessed by the PCE on a per-request basis. The overall feasibility and performance metrics of this integrated control plane are experimentally verified and quantitatively evaluated on a real IP over translucent Wavelength Switched Optical Network (WSON) testbed.

  10. An authentication scheme for secure access to healthcare services.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Kumari, Saru

    2013-08-01

    Last few decades have witnessed boom in the development of information and communication technologies. Health-sector has also been benefitted with this advancement. To ensure secure access to healthcare services some user authentication mechanisms have been proposed. In 2012, Wei et al. proposed a user authentication scheme for telecare medical information system (TMIS). Recently, Zhu pointed out offline password guessing attack on Wei et al.'s scheme and proposed an improved scheme. In this article, we analyze both of these schemes for their effectiveness in TMIS. We show that Wei et al.'s scheme and its improvement proposed by Zhu fail to achieve some important characteristics necessary for secure user authentication. We find that security problems of Wei et al.'s scheme stick with Zhu's scheme; like undetectable online password guessing attack, inefficacy of password change phase, traceability of user's stolen/lost smart card and denial-of-service threat. We also identify that Wei et al.'s scheme lacks forward secrecy and Zhu's scheme lacks session key between user and healthcare server. We therefore propose an authentication scheme for TMIS with forward secrecy which preserves the confidentiality of air messages even if master secret key of healthcare server is compromised. Our scheme retains advantages of Wei et al.'s scheme and Zhu's scheme, and offers additional security. The security analysis and comparison results show the enhanced suitability of our scheme for TMIS.

  11. The NCAR Research Data Archive's Hybrid Approach for Data Discovery and Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, D.; Worley, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    The NCAR Research Data Archive (RDA http://rda.ucar.edu) maintains a variety of data discovery and access capabilities for it's 600+ dataset collections to support the varying needs of a diverse user community. In-house developed and standards-based community tools offer services to more than 10,000 users annually. By number of users the largest group is external and access the RDA through web based protocols; the internal NCAR HPC users are fewer in number, but typically access more data volume. This paper will detail the data discovery and access services maintained by the RDA to support both user groups, and show metrics that illustrate how the community is using the services. The distributed search capability enabled by standards-based community tools, such as Geoportal and an OAI-PMH access point that serves multiple metadata standards, provide pathways for external users to initially discover RDA holdings. From here, in-house developed web interfaces leverage primary discovery level metadata databases that support keyword and faceted searches. Internal NCAR HPC users, or those familiar with the RDA, may go directly to the dataset collection of interest and refine their search based on rich file collection metadata. Multiple levels of metadata have proven to be invaluable for discovery within terabyte-sized archives composed of many atmospheric or oceanic levels, hundreds of parameters, and often numerous grid and time resolutions. Once users find the data they want, their access needs may vary as well. A THREDDS data server running on targeted dataset collections enables remote file access through OPENDAP and other web based protocols primarily for external users. In-house developed tools give all users the capability to submit data subset extraction and format conversion requests through scalable, HPC based delayed mode batch processing. Users can monitor their RDA-based data processing progress and receive instructions on how to access the data when it is

  12. Mobile app versus Web app: a comparison using 2008-2012 "PubMed for Handhelds" server data.

    PubMed

    Fontelo, Paul; Liu, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Recent surveys show that mobile apps are more popular than Web apps. Apple's iTunes Store, now has about 800,000 apps and reported to have about 40 billion downloads. Android apps, although fewer, is available to the most number of smartphones today. About 40,000 apps are medical or health related. We developed a PubMed4Hh mobile app for iPhone/iPad users to search MEDLINE/PubMed with same features as our Web-based search tools, in use since 2002. Five-year (2008-2012) server data for PubMed4Hh and Web app were analyzed. Searches using the mobile app significantly increased compared to the same five-year time period. Month-by-month comparison showed a 3 to 5-fold increase in queries. The six-month total accesses comparison increased 280% from the previous four-year average. A review of 500 randomly selected queries revealed that the majority of queries were clinical questions ((97.8%) and 61% of these queries are searches related to therapy.

  13. RNAiFold 2.0: a web server and software to design custom and Rfam-based RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Several algorithms for RNA inverse folding have been used to design synthetic riboswitches, ribozymes and thermoswitches, whose activity has been experimentally validated. The RNAiFold software is unique among approaches for inverse folding in that (exhaustive) constraint programming is used instead of heuristic methods. For that reason, RNAiFold can generate all sequences that fold into the target structure or determine that there is no solution. RNAiFold 2.0 is a complete overhaul of RNAiFold 1.0, rewritten from the now defunct COMET language to C++. The new code properly extends the capabilities of its predecessor by providing a user-friendly pipeline to design synthetic constructs having the functionality of given Rfam families. In addition, the new software supports amino acid constraints, even for proteins translated in different reading frames from overlapping coding sequences; moreover, structure compatibility/incompatibility constraints have been expanded. With these features, RNAiFold 2.0 allows the user to design single RNA molecules as well as hybridization complexes of two RNA molecules. Availability: the web server, source code and linux binaries are publicly accessible at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold2.0. PMID:26019176

  14. NASA Access Mechanism: Lessons learned document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdick, Lisa; Dunbar, Rick; Duncan, Denise; Generous, Curtis; Hunter, Judy; Lycas, John; Taber-Dudas, Ardeth

    1994-01-01

    The six-month beta test of the NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype was completed on June 30, 1993. This report documents the lessons learned from the use of this Graphical User Interface to NASA databases such as the NASA STI Database, outside databases, Internet resources, and peers in the NASA R&D community. Design decisions, such as the use of XWindows software, a client-server distributed architecture, and use of the NASA Science Internet, are explained. Users' reactions to the interface and suggestions for design changes are reported, as are the changes made by the software developers based on new technology for information discovery and retrieval. The lessons learned section also reports reactions from the public, both at demonstrations and in response to articles in the trade press and journals. Recommendations are included for future versions, such as a World Wide Web (WWW) and Mosaic based interface to heterogeneous databases, and NAM-Lite, a version which allows customization to include utilities provided locally at NASA Centers.

  15. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 3: Serving Clients with Client/Server.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on client/server issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "The Realities of Client/Server Development and Implementation" (Mary Ann Carr and Alan Hartwig), which examines Carnegie Mellon University's transition…

  16. 78 FR 48472 - Hewlett Packard Company; Enterprise Storage Servers and Networking (Tape) Group; Formerly D/B/A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard Company; Enterprise Storage Servers and Networking..., Enterprise Storage Servers and Networking (Tape) Group (formerly d/b/a Enterprise Group, HP Storage,...

  17. Managing Information Technology as a Catalyst of Change. Track IV: Managing in a Client/Server Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1993 CAUSE Conference's track on effective management of information technology at colleges and universities using a client/server environment. Papers include: (1) "Moving to Client/Server Application Development: Caveat Emptor for Management" (William Barry), which offers an overview of two mature…

  18. Optimal Self-Tuning PID Controller Based on Low Power Consumption for a Server Fan Cooling System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chengming; Chen, Rongshun

    2015-05-20

    Recently, saving the cooling power in servers by controlling the fan speed has attracted considerable attention because of the increasing demand for high-density servers. This paper presents an optimal self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, combining a PID neural network (PIDNN) with fan-power-based optimization in the transient-state temperature response in the time domain, for a server fan cooling system. Because the thermal model of the cooling system is nonlinear and complex, a server mockup system simulating a 1U rack server was constructed and a fan power model was created using a third-order nonlinear curve fit to determine the cooling power consumption by the fan speed control. PIDNN with a time domain criterion is used to tune all online and optimized PID gains. The proposed controller was validated through experiments of step response when the server operated from the low to high power state. The results show that up to 14% of a server's fan cooling power can be saved if the fan control permits a slight temperature response overshoot in the electronic components, which may provide a time-saving strategy for tuning the PID controller to control the server fan speed during low fan power consumption.

  19. Standards and Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Argues that easy claims about the relationship between language mastery and academic or economic access (made by both conservative commentators on education and mainstream writing teachers) are false and obscure real social and political boundaries, such as racism, sexism, elitism, and homophobia, that really do prevent access. (SR)

  20. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; O'Connor, David; Partrick, Richard; Orzechowski, Pawel; Spitter, Connie; Lillie, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  1. The Equal Access Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catron, J. Gregory

    1987-01-01

    Reviews past history of access of religious activities in public schools in relation to the establishment clause of the First Amendment and sets forth the prerequisites in the Equal Access Act of 1984 for creating a well-defined forum for student-initiated free speech including religious groups in public high schools. (MD)

  2. Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Felecia; De Oliver, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This case study researches the degree to which the location and services offered by a multicampus university, geographically situated consistent with the commercial principles of a large mass-market enterprise, facilitate access for educationally underserved groups. First, the necessity of democratizing educational access to an underprivileged…

  3. Granting Each Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Linda Lucas

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes federal legislation regarding equal access for students with disabilities and discusses environmental barriers to accessibility in the library media center. Solutions to these design problems are suggested in the following areas: material formats and space requirements; the physical setting, including furniture, floor coverings,…

  4. MedlinePlus: Accessibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools Español You Are Here: Home → MedlinePlus Accessibility URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/accessibility.html ... or (301) 594-5983 and provide the address (URL) of the page on which you need assistance, ...

  5. Design for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, David R.; McCallum, Barry

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the facets of building design which affect the accessibility of libraries for the physically disabled and presents some basic guidelines for designing accessible libraries. Types of disabilities, questions relating to site design, and specific architectural and physical features of libraries (entranceways, lighting, stairways, and…

  6. a Client/server Tape Robot System Implemented Using Corba and C++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Y.; Urquhart, K. B.; Watase, Y.

    The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) is an object-oriented communications framework which allows for the easy design and development of distributed, object-oriented applications. A CORBA-based implementation of a distributed client/server tape robot system (KIWI Tape Robot) is developed. This approach allows for a variety of data-modeling options in a distributed tape server environment. The use of C++ in the handling of HEP data which is stored in a Hierarchical Mass Storage System is demonstrated.

  7. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431

    SciTech Connect

    Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Brown, Richard E; Brown, Richard; Masanet, Eric; Nordman, Bruce; Tschudi, Bill; Shehabi, Arman; Stanley, John; Koomey, Jonathan; Sartor, Dale; Chan, Peter; Loper, Joe; Capana, Steve; Hedman, Bruce; Duff, Rebecca; Haines, Evan; Sass, Danielle; Fanara, Andrew

    2007-08-02

    This report was prepared in response to the request from Congress stated in Public Law 109-431 (H.R. 5646),"An Act to Study and Promote the Use of Energy Efficient Computer Servers in the United States." This report assesses current trends in energy use and energy costs of data centers and servers in the U.S. (especially Federal government facilities) and outlines existing and emerging opportunities for improved energy efficiency. It also makes recommendations for pursuing these energy-efficiency opportunities broadly across the country through the use of information and incentive-based programs.

  8. Server-based Approach to Web Visualization of Integrated Three-dimensional Brain Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Poliakov, Andrew V.; Albright, Evan; Hinshaw, Kevin P.; Corina, David P.; Ojemann, George; Martin, Richard F.; Brinkley, James F.

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe a client-server approach to three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of neuroimaging data, which enables researchers to visualize, manipulate, and analyze large brain imaging datasets over the Internet. All computationally intensive tasks are done by a graphics server that loads and processes image volumes and 3-D models, renders 3-D scenes, and sends the renderings back to the client. The authors discuss the system architecture and implementation and give several examples of client applications that allow visualization and analysis of integrated language map data from single and multiple patients. PMID:15561787

  9. A Server-Client-Based Graphical Development Environment for Physics Analyses (VISPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, H.-P.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Hinzmann, A.; Klingebiel, D.; Komm, M.; Müller, G.; Rieger, M.; Steffens, J.; Steggemann, J.; and, M. Urban; Winchen, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Visual Physics Analysis (VISPA) project provides a graphical development environment for data analysis. It addresses the typical development cycle of (re-)designing, executing, and verifying an analysis. We present the new server-client-based web application of the VISPA project to perform physics analyses via a standard internet browser. This enables individual scientists to work with a large variety of devices including touch screens, and teams of scientists to share, develop, and execute analyses on a server via the web interface.

  10. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Brown, Richard E; Brown, Richard; Masanet, Eric; Nordman, Bruce; Tschudi, Bill; Shehabi, Arman; Stanley, John; Koomey, Jonathan; Sartor, Dale; Chan, Peter; Loper, Joe; Capana, Steve; Hedman, Bruce; Duff, Rebecca; Haines, Evan; Sass, Danielle; Fanara, Andrew

    2007-08-02

    This report is the appendices to a companion report, prepared in response to the request from Congress stated in Public Law 109-431 (H.R. 5646),"An Act to Study and Promote the Use of Energy Efficient Computer Servers in the United States." This report assesses current trends in energy use and energy costs of data centers and servers in the U.S. (especially Federal government facilities) and outlines existing and emerging opportunities for improved energy efficiency. It also makes recommendations for pursuing these energy-efficiency opportunities broadly across the country through the use of information and incentive-based programs.

  11. Impact of malicious servers over trust and reputation models in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Surinder; Pathak, N. P.

    2016-03-01

    This article deals with the impact of malicious servers over different trust and reputation models in wireless sensor networks. First, we analysed the five trust and reputation models, namely BTRM-WSN, Eigen trust, peer trust, power trust, linguistic fuzzy trust model. Further, we proposed wireless sensor network design for optimisation of these models. Finally, influence of malicious servers on the behaviour of above mentioned trust and reputation models is discussed. Statistical analysis has been carried out to prove the validity of our proposal.

  12. jpHMM at GOBICS: a web server to detect genomic recombinations in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Calef, Charles; Kuiken, Carla; Leitner, Thomas; Korber, Bette; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario

    2006-07-01

    Detecting recombinations in the genome sequence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is crucial for epidemiological studies and for vaccine development. Herein, we present a web server for subtyping and localization of phylogenetic breakpoints in HIV-1. Our software is based on a jumping profile Hidden Markov Model (jpHMM), a probabilistic generalization of the jumping-alignment approach proposed by Spang et al. The input data for our server is a partial or complete genome sequence from HIV-1; our tool assigns regions of the input sequence to known subtypes of HIV-1 and predicts phylogenetic breakpoints. jpHMM is available online at http://jphmm.gobics.de/.

  13. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  14. OceanNOMADS: Real-time and retrospective access to operational U.S. ocean prediction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J. M.; Cross, S. L.; Bub, F.; Ji, M.

    2011-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Operational Model Archive and Distribution System (NOMADS) provides both real-time and archived atmospheric model output from servers at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) respectively (http://nomads.ncep.noaa.gov/txt_descriptions/marRutledge-1.pdf). The NOAA National Ocean Data Center (NODC) with NCEP is developing a complementary capability called OceanNOMADS for operational ocean prediction models. An NCEP ftp server currently provides real-time ocean forecast output (http://www.opc.ncep.noaa.gov/newNCOM/NCOM_currents.shtml) with retrospective access through NODC. A joint effort between the Northern Gulf Institute (NGI; a NOAA Cooperative Institute) and the NOAA National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC; a division of NODC) created the developmental version of the retrospective OceanNOMADS capability (http://www.northerngulfinstitute.org/edac/ocean_nomads.php) under the NGI Ecosystem Data Assembly Center (EDAC) project (http://www.northerngulfinstitute.org/edac/). Complementary funding support for the developmental OceanNOMADS from U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) through the Southeastern University Research Association (SURA) Model Testbed (http://testbed.sura.org/) this past year provided NODC the analogue that facilitated the creation of an NCDDC production version of OceanNOMADS (http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/ocean-nomads/). Access tool development and storage of initial archival data sets occur on the NGI/NCDDC developmental servers with transition to NODC/NCCDC production servers as the model archives mature and operational space and distribution capability grow. Navy operational global ocean forecast subsets for U.S waters comprise the initial ocean prediction fields resident on the NCDDC production server. The NGI/NCDDC developmental server currently includes the Naval Research Laboratory Inter-America Seas

  15. A secure wireless mobile-to-server link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Abhinav; Akopian, David; Agaian, Sos; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2009-02-01

    Modern mobile devices are some of the most technologically advanced devices that people use on a daily basis and the current trends indicate continuous growth in mobile phone applications. Nowadays phones are equipped with cameras that can capture still images and video, they are equipped with software that can read, convert, manipulate, communicate and save multimedia in multiple formats. This tremendous progress increased the volumes of communicated sensitive information which should be protected against unauthorized access. This paper discusses two general approaches for data protection, steganography and cryptography, and demonstrates how to integrate such algorithms with a mobile-toserver link being used by many applications.

  16. NASA Access Mechanism (NAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy

    1993-01-01

    A 1991 user survey indicated that NASA users want (1) access to diverse sources of information; (2) an intuitive approach to system use; (3) avoidance of system query languages; (4) access to peers and other informal sources of information; and (5) simplified and enhanced presentation of search results. Based on these requirements and the use of an intelligent gateway processor, the NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) is being developed to provide the users with the semblance of a one stop shopping environment for information management.

  17. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks

    Guest Editors Jun Zheng, University of Ottawa Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

    Background

    With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the

  18. Analysis of Java Client/Server and Web Programming Tools for Development of Educational Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muldner, Tomasz

    This paper provides an analysis of old and new programming tools for development of client/server programs, particularly World Wide Web-based programs. The focus is on development of educational systems that use interactive shared workspaces to provide portable and expandable solutions. The paper begins with a short description of relevant terms.…

  19. Log-less metadata management on metadata server for parallel file systems.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jianwei; Xiao, Guoqiang; Peng, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel metadata management mechanism on the metadata server (MDS) for parallel and distributed file systems. In this technique, the client file system backs up the sent metadata requests, which have been handled by the metadata server, so that the MDS does not need to log metadata changes to nonvolatile storage for achieving highly available metadata service, as well as better performance improvement in metadata processing. As the client file system backs up certain sent metadata requests in its memory, the overhead for handling these backup requests is much smaller than that brought by the metadata server, while it adopts logging or journaling to yield highly available metadata service. The experimental results show that this newly proposed mechanism can significantly improve the speed of metadata processing and render a better I/O data throughput, in contrast to conventional metadata management schemes, that is, logging or journaling on MDS. Besides, a complete metadata recovery can be achieved by replaying the backup logs cached by all involved clients, when the metadata server has crashed or gone into nonoperational state exceptionally.

  20. Client-Server: What Is It and Are We There Yet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershenfeld, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Discusses client-server architecture in dumb terminals, personal computers, local area networks, and graphical user interfaces. Focuses on functions offered by client personal computers: individualized environments; flexibility in running operating systems; advanced operating system features; multiuser environments; and centralized data…