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Sample records for access site-related complications

  1. Neurological complications of vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Neurological problems are common in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Over 60% of patients will suffer from symptoms of underlying polyneuropathy due to uraemia or diabetes. Others will have subclinical disease demonstrable by nerve conduction studies. Nerve injury following haemodialysis access surgery is underreported. However, sensory nerve lesions are probably common after most vascular access procedures but are rarely debilitating. Nerve compression syndromes such as carpal tunnel and ulnar compression syndromes are common, especially in patients who have been on dialysis for some years and at least some of these are related to or exacerbated by the access. Recognition is essential as they are eminently treatable by decompression surgery. Tourniquet use appears to be safe for carpal tunnel or ulnar nerve decompression surgery. Ischaemic monomelic neuropathy (IMN) is rare but follows a period of ischaemia during or as a result of access surgery, most commonly to construct a brachial arteriovenous fistula or graft. It is characterised by intense pain, out of proportion to any ischaemia, involves all of the upper limb nerves and may progress to involve the motor nerves eventually resulting in a useless clawed hand. It requires prompt treatment of any residual ischaemia after access creation, if necessary by access ligation, as in the established syndrome, like the even rarer complication of reflex sympathetic dystrophy, it is very difficult to offer any useful treatment other than symptomatic relief and physiotherapy.

  2. Arteriovenous Access: Infection, Neuropathy, and Other Complications.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Jennifer M; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Yilmaz, Serdar; Lok, Charmaine; Leung, Kelvin; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Complications of vascular access lead to morbidity and may reduce quality of life. In this module, we review both infectious and noninfectious arteriovenous access complications including neuropathy, aneurysm, and high-output access. For the challenging patients who have developed many complications and are now nearing their last vascular access, we highlight some potentially novel approaches.

  3. Urologic surgery laparoscopic access: vascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Anibal Wood

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular injury in accidental punctures may occur in large abdominal vessels, it is known that 76% of injuries occur during the development of pneumoperitoneum. The aim of this video is to demonstrate two cases of vascular injury occurring during access in laparoscopic urologic surgery. The first case presents a 60-year old female patient with a 3cm tumor in the superior pole of the right kidney who underwent a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. After the Verres needle insertion, output of blood was verified. During the evaluation of the cavity, a significant hematoma in the inferior vena cava was noticed. After the dissection, a lesion in the inferior vena cava was identified and controlled with a prolene suture, the estimated bloos loss was 300ml. The second case presents a 42-year old female live donor patient who had her right kidney selected to laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy. After the insertion of the first trocar, during the introduction of the 10mm scope, an active bleeding from the mesentery was noticed. The right colon was dissected and an inferior vena cava perforation was identified; a prolene suture was used to control the bleeding, the estimated blood loss was 200mL, in both cases the patients had no previous abdominal surgery. Urologists must be aware of this uncommon, serious, and potentially lethal complication. Once recognized and in the hands of experienced surgeons, some lesions may be repaired laparoscopically. Whenever in doubt, the best alternative is the immediate conversion to open surgery to minimize morbidity and mortality. PMID:28124541

  4. Complications in gynecological minimal-access oncosurgery.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sven; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-08-01

    Complications are the limiting factors of all surgeries. More than performing the actual surgery, learning how to avoid complications before, during, and after surgery is the most important task of every surgeon. Severe complications can lead to patient death. Complications such as ureterovaginal fistulas, resulting from <2 s of inattentive preparation, can lead to years of hardship, suffering, accusation, and litigation. Excellent surgery is about performing the right surgery for the right patient without any complications. Minimally invasive surgery in complex cases is technically challenging. This article details the major causes of complications in laparoscopy for the gynecologic cancer patient and present strategies for prevention, early detection, and intra- and postoperative management.

  5. [Problems, complications, and emergencies during pacemaker implantation. Importance of access].

    PubMed

    Israel, Carsten W; Ekosso-Ejangue, Lucy

    2015-12-01

    Pacemaker implantation represents a standard procedure with a perceived 100% success rate, without mortality and with extremely rare complications. However, some pacemaker implantations may develop into a very difficult procedure or even be associated with significant complications. Good venous access is crucial and may distinguish between comfortable, successful implantation and futile implantation with severe complications (e.g., pneumo- or hematothorax, venous dissection or perforation, accidental arterial implantation, or air embolism). This review summarizes acute problems and complications during lead implantation and provides tips and hints for prevention and acute reaction during implantation. If these simple precautions are considered, the majority of acute complications during implantation of pacemaker leads can be prevented.

  6. Impact of age on access site-related outcomes in 469,983 percutaneous coronary intervention procedures: Insights from the British Cardiovascular Intervention Society.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Simon G; Ratib, Karim; Myint, Phyo K; Keavney, Bernard; Kwok, Chun Shing; Zaman, Azfar; Ludman, Peter F; de Belder, Mark A; Nolan, James; Mamas, Mamas A

    2015-11-15

    We investigate adoption of the TRA in different age groups and study the relationship between age and access site related outcomes in a national cohort of patients undergoing PCI in the UK. Previous studies have reported conflicting data on radial access site adoption between different age groups, with age an independent predictor of failure of procedures undertaken through the radial approach. Age and access site related outcomes (based on transradial (TRA) and transfemoral (TFA) access) were studied in 469,983 PCI procedures undertaken in the UK from 2006 to 2012 in the age groups; <60, 60-<70, 70-<80, and ≥80 in the British Cardiovascular Intervention Society database. We studied access site practice in 469,983 patients who underwent PCI procedures in the United Kingdom. TRA utilization increased from 17.5% to 65.6% in the age group <60, and 16.6% to 54.5% in the age group ≥80 between 2006 and 2012. TRA was independently associated with decreased 30-day mortality in all age groups (<60: OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.54-0.74, P < 0.0001; 60-<70: OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.57-75, P < 0.0001, 70-<80: OR 0.58 (0.52-0.65, P < 0.0001 and ≥80: OR 0.65 (0.57-0.73, P < 0.0001). Adoption of the TRA for PCI has occurred least in older patients in the UK despite similar associations between TRA use and decreased 30-day mortality observed in all age groups.

  7. Deltoid Compartment Syndrome: A Rare Complication after Humeral Intraosseous Access

    PubMed Central

    Thadikonda, Kishan M.; Ma, Irene; Spiess, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: We present a case of a 65-year-old woman who developed a delayed deltoid compartment syndrome after resuscitation via humeral intraosseous access. Initially she was treated conservatively but then was taken emergently for a fasciotomy. After confirming the diagnosis with compartment pressures, a 2-incision approach was employed and a large hematoma was evacuated from the inferior margin of the anterior deltoid. The rest of the deltoid was inspected and debrided to healthy bleeding tissue. Her fasciotomy wounds were left open to heal on their own due to her tenuous clinical condition. At most recent follow-up, she had full range of motion in her shoulder and no residual pain. Our unique case study is the first documented incidence of upper extremity compartment syndrome after intraosseous access. Additionally, our case supports using humeral access only as a second-line option if lower extremity access is not available and prolonged vigilant monitoring after discontinuing intraosseous access to prevent disastrous late complications. PMID:28203508

  8. Thrombotic complications of implanted central venous access devices: prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Labourey, Jean-Luc; Lacroix, Philippe; Genet, Dominique; Gobeaux, François; Martin, Jean; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lavau-Denes, Sandrine; Maubon, Antoine; Tubiana-Mathieu, Nicole

    2004-05-01

    Implanted venous access devices (IVAD) are routinely used in oncologic patients. Thrombotic complication is a source of morbidity. During one year 246 patients with different solid neoplastic diseases received IVAD for chemotherapy administration. Two hundred forty-nine IVAD were placed percutaneously or by surgical cutdown. IVAD were flushed immediately after implantation with 3-5 mL of heparinized saline (100 U/mL). No monthly flush was required. A prospective evaluation of thrombotic complications was realised. in event of catheter dysfunction and/or clinical symptoms of phlebitis, a catheter opacification and/or a Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Twenty-three catheter dysfunctions were noted, corresponding to 13 catheter occlusions. Twelve patients presented clinical symptoms of phlebitis. Eleven venous thrombosis were diagnosed in this group; 10 by echo-Doppler and one by scanography. A unvaried statistic analysis using Fisher's test was performed to detect risk factors. Two factors were identified: the position of catheter tip above T4 (p < 0.001) and mediastinal or cervical lymph nodes larger than 6 cm (p < 0.001). The first increased the risk of catheter occlusion and the second increased the risk of phlebitis.

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  10. With "Access Codes", Textbook Pricing Gets More Complicated than Ever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    The story of one University of Maine student's quest for a reasonably priced textbook reveals just how complicated course materials have become as the textbook industry makes its awkward transition from print to digital. The student is Luke Thomas, a senior majoring in business on the Orono campus, who last semester took a 250-person introductory…

  11. Venous aneurysm complicating arteriovenous fistula access and matrix metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; Grande, Raffaele; Placida, Girolamo Domenico; Rubino, Paolo; Settimio, Ugo Francesco; Quarto, Gennaro; Amato, Maurizio; Furino, Ermenegildo; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Bruno; Gallelli, Luca; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An arteriovenous fistula (AVF) for placed for hemodialysis may be burdened by one particular complication—the formation of a venous aneurysm. It has been shown that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) could represent markers of disease in both venous and arterial vessels. Materials and methods This case study reports a rare case of enormous venous aneurysm-correlated MMP and NGAL levels in a woman with an AVF. Results Significantly higher levels of plasma MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-9, and NGAL were detected in this patient during aneurysmal evaluation before the surgery; these levels significantly decreased 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery. Conclusion MMP and NGAL levels could represent a marker of aneurysmal disease, and their plasma evaluation could help physicians to stratify the risk of complications in patients with an AVF. PMID:28352747

  12. Complications of Peripheral Venous Access Devices: Prevention, Detection, and Recovery Strategies.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Elizabeth A

    2017-04-01

    Most hospitalized patients have placement of a peripheral venous access device, either a short peripheral catheter or a peripherally inserted central catheter. Compared with central venous catheters that are not peripherally inserted, the other 2 types are generally perceived by health care providers as safer and less complicated to manage, and less emphasis is placed on the prevention and management of complications. Expertise of nurses in inserting, managing, and removing these devices may reduce the likelihood of complications, and increased recognition of complications associated with use of the devices is important to ensure continued improvements in the safety, quality, and efficiency of health care. Complications associated with short peripheral catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters include tourniquet retention, tubing and catheter misconnections, phlebitis, air embolism, device fragment embolization, and inadvertent discharge with a retained peripheral venous access device. Integration of prevention, detection, and recovery strategies into personal nursing practice promotes the quality and safety of health care delivery.

  13. Delivery Complications Associated With Prenatal Care Access for Medicaid-Insured Mothers in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Bennett, Kevin J.; Probst, Janice C.

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy complications affect many women. It is likely that some complications can be avoided through routine primary and prenatal care of reasonable quality. The authors examined access to health care during pregnancy for mothers insured by Medicaid. The access indicator is potentially avoidable maternity complications (PAMCs). Potentially…

  14. A Retrospective Clinical Study: Complications of Totally Implanted Central Venous Access Ports

    PubMed Central

    Seok, June Pill; Cho, Hyun Min; Ryu, Han Young; Hwang, Wan Jin; Sung, Tae Yun

    2014-01-01

    Background When managing patients who require repeated venous access, gaining a viable intravenous route has been problematic. To improve the situation, various studies on techniques for venous access have been conducted. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical results of complications following totally implanted central venous access port (TICVAP) insertion. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on 163 patients, from December 2008 to March 2013. The occurrence of complications was studied in three separate periods of catheter use: the intraoperative period, postoperative period, and period during the treatment. Results A total of 165 cases of TICVAP insertions involving 156 patients were included in the final analysis. There were 35 complications (21%) overall. Among these, 31 cases of complications (19%) occurred during the treatment period and the other 4 cases were intraoperative and postoperative complications (2%). There were no statistically significant differences in age and gender of the patients between the two groups to be risk factors (p=0.147, p=0.08). Past history of chemotherapy, initial laboratory findings, and the locations of TICVAP insertion also showed no statistical significance as risk factors (p>0.05). Conclusion Because the majority of complications occurred after port placement and during treatment, meticulous care and management and appropriate education are necessary when using TICVAPs. PMID:24570862

  15. Ultrasonography as a guide during vascular access procedures and in the diagnosis of complications.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, A; Manca, T; Vercelli, A; Braghieri, A; Magnacavallo, A

    2013-10-29

    Vascular access used in the treatment of patients involves central and peripheral vein accesses and arterial accesses. Catheterization of central veins is widely used in clinical practice; it is a necessary part of the treatment of patients in various settings. The most commonly involved vessels are the internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral veins. The mechanical, infectious, and thrombotic complications of central venous catheterization are markedly reduced when the procedure is performed with real-time ultrasound guidance or (to a slightly lesser extent) ultrasound assistance. Ultrasound guidance is also used to create peripheral venous accesses, for catheterization of peripheral veins and for peripheral insertion of central venous catheters. In this setting, it increases the catheterization success rate, especially during difficult procedures (e.g., obese patients, children) and reduces complications such as catheter-related infections and venous thrombosis. Arterial cannulation is used for invasive monitoring of arterial pressure and for access during diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Ultrasound guidance reduces the risk of catheterization failure and complications. It is especially useful for arterial catheterization procedures performed in the absence of a palpable pulse (e.g., patient in shock, ECMO). Imaging support is being used increasingly to facilitate the creation of vascular accesses under difficult conditions, in part because of the growing use of ultrasonography as a bedside procedure. In clinical settings where patients are becoming increasingly vulnerable as a result of advanced age and/or complex disease, the possibility to reduce the risks associated with these invasive procedures should motivate clinicians to acquire the technical skills needed for routine use of sonographic support during vascular access procedures.

  16. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Walser, Eric M.

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  17. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: central venous catheters (access, care, diagnosis and therapy of complications).

    PubMed

    Pittiruti, Mauro; Hamilton, Helen; Biffi, Roberto; MacFie, John; Pertkiewicz, Marek

    2009-08-01

    When planning parenteral nutrition (PN), the proper choice, insertion, and nursing of the venous access are of paramount importance. In hospitalized patients, PN can be delivered through short-term, non-tunneled central venous catheters, through peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC), or - for limited period of time and with limitation in the osmolarity and composition of the solution - through peripheral venous access devices (short cannulas and midline catheters). Home PN usually requires PICCs or - if planned for an extended or unlimited time - long-term venous access devices (tunneled catheters and totally implantable ports). The most appropriate site for central venous access will take into account many factors, including the patient's conditions and the relative risk of infective and non-infective complications associated with each site. Ultrasound-guided venepuncture is strongly recommended for access to all central veins. For parenteral nutrition, the ideal position of the catheter tip is between the lower third of the superior cava vein and the upper third of the right atrium; this should preferably be checked during the procedure. Catheter-related bloodstream infection is an important and still too common complication of parenteral nutrition. The risk of infection can be reduced by adopting cost-effective, evidence-based interventions such as proper education and specific training of the staff, an adequate hand washing policy, proper choices of the type of device and the site of insertion, use of maximal barrier protection during insertion, use of chlorhexidine as antiseptic prior to insertion and for disinfecting the exit site thereafter, appropriate policies for the dressing of the exit site, routine changes of administration sets, and removal of central lines as soon as they are no longer necessary. Most non-infective complications of central venous access devices can also be prevented by appropriate, standardized protocols for line insertion

  18. Pocket-size imaging devices allow for reliable bedside screening for femoral artery access site complications.

    PubMed

    Filipiak-Strzecka, Dominika; Michalski, Błażej; Kasprzak, Jarosław D; Lipiec, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate pocket-size imaging devices (PSIDs) as a fast screening tool for detecting complications after femoral artery puncture. Forty patients undergoing femoral artery puncture for arterial access related to percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled. Twenty-four hours after percutaneous coronary intervention, the involved inguinal region was assessed with PSIDs enabling 2-D gray-scale and color Doppler imaging. Subsequently, examination with a stationary high-end ultrasound system was performed to verify the findings of bedside examination in all patients. In 37 patients, PSID imaging had good diagnostic quality. False aneurysms (one asymptomatic) occurred in four patients, and all were recognized during bedside screening with PSID. One case of femoral artery thrombosis was confirmed with PSID and during standard ultrasonographic examination. Physical examination augmented with the quick bedside PSID examination had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 91%. PSID facilitated rapid bedside detection of serious access site complications in the vast majority of patients, including asymptomatic cases.

  19. Catheter fracture: a rare complication of totally implantable subclavian venous access devices.

    PubMed

    Klotz, H P; Schöpke, W; Kohler, A; Pestalozzi, B; Largiadèr, F

    1996-07-01

    Catheter fracture represents a rare problem among non-infectious complications following the insertion of totally implantable long-term central venous access systems for the application of chemotherapeutic agents. A literature survey revealed a total incidence of catheter fractures of 0-2.1%. Imminent catheter fracture can be identified radiologically, using different degrees of catheter narrowing between the clavicle and the first rib, called pinch-off sign. Two cases of catheter fracture are described and potential causes are discussed. Recommendations to avoid the pinch-off sign with the subsequent risk of catheter fracture and migration include a more lateral and direct puncture of the subclavian vein. In case of catheter narrowing in the clavicular-first rib angle, patients should be followed carefully by chest X-rays every 4 weeks. Whenever possible, the system should be removed within 6 months following insertion.

  20. Vascular Complications and Bleeding After Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Performed Through Open Surgical Access.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence; Akodad, Mariama; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Gandet, Thomas; Lattuca, Benoit; Schmutz, Laurent; Gervasoni, Richard; Nogue, Erika; Nagot, Nicolas; Levy, Gilles; Maupas, Eric; Robert, Gabriel; Targosz, Frederic; Vernhet, Hélène; Cayla, Guillaume; Albat, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Major vascular complications (VC) remain frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and may be associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of VC after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive open surgical access strategy. From 2010 to 2014, we included in a monocentric registry all consecutive patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI. The procedures were performed with 16Fr to 20Fr sheath systems. VC were evaluated within 30 days and classified as major or minor according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition. The study included 396 patients, 218 were women (55%), median age was 85 years (81 to 88), and the median logistic Euroscore was 15.2% (11 to 23). The balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT and the self-expandable Medtronic Core Valve prosthesis were used in 288 (72.7%) and 108 patients (27.3%), respectively. The total length of the procedure was 68 ± 15 minutes including 13 ± 5 minutes for the open surgical access. Major and minor VC were observed in 9 (2.3%) and 16 patients (4%), respectively, whereas life-threatening and major bleeding concerned 18 patients (4.6%). The median duration of hospitalization was 5 days (interquartile range 2 to 7), significantly higher in patients with VC (7 days [5 to 15], p <0.001). Mortality at 1-month and 1-year follow-up (n = 26, 6.6%; and n = 67, 17.2%, respectively) was not related to major or minor VC (p = 0.6). In multivariable analysis, only diabetes (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 6.1, p = 0.034) and chronic kidney failure (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 9.0, p = 0.046) were predictive of VC, whereas body mass index, gender, Euroscore, and lower limb arteriopathy were not. In conclusion, minimal rate of VC and bleeding can be obtained after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive surgical strategy, with a particular advantage observed in high-risk bleeding patients.

  1. Young Australian adults with NF1 have poor access to health care, high complication rates, and limited disease knowledge.

    PubMed

    Oates, Emily C; Payne, Jonathan M; Foster, Sheryl L; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N

    2013-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a multisystem disease associated with a lifelong risk of debilitating and potentially life-limiting complications, however many adults with NF1 have no regular health surveillance. We interviewed and examined 17 young adults with NF1 between the ages of 25 and 33. Most had not been assessed for NF1-related complications within the previous 8 years, including patients with known serious vascular complications, for example, renal artery stenosis. Acute and/or chronic pain, particularly back and plexiform-related pain were common symptoms, and despite a significant impact on quality of life, was untreated in most instances. Symptom and examination-directed imaging revealed serious complications in 41% of the cohort. These included severe spinal cord compression (two cases), a highly SUV avid lesion suggestive of malignancy (one case), and a Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma in a patient without any previous NF1-related complications. Few study participants had a good understanding of NF1, its associated risks and complications, and many had not sought appropriate medical advice as questions or problems arose. NF1-related cognitive deficits in some participants, and the lack of a clear source of expert medical advice for adults with NF1 likely contributed to poor health surveillance and management in this population. Overall, these findings suggest that many Australian adults with NF1 are at risk of serious and life-threatening medical complications, but are not accessing and receiving adequate health care. Access to multidisciplinary adult clinics that specialize in NF1 may address many of the unmet health needs of young adults with NF1.

  2. Comparison of the risk of vascular complications associated with femoral and radial access coronary catheterization procedures in obese versus nonobese patients.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nicholas; Resnic, Frederic S; Popma, Jeffrey J; Simon, Daniel I; Eisenhauer, Andrew C; Rogers, Campbell

    2004-11-01

    In this retrospective review of 5,234 cardiac catheterizations and percutaneous coronary interventions, the rate of vascular complications was highest in extremely thin and morbidly obese patients and lowest in moderately obese patients, consistent with the previously reported "obesity paradox." The use of transradial access and arterial access closure devices was associated with reduced vascular complications in the population of obese patients.

  3. Percutaneous Transsplenic Access to the Portal Vein for Management of Vascular Complication in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hee Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein for management of vascular complication in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Between Sept 2009 and April 2011, percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein was attempted in nine patients with chronic liver disease. Splenic vein puncture was performed under ultrasonographic guidance with a Chiba needle, followed by introduction of a 4 to 9F sheath. Four patients with hematemesis or hematochezia underwent variceal embolization. Another two patients underwent portosystemic shunt embolization in order to improve portal venous blood flow. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver. The percutaneous transsplenic access site was closed using coils and glue. Results: Percutaneous transsplenic splenic vein catheterization was performed successfully in all patients. Gastric or jejunal varix embolization with glue and lipiodol mixture was performed successfully in four patients. In two patients with a massive portosystemic shunt, embolization of the shunting vessel with a vascular plug, microcoils, glue, and lipiodol mixture was achieved successfully. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver; however, only one patient was treated successfully. Complete closure of the percutaneous transsplenic tract was achieved using coils and glue without bleeding complication in all patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein can be an alternative route for portography and further endovascular management in patients for whom conventional approaches are difficult or impossible.

  4. Opening of Dead Sea Scrolls Archive Underlines Problems That Can Complicate Access to Research Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, Ellen K.

    1991-01-01

    The Huntington Library (California) decision to make generally accessible, for the first time, copies of photographs of the Dead Sea Scrolls, previously tightly controlled by a small group of editors, is hailed as breaking a scholarly monopoly over an important intellectual resource, reaffirming the mission of the research library and the…

  5. [Eru somparative analysis of efficiency of various methods of operative access in cases of complications after filling material extrusion into mandibular channel].

    PubMed

    Grigor'iants, L A; Sirak, S V

    2006-01-01

    Comparative analysis of efficiency of various methods of operative access to mandibular channel is presented in the framework of the surgical help to the patients with complications endodontic treatment in the form of some filling material extrusion into mandibular channel.

  6. Non-insertion-related complications of central venous catheterization--temporary vascular access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bevc, Sebastjan; Pecovnik-Balon, Breda; Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2007-01-01

    The authors analyzed 309 central venous catheters (CVC) inserted in 147 hemodialysis patients before the maturation of the first or new arteriovenous fistula. One clinical manifestations of sepsis after CVC insertion was found. In all, 33.7% of the catheters were removed because of early minor complications: CVC occlusion, inadequate blood flow in CVC, shattered suture and malposition of CVC, fever, signs of infection at the site of CVC insertion, and bleeding at the site of CVC insertion. The most frequently isolated pathogenic bacteria at the tips of the catheters were coagulase-negative staphylococci highly sensitive to vancomycin and gentamicin.

  7. Arteriovenous Access

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Yilmaz, Serdar; Lok, Charmaine; Leung, Kelvin; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Complications of vascular access lead to morbidity and may reduce quality of life. In this module, we review both infectious and noninfectious arteriovenous access complications including neuropathy, aneurysm, and high-output access. For the challenging patients who have developed many complications and are now nearing their last vascular access, we highlight some potentially novel approaches. PMID:28270919

  8. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  9. Predictors of common femoral artery access site complications in patients on oral anticoagulants and undergoing a coronary procedure

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, Nicolas W; Shammas, Gail A; Jones-Miller, Susan; Gumpert, Mileah Rose; Gumpert, Miranda Jade; Harb, Christine; Chammas, Majid Z; Shammas, W John; Khalafallah, Rommy A; Barzgari, Amy; Bou Dargham, Bassel; Daher, Ghassan E; Rachwan, Rayan Jo; Shammas, Andrew N

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether patients on oral anticoagulants (OAC) undergoing a procedure using common femoral artery access have higher adverse events when compared to patients who are not anticoagulated at the time of the procedure. Methods We retrospectively reviewed data from consecutive patients who underwent a cardiac procedure at a tertiary medical center. Patients were considered (group A) fully or partially anticoagulated if they had an international normalized ratio (INR) ≥1.6 on the day of the procedure or were on warfarin or new OAC within 48 h and 24 h of the procedure, respectively. The nonanticoagulated group (group B) had an INR <1.6 or had stopped their warfarin and new OAC >48 h and >24 h preprocedure, respectively. The index primary end point of the study was defined as the composite end point of major bleeding, vascular complications, or cardiovascular-related death during index hospitalization. The 30-day primary end point was defined as the occurrence of the index primary end point and up to 30 days postprocedure. Results A total of 779 patients were included in this study. Of these patients, 27 (3.5%) patients were in group A. The index primary end point was met in 11/779 (1.4%) patients. The 30-day primary composite end point was met in 18/779 (2.3%) patients. There was no difference in the primary end point at index between group A (1/27 [3.7%]) and group B (10/752 [1.3%]; P=0.3155) and no difference in the 30-day primary composite end point between group A (2/27 [7.4%]) and group B (16/752 [2.1%]; P=0.1313). Multivariable analysis showed that a low creatinine clearance (odds ratio [OR] =0.56; P=0.0200) and underweight patients (<60 kg; OR =3.94; P=0.0300) were independent predictors of the 30-day primary composite end point but not oral anticoagulation (P=0.1500). Conclusion Patients on OAC did not have higher 30-day major adverse events than those who were not anticoagulated at index procedure.

  10. Totally implantable venous access devices: retrospective analysis of different insertion techniques and predictors of complications in 796 devices implanted in a single institution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of totally implanted vascular devices (TIVAD) using different techniques of insertion. Methods We performed a retrospective study using a prospective collected database of 796 consecutive oncological patients in which TIVADs were inserted. We focused on early and late complications following different insertion techniques (surgical cutdown, blind and ultrasound guided percutaneous) according to different techniques. Results Ultrasound guided technique was used in 646 cases, cephalic vein cutdown in 102 patients and percutaneous blind technique in 48 patients. The overall complication rate on insertion was 7.2% (57 of 796 cases). Early complications were less frequent using the ultrasound guided technique: arterial puncture (p = 0.009), technical failure (p = 0.009), access site change after first attempt (p = 0.002); pneumothorax occurred in 4 cases, all using the blind percutaneus technique. Late complications occurred in 49 cases (6.1%) which required TIVAD removal in 43 cases and included: sepsis (29 cases), thrombosis (3 cases), dislocation (7 cases), skin dehiscence (3 cases), and severe pain (1 case). Conclusion Ultrasound guided technique is the safest option for TIVAD insertion, with the lowest rates of immediate complications. PMID:24886342

  11. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  12. On the Conduct of Site Relations in Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Susan C.; And Others

    Schools are often reluctant to be watched or studied, especially when their interests do not coincide with those of researchers. The development of good site relations can improve the chances of successful data gathering in such circumstances. In addition to acting with courtesy and respect, research teams can organize their site relations…

  13. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the phlebitis and infiltration scales for the assessment of complications of peripheral vascular access devices.

    PubMed

    Groll, Dianne; Davies, Barbara; Mac Donald, Joan; Nelson, Susanne; Virani, Tazim

    2010-01-01

    To prevent complications from peripheral vascular access device (PVAD) therapy, the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) developed 2 scales to measure the extent and severity of phlebitis and infiltration in PVADs. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of these scales to validate them with respect to their interrater reliability, concurrent validity, feasibility, and acceptability. A total of 182 patients at 2 sites were enrolled, and 416 observations of PVAD sites were made. Two nurses independently rated each PVAD site for the presence or absence of phlebitis and/or infiltration by using the INS scales. The interrater reliability was calculated, as was the agreement of the observed versus charted incidence of phlebitis and infiltration (concurrent validity) and the ease of use of the scales (feasibility, acceptability). Interrater reliability for both the Phlebitis and Infiltration scales and concurrent validity were found to be statistically significant (P < .05). The study nurses reported the scales to be easy to use, taking an average of 1.3 minutes to complete both. The importance of valid measures for use in research cannot be underestimated. The INS Phlebitis and Infiltration scales have been shown to be easy to use, valid, and reliable scales.

  14. On the Conduct of Site Relations in Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Susan C.; Packard, John S.

    1981-01-01

    Describes efforts undertaken as part of a large scale research project to engage schools and school personnel to participate as research subjects. Identifies planning, staffing, access, formalization, maintenance of participation, and dissemination of research findings to the participating organization or individuals as critical concerns for site…

  15. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... To receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy complications Complications of pregnancy are health problems that ... pregnancy. Expand all | Collapse all Health problems before pregnancy Before pregnancy, make sure to talk to your ...

  16. Nitinol clip distal migration and resultant popliteo-tibial artery occlusion complicating access closure by the StarClose SE vascular closure system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Myeong Jin; Yoo, Chan Jong; Park, Cheol Wan

    2017-02-01

    Lower extremity ischemia following deployment of a vascular closure device for access site closure after a transfemoral endovascular procedure rarely occurs. A 68-year-old woman diagnosed with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured anterior communicating aneurysm was treated by endovascular coil embolization. The StarClose SE device was deployed for right femoral arteriotomy closure. After 2 days, critical ischemia occurred on her right lower leg due to total occlusion of the popliteo-tibial artery. Emergent surgical embolectomy was performed and the nitinol clip of the StarClose device was captured in the lumen of the tibioperoneal trunk. Although StarClose is an extravascular closure system, intravascular deployment, distal migration, and resultant critical limb ischemia can occur.

  17. Arteriovenous Access Failure, Stenosis, and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Jennifer M; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Lok, Charmaine; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Vascular access-related complications can lead to patient morbidity and reduced patient quality of life. Some of the common arteriovenous access complications include failure to mature, stenosis formation, and thrombosis.

  18. Erotic complications.

    PubMed

    Slochower, J

    1999-12-01

    The author argues that erotic transference-countertransference dynamics present particular complexities when they develop between gender constellations other than male analyst and female patient. She addresses the dynamics of a complicated erotic transference in concert with an aversive countertransference response as it evolved between a female analyst and female patient. The intense erotic transference that developed defied classification as either maternallerotic or oedipallerotic, and instead included both features in a rapidly shifting process that was difficult to address analytically. The analyst's confused, often aversive, response to her patient's erotic wishes ultimately revealed a subtle re-enactment involving split-off and erotised experiences of emotional penetration and scrutiny. When these issues were addressed, the erotic transference dissolved, and the analyst's experience of her patient shifted rather dramatically. It is suggested that complex erotic transference sometimes contains within it evidence of previously repressed object experiences that were not primarily sexual in nature.

  19. Abdominal Complications after Severe Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    abdominal compartment syndrome, schemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic ulcer disease and astritis requiring laparotomy, small bowel obstruction, rimary fungal...complications in- luded trauma exploratory laparotomy, abdominal com- artment syndrome, ischemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic lcer disease and gastritis, large...70%); 13 for other compli- ations, such as biliary or perineal conditions (26%); and 4 or feeding access (8%). For the civilians, 2 had trauma

  20. Outdoor comfort study in Rio de Janeiro: site-related context effects on reported thermal sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, E.; Drach, P.; Broede, P.

    2017-03-01

    Aimed at climate-responsive urban design for tropical areas, the paper attempts to answer the question whether the site-related context affects in some way the perceptual assessment of the microclimate by users of outdoor spaces. Our hypothesis was that visual cues resulting from urban design are important components of the outdoor thermal perception. Monitoring was carried out alongside the administration of standard comfort questionnaires throughout summer periods in 2012-2015 in pedestrian areas of downtown Rio de Janeiro (22° 54 10 S, 43° 12 27 W), Brazil. Campaigns took place at different points, pre-defined in respect of urban geometry attributes. For the measurements, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station was employed to which a gray globe thermometer was attached. Two thermal indices were used for assessing the overall meteorological conditions and comfort levels in the outdoor locations: physiological equivalent temperature (PET) and universal thermal climate index (UTCI). Our results suggest that thermal sensation in Rio depends to a large extent on the thermal environment as described by air temperature, PET, or UTCI, and that urban geometry (expressed by the sky-view factor (SVF)) may modify this relationship with increased building density associated to warmer sensation votes under moderate heat stress conditions. This relationship however reverses under strong heat stress with warmer sensations in less obstructed locations, and disappears completely under still higher heat stress, where meteorological conditions, and not the site's SVF, will drive thermal sensation.

  1. Outdoor comfort study in Rio de Janeiro: site-related context effects on reported thermal sensation.

    PubMed

    Krüger, E; Drach, P; Broede, P

    2017-03-01

    Aimed at climate-responsive urban design for tropical areas, the paper attempts to answer the question whether the site-related context affects in some way the perceptual assessment of the microclimate by users of outdoor spaces. Our hypothesis was that visual cues resulting from urban design are important components of the outdoor thermal perception. Monitoring was carried out alongside the administration of standard comfort questionnaires throughout summer periods in 2012-2015 in pedestrian areas of downtown Rio de Janeiro (22° 54 10 S, 43° 12 27 W), Brazil. Campaigns took place at different points, pre-defined in respect of urban geometry attributes. For the measurements, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station was employed to which a gray globe thermometer was attached. Two thermal indices were used for assessing the overall meteorological conditions and comfort levels in the outdoor locations: physiological equivalent temperature (PET) and universal thermal climate index (UTCI). Our results suggest that thermal sensation in Rio depends to a large extent on the thermal environment as described by air temperature, PET, or UTCI, and that urban geometry (expressed by the sky-view factor (SVF)) may modify this relationship with increased building density associated to warmer sensation votes under moderate heat stress conditions. This relationship however reverses under strong heat stress with warmer sensations in less obstructed locations, and disappears completely under still higher heat stress, where meteorological conditions, and not the site's SVF, will drive thermal sensation.

  2. Outdoor comfort study in Rio de Janeiro: site-related context effects on reported thermal sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, E.; Drach, P.; Broede, P.

    2016-08-01

    Aimed at climate-responsive urban design for tropical areas, the paper attempts to answer the question whether the site-related context affects in some way the perceptual assessment of the microclimate by users of outdoor spaces. Our hypothesis was that visual cues resulting from urban design are important components of the outdoor thermal perception. Monitoring was carried out alongside the administration of standard comfort questionnaires throughout summer periods in 2012-2015 in pedestrian areas of downtown Rio de Janeiro (22° 54 10 S, 43° 12 27 W), Brazil. Campaigns took place at different points, pre-defined in respect of urban geometry attributes. For the measurements, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station was employed to which a gray globe thermometer was attached. Two thermal indices were used for assessing the overall meteorological conditions and comfort levels in the outdoor locations: physiological equivalent temperature (PET) and universal thermal climate index (UTCI). Our results suggest that thermal sensation in Rio depends to a large extent on the thermal environment as described by air temperature, PET, or UTCI, and that urban geometry (expressed by the sky-view factor (SVF)) may modify this relationship with increased building density associated to warmer sensation votes under moderate heat stress conditions. This relationship however reverses under strong heat stress with warmer sensations in less obstructed locations, and disappears completely under still higher heat stress, where meteorological conditions, and not the site's SVF, will drive thermal sensation.

  3. Arteriovenous Access Failure, Stenosis, and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Lok, Charmaine; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular access–related complications can lead to patient morbidity and reduced patient quality of life. Some of the common arteriovenous access complications include failure to mature, stenosis formation, and thrombosis. PMID:28270918

  4. Complications of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bladé, Joan; Rosiñol, Laura

    2007-12-01

    Multiple myeloma, also known as myeloma or plasma cell myeloma, is a progressive hematologic disease. Complications of multiple myeloma include renal insufficiency, hematologic complications (anemia, bone marrow failure, bleeding disorders), infections, bone complications (pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, hyercalcemia), and neurologic complications (spinal cord and nerve root compression, intracranial plasmacytomas, leptomeningeal involvement, among others). This article reviews these various complications connected to multiple myeloma, examining their various causes and possible treatment.

  5. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... that only affects the colon). LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF CROHN’S DISEASE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION The most common complication of Crohn’s disease, obstruction may arise from swelling and the formation ...

  6. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ...

  7. Skin Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  8. Eye Complications in IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  9. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  10. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  11. Pregnancy Complications: Liver Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Liver disorders Liver disorders Now playing: E-mail to a friend ... have blood on them (razors, toothbrushes). Acute fatty liver of pregnancy What is acute fatty liver of ...

  12. Web Accessibility and Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz

    Access to, and movement around, complex online environments, of which the World Wide Web (Web) is the most popular example, has long been considered an important and major issue in the Web design and usability field. The commonly used slang phrase ‘surfing the Web’ implies rapid and free access, pointing to its importance among designers and users alike. It has also been long established that this potentially complex and difficult access is further complicated, and becomes neither rapid nor free, if the user is disabled. There are millions of people who have disabilities that affect their use of the Web. Web accessibility aims to help these people to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with, as well as contribute to, the Web, and thereby the society in general. This accessibility is, in part, facilitated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) currently moving from version one to two. These guidelines are intended to encourage designers to make sure their sites conform to specifications, and in that conformance enable the assistive technologies of disabled users to better interact with the page content. In this way, it was hoped that accessibility could be supported. While this is in part true, guidelines do not solve all problems and the new WCAG version two guidelines are surrounded by controversy and intrigue. This chapter aims to establish the published literature related to Web accessibility and Web accessibility guidelines, and discuss limitations of the current guidelines and future directions.

  13. Arteriovenous fistula complication following MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, Danielle; Junglee, Naushad; Mullins, Paul; Macdonald, Jamie Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Health professionals should be aware of medical procedures that cause vascular access complications. This case describes a haemodialysis patient who experienced pain, swelling and bruising over a radiocephalic fistula following MRI. Exactly the same signs and symptoms were evident following a second scan performed 3 months later. Plausible explanations include a radio frequency-induced electrical current being formed at the arteriovenous fistula, or varying gradients of the MRI sequence stimulating peripheral nerves, leading to a site of increased tissue stimulation. Of note, a juxta-anastomotic venous stenosis was confirmed by fistulogram 4 days after the second scan, although whether this access failure was due to the MRI scan per se could not be ascertained. Nevertheless, these previously undocumented observations suggest that careful patient and fistula monitoring is required when completing MRI scans in those with an arteriovenous fistula. PMID:22927271

  14. Complications of Strabismus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Olitsky, Scott E.; Coats, David K.

    2015-01-01

    All surgeries carry risks of complications, and there is no way to avoid ever having a complication. Strabismus surgery is no different in this regard. There are methods to reduce the risk of a complication during or after surgery, and these steps should always be taken. When a complication occurs, it is important to first recognize it and then manage it appropriately to allow for the best outcome possible. This article will discuss some of the more common and/or most devastating complications that can occur during or after strabismus surgery as well as thoughts on how to avoid them and manage them should they happen. PMID:26180463

  15. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  16. Complications of prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Zapała, Lukasz; Cordeiro, Ernesto; Antoniewicz, Artur; Dimitriadis, Georgios; De Reijke, Theo

    2013-07-01

    Biopsy of the prostate is a common procedure with minor complications that are usually self-limited. However, if one considers that millions of men undergo biopsy worldwide, one realizes that although complication rate is low, the number of patients suffering from biopsy complications should not be underestimated and can be a clinically relevant problem for healthcare professionals. In this review, the authors present diagnosis and management of postbiopsy of prostate complications. Bleeding is the most common complication observed after prostate biopsy, but the use of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not an absolute contraindication to prostate biopsy. Emerging resistance to ciprofloxacin is the most probable cause of the increasing risk of infectious complications after prostate biopsy. Even though extremely rare, fatal complications are possible and were described in case reports.

  17. Quality, Range, and Legibility in Web Sites Related to Orofacial Functions

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Ferrari, Deborah Viviane; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Plenty of information about health is available on the Internet; however, quality and legibility are not always evaluated. Knowledge regarding orofacial functions can be considered important for the population because it allows proper stimulus, early diagnosis, and prevention of the oral myofunctional alterations during early infancy. Objective The aim was evaluate the quality, legibility, and range of Web sites available in Brazilian Portuguese regarding the orofacial functions. Methods Selected Web sites with information directed to parents/caregivers of babies regarding breast-feeding, feeding after 6 months, deleterious oral habits, and breathing and speech were studied. The Web sites were evaluated through the application of Flesch Reading Ease Test and aspects of the Health on the Net (HON) modified code (HONCode); the range of the subjects addressed was compared with other aspects of infant development. Results From the access of 350 pages of the Internet, 35 Web sites were selected and 315 excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. In relation to legibility, Web sites scored an average of 61.23% in the Flesch Test, and the application of the modified HONCode showed an average of 6.43 points; an average of 2.49 subjects were found per Web site evaluated, with information on breast-feeding being more frequent and subjects such as breathing and speech less frequent. Conclusions Web sites that deal with orofacial functions presented standard legibility classification. Only half of the ethical principles were considered by the modified HONCode in their majority, and most addressed subjects after “breast-feeding” were presented with restricted range. PMID:25992036

  18. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Amerasekera, S S H; Jones, C M; Patel, R; Cleasby, M J

    2009-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  19. Arteriovenous Vascular Access Selection and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Jennifer M; Oliver, Matthew; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M; Moist, Louise

    2016-01-01

    When making decisions regarding vascular access creation, the clinician and vascular access team must evaluate each patient individually with consideration of life expectancy, timelines for dialysis start, risks and benefits of access creation, referral wait times, as well as the risk for access complications. The role of the multidisciplinary team in facilitating access choice is reviewed, as well as the clinical evaluation of the patient.

  20. Arteriovenous Vascular Access Selection and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Oliver, Matthew; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.; Moist, Louise

    2016-01-01

    When making decisions regarding vascular access creation, the clinician and vascular access team must evaluate each patient individually with consideration of life expectancy, timelines for dialysis start, risks and benefits of access creation, referral wait times, as well as the risk for access complications. The role of the multidisciplinary team in facilitating access choice is reviewed, as well as the clinical evaluation of the patient. PMID:28270917

  1. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  2. Complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Orrù, Emanuele; Roccatagliata, Luca; Cester, Giacomo; Causin, Francesco; Castellan, Lucio

    2013-10-01

    The number of neuroendovascular treatments of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has increased substantially in the last two decades. Complications of endovascular treatments of cerebral aneurysms are rare but can potentially lead to acute worsening of the neurological status, to new neurological deficits or death. Some of the possible complications, such as vascular access site complications or systemic side effects associated with contrast medium (e.g. contrast medium allergy, contrast induced nephropathy) can also be encountered in diagnostic angiography. The most common complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms are related to acute thromboembolic events and perforation of the aneurysm. Overall, the reported rate of thromboembolic complications ranges between 4.7% and 12.5% while the rate of intraprocedural rupture of cerebral aneurysms is about 0.7% in patients with unruptured aneurysms and about 4.1% in patients with previously ruptured aneurysms. Thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications may occur during different phases of endovascular procedures and are related to different technical, clinical and anatomic reasons. A thorough knowledge of the different aspects of these complications can reduce the risk of their occurrence and minimize their clinical sequelae. A deep understanding of complications and of their management is thus part of the best standard of care.

  3. Complications of Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Anjeni; Peters, Anju T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic rhinitis involves inflammation of the upper airways. An association with comorbid conditions, such as rhinosinusitis, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, has been commonly observed in epidemiologic studies. The underlying pathogenesis of these disorders may be similar. Complications of rhinitis include sleep disturbances, learning impairment, and decreased quality of life. It is vital to recognize the complications of rhinitis so that treatment strategies can address rhinitis as well as its comorbidities and complications in a coordinated manner.

  4. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  5. Postpancreatectomy Complications and Management.

    PubMed

    Malleo, Giuseppe; Vollmer, Charles M

    2016-12-01

    Although mortality rates after pancreatectomy have decreased, the incidence of postoperative morbidity remains high. The major procedure-related complications are pancreatic fistula, delayed gastric emptying, and postpancreatectomy hemorrhage. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery defined leading complications in a standardized fashion, allowing unbiased comparison of operative results and management strategies. Risk factors for postoperative complications have been investigated and quantitative scoring systems established to estimate patient-specific risks. Management of postpancreatectomy complications has shifted from an operative to a conservative approach. Nevertheless, postoperative morbidities may have a profound impact on patient recovery and length of hospital stay and are associated with increased hospital costs.

  6. [Complications of body piercing].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, L; Madrid, C; Odman-Jaques, M; Yersin, B; Carnon, P N

    2014-03-19

    The trend of body piercing has grown in popularity in the past decade within the general population and especially among young adults. Complications of body piercing include local inflammation and infections, but severe complications are also possible and largely underestimated. People are usually not aware of the risks before making a piercing, and their medical history, medication and comorbidities are largely neglected by the people who realise the piercing. This article presents a review of the complications that a primary care physician may observe, for a patient who wishes to make a piercing, or presents complications due to the implementation of such a device.

  7. Neurologic Complications and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Welch, Kevin C

    2015-10-01

    Risk is inherent with all surgical procedures. Most endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is uncomplicated. Among the many complications inherent with ESS are the neurologic complications, which include cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, traumatic soft tissue and vascular injuries, infection, and seizures. Despite intense review of a patient's preoperative scans, use of stereotactic image guidance, and an expert understanding of anatomy, neurologic complications occur. An understanding of these complications and how to manage them can help to reduce long-term patient injury as well as help prevent recurrence.

  8. Central venous access.

    PubMed

    Ganeshan, Arul; Warakaulle, Dinuke R; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access plays an important role in the management of an ever-increasing population of patients ranging from those that are critically ill to patients with difficult clinical access. Interventional radiologists are key in delivering this service and should be familiar with the wide range of techniques and catheters now available to them. A comprehensive description of these catheters with regard to indications, technical aspects of catheterization, success rates, and associated early and late complications, as well as a review of various published guidelines on central venous catheter insertion are given in this article.

  9. Patency and complications of translumbar dialysis catheters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. Results There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/min) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter and total catheter were 65, 84 and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6 and 12 months were 43%, 25% and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion This study data suggests that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  10. Complications in percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Kyriazis, Iason; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Özsoy, Mehmet; Vasilas, Marinos; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2015-08-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is generally considered a safe technique offering the highest stone-free rates after the first treatment as compared to the other minimal invasive lithotripsy techniques. Still, serious complications although rare should be expected following this percutaneous procedure. In this work, the most common and important complications associated with PCNL are being reviewed focusing on the perioperative risk factors, current management, and preventing measures that need to be taken to reduce their incidence. In addition, complication reporting is being criticized given the absence of a universal consensus on PCNL complications description. Complications such as perioperative bleeding, urine leak from nephrocutaneous fistula, pelvicalyceal system injury, and pain are individually graded as complications by various authors and are responsible for a significant variation in the reported overall PCNL complication rate, rendering comparison of morbidity between studies almost impossible. Due to the latter, a universally accepted grading system specialized for the assessment of PCNL-related complications and standardized for each variation of PCNL technique is deemed necessary.

  11. A "Needling" Complication.

    PubMed

    Banerji, John S; Govier, Fred E

    2016-11-01

    Intracavernosal injection therapy with vasoactive agents for treatment of erectile dysfunction has been around for more than 3 decades since its advent in the early 1980s. Common complications include ecchymosis and hematoma at the site of injection, priapism, and fibrosis. We describe a rare but potentially dangerous complication of breakage of needle during administering of injections, and discuss its successful retrieval.

  12. COMPLICATIONS IN HIP ARTHROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Marcos Emílio Kuschnaroff; Hoffmann, Rafael Barreiros; de Araújo, Lúcio Cappelli Toledo; Dani, William Sotau; José Berral, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of complications in a series of consecutive cases of hip arthroscopy; to assess the progression of the sample through a learning curve; and to recognize the causes of complications in arthroscopic hip operations. Method: 150 consecutive cases that underwent hip arthroscopy between May 2004 and December 2008 were evaluated. The complications encountered were classified in three ways: organic system affected, severity and groups of 50 consecutive cases. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test. Results: We observed 15 complications in this study (10%): ten were neurological, two were osteoarticular, one was vascular-ischemic and two were cutaneous. In the classification of severity, three were classified as major, 12 as intermediate and none as minor. The incidence of complications over the course of the learning curve did not present any statistically significant difference (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Hip arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that involves low morbidity, but which presents complications in some cases. These complications are frequently neurological and transitory, and mainly occur because of joint traction. The complication rate did not decrease with progression of our sample. PMID:27022521

  13. Pregnancy Complications: Shoulder Dystocia

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe cases, which are rare, this can cause brain damage and even death. Complications for the mother include: Heavy bleeding after ... severe cases, which are rare, this can cause brain damage and even death. Complications for the mother include: Heavy bleeding after ...

  14. Post dengue neurological complication.

    PubMed

    Hasliza, A H; Tohid, H; Loh, K Y; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case.

  15. Complications following hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    As the number of liver resections in the United States has increased, operations are more commonly performed on older patients with multiple comorbidities. The advent of effective chemotherapy and techniques such as portal vein embolization, have compounded the number of increasingly complex resections taking up to 75% of healthy livers. Four potentially devastating complications of liver resection include postoperative hemorrhage, venous thromboembolism, bile leak, and post-hepatectomy liver failure. The risk factors and management of these complications are herein explored, stressing the importance of identifying preoperative factors that can decrease the risk for these potentially fatal complications.

  16. Vascular access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, R; Ringoir, S

    1994-04-01

    Indwelling central venous catheters were consecutively used as access for acute and chronic hemodialysis, emergency treatment of pulmonary fluid overload, intoxication and electrolyte disturbances, plasmapheresis, and semiacute continuous dialysis strategies, such as continuous arteriovenous hemofiltration (CAVH). Modification in catheter structure also made it possible to use this access for long-term treatment (e.g., surgically insertable catheters [Hickman], soft large-bore catheters for blind insertion). We discuss the remaining open questions in this field: Which is the insertion site of preference (i.e., subclavian, femoral, or deep jugular)? Should we prefer stiff or soft catheters? Should soft catheters be positioned surgically or is blind insertion by nonsurgeons as adequate? Is it necessary to couple catheter insertion to adjuvant techniques, such as echographic guidance, to reduce complications? Is the currently used polymer structure of the catheters acceptable? Should catheter dialysis be used with single or double vascular access?

  17. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neurological complications of AIDS. Some disorders require aggressive therapy while others are treated symptomatically. Medicines range ... certain bacterial infections, and penicillin to treat neurosyphilis. Aggressive antiretroviral therapy is used to treat AIDS dementia ...

  18. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Serology Publications and Resources Multimedia MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  19. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Lymphedema? What Causes Lymphedema What is the Lymphatic System? Signs and Symptoms Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage ... is Lymphedema? What Causes Lymphedema What is the Lymphatic System? Signs and Symptoms Infection and Other Complications NLN ...

  20. Atrial Fibrillation: Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Complications Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... two major complications—stroke and heart failure. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Click to enlarge image This illustration ...

  1. Complications of Circumcision

    PubMed Central

    Krill, Aaron J.; Palmer, Lane S.; Palmer, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, circumcision is a commonly performed procedure. It is a relatively safe procedure with a low overall complication rate. Most complications are minor and can be managed easily. Though uncommon, complications of circumcision do represent a significant percentage of cases seen by pediatric urologists. Often they require surgical correction that results in a significant cost to the health care system. Severe complications are quite rare, but death has been reported as a result in some cases. A thorough and complete preoperative evaluation, focusing on bleeding history and birth history, is imperative. Proper selection of patients based on age and anatomic considerations as well as proper sterile surgical technique are critical to prevent future circumcision-related adverse events. PMID:22235177

  2. Chickenpox (Varicella) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Chickenpox (Varicella) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chickenpox Home About Chickenpox Signs & Symptoms Complications Transmission Prevention & ...

  3. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient & Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Neurological Complications of AIDS Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump ... Where can I get more information? What is AIDS? AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is a condition ...

  4. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  5. Early complications. Respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Zwischenberger, J B; Alpard, S K; Bidani, A

    1999-08-01

    Pulmonary complications following thoracic surgery are common and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Respiratory failure after pneumonectomy occurs in approximately 5% to 15% of cases and significantly increases patient mortality. Strategies for ventilator support are based on the nature of the underlying complication and the pathophysiology of respiratory failure. This article describes the cause and pathophysiology of respiratory failure and pulmonary embolus postpneumonectomy. Diagnosis, management, and innovative therapies are also reviewed.

  6. Venous Access Devices: Clinical Rounds

    PubMed Central

    Matey, Laurl; Camp-Sorrell, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Nursing management of venous access devices (VADs) requires knowledge of current evidence, as well as knowledge of when evidence is limited. Do you know which practices we do based on evidence and those that we do based on institutional history or preference? This article will present complex VAD infection and occlusion complications and some of the controversies associated with them. Important strategies for identifying these complications, troubleshooting, and evaluating the evidence related to lack of blood return, malposition, infection, access and maintenance protocols, and scope of practice issues are presented. PMID:28083553

  7. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  8. Complications in Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent developments in hip arthroscopic techniques and technology have made it possible in many cases to avoid open surgical dislocation for treating a variety of pathology in the hip. Although early reports suggest favourable results’ using hip arthroscopy and it has been shown to be a relatively safe procedure, complications do exist and can sometimes lead to significant morbidity. Methods This is a review article. The aim of this manuscript is to present the most frequent and/or serious complications that could occur at or following hip arthroscopy and some guidelines to avoid these complications. Conclusion Most complications of hip arthroscopy are minor or transient but serious complications can occur as well. A lot of complication e.g. acetabular labral puncture go unreported. Appropriate education and training, precise and meticulous surgical technique with correct instrumentation, the right indication in the right patient and adherence to advice from mentors and experienced colleagues are all essential factors for a successful outcome. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066747

  9. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies.

  10. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  11. Treating Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The death of a loved one is one of life’s greatest, universal stressors to which most bereaved individuals successfully adapt without clinical intervention. For a minority of bereaved individuals, grief is complicated by superimposed problems and healing does not occur. The resulting syndrome of complicated grief causes substantial distress and functional impairment even years after a loss, yet knowing when and how to intervene can be a challenge. OBJECTIVE To discuss the differential diagnosis, risk factors for and management of complicated grief based on available evidence and clinical observations. EVIDENCE REVIEW MEDLINE was searched from January 1990 to October 2012. Additional citations were procured from references of select research and review articles. Available treatment studies targeting complicated grief were included. RESULTS A strong research literature led to inclusion of complicated grief in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) (termed persistent complex bereavement disorder as a subtype of other specified trauma and stressor-related disorders), although it is a condition for which more research is formally recommended, and there is still ongoing discussion about the optimal name and diagnostic criteria for the disorder. Reliable screening instruments are available, and the estimated prevalence rate is 7% of bereaved people. Randomized controlled data support the efficacy of a targeted psychotherapy including elements that foster resolution of complicating problems and facilitate the natural healing process. Preliminary studies suggest antidepressant medications may be helpful. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Individuals with complicated grief have greater risk of adverse health outcomes, should be diagnosed and assessed for suicide risk and comorbid conditions such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, and should be considered for treatment. PMID:23917292

  12. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  13. [Complications of tubal sterilization].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, W E

    1986-05-01

    In Europe and the US, tubal sterilization by laparoscopy has become the most widely used technique for female sterilization. The overall rate of intra- and postoperative complications differs between 0.145% and 0.85% in the numerous studies which have been done. This means 1 severe complication in 120-700 laparoscopic sterilizations. The lethality of tubal sterilization by laparoscopy lies between 3-10 deaths/100,000 interventions. The so-called "post-tubal ligation syndrome" is a rare complication. The overall pregnancy rate after tubal sterilization is 3-10/1000 women. The rate of ectopic pregnancy is very high and varies between 13.6% and 90%. Only 5% of the sterilized women show dissatisfaction. Several factors are relevant with regard to psychological sequelae and must be considered before tubal sterilization can be performed. 1 of the most important is the individual comprehensive counselling of the female or the couple prior to the sterilization.

  14. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  15. Jejunal access loop cholangiogram and intervention using image guided access.

    PubMed

    Amitha Vikrama, K S; Keshava, S N; Surendrababu, N R S; Moses, V; Joseph, P; Vyas, F; Sitaram, V

    2010-02-01

    Jejunal access loop is fashioned in patients who undergo Roux en Y hepaticojejunostomy and biliary intervention is anticipated on follow up. Post-operative study of the biliary tree through the access loop is usually done under fluoroscopic guidance. We present a series of 20 access loop cholangiograms performed in our institution between August 2004 and November 2008. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the procedure and to highlight the role of CT guidance in procuring access. Access loop was accessed using CT (n = 13), ultrasound (n = 3) or fluoroscopic guidance (n = 4). Fluoroscopy was used for performing cholangiograms and interventions. Twelve studies had balloon plasty of the stricture at anastomotic site or high up in the hepatic ducts. Seven studies showed normal cholangiogram. Plasty was unsuccessful in one study. Technical success in accessing the jejunal access loop was 100%; in cannulation of anastomotic site and balloon plasty it was 95%. One case required two attempts. Procedure-related complications were not seen. All patients who underwent balloon plasty of the stricture were doing well for variable lengths of time. Access loop cholangiogram and interventions are safe and effective. CT guidance in locating/procuring the access loop is a good technique.

  16. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  17. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  18. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  19. Candida endophthalmitis: an unusual complication of prolonged intravenous access

    PubMed Central

    Vose, M; Beatty, S; Charles, S

    2001-01-01

    A 16 year old boy awaiting a defunctioning colostomy for Crohn's disease complained of reduced vision in his left eye. Four weeks previously candida had been isolated from his central line used for parenteral feeds. Fundal examination of the left eye revealed a macular abscess with a classic "string of pearls" appearance of multiple vitreous abscesses. This was treated with pars plana vitrectomy and intravitreal antifungal therapy. Microbiological studies confirmed a diagnosis of candida endophthalmitis.


Keywords: candida; endophthalmitis; intravitreal PMID:11161082

  20. [Septic complications of gonorrhea].

    PubMed

    Ebner, H; Gebhart, W

    1976-09-01

    Septic gonococcal complications consist in intermittent fever, arthralgia and skin lesions. In recent years predominantly females suffering from this disease were observed. This diagnosis is made by the demonstration of gonococcal infection combined with the above mentioned clinical symptoms. A further confirmation is possible by blood culture and the demonstration of gonococci in skin lesions or joint fluid.

  1. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  2. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K

    2015-10-09

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman's physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up.

  3. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  4. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  5. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  6. Improved hemodialysis access in children.

    PubMed

    Applebaum, H; Shashikumar, V L; Somers, L A; Baluarte, H J; Gruskin, A B; Grossman, M; McGarvey, M J; Weintraub, W H

    1980-12-01

    Vascular access for chronic hemodialysis in children is difficult because of problems that include obtaining vessels of sufficient size, the limited life-span of external shunts, and the multiple painful punctures associated with internal fistulae. Twenty-five expanded polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE) grafts of 6-mm diameter were inserted for dialysis access over a 2-yr period in 23 children. Grafts were placed either in the upper arm or thigh. Each patient was successfully dialyzed from 60 to 370 times. Longterm patency of the PTFE grafts was 88%, with a complication rate of 36%, mostly minor. The same ease of insertion and high flow characteristics were noted in a series of 22 bovine carotid heterograft (BCH) fistulae inserted in the two years immediately preceeding this study. However, the patency rate was only 36% and the complication rate was 69%, mostly major. We consider the PTFE graft fistula to be the preferred method for long-term hemodialysis access in children.

  7. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  8. A Site-Related Suitability Analysis for the Production of Biomass as a Contribution to Sustainable Regional Land-Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Michael; Helms, Yvonne; Herberg, Alfred; Köppen, Antje; Kunzmann, Kathrin; Radtke, Dörte; Ross, Lutz; Itzerott, Sibylle

    2008-04-01

    The use of renewable energy in Europe offers the possibility of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and contributes to energy security and independence. With the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and a variety of recently introduced national directives supporting renewable energy sources in the European Union, the economic attractiveness of bioenergy production has distinctly increased. This article combines an economic evaluation of biomass production with site-related natural conditions of the Havelland region, situated in the north-east area of Germany. Two methods for evaluating site-specific potential biomass yields were compared. For three example biomass crops, evaluations of yield estimations at agricultural lots for site-optimized suitability (SOS) and conventional suitability (CS) were carried out. Both modelling approaches were compared. The results of the GIS modelling indicate that the financial support for increasing the use of renewable energy with the German feed-in system, called Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG), will possibly lead to an increased cultivation of crops with high biomass output. This monocultural orientation of farming practices and the negative effects on the ecosystem could act in opposition to other environmental initiatives of the EU. The outputs of the SOS analysis show that high biomass production could be integrated into environmental policy proposals. Therefore, new EU policy should take modified subsidies into consideration in order to avoid developing conflicts between small-scale changes in landscape ecosystems caused by large-scale transformations in energy policy.

  9. A site-related suitability analysis for the production of biomass as a contribution to sustainable regional land-use.

    PubMed

    Förster, Michael; Helms, Yvonne; Herberg, Alfred; Köppen, Antje; Kunzmann, Kathrin; Radtke, Dörte; Ross, Lutz; Itzerott, Sibylle

    2008-04-01

    The use of renewable energy in Europe offers the possibility of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and contributes to energy security and independence. With the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and a variety of recently introduced national directives supporting renewable energy sources in the European Union, the economic attractiveness of bioenergy production has distinctly increased. This article combines an economic evaluation of biomass production with site-related natural conditions of the Havelland region, situated in the north-east area of Germany. Two methods for evaluating site-specific potential biomass yields were compared. For three example biomass crops, evaluations of yield estimations at agricultural lots for site-optimized suitability (SOS) and conventional suitability (CS) were carried out. Both modelling approaches were compared. The results of the GIS modelling indicate that the financial support for increasing the use of renewable energy with the German feed-in system, called Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG), will possibly lead to an increased cultivation of crops with high biomass output. This monocultural orientation of farming practices and the negative effects on the ecosystem could act in opposition to other environmental initiatives of the EU. The outputs of the SOS analysis show that high biomass production could be integrated into environmental policy proposals. Therefore, new EU policy should take modified subsidies into consideration in order to avoid developing conflicts between small-scale changes in landscape ecosystems caused by large-scale transformations in energy policy.

  10. Standardized Definitions for Hemodialysis Vascular Access

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timmy; Mokrzycki, Michele; Moist, Louise; Maya, Ivan; Vazquez, Miguel; Lok, Charmaine

    2014-01-01

    Vascular access dysfunction is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among end-stage renal disease patients 1,2. Vascular access dysfunction exists in all 3 types of available accesses: arteriovenous fistulas, arteriovenous grafts, and tunneled catheters. In order to improve clinical research and outcomes in hemodialysis access dysfunction, the development of a multidisciplinary network of collaborative investigators with various areas of expertise, and common standards for terminology and classification in all vascular access types is required. The North American Vascular Access Consortium (NAVAC) is a newly formed multidisciplinary and multicenter network of experts in the area of hemodialysis vascular access, who include nephrologists and interventional nephrologists from the United States and Canada with: (1) a primary clinical and research focus in hemodialysis vascular access dysfunction, (2) national and internationally recognized experts in vascular access, and (3) a history of productivity measured by peer-reviewed publications and funding among members of this consortium. The consortium’s mission is to improve the quality and efficiency in vascular access research, and impact the research in the area of hemodialysis vascular access by conducting observational studies and randomized controlled trials. The purpose of the consortium’s initial manuscript is to provide working and standard vascular access definitions relating to (1) epidemiology, (2) vascular access function, (3) vascular access patency, and (4) complications in vascular accesses relating to each of the vascular access types. PMID:21906166

  11. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  12. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Louise E; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A

    2015-11-30

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question.

  13. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  14. Neurologic complications of immunizations.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, S L; Snead, O C

    1986-12-01

    Although there does appear to be at least a temporal relationship between pertussis immunization and serious acute neurologic illness, data to suggest that children with stable preexisting neurologic disease or positive family history of neurologic disease are at increased risk for complications of pertussis immunizations are inconclusive. Furthermore, there are no firm statistical data concerning the incidence of pertussis vaccine-related encephalopathy. Rather, the literature on pertussis vaccine complications is replete with anecdotal reports and retrospective studies with a number of questionable conclusions drawn from this inadequate data base. Unfortunately, these conclusions have been sensationalized and exploited with litigious fervor to the point that the practice of pertussis immunization is being questioned in the United States. A number of points should be reiterated: pertussis is a dangerous and deadly disease, as seen in the epidemic in Great Britain; pertussis immunization is effective in protecting against the disease; and there is no conclusive proof that the incidence of complications from pertussis vaccination of children with seizure disorders or other preexisting stable neurologic abnormalities is higher, because appropriate studies have not been done to define such a risk. We would do well to keep these facts in mind in order to avoid a disaster similar to the pertussis epidemic in Great Britain. Pertussis vaccination should be given to all children except those with allergic hypersensitivity, a progressive neurologic disorder, or an adverse reaction to a previous pertussis dose.

  15. Keratomycosis complicating pterygium excision.

    PubMed

    Merle, Harold; Guyomarch, Jérôme; Joyaux, Jean-Christophe; Dueymes, Maryvonne; Donnio, Angélique; Desbois, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a case of keratomycosis that appeared after the exeresis of a pterygium. A 48-year-old patient had been referred with a red right eye associated with an abscess of the cornea along the ablation zone of the pterygium. The surgery had been performed a month beforehand. The abscess was 6 mm high and 4 mm wide. The authors instigated a treatment that included amphotericin B (0.25%) after noticing a clinical aspect evoking a fungal keratitis and finding several septate filaments on direct examination. On day 10, a Fusarium dimerum was isolated on Sabouraud agar. After 15 days of treatment, the result was favorable and the size of the ulceration as well as the size of the abscess had progressively decreased. The antifungal treatment was definitively stopped at 14 weeks. Infectious-related complications of the pterygium surgery are rare and are essentially caused by bacterial agents. Secondary infections by fungus are rare. There have been two previous cases reported: one that appeared 15 years after radiotherapy and another that appeared at 3 weeks post surgery, consecutive to the use of mitomycin C. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of a keratomycosis due to F. dimerum reported that complicated the exeresis of a pterygium without the use of an adjuvant antihealing treatment. Pterygium surgery is a common procedure; nevertheless, ophthalmologists need to be aware of the existence of potential infectious complications.

  16. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  17. Vascular access in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Pittiruti, Mauro; Biffi, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Adequate vascular access is of paramount importance in oncology patients. It is important in the initial phase of surgical treatment or chemotherapy, as well as in the chronic management of advanced cancer and in the palliative care setting. We present an overview of the available vascular access devices and of the most relevant issues regarding insertion and management of vascular access. Particular emphasis is given to the use of ultrasound guidance as the preferred technique of insertion, which has dramatically decreased insertion-related complications. Vascular access management has considerably improved after the publication of effective guidelines for the appropriate nursing of the vascular device, which has reduced the risk of late complications, such as catheter-related bloodstream infection. However, many areas of clinical practice are still lacking an evidence-based background, such as the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device in each clinical situation, as well as prevention and treatment of thrombosis. We suggest an approach to the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device for the oncology patient, based on the literature available to date.

  18. Anti-Leu3a induces combining site-related anti-idiotypic antibody without inducing anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Reeves, J P; Buck, D; Berkower, I; Murphy, D; Epstein, S L

    1991-01-01

    Development of a vaccine for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has proven difficult, and so alternative approaches such as idiotypic manipulation have been suggested. As applied to AIDS, this approach could involve immunizing with an anti-CD4 antibody resembling gp120, to induce anti-idiotypic antibodies which would bind to gp120. The CD4 binding site on gp120 is conserved, and so, such an immune response should protect against all variants. Induction of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunity has been reported using anti-Leu3a, and this result has led to testing in humans. Negative results obtained by others have been attributed to differences in immunization protocols. Because of the importance of this question, we reinvestigated the potential of anti-Leu3a to induce anti-HIV antibodies, compared with control immunizations with OKT4A (another anti-CD4 antibody) and the irrelevant Ig MOPC-21. Responses to anti-Leu3a showed induction of high-titer anti-idiotypic activity, and included combining-site-related activity. Yet sera showed no binding to gp160 above controls and no detectable neutralizing activity in a sensitive HIV plaque assay, so the anti-idiotypes induced were not internal images of CD4. We conclude that the pronounced anti-HIV responses reported with anti-Leu3a cannot be generalized, and thus that anti-Leu3a does not offer promise as an HIV vaccine. However, these results do not negate the promise of the idiotypic approach, and a vaccine for AIDS based on idiotype manipulation remains a possibility.

  19. Pregnancy complicated with agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Sun, Jiang-Li; Zhang, Zheng-Liang; Pei, Hong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Pregnancy is a complicated physiological process. Physiological leukocytosis often takes place and it is primarily related to the increased circulation of neutrophils, especially during the last trimester of pregnancy. Noncongenital agranulocytosis during pregnancy is rare and reported only occasionally, while in most of the cases, the agranulocytosis has already occurred prior to pregnancy or induced by identified factors such as antibiotics, antithyroid agents, or cytotoxic agents. Gestation-induced agranulocytosis has not been reported, so we present a case of gestation-induced agranulocytosis in this article. Patients concern: In this case, we present a Chinese woman (aged 25) in her 38th week of the first gestation who had the complication of agranulocytosis. No abnormality was detected in regular examinations before pregnancy and in the first trimester. Since the last trimester of pregnancy, the patient began to suffer from agranulocytosis and intermittent fever, the maximum being temperature 38.8°C. At admission, the neutrophil granulocytes were 0.17 × 109 L−1 and the bone marrow biopsy showed that agranulocytosis was detected, but the levels of red blood cell and megalokaryocyte were normal. In addition, antinuclear antibodies were detected at a dilution of 1:40, but anti-dsDNA, antiphospholipid antibody, and neutrophil granulocyte antibody were negative. Diagnoses: The patient was empirically treated as having pneumonia. Interventions: We tried to use granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, γ-globulin, glucocorticoids, antibiotics, and antifungi agents to treat the patient, but her symptoms were not alleviated until the patient had a cesarean section. Outcomes: After 24 hours of cesarean section, the temperature and neutrophil granulocyte returned to normal. After a year of follow-up, we found that the patient and the baby were healthy. Lessons: Agranulocytosis during pregnancy seems to be associated with immunosuppression

  20. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  1. [Complications of hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    The most common and serious complications of haemorrhoids include perianal thrombosis and incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids with subsequent thrombosis. They are characterised by severe pain in the perianal region possibly with bleeding. In a short history of the perianal thrombosis, acute surgical incision or excision is indicated, which can result in rapid relief of the painful symptoms. In incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids, emergency haemorrhoidectomy may also be indicated. Segmental haemorrhoidectomy in the most affected quadrants followed by further elective surgery for haemorrhoids in the next stage is preferred.

  2. Unexpected complication of colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Ramesh; Pee, Leon

    2017-01-16

    The authors present a rare case of a 71-year-old man presenting with large bowel obstruction after attempted colonoscopy. The procedure was impossible to complete due to a tight sigmoid stricture and the patient presented with an acute abdomen the following day. He was managed conservatively and discharged before returning for an elective laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy. The potential differentials of an acute abdomen post-colonoscopy are discussed and the literature reviewed on this rare complication. Finally, the authors review whether there is pressure on endoscopists to 'complete' colonoscopies (by achieving caecal intubation) based on regulatory indices in quality, and how this might have to be disregarded in unfavourable circumstances.

  3. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis.

  4. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  5. Complications associated with orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    While most patients undergo orthognathic surgery for aesthetic purposes, aesthetic improvements are most often followed by postoperative functional complications. Therefore, patients must carefully decide whether their purpose of undergoing orthognathic surgery lies on the aesthetic side or the functional side. There is a wide variety of complications associated with orthognathic surgery. There should be a clear distinction between malpractice and complications. Complications can be resolved without any serious problems if the cause is detected early and adequate treatment provided. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must have a full understanding of the types, causes, and treatment of complications, and should deliver this information to patients who develop these complications. PMID:28280704

  6. Vascular access today

    PubMed Central

    Pantelias, Konstantinos; Grapsa, Eirini

    2012-01-01

    The number of patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement therapy has increased worldwide. The most common replacement therapy is hemodialysis (HD). Vascular access (VA) has a key role for successful treatment. Despite the advances that have taken place in the field of the HD procedure, few things have changed with regards to VA in recent years. Arteriovenous fistula (AVF), polytetrafluoroethylene graft and the cuffed double lumen silicone catheter are the most common used for VA. In the long term, a number of complications may present and more than one VA is needed during the HD life. The most common complications for all of VA types are thrombosis, bleeding and infection, the most common cause of morbidity in these patients. It has been estimated that VA dysfunction is responsible for 20% of all hospitalizations. The annual cost of placing and looking after dialysis VA in the United States exceeds 1 billion dollars per year. A good functional access is also vital in order to deliver adequate HD therapy. It seems that the native AVF that Brescia and Cimino described in 1966 still remains the first choice for VA. The native forearm AVFs have the longest survival and require the fewest interventions. For this reason, the forearm AVF is the first choice, followed by the upper-arm AVF, the arteriovenous graft and the cuffed central venous catheter is the final choice. In conclusion, VA remains the most important issue for patients on HD and despite the technical improvements, a number of problems and complications have to be resolved. PMID:24175244

  7. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  8. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  9. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  10. Ultrasound guidance for vascular access.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Paul-André C; Kendall, John L

    2004-08-01

    The evidence that supports the general application of US guidance for venous access in the ED has reached a critical mass. The increasing familiarity of emergency physicians with US and the recent focus on patient safety and clinical outcomes has intensified attention on the capacity for US to improve patient care in the ED. US guidance can increase the safety and efficiency of venous access procedures and offers improved outcomes. The potential for these improvements is compelling, especially among certain types of ED patients such as those with difficult or complicated access. Varying levels of evidence support the use of US guidance over the traditional landmark approach for venous access in adult and pediatric populations and for central and peripheral veins. Many different techniques may be applied, depending on the clinical situation and equipment available.

  11. Early complications with the holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Stewart, Steven C.; Ruckle, Herbert C.; Poon, Michael W.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to report early complications in our initial experience with the holmium laser in 133 patients. A retrospective study of patients undergoing endourological procedures with the holmium laser was performed. Complications included urinary tract infection (3), post-operative bradycardia (1), inverted T-waves (1), intractable flank pain (1), urinary retention (1), inability to access a lower pole calyx with a 365 micron fiber (9), stone migration (5), termination of procedure due to poor visualization (2). No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred. The holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. In our initial experience, the holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of genitourinary pathology. Use of laser fibers larger than 200 microns occasionally limit deflection into a lower pole or dependent calyx.

  12. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long-term complications of diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, ... other tests. All these may help you keep complications of diabetes away. You will need to check your blood ...

  13. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  14. Complications of endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, C; Luigiano, C; Cennamo, V; Ferrara, F; Pellicano, R; Polifemo, A M; Tarantino, I; Barresi, L; Morace, C; Consolo, P; D'Imperio, N

    2011-06-01

    Since its development in the 1980s, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has undergone a great deal of technological modifications. EUS has become an important tool in the evaluation of patients with various clinical disorders and is increasingly being utilized in many centers. EUS has been evolving over the years; EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) for cytological and/or histological diagnosis has become standard practice and a wide array of interventional and therapeutic procedures are performed under EUS guidance for diseases which otherwise would have needed surgery, with its associated morbidities. EUS shares the risks and complications of other endoscopic procedures. This article addresses the specific adverse effects and risks associated with EUS, EUS-FNA and interventional EUS, namely perforation, bleeding, pancreatitis and infection. Measures to help minimizing these risks will also be discussed.

  15. Postoperative complications of spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Swann, Matthew C; Hoes, Kathryn S; Aoun, Salah G; McDonagh, David L

    2016-03-01

    A variety of surgical approaches are available for the treatment of spine diseases. Complications can arise intraoperatively, in the immediate postoperative period, or in a delayed fashion. These complications may lead to severe or even permanent morbidity if left unrecognized and untreated [1-4]. Here we review a range of complications in the early postoperative period from more benign complications such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) to more feared complications leading to permanent loss of neurological function or death [5]. Perioperative pain management is covered in a separate review (Chapter 8).

  16. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  17. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis ...

  18. Dermatological complications of obesity.

    PubMed

    García Hidalgo, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a health problem of considerable magnitude in the Western world. Dermatological changes have been reported in patients with obesity, including: acanthosis nigricans and skin tags (due to insulin resistance); hyperandrogenism; striae due to over extension; stasis pigmentation due to peripheral vascular disease; lymphedema; pathologies associated with augmented folds; morphologic changes in the foot anatomy due to excess load; and complications that may arise from hospitalization. Acanthosis nigricans plaques can be managed by improved control of hyperinsulinemia; the vitamin D3 analog calcipitriol has also been shown to be effective. Skin tags can be removed by snipping with curved scissors, by cryotherapy or by electrodesiccation. Hyperandrogenism, a result of increased production of endogenous androgens due to increased volumes of adipose tissue (which synthesizes testosterone) and hyperinsulinemia (which increases the production of ovarian androgens) needs to be carefully assessed to ensure disorders such as virilizing tumors and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are treated appropriately. Treatment of hyperandrogenism should be centred on controlling insulin levels; weight loss, oral contraceptive and antiandrogenic therapies are also possible treatment options. The etiology of striae distensae, also known as stretch marks, is yet to be defined and treatment options are unsatisfactory at present; striae rubra and alba have been treated with a pulsed dye laser with marginal success. The relationship between obesity and varicose veins is controversial; symptoms are best prevented by the use of elastic stockings. Itching and inflammation associated with stasis pigmentation, the result of red blood cells escaping into the tissues, can be treated with corticosteroids. Lymphedema is associated with dilatation of tissue channels, reduced tissue oxygenation and provides a culture medium for bacterial growth. Lymphedema treatment is directed towards reducing the

  19. [Artificial nutrition in children (I): enteral access].

    PubMed

    Estevão-Costa, José

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate nutritional support is crucial in the therapeutic approach of multiple conditions, which justifies the frequent and increasing use of specific access routes for enteral and parenteral nutrition. This article reviews the relevant literature concerning indications, procedures, effectiveness and complications of enteral access routes in children. The decision between gastric and postpyloric access, and between nasogastric tube and gastrostomy is thoroughly discussed. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is the most commonly used technique when a long-term gastric access is required, given its efficacy and safety although the associated morbidity is not negligible;laparoscopic gastrostomy emerges as a potentially advantageous alternative.

  20. Hematologic Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This paper specifically reviews the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations,; however care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters in order to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  1. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  2. Complications of donor apheresis.

    PubMed

    Winters, Jeffrey L

    2006-07-01

    A decreasing blood donor pool in the presence of increasing blood transfusion demands has resulted in the need to maximally utilize each blood donor. This has led to a trend in the increasing use of automated blood collections. While apheresis donation shares many reactions and injuries with whole blood donation, because of the differences, unique complications also exist. Overall, evidence in the literature suggests that the frequency of reactions to apheresis donation is less than that seen in whole blood donation, though the risk of reactions requiring hospitalization is substantially greater. The most common apheresis-specific reaction is hypocalcemia due to citrate anticoagulation, which, while usually mild, has the potential for severely injuring the donor. Other reactions to apheresis donation are uncommon (e.g., hypotension) or rare (e.g., air embolism). More worrisome, and in need of additional study, are the long-term effects of apheresis donation. Recent evidence suggests that repeated apheresis platelet donations may adversely effect thrombopoiesis as well as bone mineralization. Granulocyte donation has also been implicated in unexpected long-term consequences.

  3. COMPLICATIONS OF TATTOOING

    PubMed Central

    Lubeck, Glenn; Epstein, Ervin

    1952-01-01

    Pathologic consequence of tattooing is relatively rare, but in light of the great number of persons in military service, where tattooing seems to be popular, consideration of the complications seems worth while. Four unusual cases of patients with cutaneous lesions in tattoos are reported. One patient had Boeck's sarcoid, in which the cutaneous eruption was limited solely to the tattooed areas on the body and involved all the various colors of the tattoo. The cutaneous eruption was only a single manifestation of generalized sarcoidosis. Another patient had secondary syphilis with the cutaneous lesions involving multi-colored tattoos, including the red areas. These tattoos were applied in Hawaii, and presumably the red dye was not the usual cinnabar (mercuric sulfide). As a general rule, the cutaneous lesions of secondary syphilis do not involve the red areas because of the treponomicidal action of mercuric sulfide. In the third case the characteristic eruption of discoid lupus erythematosus was present. It began over the red areas of a tattoo on the patient's forearm. It has been stated that mercuric sulfide is a photo-sensitizing agent, and it is believed that this explains the localization of the eruption in this case. The fourth patient had eruption, caused by mercury sensitivity, in an area of tattoo. The eruption was noted soon after the tattooing was done, and it persisted for seven years. PMID:14905289

  4. Neurovascular complications of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Daras, M; Tuchman, A J; Koppel, B S; Samkoff, L M; Weitzner, I; Marc, J

    1994-08-01

    Use of cocaine in the USA, has reached epidemic proportions since 1983, when "crack" was introduced, its higher potency compared with cocaine HCl has been associated with a tremendous increase in the incidence of strokes. This study reports our experience with 55 cases of neurovascular events (25 ischemic and 30 hemorrhagic) related to cocaine use in 54 patients. Only 15 patients had other risk factors for stroke. Twenty six patients smoked "crack", 10 snorted cocaine and 12 injected it intravenously. Strokes occurred within 3 h of cocaine use in 15 patients with infarcts and 17 with hemorrhages. Ten infarcts occurred after an overnight binge. Of the hemorrhage group 9 were subarachnoid, 16 intracerebral (8 basal ganglia, 7 hemispheric and one brain stem) and 5 intraventricular. Computerized tomography (CT) showed an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, as well as one of the vein of Galen. Four aneurysms and 3 AVMs were identified on angiography. CT revealed 15 infarcts; it was normal in 7 patients with pure motor hemiparesis and in 3 with findings consistent with anterior spinal artery infarction. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the cerebrovascular complications. A sudden rise in systemic arterial pressure may cause hemorrhages, frequently in association with an underlying aneurysm or AVM. Vasospasm, arteritis, myocardial infarction with cardiac arrhythmias and increased platelet aggregation may provoke infarcts.

  5. [Hyponatremia - carbamazepine medication complications].

    PubMed

    Dedinská, I; Maňka, V; Ságová, I; Klimentová, A; Makovický, P; Polko, J; Sadloňová, J; Mokáň, M

    2012-01-01

    Hyponatremia can be defined like the low sodium concentration, lower that 135 mmol/l. It becomes really serious when the concentration is lower than 120 mmol/l. The most frequent causes of hyponatremia are: the extrarenal loss (GIT, skin, bleeding, sequestration), the renal loss (diuretics, nephritis with the salt loss, osmotical diuresis, the Addison disease), hypothyroidism, the lack of glucocorticoids, emotional stress, pain, pseudohyponatremia (incorrect taking, dyslipoproteinemia). There is fatigue, exhaustion, headache and vertigoes dominating in the clinical record file. By the deficit increasing a patient becomes delirious, comatose even with the shock development. It is necessary to separate sufficient supply of sodium from much more often reason, which is loss of sodium which can be caused by: excessive sweating, vomitting with the metabolical alkalosis development, diarrhoea with the metabolical acidosis development, renal losses (a phase of renal failure). Treatment of hyponatremia: intensive treatment starts at the level of plasmatic concentration of sodium under 120 mmol/l or when neurological symptoms of brain oedema are present. In the therapy it is necessary to avoid fast infusions of hypertonic saline solutions (3-5% NaCl solutions) because of the danger of the development of serious CNS complications (intracranial bleeding, etc.). It is recommended to adjust the plasmatic concentration of sodium up to 120 mmol/l during the first four hours and a subsequent correction should not be higher than 2 mmol per an hour. Treatment of the basic illness is very important. We present 2 case histories: a 74-year old female patient and a 69-year old female patient both with the hyponatremia caused by taking of carbamazepine. We want to inform and warn about not only a well known side effect during long-term treatment but about hyponatremia that arose within 48 hours after the start of taking medicine as well.

  6. Neurosurgical complications after intranasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Toselli, R M; dePapp, A; Harbaugh, R E; Saunders, R L

    1991-05-01

    Intranasal ethmoidectomy is a common otolaryngological procedure. Despite the potential for serious intracranial complications, there is a paucity of reports describing the neurosurgical complications of the procedure. Two patients with intracranial complications of intranasal ethmoidectomy, and the relevant medical literature, are reviewed. The anatomy of the ethmoid air cells and their relation to the intracranial cavity are described. The importance of definitive, emergent repair with attention to the potential for vascular injury is discussed.

  7. Neurosurgical complications after intranasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Toselli, R M; dePapp, A; Harbaugh, R E; Saunders, R L

    1991-01-01

    Intranasal ethmoidectomy is a common otolaryngological procedure. Despite the potential for serious intracranial complications, there is a paucity of reports describing the neurosurgical complications of the procedure. Two patients with intracranial complications of intranasal ethmoidectomy, and the relevant medical literature, are reviewed. The anatomy of the ethmoid air cells and their relation to the intracranial cavity are described. The importance of definitive, emergent repair with attention to the potential for vascular injury is discussed. PMID:1865214

  8. [Epidural emphysema complicating bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Rouetbi, N; Ben Saad, A; Joobeur, S; Skhiri, N; Cheikh Mhamed, S; Mribah, H; El Kamel, A

    2012-12-01

    Epidural emphysema is an exceptional complication of bronchial asthma, revealed by an incidental finding in chest tomography. We report a case of a 21-year-old man admitted with asthma attack complicated by subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema. Chest tomography confirmed the mediastinal emphysema and also revealed the epidural emphysema within the vertebral canal. Neurological examination was negative. The patient showed complete recovery 10days after the onset of symptoms. The epidural emphysema is a rare complication during asthma attacks. The benignity of this complication should not require a systematic chest tomography.

  9. Complications of endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, J A

    1987-11-01

    A consecutive series of 90 patients undergoing endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy was reviewed. There were 26 complications (29%) in 19 patients in this group. Eight complications (8%) including CSF leak, temporary blindness, and hemorrhage were considered major with the latter occurring most commonly. Synechiae were the most commonly occurring minor complications. Endoscopic nasal sinus surgery performed by inexperienced operators carries with it the same risks and complications as traditional intranasal sinus surgery. Any surgeon who does not routinely perform traditional intranasal ethmoidectomy should accrue endoscopic experience through appropriate didactic training and multiple cadaver dissections (akin to otologic training).

  10. Surgical Options in the Problematic Arteriovenous Haemodialysis Access.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Chemla, Eric S

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the paper is to review surgical options in problematic arteriovenous haemodialysis access--in particular, to explore and discuss some surgical alternatives to interventional radiology in the case of failing, failed or complicated arteriovenous access. There is copious evidence to support endovascular techniques to treat non-maturation, stenosis, thrombosis and other complications of arteriovenous access. However, there may be times when the surgery-first approach might be a useful adjunct, alternative or even preferable, including the creation or revision of an anastomosis in the forearm, which may yield better patency rates than endovascular intervention. The creation and maintenance of haemodialysis access can be a complex process and the surgeon and the interventional radiologist should work closely together. The distinct roles of the surgeon and the interventional radiologist in the treatment of a problematic arteriovenous access remain debatable and the authors suggest a multidisciplinary team approach when planning treatment of access complications, which may require repeated interventions.

  11. [Artificial nutrition in children (II): parenteral access].

    PubMed

    Estevão-Costa, José

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial when the use of the gastrointestinal tract is not feasible. This article addresses the main techniques for parenteral access in children, its indications, insertion details and maintenance, and complications. The type of venous access is mainly dictated by the expected duration of parenteral nutrition and by the body weight/stature. The peripheral access is viable and advantageous for parenteral nutrition of short duration (< 2 weeks); a tunneled central venous catheter (Broviac) is usually necessary in long-term parenteral nutrition (> 3 weeks); a peripherally introduced central catheter is an increasingly used alternative. Parenteral accesses are effective and safe, but the morbidity and mortality is not negligible particularly in cases of short bowel syndrome. Most complications are related to the catheter placement and maintenance care, and can be largely avoided when the procedures are carried out by experienced staff under strict protocols.

  12. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter Noninfectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Kappel, Joanne; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Pike, Pamela; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Noninfectious hemodialysis catheter complications include catheter dysfunction, catheter-related thrombus, and central vein stenosis. The definitions, causes, and treatment strategies for catheter dysfunction are reviewed below. Catheter-related thrombus is a less common but serious complication of catheters, requiring catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation. In addition, the risk factors, clinical manifestation, and treatment options for central vein stenosis are outlined. PMID:28270922

  13. [Renal complications due to desensitization].

    PubMed

    Drouet, M; Sabbah, A; Bonneau, J C; Le Sellin, J

    1986-04-01

    Two observations with induction of renal complications during immunotherapy are reported. For the first patient proteinuria and infections complications happened immediately after a rush immunotherapy with Yellow Jacket Venom Extract. For the second patient an "half-rush" immunotherapy with light doses of phleole extract (cumulative dose: 7 PNU) induced an immediate reaction with rhinitis, conjunctivitis and after 24 hours a macroscopic hematuria.

  14. [Complications caused by intravenous therapy].

    PubMed

    Quirós Luque, José María; Gago Fornells, Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Nursing professionals must know everything related to complications caused by intravenous therapy including the ways to prevent and solve these complications. We need not forget that nurses are the ones mainly responsible for the insertion, manipulation, removal and care of catheters.

  15. Complications of Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Mariña Naveiro; Naveiro Rilo, José Cesáreo; Paredes, Aida González; Aguilar Romero, María Teresa; Parra, Jorge Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the frequency of complications during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and identify associated risk factors. Methods: A descriptive observational study was performed between January 2000 and December 2012 and included all gynecologic laparoscopies performed at our center. Variables were recorded for patient characteristics, indication for surgery, length of hospital stay (in days), major and minor complications, and conversions to laparotomy. To identify risk factors and variables associated with complications, crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of all 2888 laparoscopies included, most were procedures of moderate difficulty (adnexal surgery) (54.2%). The overall frequency of major complications was 1.93%, and that of minor complications was 4.29%. The level of technical difficulty and existence of prior abdominal surgery were associated with a higher risk of major complications and conversions to laparotomy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic gynecologic surgery is associated with a low frequency of complications but is a procedure that is not without risk. Greater technical difficulty and prior surgery were factors associated with a higher frequency of complications. PMID:25392659

  16. Difficulties with access in percutaneous renal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Friedlander, Justin I.; Duty, Brian D.; Okeke, Zeph; Smith, Arthur D.

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous renal surgery provides a minimally invasive approach to the kidney for stone extraction in a number of different clinical scenarios. Certain clinical cases present inherent challenges to percutaneous access to the kidney. Herein, we present scenarios in which obtaining and/or maintaining percutaneous access is difficult along with techniques to overcome the challenges commonly encountered. Also, complications associated with these challenging percutaneous renal surgeries are discussed. PMID:21869906

  17. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  18. Risk‐Treatment Paradox in the Selection of Transradial Access for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Neil J.; Resnic, Frederic S.; Mauri, Laura; Matheny, Michael E.; Piemonte, Thomas C.; Pomerantsev, Eugene; Ho, Kalon K. L.; Robbins, Susan L.; Waldman, Howard M.; Yeh, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Access site complications contribute to morbidity and mortality during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Transradial arterial access significantly lowers the risk of access site complications compared to transfemoral arteriotomy. We sought to develop a prediction model for access site complications in patients undergoing PCI with femoral arteriotomy, and assess whether transradial access was selectively used in patients at high risk for complications. Methods and Results We analyzed 17 509 patients who underwent PCI without circulatory support from 2008 to 2011 at 5 institutions. Transradial arterial access was used in 17.8% of patients. In those who underwent transfemoral access, 177 (1.2%) patients had access site complications. Using preprocedural clinical and demographic data, a prediction model for femoral arteriotomy complications was generated. The variables retained in the model included: elevated age (P<0.001), female gender (P<0.001), elevated troponin (P<0.001), decreased renal function or dialysis (P=0.002), emergent PCI (P=0.01), prior PCI (P=0.005), diabetes (P=0.008), and peripheral artery disease (P=0.003). The model showed moderate discrimination (optimism‐adjusted c‐statistic=0.72) and was internally validated via bootstrap resampling. Patients with higher predicted risk of complications via transfemoral access were less likely to receive transradial access (P<0.001). Similar results were seen in patients presenting with and without ST‐segment myocardial infarction and when adjusting for individual physician operator. Conclusions We generated and validated a model for transfemoral access site complications during PCI. Paradoxically, patients most likely to develop access site complications from transfemoral access, and therefore benefit from transradial access, were the least likely to receive transradial access. PMID:23709565

  19. Neurological complications of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Hussein A.; Khan, Abid S.; Khan, Muhammad A.; Aldarmahi, Ahmed A.; Lodhi, Yousif

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review and analyze the neurological complications from bariatric surgery in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from January 2009 to December 2015. Important personal and clinical data were collected from the charts of the patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Data on follow up visit and remote complication if present, was also collected. All patients with neurological complications were reviewed in detail. The significant difference was calculated by using T-test and p-value<0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 451 patients underwent bariatric surgery, 15 cases had neurological complications (3%). Axonal polyneuropathy was the most frequent neurological complication, but cases of Wernicke syndrome, vitamin B12 deficiency, Guillain-Barre syndrome and copper deficiency were also identified. Fourteen patients (93.3%) had full recovery from the neurological signs and symptoms; one patient died. Conclusions: Bariatric surgery is not free of potential neurological complications. Complications may affect both central and peripheral nervous system and death is a possibility. Multidisciplinary care including consultation of different teams is highly recommended. PMID:27356656

  20. [Infectious complications of long term intravenous devices: incidence, risk factors, diagnostic tools].

    PubMed

    Douard, M C; Ardoin, C; Payri, L; Tarot, J P

    1999-03-01

    Implantable venous ports and Hickman central venous catheters are widely used in patients with cancer, blood disorders, or HIV infection, both for in-hospital care and at home. Infectious complications are among the common causes for readmission in these patients. The present review discusses the incidence, risk factors, and diagnostic tools for infectious complications associated with long-term venous access devices.

  1. Airway complications after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Machuzak, Michael; Santacruz, Jose F; Gildea, Thomas; Murthy, Sudish C

    2015-01-01

    Airway complications after lung transplantation present a formidable challenge to the lung transplant team, ranging from mere unusual images to fatal events. The exact incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the type of event, and there is still evolution of a universal characterization of the airway findings. Management is also wide-ranging. Simple observation or simple balloon bronchoplasty is sufficient in many cases, but vigilance following more severe necrosis is required for late development of both anastomotic and nonanastomotic airway strictures. Furthermore, the impact of coexisting infection, rejection, and medical disease associated with high-level immunosuppression further complicates care.

  2. Neurological complications of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, David L; Berger, Miles; Mathew, Joseph P; Graffagnino, Carmelo; Milano, Carmelo A; Newman, Mark F

    2014-05-01

    As increasing numbers of elderly people undergo cardiac surgery, neurologists are frequently called upon to assess patients with neurological complications from the procedure. Some complications mandate acute intervention, whereas others need longer term observation and management. A large amount of published literature exists about these complications and guidance on best practice is constantly changing. Similarly, despite technological advances in surgical intervention and modifications in surgical technique to make cardiac procedures safer, these advances often create new avenues for neurological injury. Accordingly, rapid and precise neurological assessment and therapeutic intervention rests on a solid understanding of the evidence base and procedural variables.

  3. Complications of equine oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Padraic M; Hawkes, Claire; Townsend, Neil

    2008-12-01

    The vast majority of equine oral procedures are dental-related and, unless great care is taken, almost all such procedures have the potential to cause marked short- or long-term damage to other oral structures. This review of the more common complications of oral surgery begins at the rostral oral cavity with procedures of the incisors, and then moves caudally to deal with complications related to procedures of wolf teeth and cheek teeth, including salivary duct disruption and dental sinusitis. Finally, complications associated with maxillary and mandibular fractures are discussed.

  4. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Irene T.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical procedures: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. PMID:27118949

  5. Management and complications of stomas.

    PubMed

    Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management.

  6. Liver Transplant: Complications/Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... can develop a complication requiring return to the operating room for repair or other procedures to open up the new connections. Rejection: Your immune system helps fight infections. It does this by recognizing ...

  7. Prevention of complications in dermatosurgery.

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Buljan, Marija; Cavka, Vlatka; Di Biagio, Nevena Skroza; Sebetić, Klaudija; Poduje, Sanja

    2008-01-01

    Dermatosurgery has become ever more popular and important in recent years, mostly due to the increasing prevalence of skin malignancies. It also encompasses a wide variety of methods to remove or modify skin tissue for numerous cosmetic reasons. Nowadays, many dermatologists provide complete dermatologic care for their patients, including surgery. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the possible complications and to be able to manage them properly. Complications in cutaneous surgery are not very often, but they can be serious and worrisome including bleeding, infections, allergic reactions, syncope, wound dehiscence, necrosis, and others. In this article special attention is given to bleeding, which is the most common complication in this field. The best way to reduce the number of possible complications is to recognize patients at risk. Thus, complete history and physical examination are required before performing any dermatosurgical operation.

  8. [Postoperative complications in plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Vogt, P M

    2009-09-01

    Plastic surgery covers a broad spectrum of diseases and conditions in the areas of reconstructive surgery, hand, burn and aesthetic surgery. Besides acquired defects or malformations an increasing number of patients are being treated for surgical or multimodal complications. In a considerable number of patients plastic and reconstructive surgery remains the only therapeutic alternative after other therapy has failed. Therefore complication management in plastic surgery is of utmost importance for a successful outcome. In addition patient expectations in the results of plastic surgery as a discipline of invention and problem solving are steadily increasing. This challenge is reflected in clinical patient management by intensive research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Patients in plastic surgery are recruited from all age groups of either gender, involving traumatic and oncologic as well as congenital and aesthetic disorders. The demographics of aging, multimorbidity and obesity pose new challenges to plastic surgery. Although age over 70 years is not an independent risk factor per se for complications in plastic surgery, e.g. for complex free flap transfer, medical problems are present at a higher rate, which is to be expected in this age group. Risk factors such as alcoholism and coronary heart diseases seem to be independent predictors of perioperative complications. Therefore older patients can also benefit from plastic surgery and recurrent operations by the corresponding risk and complication management. Complication management necessitates careful patient selection, estimation of operative risks and patient-adapted selection of procedures. In addition to expertise in plastic surgery a thorough knowledge of non-surgical and surgical back-up procedures for technical incidents as well as vascular circulatory and wound healing disorders is required to deal successfully with complications in plastic surgery. This article presents these specific

  9. The management of complicated glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Clement, C I; Goldberg, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Complicated glaucomas present considerable diagnostic and management challenges. Response to treatment can be unpredictable or reduced compared with other glaucomas. However, target intraocular pressure and preservation of vision may be achieved with selected medical, laser and surgical treatment. The evidence for such treatment is expanding and consequently affords clinicians a better understanding of established and novel techniques. Herein we review the mechanisms involved in the development of complicated glaucoma and the current evidence supporting its management. PMID:21150026

  10. Bent Metal in a Bone: A Rare Complication of an Emergent Procedure or a Deficiency in Skill Set?

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Mridula; Bardeloza, Kaye; Edemekong, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intraosseous (IO) access is an important consideration in patients with difficult intravenous (IV) access in emergent situations. IO access in adults has become more popular due to the ease of placement and high success rates. The most common sites of access include the proximal tibia and the humeral head. The complications associated are rare but can be catastrophic: subsequent amputation of a limb has been described in the literature. We report a 25-year-old female presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in whom emergent IO access was complicated by needle bending inside the humerus. Conventional bedside removal was impossible and required surgical intervention in operating room. PMID:28018682

  11. [Multiple complications after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Manrique, J; Rossich, E; Hernández Sierra, A

    2004-01-01

    This is the case of a 32-year-old male patient, diagnosed with end stage renal disease secondary to a focal and segmental glomerulonephritis. After four years of haemodialysis, he received a renal graft from a cadaveric donor. During the following sixteen years, he developped many different complications. In the early post-transplant period, he developed a severe acute tubular necrosis and two episodes of acute rejection took place, both of them with later recovery. Among the outstanding infectious complications were a virus herpes zoster dorsal infection and a Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial pneumonia. Twelve months later, a series of severe digestive complications took place: cholecystitis that required cholecystectomy, pancreatic pseudocyst which required laparotomy because of an abdominal complication, two separate episodes of upper digestive bleeding that finally required gastric surgery, and an hemorrhagic subphrenic abscess that required a second laparotomy. Currently he has developed a calcified chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, metabolic complications must be mentioned carbohydrate intolerance, cataracts and an avascular bone necrosis, all of them closely related to the immunosuppressive therapy. In spite of these multiple complications, he mantains a good renal function and his quality of life is acceptable.

  12. The genetics of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Emma; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-05-01

    The rising global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality that is attributable to the complications of chronic hyperglycaemia. These complications include blindness, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Current therapeutic options for chronic hyperglycaemia reduce, but do not eradicate, the risk of these complications. Success in defining new preventative and therapeutic strategies hinges on an improved understanding of the molecular processes involved in the development of these complications. This Review explores the role of human genetics in delivering such insights, and describes progress in characterizing the sequence variants that influence individual predisposition to diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Numerous risk variants for microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported, but very few have shown robust replication. Furthermore, only limited evidence exists of a difference in the repertoire of risk variants influencing macrovascular disease between those with and those without diabetes. Here, we outline the challenges associated with the genetic analysis of diabetic complications and highlight ongoing efforts to deliver biological insights that can drive translational benefits.

  13. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: Indications, technique, complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the “pull” technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  14. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: indications, technique, complications and management.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-06-28

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the "pull" technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  15. Data access service of China-VO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Jian; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Cui, Chen-Zhou

    2004-09-01

    With the development of technologies and the implementation of large quantity of astronomical observation projects, astronomy faces data avalanche and has entered an information era. A basic aim of the Virtual Observatory is to provide uniform access to highly distributed, complicated, huge astronomical datasets, and to realize federation of global astronomical data resources, so that astronomers can obtain required data efficiently and conveniently for their research. China Virtual Observatory (China-VO) project designs and implements astronomical data access services based on Grid technology, and provides uniform interface to Grid client application. In this paper, we introduce the data access service toolkit development using Globus Toolkit, the Grid services encapsulation of catalogs according to the latest astronomical data standards recommended by International Virtual Observatory Alliance, the implements of catalog Cone Search access service. Furthermore, we also introduce how to construct other Grid services using above data access services.

  16. Survival and complications in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Borgna-Pignatti, C; Cappellini, M D; De Stefano, P; Del Vecchio, G C; Forni, G L; Gamberini, M R; Ghilardi, R; Origa, R; Piga, A; Romeo, M A; Zhao, H; Cnaan, A

    2005-01-01

    The life expectancy of patients with thalassemia major has significantly increased in recent years, as reported by several groups in different countries. However, complications are still frequent and affect the patients' quality of life. In a recent study from the United Kingdom, it was found that 50% of the patients had died before age 35. At that age, 65% of the patients from an Italian long-term study were still alive. Heart disease is responsible for more than half of the deaths. The prevalence of complications in Italian patients born after 1970 includes heart failure in 7%, hypogonadism in 55%, hypothyroidism in 11%, and diabetes in 6%. Similar data were reported in patients from the United States. In the Italian study, lower ferritin levels were associated with a lower probability of experiencing heart failure and with prolonged survival. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are common and affect virtually all patients. Hepatitis C virus antibodies are present in 85% of multitransfused Italian patients, 23% of patients in the United Kingdom, 35% in the United States, 34% in France, and 21% in India. Hepatocellular carcinoma can complicate the course of hepatitis. A survey of Italian centers has identified 23 such cases in patients with a thalassemia syndrome. In conclusion, rates of survival and complication-free survival continue to improve, due to better treatment strategies. New complications are appearing in long-term survivors. Iron overload of the heart remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality.

  17. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... returned to your body. Usually the access is put in your arm but it can also go ... A surgeon will put the access in. There are 3 types of access. Fistula: The surgeon joins an artery and vein under the ...

  18. Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  19. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers.

  20. [Surgery in complicated colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kreisler, Esther; Biondo, Sebastiano; Martí-Ragué, Joan

    2006-07-01

    Colorectal cancer continues to have a serious social impact. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. Approximately one-third of patients with colorectal cancer will undergo emergency surgery for a complicated tumor, with a high risk of mortality and poorer long-term prognosis. The most frequent complications are obstruction and perforation, while massive hemorrhage is rare. The curative potential of surgery, whether urgent or elective, depends on how radical the resection is, among other factors. In the literature on the management of urgent colorectal disease, there are few references to the oncological criteria for resection. Uncertainly about the optimal treatment has led to wide variability in the treatment of this entity. The present article aims to provide a critical appraisal of the controversies surrounding the role of surgery and its impact on complicated colorectal cancer.

  1. Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

  2. Neurological complications of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R H; Marshall, W C; Chessells, J M

    1977-01-01

    We have reviewed the neurological complications not directly attributable to leukaemic infiltration in a group of 438 children with leukaemia or lymphoma. 61 children had one or more complications due chiefly to bleeding, infection, or drug toxicity. Early death from intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 1% of children with lymphoblastic leukaemia and 7% of children with myeloblastic leukaemia. Measles and chicken pox were the most serious infective complications; one child remains severely retarded after presumed measles encephalitis, one child with chicken pox died, and a second remains disabled. 2 additional cases of measles encephalitis and one of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy are described. Drugs which caused neurotoxicity included vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, L-asparaginase, and phenothiazines, but most problems were caused by methotrexate. Methotrexate toxicity was more prevalent and more serious in children who had had previous central nervous system leukaemia. We conclude that viral infections and methotrexate pose the greatest neurological hazards to children with leukaemia. PMID:596922

  3. Complications of third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Bouloux, Gary F; Steed, Martin B; Perciaccante, Vincent J

    2007-02-01

    This article addresses the incidence of specific complications and, where possible, offers a preventive or management strategy. Injuries of the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves are significant issues that are discussed separately in this text. Surgical removal of third molars is often associated with postoperative pain, swelling, and trismus. Factors thought to influence the incidence of complications after third molar removal include age, gender, medical history, oral contraceptives, presence of pericoronitis, poor oral hygiene, smoking, type of impaction, relationship of third molar to the inferior alveolar nerve, surgical time, surgical technique, surgeon experience, use of perioperative antibiotics, use of topical antiseptics, use of intra-socket medications, and anesthetic technique. Complications that are discussed further include alveolar osteitis, postoperative infection, hemorrhage, oro-antral communication, damage to adjacent teeth, displaced teeth, and fractures.

  4. Complications of injectable fillers, part 2: vascular complications.

    PubMed

    DeLorenzi, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    Accidental intra-arterial filler injection may cause significant tissue injury and necrosis. Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers, currently the most popular, are the focus of this article, which highlights complications and their symptoms, risk factors, and possible treatment strategies. Although ischemic events do happen and are therefore important to discuss, they seem to be exceptionally rare and represent a small percentage of complications in individual clinical practices. However, the true incidence of this complication is unknown because of underreporting by clinicians. Typical clinical findings include skin blanching, livedo reticularis, slow capillary refill, and dusky blue-red discoloration, followed a few days later by blister formation and finally tissue slough. Mainstays of treatment (apart from avoidance by meticulous technique) are prompt recognition, immediate treatment with hyaluronidase, topical nitropaste under occlusion, oral acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), warm compresses, and vigorous massage. Secondary lines of treatment may involve intra-arterial hyaluronidase, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and ancillary vasodilating agents such as prostaglandin E1. Emergency preparedness (a "filler crash cart") is emphasized, since early intervention is likely to significantly reduce morbidity. A clinical summary chart is provided, organized by complication presentation.

  5. Exotic encounters with dental implants: managing complications with unidentified systems.

    PubMed

    Mattheos, N; Janda, M Schittek

    2012-06-01

    As the application of dental implants increases worldwide, so is the number of technical and biological complications that general dental practitioners will be called to manage, while maintaining implant patients. In addition, the greater patient mobility encountered today combined with a growing trend of 'dental implant tourism' will very often result in situations where the dentist is requested to deal with complications in implants placed elsewhere and which sometimes might be of an 'exotic' system one cannot directly recognize. Such a situation can pose significant challenges to even experienced clinicians. The challenges are not only in the scientific field, but often include professional and ethical implications. This case report will discuss strategies for the management of implant complications in cases of unidentified implant systems. Critical factors in such situations would be the clinician's experience and special training, the correct radiographic technique, as well as access to the appropriate tools and devices.

  6. Surgical Complications of Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Leroy R.; Gandhi, Shobhana Anil; Gandhi, Anil Krishnakumar

    1977-01-01

    Complications of gynecological surgery are considerable and when reviewed in detail are almost frightening. There is no substitute for experience and intimate knowledge of the intricate pelvic structures in health and disease. Anyone who is active in the field is sooner or later going to experience some difficulty whether it be due to his miscalculation or to innate conditions in the patient which are beyond his/her control. It is the responsibility of the pelvic surgeon to recognize the complication and apply proper corrective measures. The patient should not be given false hopes of sure success nor should she be deprived of whatever hope for success does exist. PMID:572875

  7. Complicated grief in late life

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is a syndrome that affects 10% to 20% of grievers regardless of age, although proportionally more will face the death of loved ones in late life, CG is characterized by preoccupying and disabling symptoms that can persist for decades such as an inability to accept the death, intense yearning or avoidance, frequent reveries, deep sadness, crying, somatic distress, social withdrawal, and suicidal ideation. This syndrome is distinct from major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, but CG maybe comorbid with each. This communication will focus on the impact of CG in late life (over age 60) and will include a case vignette for illustrating complicated grief therapy. PMID:22754292

  8. [Intestinal complications from vascular prostheses].

    PubMed

    Fernández, C; Calvete, J; García, J; Buch, E; Castells, P; Lledó, S

    1993-01-01

    Secondary FAE is a rare complication, usually located at the duodenum. The typical clinical presentation is like a digestive hemorrhage or a sepsis. We report two cases of FAE with atypical manifestations. The first case presented a lower digestive hemorrhage produced by the fistulization to the sigma. The second case appeared like an intestinal obliteration caused by the full emigration of a prosthesis to the jejunum. We wish to remark the importance of the clinical suspicion of a FAE (Key of diagnosis), and the sparing relevance of the complementary examinations and the urgency of a surgical treatment in order to avoid the high rate of morbi-mortality associated with this complication.

  9. Managing complications in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Paolo; Cordoba, Juan; Farges, Oliver; Valla, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. This life-threatening condition usually arises from complications of cirrhosis. While variceal bleeding is the most acute and probably best studied, several other complications of liver cirrhosis are more insidious in their onset but nevertheless more important for the long-term management and outcome of these patients. This review summarizes the topics discussed during the UEG-EASL Hepatology postgraduate course of the United European Gastroenterology Week 2013 and discusses emergency surgical conditions in cirrhotic patients, the management of hepatic encephalopathy, ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, coagulation disorders, and liver cancer. PMID:25653862

  10. Sigmoid Volvulus Complicating Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Erin; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Pieracci, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    Background. Sigmoid volvulus is a rare complication of pregnancy and the puerperium. Case. A 19-year-old patient, gravida 1 para 0 at 41 0/7 weeks of gestation, admitted for late-term induction of labor underwent an uncomplicated primary low transverse cesarean delivery for arrest of descent. Her postoperative period was complicated by sudden onset of abdominal pain and the ultimate diagnosis of sigmoid volvulus. Conclusion. Prompt surgical evaluation of an acute abdomen in the postpartum period is essential; delayed diagnosis and treatment can lead to significant maternal morbidity and mortality. PMID:28251004

  11. Intracranial complications of transnasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Freije, J E; Donegan, J O

    1991-06-01

    The transnasal approach to the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses is a well-established technique for treating nasal polyposis and chronic sinusitis. The literature supports the effectiveness and safety of this procedure when performed by experienced surgeons. Although various authors allude to catastrophic complications of intranasal ethmoidectomy, there are few case reports of complications involving significant morbidity or mortality. The potential for serious intracranial trauma is present during ethmoid surgery, especially during an intranasal approach due to limited exposure and difficulty in identifying surgical landmarks, but with renewed interest in this approach utilizing endoscopic instrumentation, the risks may be reduced.

  12. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines and standards for the built environment, transportation, communication, medical diagnostic equipment, and information technology. ...

  13. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... use requirements for Critical Access Hospitals related to Electronic Health Records (EHRs)? Critical Access Hospital (CAH) are eligible for Electronic Health Record (EHR) incentive payments and can receive ...

  14. Venous complications of pancreatitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Yashant; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-31

    Pancreatitis is notorious to cause vascular complications. While arterial complications include pseudoaneurysm formation with a propensity to bleed, venous complications can be quite myriad. Venous involvement in pancreatitis often presents with thrombosis. From time to time case reports and series of unusual venous complications associated with pancreatitis have, however, been described. In this article, we review multitudinous venous complications in the setting of pancreatitis and propose a system to classify pancreatitis associated venous complications.

  15. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  16. Third-trimester pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Newfield, Emily

    2012-03-01

    Complications arising in the third trimester often challenge the clinician to balance the concern for maternal well-being with the consequences of infant prematurity. The most serious and challenging antepartum issues relate to preterm labor and birth, hypertensive disorders, and bleeding events. This article guides the practitioner through decision-making and management of these problems.

  17. Inflammatory duodenal necrosis complicating gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Dina; Lee, Geraint J.; Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Drake, David

    2016-01-01

    Babies with gastroschisis have an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that can lead to short bowel syndrome, a long-term parenteral nutrition requirement, and its associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent duodenal ischemia and necrosis associated with gastroschisis in the absence of NEC totalis. PMID:27695214

  18. Not to Complicate Matters, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    The writer discusses the current academic enthrallment with complicating seemingly every aspect of every event or phenomenon, arguing that the fashion elevates confusion from a transitional stage into an end goal. Rather than scholarly clarification, says Jacoby, people celebrate the fact that everything can be "problematized," rejoicing in…

  19. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

    2013-05-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome.

  20. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients’ experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  1. A Rare Complication of Septorhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Septoplasty and septorhinoplasty are common procedures. A 28-year-old woman underwent the procedure and presented postoperatively with headache and vomiting and had developed a large pneumocephalus. We describe the case in detail and analyze the possible causes and ways to prevent such a complication. PMID:25587507

  2. Risks and complications in rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rettinger, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Rhinoplasty is regarded to be associated with many risks as the expectations of patient and physician are not always corresponding. Besides of postoperative deformities many other risks and complications have to be considered. Reduction-rhinoplasty e.g. can cause breathing disturbances which are reported in 70% of all revision-rhinoplasty-patients. One has to be aware however that scars and loss of mucosal-sensation can also give the feeling of a “blocked nose”. The main risks of autogenous transplants are dislocation and resorption, while alloplasts can cause infection and extrusion. In this respect silicone implants can have a complication rate between 5-20%. Less complications are reported with other materials like Gore-Tex. Complications of skin and soft tissues can be atrophy, fibrosis, numbness, cysts originating from displaced mucosa or subcutaneous granulomas caused by ointment material. Postoperative swelling depends mainly on the osteotomy technique. Percutaneous osteotomies cause less trauma, but may result in visible scars. Infections are rare but sometimes life-threatening (toxic-shock-syndrome). The risk is higher, when sinus surgery and rhinoplasty are combined. Osteotomies can also cause injuries of the orbital region. Necrosis of eye-lids by infections and blindness by central artery occlusion are known. There are reports on various other risks like rhinoliquorrhea, brain damage, fistulas between sinus-cavernosus and carotid artery, aneurysms and thrombosis of the cavernous sinus. Discoloration of incisors are possible by damage of vessels and nerves. Rhinoplasty can also become a court-case in dissatisfied patients, a situation that may be called a “typical complication of rhinoplasty”. It can be avoided by proper patient selection and consideration of psychological disturbances. Postoperative deformities are considered as main risks of rhinoplasty, causing revision surgery in 5% to 15% of the cases. The analysis of postoperative

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR): access planning and strategies.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Reardon, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has proven to be a viable tool for the high-surgical-risk population with severe aortic valve stenosis. Vascular access complications are not uncommon with TAVR and may increase early and late mortality. Avoiding these serious complications is the goal. With experience and careful screening, we are now able to risk-stratify patients who may be at increased risk of vascular complications. While the traditional iliofemoral access site remains the most common for TAVR, alternate access sites that have proven to be viable and safe alternatives include the transapical, direct-aortic, and subclavian techniques. TAVR teams should be familiar and comfortable with these approaches as each of them has its own advantages and weaknesses. The best option is usually one in which the procedure is tailored to the patient. The present review examines our current access planning and strategies for TAVR.

  4. Lower Extremity Permanent Dialysis Vascular Access.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Vishal B; Niyyar, Vandana D; Vachharajani, Tushar J

    2016-09-07

    Hemodialysis remains the most commonly used RRT option around the world. Technological advances, superior access to care, and better quality of care have led to overall improvement in survival of patients on long-term hemodialysis. Maintaining a functioning upper extremity vascular access for a prolonged duration continues to remain a challenge for dialysis providers. Frequently encountered difficulties in clinical practice include (1) a high incidence of central venous catheter-related central vein stenosis and (2) limited options for creating a functioning upper extremity permanent arteriovenous access. Lack of surgical skills, fear of complications, and limited involvement of the treating nephrologists in the decision-making process are some of the reasons why lower extremity permanent dialysis access remains an infrequently used option. Similar to upper extremity vascular access options, lower extremity arteriovenous fistula remains a preferred access over arteriovenous synthetic graft. The use of femoral tunneled catheter as a long-term access should be avoided as far as possible, especially with the availability of newer graft-catheter hybrid devices. Our review provides a summary of clinical evidence published in surgical, radiology, and nephrology literature highlighting the pros and cons of different types of lower extremity permanent dialysis access.

  5. Systemic barriers to improving vascular access outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, Jeffrey J; Ferrell, Lori M; Perry, Michael A

    2002-04-01

    Vascular access dysfunction is the most frequent cause of hospitalization for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Our system of vascular access care and industry standards developed for historic reasons have resulted in a haphazard approach to access management. The Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative has provided a road map for improving vascular access management. However, despite widespread acceptance, these recommendations are not routinely followed. This is largely the result of inertia coupled with systemic barriers to improving access outcomes. These barriers include lack of funded pre-ESRD care and preoperative imaging, lack of reimbursement for access monitoring, unavailable surgical and interventional suites, erosion of the real value of the composite rate, bundling of additional new services without rate adjustment, poor accountability of surgeons and hospitals, and a reimbursement system that rewards procedures and, in particular, graft and catheter placement. Currently, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services is reevaluating the composite rate and its included bundle of services. To provide the best access care with the fewest complications while insuring multidisciplinary involvement and accountability, a realistic appraisal and realignment of incentives must be developed to insure improvement of access care in the United States.

  6. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  7. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer

  8. [Mechanical complication of central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Koja, Hiroki; Tokumine, Joho; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure with a high success rate. However, life-threatening complications are occasionally caused by mechanical injury during the catheterization process. Therefore, surgeons should have sufficient knowledge of the potential complications and the effective use of preventative measures when performing catheterization. We herein review and discuss the mechanical complications previously reported to have occurred in association with central venous catheterization. Comprehensive knowledge about various complication-inducing factors, the ability to make a quick and accurate diagnosis of such complications, and sufficient skill to prevent worsening of these complications can thus help patients from suffering lethal complications due to central venous catheterization.

  9. Complications of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Wu, Xiujuan; Zhu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated disorder in the peripheral nervous system with a wide spectrum of complications. A good understanding of the complications of GBS assists clinicians to recognize and manage the complications properly thereby reducing the mortality and morbidity of GBS patients. Herein, we systemically review the literature on complications of GBS, including short-term complications and long-term complications. We summarize the frequency, severity, clinical manifestations, managements and possible mechanisms of different kinds of complications, and point out the flaws of current studies as well as demonstrate the further investigations needed.

  10. Complications in endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy: an update.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, J A

    1989-07-01

    A previous publication by this author discussing complications of endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy indicated an overall complication rate of 29% in 90 patients (17% in 150 ethmoidectomies). Compared to published complications rates for traditional intranasal ethmoidectomy (2.7% to 3.7%), 17% is alarming and of concern. The complication results in 300 ethmoidectomies performed on 180 patients are presented. The overall complication rate was 9.3%. Only two further complications have occurred since the first reported series: a cerebrospinal fluid leak and one case of subcutaneous emphysema. Methods and techniques that have led to the reduction of complications are briefly discussed. Endoscopic ethmoidectomy is a valid, safe procedure in experienced hands.

  11. Retinal complications after bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Filipe, J A; Pinto, A M; Rosas, V; Castro-Correia, J

    Bungee jumping is becoming a popular sport in the Western world with some cases of ophthalmic complications being reported in recent literature. The authors reported a case of a 23-year-old healthy female who presented retinal complications following a bungee jumping. Her fundi showed superficial retinal hemorrhages in the right eye and a sub-internal limiting membrane hemorrhage affecting the left eye. A general examination, including a full neurological examination, was normal and laboratorial investigations were all within normal values. More studies are necessary to identify risk factors and the true incidence of related ocular lesions, but until then, we think this sport activity should be desencouraged, especially to those that are not psychological and physically fit.

  12. Evaluating Complications of Chronic Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Phillip; Pereyra, Charles A.; Breslin, Adam; Melville, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a relatively common diagnosis throughout the US. In patients with an otherwise unremarkable medical history the treatment is typically supportive, requiring only clinical evaluation. We present the case of a 25-year-old male with a history of chronic sinusitis that was brought to our emergency department with new-onset seizure. Three days before he had presented to his usual care facility with two days of headache and fever and was discharged stating headache, subjective fever, and neck stiffness. After further investigation he was diagnosed with a mixed anaerobic epidural abscess. The evaluation and management of chronic sinusitis are based on the presence of symptoms concerning for complication. Prompt investigation of complicated sinusitis is essential in preventing debilitating and fatal sequelae. Our case study underscores the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:28163938

  13. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Catherine Hy; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig's angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk.

  14. Painless thyroiditis complicated by acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takatoshi; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Tajima, Naoko

    2010-01-01

    The serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level is decreased in acromegalic patients. Although this phenomenon is thought to be caused by the enhanced secretion of somatostatin which suppresses TSH production, it has not yet been proven. We describe a 60-year-old woman with acromegaly who showed a low concentration of TSH. We diagnosed her as painless thyroiditis based on an increased level of thyroglobulin, depressed radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU), normal vascularity and mild swelling of the thyroid, and normal T3, T4, free T3 and free T4 levels. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of acromegaly complicated by painless thyroiditis. The differential diagnosis between central hypothyroidism and painless thyroiditis is so important. Since it is difficult to diagnose precisely based on only the data of a low level of TSH and normal levels of thyroid hormones, we consider that measurement of thyroglobulin and RAIU is necessary when the complication of painless thyroiditis is suspected.

  15. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-06-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide.

  16. Medical complications associated with earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Susan A; VanRooyen, Michael J

    2012-02-25

    Major earthquakes are some of the most devastating natural disasters. The epidemiology of earthquake-related injuries and mortality is unique for these disasters. Because earthquakes frequently affect populous urban areas with poor structural standards, they often result in high death rates and mass casualties with many traumatic injuries. These injuries are highly mechanical and often multisystem, requiring intensive curative medical and surgical care at a time when the local and regional medical response capacities have been at least partly disrupted. Many patients surviving blunt and penetrating trauma and crush injuries have subsequent complications that lead to additional morbidity and mortality. Here, we review and summarise earthquake-induced injuries and medical complications affecting major organ systems.

  17. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  18. [Infectious complications of biological therapy].

    PubMed

    Holub, M; Rozsypal, H; Chalupa, P

    2011-02-01

    Biological treatment represents a significant progress in the therapy of many serious diseases. Together with the growing knowledge of pathophysiology and subsequent development of new therapeutic agents, this progress will definitely lead to further expansion of biologics. Since biologics interfere with many mechanisms of host defence, which may sometimes be compromised by them, increased risk of infectious complications must be taken into account. Patients treated with biologics are prone to classical virulent infections (e.g. listeriosis, legionellosis and tuberculosis) and opportunistic infections such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Furthermore, suppression of the immune response that is caused by biologics may lead to reactivation of latent infections such as tuberculosis or viral hepatitis B. Therefore, the knowledge of basic mechanisms by which biologics modify the immune response is important for a rapid clinical diagnosis of possible aetiology of infectious complications.

  19. [Prevention of complications of IUDs].

    PubMed

    Henrion, R

    1980-11-01

    Complications resulting from IUD use are essentially of 4 types: 1) uterine perforation, either at the time of insertion or by translocation of the device. Perforations can be avoided by exercising the utmost attention at time of insertion, and by choosing the proper time of insertion, usually postmentruation. It is also imperative that the IUD be right for the uterine cavity size; 2) pelvic infection, the most serious of IUD complications, since it can, however rarely, cause death; it is absolutely necessary to observe the strictest asepsy during IUD insertion; 3) menorrhagia, which, when severe, can cause anemia. Women with heavy menstrual flow should not wear an IUD; and, 4) ectopic pregnancy, which usually ends in spontaneous abortion, but which can cause infection.

  20. Gastrointestinal complications postthoracotomy and postvagotomy.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Naunheim, K S

    1998-08-01

    Postthoracotomy gastrointestinal complications, although relatively uncommon, can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is necessary to identify patients who are at high risk for gastrointestinal complications during the preoperative evaluation. Appropriate stress ulcer prophylaxis should be provided to high-risk patients, and enteral feeds should be initiated as early in the postoperative course as possible. Postoperative hypotension and massive blood transfusions can be avoided with early reexploration in the case of postoperative hemorrhage. Finally, unexplained abdominal pain must not be ignored; a high index of suspicion should be maintained, with early and liberal use of diagnostic tools such as standard radiography, CT, endoscopy, and angiography. Consultation should be requested from a surgeon experienced in abdominal catastrophes. Early laparotomy with aggressive operative management can be lifesaving therapy but must be not applied in a cavalier fashion, as many of these disorders can and should be managed conservatively.

  1. Permanent makeup: indications and complications.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2008-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, simulating makeup, have become very popular in the last decades; the technique of micropigmentation consists of implantation of pigment into the skin using a tattoo pen. The procedure can also be used to camouflage vitiligo, to mask scars, and as an adjunct to reconstructive surgery. Risks and complications include infections, allergic reactions, scarring, fanning, fading, and dissatisfaction about color and shape. Lasers offer the best cosmetic result for removal of unwanted tattoos.

  2. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  3. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  4. Prevalence Estimates of Complicated Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Julia C; Pedersen, Rolf; Marra, Christina M; Kerani, Roxanne P; Golden, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    We reviewed 68 cases of possible neurosyphilis among 573 syphilis cases in King County, WA, from 3rd January 2012 to 30th September 2013; 7.9% (95% confidence interval, 5.8%-10.5%) had vision or hearing changes, and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 2.2%-5.4%) had both symptoms and objective confirmation of complicated syphilis with either abnormal cerebrospinal fluid or an abnormal ophthalmologic examination.

  5. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  6. Mitochondrial Hormesis and Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The concept that excess superoxide production from mitochondria is the driving, initial cellular response underlying diabetes complications has been held for the past decade. However, results of antioxidant-based trials have been largely negative. In the present review, the data supporting mitochondrial superoxide as a driving force for diabetic kidney, nerve, heart, and retinal complications are reexamined, and a new concept for diabetes complications—mitochondrial hormesis—is presented. In this view, production of mitochondrial superoxide can be an indicator of healthy mitochondria and physiologic oxidative phosphorylation. Recent data suggest that in response to excess glucose exposure or nutrient stress, there is a reduction of mitochondrial superoxide, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial ATP generation in several target tissues of diabetes complications. Persistent reduction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex activity is associated with the release of oxidants from nonmitochondrial sources and release of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines, and a manifestation of organ dysfunction. Restoration of mitochondrial function and superoxide production via activation of AMPK has now been associated with improvement in markers of renal, cardiovascular, and neuronal dysfunction with diabetes. With this Perspective, approaches that stimulate AMPK and PGC1α via exercise, caloric restriction, and medications result in stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity, restore physiologic mitochondrial superoxide production, and promote organ healing. PMID:25713188

  7. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  8. [Vascular access guidelines for hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Hernández, J A; González Parra, E; Julián Gutiérrez, J M; Segarra Medrano, A; Almirante, B; Martínez, M T; Arrieta, J; Fernández Rivera, C; Galera, A; Gallego Beuter, J; Górriz, J L; Herrero, J A; López Menchero, R; Ochando, A; Pérez Bañasco, V; Polo, J R; Pueyo, J; Ruiz, Camps I; Segura Iglesias, R

    2005-01-01

    Quality of vascular access (VA) has a remarkable influence in hemodialysis patients outcomes. Dysfunction of VA represents a capital cause of morbi-mortality of these patients as well an increase in economical. Spanish Society of Neprhology, aware of the problem, has decided to carry out a revision of the issue with the aim of providing help in comprehensión and treatment related with VA problems, and achieving an homogenization of practices in three mayor aspects: to increase arteriovenous fistula utilization as first vascular access, to increment vascular access monitoring practice and rationalise central catheters use. We present a consensus document elaborated by a multidisciplinar group composed by nephrologists, vascular surgeons, interventional radiologysts, infectious diseases specialists and nephrological nurses. Along six chapters that cover patient education, creation of VA, care, monitoring, complications and central catheters, we present the state of the art and propose guidelines for the best practice, according different evidence based degrees, with the intention to provide help at the professionals in order to make aproppiate decissions. Several quality standars are also included.

  9. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  10. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohardt, Robert; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan; Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Electronic, software-managed mechanisms using, for example, radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards, enable great flexibility in specifying access control policies to physical spaces. For example, access rights may vary based on time of day or could differ in normal versus emergency situations. With such fine-grained control, understanding and reasoning about what a policy permits becomes surprisingly difficult requiring knowledge of permission levels, spatial layout, and time. In this paper, we present a formal modeling framework, called AccessNets, suitable for describing a combination of access permissions, physical spaces, and temporal constraints. Furthermore, we provide evidence that model checking techniques are effective in reasoning about physical access control policies. We describe our results from a tool that uses reachability analysis to validate security policies.

  11. History of peritoneal access development.

    PubMed

    Twardowski, Zbylut J

    2006-01-01

    The first peritoneal accesses were devices that had been used in other fields (general surgery, urology, or gynecology): trocars, rubber catheters, and sump drains. In the period after World War II, numerous papers were published with various modifications of peritoneal dialysis. The majority of cases were treated with the continuous flow technique; rubber catheters for inflow and sump drains for outflow were commonly used. At the end of the 1940s, intermittent peritoneal dialysis started to be more frequently used. Severe complications of peritoneal accesses created incentive to design accesses specifically for peritoneal dialysis. The initial three, in the late 1940s, were modified sump drains; however, Ferris and Odel for the first time designed a soft, polyvinyl intraperitoneal tube with metal weights to keep the catheter tip in the pelvic gutter where the conditions for drain are the best. In the 1950s, intermittent peritoneal dialysis was established as the preferred technique; polyethylene and nylon catheters became commercially available and peritoneal dialysis was established as a valuable method for treatment of acute renal failure. The major breakthrough came in the 1960s. First of all, it was discovered that the silicone rubber was less irritating to the peritoneal membrane than other plastics. Then, it was found that polyester velour allowed an excellent tissue ingrowth creating a firm bond with the tissue. When a polyester cuff was glued to the catheter, it restricted catheter movement and created a closed tunnel between the integument and the peritoneal cavity. In 1968, Tenckhoff and Schechter combined these two features and designed a silicone rubber catheter with a polyester cuff for treatment of acute renal failure and two cuffs for treatment of chronic renal failure. This was the most important development in peritoneal access. Technological evolution never ends. Multiple attempts have been made to eliminate remaining complications of the

  12. LAPAROSCOPIC SALPINGECTOMY IN TWO CAPTIVE LEOPARDS (PANTHERA PARDUS) USING A SINGLE PORTAL ACCESS SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Marthinus J; Monnet, Eric; Kirberger, Robert M; Schoeman, Johan P

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic salpingectomy was performed in two adult leopards (Panthera pardus) using a single portal access system, with a multicannulated single-incision laparoscopic surgery port, without any complications. The poorly developed ovarian bursa provided easy access to the uterine tube for salpingectomy. Laparoscopic salpingectomy can be safely performed in the leopard using a single portal access system.

  13. Ocular complications of orbital venography.

    PubMed

    Safer, J N; Guibor, P

    1975-03-01

    Three ocular complications directly related to orbital venography are described, one resulting in permanent loss of vision,. The patient had lymphangioma of the orbit which evidently had bled secondary to increased venous pressure and injection of contrast bolus. Both of the 2 patients with transient visual disturbances had diabetic retinopathy. The common factor is felt to be an imparied vascular bed which cannot meet the stress of increased venous pressure and contrast medium injection. Conditions which predispose to ocular-orbital stasis and/or hemorrhage are discussed.

  14. Ocular complications of bungee jumping

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, H Mohammed J; Mariatos, Georgios; Papanikolaou, Theocharis; Ranganath, Akshatha; Hassan, Hala

    2012-01-01

    Aim In this paper, we will try to highlight the importance of various investigations and their crucial role in identifying whether the defect is structural or functional. Case history A 24-year-old woman presented with ocular complications after bungee jumping. Subsequently, although all ophthalmic signs resolved, she complained of decreased vision in her left eye. Conclusion Initial ophthalmic injury was detected by optical coherence tomography scan showing a neurosensory detachment of the fovea. This was not initially detected on slit-lamp examination or fluorescein angiography. On later examination, although the optical coherence tomography scan showed no structural damage, electrodiagnostic tests showed a functional defect at the fovea. PMID:23055687

  15. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  16. Strabismus complications from local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Guyton, David L

    2008-01-01

    Strabismus developing after retrobulbar or peribulbar anesthesia for both anterior and posterior segment eye surgery may be due to myotoxicity to an extraocular muscle from the local anesthetic agent. Initial paresis often causes diplopia immediately after surgery, but later progressive segmental fibrosis occurs, and/or hypertrophy of the muscle, producing diplopia in the opposite direction from the direction of the initial diplopia. The inferior rectus muscle is most commonly affected. Usually a large recession on an adjustable suture of the involved muscle(s) yields good alignment. Using topical anesthesia or sub-Tenon's anesthesia can avoid this complication.

  17. Neurological complications of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Pengiran, T; Wills, A; Holmes, G

    2002-01-01

    A variety of neurological disorders have been reported in association with coeliac disease including epilepsy, ataxia, neuropathy, and myelopathy. The nature of this association is unclear and whether a specific neurological complication occurs in coeliac disease remains unproved. Malabsorption may lead to vitamin and trace element deficiencies. Therefore, patients who develop neurological dysfunction should be carefully screened for these. However, malabsorption does not satisfactorily explain the pathophysiology and clinical course of many of the associated neurological disorders. Other mechanisms proposed include altered autoimmunity, heredity, and gluten toxicity. This review attempts to summarise the literature and suggests directions for future research. PMID:12151653

  18. Long-Term Nutrition: A Clinician's Guide to Successful Long-Term Enteral Access in Adults.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Matthew L; Mir, Fazia A; Boumitri, Christine; Palmer, Lena B; Evans, David C; Kiraly, Laszlo N; Nguyen, Douglas L

    2016-09-22

    Long-term nutrition support requires long-term enteral access. To ensure the success of long-term enteral access, many factors need to be taken into consideration. This article represents a guide to placing and maintaining access in patients requiring long-term nutrition and addresses many of the common questions regarding long-term enteral access, such as indications, types of access, feeding after access placed, and recognition and treatment of potential complications. This guide will help the clinician establish and maintain access to maximize nutrition in patients requiring long-term nutrition.

  19. Primary vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C P

    2006-05-01

    Primary vascular access is usually achievable by a distal autogenous arterio-venous fistula (AVF). This article describes the approach to vascular access planning, the usual surgical options and the factors affecting patency.

  20. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  1. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  2. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  3. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  4. Infectious complications of regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Horlocker, Terese T; Wedel, Denise J

    2008-09-01

    Although individual cases have been reported in the literature, serious infections of the central nervous system (CNS) such as arachnoiditis, meningitis, and abscess following spinal or epidural anesthesia are rare. However, recent epidemiologic series from Europe suggest that the frequency of infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques may be increasing. Importantly, while meningitis and epidural abscess are both complications of neuraxial block, the risk factors and causative organisms are disparate. For example, staphylococcus is the organism most commonly associated epidural abscess; often these infections occurred in patients with impaired immunity. Conversely, meningitis follows dural puncture, and is typically caused by alpha-hemolytic streptococci, with the source of the organism the nasopharynx of the proceduralist. In order to reduce the risk of serious infection following neuraxial blockade, the clinician must be knowledgeable in the pathogenesis of CNS infections, patient selection, and use of meticulous aseptic technique. Finally, since delay in the diagnosis may result in morbidity and even death, it is crucial to be aware of the presenting signs and symptoms of meningitis and epidural abscess.

  5. Infectious Complications After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria Del Pilar; Martin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the standard of care for patients with decompensated cirrhosis and for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. More than 6000 liver transplants are performed annually in the United States. High patient and graft survival rates have been achieved in great part due to the availability of potent immunosuppressive agents. Systemic immunosuppression has rendered the liver recipient susceptible to de novo infections as well as reactivation of preexisting latent infections. Infections occurring during the first month post-OLT are usually nosocomial, donor-derived, or the result of a perioperative complication. The development of opportunistic infections (OIs) such as Aspergillus and the reactivation of latent infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more frequent 1 to 6 months posttransplant, when the net state of immunosuppression is the highest. Immunosuppressive therapy is tapered 6 to 12 months post-OLT; therefore, infections occurring during that time period and afterward generally resemble those of the general population. Screening strategies applied to determine the risk of an infection after transplantation and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy have reduced the incidence of OIs after OLT. This article will review the various causes of infection post-OLT and the therapies used to manage complications. PMID:27134589

  6. [Vascular access for dialysis in elderly: AVF versus permanent CVC].

    PubMed

    Brunori, G; Bandera, A; Valente, F; Laudon, A

    2008-01-01

    The type of hemodialysis vascular access (fistula, graft, catheter) employed plays an important role in the results of dialysis treatment. Moreover, different complications can affect the vascular access and interfere with the morbidity and mortality of patients. The ideal vascular access is the Cimino Brescia fistula, followed by graft. Tunnelled central venous catheters should be considered as 'second choice' because they present a higher incidence of complications, mainly due to thrombosis and infections. Finally, in elderly patients the vascular bed is frequently damaged and this may make it difficult to create a Cimino (Brescia) fistula (AVF). The use of instrumental tests, as echo-color Doppler or angiography in order to evaluate the real status of vascular bed in elderly patients can offer a great opportunity in order to find the best position where it is possible to create a fistula or graft. We suggest that a native fistula can be easily created in elderly patients and the 'second choice' access should be limited to a small proportion of patients. Although patient selection is important, even patients of 80 years or older who are considered suitable for surgical placement of access should not be denied an AVF solely because of age. Nephrologists or vascular surgeons, who create vascular access, should develop a good patient and site selection to predict which vascular access will function successfully rather than risk complications of prolonged central catheters.

  7. Management and prevention of complications of subcutaneous intravenous infusion port.

    PubMed

    Jan, Hsiang-Chun; Chou, Shao-Jiun; Chen, Tzu-Hung; Lee, Chuin-I; Chen, Tze-Kai; Lou, Mary Ann

    2012-03-01

    Subcutaneous intravenous infusion port (SIIP) has become an increasingly and widely adopted technique in the management of oncology patients. This route has been used not only for chemotherapy but also for parenteral nutrition provision, blood transfusion, medication administration, blood sample collection, hemodialysis, and so on. This system provides a safe vascular access with low complication rate which helps preventing patients from vascular infection and catheter associated thrombosis. In this study, we reviewed 1247 cases of breast cancer patients that had subcutaneous intravenous infusion port implanted for chemotherapy in our general surgery department from 1990 to 2008. The result indicates that complication decreases as our technique and experience mature. We hereby share our accrued experience and improved technique, hoping to be of help to young surgeons.

  8. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  9. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access.

  10. Complications in Musculoskeletal Intervention: Important Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David T.; Dubois, Melissa; Tutton, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) intervention has proliferated in recent years among various subspecialties in medicine. Despite advancements in image guidance and percutaneous technique, the risk of complication has not been fully eliminated. Overall, complications in MSK interventions are rare, with bleeding and infection the most common encountered. Other complications are even rarer. This article reviews various complications unique to musculoskeletal interventions, assists the reader in understanding where pitfalls lie, and highlights ways to avoid them. PMID:26038623

  11. Treatment of complications of parotid gland surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marchese-Ragona, R; De Filippis, C; Marioni, G; Staffieri, A

    2005-01-01

    Summary Although several reports in the literature have documented the surgical technique, and the oncological outcome achieved with parotidectomy, only a few articles have described the complications of parotid gland surgery and their management. Several complications have been reported in parotid surgery. We re-classified the complications of parotidectomy in intra-operative and post-operative (early and late). The commonest complications after parotidectomy are temporary or permanent facial palsy and Frey’s syndrome. PMID:16450773

  12. Complications of Recanalization of Chronic Total Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanasundaram, Arun; Lombardi, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) of Chronic Total Occlusions (CTO) is an accepted revascularization procedure. These complex procedures carry with them certain risks and potential complications. Complications of PCI such as contrast induced renal dysfunction, radiation, etc, assume more relevance given the length and complexity of these procedures. Further, certain complications such as donor vessel injury, foreign body entrapment are unique to CTO PCI. A thorough understanding of the potential complications is important in mitigating risk during these complex procedures.

  13. COMPLICATIONS REQUIRING HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    WRZESINSKI, Aline; CORRÊA, Jéssica Moraes; FERNANDES, Tainiely Müller Barbosa; MONTEIRO, Letícia Fernandes; TREVISOL, Fabiana Schuelter; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The actual gold standard technique for obesity treatment is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, complications may occur and the surgeon must be prepared for them. Aim: To evaluate retrospectively the complications occurrence and associated factors in patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Methods: In this study, 469 medical charts were considered, from patients and from data collected during outpatient consultations. The variables considered were gender, age, height, pre-operatory BMI, pre-operatory weight, pre-operatory comorbidities, time of hospital stay, postoperative complications that demanded re-admission to the hospital and the time elapsed between the procedure and the complication. The patients' follow up was, at least, one year. Results: The incidence of postoperative complications that demanded a hospital care was 24,09%. The main comorbidity presented in this sample was hepatic steatosis. The comorbidity that was associated with the postoperative period was type 2 diabetes. There was a tendency for the female gender be related to the complications. The cholecystectomy was the most frequent complication. Complications occurred during the first year in 57,35%. Conclusion: The most frequent complication was the need to perform a cholecystectomy, where the most frequent comorbidity was hepatic steatosis. Over half the complications occurred during the first year postoperatively. Type 2 diabetes was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications; women had the highest incidence; body mass index was not associated with the occurrence of complications. PMID:26537263

  14. [Infection complicated with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Ken-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are believed to be suspected to be immunocompromized hosts. Many reports have pointed out that diabetic patients are susceptible to certain infections such as surgical site infections, malignant otitis externa, mucormycosis, and necrotizing fasciitis. But their etiology seems to be non-uniform, heterogenous and individualized. Above all, obesity-related infections are also increasing accompanied with the recent rising incidence of obesity. Further studies should be addressed about the relationships between infections and diabetes which include the factors of body mass index, life style, degree of diabetes complications, and poor glycemic control duration. They could live a normal life the same as healthy subjects if good glycemic control is achieved without hypoglycemia.

  15. Progeria syndrome with cardiac complications.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Saadia; Ilyas, Hajira; Hameed, Abdul; Ilyas, Muhammad

    2013-09-01

    A case report of 6-year-old boy with progeria syndrome, with marked cardiac complications is presented. The boy had cardiorespiratory failure. Discoloured purpuric skin patches, alopecia, prominent forehead, protuberant eyes, flattened nasal cartilage, malformed mandible, hypodentition, and deformed rigid fingers and toes were observed on examination. The boy was unable to speak. A sclerotic systolic murmur was audible over the mitral and aortic areas. Chest x-rays showed cardiac enlargement and the electrocardiogram (ECG) showed giant peaked P waves (right atrial hypertrophy) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Atherosclerotic dilated ascending aorta, thickened sclerotic aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves with increased echo texture, left and right atrial and right ventricular dilatation, reduced left ventricular cavity, and thickened speckled atrial and ventricular septa were observed on echocardiography.

  16. [Complications in null-diet].

    PubMed

    Oster, P; Mordasini, R; Raetzer, H; Schellenberg, B; Schlierf, G

    1977-09-24

    Total starvation is effective for acute weight reduction in obesity. However, in 200 patients, most of whom also had internal diseases, 8% exhibited sometimes severe complications, i.e. reversible cerebral ischemia in 3 hypertensive patients when the blood pressure was lowered to the normal range by natriuresis of fasting; breakdown of water and electrolyte homeostasis with circulatory collapse, vomiting and vertigo; acute crises of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and porphyria respectively and increase of transaminases up to 200 mu/ml, or cardiac arrhythmias. Relative (?) contraindications for total fasting appear to be clinical sings of arteriosclerosis such as vascular bruits, angina pectoris and intermittent claudication. In case of doubt, the method should only be used in hospital.

  17. [Therapy of complicated Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Scharl, Michael; Barthel, Christiane; Rogler, Gerhard

    2014-03-12

    During their disease course, the majority of Crohn's disease patients will develop a complicated disease which is characterized by the occurrence of fistulas and/or stenosis. Symptomatic, perianal fistulas should be surgically drained before anti-inflammatory therapy will be initiated. Antibiotics, such as metronidazole, improve disease symptomatic however, they are not sufficient to induce continuous fistula closure. For this purpose, azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine as well as anti-TNF antibodies are useful when administered continuously. Surgical options include seton drainage, fistula excision, fistula plugs and mucosa flaps. As ultima ratio, temporary ileostomy and proctectomy are to be discussed. Non-perianal fistulas often require surgical approaches. Symptomatic strictures or stenosis can be treated by anti-inflammatory medications (only if they are cause by inflammation), endoscopic balloon dilatation or surgery.

  18. Skeletal Complications of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Abigail A.; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  19. Pulmonary complications of inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ascherman, Dana P

    2002-10-01

    Pulmonary manifestations contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, ranging from intrinsic lung disease to secondary complications that include aspiration pneumonia, opportunistic infection, congestive heart failure, and hypoventilation. Newer classification schemes for interstitial lung disease have permitted closer correlation between histologic subtype and clinical outcome, while diagnostic techniques such as bronchoalveolar lavage have begun to define the cellular elements responsible for immune-mediated pulmonary dysfunction. Investigators have identified several serum markers correlating with inflammatory disease activity in the lung that should enhance noninvasive monitoring of therapeutic responses to newer regimens involving agents such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus. Taken together, these advances have contributed to better understanding of the immunopathogenesis of myositis-associated interstitial lung disease that should ultimately translate into more effective treatment.

  20. Respiratory complications of relapsing polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, G. J.; Davis, P.

    1974-01-01

    Gibson, G. J. and Davis, P. (1974).Thorax, 29, 726-731. Respiratory complications of relapsing polychondritis. The respiratory function of a patient with relapsing polychondritis is described. He had severe airflow obstruction due to disease of both the extra and intrathoracic large airways. Evidence of small airways disease was lacking. The airflow obstruction was probably due to a combination of structural narrowing and an enhanced dynamic effect. Despite the severity of his disease the patient's exercise capacity was only slightly reduced but he developed carbon dioxide retention on exercise. Involvement of the airways is a common feature of this rare disease and demands full physiological and radiographic assessment if tracheostomy or other surgical procedure is contemplated. Images PMID:4450183

  1. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  2. Surgical Treatment of Tattoo Complications.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Mitra; Jørgensen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    With a continuing increase in the number of tattoos performed worldwide, the need to treat tattoo complications is growing. Earlier treatments of chronic inflammatory tattoo reactions were dominated by a medical approach, or with no active intervention. In this chapter, we will address modern surgical approaches applied to situations when medical treatment is inefficient and lasers are not applicable. Dermatome shaving is positioned as first-line treatment of allergic tattoo reactions and also indicated in a number of other tattoo reactions, supplemented with excision in selected cases. The methods allow fundamental treatment with removal of the culprit pigment from the dermis. The different instruments, surgical methods, and treatment schedules are reviewed, and a guide to surgeons is presented. Postoperative treatments and the long-term outcomes are described in detail. An algorithm on specialist treatment and follow-up of tattoo reactions, which can be practiced in other countries, is presented.

  3. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD.

  4. Infantile haemangioma: a complicated disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mingke; Qi, Xianqin; Dai, Yuxin; Wang, Shuqing; Quan, Zhiwei; Liu, Yingbin; Ou, Jingmin

    2015-06-01

    Infantile haemangiomas (IH) are common benign vascular tumors of childhood. They are characterised by rapid growth during the first year of life and slow regression that is usually completed by 7-10 years of age. The underlying mechanism of action of IH is aberrant angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, and involves the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. IH become a challenge if they are part of a syndrome, are located in certain areas of the body, or if complications develop. The beta-adrenergic receptor blocker propranolol is a promising new candidate for first-line systemic therapy. This review focuses on the clinical characteristics, pathogenesis and management of IH.

  5. Severe hyponatraemia: complications and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ellis, S J

    1995-12-01

    To observe the incidence of complications in severely hyponatraemic hospitalized patients and relate outcome to rate of correction, all patients admitted to a tertiary referral hospital in New York City, USA or a group of hospitals in Oxford, UK with a sodium < or = 120 mmol/l were studied. Review of the notes and prospective evaluation were used to ascertain cause of hyponatraemia, method of management and outcome. There were 84 episodes in New York and 100 in Oxford, over 9.5 months and one year, respectively; 79% had chronic hyponatraemia ( > 3 days duration). During hyponatraemia, 76% of patients had clouding of consciousness with 11% in coma. Other hyponatraemic complications included long track signs (including hemiparesis) (6.0%), seizures (3.3%), hallucinations (0.5%), tremor (1.0%), intellectual impairment without clouding of consciousness (0.5%), and acute psychosis (0.5%). 4.3% died as a direct result of their electrolyte disturbance. After correction, central pontine myelinolysis (0.5%), post-correction seizures (1.0%), intellectual impairment (2.2%), tremor (0.5%), paraesthesiae (0.5%), and striatal syndrome (0.5%) were observed. Correction of hyponatraemia was started in 158 patients, and the mean maximum rate of correction in 24 h was 8.4 mmol/l (SD 5.6, range 2-42). The maximum rate of correction was higher in those who developed neurological sequelae (12.1 mmol/l/24 h vs. 8.2 mmol/l/24 h; p = 0.0125, t-test, separate variance, two-tail). Neurological sequelae were associated with faster rates of correction, and correction of chronic severe hyponatraemia should be < 10 mmol/l in 24 h.

  6. Elimination of pneumothorax and hemothorax during placement of implantable venous access ports using ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, Grant T; Fowl, Richard J; Stone, William M; Money, Samuel R

    2013-12-01

    Implantable venous access ports are essential for patients requiring chronic venous access. Ultrasound guided catheter placement has been recognized as a valuable adjunct for reducing complications during placement of access ports in the radiology and critical care medicine literature. We reviewed the medical records of patients undergoing insertion of implantable venous access ports from June 2006 through June 2009. All procedures were performed using ultrasound guidance with the internal jugular vein as the access site. There were 500 implantable venous access ports placed and included for review. There were no post-procedure pneumothoraces or hemothoraces. Carotid puncture was documented in 4 (0.8%)cases. Routine use of ultrasound guidance during placement of implantable venous access ports has eliminated the complications of pneumothorax and hemothorax during placement of internal jugular venous access ports on our vascular surgery service. Elimination of these complications and decreased use of chest x-rays should also provide increased cost savings for this procedure.

  7. A multicentre snapshot study of the incidence of serious procedural complications secondary to central venous catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Lathey, R K; Jackson, R E; Bodenham, A; Harper, D; Patle, V

    2017-03-01

    Despite the high number of central venous access devices inserted annually, there are limited data on the incidence of the associated procedural complications, many of which carry substantial clinical risk. This point was highlighted in the recently published Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland 'Safe vascular access 2016' guidelines. This trainee-led snapshot study aimed to identify the number of central venous catheter insertions and the incidence of serious complications across multiple hospital sites within a fixed two-week period. Secondary aims were to identify the availability of resources and infrastructure to facilitate safe central venous catheter insertion and management of potential complications. Fifteen hospital sites participated, completing an initial resource survey and daily identification of all adult central venous catheter insertions, with subsequent review of any complications detected. A total of 487 central venous catheter insertions were identified, of which 15 (3.1%) were associated with a significant procedural complication. The most common complication was failure of insertion, which occurred in seven (1.4%) cases. Facilities to enable safer central venous catheter insertion and manage complications varied widely between hospitals, with little evidence of standardisation of guidelines or protocols.

  8. Common surgical complications in degenerative spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Michael; Aggeliki, Lianou; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Girardi, Federico P

    2013-04-18

    The rapid growth of spine degenerative surgery has led to unrelenting efforts to define and prevent possible complications, the incidence of which is probably higher than that reported and varies according to the region of the spine involved (cervical and thoracolumbar) and the severity of the surgery. Several issues are becoming progressively clearer, such as complication rates in primary versus revision spinal surgery, complications in the elderly, the contribution of minimally invasive surgery to the reduction of complication rate. In this paper the most common surgical complications in degenerative spinal surgery are outlined and discussed.

  9. Factors affecting complications according to the modified Clavien classification in complete supine percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Falahatkar, Siavash; Moghaddam, Keivan Gholamjani; Kazemnezhad, Ehsan; Farzan, Alireza; Aval, Hamidreza Baghani; Ghasemi, Ali; Shahab, Elaheh; Esmaeili, Seyednaser Seyed; Motiee, Reza; Langroodi, Seyedeh Alaleh Motiei; Nemati, Mohadeseh; Allahkhah, Aliakbar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: An increase in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been accompanied by an increase in complications. We identified the parameters affecting the severity of complications using the modified Clavien classification (MCC). Methods: From 2008 to 2013, 330 patients underwent complete supine PCNL using subcostal access, one-shot dilation, rigid nephroscopy, and pneumatic lithotripsy. We assessed the impact of the following factors on complication severity based on the MCC: age, gender, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, previous stone surgery and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, preoperative hemoglobin, renal dysfunction (creatinine >1.4 mg/dL), preoperative urinary tract infection, anatomic upper urinary tract abnormality (AUUTA), significant (moderate–severe) hydronephrosis, stone-related parameters (opacity, number, burden, location, staghorn, complex stones), anesthesia type, kidney side, imaging and calyx for access, tract number, tubeless approach, operative time, postoperative hemoglobin, and hemoglobin drop and stone-free results. Results: The complication rate was 19.7% (MCC: 0=80.3%, I=6.4%, II=11.2%, ≥III=2.1%). On univariate analyses, only the following factors affected MCC: gender, preoperative hemoglobin, AUUTA, significant hydronephrosis, imaging for access, calyx for access, tract number, postoperative hemoglobin, hemoglobin drop and stone-free result. Renal dysfunction was accompanied by higher complications, yet the results were not statistically significant. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated renal dysfunction, absence of significant hydronephrosis, AUUTA, multiple tracts, lower postoperative hemoglobin, and higher postoperative hemoglobin drop as the significant parameters which affected MCC and predicted higher grades. The paper’s limitations include a low number of cases in the higher Clavien grades and some subgroups of variables, and not applying some techniques due to surgeon preference

  10. Intraosseous access in trauma by air medical retrieval teams.

    PubMed

    Sheils, Mark; Ross, Mark; Eatough, Noel; Caputo, Nicholas D

    2014-01-01

    Trauma accounts for a significant portion of overall mortality globally. Hemorrhage is the second major cause of mortality in the prehospital environment. Air medical retrieval services throughout the world have been developed to help improve the outcomes of patients suffering from a broad range of medical conditions, including trauma. These services often utilize intraosseous (IO) devices as an alternative means for access of both medically ill and traumatically injured patients in austere environments. However, studies have suggested that IO access cannot reach acceptable rates for massive transfusion. We review the subject to find the answer of whether IO access should be performed by air medical teams in the prehospital setting, or would central venous (CVC) access be more appropriate? We decided to assess the literature for capacity of IO access to meet resuscitation requirements in the prehospital management of trauma. We also decided to compare the insertion and complication characteristics of IO and CVC access.

  11. Effectiveness of Arterial Closure Devices for Preventing Complications With Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: An Instrumental Variable Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Neil J.; Secemsky, Eric A; Mauri, Laura; Roe, Matthew T.; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Dai, David; McCabe, James M.; Resnic, Frederic S.; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Yeh, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bleeding is associated with poor outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). While arterial closure devices (ACDs) are widely used in clinical practice, whether they are effective in reducing bleeding complications during transfemoral PCI is uncertain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ACDs for the prevention of vascular access site complications in patients undergoing transfemoral PCI using an instrumental variable approach. Methods and Results We performed a retrospective analysis of CathPCI Registry from 2009-2013 at 1,470 sites across United States. Variation in the proportion of ACDs used by each individual physician operator was used as an instrumental variable to address potential confounding. A two stage instrumental variable analysis was used as the primary approach. The main outcome measure was vascular access site complications, and non-access site bleeding was used as a “falsification endpoint” (negative control) to evaluate for potential confounding. A total of 1,053,155 ACDs were used during 2,056,585 PCIs during the study period. The vascular access site complication rate was 1.5%. In the instrumental variable analysis, the use of ACDs was associated with a 0.40% absolute risk reduction in vascular access site complications (95% confidence interval (95% CI):0.31%−0.42%, number needed to treat=250). Absolute differences in non-access site bleeding were negligible (risk difference 0.04%, 95% CI:0.01%−0.07%), suggesting acceptable control of confounding in the comparison. Conclusions ACDs are associated with a modest reduction in major bleeding after PCI. The number needed to treat with ACDs to prevent one major bleeding event is high. PMID:27059685

  12. A comparison of the boomerang wire vascular access management system versus manual compression alone during percutaneous diagnostic and interventional cardiovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Angela; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    Vascular closure devices allow for early sheath removal, allowing for earlier patient mobilization The Boomerang vascular access management system does not alter arterial integrity for future interventions Access site complications provide significant morbidity in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

  13. Channel Access in Erlang

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.

    2013-10-13

    We have developed an Erlang language implementation of the Channel Access protocol. Included are low-level functions for encoding and decoding Channel Access protocol network packets as well as higher level functions for monitoring or setting EPICS process variables. This provides access to EPICS process variables for the Fermilab Acnet control system via our Erlang-based front-end architecture without having to interface to C/C++ programs and libraries. Erlang is a functional programming language originally developed for real-time telecommunications applications. Its network programming features and list management functions make it particularly well-suited for the task of managing multiple Channel Access circuits and PV monitors.

  14. Thermal stress and diabetic complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko

    1995-06-01

    Activities of erythrocyte aldose reductase were compared in 34 normal subjects, 45 diabetic patients, and nine young men following immersion in water at 25, 39, and 42° C. Mean basal enzyme activity was 1.11 (SEM 0.12) U/g Hb and 2.07 (SEM 0.14) U/g Hb in normal controls and diabetic patients, respectively ( P<0.0001). Activities of the enzyme showed a good correlation with hemaglobin A1 (HbA1) concentrations ( P<0.01) but not with fasting plasma glucose concentrations. After immersion at 42° C for 10 min, enzyme activity was increased by 37.6% ( P<0.01); however, the activity decreased by 52.2% ( P<0.005) after immersion for 10 min at 39° C and by 47.0% ( P<0.05) at 25° C. These changes suggest that heat stress might aggravate diabetic complications, and body exposure to hot environmental conditions is not recommended for diabetic patients.

  15. Zebrafish sex: a complicated affair

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Woei Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we provide a detailed overview of studies on the elusive sex determination (SD) and gonad differentiation mechanisms of zebrafish (Danio rerio). We show that the data obtained from most studies are compatible with polygenic sex determination (PSD), where the decision is made by the allelic combinations of several loci. These loci are typically dispersed throughout the genome, but in some teleost species a few of them might be located on a preferential pair of (sex) chromosomes. The PSD system has a much higher level of variation of SD genotypes both at the level of gametes and the sexual genotype of individuals, than that of the chromosomal sex determination systems. The early sexual development of zebrafish males is a complicated process, as they first develop a ‘juvenile ovary’, that later undergoes a transformation to give way to a testis. To date, three major developmental pathways were shown to be involved with gonad differentiation through the modulation of programmed cell death. In our opinion, there are more pathways participating in the regulation of zebrafish gonad differentiation/transformation. Introduction of additional powerful large-scale genomic approaches into the analysis of zebrafish reproduction will result in further deepening of our knowledge as well as identification of additional pathways and genes associated with these processes in the near future. PMID:24148942

  16. Hematological complications in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    De Filippo, E; Marra, M; Alfinito, F; Di Guglielmo, M L; Majorano, P; Cerciello, G; De Caprio, C; Contaldo, F; Pasanisi, F

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives: Anemia, leukopenia and, although less frequently, thrombocytopenia are possible hematological complications of anorexia nervosa considered strictly secondary to chronic malnutrition. This is a retrospective study on the prevalence of these disorders in a large cohort of 318 female patients with AN (20.4±5.6 years, body mass index (BMI) 15.9±1.6 kg/m2), recruited in the Outpatient Unit for Malnutrition secondary to Eating Disorders at the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University Hospital, since February 1991 to December 2012. Subjects/methods: Patients were studied on an outpatient basis after obtaining medical history, clinical examination, routine hematobiochemical and endocrine tests, electrocardiography, psychiatric interview and bioelectrical impedance analysis and, in particular, phase angle determination. All patients with other comorbidities, in particular with mean corpuscular volume <80 fl, were excluded for suspected genetic alteration in the synthesis of hemoglobin. Results: Hematologic data showed that 16.7% of patients had anemia, 7.9% neutropenia and 8.9% thrombocytopenia. These abnormalities were strictly related to the duration of illness (P=0.028), and to protein energy malnutrition, in particular, BMI and phase angle (P<0.001). Conclusions: Our study offers description of the incidence of hematologic defects in a selected and large sample of AN female patients, suggesting that its incidence is related to the degree and duration of protein energy malnutrition. PMID:27436150

  17. Pulmonary complications of general surgery.

    PubMed

    Pierce, A K; Robertson, J

    1977-01-01

    1. Patients should be divided preoperatively into low- or high-risk categories, depending on their probability of developing postoperative pulmonary complications. The evaluation should include spirometry as well as an assessment of the previously defined risk factors. 2. Patients in a low-risk category need only instruction in deep breathing pre- and postoperatively. Routine use of supplemented oxygen postoperatively is reasonable until it can be demonstrated whether such is necessary. 3. High-risk patients should be as free as possible of respiratory secretions at the time of surgery. A regimen for this purpose includes cessation of smoking, and administration of inhaled bronchodilators followed by chest percussion and postural drainage. 4. High-risk patients should be carefully instructed in deep breathing and coughing preoperatively. A mechanical device such as an incentive spirometer may be beneficial in this regard. If it is not possible to achieve spontaneous deep breathing, an attempt to accomplish this by IPPB may be undertaken. The tidal volume desired should be ordered. If IPPB does not result in large tidal volumes, it should be discontinued. 5. The deep breathing procedure found to be most successful preoperativelly should be continued postoperatively. 6. The patient should be as mobile as possible while in bed and ambulated as soon as is feasible. 7. Patients with preoperative expiratory flows of less than 20% of predicted values or with chronic hypercapnia should be carefully observed for postoperative ventilatory failure.

  18. Eagle syndrome revisited: cerebrovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tsuyoshi; Alexander, Michael; Stokol, Colin; Lyden, Patrick; Braunstein, Glenn; Gewertz, Bruce

    2012-07-01

    Cervical pain caused by the elongation of the styloid process (Eagle syndrome) is well known to otolaryngologists but is rarely considered by vascular surgeons. We report two patients with cerebrovascular symptoms of Eagle syndrome treated in our medical center in the past year. Case 1: an 80-year-old man with acromegaly presented with dizziness and syncope with neck rotation. The patient was noted to have bilateral elongated styloid processes impinging on the internal carotid arteries. After staged resections of the styloid processes through cervical approaches, the symptoms resolved completely. Case 2: a 57-year-old man presented with acute-onset left-sided neck pain radiating to his head immediately after a vigorous neck massage. Hospital course was complicated by a 15-minute transient ischemic attack resulting in aphasia. Angiography revealed bilateral dissections of his internal carotid arteries, with a dissecting aneurysm on the right. Both injuries were immediately adjacent to the bilateral elongated styloid processes. Despite immediate anticoagulation therapy, he experienced aphasia and right hemiparesis associated with an occlusion of his left carotid artery. He underwent emergent catheter thrombectomy and carotid stent placement, with near-complete resolution of his symptoms. Elongated styloid processes characteristic of Eagle syndrome can result in both temporary impingement and permanent injury to the extracranial carotid arteries. Although rare, Eagle syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with cerebrovascular symptoms, especially those induced by positional change.

  19. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present.

  20. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akkuş, Selami; Uğurlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  1. AccessAbility @ Cleveland Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mates, Barbara T.

    2003-01-01

    Describes several programs that were developed by staff at the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Library to be accessible to users with disabilities. Highlights include a Braille reading program; sensory garden; poetry club; book club based on talking books; wheelchair athletics; touching museum artifacts; and a mobile library for users who could not visit…

  2. Subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm: a rare and serious complication of central venous catheterization in an infant.

    PubMed

    Koklu, Esad; Poyrazoglu, Hakan; Yikilmaz, Ali; Canpolat, Mehmet; Konuskan, Bahadir

    2008-02-01

    Serious complications of central venous access occur in 0.4-9.9% of patients undergoing attempted central venepuncture. We report an unusual case of an 18-month-old infant in whom a right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm developed rapidly after attempted subclavian vein catheterization without US guidance failed.

  3. Chylous Ascites: A Rare Complication of Thoracic Duct Embolization for Chylothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Gaba, Ron C. Owens, Charles A.; Bui, James T.; Carrillo, Tami C.; Knuttinen, M. Grace

    2011-02-15

    Thoracic duct embolization represents a safe and effective method to treat postsurgical chylothorax. Complications of this procedure are rare despite transabdominal puncture of lymphatic channels for thoracic duct access, and chylous ascites is unreported. Herein, we describe a case of chylous ascites formation after lymphatic puncture and attempted cannulation. Our management approach is also discussed.

  4. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  5. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan; Jersey Inst Ansari, New; Jersey Inst, New

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  6. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  7. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  8. Modeling the Temporal Evolution of Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Shara I.; Cobian, Alexander G.; Tevis, Sarah E.; Kennedy, Gregory D.; Craven, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative complications have a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality; these impacts are exacerbated when patients experience multiple complications. However, the task of modeling the temporal sequencing of complications has not been previously addressed. We present an approach based on Markov chain models for characterizing the temporal evolution of post-operative complications represented in the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program database. Our work demonstrates that the models have significant predictive value. In particular, an inhomogenous Markov chain model effectively predicts the development of serious complications (coma longer than a day, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, septic shock, renal failure, pneumonia) and interventional complications (unplanned re-intubation, longer than 2 days on a ventilator and bleeding transfusion). PMID:28269851

  9. Medical Treatment of Tattoo Complications.

    PubMed

    Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Tattooing is a skin trauma and involves a special vulnus punctatum (with inserted tattoo ink, a vulnus venenatum), which should heal with no infection and no local complication. Local treatment in the healing phase ideally builds on the 'moist wound' principle using plastic film, hydrocolloids, silver dressing, and compression. Bacterial infections during healing are treated with oral antibiotics, and a list of first-line antibiotics is proposed. Notice is given to severe infections with affected general condition, and it is emphasized that intravenous antibiotic treatment must be instituted as early as possible to prevent septic shock and death. Hydrophilic antibiotics shall be given in high load and maintenance dose due to increased renal clearance of such antibiotics. Chronic allergic reactions of red tattoos respond little to local corticoids and are best treated with dermatome shaving. Laser removal is contraindicated due to the risk of photochemical activation of the allergy with anaphylaxis or worsening. Chronic reactions in black tattoos can be treated with local corticoids, dermatome shaving, and lasers as well. Systemic corticoid is used in allergic reactions in red tattoos and in cross-allergic reactions of other red tattoos as well as in black tattoo reactions associated with sarcoidosis and with cutaneous 'rush phenomenon' affecting any black tattoo. Systemic corticoid is also indicated in generalized eczema due to nickel allergy or another allergy challenged through tattooing or introduced by tattooing as a primary sensitization. The use of intralesional corticoid, antihistamines, and immunosuppressive medicines is discussed. A warning against the use of lactic acid and other caustic chemicals for tattoo removal is given, since such chemicals and commercial products cannot be dosed properly and very often result in disfiguring scarring.

  10. Role of endoscopy in the conservative management of biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lisotti, Andrea; Fusaroli, Pietro; Caletti, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients receiving liver transplantation could be significantly affected by biliary complications, including strictures, leaks, stones and bilomas; early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions lead to markedly reduction in morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic gold standard is represented by conservative approaches, both endoscopic and percutaneous, based on the type of biliary reconstruction, the local availability of the procedures and specific expertise. In patients with previous transplantation, the difficult biliary access and the possible presence of concomitant complications (mainly strictures) further restrict the efficacy of the endoscopic and percutaneous treatments; on the other hand, surgery should generally be avoided because of the even increased morbidity and mortality due to technical and clinical issues. Here we review the most common biliary complications occurring after liver transplantation and discuss available treatment options including future perspectives such as endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary access in patients with Roux-en-Y choledocho-jejunostomy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for difficult stones. PMID:26730271

  11. Standards and Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Argues that easy claims about the relationship between language mastery and academic or economic access (made by both conservative commentators on education and mainstream writing teachers) are false and obscure real social and political boundaries, such as racism, sexism, elitism, and homophobia, that really do prevent access. (SR)

  12. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; O'Connor, David; Partrick, Richard; Orzechowski, Pawel; Spitter, Connie; Lillie, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  13. The Equal Access Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catron, J. Gregory

    1987-01-01

    Reviews past history of access of religious activities in public schools in relation to the establishment clause of the First Amendment and sets forth the prerequisites in the Equal Access Act of 1984 for creating a well-defined forum for student-initiated free speech including religious groups in public high schools. (MD)

  14. Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Felecia; De Oliver, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This case study researches the degree to which the location and services offered by a multicampus university, geographically situated consistent with the commercial principles of a large mass-market enterprise, facilitate access for educationally underserved groups. First, the necessity of democratizing educational access to an underprivileged…

  15. Granting Each Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Linda Lucas

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes federal legislation regarding equal access for students with disabilities and discusses environmental barriers to accessibility in the library media center. Solutions to these design problems are suggested in the following areas: material formats and space requirements; the physical setting, including furniture, floor coverings,…

  16. MedlinePlus: Accessibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools Español You Are Here: Home → MedlinePlus Accessibility URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/accessibility.html ... or (301) 594-5983 and provide the address (URL) of the page on which you need assistance, ...

  17. Design for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, David R.; McCallum, Barry

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the facets of building design which affect the accessibility of libraries for the physically disabled and presents some basic guidelines for designing accessible libraries. Types of disabilities, questions relating to site design, and specific architectural and physical features of libraries (entranceways, lighting, stairways, and…

  18. Hemoperitoneum: a rare complication of hemorrhoid treatment.

    PubMed

    Andreuccetti, J; Gaj, F; Crispino, P; Dassatti, M R; Negro, P

    2014-04-01

    Pile suturing has always been used by surgeons to treat hemorrhoidal disease. We report a case of hemoperitoneum complicating a pile suture. Ultrasonography and computed tomography scan indicated the need for an emergency laparoscopic procedure and conservative management. As other authors have pointed out, we do not know how to prevent this type of complication. This case suggests the possibility of life-threatening complications following treatment procedures for hemorrhoids and underlines the importance of conservative treatment when this is possible.

  19. Complications of arthroscopic surgery of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Papavasiliou, A. V.; Bardakos, N. V.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent years hip arthroscopic surgery has evolved into one of the most rapidly expanding fields in orthopaedic surgery. Complications are largely transient and incidences between 0.5% and 6.4% have been reported. However, major complications can and do occur. This article analyses the reported complications and makes recommendations based on the literature review and personal experience on how to minimise them. PMID:23610683

  20. [Endoscopic ethmoidectomy. How to prevent complications?].

    PubMed

    Khoury, J

    1998-01-01

    The use of the microscope and more recently of the endoscope, improve the conditions of endonasal surgery. These techniques must not give the impression of complete security. The complications of the ethmoidectomy exist. A good knowledge of the anatomy of the sinus cavities and a gradual apprenticeship are the best means to prevent these complications. We present the different types of complications and their preventions.

  1. A rare complication of tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Shukeri, Wan Fadzlina Wan Muhd; Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan; Nadarajan, Chandran

    2016-01-01

    Accidental endobronchial intubation is a frequent complication in critically ill patients requiring tracheal intubation (TI). If such complication occurs, it is more often the right main bronchus that is intubated due to anatomical reasons. Left main bronchus (LMB) intubation is rare. Here, we report a case with auscultatory, bronchoscopic, and radiographic evidence of accidental LMB intubation in a pregnant woman with dengue shock syndrome. We highlight this case to increase awareness about this possible-but-rare complication of TI. PMID:27275080

  2. Complications of childhood diabetes and the role of technology.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Hi; Couper, Jennifer J; Donaghue, Kim C

    2010-08-01

    Technology for detecting vascular complications of childhood diabetes has already helped many children and youth by allowing for the early detection and intervention of impending or present problems as the result of the diabetes state. Prior to the advent of screening, young people developed clinical disease, in particular visual loss and renal impairment that often rapidly progressed to end-stage disease. With the advent of laser photocoagulation, which dramatically reduced visual loss from diabetic retinopathy, the importance of early detection and treatment of micro and macrovascular complications prior to clinical symptoms became apparent. Many technological advances are now being applied to the pediatric diabetes population, in either clinical care or the research setting. For example, retinal photography makes screening more accessible and more meaningful to adolescents with diabetes and can be used in large screening programs, for teleophthalmology, clinical trials and in geographically remote areas. Quantitative measures used to assess microvascular structure may be useful in monitoring interventions in the future. Quantitative sensory tests can monitor nerve dysfunction, but evaluations such as intraepidermal nerve fibre pathology and cornea confocal microscopy may be more sensitive to diagnose neuropathic complications in youth. B-mode ultrasonography can assess vascular function by measuring endothelium-dependent flow mediated dilatation and changes in the intima-media thickness of the carotid and aorta. It is the purpose of this manuscript to explore the role of present and future technological advances (Table 1) in young people with diabetes.

  3. Perioperative complications in infant cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Fillies, Thomas; Homann, Christoph; Meyer, Ulrich; Reich, Alexander; Joos, Ulrich; Werkmeister, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Cleft surgery in infants includes special risks due to the kind of the malformation. These risks can be attributed in part to the age and the weight of the patient. Whereas a lot of studies investigated the long-term facial outcome of cleft surgery depending on the age at operation, less is known about the complications arising during a cleft surgery in early infancy. Methods We investigated the incidence and severity of perioperative complications in 174 infants undergoing primary cleft surgery. The severity and the complications were recorded during the intraoperative and the early postoperative period according to the classification by Cohen. Results Our study revealed that minor complications occurred in 50 patients. Severe complications were observed during 13 operations. There was no fatal complication in the perioperative period. The risk of complications was found to be directly correlated to the body weight at the time of the surgery. Most of the problems appeared intraoperatively, but they were also followed by complications immediately after the extubation. Conclusion In conclusion, cleft surgery in infancy is accompanied by frequent and sometimes severe perioperative complications that may be attributed to this special surgical field. PMID:17280602

  4. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  5. [Oral complications of chemotherapy of malignant neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Obralić, N; Tahmiscija, H; Kobaslija, S; Beslija, S

    1999-01-01

    Function and integrity disorders of the oral cavity fall into the most frequent complication of the chemotherapy of leucemias, malignant lymphomas and solid tumors. Complications associated with cancer chemotherapy can be direct ones, resulting from the toxic action of antineoplastic agents on the proliferative lining of the mouth, or indirect, as a result of myelosuppression and immunosuppression. The most frequent oral complications associated with cancer chemotherapy are mucositis, infection and bleeding. The principles of prevention and management of oral complications during cancer chemotherapy are considered in this paper.

  6. Discovering Diabetes Complications: an Ontology Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Daghistani, Tahani; Shammari, Riyad Al; Razzak, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a serious disease that spread in the world dramatically. The diabetes patient has an average of risk to experience complications. Take advantage of recorded information to build ontology as information technology solution will help to predict patients who have average of risk level with certain complication. It is helpful to search and present patient’s history regarding different risk factors. Discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Method: We designed ontology based model, using adult diabetes patients’ data, to discover the rules of diabetes with its complications in disease to disease relationship. Result: Various rules between different risk factors of diabetes Patients and certain complications generated. Furthermore, new complications (diseases) might be discovered as new finding of this study, discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Conclusion: The system can identify the patients who are suffering from certain risk factors such as high body mass index (obesity) and starting controlling and maintaining plan. PMID:26862251

  7. Management of Complications of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Mathews, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Treating a fracture of the distal radius may require the surgeon to make a difficult decision between surgical treatment and nonsurgical management. The use of surgical fixation has recently increased owing to complications associated with conservative treatment. However, conservative action may be necessary depending on certain patient factors. The treating surgeon must be aware of the possible complications associated with distal radius fracture treatments to prevent their occurrence. Prevention can be achieved with a proper understanding of the mechanism of these complications. This article discusses the most recent evidence on how to manage and prevent complications following a fracture of the distal radius. PMID:25934197

  8. Management of complications of Dupuytren contracture.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kevin; Walley, Kempland C; Rozental, Tamara D

    2015-05-01

    This evidence-based article discusses the current management options of Dupuytren disease and strategies to avoid and manage any potential complications. Treatment options include fasciectomy, needle fasciotomy/aponeurotomy, and collagenase injection. Complications include digital nerve and artery injury, flexor tendon injury, skin fissures and wound healing complications, hematoma, infection, flare reaction/complex regional pain syndrome, and recurrence. Complication rates, prevention, and management differ with each treatment modality. A detailed understanding of each of these options allows hand surgeons to select the most appropriate treatment for each patient.

  9. Approach to permanent hemodialysis access in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Feezor, Robert J

    2011-06-01

    Obesity has reached an epidemic in the United States and, not surprisingly, there has been a dramatic increase in obesity-associated comorbidities, complete with a host of new, related surgical challenges. The creation and maintenance of permanent hemodialysis access, particularly autogenous access, is generally considered more difficult in the obese patient because of the increased risk of perioperative complications, as well as a decreased maturation rate. Most of the data documenting these adverse outcomes come from retrospective studies and, therefore, the reliability of the data is somewhat limited, given the inherent selection bias. In the United States, most obese patients dialyze through prosthetic access, despite the national initiatives targeted at maximizing autogenous access. However, it is possible to construct an autogenous access in most patients, including obese patients, presenting for permanent access using proper, diligent preoperative imaging and an aggressive postoperative surveillance protocol until access maturation. This is facilitated by careful preoperative planning and liberal use of multiple diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers to improve overall access function. In this review, the outcomes associated with permanent hemodialysis access in the obese are discussed and helpful suggestions to facilitate a functional access provided.

  10. Legal issues related to vascular access devices and infusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Masoorli, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Infusion therapies are being delivered in many healthcare settings including hospitals, homecare settings, long-term care facilities, occupational health facilities, outpatient units, and physician offices. Nurses who infuse medications must be properly educated to recognize vascular access complications and initiate the proper interventions. This article discusses the high-risk areas of nursing malpractice related to infusion therapies.

  11. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension Complicating Fibrosing Mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Seferian, Andrei; Steriade, Alexandru; Jaïs, Xavier; Planché, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Amar, David; Jovan, Roland; Fadel, Elie; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibrosing mediastinitis is caused by a proliferation of fibrous tissue in the mediastinum with encasement of mediastinal viscera and compression of mediastinal bronchovascular structures. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of fibrosing mediastinitis caused by extrinsic compression of the pulmonary arteries and/or veins. We have conducted a retrospective observational study reviewing clinical, functional, hemodynamic, radiological characteristics, and outcome of 27 consecutive cases of PH associated with fibrosing mediastinitis diagnosed between 2003 and 2014 at the French Referral Centre for PH. Fourteen men and 13 women with a median age of 60 years (range 18–84) had PH confirmed on right heart catheterization. The causes of fibrosing mediastinitis were sarcoidosis (n = 13), tuberculosis-infection confirmed or suspected (n = 9), mediastinal irradiation (n = 2), and idiopathic (n = 3). Sixteen patients (59%) were in NYHA functional class III and IV. Right heart catheterization confirmed moderate to severe PH with a median mean pulmonary artery pressure of 42 mm Hg (range 27–90) and a median cardiac index of 2.8 L/min/m2 (range 1.6–4.3). Precapillary PH was found in 22 patients, postcapillary PH in 2, and combined postcapillary and precapillary PH in 3. Severe extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries (>60% reduction in diameter) was evidenced in 2, 8, and 12 patients at the main, lobar, or segmental levels, respectively. Fourteen patients had at least one severe pulmonary venous compression with associated pleural effusion in 6 of them. PAH therapy was initiated in 7 patients and corticosteroid therapy (0.5–1 mg/kg/day) was initiated in 3 patients with sarcoidosis, with 9 other being already on low-dose corticosteroids. At 1-year follow-up, 3 patients had died and among the 21 patients evaluated, 3 deteriorated, 14 were stable, and only 4 patients with sarcoidosis improved (4 receiving corticosteroids and 1

  13. Complications of Nasal Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Yeom, Seung Han; Hwang, Suk Hyun

    2017-01-27

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the treatment of nasal bone fractures. The search terms ("nasal bone fracture" AND complication) and ("nasal bone fracture" AND [anosmia OR olfaction OR olfactory nerve OR smell]) and (anosmia AND ["nasal preparation" OR "nasal antiseptics"]) were used to search PubMed and SCOPUS. Of the 500 titles, 40 full papers were reviewed. One paper was excluded, and 3 mined papers were added. Ultimately, 12 papers were analyzed. The overall deformity rate was 10.4% ± 4.8%. No significant differences were found between patients who underwent closed reduction (14.7% ± 7.3%) and those who underwent open reduction (9.4% ± 4.4%), between those who underwent local anesthesia (5.8% ± 4.5%), and those who underwent general anesthesia (8.8% ± 3.8%), or between those who received timely treatment (5.7%) and those whose treatment was delayed (9.0%). Septal deviation occurred in 10.0% of patients as a sequela of nasal bone fracture. The nasal obstruction rate was 10.5% ± 5.3%. Fewer patients of nasal obstruction occurred in the open reduction patients (6.9% ± 4.4%) than in the closed reduction patients (15.2%). One patient of epiphora and 1 patient of diplopia were reportedAmong the 77 patients with nasal bone fractures, 29 (37.7% ± 11.3%) complained of olfactory disturbances. No significant associations were found between the type of fracture and the presence of olfactory disturbances. It is recommended for providers to explain to patients that approximately one-tenth of nasal bone fractures exhibit deformity, septal deviation, or nasal obstruction after surgery. Surgeons should take considerable care to avoid the olfactory mucosa during reduction surgery.

  14. Radial access for cerebrovascular procedures: Case report and technical note

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Ansar Z; Sivapatham, Thinesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Advantages of radial access over brachial/axillary or femoral access have been well described for several decades and include decreased cost, patient preference, and decreased major access site complications. Despite these advantages, radial access is rarely employed or even considered for neurointerventional procedures. This attitude should be reconsidered given several recent large, randomized, controlled trials from the cardiovascular literature proving that radial access is associated with statistically lower costs, decreased incidence of myocardial infarctions, strokes, and even decreased mortality. Radial access is now considered the standard of care for percutaneous coronary interventions in most US centers. Although radial access has been described for neurovascular procedures in the past, overall experience is limited. The two major challenges are the unique anatomy required to access the cerebral vasculature given very acute angles between the arm and craniocervical vessels and limitations in available technology. Methods We present a simplified approach to radial access for cerebrovascular procedures and provide a concise step-by-step approach for patient selection, ultrasound-guided single-wall access, recommended catheters/wires, and review of patent hemostasis. Additionally, we present a complex cerebrovascular intervention in which standard femoral access was unsuccessful, while radial access was quickly achieved to highlight the importance of familiarity with the radial approach for all neurointerventionalists. Results We have found that the learning curve is not too steep and that the radial access approach can be adopted smoothly for a large percentage of diagnostic and interventional neuroradiologic procedures. Conclusions Radial access should be considered in all patients undergoing a cerebrovascular procedure. PMID:26659807

  15. Totally Percutaneous Access Using Perclose Proglide for Endovascular Treatment of Aortic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Eduardo Keller; Saadi, Marina; Saadi, Rodrigo; Tagliari, Ana Paula; Mastella, Bernardo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate our experience following the introduction of a percutaneous program for endovascular treatment of aortic diseases using Perclose Proglide® assessing efficacy, complications and identification of potential risk factors that could predict failure or major access site complications. Methods A retrospective cohort study during a two-year period was performed. All the patients submitted to totally percutaneous endovascular repair (PEVAR) of aortic diseases and transcatheter aortic valve implantation since we started the total percutaneous approach with the preclosure technique from November 2013 to December 2015 were included in the study. The primary endpoint was major ipsilateral access complication, defined according to PEVAR trial. Results In a cohort of 123 patients, immediate technical success was obtained in 121 (98.37%) patients, with only two (0.82%) cases in 242 vascular access sites that required intervention immediately after the procedure. Pairwise comparisons revealed increased major access complication among patients with >50% common femoral artery (CFA) calcification vs. none (P=0.004) and > 50% CFA calcification vs. < 50% CFA calcification (P=0.002). Small artery diameter (<6.5 mm) also increased major access complication compared to bigger diameters (> 6.5 mm) (P=0.027). Conclusion The preclosure technique with two Perclose Proglide® for PEVAR is safe and effective. Complications occur more often in patients with unfavorable access site anatomy and the success rate can be improved with proper patient selection.

  16. NASA Access Mechanism (NAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy

    1993-01-01

    A 1991 user survey indicated that NASA users want (1) access to diverse sources of information; (2) an intuitive approach to system use; (3) avoidance of system query languages; (4) access to peers and other informal sources of information; and (5) simplified and enhanced presentation of search results. Based on these requirements and the use of an intelligent gateway processor, the NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) is being developed to provide the users with the semblance of a one stop shopping environment for information management.

  17. Diabetic foot complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta, Maddalena; Imbriaco, Chiara; Rigolon, Riccardo; Mingolla, Lucia; Zamboni, Federica; Dal Molin, Francesca; Cioccoloni, Dario; Sanga, Viola; Bruti, Massimiliano; Brocco, Enrico; Conti, Michela; Ravenna, Giorgio; Perrone, Fabrizia; Stoico, Vincenzo; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vertebral osteomyelitis (or spondylodiscitis) is steadily increasing in Western countries and often results from hematogenous seeding, direct inoculation during spinal surgery, or contiguous spread from an infection in the adjacent soft tissue. We present the case of a 67-year-old white patient with type 2 diabetes who went to Hospital for high fever, back pain, and worsening of known infected ulcers in the left foot. Despite intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement of the foot infection, high fever and lower back pain continued. Bone biopsy and two consecutive blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, revealing serious osteomyelitis in L4 and L5 complicated by an epidural abscess. Contiguous or other distant focuses of infection were not identified. In this case, diabetic foot could be considered as a primary distant focus for vertebral osteomyelitis. Clinicians should consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a ‘possible’ diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by foot infection that is associated with fever and lower back pain. Learning points Vertebral osteomyelitis is increasing in Western countries, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary focus of infection is the genitourinary tract followed by skin, soft tissue, endocarditis, bursitis, septic arthritis, and intravascular access. Diabetic foot could be a rare primary focus of infection for vertebral osteomyelitis, and, however, vertebral osteomyelitis could be a serious, albeit rare, complication of diabetic foot. Clinicians should keep in mind the many potential complications of diabetic foot ulcerations and consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a “possible” diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes and foot ulcers associated with nonspecific symptoms such as lower back pain. Early diagnosis and correct management of vertebral osteomyelitis are crucial to improve clinical outcomes

  18. Clinical review: Vascular access for fluid infusion in children

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Nikolaus A

    2004-01-01

    The current literature on venous access in infants and children for acute intravascular access in the routine situation and in emergency or intensive care settings is reviewed. The various techniques for facilitating venous cannulation, such as application of local warmth, transillumination techniques and epidermal nitroglycerine, are described. Preferred sites for central venous access in infants and children are the external and internal jugular veins, the subclavian and axillary veins, and the femoral vein. The femoral venous cannulation appears to be the most safe and reliable technique in children of all ages, with a high success and low complication rates. Evidence from the reviewed literature strongly supports the use of real-time ultrasound techniques for venous cannulation in infants and children. Additionally, in emergency situations the intraosseous access has almost completly replaced saphenous cutdown procedures in children and has decreased the need for immediate central venous access. PMID:15566619

  19. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks

    Guest Editors Jun Zheng, University of Ottawa Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

    Background

    With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the

  20. [Postoperative complications in patients with cervicothoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, E V; Pogodina, A N; Korovkina, E N

    2014-01-01

    The results of the diagnosis and treatment of 117 patients with cervicothoracic injuries were analyzed. Different complications were observed in 51 (43.6%) cases. The main reasons contributing to the development of complications included late diagnosis of lesions of trachea and esophagus, acute blood loss, inadequate hemostasis during surgery.

  1. Complication of Behcet's disease: spontaneous aortic pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ugurlucan, Murat; Sayin, Omer Ali; Surmen, Benguhan; Kafali, Eylul; Basaran, Murat; Alpagut, Ufuk; Dayioglu, Enver; Onursal, Ertan

    2006-01-01

    Behcet's disease is an autoimmune multisystemic disorder based on vasculitis. In this disease, the most important predictor of morbidity and mortality is the vascular complications. Appropriate surgical interventions are critical and must be planned strategically. Here, we will describe a very rare complication of the disease; spontaneous aortic pseudoaneurysm in a 33-year-old patient.

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis: a rare complication of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mazza, J F; Augenstein, J S; Kreis, D J

    1987-09-01

    The mortality of acute appendicitis increases sixfold if perforation occurs. We have reported a case of perforated appendix complicated by necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall and retroperitoneum. We believe this complication has not been previously described in the English literature.

  3. A very unusual complication of amniocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Munawar; Hill, Michael; Kelly, David; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The uses of amniocentesis are numerous, including determination of chromosomal abnormalities, lung maturity, and infections. A common complication of amniocentesis is loss of the pregnancy, but rare complications should be considered. The role of patient history and clinical observation of uncommon presentations are critical in the management of the patient. PMID:26185625

  4. The Medical Complications Associated with Purging

    PubMed Central

    Forney, K. Jean; Buchman-Schmitt, Jennifer M.; Keel, Pamela K.; Frank, Guido K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Purging behaviors, including self-induced vomiting, laxative abuse, and diuretic abuse, are present across many of the eating disorders. Here we review the major medical complications of these behaviors. Method Although we identified over 100 scholarly articles describing medical complications associated with purging, most papers involved case studies or small, uncontrolled samples. Given the limited evidence base, we conducted a qualitative (rather than systematic) review to identify medical complications that have been attributed to purging behaviors. Results Medical conditions affecting the teeth, esophagus, gastrointestinal system, kidneys, skin, cardiovascular system, and musculoskeletal system were identified, with self-induced vomiting causing the most medical complications. Conclusions Purging behavior can be associated with severe medical complications across all body systems. Mental health professionals should refer patients with purging behaviors to medical providers for screening and treatment as needed. The medical work-up for individuals with eating disorders should include a comprehensive metabolic panel, complete blood count, and a full body exam including the teeth to prevent severe complications. Medical providers should screen patients for purging behaviors and associated medical complications, even in the absence of an eating disorder diagnosis, to increase the detection of eating disorders. Recognizing the link between purging and medical complications can aid in identifying potential eating disorders, particularly those that often elude detection such as purging disorder. PMID:26876429

  5. The Prone Position During Surgery and its Complications: A Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Melissa M.; Ho, Yik-Hong; Rozen, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery in the prone position is often a necessity when access to posterior anatomic structures is required. However, many complications are known to be associated with this type of surgery, as physiologic changes occur with increased pressure to anterior structures. While several studies have discussed postoperative vision loss, much fewer studies with lower levels of evidence have addressed other complications. A systematic literature review was conducted using 2 different databases, and 53 papers were regarded as appropriate for inclusion. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed. Thirteen complications were identified. Postoperative vision loss and cardiovascular complications, including hypovolemia and cardiac arrest, had the most number of studies and highest level of evidence. Careful planning for optimal positioning, padding, timing, as well as increased vigilance are evidence-based recommendations where operative prone positioning is required. PMID:25692433

  6. Nutritional and metabolic complications of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Scott S

    2006-04-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for patients with clinically severe obesity. In addition to significant weight loss, it is also associated with improvements in comorbidities. Unfortunately, bariatric surgery also has the potential to cause a variety of nutritional and metabolic complications. These complications are mostly due to the extensive surgically induced anatomical changes incurred by the patient's gastrointestinal tract, particularly with roux-en-Y gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion. Complications associated with vertical banded gastroplasty are mostly due to decreased intake amounts of specific nutrients. Macronutrient deficiencies can include severe protein-calorie malnutrition and fat malabsorption. The most common micronutrient deficiencies are of vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and vitamin D. Other micronutrient deficiencies that can lead to serious complications include thiamine, folate, and the fat-soluble vitamins. Counseling, monitoring, and nutrient and mineral supplementation are essential for the treatment and prevention of nutritional and metabolic complications after bariatric surgery.

  7. Major surgical complications from minor urological procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Eke, N.

    2000-01-01

    Some urological procedures are regarded as minor or simple. As a result, these may be delegated to trainee surgeons to do. Occasionally nonmedical persons embark on some of the procedures such as male circumcision. Published serious complications from urological procedures considered minor or simple were identified from a Medline search (1966 through 1999) and reference lists of relevant publications. The operations regarded as minor were carried out by medical personnel of all grades as well as by nonmedical persons. The complications can be classified as mutilatory, infective, hemorrhagic, or obstructive. Although the mutilatory complications affect mainly procedures on the penis, infective and hemorrhagic complications affect almost all the procedures. Tumor implantation has occurred along needle biopsy tracts. Although many of the complications are not related to technique or competence, a plea is made for the awareness of their occurrence to encourage preventive strategies. Adequate training of surgical personnel remains essential worldwide. PMID:10976176

  8. Complications of stomas: their aetiology and management.

    PubMed

    Watson, Angus J M; Nicol, Laura; Donaldson, Susan; Fraser, Cathie; Silversides, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The formation of a stoma is an essential part of many colorectal operations. Despite the frequency with which these surgeries are performed and the number of specialists involved in stoma care, complications are still common. This article investigates the most common complications, explains the reasons for their occurrence and suggests potential management options. Common stoma complications were identified by the colorectal/ stoma clinical nurse specialist (CSCNS) and a literature search was performed using a variety of online databases, including Medline and CINAHL using the keywords stoma, complications, prolapse, ischaemia, retraction, hernia and stenosis. Articles used were selected on the basis of relevance to the topic. The commonest complications of stomas included skin irritation, prolapse, retraction, ischaemia, hernia and stenosis.

  9. [Cardiac and extracardiac complications in Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Kamada, Masahiro

    2014-09-01

    In terms of frequency and prognosis, discussions of the complications of Kawasaki disease have focused on coronary artery aneurysms and stenosis. However, as revealed by autopsy findings, medium and small muscular arteries in various organs could be injured in patients with Kawasaki disease, leading to the development of a variety of complications. Accurate diagnosis of Kawasaki disease can be especially difficult when incomplete Kawasaki disease is accompanied by rare complications involving the central nervous system, digestive system, and other systems in the body, which leads to delay in treatment and subsequent development of coronary artery aneurysms and delayed improvement of the existing complications. Doctors who treat Kawasaki disease should be familiar with the rare but important complications of Kawasaki disease.

  10. HRP Data Accessibility 2009

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Clarence Sams spoke at the 2009 Human Research Program's Investigators Workshop on the current status of Data Accessibility. In this presentation he discusses the content of the Human Life Scie...

  11. Accessibility and assistive products

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Porrero, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Accessibility and assistive products and technologies are needed to ensure the rights of persons with disabilities and older persons. Many developments have been implemented in laws, standards, markets and from the consumers perspective, at international, European and national levels. The real issue is that not all the potential users benefit from the use of assistive products or accessible measures. Discussion Innovative methods are needed to allow all potential users to have real advantage of assistive technologies and accessible and design for all facilities. Best practices will be presented and existing gaps and recommendations will be discussed. Cost-benefits aspects will also be presented. Conclusion In order to get advantages from opportunities of globalization, hard work and responsibilities of all stakeholders are needed, so that assistive products and accessibility reach a whole range of situations and environments and contribute to ensure quality of life in a society for all.

  12. Access denied; invalid password.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2006-11-01

    Progress addressing access to oral health is difficult to evaluate because it is unclear what access means. Ozar's proposal that access should be defined by dentists as true dental need is criticized. It is proposed that four different types of treatment are currently identifiable in dentistry: 1) traditional oral health care, 2) oral care that has minimal or no health component, 3) episodic care, and 4) oral health outcomes not resulting from dentist interventions such as fluoridation. Each of these models has a different definition of care and of access. The profession is becoming segmented--including growing disparities among dentists in earning potential--to the point where a single model may no longer be able to cover all needs for oral health.

  13. EPA Accessibility Statement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is committed to making its websites and other electronic and information technology (EIT) accessible to the widest possible audience, including people with disabilities, in accordance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act.

  14. Equal Access to All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schettler, Joel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the Section 508 amendment to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 that directs the use of technology. Describes guidelines for online training accessibility with which vendors hoping for government business must fully comply. (JOW)

  15. Access to Investigational Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... access to investigational drugs being developed by pharmaceutical companies? Are there specific criteria used to determine whether ... laboratory. If the results are promising, the drug company or sponsor must apply for FDA approval to ...

  16. Problems of Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servedio, William; McLeod, William

    1980-01-01

    Increased participation in recreational programing by persons with handicapping conditions is a right that calls for significant changes in accessibility of facilities. Both interior and exterior building modifications must be made. (CJ)

  17. First Accessible Boat Launch

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a story about how the Northwest Indiana urban waters partnership location supported the process to create and open the first handicap accessible canoe and kayak launch in the state of Indiana.

  18. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-02-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  19. Vascular access for hemodialysis: arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2005-06-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis (HD) is dependant on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. The optimal vascular access is unquestionably the autologous arteriovenous fistula (AVF), with the most common method being the conventional radio-cephalic fistula at the wrist. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native fistula or synthetic graft before the start of chronic HD therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. This could also have a beneficial effect on the rapidity of worsening kidney failure. A multidisciplinary approach (nephrologists, surgeons, radiologists and nurses) should improve the HD outcome by promoting the use of AVF. An important additional component of this program is the Doppler ultrasound for preoperative vascular mapping. Such an approach may be realized without unsuccessful surgical explorations, with a minimal early failure rate and a high maturation, even in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  20. The Biology of Hemodialysis Vascular Access Failure

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Akshaar; Misra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are essential for patients and clinicians faced with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While this method of vascular access for hemodialysis is preferred to others due to its reduced rate of infection and complications, they are plagued by intimal hyperplasia. The pathogenesis of intimal hyperplasia and subsequent thrombosis is brought on by uremia, hypoxia, and shear stress. These forces upregulate inflammatory and proliferative cytokines acting on leukocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and platelets. This activation begins initially with the progression of uremia, which induces platelet dysfunction and primes the body for an inflammatory response. The vasculature subsequently undergoes changes in oxygenation and shear stress during AVF creation. This propagates a strong inflammatory response in the vessel leading to cellular proliferation. This combined response is then further subjected to the stressors of cannulation and dialysis, eventually leading to stenosis and thrombosis. This review aims to help interventional radiologists understand the biological changes and pathogenesis of access failure. PMID:27011423

  1. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  2. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  3. How to Perform Transcaval Access and Closure for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Robert J.; Babaliaros, Vasilis C.; Greenbaum, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous trans-catheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  4. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology.

  5. Complications of Distal Biceps Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nirav H.; Volpi, Alex; Lynch, T. Sean; Patel, Ronak M.; Cerynik, Douglas L.; Schickendantz, Mark S.; Jones, Morgan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anatomic reinsertion of the distal biceps is critical for restoring flexion and supination strength. Single- and double-incision surgical techniques have been reported, analyzing complications and outcomes measures. Which technique results in superior clinical outcomes and the lowest associated complications remains unclear. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that rerupture rates would be similar between the 2 techniques, while nerve complications would be higher for the single-incision technique and heterotopic ossification would be more frequent with the double-incision technique. Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review was conducted using the PubMed, MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), SPORTSDiscus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases to identify articles reporting distal biceps ruptures up to August 2013. We included English-language articles on adult patients with a minimum of 3 cases reporting single- and double-incision techniques. Frequencies of each complication as a percentage of total cases were calculated. Fisher exact tests were used to test the association between frequencies for each repair method, with P < .05 considered statistically significant. Odds ratios with 95% CIs were also computed. Results: A total of 87 articles met the inclusion criteria. Lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve neurapraxia was the most common complication in the single-incision group, occurring in 77 of 785 cases (9.8%). Heterotopic ossification was the most common complication in the double-incision group, occurring in 36 of 498 cases (7.2%). Conclusion: The overall frequency of reported complications is higher for single-incision distal biceps repair than for double-incision repair. The frequencies of rerupture and nerve complications are both higher for single-incision repairs while the frequency of heterotopic ossification is higher for

  6. [Complications of injuries to deciduous teeth].

    PubMed

    Oka, A E; N'Cho, K J; Bakayoko-Ly, R

    2003-03-01

    The traumatisms of the temporary teeth are very frequent. They are bound to the acquirement of the march, to the games, to the sport and to the accidents of the public way. Favoured by the presence one improved proalveoly, they constitute a dental emergency of makes some important risks of complications. Indeed, these traumatisms, in case of belated conference and/or of maladjusted treatment or conducted pain, could induce some complications and have some aesthetic and functional after effects on the dental germ underlying. Some of these complications observed in some patients are stakes in evidence by some iconographic illustrations.

  7. [Diabetic retinopathy complications--12-year retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Ignat, Florica; Davidescu, Livia

    2002-01-01

    It is analyzed, on a retrospective study on 12 years, the incidence of diabetus melitus cases, hospitalized in the Ophthalmologic Clinic from Craiova with special mention to the frequency of the diabetic retinopathy, of it's complications and in an accordance to other general diseases, especially cardiovascular's, which contributes to the aggravation of the diabetic ocular in juries evolution. The study underlines the high incidence of the new founded cases with diabetus melitus in complicated diabetes retinopathy stage; the high frequency of ocular complications is explained, according to our statistic facts and through an insufficient treatment, sometimes incorrect and many other cases total neglected by the patients.

  8. [Unusual abdominal complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt].

    PubMed

    Guillén, A; Costa, J M; Castelló, I; Claramunt, E; Cardona, E

    2002-10-01

    The most common complications after CSF shunting to treat hydrocephalus are shunt infection and obstruction. Although ventriculoperitoneal (VP) diversion of the CSF using artificial shunt devices is an accepted method for the management of hydrocephalus, high rates of various complications have been reported, ranging from 24% to 47%. Among these, abdominal complications account for approximately 25%. The incidence of bowel perforation by shunt-catheter is known to be as low as 0.1-0.7%. We describe a case of migration af a peritoneal catheter through a congenital hernia of Morgagni.

  9. Hyperopia in complicated Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Dagi, L R; Leys, M J; Hansen, R M; Fulton, A B

    1990-05-01

    We studied the refractive status of 13 children with Leber's congenital amaurosis. Seven had the disease complicated by neurological or other systemic abnormalities, while the other 6 patients had only ophthalmic abnormalities. All 13 patients were hyperopic. The magnitude of hyperopia did not differ significantly between the complicated and uncomplicated groups. Therefore, one cannot, as previously suggested, use the presence of high hyperopia to differentiate an uncomplicated form of Leber's congenital amaurosis from one complicated by neurologic or other systemic abnormalities. The concurrence of hyperopia with Leber's congenital amaurosis should not steer the physician away from careful neurologic systemic or biochemical evaluation of the child.

  10. Umbilical venous catheterization gone wrong: Hepatic complications

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Poonam; Vire, Adweta; Anand, Rama; Jajoo, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic complications of malposition of umbilical venous catheter (UVC) are uncommon and occur due to extravasation of hypertonic fluids and the blood products in the liver tissue. Various hepatic complications include thrombosis of hepatic vessels, hepatic necrosis, hepatic fluid collections, and hematoma, with the intraparenchymal liver lesions seen along the course of ductus venosus. Radiologists must be aware of these complications and their imaging findings, as the timely recognition and immediate management can prevent the fatal outcome. Here, we present a rare case of intraparenchymal liver lesions associated with malposition of UVC in a preterm baby. PMID:27081222

  11. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders.

  12. Management of complications in glaucoma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, Lingam; Manish, Panday; Ronnie, George; Shantha, B

    2011-01-01

    Surgical option for glaucoma is considered when other modalities are not working out to keep the intraocular pressure under control. Since the surgical procedures for glaucoma disrupt the integrity of the globe, they are known to produce various complications. Some of those complications can be vision-threatening. To minimize the morbidity, it is very important that one should know how to prevent them, recognize them and treat them. The objective of this article is to provide insight into some of those complications that will help the ophthalmologists in treating glaucoma patients in their clinical practice. PMID:21150025

  13. [Considerations on the complications of epidemic parotitis].

    PubMed

    Izzi, G C; Montanarini, G; Benaglia, G; Ghirardini, G; Cassaro, F; Malvicini, R

    1983-01-01

    The AA describe 82 cases of complications occurred during an outbreak of mumps in 1980-81. Forty-two cases of meningitis, 4 of pancreatitis, 2 of orchitis and 2 cases of encefalitis occurred. All patients had eventual, complete recovery. The other cases are not specific complications. The treatment was almost entirely symptomatic. The headache of meningitis was relieved by a lumbar poncture. In the epicrisis of the AA these cases of complications have some importance in relation to the opportunity of getting herd vaccination against mumps.

  14. Complications of Pediatric Foot and Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Denning, Jaime R

    2017-01-01

    Ankle fractures account for 5% and foot fractures account for approximately 8% of fractures in children. Some complications are evident early in the treatment or natural history of foot and ankle fractures. Other complications do not become apparent until weeks, months, or years after the original fracture. The incidence of long-term sequelae like posttraumatic arthritis from childhood foot and ankle fractures is poorly studied because decades or lifelong follow-up has frequently not been accomplished. This article discusses a variety of complications associated with foot and ankle fractures in children or the treatment of these injuries.

  15. Divergent Gene Expression Responses to Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The “widowhood effect” (i.e., morbidity/mortality in recently bereaved spouses) may be related to changes in immune function, but little is known about the impact of bereavement on gene transcription in immune cells. This study examined how Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief responses to bereavement differentially affect leukocyte gene expression. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and bioinformatic analyses were completed on 63 older adults. Thirty-six of them had lost their spouse/partner on average 2 years ago, and 27 were nonbereaved, married controls. Twelve of the bereaved participants met criteria for Complicated Grief. Compared to nonbereaved controls, bereavement (both Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief) was associated with upregulated expression of genes involved in general immunologic activation and a selective downregulation of genes involved in B lymphocyte responses. However, Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief differed markedly in their expression of Type I interferon-related transcripts, with Non-complicated Grief subjects showing substantial upregulation relative to nonbereaved controls and Complicated Grief subjects showing substantial downregulation. Bereavement significantly modulates immune function gene expression. The magnitude of bereavement-related distress (i.e., Complicated Grief vs. Non-complicated Grief) is linked to differential patterns of transcription factor activation and gene expression involved in innate antiviral responses. These findings provide a molecular framework for understanding the health effects of bereavement, as well as new insights into the particular gene modules that are most sensitive to the individual's psychological response to loss. PMID:24380850

  16. Multidisciplinary management of vascular access for haemodialysis: from the preparation of the initial access to the treatment of stenosis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, C; Haage, P; Hollenbeck, M; Mickley, V; Ranft, J

    2011-05-01

    In February 2008 a multidisciplinary study group was established in Germany to improve the treatment of patients with potential vascular access problems. As one of the first results of their work interdisciplinary recommendations for the management of vascular access were provided, from the creation of the initial access to the treatment of complications. As a rule the wrist arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the access of choice due to its lower complication rate when compared to other types of access. The AVF should be created 3 months prior to the expected start of haemodialysis to allow for sufficient maturation. Second and third choice accesses are arteriovenous grafts (AVG) and central venous catheters (CVC). Ultrasound is a reliable tool for vessel selection before access creation, and also for the diagnosis of complications in AVF and grafts. Access stenosis and thrombosis can be treated surgically and interventionally. The comparison of both methods reveals advantages and disadvantages for each. The therapeutic decision should be based on the individual patients' constitution, and also on the availability and experience of the involved specialists.

  17. Postprandial glucose regulation and diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Hanefeld, Markolf; Leiter, Lawrence; Monnier, Louis; Moses, Alan; Owens, David; Tajima, Naoko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2004-10-25

    Atherosclerotic disease accounts for much of the increased mortality and morbidity associated with type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies support the potential of improved glycemic control to reduce cardiovascular complications. An association between glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) level and the risk for cardiovascular complications has frequently been reported. Most epidemiological data implicate postprandial hyperglycemia in the development of cardiovascular disease, whereas the link between fasting glycemia and diabetic complications is inconclusive. Moreover, in many studies, postprandial glycemia is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than HbA(1c) level. Postprandial glucose may have a direct toxic effect on the vascular endothelium, mediated by oxidative stress that is independent of other cardiovascular risk factors such as hyperlipidemia. Postprandial hyperglycemia also may exert its effects through its substantial contribution to total glycemic exposure. The present review examines the hypothesis that controlling postprandial glucose level is an important strategy in the prevention of cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes.

  18. Ocular Complications of Diabetes and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Lee, Darren J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose (BG). DM is a global epidemic and the prevalence is anticipated to continue to increase. The ocular complications of DM negatively impact the quality of life and carry an extremely high economic burden. While systemic control of BG can slow the ocular complications they cannot stop them, especially if clinical symptoms are already present. With the advances in biodegradable polymers, implantable ocular devices can slowly release medication to stop, and in some cases reverse, diabetic complications in the eye. In this review we discuss the ocular complications associated with DM, the treatments available with a focus on localized treatments, and what promising treatments are on the horizon. PMID:27119078

  19. [A rare complication due to diverticulitis].

    PubMed

    Di Bernardo, N; D'Ambrosio, B; Mirenda, F; Cittadino, L; Vena, M

    1992-01-01

    The AA. report about a case of hepatic abscess found in a operated patient for perforation of a sigmoid diverticulum. The AA. made some consideration on the rarity of the hepatic abscess as complication of diverticulum perforation.

  20. Ocular Complications of Diabetes and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Lee, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose (BG). DM is a global epidemic and the prevalence is anticipated to continue to increase. The ocular complications of DM negatively impact the quality of life and carry an extremely high economic burden. While systemic control of BG can slow the ocular complications they cannot stop them, especially if clinical symptoms are already present. With the advances in biodegradable polymers, implantable ocular devices can slowly release medication to stop, and in some cases reverse, diabetic complications in the eye. In this review we discuss the ocular complications associated with DM, the treatments available with a focus on localized treatments, and what promising treatments are on the horizon.

  1. Cirrhosis and its complications: evidence based treatment.

    PubMed

    Nusrat, Salman; Khan, Muhammad S; Fazili, Javid; Madhoun, Mohammad F

    2014-05-14

    Cirrhosis results from progressive fibrosis and is the final outcome of all chronic liver disease. It is among the ten leading causes of death in United States. Cirrhosis can result in portal hypertension and/or hepatic dysfunction. Both of these either alone or in combination can lead to many complications, including ascites, varices, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and coagulation disorders. Cirrhosis and its complications not only impair quality of life but also decrease survival. Managing patients with cirrhosis can be a challenge and requires an organized and systematic approach. Increasing physicians' knowledge about prevention and treatment of these potential complications is important to improve patient outcomes. A literature search of the published data was performed to provide a comprehensive review regarding the management of cirrhosis and its complications.

  2. Complications of bronchoscopy: A concise synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, David L; Richard, Kathleen M; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Flexible and rigid bronchoscopes are used in diagnosis, therapeutics, and palliation. While their use is widespread, effective, and generally safe; there are numerous potential complications that can occur. Mechanical complications of bronchoscopy are primarily related to airway manipulations or bleeding. Systemic complications arise from the procedure itself, medication administration (primarily sedation), or patient comorbidities. Attributable mortality rates remain low at < 0.1% for fiberoptic and rigid bronchoscopy. Here we review the complications (classified as mechanical or systemic) of both rigid and flexible bronchoscopy in hope of making practitioners who are operators of these tools, and those who consult others for interventions, aware of potential problems, and pitfalls in order to enhance patient safety and comfort. PMID:26557489

  3. Cirrhosis and its complications: Evidence based treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, Salman; Khan, Muhammad S; Fazili, Javid; Madhoun, Mohammad F

    2014-01-01

    Cirrhosis results from progressive fibrosis and is the final outcome of all chronic liver disease. It is among the ten leading causes of death in United States. Cirrhosis can result in portal hypertension and/or hepatic dysfunction. Both of these either alone or in combination can lead to many complications, including ascites, varices, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and coagulation disorders. Cirrhosis and its complications not only impair quality of life but also decrease survival. Managing patients with cirrhosis can be a challenge and requires an organized and systematic approach. Increasing physicians’ knowledge about prevention and treatment of these potential complications is important to improve patient outcomes. A literature search of the published data was performed to provide a comprehensive review regarding the management of cirrhosis and its complications. PMID:24833875

  4. Sigmoid volvulus complicating pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Atamanalp, Sabri Selcuk; Kisaoglu, Abdullah; Ozogul, Bunyami; Kantarci, Mecit; Disci, Esra; Bulut, O Hakan; Aksungur, Nurhak; Atamanalp, Refik Selim

    2015-02-01

    Sigmoid volvulus during pregnancy is a rare complication, and as of 2012, fewer than 100 cases had been reported. In this report, we present a 30 year-old pregnant woman with sigmoid volvulus, and we discuss this rare entity.

  5. Complications of thyroidectomy for large goiter

    PubMed Central

    Berri, Toufik; Houari, Rachida

    2013-01-01

    Thyroidectomy is a routinely common practiced surgery. Morbidity and mortality from thyroid surgery are disregarded nowadays and undervalued in the literature. Perioperative risks and complications still exist for large goiters and can be life-threatening. These complications may occur during the anesthesia and intubation, intra-, or postoperatively. We set out through a case of a large cervical multinodular goiter (MNG) and a review of literature the perioperative complications and how to avoid them. During the total thyroidectomy operation, an accidental devascularisation of a parathyroid gland, a cervical hematoma which was evacuated by surgical reoperation, hemodynamic disorder and a transitory hypoparathyroidism were the postoperative complications that occurred. Surgery for large goiters remains difficult; so adequate preoperative assessment, particular attention and careful operative procedure should be followed to obtain better surgical outcomes. PMID:24847400

  6. Subclavian artery- internal jugular vein fistula and heart failure: complication of internal jugular vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jai; Takhellambam, Brojen; Ghosh, Biplab; Choudhury, Tauhidul Alam; Singh, Shivendra; Sharma, Om Prakash

    2013-02-01

    Hemodialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requires vascular access which can be either temporary or permanent. However, these procedures are not without complications. Arterial puncture is the most common immediate complication and pseudoaneurysm formation is the most common late sequel of internal jugular venous catheterization (IJVC). However, arterio-venous fistula (AVF) formatiorn following IJVC is rare. We are reporting a case of AVF formation between subclavian artery (SCA) and internal jugular vein (IJV) following IJVC which later on leads to the development of cardiac failure.

  7. Complications in common general pediatric surgery procedures.

    PubMed

    Linnaus, Maria E; Ostlie, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Complications related to general pediatric surgery procedures are a major concern for pediatric surgeons and their patients. Although infrequent, when they occur the consequences can lead to significant morbidity and psychosocial stress. The purpose of this article is to discuss the common complications encountered during several common pediatric general surgery procedures including inguinal hernia repair (open and laparoscopic), umbilical hernia repair, laparoscopic pyloromyotomy, and laparoscopic appendectomy.

  8. A Rare Hydrocephalus Complication: Cortical Blindness.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Emre; Göçmen, Rahşan; Işıkay, Ayşe İlksen; Tekşam, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Cortical blindness related to bilateral occipital lobe infarction is an extremely rare complication of hydrocephalus. Compression of the posterior cerebral artery, secondary to tentorial herniation, is the cause of occipital infarction. Particularly in children and mentally ill patients, cortical blindness may be missed. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is important. We present herein a child of ventricular shunt malfunction complicated by cortical blindness.

  9. Complications of pericardiocentesis: A clinical synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajan; Sinha, Archana; Lin, Maggie J; Uchino, Reina; Butryn, Tracy; O’Mara, M Shay; Nanda, Sudip; Shirani, Jamshid; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2015-01-01

    Pericardiocentesis (PC) is both a diagnostic and a potentially life-saving therapeutic procedure. Currently echocardiography-guided pericardiocentesis is considered the standard clinical practice in the treatment of large pericardial effusions and cardiac tamponade. Although considered relatively safe, this invasive procedure may be associated with certain risks and potentially serious complications. This review provides a summary of pericardiocentesis and a focused overview of the potential complications of this procedure. PMID:26557491

  10. Complications of selective laser trabeculoplasty: a review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Selective laser trabeculoplasty is a laser treatment to treat glaucoma. It was initially indicated for open-angle glaucoma but has been proven to be efficacious for various types of glaucoma. This review article summarizes the few rare complications that can be seen with selective laser trabeculoplasty. It also makes recommendations on how to avoid these problems and how to treat patients when these rare complications arise. PMID:26834456

  11. Body piercing complicated by atypical mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Ferringer, Tammie; Pride, Howard; Tyler, William

    2008-01-01

    Body piercing is a growing trend, especially in young people, but the literature on complications of piercing consists mostly of case reports involving ear piercing. Previous reported complications of piercing include contact dermatitis, keloids, traumatic tearing, viral transmission, and bacterial infections. We report two patients who presented with atypical mycobacterial infections of body piercing sites. It is important to recognize the association of piercing and mycobacterial infections so that tissue can be obtained for histopathologic examination and appropriate culture.

  12. Endodontic management of patients with systemic complications

    PubMed Central

    Rajeswari, Kalaiselvam; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Karthick, Soundararajan

    2016-01-01

    Successful endodontic practice requires complete knowledge about the various medical conditions and appropriateness in planning treatment as per the need with effective safety measures. This review focuses on a number of systemic complications encountered in endodontic practice and directions to be followed for avoiding potential complications. A detailed PubMed search was carried out using specific keywords, and 25 articles were referred for finalizing the content. PMID:27829742

  13. [Vademecum of skeletal complications of malignancy].

    PubMed

    Py, Céline; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Ben Aïssa, Assma

    2013-05-22

    Bone metastasis is a frequent complication for cancer patients leading pain, fracture, spinal cord compression and hypercalcemia. A multidisciplinary approach is strongly recommended to optimize the different treatment options (i.e. radiotherapy, surgery and vertebroplasty) in the context of the underlying cancer. The effectiveness of bisphosphonates and denosumab to reduce skeletal events has widely been demonstrated. Prevention and treatment of bone complications are crucial for maintaining the independence and quality of life of patients.

  14. Management of complications of congenital hand disorders.

    PubMed

    Comer, Garet C; Ladd, Amy L

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews treatment and presents complications seen in the treatment of 7 common congenital hand differences, including syndactyly, camptodactyly, ulnar and radial polydactyly, thumb hypoplasia, radial longitudinal deficiency, and epidermolysis bullosa. The management of these conditions is challenging but has evolved over the last several decades with refined understanding of the disease processes and treatments. The goal of this article is to synthesize prior knowledge and provide further insights into these conditions that will help the surgeon avoid treatment complications.

  15. Vascular ring complicates accidental button battery ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Ronald W; Schwartz, Matthew C; Stephany, Joshua; Donnelly, Lane F; Franciosi, James P; Epelman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Button battery ingestion can lead to dangerous complications, including vasculoesophageal fistula formation. The presence of a vascular ring may complicate battery ingestion if the battery lodges at the level of the ring and its important vascular structures. We report a 4-year-old boy with trisomy 21 who was diagnosed with a vascular ring at the time of button battery ingestion and died 9 days after presentation due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal erosion and vasculoesophageal fistula formation.

  16. Complications of pulmonary hypertension: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Mak, Sze M; Strickland, Nicola; Gopalan, Deepa

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disease with a significant morbidity and mortality if untreated. The disease has a multifactorial aetiology and is often associated with insidious onset of signs and symptoms. Multimodality imaging is often required for establishing the diagnosis, evaluating the underlying haemodynamic compromise and follow-up after institution of therapy. The range of potential complications associated with PH vary widely. We aimed to summarize the imaging findings of complications that the radiologist should be familiar with.

  17. Towards A Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Towards A Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Massimo Trucco, M.D...September 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Towards A Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-1055...of the beta cells. Consistently with this view, the standard of care for diabetic , and especially T1D patients is solely insulin-replacement therapy

  18. Towards a Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-1055 TITLE: Towards A Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Massimo Trucco, M.D...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-1055 Towards A Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...for favoring pro- insulin folding within the secretory granules of the beta cells. Consistently with this view, the standard of care for diabetic

  19. A rare late complication of spilled gallstones.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, Dinuk L

    2010-07-16

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the treatment of choice for symptomatic gallstones. A complication that is often overlooked is that related to lost intraabdominal gallstones as a consequence of intraoperative gallbladder perforation. This is a case report of a patient presenting with a colovesical fistula due to lost gallstones from laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 14 years previously. A literature review follows that explains how lost gallstones have the potential to cause late complications and why it is should not be ignored.

  20. Towards a Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    by C-peptide treatment of vascular and neural dysfunctions of diabetes is not mediated by stereospecific receptors or binding sites (Ido et al...Towards A Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Massimo Trucco, M.D...September 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Towards A Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1

  1. ISDC Data Access Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D.; Borkowski, J.; Contessi, T.; Lock, T.; Rohlfs, R.; Walter, R.

    The ISDC Data Access Layer (DAL) is an ANSI C and \\fortran 90 compatible library under development in support of the ESA INTEGRAL mission data analysis software. DALs primary purpose is to isolate the analysis software from the specifics of the data formats while at the same time providing new data abstraction and access capabilities. DAL supports the creation and manipulation of hierarchical data sets which may span multiple files and, in theory, multiple computer systems. A number of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) are supported by DAL that allow software to view and access data at different levels of complexity. DAL also allows data sets to reside on disk, in conventional memory or in shared memory in a way that is transparent to the user/application.

  2. Restaurant wheelchair accessibility.

    PubMed

    McClain, L; Beringer, D; Kuhnert, H; Priest, J; Wilkes, E; Wilkinson, S; Wyrick, L

    1993-07-01

    This study was designed to determine the compliance of restaurants to the wheelchair accessibility standards set forth in the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards. The standards that were operationalized in this study are also found in Title III of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990. The data were collected at 120 sites in three midwestern states. For one who uses a wheelchair, parking the car is often an obstacle to eating out. Only 53% of the restaurants surveyed provide handicapped parking. Entering the building may also be a problem. Of the restaurants that required a ramp, only 66% provided them. Inside the restaurant, the key problems were accessible rest-rooms and the height of tables. The study provided comparisons between restaurants in rural and urban settings, as well as comparisons between conventional restaurants and fast food restaurants. No notable differences emerged for these comparisons.

  3. Anticoagulant prophylaxis for placenta mediated pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Marc A

    2011-02-01

    Thrombophilias are not yet established as a cause of the placenta-mediated pregnancy complications (pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, small for gestational age and placental abruption). A thrombophilia may be only one of many factors that lead to development of these complications. Our recent large systematic review of prospective cohort studies highlight that the association between thrombophilia and placenta mediated pregnancy complications is far from proven. The small step of previously describing an association in case control studies has led a large number of clinicians and opinion leaders to take the large leap of accepting this relationship as being causal and potentially treatable with anticoagulant interventions. Furthermore, while data in women with prior severe pre-eclpamsia, abruption and small for gestational age births without thrombophilia suggests some promise for anticoagulant prophylaxis to prevent complications in subsequent pregnancies in these women, in the absence of large well done and generalisable "no intervention" controlled studies adopting anticoagulant prophylaxis to prevent these complications is premature. The absence of strong evidence, coupled with the small potential for harm from anticoagulant prophylaxis suggests that these drugs should be considered experimental in thrombophilic and non-thrombophilic women with prior placenta mediated pregnancy complications.

  4. Electrosurgical Settings and Vaginal Cuff Complications

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Megan L.; Rao, Rama; Manahan, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: After being encouraged to change the technique for opening the vaginal cuff during robotic surgery, this study was performed to determine the correlation between vaginal cuff complications and electrosurgical techniques. Methods: The study group consisted of patients who had their vaginal cuffs opened with a cutting current compared to the group of patients having their vaginal cuff opened with a coagulation current. Data were collected on 150 women who underwent robotic surgery for endometrial cancer. All patients received preoperative antibiotics. Data, including operative time, type of electrosurgery used, estimated blood loss, transfusion rate, and complications, were collected from the patients' records. Results: Surgeries in 150 women and the associated complications were studied. The mean age of the patients was not significantly different between the groups (P = .63). The mean body mass index was 38 kg/m2 in the coagulation arm and 36 kg/m2 in the cutting arm (P = .03). Transfusion was not required. Estimated blood loss and operative time were not significantly different in the coagulation versus the cutting arms (P = .29 and .5; respectively). No patients in the cutting arm and 4 patients (with 5 complications) in the coagulation arm had cuff complications (P = .02). Conclusions: Complications involving the vaginal cuff appear to occur more frequently when the vagina is entered by using electrosurgery with coagulation versus cutting in this cohort of patients undergoing robot-assisted surgery for endometrial cancer.. PMID:26681912

  5. Neurological complications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ria; Issar, Tushar; Krishnan, Arun V

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are frequently afflicted with neurological complications. These complications can potentially affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common neurological complications in CKD include stroke, cognitive dysfunction, encephalopathy, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies. These conditions have significant impact not only on patient morbidity but also on mortality risk through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of these conditions can provide insights into effective management strategies for neurological complications. This review describes clinical management of neurological complications in CKD with reference to the contributing physiological and pathological derangements. Stroke, cognitive dysfunction and dementia share several pathological mechanisms that may contribute to vascular impairment and neurodegeneration. Cognitive dysfunction and dementia may be differentiated from encephalopathy which has similar contributing factors but presents in an acute and rapidly progressive manner and may be accompanied by tremor and asterixis. Recent evidence suggests that dietary potassium restriction may be a useful preventative measure for peripheral neuropathy. Management of painful neuropathic symptoms can be achieved by pharmacological means with careful dosing and side effect considerations for reduced renal function. Patients with autonomic neuropathy may respond to sildenafil for impotence. Neurological complications often become clinically apparent at end-stage disease, however early detection and management of these conditions in mild CKD may reduce their impact at later stages. PMID:27867500

  6. Accessibility | Smokefree 60+

    Cancer.gov

    60plus.smokefree.gov is committed to making its websites accessible to all individuals—disabled or not—who are seeking information. To provide this information, the Smokefree 60+ website has been designed to comply with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (as amended). Section 508 requires that all individuals with disabilities (whether they are federal government employees or members of the general public) have access to and use of information and data comparable to that provided to individuals without disabilities, unless an undue burden would be imposed.

  7. Disability access. Open season.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brian

    2003-04-24

    A disability access audit carried out at a trust operating over 50 sites revealed that a 2.3m Pounds programme of work was needed. The audit took four months, with the team spending a day at each of the premises. The audit has been followed by a staff training programme in disability awareness. The trust's information systems now show if a patient did not attend an appointment because of difficulties with physical access. All letters to patients are produced in a minimum 12-point type.

  8. Empower: access to medicine - working towards early access.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jennifer Bryant; Turgoose, James; Hargrave, James

    2015-01-01

    Empower: Access to Medicine's contribution will document the founding of Empower: Access to Medicine and tactics used to create a lobbying campaign designed to facilitate the debate around barriers to medical innovation and patient access to medicines. The article will detail the evolution of the campaign's goals and the potential solutions to an expensive and slow system. Specifically the submission will look at the influence that Empower: Access to Medicine had on the Government's thinking and development of an early access scheme.

  9. Evaluation of Complications after Surgical Treatment of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinian, Mohammad Ali; Loron, Ali Gharibi; Soleimanifard, Yalda

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is necessary when non-surgical treatments fail. Complications of surgical procedures vary from short-term post-surgical pain to permanent disability. The outcome of TOS surgery is affected by the visibility during the operation. In this study, we have compared the complications arising during the supraclavicular and the transaxillary approaches to determine the appropriate approach for TOS surgery. Methods In this study, 448 patients with symptoms of TOS were assessed. The male-to-female ratio was approximately 1:4, and the mean age was 34.5 years. Overall, 102 operations were performed, including unilateral, bilateral, and reoperations, and the patients were retrospectively evaluated. Of the 102 patients, 63 underwent the supraclavicular approach, 32 underwent the transaxillary approach, and 7 underwent the transaxillary approach followed by the supraclavicular approach. Complications were evaluated over 24 months. Results The prevalence of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and vessel injuries in the transaxillary and the supraclavicular approaches was equal. We found more permanent and transient brachial plexus injuries in the case of the transaxillary approach than in the case of the supraclavicular approach, but the difference was not statistically significant. Persistent pain and symptoms were significantly more common in patients who underwent the transaxillary approach (p<0.05). Conclusion The supraclavicular approach seems to be the more effective technique of the two because it offers the surgeon better access to the brachial plexus and a direct view. This approach for a TOS operation offers a better surgical outcome and lower reoperation rates than the transaxillary method. Our results showed the supraclavicular approach to be the preferred method for TOS operations. PMID:28180101

  10. Managing Information Resources for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Computer Accommodation.

    This handbook presents guidance for federal managers and other personnel who are unfamiliar with the policy and practice of information accessibility to accommodate users with disabilities and to provide for their effective access to information resources. It addresses federal requirements for accessibility, adopting accessibility as a sound…

  11. Digital Scholarship and Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losoff, Barbara; Pence, Harry E.

    2010-01-01

    Open access publications provide scholars with unrestricted access to the "conversation" that is the basis for the advancement of knowledge. The large number of open access journals, archives, and depositories already in existence demonstrates the technical and economic viability of providing unrestricted access to the literature that is the…

  12. Internal jugular vein thrombosis presenting as a painful neck mass due to a spontaneous dislocated subclavian port catheter as long-term complication: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Grommes, Jochen; Junge, Karsten; Göbner, Sonja; Schumpelick, Volker; Truong, Son

    2009-01-01

    Central venous access devices are extensively used for long-term chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. However, there are some possible immediate, early, and late complications related to the implantation technique, care, and maintenance. We present the uncommon occurrence of a thrombosis of the internal jugular vein due to a spontaneous migration of a Port-A-Cath catheter into the ipsilateral internal jugular vein as a delayed complication of a central venous access catheter implanted for chemotherapy delivery. A review of the literature is given, and the factors responsible for this unusual complication will be discussed. PMID:19830037

  13. Radiocephalic Fistula Complicated by Distal Ischemia: Treatment by Ulnar Artery Dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, Alain; Novelli, Luigi Rovani, Xavier; Carreres, Thierry; Bourquelot, Pierre; Hermelin, Alain; Angel, C.; Beyssen, B.

    2010-02-15

    Hand ischemic steal syndrome due to a forearm arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. However, its frequency is increasing with the rise in numbers of elderly and diabetic patients. This complication, which is more common for proximal than for distal accesses, can be very severe and may cause loss of hand function, damage to fingers, and even amputation of fingers or the hand. Its treatment is difficult and often leads to access loss. We report here a case of severe hand ischemia related to a radiocephalic fistula successfully treated by ulnar artery dilatation.

  14. Serving up Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    When low-income students returned to Chicago public schools this fall, many had better access to technology, thanks to a public-private partnership. Chicago families with children enrolled in the National School Lunch Program are eligible for subsidized computers and Internet connections through an agreement between the city and telecom giant…

  15. ACCESS Project: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, Heiko

    2015-04-01

    The ACCESS project addressed the development, testing, and demonstration of the proposed advanced technologies and the associated emission and fuel economy improvement at an engine dynamometer and on a full-scale vehicle. Improve fuel economy by 25% with minimum performance penalties Achieve SULEV level emissions with gasoline Demonstrate multi-mode combustion engine management system

  16. ACCENT ON ACCESS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHATELAIN, LEON, JR.; AND OTHERS

    EMPHASIS IS GIVEN ON ACCESSIBILITY TO PUBLIC BUILDINGS BY THE HANDICAPPED. ATTENTION IS DIRECTED TO THIS SUBJECT INASMUCH AS ARCHITECTS GENERALLY HAVE OVERLOOKED THE PROBLEM. HENCE, PUBLIC BUILDINGS ARE NOT TRULY AVAILABLE TO THE TOTAL PUBLIC. IN RECENT YEARS, HOWEVER, LEGISLATION HAS BECOME INCREASINGLY MORE COMMON TO CORRECT THE SITUATION. THE…

  17. Partners: Promoting Accessible Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Janet; Gravink, Jill

    1995-01-01

    The Promoting Accessible Recreation through Networking, Education, Resources and Services (PARTNERS) Project, a partnership between Northeast Passage, the University of New Hampshire, and Granite State Independent Living Foundation, helps create barrier-free recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The paper describes PARTNERS and…

  18. College Access Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    College Access Marketing (CAM) is a relatively new phenomenon that seeks to positively influence the college-going rate. This report defines CAM, describes CAM examples, and discusses how CAM seeks to counter barriers to college. It explores four main elements of CAM: information, marketing, advocacy, and social mobilization. Further, it…

  19. Unique Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  20. Improved Access to Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sandra; Simkins, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes efforts by principal of the Willow Elementary School in the Charter Oak Unified School District (California) to provide students with technology-enhanced access to information and learning resources to improve reading and mathematics skills. Includes list of the Web addresses for the skills software used at the school. (PKP)

  1. Internet 2 Access Grid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet 2 Initiative, which is based on collaboration among universities, businesses, and government, focuses on the Access Grid, a Computational Grid that includes interactive multimedia within high-speed networks to provide resources to enable remote collaboration among the research community. (Author/LRW)

  2. Accessible Theatre Arts Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Curriculum Development.

    Intended to help administrators and theatre teachers provide a theatre arts program accessible to disabled actors, technicians, and audiences, the guide focuses on ways to alleviate limitations in the theatre. The following topics are addressed (sample subtopics in parentheses): awareness (use of improvisations and simulations); acclimatization…

  3. Access to Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how modern library systems can protect collections while not impeding disabled persons' access to facilities. Describes the problem with swinging gates and offers some security alternatives, such as high-tech gateless security, video detection, and voice alarms, that do not impede disabled persons' movements. (RJM)

  4. CAS. Controlled Access Security

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, B.; Pomeroy, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Security Alarm System is a data acquisition and control system which collects data from intrusion sensors and displays the information in a real-time environment for operators. The Access Control System monitors and controls the movement of personnel with the use of card readers and biometrics hand readers.

  5. Accessing Electronic Theses: Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2000-01-01

    Describes various ways by which universities provide access to their electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs), discussing UMI (University Microfilms International), XML (eXtensible Markup Language), and other formats. Discusses key leaders--national and international--in the ETD effort. Outlines the two main methods for locating ETDs. Presents a…

  6. APS and Open Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    The movement toward Open Access continues to gain momentum. A brief review of APS efforts in this area will be presented by APS Editor in Chief, Gene Sprouse. Editors from Physical Review A, B, E, Focus, Letters, and X, Reviews of Modern Physics, and Physics will address your questions about publishing in this evolving environment.

  7. Accessibility Standards, Illustrated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael A.

    The book sets forth Illinois environmental accessibility standards for disabled persons based on observation and interview data. Photographs, drawings, and detailed floor plans are included in sections dealing with human data (including space requirements for maneuvering wheelchairs, color blindness, incontinence, and severe auditory or visual…

  8. Computer Accessibility Technology Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This technology information packet includes information about the technical aspects of access to technology, legal obligations concerning technology and individuals with disabilities, and a list of resources for further information and assistance. A question and answer section addresses: barriers to educational technology for students with…

  9. Complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Bao, Rong-Hua; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Huo-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study focused on a number of factors that have been implicated in calcaneal complications and find the incidence of wound complications. Methods: This was a retrospective study. A total of 162 patients (176 feet) who underwent calcaneal fractures between 2007 and 2012 were included. The patient’s personal details, age, time from injury to surgery, cause of injury, type of fracture, operative details, operating and tourniquet times were collected from hospital computers and paper records. Evidence of complications including wound infection, wound necrosis, pain, malunion, nonunion, impingement, loss of fixation, ect were studied. Results: Forty-seven of one hundred and seventy-six fractures (26.704%) had complications, wound infection was noted in seven fractures (3.977%), twelve fractures developed necrosis (6.818%), 14 fractures (7.955%) developed pain. Malunion was found in five fractures (2.841%), nonunion in two fractures (1.136%) and loss of fixation in four fractures (2.272%). Three neurologic injury was also seen in our study (1.705%). Operating time, time from injury to surgery and type of fracture had some association with complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures, which showed a statistically significant improvement (P=0.000, 0.031, 0.020, respectively), but there were no evidence that age and tourniquet time affect the incidence of complication after calcaneal fracture surgery (P=0.119, 0.682, respectively). Conclusions: Despite developments in the surgical treatment of calcaneal fracture, wound complications still remain inevitable. Advanced imaging techniques, less invasive surgical procedures, wealth of anatomical knowledge, surgical experience and better postoperative care should be ensured. PMID:27648028

  10. Nutritional Predictors of Complications Following Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David C.; Riggs, Stephen B.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Matthews, Jonathan E.; Woods, Michael E.; Wallen, Eric M.; Pruthi, Raj S.; Smith, Angela B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of preoperative nutritional status on the development of surgical complications following cystectomy using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). Methods We performed a retrospective review of the NSQIP 2005–2012 Participant Use Data Files. ACS-NSQIP collects data on 135 variables, including pre- and intraoperative data and 30-day post-operative complications and mortality on all major surgical procedures at participating institutions. Preoperative albumin (<3.5 or >3.5 g/dl), weight loss 6 months before surgery (>10%), and BMI were identified as nutritional variables within the database. The overall complication rate was calculated and predictors of complications were identified using multivariable logistic regression models. Results 1,213 patients underwent cystectomy for bladder cancer between 2005–2012. The overall 30-day complication rate was 55.1% (n=668). While 14.7% (n=102) had a preoperative albumin <3.5 g/dL, 3.4% had >10% weight loss in the 6 months prior to surgery, and the mean BMI was 28 kg/m2. After controlling for age, sex, medical comorbidities, medical resident involvement, operation year, operative time and prior operation, only albumin <3.5g/dl was a significant predictor of experiencing a postoperative complication (p=0.03). This remained significant when albumin was evaluated as a continuous variable (p=0.02) Conclusions Poor nutritional status measured by serum albumin is predictive of an increased rate of surgical complications following radical cystectomy. This finding supports the importance of preoperative nutritional status in this population and highlights the need for the development of effective nutritional interventions in the preoperative setting. PMID:25240535

  11. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  12. Endophthalmitis: a rare complication of arteriovenous fistula infection.

    PubMed

    Desai, Madhav; Rapoor, Ram; Gudithi, Swarna Latha; Kumar, Ravi; Prasad, Neela; Dakshinamurty, Kaligotla Venkata

    2008-04-01

    Vascular access infection is a frequent problem in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Infection of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is less common than dialysis catheter-associated infection. Previous case reports described endophthalmitis secondary to hemodialysis catheter-related infection, but not secondary to native AVF infection. We report a rare patient of endophthalmitis as a metastatic infection of AVF cannulation site abscess. A 19-year-old girl on maintenance hemodialysis for the past 2 years has presented with a history of fever, chills, and rigor of 3-days duration and painful dimness of vision in the left eye of 1-night duration. It was followed by redness of the eye, photophobia, and ocular discharge. On examination, the patient was febrile with an abscess near cannulation site of AVF. There was no perception of light in the left eye, conjunctiva was congested, cornea was clear, hypopyon present, and pupil was mid-dilated, not reacting to light. Lens was clear. Vitreitis and exudative retinal detachment was present. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from blood, pus from AVF abscess and vitreous fluid. Diagnosis of endophthalmitis was confirmed by B-scan ultrasound. She was treated with both intravenous and intraocular antibiotics and drainage of pus from AVF abscess and therapeutic vitrectomy. Though arteriovenous abscess responded to sensitive antibiotics and drainage, vision has not improved much. Strict aseptic precautions during regular AVF cannulation are required. Lapses may lead to loss of vision apart from described complications like access closure, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis.

  13. Complications Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Blum, Raphael; Müller, Andreas M.; Flury, Matthias; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid comparison of outcomes after surgical procedures requires consensus on which instruments and parameters should be used, including the recording and evaluation of surgical complications. An international standard outlining the terminology and definitions of surgical complications in orthopaedics is lacking. Purpose This study systematically reviewed the literature for terms and definitions related to the occurrence of negative events or complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) with specific focus on shoulder stiffness. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were searched for reviews, clinical studies, and case reports of complications associated with ARCR. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened. The terminology of complications and their definitions were extracted from all relevant original articles by a single reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Definitions of shoulder stiffness or equivalent terms were tabulated. Results Of 654 references published after 2007 and obtained from the search, 233 full-text papers (44 reviews, 155 studies, 31 case reports, and 3 surgical technique presentations) were reviewed. Twenty-two additional references cited for a definition were checked. One report defined the term surgical complication. There were 242 different terms used to describe local events and 64 to describe nonlocal events. Furthermore, 16 definitions of terms such as frozen shoulder, shoulder stiffness, or stiff painful shoulder were identified. Diagnosis criteria for shoulder stiffness differed widely; 12 various definitions for restriction in range of motion were noted. One definition included a gradation of stiffness severity, whereas another considered the patient’s subjective assessment of motion. Conclusion The literature does not consistently report on complications after ARCR, making valid comparison of the incidence of

  14. Neurologic complications of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is frequently associated with neurologic complications; cerebral embolism is the most common of these since thrombus formation results from the abnormalities in the valvular surfaces or from the anatomic and physiologic changes associated with valve dysfunction, such as atrial or ventricular enlargement, intracardiac thrombi, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Prosthetic heart valves, particularly mechanical valves, are very thrombogenic, which explains the high risk of thromboembolism and the need for anticoagulation for the prevention of embolism. Infective endocarditis is a disease process with protean manifestations that include not only cerebral embolism but also intracranial hemorrhage, mycotic aneurysms, and systemic manifestations such as fever and encephalopathy. Other neurologic complications include nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, a process associated with systemic diseases such as cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus. For many of these conditions, anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment to prevent cerebral embolism, therefore it is the potential complications of anticoagulation that can explain other neurologic complications in patients with VHD. The prevention and management of these complications requires an understanding of their natural history in order to balance the risks posed by valvular disease itself against the risks and benefits associated with treatment.

  15. Complications of hip fractures: A review

    PubMed Central

    Carpintero, Pedro; Caeiro, Jose Ramón; Carpintero, Rocío; Morales, Angela; Silva, Samuel; Mesa, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fracture surgery represents a big part of the orthopedic surgeon workload, and usually has associated major clinical and social cost implications. These fractures have several complications. Some of these are medical, and other related to the surgical treatment itself. Medical complications may affect around 20% of patients with hip fracture. Cognitive and neurological alterations, cardiopulmonary affections (alone or combined), venous thromboembolism, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, urinary tract complications, perioperative anemia, electrolytic and metabolic disorders, and pressure scars are the most important medical complications after hip surgery in terms of frequency, increase of length of stay and perioperative mortality. Complications arising from hip fracture surgery are fairly common, and vary depending on whether the fracture is intracapsular or extracapsular. The main problems in intracapsular fractures are biological: vascularization of the femoral head, and lack of periosteum -a major contributor to fracture healing- in the femoral neck. In extracapsular fractures, by contrast, the problem is mechanical, and relates to load-bearing. Early surgical fixation, the role of anti-thromboembolic and anti-infective prophylaxis, good pain control at the perioperative, detection and management of delirium, correct urinary tract management, avoidance of malnutrition, vitamin D supplementation, osteoporosis treatment and advancement of early mobilization to improve functional recovery and falls prevention are basic recommendations for an optimal maintenance of hip fractured patients. PMID:25232517

  16. Complications of inferior vena cava filters

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Simer; Chamarthy, Murthy R.

    2016-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement is a relatively low risk alternative for prophylaxis against pulmonary embolism in patients with pelvic or lower extremity deep venous thrombosis who are not suitable for anticoagulation. There is an increasing trend in the number of IVC filter implantation procedures performed every year. There are many device types in the market and in the early 2000s, the introduction of retrievable filters brought an additional subset of complications to consider. Modern filter designs have led to decreased morbidity and mortality, however, a thorough understanding of the limitations and complications of IVC filters is necessary to weight the risks and benefits of placing IVC filters. In this review, the complications associated with IVC filters are divided into procedure related, post-procedure, and retrieval complications. Differences amongst the device types and retrievable filters are described, though this is limited by a significant lack of prospective studies. Additionally, the clinical presentation as well as prevention and treatment strategies are outlined with each complication type. PMID:28123983

  17. Early respiratory complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Carollo, Cristiana; Barbieri, Stefania; Pettenuzzo, Tommaso; Ori, Carlo

    2013-12-28

    The poor clinical conditions associated with end-stage cirrhosis, pre-existing pulmonary abnormalities, and high comorbidity rates in patients with high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores are all well-recognized factors that increase the risk of pulmonary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) surgery. Many intraoperative and postoperative events, such as fluid overload, massive transfusion of blood products, hemodynamic instability, unexpected coagulation abnormalities, renal dysfunction, and serious adverse effects of reperfusion syndrome, are other factors that predispose an individual to postoperative respiratory disorders. Despite advances in surgical techniques and anesthesiological management, the lung may still suffer throughout the perioperative period from various types of injury and ventilatory impairment, with different clinical outcomes. Pulmonary complications after OLT can be classified as infectious or non-infectious. Pleural effusion, atelectasis, pulmonary edema, respiratory distress syndrome, and pneumonia may contribute considerably to early morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. It is of paramount importance to accurately identify lung disorders because infectious pulmonary complications warrant speedy and aggressive treatment to prevent diffuse lung injury and the risk of evolution into multisystem organ failure. This review discusses the most common perioperative factors that predispose an individual to postoperative pulmonary complications and these complications' early clinical manifestations after OLT and influence on patient outcome.

  18. [The neurological complications of infectious endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Arauz-Góngora, A A; Souta-Meiriño, C A; Cotter-Lemus, L E; Guzmán-Rodríguez, C; Méndez-Domínguez, A

    1998-01-01

    We review the neurologic complications of 131 episodes of infective endocarditis, and the influences of some factors that are considered risk factors at its presentation, like the presence of vegetations detected by echocardiography, type and location of involved valve, or bacterial culture. Neurologic complications occurred in 28 patients (21.4%), 4 of them were excluded because of the absence of neuroimaging studies. In 21 patients the underlying cardiac pathology was valve disease and in the remaining 3 patients was congenital heart disease. 11 patients had native valve endocarditis and 10 prosthetic valve endocarditis. The cultured bacteria were Streptococcus viridans in 8 cases and Staphylococcus aureus in 7. The most frequent complication was cerebrovascular with incidence of cerebral embolism, and intracerebral hemorrhage of 62.5% and 8.3% respectively. Echocardiographic evidence of vegetation was seen in 18 patients, and cerebral embolism were noted in 12. Death occurred in 29% of patients with neurologic complications and 27% without. Two of nine patients who underwent open-heat surgery died. We conclude that there is no difference in the incidence of neurologic complications between mitral and aortic valve groups, neither when comparing native and prosthetic valve groups. Open-heart surgery does not increase mortality in this group of patients.

  19. Inherited thrombophilia and gestational vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Kupferminc, Michael J; Eldor, Amiram

    2003-04-01

    Severe obstetric complications, including preeclampsia, intrauterine growth retardation, abruptio placentae, and stillbirth, constitute a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and death. The etiology of these severe obstetric complications is still unknown. However, the frequent finding of structural and thrombotic changes in placental capillaries, which lead to inadequate fetomaternal circulation and decreased placental perfusion, and the high prevalence of heritable or acquired risk factors for thrombosis found in women with these complications strongly suggest a cause-and-effect relationship. This review describes the recent findings on the association between these obstetric complications and the various thrombophilias, and recent therapeutic approaches. Aspirin, which was regarded as the drug of choice for the prevention of such obstetric complications, has proved to be ineffective in a large clinical trial. The encouraging observations on the efficacy of low-molecular-weight heparins, which are also included in the recently published guidelines of The American College of Chest Physicians, are summarized in this review. However, controlled clinical trials are still necessary to allow the development of better clinical standards.

  20. Emergency Surgery for Acute Complicated Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal treatment of acute complicated diverticulitis is a matter of debate and has undergone significant changes. Currently, the main focus of surgical treatment concepts is on controlling the emergency situation triggered by acute complicated sigmoid diverticulitis through interventional and minimally invasive measures. Methods This article presents the current data and recommendations on differentiated treatment of acute complicated sigmoid diverticulitis, which are also summarized in a decision tree. Results In general, resection of the diverticular sigmoid is needed to treat acute complicated sigmoid diverticulitis, because without resection the recurrence rate is too high at 40%. Since the morbidity and mortality rates associated with emergency resection are extremely high, resulting in the creation of a stoma, efforts are made to control the acute situation through interventional and laparoscopic measures. Therefore, pericolic and pelvic abscesses (Hinchey stages I, II) are eliminated through percutaneous or laparoscopic drainage. Likewise, laparoscopic lavage and drainage are performed for purulent and feculent peritonitis (Hinchey stages III, IV). After elimination of the acute septic situation, interval elective sigmoid resection is conducted. If emergency resection cannot be avoided, it is performed, while taking account of the patient's overall condition, with primary anastomosis and a protective stoma or as discontinuity resection using Hartmann's procedure. Conclusion Thanks to the progress made in interventional and laparoscopic treatment, differentiated concepts are now used to treat acute complicated sigmoid diverticulitis. PMID:26989380

  1. Acute gastrointestinal complications after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Halm, M A

    1996-03-01

    Gastrointestinal problems, with an incidence of about 1%, may complicate the postoperative period after cardiovascular surgery, increasing morbidity, length of stay, and mortality. Several risk factors for the development of these complications, including preexisting conditions; advancing age; surgical procedure, especially valve, combined bypass/valve, emergency, reoperative, and aortic dissection repair; iatrogenic conditions; stress; ischemia; and postpump complications, have been identified in multiple research studies. Ischemia is the most significant of these risk factors after cardiovascular surgery. Mechanisms that have been implicated include longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and hypoperfusion states, especially if inotropic or intra-aortic balloon pump support is required. These risk factors have been linked to upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding, paralytic ileus, intestinal ischemia, acute diverticulitis, acute cholecystitis, hepatic dysfunction, hyperamylasemia, and acute pancreatitis. Gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for almost half of all complications, followed by hepatic dysfunction, intestinal ischemia, and acute cholecystitis. Identification of these gastrointestinal complications may be difficult because manifestations may be masked by postoperative analgesia or not reported by patients because they are sedated or require prolonged mechanical ventilation. Furthermore, clinical manifestations may be nonspecific and not follow the "classic" clinical picture. Therefore, astute assessment skills are needed to recognize these problems in high-risk patients early in their clinical course. Such early recognition will prompt aggressive medical and/or surgical management and therefore improve patient outcomes for the cardiovascular surgical population.

  2. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zvěřina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Skřivan, Jiří; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  3. Gut microbiota-related complications in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Such, José; Sanz, Yolanda; Francés, Rubén

    2014-11-14

    Gut microbiota plays an important role in cirrhosis. The liver is constantly challenged with commensal bacteria and their products arriving through the portal vein in the so-called gut-liver axis. Bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen through the intestinal wall and to mesenteric lymph nodes is facilitated by intestinal bacterial overgrowth, impairment in the permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, and deficiencies in local host immune defences. Deranged clearance of endogenous bacteria from portal and systemic circulation turns the gut into the major source of bacterial-related complications. Liver function may therefore be affected by alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota and a role for commensal flora has been evidenced in the pathogenesis of several complications arising in end-stage liver disease such as hepatic encephalopathy, splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The use of antibiotics is the main therapeutic pipeline in the management of these bacteria-related complications. However, other strategies aimed at preserving intestinal homeostasis through the use of pre-, pro- or symbiotic formulations are being studied in the last years. In this review, the role of intestinal microbiota in the development of the most frequent complications arising in cirrhosis and the different clinical and experimental studies conducted to prevent or improve these complications by modifying the gut microbiota composition are summarized.

  4. The Single Wire Ureteral Access Sheath, Both Safe and Economical

    PubMed Central

    Delto, Joan C.; Sidhu, Ajaydeep; Yanes, Rafael; Bhandari, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Novel disposable products for ureteroscopy are often inherently more expensive than conventional ones. For example, the Cook Flexor© Parallel™ (Flexor) access sheath is designed for ease and efficiency of gaining upper tract access with a solitary wire. We analyze the cost combinations, efficiency, and safety of disposable products utilized for upper tract access, including the Flexor and standard ureteral access sheath. Methods. We performed a retrospective review from January 2014 to October 2014 of patients undergoing URS for nephrolithiasis, who were prestented for various reasons (e.g., infection). Common combinations most utilized at our institution include “Classic,” “Flexor,” and “Standard.” Total costs per technique were calculated. Patient characteristics, operative parameters, and outcomes were compared among the groups. Results. The most commonly used technique involved a standard ureteral sheath and was the most expensive ($294). The second most utilized and least expensive combination involved the Flexor, saving up to $80 per case (27%). All access sheaths were placed successfully and without complications. There were no significant differences in operative time, blood loss, or complications. Conclusions. In prestented patients within this study, the Flexor combination was the most economical. Although the savings appear modest, long-term impact on costs can be substantial. PMID:27974887

  5. Vaginal Evisceration: An Unexpected Complication of Conization

    PubMed Central

    Ghassani, Ali; Andre, Benoit; Simon-Toulza, Caroline; Tanguy le Gac, Yann; Martinez, Alejandra; Vidal, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Background. Large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) is routinely performed for the management of high grade intracervical neoplasia (CIN). Several uncommon complications have been described, including postoperative peritonitis, pseudoaneurysm of uterine artery, and bowel fistula. We report a unique case of postoperative vaginal evisceration and the subsequent management. Case. A 73-years-old woman underwent LLETZ for high grade CIN. On postoperative day 3, she was admitted for small bowel evisceration through the vagina. Surgical management was based on combined laparoscopic and transvaginal approach and consisted in bowel inspection and reinstatement, peritoneal washing, and dehiscence repair. Conclusions. Vaginal evisceration is a rare but potentially serious complication of pelvic surgery. This case report is to make clinicians aware of such complication following LLETZ and its management. PMID:25506010

  6. Complications of Blepharoplasty: Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Oestreicher, James; Mehta, Sonul

    2012-01-01

    Blepharoplasty is an operation to modify the contour and configuration of the eyelids in order to restore a more youthful appearance. The surgery involves removing redundant skin, fat, and muscle. In addition, supporting structures such as canthal tendons are tightened. Other conditions such as ptosis, brow ptosis, entropion, ectropion, or eyelid retraction may also need to be corrected at the time a blepharoplasty is performed to ensure the best functional and aesthetic result. Due to the complexity and intricate nature of eyelid anatomy, complications do exist. In addition to a thorough pre operative assessment and meticulous surgical planning, understanding the etiology of complications is key to prevention. Finally, management of complications is just as important as surgical technique. PMID:22655191

  7. Strategies to reduce pulmonary complications after esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weijs, Teus J; Ruurda, Jelle P; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard AP; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Luyer, Misha DP

    2013-01-01

    Esophagectomy, the surgical removal of all or part of the esophagus, is a surgical procedure that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary complications are an especially important postoperative problem. Therefore, many perioperative strategies to prevent pulmonary complications after esophagectomy have been investigated and introduced in daily clinical practice. Here, we review these strategies, including improvement of patient performance and technical advances such as minimally invasive surgery that have been implemented in recent years. Furthermore, interventions such as methylprednisolone, neutrophil elastase inhibitor and epidural analgesia, which have been shown to reduce pulmonary complications, are discussed. Benefits of the commonly applied routine nasogastric decompression, delay of oral intake and prophylactic mechanical ventilation are unclear, and many of these strategies are also evaluated here. Finally, we will discuss recent insights and new developments aimed to improve pulmonary outcomes after esophagectomy. PMID:24151374

  8. Late-presenting complications after splenic trauma.

    PubMed

    Freiwald, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1970s, the management of blunt splenic trauma has evolved from almost exclusive surgical management to selective use of nonsurgical management in hemodynamically stable patients. Understanding of the spleen's immunologic importance in protection against overwhelming postsplenectomy infection led to development first of surgical techniques for splenic salvage and later to protocols for nonsurgical management of adults with blunt splenic injury. The evolution of nonsurgical management has resulted in new patterns of postsplenic trauma complications.This article describes a pancreatic pseudocyst, one of several described delayed complications of nonsurgical management of blunt splenic trauma. Along with missed splenic injury and delayed rupture, the development of a splenic pseudocyst represents challenges for any multidisciplinary team involved in trauma care. Detection and management of these complications is discussed, as is postsplenectomy vaccination and return to activity.

  9. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  10. Pathophysiology of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Browne, George W; Pitchumoni, CS

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in its severe form is complicated by multiple organ system dysfunction, most importantly by pulmonary complications which include hypoxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atelectasis, and pleural effusion. The pathogenesis of some of the above complications is attributed to the production of noxious cytokines. Clinically significant is the early onset of pleural effusion, which heralds a poor outcome of acute pancreatitis. The role of circulating trypsin, phospholipase A2, platelet activating factor, release of free fatty acids, chemoattractants such as tumor necrsosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, fMet-leu-phe (a bacterial wall product), nitric oxide, substance P, and macrophage inhibitor factor is currently studied. The hope is that future management of acute pancreatitis with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lung injury will be directed against the production of noxious cytokines. PMID:17131469

  11. Early and late pulmonary complications of botulism.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Nowara, W W; Samet, J M; Rosario, P A

    1983-03-01

    Pulmonary complications of botulism were studied in an outbreak of 34 cases of type A botulism in New Mexico in 1978. Hospital record review, standardized questionnaires, and pulmonary function tests were used to define pulmonary complications during the acute illness and the patient's status one year later. Pulmonary involvement was documented in 81% of patients. Ventilatory failure occurred in 11, aspiration pneumonia in nine, and death in two patients. Difficulties in the diagnosis of ventilatory insufficiency were identified. At one year, most patients had residual symptoms, including easy fatigability in 68% and exertional dyspnea in 46%. However, only minor pulmonary function abnormalities were present. This study confirms the generally favorable prognosis of botulism and provides clinical guidance for the diagnosis and management of pulmonary complications in botulism.

  12. Management of gallstones and its related complications.

    PubMed

    Portincasa, P; Di Ciaula, A; de Bari, O; Garruti, G; Palmieri, V O; Wang, D Q-H

    2016-01-01

    The majority of gallstone patients remain asymptomatic; however, interest toward the gallstone disease is continuing because of the high worldwide prevalence and management costs and the development of gallstone symptoms and complications. For cholesterol gallstone disease, moreover, a strong link exists between this disease and highly prevalent metabolic disorders such as obesity, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and the metabolic syndrome. Information on the natural history as well as the diagnostic, surgical (mainly laparoscopic cholecystectomy) and medical tools available to facilitate adequate management of cholelithiasis and its complications are, therefore, crucial to prevent the negative outcomes of gallstone disease. Moreover, some risk factors for gallstone disease are modifiable and some preventive strategies have become necessary to reduce the onset and the severity of complications.

  13. [Biliary ileus--potential complication of cholecystolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Okolicány, R; Prochotský, A; Skultéty, J; Sekác, J; Mifkovic, A

    2008-11-01

    Biliary ileus is a rare complication of cholecystolithiasis. The condition occurs predominantly in the elderly with incidence rates of 1-4%, according to the literature data. Most commonly, it develops as a complication of cholelithiasis which remained untreated or was managed conservatively, or as a complication of a gallbladder decubitus necrosis. The condition results in a cholecysto-duodenal fistula. In this case, the cholecystolithiasis is latent or is clinically manifested in a third of the patients. A total of 1560 cholecystectomies (1345 L-CHE and 215 conventional CHE) were performed in our clinic during a five-year period. Biliary ileus was an indication for operation only in two subjects, during the studied period. In the both cases, the diagnosis was established intraoperatively, although upon re-examination of the visualization modalities views (upright native abdominal views, CT scans) the authors concluded that the primary cause of the ileus could have already been identified, based on the above views.

  14. Ventriculomammary shunt: an unusual ventriculoperitoneal shunt complication.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Johnson, Jeremiah N; Morcos, Jacques J

    2015-02-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunctions are common and can result in significant consequences for patients. Despite the prevalence of breast augmentation surgery and breast surgery for other pathologies, few breast related VP shunt complications have been reported. A 54-year-old woman with hydrocephalus post-subarachnoid hemorrhage returned 1 month after VP shunt placement complaining of painful unilateral breast enlargement. After investigation, it was determined that the distal VP shunt catheter had migrated from the peritoneal cavity into the breast and wrapped around her breast implant. The breast enlargement was the result of cerebrospinal fluid retention. We detail this unusual case and review all breast related VP shunt complications reported in the literature. To avoid breast related complications related to VP shunt procedures, it is important to illicit pre-procedural history regarding breast implants, evade indwelling implants during catheter tunneling and carefully securing the abdominal catheter to prevent retrograde catheter migration to the breast.

  15. Saphenous neuralgia: a complication of arterial surgery.

    PubMed

    Jones, N A

    1978-07-01

    The saphenous nerve may be damaged during arterial surgery in the thigh as it emerges through the aponeurotic covering of the adductor canal. A clean cut of the nerve gives rise to anaesthesia, but an incomplete cut or tearing of the nerve, followed by its involvement in scar tissue, leads to saphenous neuralgia--a painful sensation in the area supplied by the nerve. Two hundred and fifty-seven arterial operations involving the course of the saphenous nerve in the thigh have been reviewed. Twenty-six of these operations were complicated by early failure of the arterial procedure necessitating amputation and have not been considered in assessing the incidence of damage to the nerve. One in five superficial femoral thromboendarterectomies and one in nine femoropopliteal bypass grafts were complicated by saphenous neuralgia. Profundaplasty was not followed by this complication. Appreciation of this troublesome symptom should lead to greater care of the nerve during surgery.

  16. Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular disease complication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independent risk factors for the development of diabetic cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested that hyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance, the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction, the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the downregulation of miRs participated in vessel generation and recovery as well as the balance of endotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation, and increased generation of advanced glycosylation end products pathway, play an important role in inducing diabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehension of pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offer base for developing new therapeutic ways preventing diabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper we mainly reviewed present information about the possible pathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication. PMID:25685278

  17. Termination of second trimester, complicated gestation.

    PubMed

    Al-Taani, M I

    2005-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of intravaginal misoprostol for second trimester uterine evacuation, we studied 70 women with singleton pregnancies complicated by fetal malformation or dead fetuses. Participants received 200 microg misoprostol administered at 4-hour intervals. Gestations with dead fetuses had a shorter induction-abortion interval [14.2 hours, standard deviation (SD) 4.3] than those with live, malformed fetuses (20.2 hours, SD 7.3) (P< 0.001). The abortion rate was significantly higher for gestations with dead fetuses (92.1%) than those with live, malformed fetuses (68.8%) (P< 0.05). There were no major complications and no significant difference in the incidence of side-effects. All women aborted within 38 hours. Administration of misoprostol is an effective clinical method to terminate second trimester, complicated pregnancy.

  18. Major orbital complications of endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rene, C; Rose, G; Lenthall, R; Moseley, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The paranasal sinuses are intimately related to the orbit and consequently sinus disease or surgery may cause severe orbital complications. Complications are rare but can result in serious morbidity, the most devastating of which is severe visual loss.
METHODS—A retrospective review was undertaken of four cases of severe orbital trauma during endoscopic sinus surgery.
RESULTS—All the cases suffered medial rectus damage, one had additional injury to the inferior rectus and oblique, and two patients were blinded as a result of direct damage to the optic nerve or its blood supply.
CONCLUSION—Some ophthalmic complications of endoscopic sinus surgery are highlighted, the mechanisms responsible are discussed, and recommendations for prevention, early recognition, and management are proposed. 

 PMID:11316724

  19. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  20. [NOTES and single port access: surgical or marketing revolution?].

    PubMed

    Allemann, P; Schäfer, M; Demartines, N

    2010-06-23

    Promising new technologies are emerging in digestive surgery: Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) and Single Port Access Surgery. They both aim to limit the surgical morbidity by decreasing the number of parietal accesses. The feasibility in human is obviously demonstrated, but numerous issues remain concerning the safety of these techniques. Furthermore, the expected advantages are not clearly demonstrated until now in the literature. In the future, it will be advisable to standardize techniques, in order to allow large clinical studies and to limit the potential complications of these approaches.

  1. Buried bumper syndrome revisited: a rare but potentially fatal complication of PEG tube placement.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saptarshi; Dontukurthy, Sujana; Rosenzweig, Mathew G; Kothuru, Ravi; Abrol, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has been used for providing enteral access to patients who require long-term enteral nutrition for years. Although generally considered safe, PEG tube placement can be associated with many immediate and delayed complications. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS) is one of the uncommon and late complications of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. It occurs when the internal bumper of the PEG tube erodes into the gastric wall and lodges itself between the gastric wall and skin. This can lead to a variety of additional complications such as wound infection, peritonitis, and necrotizing fasciitis. We present here a case of buried bumper syndrome which caused extensive necrosis of the anterior abdominal wall.

  2. A Review of Most Relevant Complications of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Michler, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged for treating aortic stenosis in patients who are poor candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. Currently, the balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien valve—which is usually implanted via a transfemoral or transapical approach—and the self-expanding CoreValve ReValving system—which is designed for retrograde application—are the most widely implanted valves worldwide. Although a promising approach for high-risk patients, the indication may be expanded to intermediate- and eventually low-risk patients in the future; however, doing so will require a better understanding of potential complications, risk factors for these complications, and strategies to individualize each patient to a different access route and a specific valve. This paper reviews the most relevant complications that may occur in patients who undergo catheter-based aortic valve implantation. PMID:23844292

  3. Update on Insertion and Complications of Central Venous Catheters for Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bream, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are a popular choice for the initiation of hemodialysis or for bridging between different types of access. Despite this, they have many drawbacks including a high morbidity from thrombosis and infection. Advances in technology have allowed placement of these lines relatively safely, and national guidelines have been established to help prevent complications. There is an established algorithm for location and technique for placement that minimizes harm to the patient; however, there are significant short- and long-term complications that proceduralists who place catheters should be able to recognize and manage. This review covers insertion and complications of central venous catheters for hemodialysis, and the social and economic impact of the use of catheters for initiating dialysis is reviewed. PMID:27011425

  4. Resection for oesophageal cancer - complications and survival.

    PubMed

    Grøtting, Marie Sæthre; Løberg, Else Marit; Johannessen, Hans-Olaf; Johnson, Egil

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND Surgery is considered necessary to achieve a cure for oesophageal cancer. Minimally invasive oesophageal resection is increasingly performed with the aim of reducing the number of complications compared with open surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate postoperative complications, mortality and long-term survival following hybrid oesophageal resection by laparoscopy and thoracotomy.MATERIAL AND METHOD Patients with oesophageal cancer who underwent hybrid resection with curative intent at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål from 1 November 2007 to 1 June 2013 were included (n = 109). Complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and survival figures were recorded.RESULTS Median age was 65 years, 79 % were men. Altogether 118 complications were recorded in 70 patients (64.2 %). Distribution of complications was 1.8 % for stage I, 29.4 % for stage II, 22.1 % for stage III and 11.0 % for stage IV. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 4.6 %. There was no postoperative mortality. The proportion of R0 resections with microscopic radicality was 91 % (n = 100). For the entire patient population, the estimated 5-year survival rate was 48 % (95 % CI 36 - 60 %), for R0 resection 51 % (38 - 63 %) and for R1-2 resection 0 %. Estimated median survival with R0-2, R0 and R1-2 resection was 55, 55 and 10 months (0 - 28 months), respectively. R status and stage had a significant bearing on survival.INTERPRETATION There was a low percentage of serious complications, no mortality and few anastomotic leakages after hybrid resection for oesophageal cancer. The 5-year survival rate was good.

  5. Depression and Advanced Complications of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Elizabeth H.B.; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Katon, Wayne; Heckbert, Susan R.; Ciechanowski, Paul; Oliver, Malia M.; Ludman, Evette J.; Young, Bessie A.; Williams, Lisa H.; McCulloch, David K.; Von Korff, Michael

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To prospectively examine the association of depression with risks for advanced macrovascular and microvascular complications among patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A longitudinal cohort of 4,623 primary care patients with type 2 diabetes was enrolled in 2000–2002 and followed through 2005–2007. Advanced microvascular complications included blindness, end-stage renal disease, amputations, and renal failure deaths. Advanced macrovascular complications included myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular procedures, and deaths. Medical record review, ICD-9 diagnostic and procedural codes, and death certificate data were used to ascertain outcomes in the 5-year follow-up. Proportional hazard models analyzed the association between baseline depression and risks of adverse outcomes. RESULTS After adjustment for prior complications and demographic, clinical, and diabetes self-care variables, major depression was associated with significantly higher risks of adverse microvascular outcomes (hazard ratio 1.36 [95% CI 1.05–1.75]) and adverse macrovascular outcomes (1.24 [1.0–1.54]). CONCLUSIONS Among people with type 2 diabetes, major depression is associated with an increased risk of clinically significant microvascular and macrovascular complications over the ensuing 5 years, even after adjusting for diabetes severity and self-care activities. Clinical and public health significance of these findings rises as the incidence of type 2 diabetes soars. Further research is needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms for this association and to test interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes complications among patients with comorbid depression. PMID:19933989

  6. Internet access to ionosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, I. A.; Kitrosser, D. F.; Kecic, Z.; Reinisch, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    Connecting ionosondes to the Internet gives easy access to real-time information on ionospheric conditions. Some of the ionosonde sites provide just the ionogram displays, others give in addition the scaled ionospheric characteristics directly usable for frequency management and HF channel assessment. Some sounders also store days or months of station data, which makes it possible remotely to evaluate the time history of geophysical events. The Internet link is also a convenient means for remote system maintenance and control. The paper addresses various aspects of the Internet ionosonde scenario, including data base support, WWW publishing, user interface, security, and data format. A list of Internet accessible ionosonde stations is provided with a brief description.

  7. Management of postoperative complications: general approach.

    PubMed

    Sanguineti, V Ana; Wild, Jason R; Fain, Mindy J

    2014-05-01

    The goal of postoperative management is to promote early mobility and avoid postoperative complications, recognizing the potentially devastating impact of complications on elderly patients with hip fracture. The recommended approach involves early mobilization; freedom from tethers (indwelling urinary catheters and other devices); effective pain control; treating malnutrition; preventing pressure ulcers; reducing risk for pulmonary, urinary, and wound infections; and managing cognition. This carefully structured and patient-centered management provides older, vulnerable patients their best chance of returning to their previous level of functioning as quickly and safety as possible.

  8. Varicella infection complicated by marked thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Shibusawa, Motoharu; Motomura, Sayuri; Hidai, Hiroko; Tsutsumi, Hisasi; Fujita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of adult varicella complicated by marked thrombocytopenia. A 49-year-old woman presented with fever and rash for 3 days. Blood examination revealed marked thrombocytopenia (2.7 × 10(4)/μL). Varicella infection was diagnosed after elevated levels of varicella zoster virus IgM and IgG antibodies were observed 2 weeks later. In this case, thrombocytopenia was due to varicella infection, and the mechanism was estimated to be non-immunological. Because varicella infection complicated by thrombocytopenia may result in fatal bleeding, thrombocytopenia in patients with varicella warrants close attention.

  9. Late complications of Hodgkin's disease management

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Bookman, M.A.; Longo, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In the past several decades, Hodgkin's disease has been transformed from a uniformly fatal illness to one that can be treated with the expectation of long-term remission or cure in the majority of patients. Because patients now survive for long periods after curative intervention, various complications have been identified. The spectrum of complications following curative therapy is quite diverse and includes immunologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, thyroid, and gonadal dysfunction. In addition, second malignant neoplasms in the form of acute leukemia as well as secondary solid tumors have now been documented to occur with increased frequency in patients cured of Hodgkin's disease. 80 references.

  10. Maternal physiology and complications of multiple pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Norwitz, Errol R; Edusa, Valentine; Park, Joong Shin

    2005-10-01

    Approximately 1% to 3% of all pregnancies in the United States are multiple gestations. The vast majority (97-98%) are twin pregnancies. Multiple pregnancies constitute significant risk to both mother and fetuses. Antepartum complications-including preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of the membranes, intrauterine growth restriction, intrauterine fetal demise, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia-develop in over 80% of multiple pregnancies as compared with approximately 25% of singleton gestations. This article reviews in detail the maternal physiologic adaptations required to support a multiple pregnancy and the maternal complications that develop when these systems fail or are overwhelmed.

  11. [Management of complications in bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Weiner, R A; Stroh, C; El-Sayes, I; Frenken, M; Theodoridou, S; Scheffel, O; Weiner, S

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is known to be the most effective and long-lasting treatment for morbid obesity and associated comorbidities. These comorbidities together with cardiopulmonary decompensation make morbidly obese patients a high risk group for operative interventions. Early detection of postoperative complications is a challenging task in these patients and requires accurate and timely interpretation of any alarm signals. Symptoms, such as tachycardia and abdominal pain are highly suspicious. The same applies to elevated inflammatory parameters and fever. Early diagnostic laparoscopy is mandatory once cardiopulmonary complications have been excluded. Moreover, it has a higher sensitivity and specificity than other radiological modalities and is a minimally invasive procedure with a highly satisfactory outcome.

  12. Abdominal Wall Haematoma Complicating Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tate, J. J. T.; Davidson, B. R.; Hobbs, K. E. F.

    1994-01-01

    Of 61 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 4 (6.25%) developed abdominal wall haematomas. This complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy may occur more commonly than existing literature suggests, and manifests in the post-operative period (days 2 to 6) by visible bruising, excessive pain or an asymptomatic drop in haematocrit. It is readily confirmed by ultrasonography. While no specific treatment is necessary apart from replacement of significant blood loss, the patient requires reassurance that this apparently alarming complication will rapidly resolve. PMID:8204548

  13. The Heimlich maneuver: breaking down the complications.

    PubMed

    Chillag, Shawn; Krieg, Jake; Bhargava, Ranjana

    2010-02-01

    The very young and the very old are vulnerable to choking, and there are over 4000 choking-related deaths annually in the United States. Complications from the Heimlich maneuver (HM), as reported in infrequent case reports, predominantly relate to the elderly. It is doubtful that the denominator, numerator, appropriateness, expertise, and problems of maneuvers applied to choking victims will ever be known. This case report and literature review suggests that the treatment for acute elderly choking victims should be applied carefully and that esophageal food impaction, which should be rapidly distinguishable from choking, can have serious complications with application of the HM.

  14. Review of the Complications Associated with Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Guide to the Dental Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lena; Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Akintoye, Sunday O

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Focus on risk factors, improved diagnostic methods and effective management strategies have made it possible to successfully treat OPC. However, the 5-year survival rate has not improved for several years due to multiple treatment complications, tissue morbidity, loss of function and diminished quality of life. Survivors are faced with complications like oral mucositis, hyposalivation, osteoradionecrosis; tissue fibrosis, morbidity from jaw resection; disfigurement and loss of function that further diminish quality of life. The aim of this review is to highlight major complications associated with treatment of OPC via a literature search and review of available options for identification and management of these complications. Data Sources Relevant publications on oral complications of OPC therapy were thoroughly reviewed from the literature published between the years 1988 and 2012. Material and Method We evaluated reported incidence, prevalence and risk factors for oral complications of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for OPC. The authors conducted electronic search using English language databases namely PubMed Plus, Medline (Pre-Medline and Medline), Cochrane Database of systematic reviews (evidence-based medicine), Dentistry & Oral sciences source, AccessScience, Embase, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews Multifile, Google Scholar, ISI Journal Citation Reports, Ovid Multi-Database. Conclusion We identified the most common complications associated with the treatment of oral cancers. Based on the information gathered, there is evidence that survival of OPC extends beyond eradication of the diseased tissue. Understanding the potential treatment complications and utilizing available resources to prevent and minimize them are important. Caring for OPC survivors should be a multidisciplinary team approach involving the dentist, oncologist, internist and social worker to improve the currently

  15. [Complex vascular access].

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Cesano, G; Thea, A; Hamido, D; Pacitti, A; Segoloni, G P

    1998-03-01

    Availability of a proper vascular access is a basic condition for a proper extracorporeal replacement in end-stage chronic renal failure. However, biological factors, management and other problems, may variously condition their middle-long term survival. Therefore, personal experience of over 25 years has been critically reviewed in order to obtain useful information. In particular "hard" situations necessitating complex procedures have been examined but, if possible, preserving the peripherical vascular features.

  16. History of vascular access.

    PubMed

    Dudrick, Stanley J

    2006-01-01

    Milestones in the history of the development of vascular access and the subsequent advances in practical clinical applications of the knowledge, techniques, technology, and experience to the beneficial management of a variety of patients are described. The original achievements are presented and briefly discussed primarily, but not exclusively, in relationship to the successful development of parenteral nutrition (PN). Beginning with the discovery of the circulation of blood, landmark events, resulting from astute observations, experimentation, and ingenious technological advances, are summarized or outlined chronologically over the past 4 centuries, with emphasis on the many recent accomplishments of basic and clinical scientists during the past 6 decades. Brief descriptions of several seminal contributions to safe and effective IV access, management, and therapy acknowledge and recognize the historical highlights that have allowed a complex and potentially hazardous therapeutic modality to evolve into a commonly applied useful adjunct to our current inpatient and outpatient armamentarium. A comprehensive list of references documents the highlights of the development of vascular access for the student of history.

  17. Vascular access through the intraosseous route in pediatric emergencies

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Ricardo Américo Ribeiro; Melo, Clayton Lima; Dantas, Raquel Batista; Delfim, Luciana Valverde Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining venous access in critically ill children is an essential procedure to restore blood volume and administer drugs during pediatric emergencies. The first option for vascular access is through a peripheral vein puncture. If this route cannot be used or if a prolonged period of access is necessary, then the intraosseous route is an effective option for rapid and safe venous access. The present work is a descriptive and exploratory literature review. The study's aim was to describe the techniques, professional responsibilities, and care related to obtaining venous access via the intraosseous route in pediatric emergencies. We selected 22 articles (published between 2000 and 2011) that were available in the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS) and MEDLINE databases and the SciELO electronic library, in addition to the current protocol of cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the American Heart Association (2010). After the literature search, data were pooled and grouped into the following categories of analysis: historical aspects and physiological principles; indications, benefits, and contraindications; professional assignments; technical principles; care during the access; and possible complications. The results of the present study revealed that the intraosseous route is considered the main secondary option for vascular access during the emergency response because the technique is quick and easily executed, presents several non-collapsible puncture sites, and enables the rapid and effective administration of drugs and fluid replacement. PMID:23917941

  18. [Vascular access in the elderly: AVF vs CVC. A comment].

    PubMed

    Bertoli, S V; Musetti, C

    2008-01-01

    The aging population starting hemodialysis treatment raises the question as to which is the best vascular access in an older patient with multiple complications. The center effect is an important element in the choice of a vascular access, as shown by the DOPPS data and by a recent audit held in Lombardy. However, other data show an increase in the use of permanent CVCs in the last years and other factors must be taken into account in this clinical choice. Also the timing of proposing a vascular access to a patient has changed over the years (see K-DOQI 2006 vs 2000). Most of the literature agrees on the strategy of a global clinical evaluation of the patient to decide when to place a vascular access and which type of access to use. Native and prosthetic fistulas are considered superior to CVCs although the latter have certain advantages in selected patients, such as those with severe cardiac problems. The nephrologist has a major role in vascular access management as part of a team made up also by a vascular surgeon and an interventional radiologist. Only in a center where both native and prosthetic fistulas can be constructed and permanent CVCs be placed can a nephrologist choose the most appropriate vascular access for individual patients after evaluation not only of their renal function but their cardiovascular risk as well.

  19. Delayed pneumothorax after central venous access: a potential hazard.

    PubMed

    Tyburski, J G; Joseph, A L; Thomas, G A; Saxe, J M; Lucas, C E

    1993-09-01

    Percutaneous central venous catheter access is common-place in surgical patients. Though several major complications of this procedure have been described, pneumothorax is the most common. Pneumothorax is routinely assessed by a chest X-ray within 2 hours after catheter placement. During a recent 6-month interval, the authors identified five patients with delayed onset and diagnosis of pneumothorax following percutaneous central venous access. All immediate post-insertion chest X-rays were normal; however, subsequent chest X-ray showed evidence of pneumothoraxes. The pneumothorax contributed to the death of one patient on positive pressure ventilation. A review of the literature revealed a total of 18 patients in the English literature with this complication. Although the incidence of delayed pneumothorax is low, it is, in some instances, life threatening, particularly in patients on positive pressure ventilation. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnosis and treat this reversible condition.

  20. Peripheral Insertion of a Central Venous Access Device Under Fluoroscopic Guidance Using a Peripherally Accessed System (PAS) Port in the Forearm

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Yasuhiro; Morita, Sojiro; Morita, Yoshitaka; Awatani, Toshihide; Takasaki, Motohiro; Horimi, Tadashi; Ozawa, Zen

    1998-05-15

    Purpose: We describe the technique, efficacy, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a peripherally accessed system (PAS) port via the forearm. Methods: Beginning in July 1994, 105 central venous access devices were implanted in 104 patients for the long-term infusion of antibiotics or antineoplasmic agents, blood products, or parenteral nutrition. The devices was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance with real-time venography from a peripheral route. Results: All ports were successfully implanted. There were no procedure-related complications. No thrombosis or local infection was observed; however, in six patients catheter-related phlebitis occurred. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a PAS port via the forearm is safe and efficacious, and injection of contrast medium through a peripheral IV catheter before introduction of the catheter helps to avoid catheter-related phlebitis.

  1. After Access: Underrepresented Students' Postmatriculation Perceptions of College Access Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Means, Darris R.; Pyne, Kimberly B.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the perceived impact of college-going capital gained during participation in a college access program. In three, semistructured interviews spanning the first-year college experience, 10 first-year college students who participated in a college access program articulate the value of access programming and also raise…

  2. Minimally invasive tubular access for posterior cervical foraminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Byron C.; Hilton, Donald L.; Watts, Clark

    2015-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive tubular access for posterior cervical foraminotomy can be an effective and safe technique for decompression of the nerve root utilizing minimally invasive muscle splitting with routine outpatient discharge. This technique has come under scrutiny calling into question the associated learning curve, a subjective limited exposure provided, and an argument that the risks and complications are largely unknown. In response to previously published critiques, this study aims to describe the outcomes and complications associated with this technique in a large patient series. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed from 1999 to 2013 capturing a single surgeon's experience with the minimally invasive tubular access for posterior cervical foraminotomy technique from a single institution, encompassing 463 patients. Surgical outcome documented at follow-up and complications were obtained from this patient series. Additional variables analyzed include: Hospital length of stay, number of levels operated, targeted root for decompression, side operated, length of surgery, and estimated blood loss. Results: Outpatient discharge was achieved in 91.6% of cases. There were 10 complications (2.2%) among the 463 patients undergoing this technique from 1999 to 2013. Patients were followed for an average of 1 year and 2 months postoperatively. Improvement from the preoperative condition was observed in 98.2% of patients and excellent outcomes with patients reporting complete relief of symptoms with no or mild residual discomfort was seen in 92.2%. Conclusions: Compared with open techniques, minimally invasive tubular access for posterior cervical foraminotomy demonstrates comparable, if not superior, complication rates, and patient outcomes. PMID:26009705

  3. Thromboembolic Complications in Thermally Injured Patients,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    utilisation systdmatique chez le brOld sauf chez les patients A bolism: A clinico -pathological study in injured and burned patients. thromoemblie.Br. J...fueron identificados como casos de tromboembolismo, complications in the surgical patient. Ann. Surg. 186:669, 1977 pulmonar significativo. En s6lo tres

  4. Major Complications of Small Bowel Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Donald, John W.

    1979-01-01

    Complications of diverticula of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum, exclusive of Meckel's diverticula are extremely rare but can produce major diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Major reported complications include hemorrhage, perforation, biliary and pancreatic obstruction, and inflammation with intestinal obstruction. The mortality of complicated duodenal diverticula is reported from 33 to 48%. Our experience with some of these complications is reported. This experience and a review of other reported cases have led to the following recommendations for surgical treatment. 1) Massively bleeding duodenal diverticulum. Precise localization of the bleeding point by endoscopy and/or arteriography is highly desirable. Excision or partial excision of the diverticulum with suture ligation of the bleeding point is necessary. 2) Perforated duodenal diverticulum. Excision or partial excision, secure closure and drainage are necessary. If peri-Vaterian, a probe should be passed through the ampulla of Vater via the common duct. Unless an entirely satisfactory closure is achieved, complete diversion of the enteric stream from the duodenum by vagotomy, antrectomy with closure of duodenal stump, and Billroth II anastomosis is recommended. 3) Choledochal obstruction due to duodenal diverticulum. Choledocho-duodenostomy. 4) Perforation, bleeding, or obstruction due to jejunal or ileal diverticulum. In rare cases, local excision of the diverticulum is feasible. Usually, resection of the involved segment with primary anastomosis is indicated. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:111637

  5. [Acral necrosis as a complication of urosepsis].

    PubMed

    Blarer, J; Pfister, D; Jandali, A R; Gutzeit, A; John, H; Horstmann, M

    2014-06-01

    Sepsis is the third most common cause of death in Germany. Every fourth patient with sepsis has urosepsis. Even if substantial therapeutic progress has been made, sepsis remains a severe condition with high morbidity and mortality that requires rapid interdisciplinary measures. Besides life-threatening complications, acral necrosis as presented here can occur as a result of disseminated intravascular coagulation and severe microcirculatory disorders.

  6. [Portal hypertension in pediatrics: II: Hemorrhagic complications].

    PubMed

    Costaguta, Alejandro; Alvarez, Fernando

    2010-08-01

    Bleeding from esophageal varices is the most severe complication of portal hypertension, and should be managed in specially trained centers. Vasoactive drugs, mainly octreotide, plus endoscopic treatment are able to control bleeding in 90% of the cases. Rescue treatments like TIPS and surgery should be immediately available for those who do not stop bleeding or have varices difficult to manage.

  7. Severe forefoot infection complicated by Fusobacterium russii.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Elisabeth; Grisold, Andrea J; Feierl, Gebhard; Lumenta, David B; Leitner, Eva

    2016-12-01

    We present the first case of a complicated foot infection caused by Fusobacterium russii in Austria. F. russii is highly associated with mammals such as cats and dogs. Our case underlines the difficulties in isolation and identification of anaerobes and the pitfalls in antimicrobial treatment of polymicrobial infections.

  8. Complications of missed or untreated Lisfranc injuries.

    PubMed

    Philbin, Terry; Rosenberg, Gary; Sferra, James J

    2003-03-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc complex are fairly common. Delayed treatment or missed diagnosis of these injuries can lead to significant complications. Non-operative treatment and salvage surgery can help to relieve sequelae that are associated with tarsometatarsal arthritis following traumatic injury.

  9. Management of Complications of Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, M. Dror; Cotter, Shane E.; Gargollo, Patricio C.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Dahl, Douglas M.; Smith, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Treatment of men with prostate cancer commonly involves surgical, radiation, or hormone therapy. Most men with prostate cancer live for many years after diagnosis and may never suffer morbidity or mortality attributable to prostate cancer. The short-term and long-term adverse consequences of therapy are, therefore, of great importance. Adverse effects of radical prostatectomy include immediate postoperative complications and long-term urinary and sexual complications. External beam or interstitial radiation therapy in men with localized prostate cancer may lead to urinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual complications. Improvements in surgical and radiation techniques have reduced the incidence of many of these complications. Hormone treatment typically consists of androgen deprivation therapy, and consequences of such therapy may include vasomotor flushing, anemia, and bone density loss. Numerous clinical trials have studied the role of bone antiresorptive therapy for prevention of bone density loss and fractures. Other long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy may include adverse body composition changes and increased risk of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Ongoing and planned clinical trials will continue to address strategies to prevent treatment-related side effects and improve quality of life for men with prostate cancer. PMID:18502900

  10. Acute transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Bucknall, R C

    1989-01-01

    A sixteen year old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus developed acute transverse myelopathy. She was treated with high dose steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange and regained partial neurological function. Previous descriptions of transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus are reviewed, with particular reference to the efficacy of high dose steroid treatment. PMID:2662918

  11. Impetigo: aetiology, complications and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Philip

    This article describes impetigo, and outlines differential diagnoses, likely complications associated with impetigo and signs and symptoms. Main treatments for impetigo are highlighted, with explanations of when these treatments are useful and when they may not be the best choice. Anxieties that accompany impetigo in a family context and ways in which an appreciation of these anxieties may enhance the care provided are examined.

  12. Colovesical fistula: an unusual complication of prostatomegaly.

    PubMed

    Abbas, F; Memon, A

    1994-08-01

    Colovesical fistula as a sequela to long-term bladder outflow obstruction is to our knowledge a previously unreported complication. We report a case in which single stage colonic resection and anastomosis with bladder repair and transurethral resection of the prostate resolved the condition.

  13. [Mechanical complications of total shoulder inverted prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Joris, D; Colette, A; Eudier, A; Dubuc, J E

    2002-06-01

    Our series of inverted prosthesis included 5 patients with a mean age of 73 +/- 6 years. In 4 cases, the implant was performed as a surgical revision. The follow up was 81 +/- 15 months. Three shoulders were pain free whereas two caused a dull pain after a free interval due to mechanical complications. The mean active elevation was 72 degrees while external rotation was - 2 degrees. The adjusted Constant score passed from 32 to 60. In case of complications, the score dropped to 32. Mechanical complications were important with in one case, an unscrening of the glenosphere and in two cases, a loosening of the glenoid prosthesis. This last and major complication occurred 6 years after surgery and was promoted by the occurrence of a progressive bone erosion in the scapula. This gap represented an attempt to accomodate the medial part of the humeral prosthesis under the scapula when the arm is at rest or in adduction. The concept of an inverted prosthesis is attractive and this implant remains one of the options in cuff-tear arthropathy. Our results were not as good as those reported by others but most of ours patients had been already operated before. The occurrence of an osseous gap on pilar of scapula may lead to failure of this prosthesis. This gap remains a threath as it can progress and as such warrants a design alteration of the prosthesis.

  14. Selecting a Principal: Keep It Complicated!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naso, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    When searching for a new principal, many search committees tend to use the lists of competencies published in the literature and provided by state departments of education as if they were checklists. Instead, they should focus on more complicated competencies, such as acumen, judgment, and ability to manage the dilemmas of practice.

  15. Intestinal stomas: indications, management, and complications.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sean T; Vogel, Jon D

    2012-01-01

    The ability to appropriately construct and care for an ostomy is crucial to good colorectal surgical practice. Enterostomal therapy is critical to the successful management of ostomies and their complications. Although associated with morbidity, a well-constructed ostomy can provide our patients with a good, durable QoL.

  16. Airway Complications of Total Artificial Heart

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Vikas; Donovan, Colin; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    The total artificial heart is the mechanical device which is used as a bridge to the heart transplant in patients with biventricular failure. Due to the mechanical nature of the device, patients receiving total artificial heart (TAH) require to be on anticoagulation therapy. Hemorrhage and coagulopathy are few of the known complications of TAH. PMID:28250605

  17. Symptoms of Major Depression and Complicated Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of a Loved One Symptoms of major depression and complicated grief Depression It’s common for people to have sadness, pain, ... might be getting worse—going into a major depression. About 1 in 5 bereaved people will develop ...

  18. Aneurysmatic arteriovenous fistula complicating splenic injury.

    PubMed

    Sarioğlu, A; Tanyel, F C; Ariyürek, M; Balkanci, F; Hiçsönmez, A

    1996-06-01

    A child with a posttraumatic aneurysmatic arteriovenous (AV) fistula located in the spleen is presented. The fact that the increased use of more conservative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in splenic injuries might lead to underestimation of some uncommon complications is discussed.

  19. Using Programmable Calculators to Evaluate Complicated Formulas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snover, Stephen L.; Spikell, Mark A.

    The application of the programmable calculator to evaluating complicated formulas is illustrated by considering the formula for finding the area of any triangle when only the lengths of the three sides are known. Other advantages of the programmable calculator are discussed such as freeing the student to explore more challenging problems and…

  20. [Femoral venous catheter: an unusual complication].

    PubMed

    Garcia, P; Mora, A; Trambert, P; Maler, E; Courant, P

    2000-08-01

    We report an erratic course of a venous femoral catheter which was in the abdominal cavity in a patient with an haemoperitoneum and an hepatic injury. This complication led to an inefficiency of the transfusion and a worsening of the haemoperitoneum.

  1. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  2. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors, mortality and morbidity in children with CKD. PMID:17120060

  3. Factors associated with immediate abortion complications.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, L E; McMain-Klein, M; Colodny, N; Fellows, G F; Lamont, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with increased risk of immediate complications from induced abortion. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of a provincial database. SETTING: All Ontario general hospitals in which abortions are performed and all free-standing abortion clinics in Ontario. POPULATION: Women in Ontario aged 15 to 44 years who underwent an induced abortion in the province (without concurrent sterilization) between Jan. 1, 1992, and Dec. 31, 1993. OUTCOME MEASURES: Recording of complications at the time of the procedure, gestational age, type of procedure, place of abortion (hospital or clinic), and patient's age, parity and history of previous abortion (spontaneous or induced). RESULTS: During the study period 83 469 abortions were performed that met our inclusion criteria. Immediate complications were reported in 571 cases (0.7%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that, after other variables were controlled for, the patient's age, parity and history of previous abortions (spontaneous or induced) were not significant risk factors for immediate complications; however, gestational age, method of abortion and place of abortion were significant risk factors (p < 0.001). The odds ratio (OR) for having a complication from abortion was 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02 to 1.63) between 9 and 12 weeks, compared with having one after abortion at 9 weeks or earlier, and increased to 3.3 (95% CI 2.23 to 5.00) after abortion between 17 and 20 weeks. Compared with surgical dilatation and curettage (D&C), instillation of saline and instillation of prostaglandins were more likely to be associated with immediate complications (OR 24.0, 95% CI 13.22 to 43.70, and OR 11.7, 95% CI 6.43 to 21.18, respectively), whereas both suction D&C and insertion of a laminaria tent were less likely to be associated with immediate complications (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.67, and OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.52, respectively). Compared with women who had an abortion

  4. Vascular access for hemodialysis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Domenico; Benedetto, Filippo; Mondello, Placido; Pipitò, Narayana; Barillà, David; Spinelli, Francesco; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Cernaro, Valeria; Buemi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    A well-functioning vascular access (VA) is a mainstay to perform an efficient hemodialysis (HD) procedure. There are three main types of access: native arteriovenous fistula (AVF), arteriovenous graft, and central venous catheter (CVC). AVF, described by Brescia and Cimino, remains the first choice for chronic HD. It is the best access for longevity and has the lowest association with morbidity and mortality, and for this reason AVF use is strongly recommended by guidelines from different countries. Once autogenous options have been exhausted, prosthetic fistulae become the second option of maintenance HD access alternatives. CVCs have become an important adjunct in maintaining patients on HD. The preferable locations for insertion are the internal jugular and femoral veins. The subclavian vein is considered the third choice because of the high risk of thrombosis. Complications associated with CVC insertion range from 5% to 19%. Since an increasing number of patients have implanted pacemakers and defibrillators, usually inserted via the subclavian vein and superior vena cava into the right heart, a careful assessment of risk and benefits should be taken. Infection is responsible for the removal of about 30%–60% of HD CVCs, and hospitalization rates are higher among patients with CVCs than among AVF ones. Proper VA maintenance requires integration of different professionals to create a VA team. This team should include a nephrologist, radiologist, vascular surgeon, infectious disease consultant, and members of the dialysis staff. They should provide their experience in order to give the best options to uremic patients and the best care for their VA. PMID:25045278

  5. Optimal Vascular Access in the Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Moist, Louise M.; Lok, Charmaine E.; Vachharajani, Tushar J.; Xi, Wang; AlJaishi, Ahmed; Polkinghorne, Kevan R; Lee, Timmy C.

    2014-01-01

    The optimal vascular access for elderly patients remains a challenge due to the difficulty balancing the benefits and risks in a population with increased comorbidity and decreased survival. Age is commonly associated with failure to mature in fistula and decreased rates of primary and secondary patency in both fistula and grafts. In the elderly, at 1 and 2-years, primary patency rates range from 43% to 74% and 29% to 67%, respectively. Secondary patency rates at 1 and 2-years range from 56% to 82% and 44% to 67% respectively. Cumulative fistula survival is no better than grafts survival when primary failures are included. Several observational studies consistently demonstrate a lower adjusted mortality among those using a fistula compared to a catheter (1–3)(1–3) however catheter use in the elderly is increasing in most countries with the exception of Japan. Both guidelines and quality initiatives do not acknowledge the trade-offs involved in managing the elderly patients with multiple chronic conditions and limited life expectancy or the value that patients place on achieving these outcomes(4)(4). The framework for choice of vascular access presented in this article considers: 1) likelihood of disease progression before death 2) patient life expectancy, 3) risks and benefits by vascular access type and 4) patient preference. Future studies evaluating the timing and type of vascular access with careful assessments of complications, functionality, cost benefit, and patients’ preference will provide relevant information to individualize and optimize care to improve morbidity, mortality, and quality of life in the elderly patient. PMID:23173892

  6. Pulmonary complications following orthotopic liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Durán, F G; Piqueras, B; Romero, M; Carneros, J A; de Diego, A; Salcedo, M; Santos, L; Ferreiroa, J; Cos, E; Clemente, G

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary complications after orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) are frequent, involving high morbidity and mortality. We have determined the pulmonary complication incidence in 187 patients submitted to OLT at the General University Hospital "Gregorio Marañón" in the last 4 years, analyzing the type of infection, evolution, diagnostic and therapeutic measures and their influence on OLT mortality. A total of 120 patients had pulmonary complications, the most frequent being pleural effusion (61.94%), pneumonia (43.36%), and pneumothorax (11.5%). Serious pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed by invasive methods in two patients at the time of surgery (unidentified before OLT); both died at early post postoperative times. Pleural effusion was noted in 70 patients, 31.42% of them requiring thoracic tube drainage, complications developing in 22.72%. Thirteen patients were diagnosed of pneumothorax, the most frequent etiologies being percutaneous liver biopsy, thoracic tube drainage for pleural effusion, and postoperative complications in 41.6, 33.3, and 23.3%, respectively. Pneumonia was diagnosed in the 1st month after OLT in 45 patients. Tests to diagnose and identify the etiological agent were made in 71.1% of diagnosed pneumonia patients, identification being obtained in 62.5%. Telescope catheter culture identified the agent in 48%, fiber optic bronchoscopy in 50%, and lung or pleural biopsy in 100%. Respiratory insufficiency was noted in 64 patients (34.22% of transplanted patients). Factors involved in their development were pneumonia (42.18%), graft dysfunction (39.06%, pleural effusion (34.37%), sepsis (28.18%), and poor nutritional status (7.81%). Fifty patients (41.66%) died, pulmonary pathology being the determinant factor in 28.8%. Patient mortality with respiratory insufficiency was greater, especially in those with three factors involved the development of respiratory insufficiency.

  7. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  8. EPICS: Channel Access security design

    SciTech Connect

    Kraimer, M.; Hill, J.

    1994-05-01

    This document presents the design for implementing the requirements specified in: EPICS -- Channel Access Security -- functional requirements, Ned. D. Arnold, 03/09/92. Use of the access security system is described along with a summary of the functional requirements. The programmer`s interface is given. Security protocol is described and finally aids for reading the access security code are provided.

  9. Complications of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in patients with dilated and nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts.

    PubMed

    Weber, Andreas; Gaa, Jochen; Rosca, Bogdan; Born, Peter; Neu, Bruno; Schmid, Roland M; Prinz, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) have been described as an effective technique to obtain biliary access. Between January 1996 and December 2006, a total of 419 consecutive patients with endoscopically inaccessible bile ducts underwent PTBD. The current retrospective study evaluated success and complication rates of this invasive technique. PTBD was successful in 410/419 patients (97%). The success rate was equal in patients with dilated and nondilated bile ducts (p=0.820). In 39/419 patients (9%) procedure related complications could be observed. Major complications occurred in 17/419 patients (4%). Patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts had significantly higher complication rates compared to patients with dilated intrahepatic bile ducts (14.5% vs. 6.9%, respectively [p=0.022]). Procedure related deaths were observed in 3 patients (0.7%). In conclusion, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an effective procedure in patients with dilated and nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts. However, patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts showed a higher risk for procedure related complications.

  10. Role of sonography in assessing complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Starzyńska, Teresa; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Kładny, Józef

    2014-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which was introduced to the arsenal of surgical procedures in the middle of the 1980s, is a common alternative for conventional cholecystectomy. Its primary advantage is less invasive character which entails shorter hospitalization and faster recovery. Nevertheless, the complications of both procedures are comparable and encompass multiple organs and tissues. The paper presents ultrasound presentation of the surgical bed after laparoscopic cholecystectomy and of complications associated with this procedure. In the first week following the surgery, the presence of up to 60 ml of fluid in the removed gallbladder bed should be considered normal in certain patients. The fluid will gradually absorb. In single cases, slight amounts of fluid are detected in the peritoneal cavity, which also should not be alarming. Carbon dioxide absorbs from the peritoneal cavity within two days. Ultrasound assessment of the surgical bed after cholecystectomy is inhibited by hemostatic material left during the surgery. Its presentation may mimic an abscess. In such cases, the decisive examination is magnetic resonance imaging but not computed tomography. On the other hand, rapidly accumulating fluid around the liver is an alarming symptom, particularly when there is inadequate blood supply or when peritoneum irritation symptoms develop. Depending on the suspected cause of the patient's deteriorating condition, it is essential to perform urgent computed tomography angiography, celiac angiography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. The character of the fluid collection may be determined by its ultrasound-guided puncture. This procedure allows for aspiration of fluid and placement of a drain. Moreover, transabdominal ultrasound examination after laparoscopic cholecystectomy may contribute to the identification of: dropped stones in the right hypochondriac region, residual fragment of the gallbladder

  11. Complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Leyes, Manuel; Torres, Raúl; Guillén, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the complications after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Complications are classified as perioperative (malreduction, inadequate fixation, and intra-articular penetration of hardware), early postoperative (wound edge dehiscence, necrosis, infection and compartment syndrome), and late (stiffness, distal tibiofibular synostosis, degenerative osteoarthritis, and hardware related complications). Emphasis is placed on preventive measures to avoid such complications.

  12. Endoscopic management of acute colorectal anastomotic complications with temporary stent.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Maher A

    2009-01-01

    Acute postoperative anastomotic complications following colorectal resection include leak and obstruction. Often an operation is necessary to treat these complications. The role of endoluminal procedures to treat these complications has been limited. This article illustrates that such an approach is technically feasible and can be used to treat some colorectal anastomotic complications.

  13. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  14. CT findings of colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  15. Macroscopic characterisations of Web accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rui; Carriço, Luis

    2010-12-01

    The Web Science framework poses fundamental questions on the analysis of the Web, by focusing on how microscopic properties (e.g. at the level of a Web page or Web site) emerge into macroscopic properties and phenomena. One research topic on the analysis of the Web is Web accessibility evaluation, which centres on understanding how accessible a Web page is for people with disabilities. However, when framing Web accessibility evaluation on Web Science, we have found that existing research stays at the microscopic level. This article presents an experimental study on framing Web accessibility evaluation into Web Science's goals. This study resulted in novel accessibility properties of the Web not found at microscopic levels, as well as of Web accessibility evaluation processes themselves. We observed at large scale some of the empirical knowledge on how accessibility is perceived by designers and developers, such as the disparity of interpretations of accessibility evaluation tools warnings. We also found a direct relation between accessibility quality and Web page complexity. We provide a set of guidelines for designing Web pages, education on Web accessibility, as well as on the computational limits of large-scale Web accessibility evaluations.

  16. Methylglyoxal, diabetes mellitus and diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Vander Jagt, David L

    2008-01-01

    A large literature has developed around methylglyoxal (MG) concerning its role in diabetes mellitus (DM) and in the development of diabetic complications. This is related to the observation that levels of reactive aldehydes, especially 2-oxoaldehydes such as MG, are elevated in DM. There are numerous metabolic origins of MG that are accentuated in DM. MG has effects on insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells and is a major precursor of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE). Consequently, MG has a role in primary DM as well in the etiology of long-term complications. There is an extensive literature concerning the enzymes involved in the metabolism of MG, especially the glyoxalase system and aldose reductase. In addition, there is a rapidly developing literature on the direct and indirect effects of MG on signaling pathways that impact DM. This review attempts to integrate this DM-associated literature related to MG.

  17. Neurocritical care complications of pregnancy and puerperum.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jennifer A; Ahmed, Wamda

    2014-12-01

    Neurocritical care complications of pregnancy and puerperum such as preeclampsia/eclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, seizures, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, postpartum angiopathy, cerebral sinus thrombosis, amniotic fluid emboli, choriocarcinoma, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are rare but can be devastating. These conditions can present a challenge to physicians because pregnancy is a unique physiologic state, most therapeutic options available in the intensive care unit were not studied in pregnant patients, and in many situations, physicians need to deliver care to both the mother and the fetus, simultaneously. Timely recognition and management of critical neurologic complications of pregnancy/puerperum can be life saving for both the mother and fetus.

  18. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  19. Management of postoperative complications of lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Charruf, Amir Zeide; de Oliveira, Rodrigo José; Jacob, Carlos Eduardo; Cecconello, Ivan; Zilberstein, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a disease with poor prognosis, mainly due to its late diagnosis. Surgery remains as the only treatment with curative intent, where the goal is radical resection with free-margin gastrectomy and extended lymphadenectomy. Over the last two decades there has been an improvement on postoperative outcomes. However, complications rate is still not negligible even in high volume specialized centers and are directly related mainly to the type of gastric resection: total or subtotal, combined with adjacent organs resection and the extension of lymphadenectomy (D1, D2 and D3). The aim of this study is to analyze the complications specific-related to lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer surgery. PMID:28138657

  20. [Surgical complications in 479 renal transplantations].

    PubMed

    Borrego, J; Burgos, F J; Galmes, I; Orofino, L; Rodríguez Luna, J M; Marcen, R; Fernández, E; Escudero, A; Ortuño, J

    1994-04-01

    Exposition of results obtained from the review of the surgical complications found in a series of 479 renal transplantations performed between 1978 and 1992 in our centre, although some of them lack clinical relevance. There was fluid accumulation in 69 patients, distributed between 31 perirenal haematoma. 17 lymphocele, 13 urinoma, 5 perirenal abscesses and 3 mixed. 27.7% required no action. Frequency of renal rupture was 18 cases, 9 due to acute rejection and 9 to vascular thrombosis. Incidence of urinary obstruction was 4.8% with 5.8% of urinary fistula. With regard to the surgical wound, 9 infections, 7 haematomas, 1 eventration and 1 necrotizing fasciitis were observed. Vascular complications consisted in 10 arterial thrombosis, 10 venous thrombosis, 5 mixed thrombosis and 31 arterial stenosis. Treatment instituted for the various cases, its evolution, and an statistical study of risk factors are illustrated.