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Sample records for access site-related complications

  1. Routine use of ultrasound-guided access reduces access-site related complications after lower extremity percutaneous revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Fokkema, Margriet T.M.; Curran, Thomas; Darling, Jeremy; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark; Martin, Michelle; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We sought to elucidate the risks for access site-related complications (ASC) following percutaneous lower extremity revascularization and to evaluate benefit of routine ultrasound-guided access (RUS) in decreasing ASC. Methods We reviewed all consecutive percutaneous revascularizations (PTA or stent) performed for lower extremity atherosclerosis at our institution from 2002–2012. RUS began September 2007. Primary outcome was any ASC (bleeding, groin or retroperitoneal [RP] hematoma, vessel rupture, or thrombosis). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine predictors of ASC. Results A total of 1,371 punctures were performed on 877 patients (43% women, median age 69 [IQR 60–78] yrs for claudication (29%), critical limb ischemia (59%), or bypass graft stenosis (12%) using 4–8Fr sheaths. There were 72 ASCs (5%): 52 instances of bleeding or groin hematoma, 9 pseudoaneurysms, 8 retroperitoneal hematomas, 2 artery lacerations, and 1 thrombosis. ASC were less frequent when RUS was used (4% vs. 7%, P=.02). Multivariable predictors of ASC were age >75 years (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1–3.7, P=.03), CHF (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–1.3, P=.02), preoperative warfarin use (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1–3.5, P=.02), & RUS (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2–0.7, P<.01). Vascular closure devices (VCDs) were not associated with lower rates of ASCs (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.2–0.7, P<.01). RUS lowered ASCs in those >75 years (5% vs. 12%, P<.01) but not those on warfarin preoperatively (10% vs. 13%, P=.47). RUS did not decrease VCD failure (6% vs. 4%, P=.79). Conclusions We were able to decrease the rate of ASCs during lower extremity revascularization with the implementation of RUS. VCDs did not impact ASCs. Particular care should be taken on patients >75 years old, those with CHF, and those on warfarin. PMID:25240244

  2. Vascular access complications in endovascular procedures with large sheaths.

    PubMed

    Lejay, Anne; Caspar, Thibault; Ohana, Mickaël; Delay, Charline; Girsowicz, Elie; Ohlmann, P; Thaveau, Fabien; Geny, Bernard; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular procedures, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), and endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) have been established as promising less invasive therapeutic options. However, despite continuous advances and device improvements, the use of large-sheaths still remains an important challenge, since significant coexisting arterial disease may be encountered in patients undergoing such procedures. Identification of coexisting arterial diseases by optimal preoperative imaging assessment is essential to anticipate these difficulties and avoid the complications by using adequate access options. Should a vascular complication such as iliac rupture occur, vascular interventionists must be aware of salvage procedures to control and treat major complications, such as maintaining wire access across the rupture for occlusion balloon placement and vessel control, while disruption is addressed either through an endovascular or an open approach. The aims of this review are to describe how to prevent vascular complications by optimal preoperative imaging assessment, to detail intraoperative options available for addressing difficult access issues and to discuss how to manage intraoperative major vascular complications. PMID:26603161

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  4. With "Access Codes", Textbook Pricing Gets More Complicated than Ever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    The story of one University of Maine student's quest for a reasonably priced textbook reveals just how complicated course materials have become as the textbook industry makes its awkward transition from print to digital. The student is Luke Thomas, a senior majoring in business on the Orono campus, who last semester took a 250-person introductory…

  5. Utilization of inpatient and outpatient resources for the management of hemodialysis access complications.

    PubMed

    Rocco, M V; Bleyer, A J; Burkart, J M

    1996-08-01

    Complications of hemodialysis accesses are a major cause of morbidity in chronic hemodialysis patients. Although several investigators have reported on the utilization of inpatient services for hemodialysis access complications, there is a paucity of data regarding the utilization of outpatient services and temporary accesses for these complications. In this retrospective study, we identified all access-related inpatient admissions and outpatient encounters and procedures performed in an incident cohort of hemodialysis patients. Eighty-eight patients were followed for an average of 487.4 +/- 316.9 days, for a total of 119.1 patient-years of risk. The mean age was 57.0 +/- 14.6 years, with 55% females and 65% blacks; 31% of patients had diabetes mellitus as the primary cause of end-stage renal disease. Patients were referred to our nephrology practice a median of 56 days prior to the placement of a hemodialysis access and a median of 76 days prior to the initiation of hemodialysis. At the initiation of hemodialysis, 48 native arteriovenous fistulas and 40 polytetrafluoroethylene grafts were placed. Only 28 patients (31.8%) had a permanent access placed at least 14 days before the start of hemodialysis, resulting in the placement of 93 temporary accesses during the first week of dialysis therapy. Because of access complications, 21 patients had failure of their primary access, requiring the placement of 33 additional permanent accesses, including six native arteriovenous fistulas, 23 polytetrafluoroethylene grafts, and four permacaths, or an average of 0.28 new accesses per patient-year of risk. During the study period, 45 patients (51%) had at least one access complication. To manage these access complications, 25 fistulograms (0.21 per patient-year of risk) were performed and 116 additional temporary accesses (0.97 per patient-year of risk) were placed, including 50 femoral (43.1%), 52 subclavian (44.8%), and 14 internal jugular (12.1%) catheters. A total of 2

  6. Delivery Complications Associated With Prenatal Care Access for Medicaid-Insured Mothers in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Bennett, Kevin J.; Probst, Janice C.

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy complications affect many women. It is likely that some complications can be avoided through routine primary and prenatal care of reasonable quality. The authors examined access to health care during pregnancy for mothers insured by Medicaid. The access indicator is potentially avoidable maternity complications (PAMCs). Potentially…

  7. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Walser, Eric M.

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  8. [A rare complication of permanent venous access: constriction, fracture and embolization of the catheter].

    PubMed

    Groebli, Y; Wuthrich, P; Tschantz, P; Beguelin, P; Piguet, D

    1998-01-01

    The pinch off syndrome due to squeezing of the implanted catheter is a rare complication of permanent venous access devices (0.1 to 1% of the cases). The cause is a mechanical catheter's compression in the costo-clavicular space, when implanted too medially in the subclavian vein. In case of lack of venous reflux or injection difficulties, sometimes complicated by local pain, a radiological control must be obtained to demonstrate signs of compression or beginning of fracture. Significant damage to the system is shown be extravasation of radioopaque contrast medium. The suspicion of catheter damage justifies early replacement of the system to avoid right heart or pulmonary artery embolism. The electron microscopic scanning tends to prove that the catheter's rupture is caused by a fatigue process. PMID:9655009

  9. Patency rate and complications of polytetrafluoroethylene grafts compared with polyurethane grafts for hemodialysis access

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The survival of hemodialysis patients requiring dialysis depends on the long-term functioning and patency of the vascular access. Prosthetic vascular grafts are inevitably used for patients whose vessels are unsuitable for an autogenous arteriovenous (AV) fistula. The purpose of this study was to compare the patency rate and associated complications using different types of grafts. Methods This prospective study was conducted on patients who did not have an appropriate vein for arteriovenous fistula from January 2004 through July 2006. They were divided into two groups, sex, age, and basic data matched. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyurethane (PVAG) were the two types of grafts used in this study. The functionality of the graft was assessed immediately 1 day and 2 weeks after operation. The clinical follow-up was performed each 3 months until 24 months. Results One-year patency rate was reported to be 64% and 52% in the PTFE and PVAG groups, respectively. There was no significant difference in 1-year (64% versus 52%) and 2-year (49% versus 41%) patency rate of the PTFE and PVAG grafts used as vascular access. There was also no difference between the numbers of complications reported in the two groups. Conclusion It could be concluded that either PTFE or PVAG grafts can be used with the same expected outcomes. PMID:20218943

  10. Complications of Minimally Invasive, Tubular Access Surgery for Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    The object of the study was to review the author's large series of minimally invasive spine surgeries for complication rates. The author reviewed a personal operative database for minimally access spine surgeries done through nonexpandable tubular retractors for extradural, nonfusion procedures. Consecutive cases (n = 1231) were reviewed for complications. There were no wound infections. Durotomy occurred in 33 cases (2.7% overall or 3.4% of lumbar cases). There were no external or symptomatic internal cerebrospinal fluid leaks or pseudomeningoceles requiring additional treatment. The only motor injuries were 3 C5 root palsies, 2 of which resolved. Minimally invasive spine surgery performed through tubular retractors can result in a low wound infection rate when compared to open surgery. Durotomy is no more common than open procedures and does not often result in the need for secondary procedures. New neurologic deficits are uncommon, with most observed at the C5 root. Minimally invasive spine surgery, even without benefits such as less pain or shorter hospital stays, can result in considerably lower complication rates than open surgery. PMID:25097785

  11. Young Australian adults with NF1 have poor access to health care, high complication rates, and limited disease knowledge.

    PubMed

    Oates, Emily C; Payne, Jonathan M; Foster, Sheryl L; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N

    2013-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a multisystem disease associated with a lifelong risk of debilitating and potentially life-limiting complications, however many adults with NF1 have no regular health surveillance. We interviewed and examined 17 young adults with NF1 between the ages of 25 and 33. Most had not been assessed for NF1-related complications within the previous 8 years, including patients with known serious vascular complications, for example, renal artery stenosis. Acute and/or chronic pain, particularly back and plexiform-related pain were common symptoms, and despite a significant impact on quality of life, was untreated in most instances. Symptom and examination-directed imaging revealed serious complications in 41% of the cohort. These included severe spinal cord compression (two cases), a highly SUV avid lesion suggestive of malignancy (one case), and a Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma in a patient without any previous NF1-related complications. Few study participants had a good understanding of NF1, its associated risks and complications, and many had not sought appropriate medical advice as questions or problems arose. NF1-related cognitive deficits in some participants, and the lack of a clear source of expert medical advice for adults with NF1 likely contributed to poor health surveillance and management in this population. Overall, these findings suggest that many Australian adults with NF1 are at risk of serious and life-threatening medical complications, but are not accessing and receiving adequate health care. Access to multidisciplinary adult clinics that specialize in NF1 may address many of the unmet health needs of young adults with NF1. PMID:23427176

  12. Carotid-jugular arteriovenous fistula: a case report of an iatrogenic complication following internal jugular vein catheterization for hemodialysis access.

    PubMed

    Patel, Himanshu V; Sainaresh, Vellanki V; Jain, Siddharth H; Kute, Vivek B; Godara, Suraj; Gumber, Manoj R; Munjappa, Bipin; Gera, Dinesh N; Shah, Pankaj R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of diabetic end-stage renal disease patient who presented with a right common carotid artery jugular arteriovenous fistula as a complication of the insertion of a polyurethane double-lumen hemodialysis catheter into the right internal jugular vein .On physical examination of the neck, a pulsating mass with a palpable thrill and a bruit was noted in the right subclavicular region. The diagnosis was confirmed by color doppler ultrasonography of the neck and carotid angiography. The review of the literature suggests the occurrence of this complication as rather rare. The fistula was successfully repaired surgically. It is emphasized that while securing the access, a thorough physical examination with a special emphasis on seeking any neck swellings, thrill, and bruit along with routine use of vascular doppler for securing dialysis access is recommended. PMID:21624042

  13. Percutaneous Transsplenic Access to the Portal Vein for Management of Vascular Complication in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hee Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein for management of vascular complication in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Between Sept 2009 and April 2011, percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein was attempted in nine patients with chronic liver disease. Splenic vein puncture was performed under ultrasonographic guidance with a Chiba needle, followed by introduction of a 4 to 9F sheath. Four patients with hematemesis or hematochezia underwent variceal embolization. Another two patients underwent portosystemic shunt embolization in order to improve portal venous blood flow. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver. The percutaneous transsplenic access site was closed using coils and glue. Results: Percutaneous transsplenic splenic vein catheterization was performed successfully in all patients. Gastric or jejunal varix embolization with glue and lipiodol mixture was performed successfully in four patients. In two patients with a massive portosystemic shunt, embolization of the shunting vessel with a vascular plug, microcoils, glue, and lipiodol mixture was achieved successfully. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver; however, only one patient was treated successfully. Complete closure of the percutaneous transsplenic tract was achieved using coils and glue without bleeding complication in all patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein can be an alternative route for portography and further endovascular management in patients for whom conventional approaches are difficult or impossible.

  14. Two Serious Complications of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Indicating the Need to Formalize Training for Placing Central Venous Vascular Access Devices.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Volker; Feenstra, Nico

    2016-02-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters are being used in increasing numbers. Common (thrombosis, infection, phlebitis, malfunction, or disconnection) and rare complications (pericardial tamponade) have been well explored. We describe 2 serious complications that resolved without sequelae. Both complications occurred in the context of limited provider competence. We conclude that vascular access is more than "just" placing a catheter; it can have serious clinical impact and has evolved into a specialist skill. With increasing use of intravascular catheters, the need for a formalized training becomes urgent. PMID:26517231

  15. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  16. Accessibility

    MedlinePlus

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  17. Totally implantable venous access port systems and associated complications: A single-institution retrospective analysis of 2,996 breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    MA, LI; LIU, YUEPING; WANG, JIANXIN; CHANG, YUAN; YU, LONG; GENG, CUIZHI

    2016-01-01

    Totally implantable venous access port systems (TIVAPS) are widely used in breast cancer patients. However, complications are frequent and may necessitate device replacement or removal, resulting in additional patient stress and treatment delays. The aim of this study was to investigate possible risk factors for complications. A total of 2,996 consecutive female breast cancer patients, with a median age of 50.2 years (range, 21.2–85.5 years) were enrolled in this observational, single-centre study between December, 2008 and April, 2014. TIVAPS implantation was principally performed using local anaesthesia and the blind puncture or Seldinger technique through internal jugular or subclavian vein access. A retrospective chart review was conducted to obtain information associated with TIVAPS and patient data. Insertion performed by blind puncture and Seldinger technique had a success ratio of 96.34 and 99.80%, respectively (χ2=29.905, P<0.001). However, the success ratio of the puncture technique group was 99.76% when the TIVAPS was implanted in the right internal jugular vein. The most common complications were late complications, with an overall incidence rate of 5.41% (162/2,996) during the entire device duration. The most common late complications included fibrin formation (1.84%, 55/2,996), port-related bacteraemia (1.44%, 43/2,996) and deep vein thrombosis (0.63%, 19/2,996). No patient died during the study. Our results demonstrated that insertion of TIVAPS by blind puncture or the Seldinger technique through internal jugular or subclavian vein access is convenient, and insertion by the Seldinger technique through the right internal jugular vein is the preferred method. Therefore, TIVAPS is safe for continuous infusional chemotherapy regimens for breast cancer patients. PMID:26998304

  18. Totally implantable venous access devices: retrospective analysis of different insertion techniques and predictors of complications in 796 devices implanted in a single institution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of totally implanted vascular devices (TIVAD) using different techniques of insertion. Methods We performed a retrospective study using a prospective collected database of 796 consecutive oncological patients in which TIVADs were inserted. We focused on early and late complications following different insertion techniques (surgical cutdown, blind and ultrasound guided percutaneous) according to different techniques. Results Ultrasound guided technique was used in 646 cases, cephalic vein cutdown in 102 patients and percutaneous blind technique in 48 patients. The overall complication rate on insertion was 7.2% (57 of 796 cases). Early complications were less frequent using the ultrasound guided technique: arterial puncture (p = 0.009), technical failure (p = 0.009), access site change after first attempt (p = 0.002); pneumothorax occurred in 4 cases, all using the blind percutaneus technique. Late complications occurred in 49 cases (6.1%) which required TIVAD removal in 43 cases and included: sepsis (29 cases), thrombosis (3 cases), dislocation (7 cases), skin dehiscence (3 cases), and severe pain (1 case). Conclusion Ultrasound guided technique is the safest option for TIVAD insertion, with the lowest rates of immediate complications. PMID:24886342

  19. On the Conduct of Site Relations in Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Susan C.; And Others

    Schools are often reluctant to be watched or studied, especially when their interests do not coincide with those of researchers. The development of good site relations can improve the chances of successful data gathering in such circumstances. In addition to acting with courtesy and respect, research teams can organize their site relations…

  20. Enterococcus faecalis endophthalmitis as a metastatic complication of hemodialysis vascular access-related sepsis: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Osman Zikrullah; Kara, Ekrem; Belice, Tahir; Ayaz, Teslime; Baydur Sahin, Serap; Ozturk, Cinar; Yildirim, Safak; Metin, Yavuz; Sahutoglu, Tuncay

    2016-07-01

    Catheter and/or arteriovenous (A-V) graft-related bacteremia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among hemodialysis (HD) patients. Endocarditis, septic arthritis, epidural abscess, septic embolism, and osteomyelitis are the most common complications of catheter and/or A-V graft-related bacteremia; however, endogenous endophthalmitis is rarely seen. To the best of our knowledge, Enterococcus faecalis is the first case report in this population. We hereby report a case of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by E. faecalis as a complication of catheter and/or A-V graft-related bacteremia in a diabetic patient, who was undergoing HD for 5 years. We also discuss the etiology, clinical features, and outcomes of endogenous endophthalmitis in HD patients with a brief review of the literature. Although broad-spectrum parenteral (intravenous and intravitreal) antibiotics were used for 4 weeks, evisceration of the left eye could not be avoided. Endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare but rapidly blinding complication of catheter and/or A-V graft-related bacteremia in HD patients. It can develop as a result of silent catheter and/or A-V graft infections, which may lead to recurrent bacteremia. E. faecalis should be considered as a pathogen in this population who had recent history of catheter or A-V graft procedure. PMID:26346615

  1. Diphtheria Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  2. Nitinol clip distal migration and resultant popliteo-tibial artery occlusion complicating access closure by the StarClose SE vascular closure system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Myeong Jin; Yoo, Chan Jong; Park, Cheol Wan

    2016-01-01

    Lower extremity ischemia following deployment of a vascular closure device for access site closure after a transfemoral endovascular procedure rarely occurs. A 68-year-old woman diagnosed with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured anterior communicating aneurysm was treated by endovascular coil embolization. The StarClose SE device was deployed for right femoral arteriotomy closure. After 2 days, critical ischemia occurred on her right lower leg due to total occlusion of the popliteo-tibial artery. Emergent surgical embolectomy was performed and the nitinol clip of the StarClose device was captured in the lumen of the tibioperoneal trunk. Although StarClose is an extravascular closure system, intravascular deployment, distal migration, and resultant critical limb ischemia can occur. PMID:27030445

  3. Complications in Eyelid Surgery.

    PubMed

    Karimnejad, Kaveh; Walen, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Eyelid surgery consists of challenging reconstructive and cosmetic procedures. Because of the complex anatomy and corresponding vital functions of the upper and lower eyelids, the avoidance of eyelid complications is of vital importance. Complications after eyelid surgery include basic complications (infection, granuloma) and vision-threatening complications. Preoperative history, physical examination, surgical planning, and meticulous surgical technique must be undertaken to prevent complications after eyelid surgery. In addition, patient knowledge, expectations, and motivations must be determined before surgery is performed. PMID:27105805

  4. [Ablation of supraventricular tachycardias : Complications and emergencies].

    PubMed

    Sawan, N; Eitel, C; Thiele, H; Tilz, R

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment of supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) with high success rates of > 95 %. Complication rates range from 3 to 5 %, with serious complications occurring in about 0.8 %. There are general complications caused either by the vascular access or the catheters (e. g. hematomas, hemo-pneumothorax, embolism, thrombosis and aspiration) und specific ablation related complications (e. g. AV block during ablation of the slow pathway). The complication risk is elevated in elderly and multimorbid patients. Furthermore, the experience of the treating physician and the respective team plays an essential role. The purpose of this article is to give an overview on incidences, causes and management as well as prevention strategies of complications associated with catheter ablation of SVT. PMID:27206630

  5. Design and rationale of the AngioSeal versus the Radial approach In acute coronary SyndromE (ARISE) trial: a randomized comparison of a vascular closure device versus the radial approach to prevent vascular access site complications in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arterial access is a major site of bleeding complications after invasive coronary procedures. Among strategies to decrease vascular complications, the radial approach is an established one. Vascular closure devices provide more comfort to patients and decrease hemostasis and need for bed rest. However, the inconsistency of data proving their safety limits their routine adoption as a strategy to prevent vascular complications, requiring evidence through adequately designed randomized trials. The aim of this study is to compare the radial versus femoral approach using a vascular closure device for the incidence of arterial puncture site vascular complications among non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome patients submitted to an early invasive strategy. Methods ARISE is a national, multicenter, non-inferiority randomized clinical trial. Two hundred patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome will be randomized to either radial or femoral access using a vascular closure device. The primary outcome is the occurrence of vascular complications at an arterial puncture site 30 days after the procedure, including major bleeding, retroperitoneal hematoma, compartment syndrome, hematoma ≥ 5 cm, pseudoaneurysm, arterio-venous fistula, infection, limb ischemia, arterial occlusion, adjacent nerve injury or the need for vascular surgical repair. Results Enrollment was initiated in September 2012, and until October 2013 91 patients were included. The inclusion phase is expected to last until the second half of 2014. Conclusions The ARISE trial will help define the role of a vascular closure device as a bleeding avoidance strategy in patients with NSTEACS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01653587 PMID:24345099

  6. Chickenpox (Varicella) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Varicella Complications . Serious complications from chickenpox include bacterial infections of the skin and soft tissues in children including Group A streptococcal infections pneumonia infection or inflammation of the brain (encephalitis, cerebellar ...

  7. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

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    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  8. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

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    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  9. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

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    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... and your baby are healthy. What is preexisting diabetes? About 9 out of 100 women (9 percent) ...

  10. Hair implant complications.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Norins, A L; Pantzer, J G; Bennett, J E

    1981-04-01

    Four men who underwent hair implantation for pattern baldness were treated for complications such as infection, foreign-body reaction, pruritus, and scarring. The complications were similar to those reported with synthetic modacrylic fiber implants that have been used for the same purpose. Although we believe this is the first article to report complications from hair implants, the illogical basis of the procedure suggests that complications will occur in many unsuspecting patients who undergo hair implantation. PMID:7009899

  11. Complications of skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Kumar; Khunger, Niti

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsy is the most commonly performed procedure by the dermatologist. Though it is a safe and easy procedure yet complications may arise. Post operative complications like wound infection and bleeding may occur. It is essential to keep the potential complications of skin biopsy in mind and be meticulous in the technique, for better patient outcomes. PMID:26865792

  12. Complications of Strabismus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Olitsky, Scott E.; Coats, David K.

    2015-01-01

    All surgeries carry risks of complications, and there is no way to avoid ever having a complication. Strabismus surgery is no different in this regard. There are methods to reduce the risk of a complication during or after surgery, and these steps should always be taken. When a complication occurs, it is important to first recognize it and then manage it appropriately to allow for the best outcome possible. This article will discuss some of the more common and/or most devastating complications that can occur during or after strabismus surgery as well as thoughts on how to avoid them and manage them should they happen. PMID:26180463

  13. Complicated Perianal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Abhishek; Yadav, Amitabh; Mehta, Naimish; Varma, Vibha; Kumaran, Vinay; Nundy, Samiran

    2015-12-01

    Management of benign anorectal conditions like abscesses and haemorrhoids is usually uneventful. However, complicated perianal complications can result and have sparsely been reported in literature. Hereby, we report a series of seven patients who presented with rare sequelae like necrotising fasciitis, intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal involvement. All patients responded well to surgical management. Accordingly, complicated perianal sepsis warrants a timely and aggressive surgical intervention. PMID:27011454

  14. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  15. Complications of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2011-08-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  16. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  17. An unusual complication of transradial coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    McEntegart, Margaret B; Dalzell, Jonathan R; Lindsay, M Mitchell

    2009-05-01

    We report the first case of extensive cellulitis and staphylococcal bacteremia with the subsequent development of a remote mycotic pseudoaneurysm in the ipsilateral brachial artery following right transradial coronary angiography in a diabetic patient with previous right axillary node clearance. The potential for serious complication should be borne in mind when deciding on the site of vascular access in such patients. PMID:19411734

  18. Complications of Transjugular Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Navuluri, Rakesh; Ahmed, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Transvenous biopsy was first performed in 1964 by Charles Dotter. Now routinely performed in the liver and kidney by interventional radiologists, the transjugular approach to biopsy has assumed a central role in coagulopathic patients. Major arterial complications from transjugular liver and renal biopsy are rare. In this article, the authors describe such complications in both organs that necessitated selective endovascular coil embolization. PMID:25762847

  19. Complications in knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reigstad, Ole; Grimsgaard, Christian

    2006-05-01

    All simple arthroscopic procedures during 1999 through 2001 performed at Baerum community hospital were retrospectively examined. Procedures were excluded when being part of more complex procedures. A total of 876 procedures performed on 785 patients were left for examination. Complications were registered from the patient record and all received a written questionnaire or phone call. The answer was obtained from 97.6%. The overall complications rate was low, giving total of 5.00%. A total of 0.68% of the complications had therapeutic consequences. There were two superficial infections, one thromboembolic event/pulmonary embolus and one reoperation due to scar tissue. Other complications were considered minor, and had none or little consequence for the patient comprising preoperative bradycardial episodes, asthmatic events, subcutaneous infusion of total intravenous anaesthetics (TIVA), instrument breakage and conversion to arthrotomi. Postoperatively registered complications included swelling, haemarthros, portal bleeding and fistulation, temporary sensory loss and longstanding pain. Duration of surgery was the only predicting factor for postoperative complications. Simple arthroscopic surgery is safe and has few serious complications. The use of TIVA or tourniquet does not increase the morbidity or complication rate, and prophylaxis against thromboembolism was not necessary. PMID:16208459

  20. "Complicating" Educational Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Colleen S.

    Administrators desiring to lead organizations that will adapt and survive in a complex environment like today's public schools need to develop what Karl Weick calls "complicated" understanding of "requisite variety." The law of requisite variety states that a diverse and complicated environment demands similar diversity from its inhabitants if…

  1. Pellagra complicating Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, I.; Millard, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a 53-year-old patient with clinical features of pellagra as a complication of Crohn's disease. His symptoms improved rapidly on taking oral nicotinic acid and vitamin B complex. We suggest the paucity of reported cases of pellagra in Crohn's disease is a reflection of poor recognition of this complication. Images Figure PMID:7567761

  2. COMPLICATIONS IN HIP ARTHROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Marcos Emílio Kuschnaroff; Hoffmann, Rafael Barreiros; de Araújo, Lúcio Cappelli Toledo; Dani, William Sotau; José Berral, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of complications in a series of consecutive cases of hip arthroscopy; to assess the progression of the sample through a learning curve; and to recognize the causes of complications in arthroscopic hip operations. Method: 150 consecutive cases that underwent hip arthroscopy between May 2004 and December 2008 were evaluated. The complications encountered were classified in three ways: organic system affected, severity and groups of 50 consecutive cases. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test. Results: We observed 15 complications in this study (10%): ten were neurological, two were osteoarticular, one was vascular-ischemic and two were cutaneous. In the classification of severity, three were classified as major, 12 as intermediate and none as minor. The incidence of complications over the course of the learning curve did not present any statistically significant difference (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Hip arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that involves low morbidity, but which presents complications in some cases. These complications are frequently neurological and transitory, and mainly occur because of joint traction. The complication rate did not decrease with progression of our sample. PMID:27022521

  3. Complications in septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rettinger, Gerhard; Kirsche, Hanspeter

    2006-11-01

    The most frequent complications of septoplasty are deformities, infections, and perforations. The effects of each of these complications, however, can be very different. Dislocations and deformities of the septum may result not only in an impaired airway but also in visible deformities of the entire nasal base and dorsum. A patient who underwent septoplasty can be "stigmatized." Infections may lead not only to septal abscess but also to endocranial complications such as meningitis or septicemia with endocarditis. Permanent perforations of the nasal septum can result in significant symptoms if they are located in the anterior part of the nose. Surgical closure is the treatment of choice, with a high success rate if the patients are selected properly. Besides these three major types of complications there are many others, from smell disturbances to blindness. Causes, prevention, and correction of selected complications are presented and data of the recent literature reported. PMID:17131271

  4. Anorexia nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Brown, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other mental health disorders, eating disorders have a high prevalence of concomitant medical complications. Specifically, patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) have a litany of medical complications which are commonly present as part of their eating disorders. Almost every body system can be adversely, affected by this state of progressive malnutrition. Moreover, some of the complications can have permanent adverse effects even after there is a successful program of nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration. Within this article we will review all body systems affected by AN. There is also salient information about both, how to diagnose these medical complications and which are the likely ones to result in permanent sequelae if not diagnosed and addressed early in the course of AN. In a subsequent article, the definitive medical treatment for these complications will be presented in a clinically practical manner. PMID:25834735

  5. Patency and Complications of Translumbar Dialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-01-01

    Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short- and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter-related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/minute) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter, and total catheter were 65, 84, and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6, and 12 months were 43%, 25%, and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter-related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal, respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. This study data suggest that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  6. The groin hit: complications of intravenous drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Roszler, M H; McCarroll, K A; Donovan, K R; Rashid, T; Kling, G A

    1989-05-01

    We are seeing an increased number of complications in intravenous drug abusers who resort to injecting the groin for vascular access (the "groin hit"). Vascular complications include venous thrombosis, arteriovenous fistula, mycotic aneurysm, ruptured pseudoaneurysm, and dissecting hematoma. Soft tissue complications include cellulitis and abscess. The latter may dissect into the extraperitoneal space. Skeletal complications include osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. This paper illustrates the radiographic spectrum of these complications. An algorithm will illustrate the radiographic evaluation of a groin mass in a drug addict. PMID:2727357

  7. Complications in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Meguerdichian, David

    2012-11-01

    Complications of late pregnancy are managed infrequently in the emergency department and, thus, can pose a challenge when the emergency physician encounters acute presentations. An expert understanding of the anatomic and physiologic changes and possible complications of late pregnancy is vital to ensure proper evaluation and care for both mother and fetus. This article focuses on the late pregnancy issues that the emergency physician will face, from the bleeding and instability of abruptio placentae to the wide spectrum of complications and management strategies encountered with preterm labor. PMID:23137403

  8. Anesthetic Complications and Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Pender, John W.

    1968-01-01

    Anesthesiologists should fully inform patients of the possible complications from anesthesia. For rapport with the patient, with whom they usually have no acquaintance until a day or so before an operative procedure, the anesthesiologist should enlist the help of the internist or surgeon who already has established an atmosphere of trust. The extent of morbidity and minor complications from anesthesia has not been adequately recorded. One out of every 1,000 to 2,000 anesthetized patients dies of complications primarily due to or contributed to by anesthesia. Leading causes of death vary from study to study and from year to year. PMID:5652756

  9. [Complications of hip arthroscopies].

    PubMed

    Dienst, M; Grün, U

    2008-11-01

    Surgical complications of hip arthroscopies are rare in the hands of experienced hip arthroscopists. However, when performed by beginners and in more demanding situations such as marginal distraction of the head and socket and technically advanced procedures, the risk increases. This report describes possible complications which may happen during positioning and traction, portal placement, and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Possible causes of soft tissue lesions of the portal area, perineum and foot, intra-articular lesions of the labrum and cartilage, direct and traction-related indirect neurovascular lesions, and other rare complications are analyzed. PMID:18854972

  10. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  11. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  12. Complications of Measles (Rubeola)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Complications of Measles Language: English ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Language: English Español (Spanish) File ...

  13. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  14. [Complications of cocaine addiction].

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Lowenstein, William; Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel

    2009-06-20

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by repetitive and compulsive drug-seeking behavior and drug abuse despite negative health or social consequences. Cocaine addiction is a significant worldwide public health problem, which has somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and judicial complications. Some of the most frequent complications are cardiovascular effects (acute coronary syndrome, cardiac arrhythmias, increased blood pressure); respiratory effects (fibrosis, interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary hypertension, alveolar haemorrhage, asthma exacerbation; emphysema), neurological effects (strokes, aneurysms, seizures, headaches); risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, sexual transmitted disease and otolaryngologic effects. Other complications are not discussed here. The vast majority of studies indicate that there are cognitive deficits induced by cocaine addiction. Attention, visual and working memories, executive functioning are affected in cocaine users. Psychiatric complications found in clinical practice are major depressive disorders, cocaine-induced paranoia, cocaine-induced compulsive foraging and panic attacks. PMID:19642439

  15. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  16. Obstetric (nonfetal) complications.

    PubMed

    Shanbhogue, Alampady K P; Menias, Christine O; Lalwani, Neeraj; Lall, Chandana; Khandelwal, Ashish; Nagar, Arpit

    2013-11-01

    Pregnancy predisposes women to a wide array of obstetric and gynecological complications which are often complex, challenging and sometimes life-threatening. While some of these are unique to pregnancy, a few that occur in nonpregnant women are more common during pregnancy. Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of pregnancy-related obstetric and gynecologic complications. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging confer the least risk to the fetus and should be the preferred examinations for evaluating these complications. Multidetector computed tomography should be used after carefully weighing the risk-benefit ratio based on the clinical condition in question. Interventional radiology is emerging as a preferred, noninvasive or minimally invasive treatment option that can obviate surgery and its antecedent short term and long term complications. Knowledge of appropriateness of imaging and image guided intervention is necessary for accurate patient management. PMID:24210440

  17. [Neurological complications in uremia].

    PubMed

    Fong, Chin-Shih

    2008-06-01

    Neurological complications due to the uremic state or hemodialysis, contribute to the important cause of mortality in patients with uremia. Despite continuous advances in uremic treatment, many neurological complications of uremia, like uremic encephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy and myopathy fail to fully respond to hemodialysis. Moreover, hemodialysis or kidney transplantation may even induce neurological complications. Hemodialysis can directly or indirectly be associated with Wernicke's encephalopathy, dialytic dementia, dysequilibrium syndrome, cerebrovascular accidents, osmotic myelinolysis and mononeuropathy. Renal transplantation can give rise to rejection encephalopathy and acute femoral neuropathy. The use of immunosuppressive drugs after renal transplantation can cause reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy encephalopathy. The clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutical aspects of central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and myopathy complications in uremia are reviewed. PMID:18686653

  18. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Tetanus Vaccination Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Symptoms and Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle tightening ...

  19. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

  20. Complications of foam sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cavezzi, A; Parsi, K

    2012-03-01

    Foam sclerotherapy may result in drug and/or gas-related complications of a generalized or localized nature. Significant complications include anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (very rare), deep vein thrombosis (1-3%), stroke (0.01%), superficial venous thrombosis (4.4%), tissue necrosis (variable frequency), oedema (0.5%) and nerve damage (0.2%). Cosmetic complications include telangiectatic matting (15-24%) and pigmentation (10-30%). Patent foramen ovale and other cardio-pulmonary right-to-left shunts seem to play a role in the systemic gas-related complications. In conclusion, foam sclerotherapy is characterized by an overall high degree of safety, though special attention should be given to the embolic and thrombotic complications. Good technique, adequate imaging, general precautions and compliance with post-treatment instructions may help avoid some of the adverse events and an appropriate early intervention may minimize possible sequelae. Higher volumes of sclerosant foam have been attributed to local and distant thrombotic complications and should be avoided. PMID:22312067

  1. On complicity theory.

    PubMed

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value. PMID:16609713

  2. Treating Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The death of a loved one is one of life’s greatest, universal stressors to which most bereaved individuals successfully adapt without clinical intervention. For a minority of bereaved individuals, grief is complicated by superimposed problems and healing does not occur. The resulting syndrome of complicated grief causes substantial distress and functional impairment even years after a loss, yet knowing when and how to intervene can be a challenge. OBJECTIVE To discuss the differential diagnosis, risk factors for and management of complicated grief based on available evidence and clinical observations. EVIDENCE REVIEW MEDLINE was searched from January 1990 to October 2012. Additional citations were procured from references of select research and review articles. Available treatment studies targeting complicated grief were included. RESULTS A strong research literature led to inclusion of complicated grief in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) (termed persistent complex bereavement disorder as a subtype of other specified trauma and stressor-related disorders), although it is a condition for which more research is formally recommended, and there is still ongoing discussion about the optimal name and diagnostic criteria for the disorder. Reliable screening instruments are available, and the estimated prevalence rate is 7% of bereaved people. Randomized controlled data support the efficacy of a targeted psychotherapy including elements that foster resolution of complicating problems and facilitate the natural healing process. Preliminary studies suggest antidepressant medications may be helpful. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Individuals with complicated grief have greater risk of adverse health outcomes, should be diagnosed and assessed for suicide risk and comorbid conditions such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, and should be considered for treatment. PMID:23917292

  3. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-22

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications. PMID:26891794

  4. Post dengue neurological complication.

    PubMed

    Hasliza, A H; Tohid, H; Loh, K Y; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case. PMID:27099661

  5. Complications of dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Lillich, J D

    1998-08-01

    Both retrospective data and clinical experience indicate that complications of dental surgery are occasionally encountered and, to some extent, are inevitable. Many of the reported complications related to dental surgery such as incomplete removal of diseased teeth or removal of the wrong tooth can be avoided with sound preoperative planning and intraoperative technique. Diseased teeth should be properly identified prior to and during surgery. In addition, complete removal of the diseased tooth must be performed. Use of intraoperative radiographic examination to confirm the location of the diseased tooth and to document its removal cannot be overemphasized. Iatrogenic fracture of the maxillary or mandibular alveolar walls or palatine bone can be avoided by proper placement of the dental punch. The chances of developing incisional drainage or secondary sinusitis can be reduced by use of appropriate systemic antibiotics. These factors should guide the surgical approach to dental surgery to reduce the likelihood of developing common complications. PMID:9742671

  6. Complications of cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsie; Mahroo, Omar A R; Spalton, David J

    2010-11-01

    Modern cataract surgery is safe in more than 95 per cent of patients. In the small number of cases where a serious complication occurs, the most common is an intra-operative posterior capsular rupture. This can lead to vitreous loss or a dropped nucleus and can increase the risk of post-operative cystoid macular oedema or retinal detachment. Post-operatively, posterior capsular opacification is the most common complication and can be readily treated with a YAG capsulotomy. The most devastating complication is endophthalmitis, the rate of which is now significantly decreased through the use of intracameral antibiotics. As a clinician, the most important step is to assess the patient pre-operatively to predict higher risk individuals and to counsel them appropriately. In these patients, various pre- or intra-operative management steps can be taken in addition to routine phacoemulsification to optimise their visual outcome. PMID:20735786

  7. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  8. Late complications of tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Wood, D E; Mathisen, D J

    1991-09-01

    Complications of tracheotomy are largely preventable. Although some authors cite these complications as indications for prolonged endotracheal intubation to avoid tracheotomy, others believe that the laryngotracheal complications of prolonged endotracheal intubation warrant early tracheotomy. Obviously, unnecessary tracheotomies should not be performed, and the controversy regarding the timing of conversion of endotracheal intubation to tracheotomy is handled in an earlier article in this issue. We feel, however, that a properly performed tracheotomy has a low incidence of complications that are more easily managed than are the complex laryngotracheal complications of prolonged endotracheal intubation. Significant post-tracheotomy tracheal stenosis occurs in 8% of patients and is secondary to an overly large tracheotomy stoma or damage at the tracheostomy tube cuff site. Stoma stenosis can be minimized by not making an overly large tracheal stoma and by prevention of undue leverage on the tracheostomy tube. Cuff stenosis can be minimized by the use of the high-volume low-pressure cuffs with careful prevention of overdistention of the cuff. Bronchoscopic dilatation, laser resection, and Silastic T-tube placement provide control of the airway until definitive surgical resection and reconstruction can be performed safely. Tracheoesophageal fistula is an uncommon but life-threatening complication that can be prevented by avoiding overdistention of the tracheostomy tube cuff and by avoiding the concomitant use of a stiff nasogastric tube. These patients are best managed conservatively until they are able to be weaned from a ventilator. A single-stage repair of both the esophagus and the trachea should then be done. Tracheoinnominate artery fistula can be avoided by correct placement of the tracheostomy stoma through the second and third tracheal rings rather than lower in the trachea and by avoidance of overinflation of tracheostomy tube cuffs. PMID:1934960

  9. Intradialytic complications during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Andrew

    2006-04-01

    With the advent of developments and advances in hemodialysis machine technology, dialysate water purification, and dialyzers, the clinical spectrum of intradialytic complications has changed over the decades. In the pioneering days of hemodialysis, patients could develop allergic reactions to dialyzer membranes, sterilizing and reprocessing agents, coupled with machines that could not accurately control ultrafiltration rates, and chemically and bacterially contaminated dialysate. Whereas today, although cardiovascular problems remain the most common intradialytic complication, these are mainly due to the time restraints of trying to cope with excessive dialytic weight gains and achieve target dry weight on a thrice weekly schedule, coupled with an aging elderly dialysis population with increasing co-morbidity. PMID:16623668

  10. Avoiding Complications in Gigantomastia.

    PubMed

    Kling, Russell E; Tobler, William D; Gusenoff, Jeffrey A; Rubin, J Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gigantomastia is a disabling condition for patients and presents unique challenges to plastic surgeons. Presentation can occur throughout different phases of life, and treatment often begins with nonoperative measures; however, the most effective way to relieve symptoms is surgical breast reduction. Because of the large amount of tissue removed, surgeons can encounter different intraoperative and postoperative complications. By understanding this disease process and these complications, surgeons can attempt to minimize their occurrences. The authors present an overview of the cause, preoperative evaluation, techniques, and outcomes. Additionally, they present outcomes data from their center on 40 patients. PMID:27012802

  11. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. PMID:27289254

  12. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  13. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  14. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotoučová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  15. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  16. Complications and Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... successfully cure SCD. Complications from hydroxyurea therapy and stem cell transplants are rare but can be serious or life-threatening. People with SCD and their families should ask their doctors about the benefits and risks of each. Read more about treatment ...

  17. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  18. Quality, range, and legibility in web sites related to orofacial functions.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Ferrari, Deborah Viviane; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2013-10-01

    Introduction Plenty of information about health is available on the Internet; however, quality and legibility are not always evaluated. Knowledge regarding orofacial functions can be considered important for the population because it allows proper stimulus, early diagnosis, and prevention of the oral myofunctional alterations during early infancy. Objective The aim was evaluate the quality, legibility, and range of Web sites available in Brazilian Portuguese regarding the orofacial functions. Methods Selected Web sites with information directed to parents/caregivers of babies regarding breast-feeding, feeding after 6 months, deleterious oral habits, and breathing and speech were studied. The Web sites were evaluated through the application of Flesch Reading Ease Test and aspects of the Health on the Net (HON) modified code (HONCode); the range of the subjects addressed was compared with other aspects of infant development. Results From the access of 350 pages of the Internet, 35 Web sites were selected and 315 excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. In relation to legibility, Web sites scored an average of 61.23% in the Flesch Test, and the application of the modified HONCode showed an average of 6.43 points; an average of 2.49 subjects were found per Web site evaluated, with information on breast-feeding being more frequent and subjects such as breathing and speech less frequent. Conclusions Web sites that deal with orofacial functions presented standard legibility classification. Only half of the ethical principles were considered by the modified HONCode in their majority, and most addressed subjects after "breast-feeding" were presented with restricted range. PMID:25992036

  19. Quality, Range, and Legibility in Web Sites Related to Orofacial Functions

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Ferrari, Deborah Viviane; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Plenty of information about health is available on the Internet; however, quality and legibility are not always evaluated. Knowledge regarding orofacial functions can be considered important for the population because it allows proper stimulus, early diagnosis, and prevention of the oral myofunctional alterations during early infancy. Objective The aim was evaluate the quality, legibility, and range of Web sites available in Brazilian Portuguese regarding the orofacial functions. Methods Selected Web sites with information directed to parents/caregivers of babies regarding breast-feeding, feeding after 6 months, deleterious oral habits, and breathing and speech were studied. The Web sites were evaluated through the application of Flesch Reading Ease Test and aspects of the Health on the Net (HON) modified code (HONCode); the range of the subjects addressed was compared with other aspects of infant development. Results From the access of 350 pages of the Internet, 35 Web sites were selected and 315 excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. In relation to legibility, Web sites scored an average of 61.23% in the Flesch Test, and the application of the modified HONCode showed an average of 6.43 points; an average of 2.49 subjects were found per Web site evaluated, with information on breast-feeding being more frequent and subjects such as breathing and speech less frequent. Conclusions Web sites that deal with orofacial functions presented standard legibility classification. Only half of the ethical principles were considered by the modified HONCode in their majority, and most addressed subjects after “breast-feeding” were presented with restricted range. PMID:25992036

  20. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  1. Genetics of diabetes complications.

    PubMed

    Doria, Alessandro

    2010-12-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that the risk for developing chronic diabetic complications is under the control of genetic factors. Previous studies using a candidate gene approach have uncovered a number of genetic loci that may shape this risk, such as the VEGF gene for retinopathy, the ELMO1 gene for nephropathy, and the ADIPOQ gene for coronary artery disease. Recently, a new window has opened on identifying these genes through genome-wide association studies. Such systematic approach has already led to the identification of a major locus for coronary artery disease on 9p21 as well three potential genes for nephropathy on 7p, 11p, and 13q. Further insights are expected from a broader application of this strategy. It is anticipated that the identification of these genes will provide novel insights on the etiology of diabetic complications, with crucial implications for the development of new drugs to prevent the adverse effects of diabetes. PMID:20835900

  2. Mediastinal dysgerminoma complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, K; Veena, P; Elamurugan, S; Soundararaghavan, S

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy complicating pregnancy represents one of the most challenging clinical situations. Lack of evidence and the presence of the dependent fetus contribute to the management dilemma. A 26-year-old primigravida presented at 23 weeks of gestation with a bulging substernal mass. Fine-needle aspiration was reported as mediastinal dysgerminoma. She was treated with weekly bleomycin and three weekly cisplatin and etoposide (BEP). Maternal neutropenia after 11 weeks of bleomycin required colony stimulator factor. Fetal growth restriction necessitated delivery at 31 weeks. Significant clinical and radiological tumour regression was noted after chemotherapy. Postnatally mother received external beam radiotherapy but the disease worsened two weeks after the completion of radiotherapy. Mediastinal dysgerminoma differs from the ovarian counterpart and therefore therapeutic success reports on ovarian germ cell tumours complicating pregnancy cannot be extrapolated. The safety of the BEP regimen for the fetus is yet to be established.

  3. Complications of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Cooke, W D; Dattwyler, R J

    1992-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is the multisystem infectious disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Complications of this infection can involve many organ systems, especially the skin, joints, nervous system, and heart. These manifestations may be acute, or evolve slowly over months or years. Diagnosis is not always straightforward, and is currently hampered by lack of a specific serologic assay. This review discusses the syndromes associated with Lyme borreliosis and addresses issues of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:1580609

  4. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  5. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  6. Keratomycosis complicating pterygium excision.

    PubMed

    Merle, Harold; Guyomarch, Jérôme; Joyaux, Jean-Christophe; Dueymes, Maryvonne; Donnio, Angélique; Desbois, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a case of keratomycosis that appeared after the exeresis of a pterygium. A 48-year-old patient had been referred with a red right eye associated with an abscess of the cornea along the ablation zone of the pterygium. The surgery had been performed a month beforehand. The abscess was 6 mm high and 4 mm wide. The authors instigated a treatment that included amphotericin B (0.25%) after noticing a clinical aspect evoking a fungal keratitis and finding several septate filaments on direct examination. On day 10, a Fusarium dimerum was isolated on Sabouraud agar. After 15 days of treatment, the result was favorable and the size of the ulceration as well as the size of the abscess had progressively decreased. The antifungal treatment was definitively stopped at 14 weeks. Infectious-related complications of the pterygium surgery are rare and are essentially caused by bacterial agents. Secondary infections by fungus are rare. There have been two previous cases reported: one that appeared 15 years after radiotherapy and another that appeared at 3 weeks post surgery, consecutive to the use of mitomycin C. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of a keratomycosis due to F. dimerum reported that complicated the exeresis of a pterygium without the use of an adjuvant antihealing treatment. Pterygium surgery is a common procedure; nevertheless, ophthalmologists need to be aware of the existence of potential infectious complications. PMID:22034566

  7. Keratomycosis complicating pterygium excision

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Harold; Guyomarch, Jérôme; Joyaux, Jean-Christophe; Dueymes, Maryvonne; Donnio, Angélique; Desbois, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a case of keratomycosis that appeared after the exeresis of a pterygium. A 48-year-old patient had been referred with a red right eye associated with an abscess of the cornea along the ablation zone of the pterygium. The surgery had been performed a month beforehand. The abscess was 6 mm high and 4 mm wide. The authors instigated a treatment that included amphotericin B (0.25%) after noticing a clinical aspect evoking a fungal keratitis and finding several septate filaments on direct examination. On day 10, a Fusarium dimerum was isolated on Sabouraud agar. After 15 days of treatment, the result was favorable and the size of the ulceration as well as the size of the abscess had progressively decreased. The antifungal treatment was definitively stopped at 14 weeks. Infectious-related complications of the pterygium surgery are rare and are essentially caused by bacterial agents. Secondary infections by fungus are rare. There have been two previous cases reported: one that appeared 15 years after radiotherapy and another that appeared at 3 weeks post surgery, consecutive to the use of mitomycin C. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of a keratomycosis due to F. dimerum reported that complicated the exeresis of a pterygium without the use of an adjuvant antihealing treatment. Pterygium surgery is a common procedure; nevertheless, ophthalmologists need to be aware of the existence of potential infectious complications. PMID:22034566

  8. Genetics of diabetes complications.

    PubMed

    Alkayyali, Sami; Lyssenko, Valeriya

    2014-10-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia and duration of diabetes are the major risk factors associated with development of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. Although it is believed that hyperglycemia induces damage to the particular cell subtypes, e.g., mesangial cells in the renal glomerulus, capillary endothelial cells in the retina, and neurons and Schwann cells in peripheral nerves, the exact mechanisms underlying these damaging defects are not yet well understood. Clustering of micro- and macrovascular complications in families of patients with diabetes suggests a strong genetic susceptibility. However, until now only a handful number of genetic variants were reported to be associated with either nephropathy (ACE, ELMO1, FRMD3, and AKR1B1) or retinopathy (VEGF, AKR1B1, and EPO), and only a few studies were carried out for genetic susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases (ADIPOQ, GLUL) in patients with diabetes. It is, therefore, obvious that the accumulation of more data from larger studies and better phenotypically characterized cohorts is needed to facilitate genetic discoveries and unravel novel insights into the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. PMID:25169573

  9. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  10. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  11. Vascular Complications Associated with Transfemoral Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Hines, George L; Jaspan, Vita; Kelly, Brian J; Calixte, Rose

    2016-06-01

    Background Transfemoral aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a novel technique for treating aortic stenosis, yet vascular complications are yet to be delineated. Objectives This study aims to study the vascular complications of TAVR with Edwards Sapien valves (Edwards Lifesciences Corp., Irvine, CA). Methods We performed a retrospective evaluation of TAVR patients. Standard demographics, femoral vessel and sheath size, access type (femoral cut-down [FC], percutaneous access [PFA], and iliac conduit [IC]), and treatment method were recorded. Complications were defined by the Valve Academic Research Consortium Criteria. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. Results A total of 99 patients underwent TAVR between February 15, 2012 and July 17, 2013 with an Edwards Sapien valve. Out of which, 48 were males with a mean age of 83 ± 7 years. Overall, 33 had FC, 58 had PFA, and 6 had an IC. A total of 17 major (2 aortic and 15 iliac) and 38 minor complications (36 access and 2 emboli) occurred. Aortic complications were managed by open repair (OR, 1) or percutaneous repair (PR, 1). Overall, 12 iliac injuries were managed by PR and 3 by OR. Out of the 33 groin complications in FC patients 8 (24%) were treated by OR, whereas 30 (52%) of the 58 groin complications in PTA patients were treated by PR. There were no differences in transfusion requirements or length of stay. Conclusion Vascular complications of TAVR are common with most being minor, related to access site and causing no immediate sequelae. Iliac injury can be managed by PR or OR. Aortic injury is associated with significant mortality. These findings increase vascular surgeons' awareness of these complications and how to manage them. PMID:27231425

  12. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  13. Complications of Macular Peeling.

    PubMed

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  14. Complicated Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David T

    2016-10-01

    More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply. All will require highly individualized resuscitations. PMID:27600129

  15. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  16. Complications of denver shunt.

    PubMed

    Perera, Eranga; Bhatt, Shweta; Dogra, Vikram S

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax secondary to transdiaphragmatic spread of peritoneal fluid can cause respiratory discomfort to the patient. Draining of hydrothorax helps relieve these symptoms. Pleurovenous shunt (Denver shunt) is a relatively non-invasive method of shunting the pleural fluid to the central venous system. Reported complications of pleurovenous shunts are shunt failure, pulmonary edema, post shunt coagulopathy, deep vein thrombosis, and infection. We report a rare case of a leak at the venous end of the catheter that was placed within the right internal jugular vein, resulting in a large collection in the neck. PMID:21915387

  17. Medical complications of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Allen, M C; Jones, M D

    1986-03-01

    The improved survival of extremely premature infants has generated intense interest in the quality of life of the survivors. This review focuses on the major long-term complications of prematurity (developmental disability, retinopathy of prematurity, chronic lung disease) and concludes with an overview of the broader spectrum of morbidity. Severe impairment (cerebral palsy, mental retardation, retrolental fibroplasia, severe chronic lung disease) fortunately occurs in a small proportion of survivors. However, the prevalence of the lesser morbidities (minimal cerebral dysfunction/learning disability, poor growth, postneonatal illnesses, rehospitalization) is less clearly defined. These problems all have an impact on families, and on medical and educational services. PMID:2935764

  18. [Complications after hip osteotomy].

    PubMed

    Renner, L; Perka, C; Zahn, R

    2014-01-01

    Complex deformities of the acetabulum are one of the most common reasons for secondary pelvic osteoarthritis. One option of treatment is osteotomy of the acetabulum close to the joint. The correction of the spatially reduced roof of the femoral head resulting from pelvic dysplasia can minimize the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis or reduce the progression of an already existing osteoarthritis. The Ganz periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) and Tönnis triple osteotomy procedures are the predominant methods used to correct hip dysplasia in adolescents. Both are complex procedures which bear specific risks and complications, thus requiring very experienced surgeons. PMID:24356819

  19. Intracranial complications following mastoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela; Eyal, Ana; Kronenberg, Jona

    2004-01-01

    Mastoidectomy is a common surgical procedure in otology. However, postoperative complications of various degrees of severity may occur. We present 4 children who underwent mastoidectomy for middle ear and mastoid disease and developed postoperative intracranial complications. One child was operated on for brain abscess 1 week after the initial mastoidectomy. Another child appeared with seizures 5 days after the initial mastoidectomy and a subdural empyema was drained during revision surgery. Large bone defects with exposed middle cranial fossa dura were found at revision surgery in both cases and Proteus vulgaris and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the mastoid and abscess cavities in these children. A small epidural collection was diagnosed in the third patient 2 days after initial mastoid surgery and was managed with intravenous antibiotics only. The other child was found to have sigmoid sinus thrombosis the day after mastoidectomy that was performed for nonresponsive acute mastoiditis. This child received both intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulants. Timely revision surgery, combinations of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins with vancomycin or metronidazole and the addition of anticoagulants in cases of sinus thrombosis can lead to full recovery. PMID:15689642

  20. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  1. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  2. Complications after third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Pitekova, L; Satko, I; Novotnakova, D

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the incidence of postoperative complications after the surgical removal of third molars, most common postoperative complications and their symptoms as well as risk factors leading to greater incidence of postoperative complications (Ref. 17). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk. PMID:20568422

  3. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  4. Neuromuscular complications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Grisold, A; Löscher, W N

    2016-08-15

    Cancer is becoming a treatable and even often curable disease. The neuromuscular system can be affected by direct tumor invasion or metastasis, neuroendocrine, metabolic, dysimmune/inflammatory, infections and toxic as well as paraneoplastic conditions. Due to the nature of cancer treatment, which frequently is based on a DNA damaging mechanism, treatment related toxic side effects are frequent and the correct identification of the causative mechanism is necessary to initiate the proper treatment. The peripheral nervous system is conventionally divided into nerve roots, the proximal nerves and plexus, the peripheral nerves (mono- and polyneuropathies), the site of neuromuscular transmission and muscle. This review is based on the anatomic distribution of the peripheral nervous system, divided into cranial nerves (CN), motor neuron (MND), nerve roots, plexus, peripheral nerve, the neuromuscular junction and muscle. The various etiologies of neuromuscular complications - neoplastic, surgical and mechanic, toxic, metabolic, endocrine, and paraneoplastic/immune - are discussed separately for each part of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:27423586

  5. Complicated bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  6. [Cardiovascular complications of obesity].

    PubMed

    Cascella, Teresa; Giallauria, Francesco; Tafuri, Domenico; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria; Vigorito, Carlo; Orio, Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Obesity is one of the major coronary risk factor representing an increasingly important worldwide health problem. The increased prevalence of obesity among younger population is likely to have long-term implications for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Obesity plays a central role in the insulin resistance syndrome and contributes to increase the risk of atherosclerotic CVD. The present review will examine the relationships among cardiovascular risk factors during the childhood-adolescence-adulthood transition. In fact, the relationship between obesity (especially visceral obesity) and CVD appears to develop at a relatively young age. The foremost physical consequence of obesity is atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and polycystic ovary syndrome represents an intriguing example of obesity-related cardiovascular complications affecting young women. PMID:17312846

  7. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  8. Early complications with the holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Stewart, Steven C.; Ruckle, Herbert C.; Poon, Michael W.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to report early complications in our initial experience with the holmium laser in 133 patients. A retrospective study of patients undergoing endourological procedures with the holmium laser was performed. Complications included urinary tract infection (3), post-operative bradycardia (1), inverted T-waves (1), intractable flank pain (1), urinary retention (1), inability to access a lower pole calyx with a 365 micron fiber (9), stone migration (5), termination of procedure due to poor visualization (2). No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred. The holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. In our initial experience, the holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of genitourinary pathology. Use of laser fibers larger than 200 microns occasionally limit deflection into a lower pole or dependent calyx.

  9. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  10. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-02-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world's most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  11. Dermatological complications of obesity.

    PubMed

    García Hidalgo, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a health problem of considerable magnitude in the Western world. Dermatological changes have been reported in patients with obesity, including: acanthosis nigricans and skin tags (due to insulin resistance); hyperandrogenism; striae due to over extension; stasis pigmentation due to peripheral vascular disease; lymphedema; pathologies associated with augmented folds; morphologic changes in the foot anatomy due to excess load; and complications that may arise from hospitalization. Acanthosis nigricans plaques can be managed by improved control of hyperinsulinemia; the vitamin D3 analog calcipitriol has also been shown to be effective. Skin tags can be removed by snipping with curved scissors, by cryotherapy or by electrodesiccation. Hyperandrogenism, a result of increased production of endogenous androgens due to increased volumes of adipose tissue (which synthesizes testosterone) and hyperinsulinemia (which increases the production of ovarian androgens) needs to be carefully assessed to ensure disorders such as virilizing tumors and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are treated appropriately. Treatment of hyperandrogenism should be centred on controlling insulin levels; weight loss, oral contraceptive and antiandrogenic therapies are also possible treatment options. The etiology of striae distensae, also known as stretch marks, is yet to be defined and treatment options are unsatisfactory at present; striae rubra and alba have been treated with a pulsed dye laser with marginal success. The relationship between obesity and varicose veins is controversial; symptoms are best prevented by the use of elastic stockings. Itching and inflammation associated with stasis pigmentation, the result of red blood cells escaping into the tissues, can be treated with corticosteroids. Lymphedema is associated with dilatation of tissue channels, reduced tissue oxygenation and provides a culture medium for bacterial growth. Lymphedema treatment is directed towards reducing the

  12. Frequent Hemodialysis Fistula Infectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Charmaine E.; Sontrop, Jessica M.; Faratro, Rose; Chan, Christopher T.; Zimmerman, Deborah Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined if infectious arteriovenous access complications vary with the cannulation technique and whether this is modified by dialysis frequency. We compared the infection rate between fistulas cannulated using buttonhole versus stepladder techniques for patients treated with short daily (SDH) or nocturnal hemodialysis at home (NHD). We also compared patients receiving conventional intermittent hemodialysis (CIHD) using stepladder cannulation. Methods Data were prospectively collected from 631 patients dialyzed with a fistula from 2001 to 2010 (Toronto and Ottawa, Canada). We compared the person-time incidence rate of bacteremia and local fistula infections using the exact binomial test. Results Forty-six (7.3%) patients received SDH (≥5 sessions/week, 2-4 h/session), 128 (20.3%) NHD (≥4 sessions/week, ≥5 h/session) and 457 (72%) CIHD (3 sessions/week, ≤4 h/session). Fifty percent of SDH and 72% of NHD patients used the buttonhole technique. There were 39 buttonhole-related bacteremias (rate: 0.196/1,000 fistula days) and at least 2 local buttonhole site infections. Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 85% of the bacteremias. There were 5 (13%) infection-related hospitalizations and 3 (10%) serious metastatic infections, including fistula loss. In comparison, there was 1 possible fistula-related infection in CIHD during follow-up (rate: 0.002/1,000 fistula days). Conclusions The rate of buttonhole-related infections was high among patients on frequent hemodialysis and more than 50 times greater than that among patients on CIHD with the stepladder technique. Most bacteremias were due to S. aureus – with serious consequences. The risks and benefits of buttonhole cannulation require individual consideration with careful monitoring, prophylaxis and management. PMID:25473405

  13. Complications of pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, S J

    1991-09-01

    MSOF is a life-threatening complication of trauma. The body is a dynamic interrelated group of systems that work together efficiently. Changes in one system generally have a widespread impact, and soon the entire system is changed. In children with MSOF, the normal equilibrium that is maintained between organ systems does not exist. Generalized disruption of organ functions occur, and the body attempts to compensate and regain its homeostasis. This activity will often benefit certain organs and harm others. If the disruption continues and compensation fails, organ dysfunction occurs and general chaos reigns. Medical and nursing interventions are directed toward supporting individual organ systems before failure occurs. Attempts to provide this support for one system can cause adverse effects to occur in other systems. Although this is a potential result of medical and nursing interventions, often there is no other choice. It is essential that nurses be aware of the systemic consequences of these interventions and carefully evaluate them. Although overall mortality rates are high, children have a better chance for survival than adults. Expert nursing assessments, interventions, and evaluations are essential to maximize this outcome. More research in the area of MSOF in children is necessary, with specific attention to nursing management and the effect on patient outcome. PMID:1883588

  14. Pregnancy complicating Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Soh, May Ching; Hart, Hamish H; Bass, Eileen; Wilkinson, Lucille

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy associated with Wegener's granulomatosis is rare. Therapeutic options are limited. There is a paucity of published literature to guide clinical decision-making in these complex patients. Two cases are presented. Firstly, a 33-year-old woman with generalized Wegener's in remission and off all medications presented with a flare in the third trimester with haemoptysis, raised C-reactive protein and c-anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (c-ANCA) levels. Her care was complicated by florid steroid-induced psychosis. With deteriorating disease control, she was treated with pulsed-intravenous cyclophosphamide with a good response. She delivered a healthy baby at 38 weeks. She had a severe postpartum flare. Secondly, a 37-year-old woman with limited Wegener's in remission for the last two years and off all treatment became pregnant after pre-conception counselling. A normal baby was delivered at term. An exhaustive review of all published literature on Wegener's activity in pregnancy is presented along with therapeutic options and recommendations.

  15. Hematologic complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Townsley, Danielle M

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This review discusses specifically the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations; however, care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist, and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets), or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy, and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  16. Hematologic Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This paper specifically reviews the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations,; however care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters in order to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  17. Infantile hemangiomas, complications and treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Carol Erin; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2016-03-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common vascular tumors of infancy. While the majority regress without the need for intervention, approximately 10%, often site dependent, can cause serious complications and require treatment. IH complications can be categorized as life threatening, obstructive, ulcerative or disfiguring. Life threatening complications include airway and hepatic IHs. Functional complications obstructing vital structures or impairing function include periocular, nasal, labial, parotid, auricular, and breast IHs. Local complications arise from ulceration or those in cosmetically sensitive areas. Therapeutic options for complicated IHs include pharmacologic (topical or systemic), surgical, or laser interventions. Topical agents are best employed for small, superficial, and localized IHs; while systemic therapy is reserved for larger IHs and those with more aggressive growth characteristics with propranolol as first-line therapy. PMID:27607318

  18. Pulmonary Complications of Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Leon S.; Boylen, Thomas C.

    1974-01-01

    Complications resulting from drug abuse more frequently affect the lung than any other organ. The spectrum of pulmonary complications associated with drug abuse is wide. The current practice of using mixtures of drugs is mainly responsible for the increase in pulmonary complications. The chief complications observed in a series of 241 drug abuse patients were aspiration pneumonitis (12.9 percent), pulmonary edema (10.0 percent), and pneumonia (7.5 percent). ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:4812215

  19. Hemorheology in complicated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cicco, G; Vicenti, P; Stingi, G D; Tarallo; Pirrelli, A

    1999-01-01

    hypertensives especially if suffering from vascular disease which correlates significantly (p < 0.01) with a reduction in red blood cell deformability. This itself can increase peripheral resistances and favour the onset of hemorheological complications, at a cerebral-vascular level, which are frequent in hypertensives. PMID:10711762

  20. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  1. [Local vascular complications after iatrogenic femoral artery puncture].

    PubMed

    Fruhwirth, J; Pascher, O; Hauser, H; Amann, W

    1996-01-01

    Over a period of 5 years 81 vascular complications after 15,460 catheterizations of the femoral artery for diagnostic (n = 11,883) or therapeutic (n = 3577) procedures were registered. The following complications were observed in declining frequency: 1. False aneurysm (n = 65), 2. arterial occlusion (dissection, embolia, thrombosis) (n = 8), 3. vascular lesion causing profuse bleeding (n = 7), 4. AV-fistula (n = 1). The total complication rate was 0.52%. The complication rate was significantly higher in therapeutical procedures (1,03%) than in diagnostic investigations (0.37%). Pseudoaneurysms were complicated by thrombosis of the femoral vein (n = 3), lymphatic fistula (n = 3) and deep wound infection (n = 9); secondary complication rate 18.5%. Risk factors for local vascular complications are old age, female gender, high grade arteriosclerosis at the puncture site, overweight, manifest arterial hypertension and medication with cumarin, acetylsalicylic acid or heparin. Further complicating factors are connected with technical risks such as duration of the procedure. French size of the catheter, the catheter sheath and multiple punctures. Vascular repair was performed by simple angiography in most cases, but in 14.8% more extensive surgical procedures were required. In patients with signs of occlusive vascular disease the external iliac artery was replaced by a PTFE-vascular access graft in 4 cases and an arterioplasty of the deep femoral artery was performed in 2 patients. 36% of the operations were undertaken as emergencies. Reintervention was necessary for a postoperative bleeding complication in 1 case (surgical complication rate 1.2%). A female patient suffering from aortic valve stenosis died during emergency operation due to massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage after cardiac catheterization (mortality rate 1.2%). Over a median follow-up period of 37 months no late complications of the intervention were recorded, nor recurrences of peripheral arterial occlusive

  2. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - ...

  3. Complications of Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Mariña Naveiro; Naveiro Rilo, José Cesáreo; Paredes, Aida González; Aguilar Romero, María Teresa; Parra, Jorge Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the frequency of complications during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and identify associated risk factors. Methods: A descriptive observational study was performed between January 2000 and December 2012 and included all gynecologic laparoscopies performed at our center. Variables were recorded for patient characteristics, indication for surgery, length of hospital stay (in days), major and minor complications, and conversions to laparotomy. To identify risk factors and variables associated with complications, crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of all 2888 laparoscopies included, most were procedures of moderate difficulty (adnexal surgery) (54.2%). The overall frequency of major complications was 1.93%, and that of minor complications was 4.29%. The level of technical difficulty and existence of prior abdominal surgery were associated with a higher risk of major complications and conversions to laparotomy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic gynecologic surgery is associated with a low frequency of complications but is a procedure that is not without risk. Greater technical difficulty and prior surgery were factors associated with a higher frequency of complications. PMID:25392659

  4. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  5. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  6. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  7. [Urinary complications after anorectal surgery].

    PubMed

    Iusuf, T; Sârbu, V; Cristache, C; Popescu, R; Botea, F; Panait, L

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of urinary complications after various anorectal operations was studied in a group of 273 patients. The overall prevalence of urinary complications was 26.7%; most of these complications affected men between 41 and 50, mainly after hemorrhoidectomy. In 10.6% of patients, bladder catheterization was needed. These urinary complications result from nervous reflexes originating from the anus and determined by the operative trauma and/or rectal distinction. In the treatment of these urinary complications, the role of the muses is essential for reassuring the patients. Parasympathomimetic drugs are often efficient. Urinary catheterization must be delayed until the 18th hour. Fluid restriction may be useful to prevent urinary retention. PMID:14870531

  8. A Site-Related Suitability Analysis for the Production of Biomass as a Contribution to Sustainable Regional Land-Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Michael; Helms, Yvonne; Herberg, Alfred; Köppen, Antje; Kunzmann, Kathrin; Radtke, Dörte; Ross, Lutz; Itzerott, Sibylle

    2008-04-01

    The use of renewable energy in Europe offers the possibility of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and contributes to energy security and independence. With the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and a variety of recently introduced national directives supporting renewable energy sources in the European Union, the economic attractiveness of bioenergy production has distinctly increased. This article combines an economic evaluation of biomass production with site-related natural conditions of the Havelland region, situated in the north-east area of Germany. Two methods for evaluating site-specific potential biomass yields were compared. For three example biomass crops, evaluations of yield estimations at agricultural lots for site-optimized suitability (SOS) and conventional suitability (CS) were carried out. Both modelling approaches were compared. The results of the GIS modelling indicate that the financial support for increasing the use of renewable energy with the German feed-in system, called Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG), will possibly lead to an increased cultivation of crops with high biomass output. This monocultural orientation of farming practices and the negative effects on the ecosystem could act in opposition to other environmental initiatives of the EU. The outputs of the SOS analysis show that high biomass production could be integrated into environmental policy proposals. Therefore, new EU policy should take modified subsidies into consideration in order to avoid developing conflicts between small-scale changes in landscape ecosystems caused by large-scale transformations in energy policy.

  9. [Permanent vascular access for haemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Manafov, E N; Batrashov, V A; Sergeev, O G; Yudaev, S S

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a permanent vascular access (PVA) is the pledge of successful treatment of patients being on chronic haemodialysis (CD). Creation and maintenance of a functioning PVA is the priority task of vascular and endovascular surgeons, nephrologists and specialists of haemodialysis departments. According to the KDOQI guidelines, the most preferable type of PVA is a native arteriovenous fistula (AVF). As an alternative it is possible to use a synthetic prosthesis for creating an arteriovenous shunt (AVS) or implantation of a central venous catheter (CVC). Various complications of vascular accesses leading to their loss create the necessity of forming just another PVA, thus negatively influencing the life span and quality of life of this cohort of patients. Improving surgical technique and approaches to treatment, as well as carrying out dynamic monitoring of the condition of the created PVA make it possible to considerably decrease the incidence rate of such complications and to improve the quality of medical care rendered. PMID:26451410

  10. Cerebrovascular Complications After Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alejaldre, Aída; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Santos, Miguel Ángel; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Neurological complications in orthotopic heart transplantation represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite successful transplantation. The most frequent perioperative neurological complications are delirium or encephalopathy. In this period cerebrovascular complication ranges between 5-11%. After the perioperative period, the 5-year stroke risk after cardiac transplantation is 4.1%. In a retrospective study conducted with 314 patients who underwent cardiac transplantation, it was found that 20% of cerebrovascular complications occurred within the first two weeks after transplantation, while 80% occurred in the late postoperative phase. Of these, ischemic stroke is the most common subtype. In the perioperative periode, hemodynamic instability, cardiac arrest, extracorporeal circulation over 2 hours, prior history of stroke, and carotid stenosis greater than 50% have been reported to be risk factors for the occurrence of cerebrovascular complications. Perioperative cerebrovascular complications are associated with higher mortality and poor functional outcome at one year follow-up. After the perioperative period, the only factor that has been significantly associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular complications is a history of prior stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic. Other associated factors include unknown atrial fibrillation, septic emboli from endocarditis, cardiac catheterization and perioperative hemodynamic shock. According to the TOAST etiologic classification, the most prevalent etiologic subtype of ischemic stroke is undetermined cause. PMID:21804780

  11. Management and complications of stomas.

    PubMed

    Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management. PMID:23177069

  12. PEG tubes: dealing with complications.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Hardip; Thompson, Rosie

    A percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube can be used to deliver nutrition, hydration and medicines directly into the patient's stomach. Patients will require a tube if they are unable to swallow safely, putting them at risk of aspiration of food, drink and medicines into their lungs. It is vital that nurses are aware of the complications that may arise when caring for a patient with a PEG tube. It is equally important that nurses know how to deal with these complications or from where tc seek advice. This article provides a quick troubleshooting guide to help nurses deal with complications that can arise with PEG feeding. PMID:26016095

  13. Pulmonary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, M Y; Flight, W; Smith, E

    2014-03-01

    The life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has steadily increased over recent decades with a corresponding increase in the frequency of complications of the disease. Radiologists are increasingly involved with managing and identifying the pulmonary complications of CF. This article reviews the common manifestations of CF lung disease as well as updating radiologists with a number of less well-known complications of the condition. Early and accurate detection of the pulmonary effects of CF are increasingly important to prevent irreversible lung damage and give patients the greatest possibility of benefiting from the new therapies becoming available, which correct the underlying defect causing CF. PMID:24361142

  14. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long term complications of diabetes To use the sharing ... sores and infections. If it goes on too long, your toes, foot, or leg may need to ...

  15. Liver Transplant: Complications/Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... can develop a complication requiring return to the operating room for repair or other procedures to open up the new connections. Rejection: Your immune system helps fight infections. It does this by recognizing ...

  16. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, E; Sharma, S; Lal, S; Allan, P J

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with potential life-threatening medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with anorexia nervosa, highlights associated diagnostic pitfalls and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to management. PMID:27166107

  17. Coal workers pneumoconiosis, complicated (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the lungs. Diseases which may explain these X-ray findings include complicated coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP), silico-tuberculosis, disseminated tuberculosis, metastatic lung cancer, and other diffuse infiltrative pulmonary diseases.

  18. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... two complications of diabetes: nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor circulation. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your ... you may not detect an injury or irritation. Poor circulation in your feet reduces your ability to ...

  19. Uncommon complications of laparoscopic sterilisation.

    PubMed

    Denton, G W; Schofield, J B; Gallagher, P

    1990-05-01

    We present three unusual complications of laparoscopic sterilisation with clinical presentation, pathology and management. We discuss the possible aetiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical importance in relation to each case. PMID:2141462

  20. Uncommon complications of laparoscopic sterilisation.

    PubMed Central

    Denton, G. W.; Schofield, J. B.; Gallagher, P.

    1990-01-01

    We present three unusual complications of laparoscopic sterilisation with clinical presentation, pathology and management. We discuss the possible aetiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical importance in relation to each case. PMID:2141462

  1. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-dialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-dialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency-dialysis access; Chronic kidney failure-dialysis access; Chronic renal failure-dialysis access

  2. The management of complicated glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Clement, C I; Goldberg, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Complicated glaucomas present considerable diagnostic and management challenges. Response to treatment can be unpredictable or reduced compared with other glaucomas. However, target intraocular pressure and preservation of vision may be achieved with selected medical, laser and surgical treatment. The evidence for such treatment is expanding and consequently affords clinicians a better understanding of established and novel techniques. Herein we review the mechanisms involved in the development of complicated glaucoma and the current evidence supporting its management. PMID:21150026

  3. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23762661

  4. Neurologic Complications in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Abbas; Soltani, Mohammad Hossein; Kamranmanesh, Mohammadreza; Tabibi, Ali; Mohsen Ziaee, Seyed Amir; Nouralizadeh, Akbar; Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Poorzamani, Mahtab; Gharaei, Babak; Ozhand, Ardalan; Lashay, Alireza; Ahanian, Ali; Aminsharifi, Alireza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Asl-Zare, Mohammad; Ali Beigi, Faramarz Mohammad; Najjaran, Vahid; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been the preferred procedure for the removal of large renal stones in Iran since 1990. Recently, we encountered a series of devastating neurologic complications during PCNL, including paraplegia and hemiplegia. There are several reports of neurologic complications following PCNL owing to paradoxical air emboli, but there are no reports of paraplegia following PCNL. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had undergone PCNL in 13 different endourologic centers and retrieved data related to neurologic complications after PCNL, including coma, paraplegia, hemiplegia, and quadriplegia. Results The total number of PCNL procedures in these 13 centers was 30,666. Among these procedures, 11 cases were complicated by neurologic events, and four of these cases experienced paraplegia. All events happened with the patient in the prone position with the use of general anesthesia and in the presence of air injection. There were no reports of neurologic complications in PCNL procedures performed with the patient under general anesthesia and in the prone position and with contrast injection. Conclusions It can be assumed that using room air to opacify the collecting system played a major role in the occurrence of these complications. Likewise, the prone position and general anesthesia may predispose to these events in the presence of air injection. PMID:23526482

  5. Complications of umbilical vein catherisation. Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bothur-Nowacka, Joanna; Czech-Kowalska, Justyna; Gruszfeld, Dariusz; Nowakowska-Rysz, Monika; Kościesza, Andrzej; Polnik, Dariusz; Dobrzańska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background: Umbilical vein catheterization is a relatively easy procedure performed routinely on the neonate intensive care units. It provides a fast central vein access, but some complications have been described in the literature. Case Reports: We presented a case report of a premature infant (34 hbd) with extravasation of the parenteral nutrition and drugs to the liver after umbilical vein catheterization. Fever and increasing biochemical markers of infection were observed. USG revealed a heterogenic, well-limited space of 4 cm in diameter, located in the right lobe of the liver. CT excluded liver abscess. Considering neoplastic process or incorrect location of the catheter of the central vein, we performed liver biopsy. Results: Cytological and biochemical analysis of the aspirated fluid revealed extravasation of parenteral nutrition to the liver. Our case confirms the necessity of controlling a proper location of the central catheter right after its insertion and during hospitalization. PMID:22802847

  6. A case of micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy with macro complication.

    PubMed

    Dede, Onur; Utangaç, Mazhar; Dağguli, Mansur; Hatipoğlu, Namık Kemal; Sancaktutar, Ahmet Ali; Bodakçı, Mehmet Nuri

    2015-06-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is accepted as the standard management approach for kidney stones that are either refractory to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy or are >2 cm in diameter. The recently developed micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (microperc) technique provides intrarenal access under full vision using an optic instrument with a smaller calibration. A lesser amount of bleeding has been reported with the use of this method. Here we present a case of a bleeding complication on postoperative day 15 after a microperc procedure used to treat a left kidney stone. The complication led to retention of bloody urine in the bladder and required transfusion of 5 units of whole blood. PMID:26328211

  7. Anticipated and unanticipated complications of severe dengue in a primigravida

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Madiha; Zainab, Ghulam; Khan, Farah

    2015-01-01

    As the incidence of dengue is rising among adults more cases of dengue fever are being reported during pregnancy. Physiological changes of pregnancy mask the pathognomonic features of severe dengue such as increased hematocrit, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia and a high index of suspicion are required in endemic areas. Massive hemorrhage may complicate operative deliveries in unsuspected patients. World Health Organization recommends that all patients with severe dengue should be admitted to a hospital with access to intensive care facilities and blood transfusion. We present the successful management of hemorrhage and unanticipated complications of severe dengue in a young primigravida admitted to the Intensive Care Unit after an emergency cesarean section. PMID:26730121

  8. Postoperative assessment of vascular access.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Vascular access problems lead to increased patient morbidity and mortality. Autologous arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are preferred over grafts. An increase in utilization of AVFs results in an increased incidence of early AVF failure and nonmaturation. A thorough evaluation of a new AVF after 4-6 weeks after creation should be considered mandatory. Experienced persons can examine AVF and predict its utility as a dialysis access. Detailed physical examination of the access performed by educated and trained staff can provide, in most cases, adequate information about the main causes for AVF dysfunction in case of nonmaturation or in case of late access complications. Physical examination has been shown to be very accurate in assessing fistula and is not difficult to learn. Doppler ultrasound (DU) is an additional diagnostic method to predict the ultimate maturation of newly created AVFs and is also very useful in further defining problems that have been detected by physical examination. DU also provides additional information that is of the utmost importance for the surgical or interventional treatment.In this review, basic principles of physical examination and of DU examination of early and late AVF/graft complications are shown. PMID:24817448

  9. Laparoscopic morcellator-related complications.

    PubMed

    Milad, Magdy P; Milad, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Morcellation at laparoscopy is a commonly used minimally invasive method to extract bulky tissue from the abdomen without extending abdominal incisions. Despite widespread use of morcellation, complications still remain underreported and poorly understood. We performed a systematic review of surgical centers in the United States to identify, collate and update the morcellator-related injuries and near misses associated with powered tissue removal. We searched articles on morcellator-related injuries published from 1993 through June 2013. In addition, all cases reported to MedSun and the FDA device database (MAUDE) were evaluated for inclusion. We used the search terms "morcellation," "morcellator," "parasitic," and "retained" and model name keywords "Morcellex," "MOREsolution," "PlasmaSORD," "Powerplus," "Rotocut," "SAWALHE," "Steiner," and "X-Tract." During the past 15 years, 55 complications were identified. Injuries involved the small and large bowels (n = 31), vascular system (n = 27), kidney (n = 3), ureter (n = 3), bladder (n = 1), and diaphragm (n = 1). Of these injuries, 11 involved more than 1 organ. Complications were identified intraoperatively in most patients (n = 37 [66%]); however, the remainder were not identified until up to 10 days postoperatively. Surgeon inexperience was a contributing factor in most cases in which a cause was ascribed. Six deaths were attributed to morcellator-related complications. Nearly all major complications were identified from the FDA device database and not from the published literature. The laparoscopic morcellator has substantially expanded our ability to complete procedures using minimally invasive techniques. Associated with this opportunity have been increasing reports of major and minor intraoperative complications. These complications are largely unreported, likely because of publication bias associated with catastrophic events. Surgeon experience likely confers some protection against these injuries

  10. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: indications, technique, complications and management.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-06-28

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the "pull" technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  11. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: Indications, technique, complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the “pull” technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  12. Complications

    MedlinePlus

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  13. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Complicated by Vascular Erosion in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, Brian P; Farrow, Kathryn N; Kim, Stan; Hunter, Catherine J

    2016-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are widely used in the pediatric population, and their use continues to grow in popularity. These catheters provide a reliable source of venous access to neonatal patients but can also be the cause of life-threatening complications. There are several well-documented complications such as infections, catheter thrombosis, vascular extravasations, and fractured catheters. However, the complication of vascular erosion into the pleural space using both small and silicone-based catheters is rarely described. After obtaining institutional review board approval, we identified 4 cases to review of PICCs complicated by vascular erosions in the past 2 years. Herein, we also review the current literature of PICC complications. Getting the catheter tip as close to the atrial-caval junction as possible and confirmation of this placement are of the utmost importance. The thick wall of the vena cava near the atrium seems to be less likely to perforate; in addition, this position provides increased volume and turbulence to help dilute the hyperosmolar fluid, which seems to also be a factor in this complication. A daily screening chest x-ray in patients with upper extremity PICCs and ongoing parenteral nutrition (PN) are not necessary at this time given the overall low rate of vascular erosion and concerns regarding excessive radiation exposure in pediatric populations. However, a low threshold for chest x-ray imaging in patients with even mild respiratory symptoms in the setting of upper extremity PN is recommended. PMID:25700180

  14. Septic complications of hemorrhoidal banding.

    PubMed

    Quevedo-Bonilla, G; Farkas, A M; Abcarian, H; Hambrick, E; Orsay, C P

    1988-05-01

    Rubber band ligation is an efficacious and cost-effective alternative to conventional hemorrhoidectomy for symptomatic internal hemorrhoids. Even though the well-recognized complications of bleeding and thrombosis occur infrequently, far more serious septic complications have only recently been described, as evidenced in five of our patients: four cases were serious enough to necessitate surgical intervention, and one patient died. Pain followed by urinary dysfunction with or without toxic symptoms should alert the physician to the probability of localized perianal or systemic sepsis. Acute awareness of these rare but potentially life-threatening complications and immediate aggressive treatment is mandatory if death is to be prevented. Rubber band ligation of internal hemorrhoids need not be abandoned; however, the indications should be clear, the technique mastered, and a close patient follow-up maintained. PMID:3358691

  15. Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

  16. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. PMID:25666773

  17. [Pulmonary hemorrhage complicating transthoracic puncture].

    PubMed

    Febvre, M; de Fenoyl, O; Capron, F; Vadrot, D; Rochemaure, J

    1989-01-01

    Fine needle transthoracic aspiration (FNTA) of pulmonary opacities under guidance of computerized tomography (CT) is a simple procedure yielding conclusive results in many patients with malignant lung tumours. The small caliber of the needles utilized and the CT control make this increasingly popular procedure both accurate and safe. Yet a number of complications have occurred; most of them were benign (e.g. pneumothorax) but some were potentially dangerous (e.g. pulmonary haemorrhage), so that the pros and cons of the procedure must carefully be weighed. We report the case of a patient in whom FNTA was complicated by copious haemoptysis and a pulmonary haematoma clearly visible at CT. The literature concerning the potential complications of transthoracic puncture is reviewed. PMID:2633295

  18. Pulmonary Complications due to Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shirinzadeh, Abulfazl; Talebi, Yashar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal carcinoma is the scourge of human beings. Pulmonary complications in patients who have undergone operation are common (20-30% of cases) and there are no suitable tools and ways to predict these complications. Methods During a period of 10 years, from March 1998 to February 2007, 200 patients (150 male and 50 female) underwent Esophagectomy due to esophageal carcinoma in thoracic surgery ward retrospectively. Complications include the length of hospitalization, mechanical ventilation, morbidity and mortality. Patients’ risk factors include age, preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, stage of the disease and preoperative spirometry condition. Results We grouped our patients into three categories: Normal (FEV1 ≥ 80% predicted), mildly impaired (FEV1 65% to 79% predicted), more severely impaired (FEV1 < 65% predicted).Although almost all patients had radiographic pulmonary abnormalities, significant pulmonary complications occurred in 40 patients (20%) which underwent Esophagectomy. Pleural effusion and atelectasia in 160 patients (80%). 24 patients needed chest-tube insertion. 20 patients (10%) developed ARDS. 14 patients (7%) developed chylothorax. 20 patients (10%) of patients died during their postoperative hospital stay. 30 patients (15%) required mechanical ventilation for greater than 48 hours. Conclusion We reviewed a number of preoperative clinical variables to determine whether they contributed to postoperative pulmonary complications as well as other outcomes. In general, age, impaired pulmonary function especially in those patients with FEV1 less than 65% predicted was associated with prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS). In fact pulmonary complications rate after Esophagectomy are high and there was associated mortality and morbidity. PMID:24250962

  19. Maintenance of permanent hemodialysis vascular access patency.

    PubMed

    Berkoben, M; Schwab, S J

    1995-02-01

    The morbidity and mortality of maintenance hemodialysis patients are in large part determined by the ability of the nephrologist, dialysis staff, and vascular surgeon to establish and maintain adequate vascular access. Primary arteriovenous fistulae are the preferred form of vascular access because they are the more likely to provide long-term complication-free access. In 1994, however, the majority of patients entering hemodialysis programs have vascular anatomy unsuitable for primary arteriovenous fistula creation. Synthetic fistulae are currently the more common form of vascular access. Unfortunately, this form of vascular access is more prone to thrombosis and infection. Thrombosis is the most common cause of vascular access loss. Venous stenoses account for the majority of thromboses but can be prospectively identified by performing routine measurements of venous dialysis pressure or urea recirculation. Prospective identification of venous stenoses followed by either angioplasty or surgical revision will improve fistula patency and enhance the quality of life of the hemodialysis population. PMID:7598559

  20. TAVR: Imaging Spectrum of Complications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satinder P; Alli, Oluseun; Melby, Spencer; Lessar, Massoud; Sasse, Mark; Booker, Julian; Davies, James

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has recently become a suitable alternative for senile aortic stenosis in patients not suitable for surgery. With growing operative experience, appropriate patient selection, advances in imaging evaluation, and technical refinements, the outcomes have improved. Despite its less invasive nature, a unique set of complications and events are encountered during the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure and in the postoperative period. Knowledge of these complications, their prompt detection, and quick adequate treatment are critical in reducing the mortality and morbidity. PMID:26488207

  1. Managing complications in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Paolo; Cordoba, Juan; Farges, Oliver; Valla, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. This life-threatening condition usually arises from complications of cirrhosis. While variceal bleeding is the most acute and probably best studied, several other complications of liver cirrhosis are more insidious in their onset but nevertheless more important for the long-term management and outcome of these patients. This review summarizes the topics discussed during the UEG-EASL Hepatology postgraduate course of the United European Gastroenterology Week 2013 and discusses emergency surgical conditions in cirrhotic patients, the management of hepatic encephalopathy, ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, coagulation disorders, and liver cancer. PMID:25653862

  2. Caregiving, bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Boerner, Kathrin; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Most deaths are preceded by chronic illness and disability and the provision of support by family caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe how the caregiving experience affects bereavement, with an emphasis on the relationship between challenging caregiving situations and difficult grieving processes – often referred to as `complicated grief'. The article starts with a brief summary of the general literature on caregiving and bereavement. It then defines complicated grief and discusses why some caregivers may struggle with the death of their loved one. Finally, it offers practical suggestions for what professionals can do to help caregivers both before and after the death has occurred. PMID:20463850

  3. Neurological complications of rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tullu, Millind S; Rodrigues, Sean; Muranjan, Mamta N; Bavdekar, Sandeep B; Kamat, Jaishree R; Hira, Priya R

    2003-02-01

    The rabies vaccines containing neural elements are used in some countries including India. We report three cases that presented with various neurological complications following the use of these vaccines. The presenting manifestations included those of encephalitis, radiculitis and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. These neurological complications are highlighted so that scientific evidence compels the community to discontinue the use of the neural tissue rabies vaccines. Newer generation cell culture rabies vaccines should be preferred over the neural tissue rabies vaccines for post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:12626831

  4. Surgical Complications of Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Leroy R.; Gandhi, Shobhana Anil; Gandhi, Anil Krishnakumar

    1977-01-01

    Complications of gynecological surgery are considerable and when reviewed in detail are almost frightening. There is no substitute for experience and intimate knowledge of the intricate pelvic structures in health and disease. Anyone who is active in the field is sooner or later going to experience some difficulty whether it be due to his miscalculation or to innate conditions in the patient which are beyond his/her control. It is the responsibility of the pelvic surgeon to recognize the complication and apply proper corrective measures. The patient should not be given false hopes of sure success nor should she be deprived of whatever hope for success does exist. PMID:572875

  5. [Psychiatric complications of cannabis use].

    PubMed

    Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Karila, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance, especially among young people. Cannabis use is extremely commonplace and frequently comorbid with psychiatric disorders that raise questions about the etiology. The use of cannabis is an aggravating factor of all psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric complications are related to the age of onset, duration of exposure and individual risk factors of the individual (mental and social health). The panic attack is the most common complication. The link with psychosis is narrow that leads to increased prevention for vulnerable populations. Cannabis is also an indicator of increased depressive vulnerability and an aggravating factor for bipolar disorder. PMID:24579344

  6. Complications of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Steinberg, John S

    2013-12-01

    The diabetic foot is at high risk for complications because of its role in ambulation. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can lead to chronic foot ulcers, which are at high risk for infection, in part attributable to areas of high pressure caused by lack of tolerance of the soft tissue and bone and joint deformity. If left untreated, infection and ischemia lead to tissue death, culminating in amputation. Treatment strategies include antibiosis, topical therapies, offloading, debridement, and surgery. A multidisciplinary team approach is necessary in the prevention and treatment of complications of the diabetic foot. PMID:24286952

  7. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  8. [Plasmapheresis: technique, complications and indications].

    PubMed

    Pruijm, M T; Cherpillod, A; Vogt, B; Burnier, M

    2008-03-01

    Plasmapheresis is an extracorporeal technique used to remove pathogenic macromolecules from the plasma. Plasmapheresis is used to treat neurological, renal, hematological as well as systemic diseases, which explains why many different specialties in medicine can be involved. Plasmapheresis has evolved in forty years into a frequently used, relatively safe procedure. Nowadays a large spectrum of different techniques exists, each with its own possible complications. In this article we will give an overview of these different techniques, their complications and indications, in order to familiarize the reader with this fascinating treatment. PMID:18402016

  9. Complications from international surgery tourism.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Mark M; Alizadeh, Kaveh

    2011-08-01

    Medical tourism is an increasing trend, particularly in cosmetic surgery. Complications resulting from these procedures can be quite disruptive to the healthcare industry in the United States since patients often seek treatment and have no compensation recourse from insurance. Despite the increasing number of plastic surgery patients seeking procedures abroad, there have been little reported data concerning outcomes, follow-up, or complication rates. Through a survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) members, the authors provide data on trends to help define the scope of the problem. PMID:21813883

  10. Complications in hair restoration surgery.

    PubMed

    Perez-Meza, David; Niedbalski, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Hair loss affects more than 1.2 billion people worldwide. As the technology and artistry of hair restoration surgery has improved including natural results, so too has the popularity of this procedure. As with any other surgical procedure, complications may occur and this presents a major challenge for the surgeon and the patient. This article provides an overview of the complications most likely to occur during the pre, intra, and postoperative periods with modern hair transplant surgery (single follicular unit or multifollicular unit) including scalp surgery, and discusses their treatment and most importantly their prevention. PMID:19185800

  11. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  12. Risk Factors for Complications of Traumatic Injuries.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Júnior, Wagner; Saleh, Carmen Mohamad Rida; Whitaker, Iveth Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Complications in hospitalized trauma patients are major causes of morbidity and mortality. The aims of this study were to identify the in-hospital trauma patients' complications and identify the risk factors for complications in this population. A retrospective analysis was conducted in a sample from a Brazilian hospital. The sample consisted of 407 patients, 194 (47.66%) of whom had records of complications. The most common complications were infections (41.80%). The risk factors related to the complications were age, length of hospital stay, external causes, and injury severity. The complications were frequent in this sample, and the risk for complications was characterized by multiple factors. PMID:27618375

  13. Ureteric access sheath aided insertion of resonance metal ureteric stent

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Matthew; Strahan, Stephen; Wines, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ureteral obstruction caused by malignancy is a challenging and often complicated problem for urologists. We present a novel technique of ureteric access sheath aided insertion of a Resonance metal ureteric stent in the setting of a difficult obstruction. PMID:24879725

  14. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-05-16

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  15. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications

    PubMed Central

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  16. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  17. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients’ experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  18. The complication of pneumatic retinopexy.

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, G F; Tornambe, P E; Brinton, D A; Flood, T P; Green, S; Grizzard, W S; Hammer, M E; Leff, S R; Mascuilli, L; Morgan, C M

    1990-01-01

    There have been 26 published series with a total of 1274 detachments operated with pneumatic retinopexy. Eighty percent were reattached with a single procedure and 98% with reoperations. New breaks occurred in 13% and PVR in 4%. The complications published in 101 papers on pneumatic retinopexy in the last 5 years are analyzed as to frequency, prevention, management, and results. PMID:2095021

  19. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

    2013-05-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  20. Constraints complicate centrifugal compressor depressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Key, B. ); Colbert, F.L. )

    1993-05-10

    Blowdown of a centrifugal compressor is complicated by process constraints that might require slowing the depressurization rate and by mechanical constraints for which a faster rate might be preferred. The paper describes design constraints such as gas leaks; thrust-bearing overload; system constraints; flare extinguishing; heat levels; and pressure drop.

  1. Not to Complicate Matters, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    The writer discusses the current academic enthrallment with complicating seemingly every aspect of every event or phenomenon, arguing that the fashion elevates confusion from a transitional stage into an end goal. Rather than scholarly clarification, says Jacoby, people celebrate the fact that everything can be "problematized," rejoicing in…

  2. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  3. Complicating the Concept of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Levitt, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues against a simple, reified view of culture as a set of ideas and norms belonging to a group or nation, and considers the implications of a more complicated concept for discussion of world culture and the global/local nexus. Most anthropologists define culture as the making of meaning, with an emphasis on the process itself as…

  4. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  5. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  6. Manufacturing Complicated Shells And Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobol, Paul J.; Faucher, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    Explosive forming, wax filling, and any one of welding, diffusion bonding, or brazing used in method of manufacturing large, complicated shell-and-liner vessels or structures. Method conceived for manufacture of film-cooled rocket nozzles but applicable to joining large coaxial shells and liners in general.

  7. Lymphatic complications after vascular interventions

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Andrzej; Maruszynski, Marek; Witkowski, Adam; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Chmielak, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lymphorrhea due to classical and mini-invasive surgical interventions on femoral and popliteal arteries is a serious hindrance to patient treatment. Depending on the experience of a particular center, the incidence and frequency of this type of complication may constitute a serious clinical problem. While the level of lymphorrhea intensity and its duration result in certain foreseeable consequences, their treatment can be a time-consuming and multistep procedure. Aim To compare different types of vascular interventions with lymphorrhea occurrence. Material and methods The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of lymphatic complications based on the material collected between 2005 and 2012 at the Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery of the Military Institute of Medicine in Warsaw and in the Department of Interventional Cardiology and Angiology of the Institute of Cardiology in Anin, Warsaw, in 2009–2012. Results Maintaining due thoroughness when dissecting tissues and treating the cutting line in this area with ligatures and tissue puncture are the most reliable methods of minimizing the risk of lymphatic leakage after surgical procedures performed in a classical way. The lymphatic complication under analysis is far less likely to occur when procedures are performed as planned and an endovascular technique is used – statistical significance p < 0.05. Minimally invasive and fully percutaneous procedures performed via needle puncture, including the use of the fascial closure technique to close the femoral artery, eliminate the likelihood of the occurrence of this vascular complication – statistical significance was found with p value less than 0.05. Conclusions We concluded that in every case by minimizing the vascular approach we protected the patient against lymphatic complications. PMID:25337168

  8. Long-term parenteral nutrition: problems with venous access.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, A S; Gertner, D J; Wood, S; Phillips, R K; Lennard-Jones, J E

    1990-01-01

    Long-term parenteral nutrition requires central venous access, often difficult in patients who have had several central venous catheterizations. Therapy may be complicated by thrombosis and sepsis which may further compromise central access. We report five cases illustrating such difficulties and suggest that these patients be referred early to specialist centres where experienced catheter insertion and management results in a greatly reduced incidence of complications. PMID:2116522

  9. Complications of immobilization and bed rest. Part 2: Other complications.

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, R.; Dittmer, D. K.

    1993-01-01

    Prolonged immobilization affects almost every organ system. Respiratory complications include decreased ventilation, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Decreased basal metabolic rate, increased diuresis, natriuresis, and nitrogen and calcium depletion affect metabolism. Genitourinary problems include renal stones and more frequent urinary tract infections. Glucose intolerance, anorexia, constipation, and pressure sores might develop. Central nervous system changes could affect balance and coordination and lead to increasing dependence on caregivers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8324412

  10. Complications of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Wu, Xiujuan; Zhu, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated disorder in the peripheral nervous system with a wide spectrum of complications. A good understanding of the complications of GBS assists clinicians to recognize and manage the complications properly thereby reducing the mortality and morbidity of GBS patients. Herein, we systemically review the literature on complications of GBS, including short-term complications and long-term complications. We summarize the frequency, severity, clinical manifestations, managements and possible mechanisms of different kinds of complications, and point out the flaws of current studies as well as demonstrate the further investigations needed. PMID:26642351

  11. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-06-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  12. Complication of antiquated tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Husta, Bryan; Devarajan, Sunjay; Reichner, Cristina A

    2014-01-01

    In the early 20th century, the rapid spread of tuberculosis (TB) invited novel therapies for treatment. A surgical procedure known as plombage was one such method where lobes were forced to collapse by placing an inert object such as mineral oil, paraffin wax, gauze or Lucite (methyl methacylate) balls. The collapse would lead to isolation of TB infection and decrease aeration of the affected lung. Removal of these objects had initially been, usually after 24 months, however this fell out of favor after the patient had recovered without commonly seen late complications. Decades later, reports have been made illustrating complications such as migration and infection of the plombe as well as expanding oleothorax. PMID:26029549

  13. [Consequences and complications of obesity].

    PubMed

    Simon-Vermot, I; Keller, U

    2000-08-01

    Obesity increases the risk of metabolic complications such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, systemic hypertension and cardiovascular disease. These are mainly responsible for the increased mortality of obese people. Other metabolic consequences of obesity are: gallstones, steatosis of the liver and the polycystic ovary syndrome. Beside the body mass index the distribution of body fat is important. Centralized obesity, as measured by the waist-to-hip circumference ratio (WHR), is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia seem to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this association. Obesity has not only metabolic complications. There is a relationship between obesity and impaired respiratory function. Furthermore is obesity a risk factor for osteoarthrosis of the knee, the hip and even the hand and for pulmonary embolism and venous thrombosis. Obesity can also lead to psycho-social problems such as depression, social discrimination and isolation. PMID:11026085

  14. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  15. [Prevention of complications of IUDs].

    PubMed

    Henrion, R

    1980-11-01

    Complications resulting from IUD use are essentially of 4 types: 1) uterine perforation, either at the time of insertion or by translocation of the device. Perforations can be avoided by exercising the utmost attention at time of insertion, and by choosing the proper time of insertion, usually postmentruation. It is also imperative that the IUD be right for the uterine cavity size; 2) pelvic infection, the most serious of IUD complications, since it can, however rarely, cause death; it is absolutely necessary to observe the strictest asepsy during IUD insertion; 3) menorrhagia, which, when severe, can cause anemia. Women with heavy menstrual flow should not wear an IUD; and, 4) ectopic pregnancy, which usually ends in spontaneous abortion, but which can cause infection. PMID:12336586

  16. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  17. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  18. [Hemorrhagic complications during warfarin treatment].

    PubMed

    Gumulec, J; Kessler, P; Penka, M; Klodová, D; Králová, S; Brejcha, M; Wróbel, M; Sumná, E; Blatný, J; Klaricová, K; Riedlová, P; Lasota, Z

    2006-03-01

    Bleeding is probably the major complication of anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists represented nowadays mostly by warfarin in the Czech Republic. The main risk factors in hemorrhagic complications of warfarinisation are the intensity and instability of the anticoagulant treatment, individual patient characteristics, warfarin interactions with other drugs and the length of the anticoagulant therapy. Severe bleeding in warfarin patients is most effectively brought about by a fast and complete undoing of the anticoagulation effect of the drug employing the prothrombin complex concentrate and slow i.v. vitamin K1 infusion regardless of the reason for the anticoagulation. This approach can secure the minimalisation of the bleeding's negative consequences. A less severe bleeding or asymptomatic increase in the international normalized ratio can be treated effectively by skipping or decreasing of the warfarin dosage and/or oral administration of vitamin K1 (i.v. administration only in selected higher risk cases) that does result only in a partial consolidation of coagulopathy but of such type that the risk of thrombotic event requires. The article's goal is to contribute to the treatment standardization in patients with warfarin overdose and/or with hemorrhagic complications due to warfarin treatment and it is available at www.thrombosis.cz. The guidelines include a ready-reference chart whose objective is immediate and quick crash course in the clinical practice. PMID:16637455

  19. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živković, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  20. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zivković, Saša A

    2013-08-27

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  1. [Stomatologic complications of eating disorders].

    PubMed

    Resch, Mária; Nagy, Agnes

    2012-11-11

    Since the 1990s numerous international experts have reported about the somatic complications of eating disorders including those having a dental and stomatological nature. Several reports emphasised that deformations in the oral cavity resulting from this grave nutritional disease typical of the young generation could already appear in the early stage and, therefore, dentists are among the first to diagnose them. Dentists are still often unaware of the importance of their role in multidisciplinary treatment. Even if they knew what the disease was about and recognised it on the basis of deformations in the oral cavity in time, their advice that their patients should brush their teeth more often would fail to eliminate the root cause of the problem. Not only the earliest possible treatment of the complications of the bingeing-purging mechanism and the maintenance of oral hygiene are important, but controlling and curing pathological habits with active participation of psychiatrists are also required to ensure full recovery. Due to the multidisciplinary nature of the disease, manifold communication is required. For this reason, publishing the dental ramifications of organic and systemic diseases at dental conferences and in technical journals, as well as providing information about oral complications of eating disorders for general practitioners and specialists are particularly important. PMID:23123325

  2. Unusual Complications of Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Emegoakor, CD; Dike, EI; Emegoakor, FC

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernia represents a breakdown or loss of continuity of a fascial closure. These hernias are of particular concern not only for the high recurrence rates among them but also for the challenges that follow their repair. It is known to occur in 11-23% of laparotomies. This paper presents two unusual complications of incisional hernia managed by the authors. One ruptured incisional hernia with evisceration of gut and a case of incarcerated gravid uterus in a woman in labour. The case records of the two patients with unusual complications of incisional hernia were pooled and presented to highlight the clinical presentation and management options of this condition. The patient with ruptured hernia and eviscerated gut presented immediately and was resuscitated and the hernia repaired with polypropylene mesh. The patient with incarcerated uterus had caesarean section and mesh repair of the hernia. Incisional hernia can present with unusual complications. The management is very challenging. Good knowledge and skills are required to deal with this condition. PMID:25506498

  3. Unusual complications of incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Emegoakor, Cd; Dike, Ei; Emegoakor, Fc

    2014-11-01

    Incisional hernia represents a breakdown or loss of continuity of a fascial closure. These hernias are of particular concern not only for the high recurrence rates among them but also for the challenges that follow their repair. It is known to occur in 11-23% of laparotomies. This paper presents two unusual complications of incisional hernia managed by the authors. One ruptured incisional hernia with evisceration of gut and a case of incarcerated gravid uterus in a woman in labour. The case records of the two patients with unusual complications of incisional hernia were pooled and presented to highlight the clinical presentation and management options of this condition. The patient with ruptured hernia and eviscerated gut presented immediately and was resuscitated and the hernia repaired with polypropylene mesh. The patient with incarcerated uterus had caesarean section and mesh repair of the hernia. Incisional hernia can present with unusual complications. The management is very challenging. Good knowledge and skills are required to deal with this condition. PMID:25506498

  4. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  5. The Cardiac Complications of Methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Cunningham, Neil J; MacIsaac, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Methamphetamines are increasingly popular drugs of abuse in Australia, and are rising in purity. The rising popularity and purity of methamphetamines has notably increased demands upon Australian medical services. Methamphetamines are sympathomimetic amines with a range of adverse effects upon multiple organ systems. Cardiovascular complications are the second leading cause of death in methamphetamine abusers, and there appears to be a high prevalence of cardiac pathology. Cardiovascular pathology frequently seen in methamphetamine abusers includes hypertension, aortic dissection, acute coronary syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy. The rising prevalence of methamphetamine abuse is likely to increase the burden of cardiovascular pathology in Australians. A National Parliamentary Enquiry was opened in March 2015 to address concerns regarding the medical and social impacts of methamphetamine abuse. From April 2015, a National 'Ice Taskforce' was also created in parallel. Reversal of cardiac pathology appears to be achievable with abstinence from methamphetamines and initiation of appropriate treatment. It is key to appreciate that the pathogenesis of methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications arises as a result of the specific toxic effects of methamphetamines. Clinical management is hence individualised; suggested management approaches for methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications are detailed within this article. PMID:26706652

  6. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  7. Dengue-associated neuromuscular complications.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Kiran Preet

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is associated with many neurological dysfunctions. Up to 4% of dengue patients may develop neuromuscular complications. Muscle involvement can manifest with myalgias, myositis, rhabdomyolysis and hypokalemic paralysis. Diffuse myalgia is the most characteristic neurological symptom of dengue fever. Dengue-associated myositis can be of varying severity ranging from self-limiting muscle involvement to severe dengue myositis. Dengue-associated hypokalemic paralysis often has a rapidly evolving course; benign nature; excellent response to potassium; and, often leads to diagnostic confusion with other dengue-associated neuromuscular disorders. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe form of muscle involvement and may be life-threatening. Guillain-Barrι syndrome is another frequent neuromuscular dengue-associated complication. Dengue-associated Guillain-Barrι syndrome responds very well to intravenous immunoglobulins. Predominant spinal gray matter involvement has been reported in a patient presenting with areflexic paraparesis. Mononeuropathies often manifest with paralysis of the diaphragm due to phrenic nerve dysfunction. Brachial plexopathy, in the form of neuralgic amyotrophy, has been described much more frequently than lumbo-sacral plexopathy. Early recognition of these neuromuscular complications is needed for successful treatment and to prevent further disabilities. PMID:26238884

  8. Data access service of China-VO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Jian; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Cui, Chen-Zhou

    2004-09-01

    With the development of technologies and the implementation of large quantity of astronomical observation projects, astronomy faces data avalanche and has entered an information era. A basic aim of the Virtual Observatory is to provide uniform access to highly distributed, complicated, huge astronomical datasets, and to realize federation of global astronomical data resources, so that astronomers can obtain required data efficiently and conveniently for their research. China Virtual Observatory (China-VO) project designs and implements astronomical data access services based on Grid technology, and provides uniform interface to Grid client application. In this paper, we introduce the data access service toolkit development using Globus Toolkit, the Grid services encapsulation of catalogs according to the latest astronomical data standards recommended by International Virtual Observatory Alliance, the implements of catalog Cone Search access service. Furthermore, we also introduce how to construct other Grid services using above data access services.

  9. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, P I

    1985-03-01

    Neurologic complications continue to occur in approximately 30 per cent of all patients with infective endocarditis and represent a major factor associated with an increased mortality rate in that disease. Of these complications, cerebral embolism is the most common and the most important, occurring in as many as 30 per cent of all patients, most of whom ultimately die. Emboli that are infected also account for all the other complications (mycotic aneurysm, meningitis or meningoencephalitis, brain abscess) that may develop. Emboli are more common in patients with mitral valve infection and in those infected with more virulent organisms. Mycotic aneurysms (often preceded by an embolic event) occur more frequently and earlier in the course of acute endocarditis, rather than later, which is more common in the course of subacute disease. The management of a cerebral mycotic aneurysm depends on the presence or absence of hemorrhage, its anatomic location and the clinical course. Healing can occur during the course of effective antimicrobial therapy and thus will preclude the need for automatic surgery in all angiographically demonstrated aneurysms. The indication for surgical intervention must be evaluated on an individual basis. Meningitis is usually purulent when associated with virulent organisms, but the CSF may present an aseptic formula when associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage or multiple microscopic embolic lesions, infected or otherwise. Macroscopic brain abscesses are rare, but multiple microscopic abscesses are not uncommon in patients with acute endocarditis due to virulent organisms. Seizures are not uncommon in patients with infective endocarditis. Focal seizures are more commonly associated with acute emboli, whereas generalized seizures are more commonly associated with systemic metabolic factors. Penicillin neurotoxicity should be considered in seizure patients with compromised renal function who are receiving high doses of penicillin. The CSF tends

  10. Modified Retroperitoneal Access for Percutaneous Intervention after Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Lawrence H H

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous access to the surgical bed after pancreaticoduodenectomy can be a challenge, due to the post-operative anatomy alteration. However, immediate complications, such as surgical bed abscess or suspected tumor recurrence, are often best accessed percutaneously, as open surgical or endoscopic approaches are often difficult, if not impossible. We, hereby, describe a safe approach that is highly replicable, in accessing the surgical bed for percutaneous intervention, following pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:23690711

  11. Infectious complications of regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Horlocker, Terese T; Wedel, Denise J

    2008-09-01

    Although individual cases have been reported in the literature, serious infections of the central nervous system (CNS) such as arachnoiditis, meningitis, and abscess following spinal or epidural anesthesia are rare. However, recent epidemiologic series from Europe suggest that the frequency of infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques may be increasing. Importantly, while meningitis and epidural abscess are both complications of neuraxial block, the risk factors and causative organisms are disparate. For example, staphylococcus is the organism most commonly associated epidural abscess; often these infections occurred in patients with impaired immunity. Conversely, meningitis follows dural puncture, and is typically caused by alpha-hemolytic streptococci, with the source of the organism the nasopharynx of the proceduralist. In order to reduce the risk of serious infection following neuraxial blockade, the clinician must be knowledgeable in the pathogenesis of CNS infections, patient selection, and use of meticulous aseptic technique. Finally, since delay in the diagnosis may result in morbidity and even death, it is crucial to be aware of the presenting signs and symptoms of meningitis and epidural abscess. PMID:18831298

  12. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  13. Infectious Complications After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria Del Pilar; Martin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the standard of care for patients with decompensated cirrhosis and for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. More than 6000 liver transplants are performed annually in the United States. High patient and graft survival rates have been achieved in great part due to the availability of potent immunosuppressive agents. Systemic immunosuppression has rendered the liver recipient susceptible to de novo infections as well as reactivation of preexisting latent infections. Infections occurring during the first month post-OLT are usually nosocomial, donor-derived, or the result of a perioperative complication. The development of opportunistic infections (OIs) such as Aspergillus and the reactivation of latent infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more frequent 1 to 6 months posttransplant, when the net state of immunosuppression is the highest. Immunosuppressive therapy is tapered 6 to 12 months post-OLT; therefore, infections occurring during that time period and afterward generally resemble those of the general population. Screening strategies applied to determine the risk of an infection after transplantation and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy have reduced the incidence of OIs after OLT. This article will review the various causes of infection post-OLT and the therapies used to manage complications. PMID:27134589

  14. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines and standards for the built environment, transportation, communication, medical diagnostic equipment, and information technology. ...

  15. Nosocomial infections in dialysis access.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Alexander; Trevino, Sergio; Marschall, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections in patients requiring renal replacement therapy have a high impact on morbidity and mortality. The most dangerous complication is bloodstream infection (BSI) associated with the vascular access, with a low BSI risk in arteriovenous fistulas or grafts and a comparatively high risk in central venous catheters. The single most important measure for preventing BSI is therefore the reduction of catheter use by means of early fistula formation. As this is not always feasible, prevention should focus on educational efforts, hand hygiene, surveillance of dialysis-associated events, and specific measures at and after the insertion of catheters. Core measures at the time of insertion include choosing the optimal site of insertion, the use of maximum sterile barrier precautions, adequate skin antisepsis, and the choice of catheter type; after insertion, access care needs to ensure hub disinfection and regular dressing changes. The application of antimicrobial locks is reserved for special situations. Evidence suggests that bundling a selection of the aforementioned measures can significantly reduce infection rates. The diagnosis of central line-associated BSI (CLABSI) is based on clinical signs and microbiological findings in blood cultures ideally drawn both peripherally and from the catheter. The prompt installation of empiric antibiotic treatment covering the most commonly encountered organisms is key regarding CLABSI treatment. Catheter removal is recommended in complicated cases or if cultures yield Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, Pseudomonas or fungi. In other cases, guide wire exchange or catheter salvage strategies with antibiotic lock solutions may be acceptable alternatives. PMID:25676304

  16. Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159391.html Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty Nightly breathing ... 15, 2016 WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea may increase the risk of serious complications ...

  17. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Apr 27,2016 Complications The possibility of ... problems that did not show up right away. Prevention There is no known prevention for Kawasaki disease. ...

  18. Neurologic complications following pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Partha S; Kwon, Charles; Klein, Melanie; Corder, Julie; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2014-06-01

    We reviewed neurologic complications after renal transplantation in children over a 20-year period. Neurologic complications were classified as early (within 3 months) and delayed (beyond 3 months). Of 115 children, 10 (8.7%) had complications. Early complications were found in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 4 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to immunosuppressant toxicity, sepsis/presumed meningitis, and indeterminate) and headaches in 1. One patient with seizures received levetiracetam for 6 months and 1 with headaches received amitriptyline prophylaxis. Late complications were noted in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 3 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy), headaches in 2, and tremors in 1. Two patients with seizures were treated with anti-epilepsy medications; 1 with migraine received cyproheptadine prophylaxis. Neurologic complications develop in children after renal transplantation. Seizures due to posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome were the commonest complication. Early detection and appropriate management of these complications is important. PMID:23752071

  19. Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159391.html Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty Nightly breathing ... 15, 2016 WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea may increase the risk of serious complications ...

  20. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  1. Complications in Musculoskeletal Intervention: Important Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David T.; Dubois, Melissa; Tutton, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) intervention has proliferated in recent years among various subspecialties in medicine. Despite advancements in image guidance and percutaneous technique, the risk of complication has not been fully eliminated. Overall, complications in MSK interventions are rare, with bleeding and infection the most common encountered. Other complications are even rarer. This article reviews various complications unique to musculoskeletal interventions, assists the reader in understanding where pitfalls lie, and highlights ways to avoid them. PMID:26038623

  2. Mead Johnson Critical Care Symposium for the Practising Surgeon. 2. Complications of monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Todd, T R

    1988-09-01

    Current invasive monitoring techniques, although valuable in the care of critically ill patients, also have disadvantages. Complications of these techniques include errors in interpretation of measurements and complications of venous access and indwelling lines. To prevent these, the author recommends a standard routine for inserting and changing catheters, regular calibration of transducers and insertion of Swan-Ganz catheters with the balloon inflated with 1.0 to 1.5 ml of air. PMID:3046728

  3. Common complications of pediatric neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Skalsky, Andrew J; Dalal, Pritha B

    2015-02-01

    Children with pediatric neuromuscular disorders experience common complications, primarily due to immobility and weakness. Musculoskeletal complications include hip dysplasia with associated hip subluxation or dislocation, neuromuscular scoliosis, and osteoporosis and resulting fractures. Constipation, gastroesophageal reflux, and obesity and malnutrition are commonly experienced gastrointestinal complications. Disordered sleep also is frequently observed, which affects both patients and caregivers. PMID:25479776

  4. Skeletal complications of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Abigail A; Gordon, Catherine M

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  5. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Tomer M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  6. Complicated grief in Aboriginal populations

    PubMed Central

    Spiwak, Rae; Sareen, Jitender; Elias, Brenda; Martens, Patricia; Munro, Garry; Bolton, James

    2012-01-01

    To date there have been no studies examining complicated grief (CG) in Aboriginal populations. Although this research gap exists, it can be hypothesized that Aboriginal populations may be at increased risk for CG, given a variety of factors, including increased rates of all-cause mortality and death by suicide. Aboriginal people also have a past history of multiple stressors resulting from the effects of colonization and forced assimilation, a significant example being residential school placement. This loss of culture and high rates of traumatic events may place Aboriginal individuals at increased risk for suicide, as well as CG resulting from traumatic loss and suicide bereavement. Studies are needed to examine CG in Aboriginal populations. These studies must include cooperation with Aboriginal communities to help identify risk factors for CG, understand the role of culture among these communities, and identify interventions to reduce poor health outcomes such as suicidal behavior. PMID:22754293

  7. Neurologic complications of scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Newton, H B

    2001-06-01

    Recreational scuba diving has become a popular sport in the United States, with almost 9 million certified divers. When severe diving injury occurs, the nervous system is frequently involved. In dive-related barotrauma, compressed or expanding gas within the ears, sinuses and lungs causes various forms of neurologic injury. Otic barotrauma often induces pain, vertigo and hearing loss. In pulmonary barotrauma of ascent, lung damage can precipitate arterial gas embolism, causing blockage of cerebral blood vessels and alterations of consciousness, seizures and focal neurologic deficits. In patients with decompression sickness, the vestibular system, spinal cord and brain are affected by the formation of nitrogen bubbles. Common signs and symptoms include vertigo, thoracic myelopathy with leg weakness, confusion, headache and hemiparesis. Other diving-related neurologic complications include headache and oxygen toxicity. PMID:11417773

  8. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should therefore be determined by a multidisciplinary expert team in a specialised centre. It is still a major challenge to identify sarcoidosis patients at risk for developing PH. There is no validated algorithm when to refer a patient suspected for PH, and PH analysis itself is difficult. Until present, there is no established therapy for PH in sarcoidosis. Besides optimal treatment for sarcoidosis, case series evaluating new therapeutic options involving PH-targeted therapy are arising for a subgroup of patients. This review summarises the current knowledge regarding the aetiology, diagnosis and possible treatment options for PH in sarcoidosis. PMID:27194118

  9. Ocular Complications of Chloroquine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Lois A.; Hiltz, John W.

    1965-01-01

    Ocular complications of long-term chloroquine therapy were observed in 18 of 45 patients so treated. This therapy was used in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, discoid lupus and other chronic “collagen disease”. Thirteen patients had reversible corneal opacifications, and seven had irreversible retinal changes, with visual loss and visual field defects. Pathological evidence of chloroquine retinopathy was obtained in one patient. Physicians are therefore warned to use this drug only after careful consideration. If it is used, repeated ocular examinations should include assessment of visual acuity, visual fields on a tangent screen and fundus examination through a dilated pupil. ImagesFig. 4Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:14275038

  10. Complicated grief in Aboriginal populations.

    PubMed

    Spiwak, Rae; Sareen, Jitender; Elias, Brenda; Martens, Patricia; Munro, Garry; Bolton, James

    2012-06-01

    To date there have been no studies examining complicated grief (CG) in Aboriginal populations. Although this research gap exists, it can be hypothesized that Aboriginal populations may be at increased risk for CG, given a variety of factors, including increased rates of all-cause mortality and death by suicide. Aboriginal people also have a past history of multiple stressors resulting from the effects of colonization and forced assimilation, a significant example being residential school placement. This loss of culture and high rates of traumatic events may place Aboriginal individuals at increased risk for suicide, as well as CG resulting from traumatic loss and suicide bereavement. Studies are needed to examine CG in Aboriginal populations. These studies must include cooperation with Aboriginal communities to help identify risk factors for CG, understand the role of culture among these communities, and identify interventions to reduce poor health outcomes such as suicidal behavior. PMID:22754293

  11. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications. PMID:18160357

  12. ORTHOPEDIC COMPLICATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ana Lúcia Lei Munhoz; Godoy, Alexandre Leme; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba Domingos; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; de Almeida Silva, Camila; Martino, Patricia Bernardelli; Gutierrez, Eliana Bataggia; Gianna, Maria Clara; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2009-01-01

    The considerable increase of the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the age of highly-powerful antiretroviral treatment results in important metabolic and bone-joint changes resulting from a long-lasting viral infection time and from this treatment. The most common orthopaedic complications are bone mineralization changes, osteonecrosis, carpal tunnel syndrome and gleno-humeral adhesive capsulitis, with different clinical presentation features, natural disease progression and therapeutic response compared to the overall population. Literature reports are initial, and the experience of the multidisciplinary service of the University of Sao Paulo's Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology enables us a more indepth knowledge about the various pathologies involved and the development of treatment protocols that are appropriate to these diagnoses. PMID:27004170

  13. ORTHOPEDIC COMPLICATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Lúcia Lei Munhoz; Godoy, Alexandre Leme; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba Domingos; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; de Almeida Silva, Camila; Martino, Patricia Bernardelli; Gutierrez, Eliana Bataggia; Gianna, Maria Clara; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    The considerable increase of the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the age of highly-powerful antiretroviral treatment results in important metabolic and bone-joint changes resulting from a long-lasting viral infection time and from this treatment. The most common orthopaedic complications are bone mineralization changes, osteonecrosis, carpal tunnel syndrome and gleno-humeral adhesive capsulitis, with different clinical presentation features, natural disease progression and therapeutic response compared to the overall population. Literature reports are initial, and the experience of the multidisciplinary service of the University of Sao Paulo's Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology enables us a more indepth knowledge about the various pathologies involved and the development of treatment protocols that are appropriate to these diagnoses. PMID:27004170

  14. Skeletal Complications of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Abigail A.; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  15. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Udhay; Mark, Tomer M; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  16. [Prevention and treatment of intraoperative complications of thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Lampl, L

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve a minimal complication rate there is a need for a comprehensive strategy. This means in the first line preventive steps which include patient positioning, suitable approaches and access, an appropriately qualified surgical team as well as a carefully planned dissection and preparation. Furthermore, a supply of additional instrumentation, such as thrombectomy catheters, special vascular clamps and even extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and a heart-lung machine (HLM) in cases of centrally located lesions should be on stand-by. Control instruments, such as a bronchoscope and esophagoscope should not be forgotten. In selected cases a preoperative embolization (vascular malformation) or cream swallow (thoracic duct injury) can be helpful. Special interventions to overcome complications arising are described for the chest wall, lung parenchyma, pulmonary vessels, great vessels, bronchial arteries, trachea and bronchi, esophagus, thoracic duct, heart, vertebral column and sternum corresponding to the topography. PMID:25691227

  17. Access routes for nutritional therapy.

    PubMed

    Waitzberg, D L; Plopper, C; Terra, R M

    2000-12-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) may provide life-sustaining therapy for surgical patients. The duration of nutritional therapy (enteral or parenteral) implies distinct access routes. We review the main aspects related to access routes for nutrient delivery. The enteral route, whenever feasible, is preferred. For EN lasting less than 6 weeks, nasoenteric tubes are the route of choice. Conversely, enterostomy tubes should be used for longer-term enteral feeding and can be placed surgically or with fluoroscopic and endoscopic assistance. The first choice for patients who will not be submitted to laparotomy is percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. Postpyloric access, although not consensual, must be considered when there is a high risk of aspiration. For intravenous delivery of nutrients lasting less than 10 days, the peripheral route can be used. However, because of frequent infusion phlebitis, its role is still in discussion. Central venous catheters (CVCs) for TPN delivery may be (1) nonimplantable, percutaneous, nontunneled-used for a few days to 3 to 4 weeks; (2) partially implantable, percutaneous, tunneled-used for longer periods and permanent access; or (3) totally implantable subcutaneous ports-also used for long-term or permanent access. The subclavian vein is usually the insertion site of choice for central venous catheters. Implantable ports are associated with lower rates of septic complications than percutaneous CVCs. The catheter with the least number of necessary lumens should be applied. Central venous nutrient delivery can also be accomplished through peripherally inserted central catheters, which avoid insertion-related risks. PMID:11193710

  18. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  19. Neurologic Complications in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Rubinos, Clio; Ruland, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Complications involving the central and peripheral nervous system are frequently encountered in critically ill patients. All components of the neuraxis can be involved including the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. Neurologic complications adversely impact outcome and length of stay. These complications can be related to underlying critical illness, pre-existing comorbid conditions, and commonly used and life-saving procedures and medications. Familiarity with the myriad neurologic complications that occur in the intensive care unit can facilitate their timely recognition and treatment. Additionally, awareness of treatment-related neurologic complications may inform decision-making, mitigate risk, and improve outcomes. PMID:27098953

  20. Complications of orthopaedic surgery in horses.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Dean W

    2008-12-01

    Complications are a price all surgeons eventually pay. Experience and increasing skill will decrease many of them but certainly not all. The most important thing is for the surgeon to react correctly to a complication. Acknowledge the mistake (or bad luck) quickly and take whatever steps you can to correct the problem. Because so many equine orthopaedic cases have the potential for complications, recognizing and responding properly to these complications are imperative for successful outcomes. Discussion of the most common complications, their prevention and corrections, is presented. PMID:19203703

  1. Role of minimally invasive surgery for adult spinal deformity in preventing complications.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chun-Po; Mosley, Yusef I; Uribe, Juan S

    2016-09-01

    With the aging population, there is a rising prevalence of degenerative spinal deformity and need of surgical care for these patients. Surgical treatment for adult spinal deformity (ASD) is often fraught with a high rate of complications. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has for the past decade been adopted by spine surgeons to treat ASD in the hopes of reducing access-related morbidity and perioperative complications. The benefits of MIS approach in general and recent development of MIS techniques to avoid long-term complications such as pseudoarthrosis or proximal junctional kyphosis are reviewed. PMID:27411527

  2. Post-traumatic internal mammary artery pseudoaneurysm: A rare complication of pericardiocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Sanjay; Buch, Ashesh; Truong, Crystal N; Moshiri, Mariam; Shriki, Jabi E.; Bhargava, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Before the advent of ultrasound, percutaneous pericardiocentesis was associated with relatively high mortality and complication rates (6% and 20–50%, respectively) [1–3]. Ultrasound (US)-guided pericardiocentesis has dramatically decreased the incidence of complications by direct visualization of the heart and other adjacent vital structures. US helps localize the size and location of the pericardial effusion, measure the distance from the chest wall, localize adjacent, vital organs, and determine the optimal access site to the effusion. We report a case of posttraumatic internal mammary artery pseudoaneurysm, a rare complication of pericardiocentesis. PMID:27141247

  3. Intravascular access in pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; Fischer, R

    1988-11-01

    All cases of patients aged less than 48 months who presented in cardiac arrest to the Hennepin County Medical Center's emergency department (ED) during the years 1984 to 1986 were reviewed retrospectively. The ED record, initial and subsequent chest radiographs, hospital charts, and autopsy reports were analyzed. A total of 33 cases were reviewed. The average patient age was 5 months. The average time needed to establish intravascular access was 7.9 +/- 4.2 minutes. Success rates were 77% for central venous catheterization, 81% for surgical vein cutdown, 83% for intraosseous infusion, and 17% for percutaneous peripheral catheterization. Percutaneous peripheral catheterization, when successful, and bone marrow needle placement were the fastest methods of obtaining intravascular access. There were no major immediate complications, and delayed complications were minimal. Attempts at peripheral intravenous catheter placement should be brief, with rapid progression to intraosseous infusion if peripheral attempts are not successful. PMID:3178949

  4. LAPAROSCOPIC SALPINGECTOMY IN TWO CAPTIVE LEOPARDS (PANTHERA PARDUS) USING A SINGLE PORTAL ACCESS SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Marthinus J; Monnet, Eric; Kirberger, Robert M; Schoeman, Johan P

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic salpingectomy was performed in two adult leopards (Panthera pardus) using a single portal access system, with a multicannulated single-incision laparoscopic surgery port, without any complications. The poorly developed ovarian bursa provided easy access to the uterine tube for salpingectomy. Laparoscopic salpingectomy can be safely performed in the leopard using a single portal access system. PMID:26667558

  5. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present. PMID:21720901

  6. Cardiovascular complications of respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Crook, Errol D; Taylor, Herman A; Badr, M Safwan

    2007-11-01

    A major burden of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory diseases can be directly related to the cardiovascular (CV) complications of these disorders. Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies link reduced lung function and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Hypoxia-induced increased sympathetic activity, blood viscosity, or inflammation, among other factors, may mediate the underlying pathogenesis. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been implicated by association in multiple CV diseases including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. However, the exact contribution of SDB, including obstructive and central sleep apneas, to the development of cardiovascular diseases is not fully understood. In this context, the contribution of the new large, prospective, Jackson Heart Study could be significant in that it is designed to answer several of these questions, specifically in the African American population. This review examines the current evidence that links both reduced lung function and SDB to CV diseases. PMID:18004091

  7. Vascular Complications of Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Alan C; Touyz, Rhian M; Lang, Ninian N

    2016-07-01

    Development of new anticancer drugs has resulted in improved mortality rates and 5-year survival rates in patients with cancer. However, many of the modern chemotherapies are associated with cardiovascular toxicities that increase cardiovascular risk in cancer patients, including hypertension, thrombosis, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. These limitations restrict treatment options and might negatively affect the management of cancer. The cardiotoxic effects of older chemotherapeutic drugs such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, and anticancer antibiotics have been known for a while. The newer agents, such as the antiangiogenic drugs that inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor signalling are also associated with cardiovascular pathology, especially hypertension, thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and proteinuria. Exact mechanisms by which vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors cause these complications are unclear but impaired endothelial function, vascular and renal damage, oxidative stress, and thrombosis might be important. With increasing use of modern chemotherapies and prolonged survival of cancer patients, the incidence of cardiovascular disease in this patient population will continue to increase. Accordingly, careful assessment and management of cardiovascular risk factors in cancer patients by oncologists and cardiologists working together is essential for optimal care so that prolonged cancer survival is not at the expense of increased cardiovascular events. PMID:26968393

  8. [Arterial complications of hydatic disease].

    PubMed

    Mayoussi, C; El Mesnaoui, A; Lekehal, B; Sefiani, Y; Benosman, A; Bensaid, Y

    2002-04-01

    We report two cases of hydatic cyst with rupture into the aorta in two young patients cared for at the Ibn Sina hospital in Rabat, Morocco. In the first patient, a false hydatic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta was discovered at surgery performed for suspected hydatic cyst of the lower lobe of the left lung. Despite reconstruction with a prosthetic graft, the patient died peroperatively due to exsanguination via uncontrollable bleeding through the aneurysmal sac. The second case was a 20-year-old woman whose false hydatic aneurysm of the thoracoabdominal aorta was disclosed by embolic ischemia of the lower limbs. Aorto-aortic reconstruction was followed by medical treatment with albendazol. During follow-up, the patient developed a hydatic cyst of the kidney and a parietal cyst. Both were treated surgically. An analysis of these two cases and 9 others reported in the literature concerning arterial involvement in hydatic disease revealed the characteristic clinical, radiological and therapeutic features of this rare but serious complication. PMID:12015489

  9. [Postoperative hypoparathyroidism: risk of complications].

    PubMed

    Sawicki, A

    For assessing the risk of adverse complications of surgery the group of 130 patients with post-operational hypoparathyroidism was analysed. Surgical hypoparathyroidism has been diagnosed in 51% of operated on thyroid gland patients. Laryngeal nerves have been damaged in 46.6% of patients. The injury to laryngeal nerves has been irreversible in 2/3 of patients, and reversible in the remaining 1/3. Cataract, nephrolithiasis and vitamin D3 intoxication have been observed in some cases before surgery. Their incidence increased in severe surgical hypoparathyroidism. Osteoporosis of the spine has been diagnosed in 49% of patients including some with vertebral fractures. No correlation between the degree of spine osteoporosis and diagnosis before surgery, number of operations on thyroid gland, and type of therapy has been noted. The symptoms of hypercalcemia have been diagnosed in 5 patients out of which hypercalcemia has been transient in 2 patients, and lasted for 1-5 months in the remaining 3 patients. The results of 7,873 analyses of mineral metabolism have been assessed. Hypocalcemia has been found in 38.4%, hypercalcemia in 1.6%, hypomagnesemia in 25.7%, hyperphosphatemia in 41.5%, decreased alkaline phosphatase serum activity in 28.7%, and hypercalciuria in 22.4% of cases. Surgical hypoparathyroidism is frequently accompanied by surgical hypothyroidism and injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerves. PMID:1669168

  10. Cognitive Functioning in Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Charles A.; Butters, Meryl; Zisook, Sidney; Simon, Naomi; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Lebowitz, Barry D.; Begley, Amy; Mauro, Christine; Shear, M. Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is increasingly recognized as a debilitating outcome of bereavement. Given the intensity of the stressor, its chronicity, and its association with depression, it is important to know the impact CG may have on cognitive functioning. This exploratory and descriptive study examined global and domain-specific cognitive functioning in a help-seeking sample of individuals with CG (n=335) compared to a separately ascertained control sample (n=250). Cognitive functioning was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Controlling for age, sex and education effects, CG participants had lower total MoCA, visuospatial and attention scores relative to control participants. The two groups did not differ significantly in the domains of executive function, language, memory or orientation. Age, sex, and education accounted for much of the variance in MoCA scores, while CG severity and chronicity accounted for a very small percentage of MoCA score variance. Major depression was not a significant predictor of MoCA scores. This study is consistent with previous work demonstrating lower attention and global cognitive performance in individuals with CG compared to control participants. This study newly identifies the visuospatial domain as a target for future studies investigating cognitive functioning in CG. PMID:25088285

  11. Thermal stress and diabetic complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko

    1995-06-01

    Activities of erythrocyte aldose reductase were compared in 34 normal subjects, 45 diabetic patients, and nine young men following immersion in water at 25, 39, and 42° C. Mean basal enzyme activity was 1.11 (SEM 0.12) U/g Hb and 2.07 (SEM 0.14) U/g Hb in normal controls and diabetic patients, respectively ( P<0.0001). Activities of the enzyme showed a good correlation with hemaglobin A1 (HbA1) concentrations ( P<0.01) but not with fasting plasma glucose concentrations. After immersion at 42° C for 10 min, enzyme activity was increased by 37.6% ( P<0.01); however, the activity decreased by 52.2% ( P<0.005) after immersion for 10 min at 39° C and by 47.0% ( P<0.05) at 25° C. These changes suggest that heat stress might aggravate diabetic complications, and body exposure to hot environmental conditions is not recommended for diabetic patients.

  12. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  13. Complications of otoplasty: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Limandjaja, G C; Breugem, C C; Mink van der Molen, A B; Kon, M

    2009-01-01

    Over 200 otoplasty techniques have been described in the current literature. However, relatively few articles focus on the associated complication rates. The goal of this review is to examine the incidence of complication rates associated with otoplasty procedures. An electronic search of the Pubmed database yielded 205 articles with significant overlap in search results. Twenty articles published between 2000 and 2007 adhered to our inclusion criteria. Early complications included in this review were haematoma, bleeding, infection, skin necrosis and wound dehiscence; late complications included suture extrusion, scarring, hypersensitivity, asymmetry and inaesthetic results. The cumulative incidence of early complications was low and varied from 0% to 8.4%, with the exception of two outliers. Although cumulative late complication incidences varied greatly from 0% to 47.3%, complication rates on the higher end of the spectrum were not accompanied with revision rates of the same magnitude. Comparison of the different articles was made difficult by the lack of a uniform calculation method for complication incidence, variable follow-up length and data collection, inconsistent use of operation technique and publication bias. Recommendations for future studies include: consistent use of operative technique or at least differentiate between the used surgical techniques when presenting complication rates, inclusion of only patients with bilateral primary procedures, considering each operated ear as an independent variable when calculating complication incidence and a minimum follow-up period of 2 years, with both objective and subjective data collection. PMID:18952516

  14. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akkuş, Selami; Uğurlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  15. Factors affecting complications according to the modified Clavien classification in complete supine percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Falahatkar, Siavash; Moghaddam, Keivan Gholamjani; Kazemnezhad, Ehsan; Farzan, Alireza; Aval, Hamidreza Baghani; Ghasemi, Ali; Shahab, Elaheh; Esmaeili, Seyednaser Seyed; Motiee, Reza; Langroodi, Seyedeh Alaleh Motiei; Nemati, Mohadeseh; Allahkhah, Aliakbar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: An increase in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been accompanied by an increase in complications. We identified the parameters affecting the severity of complications using the modified Clavien classification (MCC). Methods: From 2008 to 2013, 330 patients underwent complete supine PCNL using subcostal access, one-shot dilation, rigid nephroscopy, and pneumatic lithotripsy. We assessed the impact of the following factors on complication severity based on the MCC: age, gender, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, previous stone surgery and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, preoperative hemoglobin, renal dysfunction (creatinine >1.4 mg/dL), preoperative urinary tract infection, anatomic upper urinary tract abnormality (AUUTA), significant (moderate–severe) hydronephrosis, stone-related parameters (opacity, number, burden, location, staghorn, complex stones), anesthesia type, kidney side, imaging and calyx for access, tract number, tubeless approach, operative time, postoperative hemoglobin, and hemoglobin drop and stone-free results. Results: The complication rate was 19.7% (MCC: 0=80.3%, I=6.4%, II=11.2%, ≥III=2.1%). On univariate analyses, only the following factors affected MCC: gender, preoperative hemoglobin, AUUTA, significant hydronephrosis, imaging for access, calyx for access, tract number, postoperative hemoglobin, hemoglobin drop and stone-free result. Renal dysfunction was accompanied by higher complications, yet the results were not statistically significant. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated renal dysfunction, absence of significant hydronephrosis, AUUTA, multiple tracts, lower postoperative hemoglobin, and higher postoperative hemoglobin drop as the significant parameters which affected MCC and predicted higher grades. The paper’s limitations include a low number of cases in the higher Clavien grades and some subgroups of variables, and not applying some techniques due to surgeon preference

  16. Saphenofemoral arteriovenous fistula as hemodialysis access

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An upper limb arteriovenous (AV) fistula is the access of choice for haemodialysis (HD). There have been few reports of saphenofemoral AV fistulas (SFAVF) over the last 10-20 years because of previous suggestions of poor patencies and needling difficulties. Here, we describe our clinical experience with SFAVF. Methods SFAVFs were evaluated using the following variables: immediate results, early and late complications, intraoperative and postoperative complications (up to day 30), efficiency of the fistula after the onset of needling and complications associated to its use. Results Fifty-six SFAVF fistulas were created in 48 patients. Eight patients had two fistulas: 8 patent (16%), 10 transplanted (20%), 12 deaths (24%), 1 low flow (2%) and 20 thrombosis (39%) (first two months of preparation). One patient had severe hypotension during surgery, which caused thrombosis of the fistula, which was successfully thrombectomised, four thrombosed fistulae were successfully thrombectomised and revised on the first postoperative day. After 59 months of follow-up, primary patency was 44%. Conclusion SFAVF is an adequate alternative for patients without the possibility for other access in the upper limbs, allowing efficient dialysis with good long-term patency with a low complication rate. PMID:20955561

  17. Complications of fast neutron therapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, L

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the tissues and organs at risk following high-energy neutron-beam therapy for selected radioresistant tumors, estimating the separate probabilities of both normal tissue injury and of tumor recurrence, each in relation to the absorbed dose. Published statistical and anecdotal reports on the incidence of serious complications observed following fast neutron treatment directed to the cranium, head and neck, chest, upper abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are reviewed and dose-response parameters derived using bivariate probit or logistic analyses. We then calculate the conditional probability of uncomplicated control (PUC) at various doses, assuming that tumor cure and late injury are stochastically independent events. The median effective doses and coefficients of variation, derived for neutron irradiation of human brain and spinal cord, oropharynx, lung, stomach and bowel, rectum and bladder, and extremities, are tabulated and tentative "tolerance limits" estimated. Tolerance doses are shown to depend on several factors including beam quality, chemical composition, cell cycling rate, fraction-size, and follow-up time. In patients followed over 5 years, safe tolerance doses appear to range from < 14 GY for the central nervous system up to 22 GY in the oropharynx and mandible. Given well-determined dose-response data for specific normal tissues and the associated tumors, the separate probabilities of tumor control and of normal tissue injury at a given dose can be estimated. The particular treatment scheme yielding the highest PUC can usually be identified. The maximum PUC for neutron therapy, compared with other modalities, is a measure of both efficacy and safety for the procedure under study and thus provides a useful guide for comparing various modalities and treatment plans and for designing more effective treatment strategies. PMID:9670290

  18. Fournier's gangrene complicating ulcerative pancolitis.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Ignatiadou, Eleftheria; Sarandi, Maria; Godevenos, Dimitrios; Asproudis, Ioannis; Fatouros, Michael; Tsianos, Epameinondas V

    2010-06-01

    Fournier gangrene is a very rare and a rapidly progressing, polymicrobial necrotizing faciitis or myonecrosis of the perineal, perianal and genital regions, with a high mortality rate. Infection is associated with superficial traum, urological and colorectal diseases and operations. The most commonly found bacteria are Escherichia coli followed by Bacteroides and streptococcal species. Diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, and immunosuppression are perpetuating co-factors. Fournier's gangrene complicating inflammatory bowel disease has been reported in three patients so far, two with Crohn's disease. A 78-year-old man diagnosed with ulcerative pancolitis was referred for fever, and painful perianal and scrotal swelling after perianal surgery for a horseshoe-type perianal abscess. Since bowel disease diagnosis, patient was on mesalazine and achieved long-term remission. Perianal abscess occurred suddenly one week before perianal surgery without any evidence of pre-existing fistula or other abnormalities. Physical examination showed extensive edema and crepitus of perineum and genitalia and patient had symptoms of significant toxicity. The diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene was made and patient underwent emergency surgery with extensive surgical debridement of the scrotal and perianal area and Hartman procedure with a diverting colostomy. In addition, patient started on therapy with mesalazine 3gr, methylprednisolone 16 mg, parenteral nutrition and broad spectrum of antibiotics. Two days after the first operation the patient needed a second operation for perianal debridement. On the fourth day, blood cultures showed E. coli. Patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 34 days of hospitalization. On follow up, disease review is scheduled and colostomy closure is planned. PMID:21122507

  19. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  20. Periorbital Injectables: Understanding and Avoiding Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Catherine J

    2016-01-01

    Periorbital rejuvenation with neurotoxins and dermal fillers address several aging changes. Safe and effective results require a thorough understanding of periorbital anatomy, proper injection techniques, and complications of these products. Prompt recognition and treatment of complications can minimize their adverse impacts. Complications can be divided into ischaemic and non-ischaemic effects. Hylauronidase, an enzyme that degrades hyaluronic acid, may improve outcomes after intravascular hyaluronic acid fillers. PMID:27398006

  1. Management of biliary complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Riccardo; Piardi, Tullio; Sangiuolo, Federico; Sommacale, Daniele; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) currently represent a major source of morbidity after liver transplantation. Although refinements in surgical technique and medical therapy have had a positive influence on the reduction of postoperative morbidity, BC affect 5% to 25% of transplanted patients. Bile leak and anastomotic strictures represent the most common complications. Nowadays, a multidisciplinary approach is required to manage such complications in order to prevent liver failure and retransplantation. PMID:26689137

  2. A rare complication of tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Shukeri, Wan Fadzlina Wan Muhd; Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan; Nadarajan, Chandran

    2016-05-01

    Accidental endobronchial intubation is a frequent complication in critically ill patients requiring tracheal intubation (TI). If such complication occurs, it is more often the right main bronchus that is intubated due to anatomical reasons. Left main bronchus (LMB) intubation is rare. Here, we report a case with auscultatory, bronchoscopic, and radiographic evidence of accidental LMB intubation in a pregnant woman with dengue shock syndrome. We highlight this case to increase awareness about this possible-but-rare complication of TI. PMID:27275080

  3. A rare complication of tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Shukeri, Wan Fadzlina Wan Muhd; Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan; Nadarajan, Chandran

    2016-01-01

    Accidental endobronchial intubation is a frequent complication in critically ill patients requiring tracheal intubation (TI). If such complication occurs, it is more often the right main bronchus that is intubated due to anatomical reasons. Left main bronchus (LMB) intubation is rare. Here, we report a case with auscultatory, bronchoscopic, and radiographic evidence of accidental LMB intubation in a pregnant woman with dengue shock syndrome. We highlight this case to increase awareness about this possible-but-rare complication of TI. PMID:27275080

  4. Periorbital Injectables: Understanding and Avoiding Complications.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Catherine J

    2016-01-01

    Periorbital rejuvenation with neurotoxins and dermal fillers address several aging changes. Safe and effective results require a thorough understanding of periorbital anatomy, proper injection techniques, and complications of these products. Prompt recognition and treatment of complications can minimize their adverse impacts. Complications can be divided into ischaemic and non-ischaemic effects. Hylauronidase, an enzyme that degrades hyaluronic acid, may improve outcomes after intravascular hyaluronic acid fillers. PMID:27398006

  5. Accounts of severe acute obstetric complications in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As maternal deaths have decreased worldwide, increasing attention has been placed on the study of severe obstetric complications, such as hemorrhage, eclampsia, and obstructed labor, to identify where improvements can be made in maternal health. Though access to medical care is considered to be life-saving during obstetric emergencies, data on the factors associated with health care decision-making during obstetric emergencies are lacking. We aim to describe the health care decision-making process during severe acute obstetric complications among women and their families in rural Bangladesh. Methods Using the pregnancy surveillance infrastructure from a large community trial in northwest rural Bangladesh, we nested a qualitative study to document barriers to timely receipt of medical care for severe obstetric complications. We conducted 40 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with women reporting severe acute obstetric complications and purposively selected for conditions representing the top five most common obstetric complications. The interviews were transcribed and coded to highlight common themes and to develop an overall conceptual model. Results Women attributed their life-threatening experiences to societal and socioeconomic factors that led to delays in seeking timely medical care by decision makers, usually husbands or other male relatives. Despite the dominance of male relatives and husbands in the decision-making process, women who underwent induced abortions made their own decisions about their health care and relied on female relatives for advice. The study shows that non-certified providers such as village doctors and untrained birth attendants were the first-line providers for women in all categories of severe complications. Coordination of transportation and finances was often arranged through mobile phones, and referrals were likely to be provided by village doctors. Conclusions Strategies to increase timely and appropriate care seeking

  6. [Respiratory complications after oesophagectomy for cancer].

    PubMed

    D'journo, X-B; Michelet, P; Avaro, J-P; Trousse, D; Giudicelli, R; Fuentes, P; Doddoli, C; Thomas, P

    2008-06-01

    Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment for resectable tumours of the oesophagus. Recent advances of surgical techniques and anaesthesiology have led to a substantial decrease in mortality and morbidity. Respiratory complications affect about 30% of patients after oesophagectomy and 80% of these complications occur within the first five days. Respiratory complications include sputum retention, pneumonia and ARDS. They are the major cause of morbidity and mortality after oesophageal resection and numerous studies have identified the factors associated with these complications. The mechanisms are not very different from those observed after pulmonary resection. Nevertheless, there is an important lack of definition, and evaluation of the incidence is particularly difficult. Furthermore, respiratory complications are related to many factors. Careful medical history, physical examination and pulmonary function testing help to identify the risk factors and provide strategies to reduce the risk of pulmonary complications. Standardized postoperative management and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pulmonary complications are necessary to reduce hospital mortality. This article discusses preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors affecting respiratory complications and strategies to reduce the incidence of these complications after oesophagectomy. PMID:18772826

  7. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  8. Perioperative complications in infant cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Fillies, Thomas; Homann, Christoph; Meyer, Ulrich; Reich, Alexander; Joos, Ulrich; Werkmeister, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Cleft surgery in infants includes special risks due to the kind of the malformation. These risks can be attributed in part to the age and the weight of the patient. Whereas a lot of studies investigated the long-term facial outcome of cleft surgery depending on the age at operation, less is known about the complications arising during a cleft surgery in early infancy. Methods We investigated the incidence and severity of perioperative complications in 174 infants undergoing primary cleft surgery. The severity and the complications were recorded during the intraoperative and the early postoperative period according to the classification by Cohen. Results Our study revealed that minor complications occurred in 50 patients. Severe complications were observed during 13 operations. There was no fatal complication in the perioperative period. The risk of complications was found to be directly correlated to the body weight at the time of the surgery. Most of the problems appeared intraoperatively, but they were also followed by complications immediately after the extubation. Conclusion In conclusion, cleft surgery in infancy is accompanied by frequent and sometimes severe perioperative complications that may be attributed to this special surgical field. PMID:17280602

  9. Massive hiatus hernia complicated by jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Ruelan V.; D'Netto, Trevor J.; Hook, Henry C.; Falk, Gregory L.; Vivian, SarahJayne

    2015-01-01

    Giant para-oesophageal hernia may include pancreas with pancreatic complication and rarely jaundice. Repair is feasible and durable by laparoscopy. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is diagnostic. PMID:26246452

  10. Management of Complications of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Mathews, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Treating a fracture of the distal radius may require the surgeon to make a difficult decision between surgical treatment and nonsurgical management. The use of surgical fixation has recently increased owing to complications associated with conservative treatment. However, conservative action may be necessary depending on certain patient factors. The treating surgeon must be aware of the possible complications associated with distal radius fracture treatments to prevent their occurrence. Prevention can be achieved with a proper understanding of the mechanism of these complications. This article discusses the most recent evidence on how to manage and prevent complications following a fracture of the distal radius. PMID:25934197

  11. Discovering Diabetes Complications: an Ontology Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Daghistani, Tahani; Shammari, Riyad Al; Razzak, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a serious disease that spread in the world dramatically. The diabetes patient has an average of risk to experience complications. Take advantage of recorded information to build ontology as information technology solution will help to predict patients who have average of risk level with certain complication. It is helpful to search and present patient’s history regarding different risk factors. Discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Method: We designed ontology based model, using adult diabetes patients’ data, to discover the rules of diabetes with its complications in disease to disease relationship. Result: Various rules between different risk factors of diabetes Patients and certain complications generated. Furthermore, new complications (diseases) might be discovered as new finding of this study, discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Conclusion: The system can identify the patients who are suffering from certain risk factors such as high body mass index (obesity) and starting controlling and maintaining plan. PMID:26862251

  12. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse. Vascular Access for Hemodialysis . Updated July 23, 2014. Available at: kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/vascularaccess/index.aspx. Accessed: February 9, 2015. ...

  13. Implantable Port Devices, Complications and outcome in Pediatric Cancer, a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, H; Ghorbanpor, M; Tanasan, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral blood vessels, due to availability are used for many years in cancer patients, however in patients with potentially harmful drugs to skin (vesicant drugs) or difficult accessibility to vessels, the use of implantable port (totally implantable venous access port-TIVAP) devices with central vascular access are important. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, 85 pediatric cancer patients younger than 16 years, with TIVAP implantation, were followed for their complications and outcome. In addition to demographic data, patients’ port complications were assessed and compared with published articles. Results Mean days of implanted port usage were 531 ± 358 days in all patients. This period was 287 ±194 days in complicated patients. Complications included as infection (tunnel infection and catheter related blood-stream infection), malfunction and thrombosis, skin erosion, tube avulsion, and tube adhesion to the adjacent vessels were seen in 30.6% of patients. Conclusion According to the published data and this experience, the most common complications in TIVAP are infection and catheter malfunction. It is important to notice that in order to prolong its efficacious life, effective sterilization methods, prevention of clot formation and trauma, are the most useful measures. PMID:27222696

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension Complicating Fibrosing Mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Seferian, Andrei; Steriade, Alexandru; Jaïs, Xavier; Planché, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Amar, David; Jovan, Roland; Fadel, Elie; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibrosing mediastinitis is caused by a proliferation of fibrous tissue in the mediastinum with encasement of mediastinal viscera and compression of mediastinal bronchovascular structures. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of fibrosing mediastinitis caused by extrinsic compression of the pulmonary arteries and/or veins. We have conducted a retrospective observational study reviewing clinical, functional, hemodynamic, radiological characteristics, and outcome of 27 consecutive cases of PH associated with fibrosing mediastinitis diagnosed between 2003 and 2014 at the French Referral Centre for PH. Fourteen men and 13 women with a median age of 60 years (range 18–84) had PH confirmed on right heart catheterization. The causes of fibrosing mediastinitis were sarcoidosis (n = 13), tuberculosis-infection confirmed or suspected (n = 9), mediastinal irradiation (n = 2), and idiopathic (n = 3). Sixteen patients (59%) were in NYHA functional class III and IV. Right heart catheterization confirmed moderate to severe PH with a median mean pulmonary artery pressure of 42 mm Hg (range 27–90) and a median cardiac index of 2.8 L/min/m2 (range 1.6–4.3). Precapillary PH was found in 22 patients, postcapillary PH in 2, and combined postcapillary and precapillary PH in 3. Severe extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries (>60% reduction in diameter) was evidenced in 2, 8, and 12 patients at the main, lobar, or segmental levels, respectively. Fourteen patients had at least one severe pulmonary venous compression with associated pleural effusion in 6 of them. PAH therapy was initiated in 7 patients and corticosteroid therapy (0.5–1 mg/kg/day) was initiated in 3 patients with sarcoidosis, with 9 other being already on low-dose corticosteroids. At 1-year follow-up, 3 patients had died and among the 21 patients evaluated, 3 deteriorated, 14 were stable, and only 4 patients with sarcoidosis improved (4 receiving corticosteroids and 1

  15. Chylous Ascites: A Rare Complication of Thoracic Duct Embolization for Chylothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Gaba, Ron C. Owens, Charles A.; Bui, James T.; Carrillo, Tami C.; Knuttinen, M. Grace

    2011-02-15

    Thoracic duct embolization represents a safe and effective method to treat postsurgical chylothorax. Complications of this procedure are rare despite transabdominal puncture of lymphatic channels for thoracic duct access, and chylous ascites is unreported. Herein, we describe a case of chylous ascites formation after lymphatic puncture and attempted cannulation. Our management approach is also discussed.

  16. Selective digital venous hypertension: A rare complication of hemodialysis arteriovenous fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, L.C.; Manstein, C.; Somers, R.; Cope, C.

    1983-04-01

    We report and document angiographically a case of selective venous hypertension, masquerading as an infection, which involved the three middle digits of the right hand in a patient with an access arteriovenous (AV) fistula. This complication arose following hemodialysis and was resolved after resection of the right radial artery at the site of AV fistula and re-anastomosis.

  17. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  18. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  19. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  20. Open Access and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shawn; Schmidt, Christian; Das, Chhaya; Tucker, Philip W

    2006-01-01

    Uncensored exchange of scientific results hastens progress. Open Access does not stop at the removal of price and permission barriers; still, censorship and reading disabilities, to name a few, hamper access to information. Here, we invite the scientific community and the public to discuss new methods to distribute, store and manage literature in order to achieve unfettered access to literature. PMID:16956402

  1. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  2. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access. PMID:25751545

  3. Role of endoscopy in the conservative management of biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lisotti, Andrea; Fusaroli, Pietro; Caletti, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients receiving liver transplantation could be significantly affected by biliary complications, including strictures, leaks, stones and bilomas; early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions lead to markedly reduction in morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic gold standard is represented by conservative approaches, both endoscopic and percutaneous, based on the type of biliary reconstruction, the local availability of the procedures and specific expertise. In patients with previous transplantation, the difficult biliary access and the possible presence of concomitant complications (mainly strictures) further restrict the efficacy of the endoscopic and percutaneous treatments; on the other hand, surgery should generally be avoided because of the even increased morbidity and mortality due to technical and clinical issues. Here we review the most common biliary complications occurring after liver transplantation and discuss available treatment options including future perspectives such as endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary access in patients with Roux-en-Y choledocho-jejunostomy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for difficult stones. PMID:26730271

  4. Incidence of Vascular Complications Arising from Anterior Spinal Surgery in the Thoraco-Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Klezl, Zdenek; Vyskocil, Thomas; Kryl, Jan; Stulik, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Modern biomaterials and instrumentation have popularised surgery of the thoraco-lumbar spine through an anterior route. The advantage of anterior surgery is that it allows for a direct decompression of the compromised spinal canal. However, the potential for devastating long-term sequelae as a result of complications is high. Purpose The aim of this study was to give a general overview and identify the incidence of vascular complications. Overview of Literature There is limited literature describing the overall incidence and complications of anterior spinal surgery. Methods A retrospective review of a prospective database of 1,262 consecutive patients with anterior surgery over a twelve-year period. Results In our study, 1.58% (n=20) of patients suffered complications. Injury to a major vessel was encountered in 14 (1.11%) cases, of which nine involved an injury to the common iliac vein. In six cases, the original procedure was abandoned due to a life-threatening vascular injury (n=3) and unfavourable anatomy (n=3). Conclusions The incidence of vascular and other complications in our study was relatively low. Nevertheless, the potential for devastating long-term sequelae as a result of complications remains high. A thorough knowledge and awareness of normal and abnormal anatomy should be gained before attempting such a procedure, and a vascular surgical assistance especially should be readily accessible. We believe use of access surgeons is mandatory in cases with difficult or aberrant anatomy. PMID:24596606

  5. A very unusual complication of amniocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Munawar; Hill, Michael; Kelly, David; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The uses of amniocentesis are numerous, including determination of chromosomal abnormalities, lung maturity, and infections. A common complication of amniocentesis is loss of the pregnancy, but rare complications should be considered. The role of patient history and clinical observation of uncommon presentations are critical in the management of the patient. PMID:26185625

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis: a rare complication of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mazza, J F; Augenstein, J S; Kreis, D J

    1987-09-01

    The mortality of acute appendicitis increases sixfold if perforation occurs. We have reported a case of perforated appendix complicated by necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall and retroperitoneum. We believe this complication has not been previously described in the English literature. PMID:2957793

  7. Tube Thoracostomy: Complications and Its Management

    PubMed Central

    Kesieme, Emeka B.; Dongo, Andrew; Ezemba, Ndubueze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Jebbin, Nze; Kesieme, Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended. PMID:22028963

  8. Tube thoracostomy: complications and its management.

    PubMed

    Kesieme, Emeka B; Dongo, Andrew; Ezemba, Ndubueze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Jebbin, Nze; Kesieme, Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended. PMID:22028963

  9. [Complications in the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Eggeling, S

    2015-05-01

    The therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax is a common necessity in hospitals of all care hierarchies In addition to sufficient primary treatment by placement of a thorax drainage, knowledge of complicationg constellations, recognition of complications and irregular courses during the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax are of fundamental importance for achieving a satisfactory treatment outcome. Furthermore, the enlightenment of patients regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, possible measures for influencing the recurrence rate and information about future behavioral and lifestyle modifications are important. The principal complications during hospital treatment can be subdivided into complications of the surgical placement of the thorax drain and relief of the pleural cavity, problems in the management of treatment of the pleural negative pressure, the possibly demanding management of a persisting air leak and the individualized decision-making with respect to an interventional or operative procedure. The most common complicating constellations and possible complications during the inpatient hospital stay are described, the. PMID:25995086

  10. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-08-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

  11. Diabetic foot complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta, Maddalena; Imbriaco, Chiara; Rigolon, Riccardo; Mingolla, Lucia; Zamboni, Federica; Dal Molin, Francesca; Cioccoloni, Dario; Sanga, Viola; Bruti, Massimiliano; Brocco, Enrico; Conti, Michela; Ravenna, Giorgio; Perrone, Fabrizia; Stoico, Vincenzo; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vertebral osteomyelitis (or spondylodiscitis) is steadily increasing in Western countries and often results from hematogenous seeding, direct inoculation during spinal surgery, or contiguous spread from an infection in the adjacent soft tissue. We present the case of a 67-year-old white patient with type 2 diabetes who went to Hospital for high fever, back pain, and worsening of known infected ulcers in the left foot. Despite intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement of the foot infection, high fever and lower back pain continued. Bone biopsy and two consecutive blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, revealing serious osteomyelitis in L4 and L5 complicated by an epidural abscess. Contiguous or other distant focuses of infection were not identified. In this case, diabetic foot could be considered as a primary distant focus for vertebral osteomyelitis. Clinicians should consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a ‘possible’ diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by foot infection that is associated with fever and lower back pain. Learning points Vertebral osteomyelitis is increasing in Western countries, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary focus of infection is the genitourinary tract followed by skin, soft tissue, endocarditis, bursitis, septic arthritis, and intravascular access. Diabetic foot could be a rare primary focus of infection for vertebral osteomyelitis, and, however, vertebral osteomyelitis could be a serious, albeit rare, complication of diabetic foot. Clinicians should keep in mind the many potential complications of diabetic foot ulcerations and consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a “possible” diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes and foot ulcers associated with nonspecific symptoms such as lower back pain. Early diagnosis and correct management of vertebral osteomyelitis are crucial to improve clinical outcomes

  12. Complications of immobilization and bed rest. Part 1: Musculoskeletal and cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, D. K.; Teasell, R.

    1993-01-01

    Prolonged bed rest and immobilization inevitably lead to complications. Such complications are much easier to prevent than to treat. Musculoskeletal complications include loss of muscle strength and endurance, contractures and soft tissue changes, disuse osteoporosis, and degenerative joint disease. Cardiovascular complications include an increased heart rate, decreased cardiac reserve, orthostatic hypotension, and venous thromboembolism. Images Figures 1-2 Figures 3-4 PMID:8324411

  13. The Prone Position During Surgery and its Complications: A Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Melissa M.; Ho, Yik-Hong; Rozen, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery in the prone position is often a necessity when access to posterior anatomic structures is required. However, many complications are known to be associated with this type of surgery, as physiologic changes occur with increased pressure to anterior structures. While several studies have discussed postoperative vision loss, much fewer studies with lower levels of evidence have addressed other complications. A systematic literature review was conducted using 2 different databases, and 53 papers were regarded as appropriate for inclusion. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed. Thirteen complications were identified. Postoperative vision loss and cardiovascular complications, including hypovolemia and cardiac arrest, had the most number of studies and highest level of evidence. Careful planning for optimal positioning, padding, timing, as well as increased vigilance are evidence-based recommendations where operative prone positioning is required. PMID:25692433

  14. Management of Mesh Complications after SUI and POP Repair: Review and Analysis of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Deng, D. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the surgical treatment concepts for the complications related to the implantation of mesh material for urogynecological indications. Materials and Methods. A review of the current literature on PubMed was performed. Results. Only retrospective studies were detected. The rate of mesh-related complications is about 15–25% and mesh erosion is up to 10% for POP and SUI repair. Mesh explantation is necessary in about 1-2% of patients due to complications. The initial approach appears to be an early surgical treatment with partial or complete mesh resection. Vaginal and endoscopic access for mesh resection is favored. Prior to recurrent surgeries, a careful examination and planning for the operation strategy are crucial. Conclusions. The data on the management of mesh complication is scarce. Revisions should be performed by an experienced surgeon and a proper follow-up with prospective documentation is essential for a good outcome. PMID:25973425

  15. Intraosseous access in trauma by air medical retrieval teams.

    PubMed

    Sheils, Mark; Ross, Mark; Eatough, Noel; Caputo, Nicholas D

    2014-01-01

    Trauma accounts for a significant portion of overall mortality globally. Hemorrhage is the second major cause of mortality in the prehospital environment. Air medical retrieval services throughout the world have been developed to help improve the outcomes of patients suffering from a broad range of medical conditions, including trauma. These services often utilize intraosseous (IO) devices as an alternative means for access of both medically ill and traumatically injured patients in austere environments. However, studies have suggested that IO access cannot reach acceptable rates for massive transfusion. We review the subject to find the answer of whether IO access should be performed by air medical teams in the prehospital setting, or would central venous (CVC) access be more appropriate? We decided to assess the literature for capacity of IO access to meet resuscitation requirements in the prehospital management of trauma. We also decided to compare the insertion and complication characteristics of IO and CVC access. PMID:25049187

  16. Common complications in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Wollschlager, C M; Conrad, A R; Khan, F A

    1988-05-01

    Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are subject to many complications connected with the advanced therapy required for their serious illnesses. Complications of ventilatory support include problems associated with short-term and long-term intubation, barotrauma, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, and weaning errors. Cardiac tachyarrhythmias can arise from a patient's intrinsic cardiac disease, as well as from drug therapy itself. Hemodynamic monitoring is crucial to careful patient management, but it is associated with technical complications during insertion such as pneumothorax, as well as interpretive errors such as those caused by positive end-inspiratory pressure. Acute renal failure can develop as a result both of therapy with drugs such as aminoglycosides and hypotension of many etiologies, as well as the use of contrast media. Nosocomial infection, which is a dreaded complication in ICU patients, usually arises from sources in the urinary tract, bloodstream, or lung. Complications frequently can arise if the interactions of drugs commonly used in the ICU are not recognized. Further, the ICU patient is subject to nutritional complications, acid base problems, and psychological disturbances. This monograph deals with the frequency, etiology, and prevention of these common ICU complications. PMID:3286162

  17. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  18. Complications in 100 living-liver donors.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, H P; Thistlewaite, J R; Loss, G E; Fisher, J S; Cronin, D C; Siegel, C T; Newell, K A; Bruce, D S; Woodle, E S; Brady, L; Kelly, S; Boone, P; Oswald, K; Millis, J M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A review of 100 living-liver donors was performed to evaluate the perisurgical complications of the procedure and thus to help quantify the risks to the donor. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Despite the advantages of living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT), the procedure has received criticism for the risk it imposes on healthy persons. A paucity of data exists regarding the complications and relative safety of the procedure. METHODS: One hundred LDLTs performed between November 1989 and November 1996 were reviewed. Donor data were obtained by chart review, anesthesia records, and the computerized hospital data base. Patient variables were compared by Fisher's exact test and the Student's t test. RESULTS: There were 57 women and 43 men with a median age of 29. Donors were divided into two groups: group A (first 50 donors), and group B (last 50 donors). There were 91 left lateral segments and 9 left lobes. There were no deaths. Fourteen major complications occurred in 13 patients; 9 occurred in group A and 5 in group B. Biliary complications consisted of five bile duct injuries (group A = 4, group B = 1) and two cut edge bile leaks. Complications were more common in left lobe resections (55%) than in left lateral segment grafts (10%). Minor complications occurred in 20% of patients. A significant reduction in overall complications (major and minor) was observed between the groups (group A, n = 24 [45%] vs. group B, n = 10 [20%]). In addition, surgical time and hospital stay were both significantly reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Although the procedure is safe, many LDLT donors have a perisurgical complication. Surgical experience and technical modifications have resulted in a significant reduction in these complications, however. To minimize the risks for these healthy donors, LDLT should be performed at institutions with extensive experience. PMID:9712567

  19. “Wire-Target” Technique for Precise Vascular Access

    PubMed Central

    Hamzeh, Rabih K.; Danon, Saar; Shah, Sanjay; Levi, Daniel S.; Moore, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Herein, we describe a technique that facilitates percutaneous vascular access when the traditional method of achieving access is unsuccessful. For multiple reasons, gaining access to small vessels in pediatric patients is sometimes difficult. In instances of atrial, ventricular, or great arterial communications, a wire can be positioned from a vein or artery across the communications into an artery or vein to which access needs to be gained. This wire then serves as a target for vascular access. All pediatric patients who underwent cardiac catheterization at Mattel Children's Hospital from July 2003 through June 2006, and at Rady Children's Hospital from July through December 2006, were considered for the wire-target technique when access could not be achieved in vessels of interest via traditional methods. Fifteen wire-target procedures were undertaken in 14 patients (ages, 4 d–11 yr). By use of a directional catheter, a Wholey or 0.014-inch coronary wire was positioned in a vessel to which access was desired. Anterior–posterior and lateral fluoroscopic views were used to target the wire and attain vascular access. The patients' diagnoses, ages, vessels to which access was gained via traditional methods and via the wire-target technique, and wire routes were retrospectively recorded, and outcomes were noted. In all instances, the technique was performed successfully and without complications. In selected pediatric patients in whom percutaneous vascular access is difficult, the wire-target technique may be used safely and effectively to establish arterial, venous, or transhepatic access. PMID:19693307

  20. Intestinal complications of round worms in children.

    PubMed

    Surendran, N; Paulose, M O

    1988-10-01

    One hundred forty-two patients with surgical complications of Ascaris lumbricoides were treated in our hospital over a period of 5 years. Included were 120 patients with subacute intestinal obstruction that were treated conservatively, and 22 patients with acute intestinal obstruction that required surgical intervention. Four of the 22 patients that were operated on died following various postoperative complications. However, there were no deaths among those presenting with subacute obstruction. In our experience, early recognition of the condition avoided serious complications and morbidity. PMID:3236163

  1. Maternal complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Vidushi; Agarwal, Nutan

    2016-09-01

    Maternal complications of diabetes in pregnancy include obstetric complications such as pre-eclampsia, preterm labour, polyhydramnios, increased operative delivery and increased infective morbidity. These can be minimized with optimal glycaemic control. Additionally, pregnancies with overt/pregestational diabetes may have diabetes related complications such as hypoglycaemia, worsening of retinopathy, nephropathy and diabetic ketoacidosis. Women with pre-existing diabetic vasculopathy should be managed with multi-disciplinary approach with maternal and foetal surveillance to detect any deterioration. Such patients have a poor pregnancy outcome. Gastropathy and coronary artery disease in diabetics is a contraindication to pregnancy. PMID:27582159

  2. [Complications of breast augmentation - a case report].

    PubMed

    Zedníková, I; Třešková, I; Schmiedhuber, P; Hes, O

    2012-08-01

    As with any surgery, breast augmentation does have certain risks and complications. The aim of this article is to point out a rare complication of breast augmentation - axillary silicone lymphadenopathy (defined as the presence of silicone in the lymph nodes). The authors present a case report of silicone lymphadenopathy in a young woman after the rupture of a silicone breast implant. As the number of women with breast implants is increasing, it is necessary to bear this rare complication of breast augmentation in mind in differential diagnosis of axillary lymphadenopathy. PMID:23153428

  3. Stillbirth in the pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Starikov, Roman; Dudley, Donald; Reddy, Uma M

    2015-03-01

    Pregestational diabetes currently complicates 4% of pregnancies, while gestational diabetes complicates approximately 8% of pregnancies. Increased risk of stillbirth in diabetic pregnancies has been a well-known and recognized complication for decades. While stillbirth rates for diabetic pregnancies have decreased due to screening, treatment, and antenatal surveillance of these patients, about 4% of all stillbirths remain attributable to diabetes, and diabetic pregnancies continue to be at increased risk for perinatal mortality. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and prevention, as well as future research, of diabetes-associated perinatal mortality. PMID:25667005

  4. Pregnancy complications and neuropsychological outcomes: A review.

    PubMed

    Gerner, Gwendolyn; Baron, Ida Sue

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy complications elevate risk of associated adverse medical, socioenvironmental, and behavioral outcomes in children. These are likely to have a substantial impact on neuropsychological functioning and mental health across the child's lifespan. Thus, an understanding of the complex relationships between pregnancy complications and neuropsychological outcomes is critical for both practitioners and researchers. This review summarizes prevalent pregnancy complications and the associated psychological and neuropsychological findings, highlighting methodological challenges that have restricted investigations of these outcomes and identifying opportune areas for future study. PMID:24801883

  5. Complications in hair-restoration surgery.

    PubMed

    Konior, Raymond J

    2013-08-01

    Most complications associated with hair restoration are completely preventable and arise from variables that are directly controlled by the surgeon and the patient. Physicians who thoroughly grasp the nuances of modern surgical techniques and fully understand the physiologic dynamics of the balding process are least likely to generate a physician-controlled error. Highly motivated, well-educated patients who carefully follow instructions and take an active role in the postoperative recovery process minimize the chance of patient-controlled errors. This article discusses potential complications associated with surgical hair restoration, and the roles of the patient and physician in minimizing the risk of complications. PMID:24017992

  6. Prevention and management of complications in sphenoidotomy.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Carl W; Welch, Kevin C

    2010-08-01

    Endoscopic sphenoidotomy is a common surgical procedure that often accompanies routine sinus surgery. Safe completion of a sphenoidotomy depends on a thorough understanding of the surrounding anatomy, reviewing preoperative imaging, and maintaining intraoperative orientation. Intraoperative complications include local hemorrhage, catastrophic hemorrhage caused by internal carotid injury, optic nerve injury, and CSF leak. Postoperative complications tend to be less severe and include postoperative stenosis and mucocele formation. Regarding surgery of the sphenoid sinuses, the best management of complications truly is prevention, making pre- and intraoperative vigilance vital to a successful outcome. PMID:20599088

  7. Management of complications in glaucoma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, Lingam; Manish, Panday; Ronnie, George; Shantha, B

    2011-01-01

    Surgical option for glaucoma is considered when other modalities are not working out to keep the intraocular pressure under control. Since the surgical procedures for glaucoma disrupt the integrity of the globe, they are known to produce various complications. Some of those complications can be vision-threatening. To minimize the morbidity, it is very important that one should know how to prevent them, recognize them and treat them. The objective of this article is to provide insight into some of those complications that will help the ophthalmologists in treating glaucoma patients in their clinical practice. PMID:21150025

  8. Complications Following Carinal Resections and Sleeve Resections.

    PubMed

    Tapias, Luis F; Ott, Harald C; Mathisen, Douglas J

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary resections with concomitant circumferential airway resection and resection and reconstruction of carina and main stem bronchi remain challenging operations in thoracic surgery. Anastomotic complications range from mucosal sloughing and formation of granulation tissue, anastomotic ischemia promoting scar formation and stricture, to anastomotic breakdown leading to bronchopleural or bronchovascular fistulae or complete dehiscence. Careful attention to patient selection and technical detail results in acceptable morbidity and mortality as well as good long-term survival. In this article, we focus on the technical details of the procedures, how to avoid complications and most importantly how to manage complications when they occur. PMID:26515944

  9. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders. PMID:26169883

  10. [Postoperative pulmonary complications: prophylaxis after noncardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Hofer, S; Plachky, J; Fantl, R; Schmidt, J; Bardenheuer, H J; Weigand, M A

    2006-04-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications are a major problem after upper abdominal or thoracoabdominal surgery. They lead to a prolonged ICU stay as well as increased costs and are one of the main causes of early postoperative mortality. Even after uncomplicated operations, postoperative hypoxemia occurs in 30-50% of patients. Acute respiratory failure involves a disturbance in gas exchange. The mortality ranges from 10 to 60% according to the severity of respiratory failure. The most important complications are interstitial and alveolar pulmonary edema, atelectasis, postoperative pneumonia, hypoventilation, and aspiration. Preoperative optimization, postoperative prophylaxis according to a stepwise approach, and early mobilization decrease the rate of complications. PMID:16575614

  11. Role of interventional radiology in the management of complications after pancreatic surgery: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Giovanni; Mattiuz, Chiara; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Pedicini, Vittorio; Poretti, Dario; Melchiorre, Fabio; Rossi, Umberto; Lutman, Fabio Romano; Montorsi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic resections are surgical procedures associated with high incidence of complications, with relevant morbidity and mortality even at high volume centres. A multidisciplinary approach is essential in the management of these events and interventional radiology plays a crucial role in the treatment of patients developing post-surgical complications. This paper offers an overview on the interventional radiological procedures that can be performed to treat different type of complications after pancreatic resection. Procedures such as percutaneous drainage of fluid collections, percutaneous transhepatic biliary procedures, arterial embolisation, venous interventions and fistula embolisation are viable treatment options, with fewer complications compared with re-look surgery, shorter hospital stay and faster recovery. A selection of cases of complications following pancreatic surgery managed with interventional radiological procedure are presented and discussed. Teaching Points • Interventional radiology is crucial to treat complications after pancreatic surgery • Percutaneous drainage of collections can be performed under ultrasound or computed tomography guidance • Percutaneous biliary procedures can be used to treat biliary complications • Venous procedures can be performed effectively through transhepatic or transjugular access • Fistulas can be treated effectively by percutaneous embolisation. PMID:25516470

  12. Divergent Gene Expression Responses to Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The “widowhood effect” (i.e., morbidity/mortality in recently bereaved spouses) may be related to changes in immune function, but little is known about the impact of bereavement on gene transcription in immune cells. This study examined how Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief responses to bereavement differentially affect leukocyte gene expression. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and bioinformatic analyses were completed on 63 older adults. Thirty-six of them had lost their spouse/partner on average 2 years ago, and 27 were nonbereaved, married controls. Twelve of the bereaved participants met criteria for Complicated Grief. Compared to nonbereaved controls, bereavement (both Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief) was associated with upregulated expression of genes involved in general immunologic activation and a selective downregulation of genes involved in B lymphocyte responses. However, Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief differed markedly in their expression of Type I interferon-related transcripts, with Non-complicated Grief subjects showing substantial upregulation relative to nonbereaved controls and Complicated Grief subjects showing substantial downregulation. Bereavement significantly modulates immune function gene expression. The magnitude of bereavement-related distress (i.e., Complicated Grief vs. Non-complicated Grief) is linked to differential patterns of transcription factor activation and gene expression involved in innate antiviral responses. These findings provide a molecular framework for understanding the health effects of bereavement, as well as new insights into the particular gene modules that are most sensitive to the individual's psychological response to loss. PMID:24380850

  13. Demystifying Open Access

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, Salvatore

    2007-05-14

    The tenets of Open Access are to grant anyone, anywhere and anytime free access to the results of scientific research. HEP spearheaded the Open Access dissemination of scientific results with the mass mailing of preprints in the pre-WWW era and with the launch of the arXiv preprint system at the dawn of the '90s. The HEP community is now ready for a further push to Open Access while retaining all the advantages of the peer-review system and, at the same time, bring the spiralling cost of journal subscriptions under control. I will present a possible plan for the conversion to Open Access of HEP peer-reviewed journals, through a consortium of HEP funding agencies, laboratories and libraries: SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics). SCOAP3 will engage with scientific publishers towards building a sustainable model for Open Access publishing, which is as transparent as possible for HEP authors. The current system in which journals income comes from subscription fees is replaced with a scheme where SCOAP3 compensates publishers for the costs incurred to organise the peer-review service and give Open Access to the final version of articles. SCOAP3 will be funded by all countries active in HEP under a 'fair share' scenario, according to their production of HEP articles. In this talk I will present a short overview of the history of Open Access in HEP, the details of the SCOAP3 model and the outlook for its implementation.

  14. Demystifying Open Access

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, Salvatore

    2007-05-14

    The tenets of Open Access are to grant anyone, anywhere and anytime free access to the results of scientific research. HEP spearheaded the Open Access dissemination of scientific results with the mass mailing of preprints in the pre-WWW era and with the launch of the arXiv preprint system at the dawn of the '90s. The HEP community is now ready for a further push to Open Access while retaining all the advantages of the peer-review system and, at the same time, bring the spiralling cost of journal subscriptions under control. I will present a possible plan for the conversion to Open Access of HEP peer-reviewed journals, through a consortium of HEP funding agencies, laboratories and libraries: SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics). SCOAP3 will engage with scientific publishers towards building a sustainable model for Open Access publishing, which is as transparent as possible for HEP authors. The current system in which journals income comes from subscription fees is replaced with a scheme where SCOAP3 compensates publishers for the costs incurred to organise the peer-review service and give Open Access to the final version of articles. SCOAP3 will be funded by all countries active in HEP under a "fair share" scenario, according to their production of HEP articles. In this talk I will present a short overview of the history of Open Access in HEP, the details of the SCOAP3 model and the outlook for its implementation.

  15. Access Interface Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fager, Susan; Beukelman, David R.; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jakobs, Tom; Baker, John

    2013-01-01

    Individuals who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices to support their communication often have physical movement challenges that require alternative methods of access. Technology that supports access, particularly for those with the most severe movement deficits, have expanded substantially over the years. The purposes of this article are to review the state of the science of access technologies that interface with augmentative and alternative communication devices and to propose a future research and development agenda that will enhance access options for people with limited movement capability due to developmental and acquired conditions. PMID:22590797

  16. Cirrhosis and its complications: Evidence based treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, Salman; Khan, Muhammad S; Fazili, Javid; Madhoun, Mohammad F

    2014-01-01

    Cirrhosis results from progressive fibrosis and is the final outcome of all chronic liver disease. It is among the ten leading causes of death in United States. Cirrhosis can result in portal hypertension and/or hepatic dysfunction. Both of these either alone or in combination can lead to many complications, including ascites, varices, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and coagulation disorders. Cirrhosis and its complications not only impair quality of life but also decrease survival. Managing patients with cirrhosis can be a challenge and requires an organized and systematic approach. Increasing physicians’ knowledge about prevention and treatment of these potential complications is important to improve patient outcomes. A literature search of the published data was performed to provide a comprehensive review regarding the management of cirrhosis and its complications. PMID:24833875

  17. Complications of deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Beric, A; Kelly, P J; Rezai, A; Sterio, D; Mogilner, A; Zonenshayn, M; Kopell, B

    2001-01-01

    Although technological advances have reduced device-related complications, DBS surgery still carries a significant risk of transient and permanent complications. We report our experience in 86 patients and 149 DBS implants. Patients with Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dystonia were treated. There were 8 perioperative, 8 postoperative, 9 hardware-related complications and 4 stimulation-induced side effects. Only 5 patients (6%) sustained some persistent neurological sequelae, however, 26 of the 86 patients undergoing 149 DBS implants in this series experienced some untoward event with the procedure. Although there were no fatalities or permanent severe disabilities encountered, it is important to extend the informed consent to include all potential complications. PMID:12378060

  18. Macrovascular complications in pregnancy and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Rakesh Kumar; Pydi, Venu Madhavi

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses macrovascular conditions which may occur during pregnancy complicated by diabetes. It describes the effect of dyslipidaemia and hypertension on foeto-maternal outcomes and explores the pathogenesis of these states. PMID:27582155

  19. [The surgery of laparoceles. The postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Garavello, A; Tuccimei, U; Sadighi, A; Belardi, A; Remedi, M; Antonellis, D

    1997-05-01

    The use of prosthetic meshes in incisional hernias repairs is now very attractive, particularly for wide fascial defects; nevertheless the presence of a foreign body and placement technique may be responsible for complications sometimes leading to failure. To evaluate technical problems and complications in incisional hernia surgery the authors reviewed their 5 year experience in 70 patients; 39 mesh repairs and 31 direct sutures of the abdominal wall were performed. Local complications (fistulas, wound hematoma or infections) were more frequent in the former group; PTFE meshes showed a lower resistance to infections, particularly in diabetics, and in three patients partial or total removal was mandatory. Prosthetic meshes showed a marked reduction of recurrences in incisional hernia surgery, but their use leads to more local complications than direct repair; the authors believe that mesh placement must be evaluated for every single patient and not used as a routine procedure. PMID:9297143

  20. [Early postoperative complications after scoliosis surgery].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Caballero Macarrón, C; Burgos Flores, J; Martos Sánchez, I; Pérez Palomino, A; Vázquez Martínez, J L; Alvarez Rojas, E; Fernández Pineda, L; Vellibre Vargas, D

    2006-03-01

    Several medical complications can occur after scoliosis surgery in children and adolescents. New surgical techniques have allowed greater degrees of scoliosis correction but have also increased the possibility of postsurgical deficit due to their greater aggressivity. We analyzed the early postsurgical complications of scoliosis surgery in a pediatric intensive care unit over a 10-year period. Seventy-six surgical procedures were performed. Of these, no complications occurred in 55 (73%). Chest X-ray revealed pulmonary atelectasia in 8 patients (10%) and pleural effusion in 7 patients (9%). Symptoms and signs of infection related to surgery were observed in only 6 children (8%). The absence of severe medical complications may be related to new surgical techniques and an experienced team. PMID:16527092

  1. Immediate implant post-surgical complications.

    PubMed

    Ibbott, C G; Oles, R D

    1995-03-01

    Immediate surgical implants provide a convenient means of replacing missing teeth without requiring hard tissue reduction of restoration-free potential fixed partial denture abutments. Although the procedure is described as "predictable," complications and failures do occur. This report presents four cases of immediate implant complications and their management, and discusses possible causes of the untoward results. Careful pre-operative planning, adequate surgical technique and post-surgical management, timely and suitable loading, and meticulous hygiene maintenance can serve to minimize implant complications and failures. The prospective immediate implant patient must be provided with sufficient information to allow informed consent to be given. Minimal requirements are a description of the procedures in terms the patient can understand, an explanation of potential risks and complications, and adequate disclosure of information about alternative therapies. PMID:7773849

  2. Ocular Complications of Diabetes and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Lee, Darren J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose (BG). DM is a global epidemic and the prevalence is anticipated to continue to increase. The ocular complications of DM negatively impact the quality of life and carry an extremely high economic burden. While systemic control of BG can slow the ocular complications they cannot stop them, especially if clinical symptoms are already present. With the advances in biodegradable polymers, implantable ocular devices can slowly release medication to stop, and in some cases reverse, diabetic complications in the eye. In this review we discuss the ocular complications associated with DM, the treatments available with a focus on localized treatments, and what promising treatments are on the horizon. PMID:27119078

  3. Pulmonary hypertension complicating connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Joseph P; Belperio, John A; Saggar, Rajeev; Fishbein, Michael C; Saggar, Rajan

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may complicate connective tissue disease (CTD), particularly systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma), and markedly increases mortality. More than 70% of cases of PH complicating CTD occur in SSc, which is the major focus of this article. Pulmonary complications (i.e., interstitial lung disease [ILD] and PH) are the leading causes of scleroderma-related deaths. "Isolated" PH (i.e., without ILD) complicates SSc in 7.5 to 20% of cases; secondary PH may also occur in patients with SSc-associated ILD. Several clinical markers and specific autoantibody profiles have been associated with PH in SSc. The role of PH-specific therapy is controversial, as prognosis and responsiveness to therapy are worse in SSc-associated PH compared with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We discuss medical therapies for CTD-associated PH and the role of lung transplantation for patients failing medical therapy. PMID:24037627

  4. Ocular Complications of Diabetes and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Lee, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose (BG). DM is a global epidemic and the prevalence is anticipated to continue to increase. The ocular complications of DM negatively impact the quality of life and carry an extremely high economic burden. While systemic control of BG can slow the ocular complications they cannot stop them, especially if clinical symptoms are already present. With the advances in biodegradable polymers, implantable ocular devices can slowly release medication to stop, and in some cases reverse, diabetic complications in the eye. In this review we discuss the ocular complications associated with DM, the treatments available with a focus on localized treatments, and what promising treatments are on the horizon. PMID:27119078

  5. Long-Term Complications of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... vessel problems, as well as other diabetes complications. Gum Disease People with diabetes are more likely than others to develop gum disease (also called periodontal disease) because they may have: ...

  6. Avoidance and Management of Stomal Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatt, Michael; Kawata, Michitaka

    2013-01-01

    The construction of an intestinal stoma is fraught with complications and should not be considered a trivial undertaking. Serious complications requiring immediate reoperations can occur, as can minor problems that will subject the patient to daily and nightly distress. Intestinal stomas undoubtedly will dramatically change lifestyles; patients will experience physiologic and psychologic detriment with stoma-related problems, however minor they may seem. Common complications include poor stoma siting, high output, skin irritation, ischemia, retraction, parastomal hernia (PH), and prolapse. Surgeons should be cognizant of these complications before, during, and after stoma creation, and adequate measures should be taken to avoid them. In this review, the authors highlight these often seen problems and discuss management and prevention strategies. PMID:24436659

  7. Management of complications after rotator cuff surgery.

    PubMed

    Parada, Stephen A; Dilisio, Matthew F; Kennedy, Colin D

    2015-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair (RCR) is a common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons via arthroscopic, open, or mini-open techniques. While this surgery is considered to be of low morbidity, several potential complications can arise either intraoperatively or during the postoperative time period. Some of these complications are related to the surgical approach (arthroscopic or open), while others are patient dependent. Many of these complications can be managed through nonoperative means; however, early recognition and timely treatment is essential in limiting the long-term sequela and improving patient outcome. There are several different ways to classify complications after RCR repair: timing, severity, preventability, whether or not the pathology is intra- or extra-articular, and the type of treatment necessary. It is essential that the surgeon is cognizant of the etiology contributing to the failed RCR surgery in order to provide timely and proper management. PMID:25532916

  8. [Allogenic bone marrow transplantation complications. Part II].

    PubMed

    Saloua, L; Tarek, B O; Abderrahman, A; Abdeladhim, B A

    2000-03-01

    Bone marrow transplantation increase the chances of cure of many hematology and also neoplasms cancers. The procedure is however a cause of expected mortality and morbidity. The complications are represented by mucocutaneous, toxicity graft versus host disease, veno-occlusive disease and most importantly injections consequences all this complications needs to be prevented and treated considering the risk associated to the moderling immunosuppression. PMID:11026816

  9. Parenteral nutrition: risks, complications, and management.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Patricia H; Gilbert, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving modality, but one that also carries risks for potentially life-threatening complications. Comprehensive management of patients receiving parenteral nutrition includes careful selection of candidates, individualizing formulas to meet patients' unique needs, monitoring response to therapy, and implementing strategies designed to avoid complications. Measures to mitigate the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections are particularly important. As with all complex therapies, a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach promotes optimal outcomes. PMID:22222292

  10. Perinatal Complications and Aging Indicators by Midlife

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Avshalom; Ambler, Antony; Belsky, Daniel W.; Chapple, Simon; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Israel, Salomon; Poulton, Richie; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Rivera, Christine D.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Wolke, Dieter; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal complications predict increased risk for morbidity and early mortality. Evidence of perinatal programming of adult mortality raises the question of what mechanisms embed this long-term effect. We tested a hypothesis related to the theory of developmental origins of health and disease: that perinatal complications assessed at birth predict indicators of accelerated aging by midlife. METHODS: Perinatal complications, including both maternal and neonatal complications, were assessed in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort (N = 1037), a 38-year, prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. Two aging indicators were assessed at age 38 years, objectively by leukocyte telomere length (TL) and subjectively by perceived facial age. RESULTS: Perinatal complications predicted both leukocyte TL (β = −0.101; 95% confidence interval, −0.169 to −0.033; P = .004) and perceived age (β = 0.097; 95% confidence interval, 0.029 to 0.165; P = .005) by midlife. We repeated analyses with controls for measures of family history and social risk that could predispose to perinatal complications and accelerated aging, and for measures of poor health taken in between birth and the age-38 follow-up. These covariates attenuated, but did not fully explain the associations observed between perinatal complications and aging indicators. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide support for early-life developmental programming by linking newborns’ perinatal complications to accelerated aging at midlife. We observed indications of accelerated aging “inside,” as measured by leukocyte TL, an indicator of cellular aging, and “outside,” as measured by perceived age, an indicator of declining tissue integrity. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying perinatal programming of adult aging is needed. PMID:25349321

  11. Imaging of Pancreas Transplantation and Its Complications.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ryan B; Moshiri, Mariam; Osman, Sherif; Menias, Christine O; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-03-01

    Whole pancreas transplantation is an effective treatment for obtaining euglycemic status in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and is usually performed concurrent with renal transplantation in the affected patient. This article discusses complex surgical anatomical details of pancreas transplantation including surgical options for endocrine and exocrine drainage pathways. It then describes several possible complications related to surgical factors in the immediate post operative period followed by other complications related to systemic issues, vasculature, and the pancreatic parenchyma. PMID:26896223

  12. Complications of selective laser trabeculoplasty: a review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Selective laser trabeculoplasty is a laser treatment to treat glaucoma. It was initially indicated for open-angle glaucoma but has been proven to be efficacious for various types of glaucoma. This review article summarizes the few rare complications that can be seen with selective laser trabeculoplasty. It also makes recommendations on how to avoid these problems and how to treat patients when these rare complications arise. PMID:26834456

  13. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage Complicated by Bilothorax.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stephanie H; Zangan, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is a well-established and safe technique for the management of biliary obstructions and leaks. While approach is variable based on operator preference, patient anatomy, and indications; PTBD is commonly performed via a right-sided intercostal route. With a right-sided approach, pleural complications may be encountered. The authors describe a case of a right PTBD complicated by a leak into the pleural space, with the subsequent development of bilothorax. PMID:27053829

  14. Management of complications of congenital hand disorders.

    PubMed

    Comer, Garet C; Ladd, Amy L

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews treatment and presents complications seen in the treatment of 7 common congenital hand differences, including syndactyly, camptodactyly, ulnar and radial polydactyly, thumb hypoplasia, radial longitudinal deficiency, and epidermolysis bullosa. The management of these conditions is challenging but has evolved over the last several decades with refined understanding of the disease processes and treatments. The goal of this article is to synthesize prior knowledge and provide further insights into these conditions that will help the surgeon avoid treatment complications. PMID:25934210

  15. Complications in facelift surgery and their prevention.

    PubMed

    Niamtu, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the pros and cons of various aspects of rhytidectomy surgery. The author presents his experiences that have led to performing approximately 85 facelifts a year and what has proved beneficial along the way over the past decade in his cosmetic facial practice. Because it is impossible to incorporate all aspects of facelift complications into the confines of this article, the author focuses on some of the more common problematic and avoidable complications. PMID:19185796

  16. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur. PMID:27514084

  17. Thrombotic complications in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo

    2006-02-01

    Thrombotic events occur rarely in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD). In this review we analyze the data reported in the literature, selected through a PubMed search, on thrombotic complications in VWD patients. On the basis of this analysis, we conclude that thrombotic complications in VWD patients often have a multi-factorial pathogenesis resulting from a complex interaction between acquired (coagulation factor replacement, surgery, cardiovascular risk factors) and/or inherited (thrombophilic gene mutations) prothrombotic risk factors. PMID:16522550

  18. The changing face of diabetes complications.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Edward W; Sattar, Naveed; Ali, Mohammed K

    2016-06-01

    The global increase in type 2 diabetes prevalence is well documented, but international trends in complications of type 2 diabetes are less clear. The available data suggest large reductions in classic complications of type 2 diabetes in high-income countries over the past 20 years, predominantly reductions in myocardial infarction, stroke, amputations, and mortality. These trends might be accompanied by less obvious, but still important, changes in the character of morbidity in people with diabetes. In the USA, for example, substantial reductions in macrovascular complications in adults aged 65 years or older mean that a large proportion of total complications now occur among adults aged 45-64 years instead, rates of renal disease could persist more than other complications, and obesity-related type 2 diabetes could have increasing effect in youth and adults under 45 years of age. Additionally, the combination of decreasing mortality and increasing diabetes prevalence has increased the overall mean years lived with diabetes and could lead to a diversification of diabetes morbidity, including continued high rates of renal disease, ageing-related disability, and cancers. Unfortunately, data on trends in diabetes-related complications are limited to only about a dozen countries, most of which are high income, leaving the changing character for countries of low and middle income ambiguous. PMID:27156051

  19. Complicated Gallstones after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sioka, Eleni; Zacharoulis, Dimitris; Zachari, Eleni; Katsogridaki, Georgia; Tzovaras, George

    2014-01-01

    Background. The natural history of gallstone formation after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), the incidence of symptomatic gallstones, and timing of cholecystectomy are not well established. Methods. A retrospective review of prospectively collected database of 150 patients that underwent LSG was reviewed. Results. Preoperatively, gallbladder disease was identified in 32 of the patients (23.2%). Postoperatively, eight of 138 patients (5.8%) became symptomatic. Namely, three of 23 patients (13%) who had evident cholelithiasis preoperatively developed complicated cholelithiasis. From the cohort of patients without preoperative cholelithiasis, five of 106 patients (4.7%) experienced complicated gallstones after LSG. Total cumulative incidence of complicated gallstones was 4.7% (95% CI: 1.3–8.1%). The gallbladder disease-free survival rate was 92.2% at 2 years. No patient underwent cholecystectomy earlier than 9 months or later than 23 months indicating the post-LSG effect. Conclusion. A significant proportion of bariatric patients compared to the general population became symptomatic and soon developed complications after LSG, thus early cholecystectomy is warranted. Routine concomitant cholecystectomy could be considered because the proportion of patients who developed complications especially those with potentially significant morbidities is high and the time to develop complications is short and because of the real technical difficulties during subsequent cholecystectomy. PMID:25105023

  20. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  1. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan; Jersey Inst Ansari, New; Jersey Inst, New

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  2. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  3. Right internal jugular venous cannulation complicated by tension hydrothorax.

    PubMed

    Maroun, Rabih; Chalhoub, Michel; Harris, Kassem

    2013-01-01

    Central Venous Catheter (CVC) is a common procedure performed in patients' management, especially the critically ill ones. CVC has been used as main access in patients requiring large amount of fluid resuscitation, total parenteral nutrition or measuring the central venous pressure. Although most complications associated with central venous cannulation are minimal, local and easy to control, others may be critical and rapidly fatal if not recognized and treated immediately. One of the most serious incidents that can occur post CVC placement is delayed hydrothorax. It usually results from migration and perforation of the catheter through the SVC wall. In this report, we describe a case of tension hydrothorax that occurred a few hours after placement of CVC in the right internal jugular vein. In acutely ill patients that are already unstable, making the diagnosis of tension hydrothorax secondary to CVC placement requires high level of suspicion. Prompt pleural effusion drainage like in our case is crucial for favorable outcome. PMID:23871236

  4. Accessing the Microform Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindler, Stan

    1985-01-01

    Characterizes types of indexing programs used by Research Publications, Inc. and describes provision of access to four major projects: "The Official Washington Post Index" (provides access to newspaper and microfilm edition); "The Eighteenth Century"; "The Declassified Documents Reference System" (ongoing fiche project abstracted and indexed…

  5. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; O'Connor, David; Partrick, Richard; Orzechowski, Pawel; Spitter, Connie; Lillie, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  6. Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Felecia; De Oliver, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This case study researches the degree to which the location and services offered by a multicampus university, geographically situated consistent with the commercial principles of a large mass-market enterprise, facilitate access for educationally underserved groups. First, the necessity of democratizing educational access to an underprivileged…

  7. Intellectual Access to Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsin-Liang; Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1999-01-01

    The increased availability of digital images is accompanied by a need for solutions to the problems inherent in indexing them for retrieval. Problems in image description and access are discussed, with a perspective on traditional and new solutions. Recent developments in intellectual access to images are surveyed and contrasted with…

  8. The Universal Access System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Neil G.

    This final report discusses the outcomes of a project that created a Universal Access System (UAS), a system that gives students with disabilities access to the same computers as their classmates. The project developed a new approach in which the needs of the individual with disabilities are handled separately from the computers and other devices…

  9. MedlinePlus: Accessibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools Español You Are Here: Home → MedlinePlus Accessibility URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/accessibility.html ... or (301) 594-5983 and provide the address (URL) of the page on which you need assistance, ...

  10. Access and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Lemuel W.

    2004-01-01

    Community colleges are well positioned to provide underserved student populations with access to computer technology. This chapter explores the issues of access and technology from multiple perspectives in the community college, and explains how community colleges can develop a foundation for their technology plan.

  11. Improving School Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Few things are more important for school safety and security than controlling access to buildings and grounds. It is relatively easy to incorporate effective access control measures in new school designs but more difficult in existing schools, where most building and site features cannot be readily altered or reconfigured. The National…

  12. Maxillary Reconstruction for Sinus Lift Complications With Oro-Antral Fistula: The Le Fort I Approach.

    PubMed

    Pigache, Pénélope; Anavekar, Namrata; Raoul, Gwénaël; Ferri, Joël

    2016-03-01

    Although sinus lift procedures are reliable, some complications can lead to serious maxillary sequelae, including the development of oro-antral fistula (OAF). Maxillary reconstruction in such patients presents a challenge owing to sinus floor alterations, graft remnants, chronic infection, and morbidity from the original sinus lift approach. The current study describes our technique of maxillary reconstruction using a Le Fort 1 approach following major sinus lift complications with associated residual OAF. This technique provides excellent access for sinus curettage, OAF closure, and osseous reconstruction. It allowed a successful rehabilitation in our patients, with no implant loss and good functional and esthetic results. PMID:26825748

  13. Hospice Services for Complicated Grief and Depression: Results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela R.; Aldridge, Melissa D.; Johnson-Hürzeler, Rosemary; Kaplan, Daniel; Bruce, Martha L.; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe the prevalence of screening for complicated grief (CG) and depression in hospice and access to bereavement therapy and to examine whether screening and access to therapy varied according to hospice organizational characteristics or staff training and involvement. DESIGN Cross-sectional national survey conducted from 2008 to 2009. SETTING United States. PARTICIPANTS Hospices (N = 591). MEASUREMENTS Whether hospices screened for depression or CG at the time of death or provided access to bereavement therapy (individual or group). Organizational characteristics included region, chain status, ownership, and patient volume. Staffing-related variables included training length and meeting attendance requirements. RESULTS Fifty-five percent of hospices provided screening for CG and depression and access to bereavement therapy, 13% provided screening but not access to bereavement therapy, 24% provided access to bereavement therapy but not screening, and 8% neither screened nor provided access to bereavement therapy. Hospices with 100 patients per day or more were significantly more likely to provide screening and access to bereavement therapy. CONCLUSION Hospices appear to have high capacity to provide screening for CG and depression and to deliver group and individual therapy, but data are needed on whether screeners are evidence based and whether therapy addresses CG or depression specifically. Future work could build upon existing infrastructure to ensure use of well-validated screeners and evidence-based therapies. PMID:26456597

  14. Nutritional Predictors of Complications Following Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David C.; Riggs, Stephen B.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Matthews, Jonathan E.; Woods, Michael E.; Wallen, Eric M.; Pruthi, Raj S.; Smith, Angela B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of preoperative nutritional status on the development of surgical complications following cystectomy using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). Methods We performed a retrospective review of the NSQIP 2005–2012 Participant Use Data Files. ACS-NSQIP collects data on 135 variables, including pre- and intraoperative data and 30-day post-operative complications and mortality on all major surgical procedures at participating institutions. Preoperative albumin (<3.5 or >3.5 g/dl), weight loss 6 months before surgery (>10%), and BMI were identified as nutritional variables within the database. The overall complication rate was calculated and predictors of complications were identified using multivariable logistic regression models. Results 1,213 patients underwent cystectomy for bladder cancer between 2005–2012. The overall 30-day complication rate was 55.1% (n=668). While 14.7% (n=102) had a preoperative albumin <3.5 g/dL, 3.4% had >10% weight loss in the 6 months prior to surgery, and the mean BMI was 28 kg/m2. After controlling for age, sex, medical comorbidities, medical resident involvement, operation year, operative time and prior operation, only albumin <3.5g/dl was a significant predictor of experiencing a postoperative complication (p=0.03). This remained significant when albumin was evaluated as a continuous variable (p=0.02) Conclusions Poor nutritional status measured by serum albumin is predictive of an increased rate of surgical complications following radical cystectomy. This finding supports the importance of preoperative nutritional status in this population and highlights the need for the development of effective nutritional interventions in the preoperative setting. PMID:25240535

  15. Complications related to pubic hair removal

    PubMed Central

    DEMARIA, Andrea L.; FLORES, Marissa; HIRTH, Jacqueline M.; BERENSON, Abbey B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the prevalence and correlates of complications related to pubic hair removal among a diverse clinical sample of women attending a public clinic. Study Design Women (aged 16 to 40 years) who received care from April to June 2012 at two publicly funded clinics completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire (n=369). After excluding women with missing data, analyses were conducted on 333 women. Additional measures were retrieved through a medical chart review. Chi-square and multivariable logistic regression were used to analyze participant characteristics, pubic hair removal behaviors, and complications related to pubic hair removal. Results Most women (87%) admitted to current removal of at least some pubic hair, while the remainder responded that they had removed pubic hair in the past. Under or normal weight women were more likely to report total pubic hair removal than overweight or obese women. The majority (60%) had experienced at least one health complication due to removal, of which the most common were epidermal abrasion and ingrown hairs. Black and Hispanic women were less likely than white women to report complications. Overweight or obese women were almost twice as likely to report a complication and almost 3 times as likely if they were also total removers. Only 4% had seen a healthcare provider for a complication related to hair removal and only 4% discussed safe removal practices with their doctor. Conclusions Minor complications commonly occur as a result of pubic hair removal. Gynecological visits could provide a safe environment for women to discuss pubic hair removal practices. PMID:24486227

  16. Colorectal resection in deep pelvic endometriosis: Surgical technique and post-operative complications

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Marco; Vignali, Andrea; Milone, Francesco; Pignata, Giusto; Elmore, Ugo; Musella, Mario; De Placido, Giuseppe; Mollo, Antonio; Fernandez, Loredana Maria Sosa; Coretti, Guido; Bracale, Umberto; Rosati, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of different surgical techniques on post-operative complications after colorectal resection for endometriosis. METHODS: A multicenter case-controlled study using the prospectively collected data of 90 women (22 with and 68 without post-operative complications) who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection for endometriosis was designed to evaluate any risk factors of post-operative complications. The prospectively collected data included: gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists risk class, endometriosis localization (from anal verge), operative time, conversion, intraoperative complications, and post-operative surgical complications such as anastomotic dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and bowel dysfunction. RESULTS: A similar number of complicated cases have been registered for the different surgical techniques evaluated (laparoscopy, single access, flexure mobilization, mesenteric artery ligation, and transvaginal specimen extraction). A multivariate regression analysis showed that, after adjusting for major clinical, demographic, and surgical characteristics, complicated cases were only associated with endometriosis localization from the anal verge (OR = 0.8, 95%CI: 0.74-0.98, P = 0.03). After analyzing the association of post-operative complications and each different surgical technique, we found that only bowel dysfunction after surgery was associated with mesenteric artery ligation (11 out of 44 dysfunctions in the mesenteric artery ligation group vs 2 out of 36 cases in the no mesenteric artery ligation group; P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Although further randomized clinical trials are needed to give a definitive conclusion, laparoscopic colorectal resection for deep infiltrating endometriosis appears to be both feasible and safe. Surgical technique cannot be considered a risk factor of post-operative complications. PMID:26715819

  17. Hydroperitoneum: A Rare Complication Performing Endoscopic Combined Intrarenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Federico; Falsaperla, Mario; Saita, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recently endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery (ECIRS) has been introduced as an innovative approach for the treatment of complex single, multiple, and staghorn urolithiasis, which reveals to be a viable alternative to standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Although considered to be a versatile, safe, and efficient endoscopic procedure, it is not free from complications. We would like to report two rare cases of hydroperitoneum that occurred during ECIRS and their management. Case Presentation: Two female patients, respectively, of 75 and 41 years of age, underwent ECIRS procedure for the treatment of complex staghorn kidney urolithiasis, previously evaluated by noncontrast computed tomography (CT) scan. A combined retrograde-percutaneous access to the intrarenal collecting system, under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance with the additional assistance of Endovision technique, was performed. At the end of the procedures, both patients revealed a taut and globous abdomen, and a perioperative CT and ultrasonography revealed the presence of intraperitoneal liquid. Both patients were effectively treated with immediate positioning of abdominal drain with rapid improvement of the clinical presentation. Conclusion: To our knowledge these are the first two cases of hydroperitoneum occurring during ECIRS and reported in the literature. An early detection of the complication and its prompt treatment revealed to be crucial to effectively prevent morbidity. PMID:27579417

  18. Diagnosis and management of bile stone disease and its complications.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Anneline; Arvanitakis, Marianna

    2016-03-01

    Bile stone disease is one of the most prevalent gastroenterological diseases with a considerable geographical and ethnic variation. Bile stones can be classified according their origin, their localization and their biochemical structure. Development and clinical expression depend on a complex interaction between congenital and acquired risk factors. Indeed, bile stones can be either asymptomatic, or cause biliary colic or complications such as acute cholecystitis, jaundice, cholangitis and acute pancreatitis. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical features, laboratory findings and imaging techniques and correct identification of symptomatic gallstone patients is essential before cholecystectomy. Transabdominal ultrasonography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of gallstones. However, endoscopic ultrasonography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and intraoperative cholangiography may also play a role in the diagnosis of bile stones. Management includes prevention measures against modifiable risk factors. Biliary colic and acute cholecystitis are common indications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, while endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stone extraction is the gold standard for the treatment of common bile duct (CBD) stones. Timing of ERCP and cholecystectomy are of critical importance in the management. Lithotripsy modalities are generally reserved for patients with technically difficult CBD stone removal. Percutaneous access combined with lithotripsy may be helpful for complicated intrahepatic stones. PMID:26771377

  19. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  20. Complications Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Blum, Raphael; Müller, Andreas M.; Flury, Matthias; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid comparison of outcomes after surgical procedures requires consensus on which instruments and parameters should be used, including the recording and evaluation of surgical complications. An international standard outlining the terminology and definitions of surgical complications in orthopaedics is lacking. Purpose This study systematically reviewed the literature for terms and definitions related to the occurrence of negative events or complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) with specific focus on shoulder stiffness. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were searched for reviews, clinical studies, and case reports of complications associated with ARCR. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened. The terminology of complications and their definitions were extracted from all relevant original articles by a single reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Definitions of shoulder stiffness or equivalent terms were tabulated. Results Of 654 references published after 2007 and obtained from the search, 233 full-text papers (44 reviews, 155 studies, 31 case reports, and 3 surgical technique presentations) were reviewed. Twenty-two additional references cited for a definition were checked. One report defined the term surgical complication. There were 242 different terms used to describe local events and 64 to describe nonlocal events. Furthermore, 16 definitions of terms such as frozen shoulder, shoulder stiffness, or stiff painful shoulder were identified. Diagnosis criteria for shoulder stiffness differed widely; 12 various definitions for restriction in range of motion were noted. One definition included a gradation of stiffness severity, whereas another considered the patient’s subjective assessment of motion. Conclusion The literature does not consistently report on complications after ARCR, making valid comparison of the incidence of

  1. Clinical review: Vascular access for fluid infusion in children

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Nikolaus A

    2004-01-01

    The current literature on venous access in infants and children for acute intravascular access in the routine situation and in emergency or intensive care settings is reviewed. The various techniques for facilitating venous cannulation, such as application of local warmth, transillumination techniques and epidermal nitroglycerine, are described. Preferred sites for central venous access in infants and children are the external and internal jugular veins, the subclavian and axillary veins, and the femoral vein. The femoral venous cannulation appears to be the most safe and reliable technique in children of all ages, with a high success and low complication rates. Evidence from the reviewed literature strongly supports the use of real-time ultrasound techniques for venous cannulation in infants and children. Additionally, in emergency situations the intraosseous access has almost completly replaced saphenous cutdown procedures in children and has decreased the need for immediate central venous access. PMID:15566619

  2. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W.; Kelly, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS). We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise. PMID:26697063

  3. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  4. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zvěřina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Skřivan, Jiří; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  5. Perioperative complications following total joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Talmo, Carl T; Aghazadeh, Mehran; Bono, James V

    2012-08-01

    Total joint arthroplasty is a safe and highly effective treatment for moderate to severe osteoarthritic symptoms and other causes of joint derangement in the elderly population. Significant improvements in pain, function, and quality of life are nearly universal, with a low rate of complications and adverse outcomes. Because of its success and cost-effectiveness, the rate of utilization of TJR is increasing, and all health care providers must be familiar with the potential complications and perioperative management of these patients. Elderly patients may be at a higher risk for postoperative medical complications; however, the majority of these complications are minor and many are avoidable with appropriate preoperative screening and careful postoperative management. As with all patients undergoing TJR, patients should be prophylactically treated for infection and thromboembolism and carefully followed for the development of these potential complications as well as fracture, hip dislocation, and neurovascular dysfunction. Postoperative delirium may be minimized and prophylactically treated in appropriate elderly patients to maximize recovery and promote safety. PMID:22840309

  6. Nutritional considerations for other complications of diabetes.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, S

    1992-01-01

    The long-term complications of diabetes can have a devastating effect on an individual's self-esteem and outlook on life. Some preliminary studies have suggested that normalization of blood glucose levels may prevent or reverse the complications of diabetes in some individuals. Nutrition and diabetes meal planning play a critical role toward achieving this normalization. It is our job as diabetes educators to fully assess a patient's eating and life-style habits, as well as to recognize any complications from diabetes that the patient may be coping with at this time. Depending on the type of complication, diet alterations may need to be made to meet the patient's current needs, ie, reducing fiber content of the diet temporarily in patients with mild gastroparesis, or increasing the protein content of the diet in patients with nephropathy and a foot ulcer. By setting positive, attainable goals, the individual with diabetes may lead a healthier, more productive life in which the complications from diabetes can be prevented, reduced, or better tolerated. PMID:1296903

  7. Acute abdominal complications following hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Deleanu, B; Prejbeanu, R; Vermesan, D; Haragus, H; Icma, I; Predescu, V

    2014-01-01

    Hip surgeries are some of the most common and successful orthopedic procedures. Although rarely, abdominal complications do occur and are associated with unfavorable outcomes.We aimed to identify and describe the severe abdominal complications that appear in patients under-going elective or traumatic hip surgery. A four year retrospective electronic database research identified 408 elective primary hip replacements,51 hip revisions and 1040 intra and extracapsular proximal femur fractures. Out of these, three males and 4 females between 64 - 84 years old were identified to have developed acute abdominal complications: perforated acute ulcer (3),acute cholecystitis (2), volvulus (1), toxic megacolon with peritonitis (1) and acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (1).Complications debuted 3 - 10 days after index orthopedic surgery. Acute perioperative abdominal complications are rarely encountered during orthopedic surgery. When these do occur, they do so almost exclusively in patients with hippathology, comorbidities and most often lead to life threatening situations. We thus emphasize the need for early identification and appropriate management by both orthopedic and general surgery doctors in order to improve patient safety. PMID:24742414

  8. Avoiding Complications in Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay Singh; Ratre, Shailendra; Kher, Yatin

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic neurosurgical techniques hold the potential for reducing morbidity. But they are also associated with limitations such as the initial learning curve, proximal blind spot, visual obscurity, difficulty in controlling bleeding, disorientation, and loss of stereoscopic image. Although some of the surgical techniques in neuroendoscopy and microsurgery are similar, endoscopy requires additional skills. A thorough understanding of endoscopic techniques and their limitations is required to get maximal benefit. Knowledge of possible complications and techniques to avoid such complications can improve results in endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). The surgeon must be able to manage complications and have a second strategy such as a cerebrospinal fluid shunt if ETV fails. It is better to abandon the procedure if there is disorientation or a higher risk of complications such as bleeding or a thick and opaque floor without any clear visualization of anatomy. Attending live workshops, practice on models and simulators, simpler case selection in the initial learning curve, and hands-on cadaveric workshops can reduce complications. Proper case selection, good surgical technique, and better postoperative care are essential for a good outcome in ETV. Although it is difficult to make a preoperative diagnosis of complex hydrocephalus (combination of communicating and obstructive), improving methods to detect the exact type of hydrocephalus before surgery could increase the success rate of ETV and avoid an unnecessary ETV procedure in such cases. PMID:26140421

  9. Complications of hip fractures: A review.

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Pedro; Caeiro, Jose Ramón; Carpintero, Rocío; Morales, Angela; Silva, Samuel; Mesa, Manuel

    2014-09-18

    Nowadays, fracture surgery represents a big part of the orthopedic surgeon workload, and usually has associated major clinical and social cost implications. These fractures have several complications. Some of these are medical, and other related to the surgical treatment itself. Medical complications may affect around 20% of patients with hip fracture. Cognitive and neurological alterations, cardiopulmonary affections (alone or combined), venous thromboembolism, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, urinary tract complications, perioperative anemia, electrolytic and metabolic disorders, and pressure scars are the most important medical complications after hip surgery in terms of frequency, increase of length of stay and perioperative mortality. Complications arising from hip fracture surgery are fairly common, and vary depending on whether the fracture is intracapsular or extracapsular. The main problems in intracapsular fractures are biological: vascularization of the femoral head, and lack of periosteum -a major contributor to fracture healing- in the femoral neck. In extracapsular fractures, by contrast, the problem is mechanical, and relates to load-bearing. Early surgical fixation, the role of anti-thromboembolic and anti-infective prophylaxis, good pain control at the perioperative, detection and management of delirium, correct urinary tract management, avoidance of malnutrition, vitamin D supplementation, osteoporosis treatment and advancement of early mobilization to improve functional recovery and falls prevention are basic recommendations for an optimal maintenance of hip fractured patients. PMID:25232517

  10. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  11. Multiple Access Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) strawman design uses a hybrid Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA)/Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) implementation. TDMA is used for the forward direction (from Suppliers to Users), and FDMA for the return direction (from Users to Suppliers). An alternative architecture is proposed that will require minimal real time coordination and yet provide a fast access method by using random access Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). The CDMA system issues are addressed such as connecting suppliers and users, both of whom may be located anywhere in the CONUS, when the user terminals are constrained in size and weight; and providing efficient traffic routing under highly variable traffic requirements. It is assumed that bandwidth efficiency is not of paramount importance. CDMA or Spread Spectrum Multiple Access (SSMA) communication is a method in which a group of carriers operate at the same nominal center frequency but are separable from each other by the low cross correlation of the spreading codes used. Interference and multipath rejection capability, ease of selective addressing and message screening, low density power spectra for signal hiding and security, and high resolution ranging are among the benefits of spread spectrum communications.

  12. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks

    Guest Editors Jun Zheng, University of Ottawa Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

    Background

    With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the

  13. Percutaneous Large Arterial Access Closure Techniques.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Charles J; Gandhi, Ripal T; Vatakencherry, Geogy; Baumann, Frederic; Benenati, James F

    2015-06-01

    Endovascular repair has replaced open surgical repair as the standard of care for treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in appropriately selected patients owing to its decreased morbidity and length of stay and excellent clinical outcomes. Similarly, there is a progressive trend toward total percutaneous repair of the femoral artery using percutaneous suture-mediated closure devices over open surgical repair due to decreased complications and procedure time. This article describes the techniques of closure for large-bore vascular access most commonly used in endovascular treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms, but could similarly be applied to any procedure requiring large-bore arterial access, such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement. PMID:26070624

  14. Burdick's Technique for Biliary Access Revisited.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Rai, Vijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The precut sphincterotomy is used to facilitate selective biliary access in cases of difficult biliary cannulation. Needle-knife precut papillotomy is the standard of care but is associated with a high rate of complications such as pancreatitis, duodenal perforation, bleeding, etc. Sometimes during bowing of the sphincterotome/cannula and the use of guide wire to facilitate biliary cannulation, inadvertent formation of a false passage occurs in the 10 to 11 o'clock direction. Use of this step to access the bile duct by the intramucosal incision technique was first described by Burdick et al., and since then two more studies have also substantiated the safety and efficacy of this non-needle type of precut sphincterotomy. In this review, we discuss this non-needle technique of precut sphincterotomy and also share our experience using this "Burdick's technique." PMID:25674522

  15. Vascular access for hemodialysis: arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2005-06-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis (HD) is dependant on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. The optimal vascular access is unquestionably the autologous arteriovenous fistula (AVF), with the most common method being the conventional radio-cephalic fistula at the wrist. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native fistula or synthetic graft before the start of chronic HD therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. This could also have a beneficial effect on the rapidity of worsening kidney failure. A multidisciplinary approach (nephrologists, surgeons, radiologists and nurses) should improve the HD outcome by promoting the use of AVF. An important additional component of this program is the Doppler ultrasound for preoperative vascular mapping. Such an approach may be realized without unsuccessful surgical explorations, with a minimal early failure rate and a high maturation, even in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:15966992

  16. Simulation in vascular access surgery training.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Lukas Werner; Schmidli, Jürg; Widmer, Matthias Kurt; Wyss, Thomas Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing technical developments and working time constraints call for changes in trainee formation. In reality, trainees spend fewer hours in the hospital and face more difficulties in acquiring the required qualifications in order to work independently as a specialist. Simulation-based training is a potential solution. It offers the possibility to learn basic technical skills, repeatedly perform key steps in procedures and simulate challenging scenarios in team training. Patients are not at risk and learning curves can be shortened. Advanced learners are able to train rare complications. Senior faculty member's presence is key to assess and debrief effective simulation training. In the field of vascular access surgery, simulation models are available for open as well as endovascular procedures. In this narrative review, we describe the theory of simulation, present simulation models in vascular (access) surgery, discuss the possible benefits for patient safety and the difficulties of implementing simulation in training. PMID:25751566

  17. Complications of Blepharoplasty: Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Oestreicher, James; Mehta, Sonul

    2012-01-01

    Blepharoplasty is an operation to modify the contour and configuration of the eyelids in order to restore a more youthful appearance. The surgery involves removing redundant skin, fat, and muscle. In addition, supporting structures such as canthal tendons are tightened. Other conditions such as ptosis, brow ptosis, entropion, ectropion, or eyelid retraction may also need to be corrected at the time a blepharoplasty is performed to ensure the best functional and aesthetic result. Due to the complexity and intricate nature of eyelid anatomy, complications do exist. In addition to a thorough pre operative assessment and meticulous surgical planning, understanding the etiology of complications is key to prevention. Finally, management of complications is just as important as surgical technique. PMID:22655191

  18. A review of complications of odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these "space infections" has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms "odontogenic infections," "complications," and "risk factors." PMID:27390486

  19. Neurological complications of cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Honan, W; Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2001-03-01

    To obtain preliminary data on neurological complications of spinal manipulation in the UK all members of the Association of British Neurologists were asked to report cases referred to them of neurological complications occurring within 24 hours of cervical spine manipulation over a 12-month period. The response rate was 74%. 24 respondents reported at least one case each, contributing to a total of about 35 cases. These included 7 cases of stroke in brainstem territory (4 with confirmation of vertebral artery dissection), 2 cases of stroke in carotid territory and 1 case of acute subdural haematoma. There were 3 cases of myelopathy and 3 of cervical radiculopathy. Concern about neurological complications following cervical spine manipulation appears to be justified. A large long-term prospective study is required to determine the scale of the hazard. PMID:11285788

  20. Neurological complications of cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevinson, C; Honan, W; Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2001-01-01

    To obtain preliminary data on neurological complications of spinal manipulation in the UK all members of the Association of British Neurologists were asked to report cases referred to them of neurological complications occurring within 24 hours of cervical spine manipulation over a 12-month period. The response rate was 74%. 24 respondents reported at least one case each, contributing to a total of about 35 cases. These included 7 cases of stroke in brainstem territory (4 with confirmation of vertebral artery dissection), 2 cases of stroke in carotid territory and 1 case of acute subdural haematoma. There were 3 cases of myelopathy and 3 of cervical radiculopathy. Concern about neurological complications following cervical spine manipulation appears to be justified. A large long-term prospective study is required to determine the scale of the hazard. PMID:11285788

  1. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  2. Pulmonary complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Ruby A; Musallam, Khaled M; Mroueh, Salman; Abboud, Miguel R

    2011-01-01

    The pulmonary complications of sickle cell disease are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease and has a multifactorial etiology. Hydroxyurea (HU), stem cell transplantation (SCT) and chronic transfusions are known to prevent the recurrence of ACS. Careful management of patients admitted for pain crises and surgery including use of incentive spirometry is critical in preventing this complication. Pulmonary hypertension is well known to be associated with sickle cell disease and patients with pulmonary hypertension have increased mortality. Asthma is also commonly seen in patients with sickle cell disease and is associated with a more complicated course. Chronic lung disease develops in a significant proportion of patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:21973051

  3. Complications of obesity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Daniels, S R

    2009-04-01

    The increasing prevalence and severity of obesity in children and adolescents has provided greater emphasis on the wide variety of comorbid conditions and complications that can be experienced as a consequence of obesity. These complications can occur both in the short term and in the long term. Some complications, earlier thought to be long-term issues, which would only occur in adulthood, have now been shown to occur in children and adolescents. These findings have raised concerns about the overall health experience of those who develop obesity early in life and have even raised questions about whether the obesity epidemic might shorten the life span of the current generation of children. In this paper, I will examine current knowledge regarding the different organ systems that may be impacted by childhood obesity. PMID:19363511

  4. Ventriculomammary shunt: an unusual ventriculoperitoneal shunt complication.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Johnson, Jeremiah N; Morcos, Jacques J

    2015-02-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunctions are common and can result in significant consequences for patients. Despite the prevalence of breast augmentation surgery and breast surgery for other pathologies, few breast related VP shunt complications have been reported. A 54-year-old woman with hydrocephalus post-subarachnoid hemorrhage returned 1 month after VP shunt placement complaining of painful unilateral breast enlargement. After investigation, it was determined that the distal VP shunt catheter had migrated from the peritoneal cavity into the breast and wrapped around her breast implant. The breast enlargement was the result of cerebrospinal fluid retention. We detail this unusual case and review all breast related VP shunt complications reported in the literature. To avoid breast related complications related to VP shunt procedures, it is important to illicit pre-procedural history regarding breast implants, evade indwelling implants during catheter tunneling and carefully securing the abdominal catheter to prevent retrograde catheter migration to the breast. PMID:25127261

  5. Neurological complications associated with epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-05-01

    Multiple case reports of neurological complications resulting from intraarterial injection of corticosteroids have led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue a warning, requiring label changes, warning of serious neurological events, some resulting in death. The FDA has identified 131 cases of neurological adverse events, including 41 cases of arachnoiditis. A review of the literature reveals an overwhelming proportion of the complications are related to transforaminal epidural injections, of which cervical transforaminal epidural injections constituted the majority of neurological complications. Utilization data of epidural injections in the Medicare population revealed that cervical transforaminal epidural injections constitute only 2.4 % of total epidural injections and <5 % of all transforaminal epidural injections. Multiple theories have been proposed as the cause of neurological injury including particulate steroid, arterial intimal flaps, arterial dissection, dislodgement of plaque causing embolism, arterial muscle spasm, and embolism of a fresh thrombus following disruption of the intima. PMID:25795154

  6. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  7. Inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP): diagnosis of complications.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert P; Kawashima, Akira; Takahashi, Naoki; LeRoy, Andrew J; King, Bernard F

    2016-06-01

    Inflatable penile prostheses are a common treatment for erectile dysfunction that is unresponsive to less-invasive measures. Complications can arise at the time of the placement of the prosthesis or at a later date. Complications may be related to infection and/or mechanical failure of one or more of the prosthesis components including cylinder, reservoir, pump, and tubing. Mechanical failure includes kinking, migration, and aneurysmal dilation of the cylinder, erosion of the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosum by the cylinder, disconnection of the tubing, and migration of the reservoir. MRI of the entire components with the cylinders in both flaccid and inflated states is the best imaging modality available to image patients with suspected implant complications. PMID:26907716

  8. Radiocephalic Fistula Complicated by Distal Ischemia: Treatment by Ulnar Artery Dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, Alain; Novelli, Luigi Rovani, Xavier; Carreres, Thierry; Bourquelot, Pierre; Hermelin, Alain; Angel, C.; Beyssen, B.

    2010-02-15

    Hand ischemic steal syndrome due to a forearm arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. However, its frequency is increasing with the rise in numbers of elderly and diabetic patients. This complication, which is more common for proximal than for distal accesses, can be very severe and may cause loss of hand function, damage to fingers, and even amputation of fingers or the hand. Its treatment is difficult and often leads to access loss. We report here a case of severe hand ischemia related to a radiocephalic fistula successfully treated by ulnar artery dilatation.

  9. Intestinal and extraintestinal complications of Crohn's disease: predictors and cumulative probability of complications.

    PubMed

    Maeda, K; Okada, M; Yao, T; Sakurai, T; Iida, M; Fuchigami, T; Yoshinaga, K; Imamura, K; Okada, Y; Sakamoto, K

    1994-10-01

    Of 238 patients with Crohn's disease seen at our clinics from April 1973 to August 1988, 203 patients were selected for this study, since they fulfilled the following criteria: they had been followed up for more than 6 months as outpatients or had been treated as inpatients for more than 1 month. They were studied to elucidate: (a) the different types and incidence of various complications, (b) the factors related to complications present at the time of diagnosis, (c) predictors of new complications arising after diagnosis, and (d) the cumulative incidence of complications occurring during the course of the disease from the times of onset and diagnosis. Of the intestinal complications, perianal fistula was most common (33%), followed by strictures with dilatations of the proximal bowel (21%), and internal fistula (14%). Of the extraintestinal complications, menstrual disturbance was the most common (18% of the female patients), followed by arthritis (10%), and aphthous stomatitis (10%). As for the factors influencing complications present at the time of diagnosis, the pattern of bowel involvement was significantly correlated with the presence of intestinal stricture, while the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was significantly correlated with the presence of perianal fistula. A significant predictor of new complications arising after diagnosis was the general well-being of patients at the time of diagnosis. Patients who, at diagnosis, already have complications such as stricture, abdominal abscess, internal or external fistula, massive hemorrhage, and free perforation or anal lesions are more likely to develop new complications in addition to those present at diagnosis, compared with patients without any complications at diagnosis (P = 0.055). PMID:8000504

  10. Internal jugular vein thrombosis presenting as a painful neck mass due to a spontaneous dislocated subclavian port catheter as long-term complication: a case report.

    PubMed

    Binnebösel, Marcel; Grommes, Jochen; Junge, Karsten; Göbner, Sonja; Schumpelick, Volker; Truong, Son

    2009-01-01

    Central venous access devices are extensively used for long-term chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. However, there are some possible immediate, early, and late complications related to the implantation technique, care, and maintenance. We present the uncommon occurrence of a thrombosis of the internal jugular vein due to a spontaneous migration of a Port-A-Cath catheter into the ipsilateral internal jugular vein as a delayed complication of a central venous access catheter implanted for chemotherapy delivery. A review of the literature is given, and the factors responsible for this unusual complication will be discussed. PMID:19830037

  11. Pregnancy complicated by heart disease in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Shailaja; Shrestha, Nikesh Raj; Pilgrim, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence, characteristics and maternal and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by heart disease. Design Prospective single-centre registry. Setting Tertiary care teaching hospital in eastern Nepal. Patients Pregnant women presenting to the antenatal clinic and/or labour room between 1 March 2012 and 31 March 2013. Main outcome measures Prevalence, characteristics, and maternal and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by heart disease. Results Fifty-three out of 9463 pregnancies (0.6%) were complicated by cardiac disease. Proportions of acquired, congenital and arrhythmic heart disease amounted to 89%, 9% and 2%, respectively. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) was the most frequent cardiac disease complicating pregnancy (n=47). Among 45 women with RHD continuing pregnancy until delivery, 30 (67%) were primigravidae. The predominant valvular pathology was mitral stenosis (62%), followed by mitral regurgitation (21%) and aortic regurgitation (13%). Twenty women (44%) underwent elective or emergency caesarean section. Maternal and fetal/perinatal mortality of pregnancies complicated by RHD amounted to 4% and 16%, respectively. New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III or class IV (HR 6.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 29.1, p=0.026), pulmonary hypertension (HR 9.1, 95% CI 1.6 to 51.5, p=0.012) and severe mitral stenosis (HR 7.0, 95% CI 1.4 to 34.4, p=0.017) were identified as predictors of maternal or fetal/perinatal mortality in an univariate analysis. Conclusions Rheumatic mitral stenosis was the most frequent heart disease complicating pregnancy in a consecutive cohort from a teaching hospital in Nepal. Exercise intolerance, pulmonary hypertension and severe mitral stenosis were identified as predictors of maternal or fetal/perinatal mortality. PMID:27326158

  12. [Intervention-specific complications of hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Dietz, U A; Wiegering, A; Germer, C T

    2014-02-01

    Hernia surgery is generally a rewarding task, patient satisfaction is high and the long-term results are generally good. Incisional hernias are more heterogeneous and there is a higher variability of morphologies to be matched with the available therapeutic approaches but the majority of patients are also satisfied with the results. This positive scenario for hernia surgery can be largely attributable to careful preoperative planning, effective surgical techniques and a high degree of standardization. The picture is somewhat clouded by the complications associated with hernia surgery. If complications do arise, the outcome largely depends on how well the surgeon responds. For inguinal and femoral hernias, the risk profile of the patient is crucial to the surgical planning and the wrong operation on the wrong patient can be disastrous. Open procedures have complication risks in common but the question of how best to deal with the nerves has yet to be answered. Endoscopic procedures are an indispensable part of the hernia surgery repertoire and the hernia specialist should be proficient in TEP and TAPP techniques. Ventral and incisional hernias have higher complication rates and the treatment is similar despite differences in etiology and pathophysiology. Although open procedures are better for morphological reconstruction they are accompanied by a higher complication rate. Laparoscopic procedures had a severe complication profile early on but the situation has greatly improved today due to continued refinement of the learning curve. A critical approach to the application of methods and meshes, a deep knowledge of anatomical peculiarities and the careful planning of tactics for dealing with intraoperative problems are the hallmarks of today's good hernia surgeon. PMID:24435828

  13. Non-infectious complications of transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, P L; Snyder, E L

    2001-06-01

    Blood transfusion is considered safe when the infused blood is tested using state of the art viral assays developed over the past several decades. Only rarely are known viruses like HIV and hepatitis C transmitted by transfusion when blood donors are screened using these sensitive laboratory tests. However, there are a variety of transfusion risks which still remain that cannot be entirely eliminated, many of which are non-infectious in nature. Predominantly immune-mediated complications include the rapid intravascular or slow extravascular destruction (hemolysis) of transfused red cells or extravascular removal of platelets by pre-formed antibodies carried by the transfusion recipient. Alternatively, red cells can be damaged when exposed to excessive heat or incompatible intravenous fluids before or during the transfusion. Common complications of blood transfusion that at least partly involve the immune system include febrile non-hemolytic and allergic reactions. While these are usually not life-threatening, they can hamper efforts to transfuse a patient. Other complications include circulatory overload, hypothermia and metabolic disturbances. Profound hypotensive episodes have been described in patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors who receive platelet transfusions through bedside leukoreduction filters. These curious reactions appear to involve dysmetabolism of the vasoactive substance bradykinin. Products contaminated by bacteria during blood collection and transfused can cause life-threatening septic reactions. A long-term complication of blood transfusion therapy unique to chronically transfused patients is iron overload. Less common - but serious - reactions more specific to blood transfusion include transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and transfusion-associated acute lung injury. Many of these complications of transfusion therapy can be prevented by adhering to well-established practice guidelines. In addition, individuals

  14. How to Perform Transcaval Access and Closure for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Robert J.; Babaliaros, Vasilis C.; Greenbaum, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous trans-catheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  15. How to perform transcaval access and closure for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Robert J; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Greenbaum, Adam B

    2015-12-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  16. Musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disease in children.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Skinner, Joline

    2008-02-01

    A wide variety of neuromuscular diseases affect children, including central nervous system disorders such as cerebral palsy and spinal cord injury; motor neuron disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy; peripheral nerve disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease; neuromuscular junction disorders such as congenital myasthenia gravis; and muscle fiber disorders such as Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Although the origins and clinical syndromes vary significantly, outcomes related to musculoskeletal complications are often shared. The most frequently encountered musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disorders in children are scoliosis, bony rotational deformities, and hip dysplasia. Management is often challenging to those who work with children who have neuromuscular disorders. PMID:18194756

  17. Tension chylothorax complicating acute malignant airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco; Pietrini, Domenico; Ruggiero, Antonio; Rizzo, Daniela; Marzano, Laura; Attinà, Giorgio; De Luca, Daniele; De Rosa, Gabriella; Conti, Giorgio

    2011-05-01

    Acute upper airway obstruction represents one of the most challenging emergencies in pediatric practice. In particular, a tension chylothorax complicating a malignant airway obstruction is a rare and life-threatening complication. We report a rapidly progressing tension chylothorax associated with a cervical mass in a 10-month-old male infant. To our knowledge, the extension of a cervical mass to the supraclavear region resulting in a compressive chylothorax represents an exceptional event in pediatrics. Early recognition and prompt treatment resulted to be essential to relieve the compression and to avoid end-stage hemodynamic and respiratory function derangement. PMID:21546802

  18. Pulmonary Disorders Complicating Pregnancy: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Leidecker, Katie; Dorman, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of pulmonary complications and the timely execution of appropriate interventions are critical to maintaining adequate oxygenation for the pregnant woman and the fetus. Clinicians have an opportunity during prenatal visits to provide women with education regarding pulmonary complications during pregnancy to promote positive maternal and fetal outcomes. The pulmonary conditions to be addressed in this article include asthma, tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis, and pneumonia. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an overview of specific pulmonary conditions, as well as interventions related to each disorder and its impact on pregnancy. PMID:26813391

  19. Neuromuscular complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ruzhansky, Katherine M; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular diseases such as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, peripheral neuropathy, and disorders of neuromuscular transmission are reported to be complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although cases have been reported with allogeneic HSCT in the setting of chronic graft versus host disease, they are also known to occur without evidence thereof and even occur in the setting of autologous HSCT. The 2005 National Institutes of Health Consensus Criteria classify polymyositis and dermatomyositis as "distinctive" features, and neuropathy and MG as "other" features. These neuromuscular complications present very similarly to the idiopathic autoimmune disorders and respond to similar treatment modalities. PMID:26044357

  20. Rare extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Kiran; Enright, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnsons syndrome (SJS) is a rare extra-pulmonary complication of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. We present the case of a 26-year-old man with fever, cough, extensive oral mucosal ulceration and a widespread truncal rash. He was diagnosed with M. pneumoniae-induced SJS. He responded well to antibiotics and steroids initially, but went on to develop pseudomembranous conjunctivitis requiring bilateral amniotic membrane grafting. SJS is most commonly drug-induced, however, M. pneumoniae is the commonest infectious cause and should be considered in the differential diagnosis. It is also important to get specialist care involved early to minimise the long-term effects of any complications. PMID:26837942

  1. Late complications of Hodgkin's disease management

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Bookman, M.A.; Longo, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In the past several decades, Hodgkin's disease has been transformed from a uniformly fatal illness to one that can be treated with the expectation of long-term remission or cure in the majority of patients. Because patients now survive for long periods after curative intervention, various complications have been identified. The spectrum of complications following curative therapy is quite diverse and includes immunologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, thyroid, and gonadal dysfunction. In addition, second malignant neoplasms in the form of acute leukemia as well as secondary solid tumors have now been documented to occur with increased frequency in patients cured of Hodgkin's disease. 80 references.

  2. Chylous complications after abdominal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Haug, E S; Saether, O D; Odegaard, A; Johnsen, G; Myhre, H O

    1998-12-01

    Two patients developed chylous complications following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. One patient had chylous ascitis and was successfully treated by a peritoneo-caval shunt. The other patient developed a lymph cyst, which gradually resorbed after puncture. Chylous complications following aortic surgery are rare. Patients in bad a general condition should be treated by initial paracentesis and total parenteral nutrition, supplemented by medium-chain triglyceride and low-fat diet. If no improvement is observed on this regimen, the next step should be implementation of a peritoneo-venous shunt, whereas direct ligation of the leak should be reserved for those who are not responding to this treatment. PMID:10204656

  3. Complications when augmenting the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, Paul; Melnick, Philip R; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary posterior edentulous region presents a challenge when planning for restoring missing teeth with a dental implant. The available bone in such cases is often not dense and not adequate for the placement of a properly sized implant because of maxillary sinus pneumatization and alveolar bone loss. Maxillary sinus lift is a predictable procedure to provide adequate bone height for the purpose of implant placement. However, complications are encountered during or after the execution of the sinus lift procedure. In this article, the prevention and management of maxillary sinus complications are discussed. PMID:25434561

  4. [Local complications after poisonous snake bite].

    PubMed

    Kuzbari, R; Seidler, D; Deutinger, M

    1994-01-01

    The case of a zoo keeper who was bitten on the left finger by a venomous snake (Vipera xanthina) is reported. The administration of antivenom prevented the development of systemic poisoning but had no effect on the extent of the local complications. A compartment syndrome with a concomitant severe reaction at the bite site required fasciotomy of the upper and lower arm. The extensor tendon of the involved finger ruptured spontaneously, many weeks after wound healing was completed. Therefore, delayed local complications following snake bites may occur, even if signs of systemic poisoning are missing. PMID:8150389

  5. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis complicated by Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Kato, Masataka; Chou, Ami; Komori, Akiko; Abe, Yuriko; Matsumura, Masaharu; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Shori

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old girl with Down syndrome (DS) diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH). Although acute pneumonia complicated by hemolytic anemia was suspected, IPH was finally diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Treatment with prednisolone achieved good clinical response. An association between IPH and DS was not able to be identified, but immunological issues in DS may contribute to the onset of IPH. Recurrent and intractable respiratory symptoms with marked infiltrative shadows in the bilateral lungs and complicated by severe anemia in patients with DS should suggest IPH. PMID:26508184

  6. Endocrine and Metabolic Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jammah, Anwar A.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapeutic option for obese patients; however, it carries substantial risks, including procedure-related complications, malabsorption, and hormonal disturbance. Recent years have seen an increase in the bariatric surgeries performed utilizing either an independent or a combination of restrictive and malabsorptive procedures. We review some complications of bariatric procedures more specifically, hypoglycemia and osteoporosis, the recommended preoperative assessment and then regular follow up, and the therapeutic options. Surgeon, internist, and the patient must be aware of the multiple risks of this kind of surgery and the needed assessment and follow up. PMID:26458852

  7. Imaging Manifestations of Neurologic Complications in Anemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ritesh; Sabat, Shyam; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    The hallmark signs and symptoms of anemia are directly related to a decrease in oxygen delivery to vital tissues and organs and include pallor, fatigue, lightheadedness, and shortness of breath. Neurologic complications are often nonspecific and can include poor concentration, irritability, faintness, tinnitus, and headache. If undiagnosed or untreated, anemia can progress to cognitive dysfunction, psychosis, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and more focal syndromes, such as stroke, seizures, chorea, and transverse myelitis. Imaging can play an important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of these neurologic and systemic complications associated with anemia, and hence, better outcome. PMID:27443995

  8. HRP Data Accessibility 2009

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Clarence Sams spoke at the 2009 Human Research Program's Investigators Workshop on the current status of Data Accessibility. In this presentation he discusses the content of the Human Life Scie...

  9. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  10. Computer memory access technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zottarelli, L. J.

    1967-01-01

    Computer memory access commutator and steering gate configuration produces bipolar current pulses while still employing only the diodes and magnetic cores of the classic commutator, thereby appreciably reducing the complexity of the memory assembly.

  11. Adapting Web Browsers for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Paul; Birkmire, Mike

    This paper examines ways to make World Wide Web browsers accessible for individuals with disabilities, and through them, gain access to the information on the Web. It discusses which browsers can be made more accessible and evaluates different types of input. Mouse access, keyboard access, and voice input are reviewed. Processing aids, such as…

  12. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-02-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  13. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  14. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  15. Access to health care

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Martin; Maltais, Danielle; Hudon, Catherine; Lapointe, Lise; Ntetu, Antoine Lutumba

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access. DESIGN Qualitative study with focus groups. SETTING Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions. METHODS For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held. MAIN FINDINGS The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access. CONCLUSION Systematic callbacks, family physicians’ personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:16926944

  16. Atom-Role-Based Access Control Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weihong; Huang, Richeng; Hou, Xiaoli; Wei, Gang; Xiao, Shui; Chen, Yindong

    Role-based access control (RBAC) model has been widely recognized as an efficient access control model and becomes a hot research topic of information security at present. However, in the large-scale enterprise application environments, the traditional RBAC model based on the role hierarchy has the following deficiencies: Firstly, it is unable to reflect the role relationships in complicated cases effectively, which does not accord with practical applications. Secondly, the senior role unconditionally inherits all permissions of the junior role, thus if a user is under the supervisor role, he may accumulate all permissions, and this easily causes the abuse of permission and violates the least privilege principle, which is one of the main security principles. To deal with these problems, we, after analyzing permission types and role relationships, proposed the concept of atom role and built an atom-role-based access control model, called ATRBAC, by dividing the permission set of each regular role based on inheritance path relationships. Through the application-specific analysis, this model can well meet the access control requirements.

  17. Access to an optimal treatment. Current situation.

    PubMed

    Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F; Silvestre, Adriana M R; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2015-03-01

    Access to an optimal treatment is determined by several factors, like availability, pricing/funding, and acceptability. In Latin America (LA), one of the regions with more disparities particularly on healthcare in the world, access is affected by other factors, including socio-demographic factors like poverty, living in rural regions, and/or health coverage. Regarding rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an inadequate access to specialists leads to diagnosis and treatment delays diminishing the probability of remission or control. Unfortunately, in almost every LA country, there are cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants without rheumatologists; furthermore, a primary care reference system is present in only about half the countries. In the public health system, coverage of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs occurs for less than 10 % of the patients in about half of the countries. Also, as healthcare providers based their funding decisions mainly in direct costs instead of on patient-centered healthcare quality indicators, access to new drugs is more complicated in this region than in high-income countries. More accurate epidemiological data from LA need to be obtained in order to improve the management of patients with rheumatic diseases in general and RA in particular. PMID:26188617

  18. Obesity and access to chain grocers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Susan; Florax, Raymond J G M; Snyder, Samantha; Miller, Christopher C

    2010-01-01

    Recent empirical work in the obesity literature has highlighted the role of the built environment and its potential influence in the increasing prevalence of obesity in adults and children. One feature of the built environment that has gained increasing attention is the role of access to chain grocers and their impact on body mass index (BMI). The assessment of the impacts of spatial access to chain grocers on BMI is complicated by two empirical regularities in the data. There is evidence that health outcomes such as BMI are clustered in space and that there is spatial dependence across individuals. In this article, we use an econometric model that takes into account the spatial dependence, and we allow the effect of access to differ for a person depending on whether he or she lives in a low-income community or peer group. We categorize this community using the characteristics of the people who immediately surround the individual rather than using census tracts. Using georeferenced survey data on adults in Marion County, Indiana, we find that the effect of improvements in chain grocer access on BMI varies depending on community characteristics. PMID:21117331

  19. A prospective study of complications from comprehensive abortion care services in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    similar to other settings; however, significant differences in complication rates were observed by facility type and gestational age. Interventions such as supportive supervision to improve providers' uterine evacuation skills and investment in equipment for infection control may lower complication rates in government facilities. In addition, there should be increased focus on early pregnancy detection and access to CAC services early in pregnancy in order to prevent complications. PMID:22221895

  20. Buried Bumper Syndrome Revisited: A Rare but Potentially Fatal Complication of PEG Tube Placement

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Saptarshi; Dontukurthy, Sujana; Rosenzweig, Mathew G.; Kothuru, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has been used for providing enteral access to patients who require long-term enteral nutrition for years. Although generally considered safe, PEG tube placement can be associated with many immediate and delayed complications. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS) is one of the uncommon and late complications of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. It occurs when the internal bumper of the PEG tube erodes into the gastric wall and lodges itself between the gastric wall and skin. This can lead to a variety of additional complications such as wound infection, peritonitis, and necrotizing fasciitis. We present here a case of buried bumper syndrome which caused extensive necrosis of the anterior abdominal wall. PMID:24829838

  1. Review of the Complications Associated with Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Guide to the Dental Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lena; Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Akintoye, Sunday O

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Focus on risk factors, improved diagnostic methods and effective management strategies have made it possible to successfully treat OPC. However, the 5-year survival rate has not improved for several years due to multiple treatment complications, tissue morbidity, loss of function and diminished quality of life. Survivors are faced with complications like oral mucositis, hyposalivation, osteoradionecrosis; tissue fibrosis, morbidity from jaw resection; disfigurement and loss of function that further diminish quality of life. The aim of this review is to highlight major complications associated with treatment of OPC via a literature search and review of available options for identification and management of these complications. Data Sources Relevant publications on oral complications of OPC therapy were thoroughly reviewed from the literature published between the years 1988 and 2012. Material and Method We evaluated reported incidence, prevalence and risk factors for oral complications of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for OPC. The authors conducted electronic search using English language databases namely PubMed Plus, Medline (Pre-Medline and Medline), Cochrane Database of systematic reviews (evidence-based medicine), Dentistry & Oral sciences source, AccessScience, Embase, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews Multifile, Google Scholar, ISI Journal Citation Reports, Ovid Multi-Database. Conclusion We identified the most common complications associated with the treatment of oral cancers. Based on the information gathered, there is evidence that survival of OPC extends beyond eradication of the diseased tissue. Understanding the potential treatment complications and utilizing available resources to prevent and minimize them are important. Caring for OPC survivors should be a multidisciplinary team approach involving the dentist, oncologist, internist and social worker to improve the currently

  2. Hiatal Hernia as a Total Gastrectomy Complication

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruna do Nascimento; de Oliveira, Marcos Belotto; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer, gastric cancer is the third leading cause of death among men and the fifth among women in Brazil. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment. The most serious complications associated with surgery are fistulas and dehiscence of the jejunal-esophageal anastomosis. Hiatal hernia refers to herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm, though this occurrence is rarely reported as a complication in gastrectomy. Case Report A 76-year-old man was diagnosed with intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. He underwent a total laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy on May 19, 2015. The pathology revealed a pT4pN3 gastric adenocarcinoma. The patient became clinically stable and was discharged 10 days after surgery. He was subsequently started on adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy; however, 9 days after the second cycle, he was brought to the emergency room with nausea and severe epigastric pain. A CT scan revealed a hiatal hernia with signs of strangulation. The patient underwent emergent repair of the hernia and suffered no postoperative complications. He was discharged from the hospital 9 days after surgery. Conclusion Hiatal hernia is not well documented, and its occurrence in the context of gastrectomy is an infrequent complication.

  3. Acute transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Bucknall, R C

    1989-01-01

    A sixteen year old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus developed acute transverse myelopathy. She was treated with high dose steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange and regained partial neurological function. Previous descriptions of transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus are reviewed, with particular reference to the efficacy of high dose steroid treatment. PMID:2662918

  4. Pericardiectomy for Pleuropericardial Effusion Complicating Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Quarti, Andrea; de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Soura, Elli; Pozzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Severe pericardial effusion is a rare complication of bacterial pneumonia and it usually disappears under medical treatment. Herein we report a case of a girl with a congenital immunodeficient syndrome and bacterial pneumonia, who developed recurrent and life-threatening pericardial effusion refractory to medical treatment. She was finally treated with pericardiectomy. PMID:20585369

  5. Safety and Complications of Medical Thoracoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nour Moursi Ahmed, Shimaa; Mohammadien, Hamdy Ali; Tanikawa, Yoshimasa; Tsuboi, Rie; Sugiyama, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To highlight the possible complications of medical thoracoscopy (MT) and how to avoid them. Methods. A retrospective and prospective analysis of 127 patients undergoing MT in Nagoya Medical Center (NMC) and Toyota Kosei Hospital. The data about complications was obtained from the patients, notes on the computer system, and radiographs. Results. The median age was 71.0 (range, 33.0–92.0) years and 101 (79.5%) were males. The median time with chest drain after procedure was 7.0 (range, 0.0–47.0) days and cases with talc poudrage were 30 (23.6%). Malignant histology was reported in 69 (54.3%), including primary lung cancer in 35 (27.5), mesothelioma in 18 (14.2), and metastasis in 16 (12.6). 58 (45.7%) revealed benign pleural diseases and TB was diagnosed in 15 (11.8%). 21 (16.5%) patients suffered from complications including lung laceration in 3 (2.4%), fever in 5 (3.9%) (due to hospital acquired infection (HAI) in 2, talc poudrage in 2, and malignancy in 1), HAI in 2 (1.6%), prolonged air-leak in 14 (11.0%), and subcutaneous emphysema in 1 (0.8%). Conclusions. MT is generally a safe procedure. Lung laceration is the most serious complication and should be managed well. HAI is of low risk and can be controlled by medical treatment. PMID:27413774

  6. Urinary diversion metabolic complications - underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Wojciech; Piszczek, Radosław; Krajewska, Magdalena; Dembowski, Janusz; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent human cancers. In 2011 more than six thousand people in Poland developed BC and more than three thousand died because of it. Treatment of bladder cancer depends on its stage. In less advanced tumours (Ta, Tcis, T1) transurethral resection of bladder tumor with adjuvant immunotherapy is often therapeutic. In more advanced cases (≥ T2) radical cystectomy is needed. There are several surgical types of post-cystectomy urinary diversion divided into two fundamental types - enabling and not enabling urine continence. The most common procedures include ureterocutaneostomy, ileal or colon conduit, orthopic ileal bladder, heterotopic continent bladder replacement (pouch) and urinary diversion via the rectum. Depending on type of cystectomy, various metabolic complications occur, because the absorptive-secretory function of used bowel segment is intact. Complications include bowel dysfunction, malabsorption of various vitamins, acid-base imbalance, electrolyte imbalance, abnormalities in bone metabolism, formation of renal calculi, secondary malignancies and disturbances in function of kidneys or liver. Early diagnosed complications can be treated easier, recognised in advanced stages are often irreversible. In our paper we present review of different approaches to bladder cancer treatment and metabolic complications occurring after these procedures. PMID:25166450

  7. Interventional management for complications following caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Ko, S Y; Park, S W; Sohn, I S; Lee, J Y; Kwon, H S; Hwang, H S; Jung, S I

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of interventional management for various intractable complications following caesarean section. Methods Between August 2005 and September 2009, 18 consecutive women were referred to interventional radiology for treatment of complications developing after caesarean section. Complications included vaginal bleeding (n = 14), haemoperitoneum with abdominal wall haematoma (n = 2), caesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) (n = 1) and post-caesarean fluid collection (n = 1). Results 17 women underwent transcatheter arterial embolisation (TAE) with a variety of embolic materials, and two women underwent percutaneous drainage (PCD) for fluid collection and haemoperitoneum. 5 of the 14 women with vaginal bleeding had extravasation of contrast media on angiography; the other 9 had no visible bleeding foci. The two women with haemoperitoneum with abdominal wall haematoma had injury to the inferior epigastric artery from angiography. TAE and PCD were successfully performed in both women. The CSP was successfully managed and the serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) level finally normalised. Hysterectomy or dilatation and curretage was required in women with placenta accrete and undetectable bleeding foci. Conclusion Interventional management including TAE and PCD is effective and safe in controlling complications following caesarean section. Use of these procedures can help avoid high-risk surgery, but subsequent procedures including hysterectomy may be required in cases of placental abnormalities and undetectable bleeding foci. PMID:20959367

  8. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonitis complicating ruxolitinib therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Samantha C; Feenstra, John; Georghiou, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Ruxolitinib is a novel inhibitor of the Janus kinase (JAK) pathway that has become available for the treatment of myelofibrosis. There are increasing reports of opportunistic infections associated with ruxolitinib therapy. We present a case of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonitis complicating ruxolitinib therapy. Clinicians should consider the use of pneumocystis prophylaxis when using ruxolitinib. PMID:24891492

  9. Extracranial complications of chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M M; Kundu, S C; Haque, M R; Shamsuzzaman, A K; Khan, M K; Halder, K K

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the pattern of extracranial complications of CSOM cases who attended to the department of ENTD, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital during the period from July'1999 to June' 2001. Different types of extracranial complications of CSOM were presented here. A total of 100 cases, diagnosed clinically and radiologically were included in the study of which 66 were male and 34 were female giving a male to female ratio of 1.94 : 1 (p < 0.05). Majority cases (53) were in the age group of 11- 20 years followed by the age group of below 10 years where there were 30 cases. Majority (64) cases came from low socio-economic class. The number of different types of extracranial complications of CSOM were as follows: mastoid abscess 57, discharging sinuses 28, purulent labyrinthitis 07, Bezold's abscess 04, fascial nerve paralysis 03 and zygomatic abscess 01. In all cases of CSOM Cholesteatoma were detected. In 14 cases, Cholesteatoma were associated with granulation tissue/polyp. Modified radical mastoidectomy were performed in all cases. On analyzing the findings of the present study it was observed that mastoid abscess were the predominant extracranial complications of CSOM, affecting mostly the male population of 11 - 20 years age group coming from low socio-economic class. PMID:16467754

  10. Pregnancy complications associated with childhood anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R; Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V; Robin, Joanna A; Friedman, Deborah; Rosenthal, Jessica M; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether perinatal complications predict childhood anxiety disorders independently of parental psychopathology, we systematically assessed pregnancy and delivery complications and psychopathology in a sample of children (mean age=6.8 years) at high risk for anxiety disorders whose parents had panic disorder with (n=138) or without (n=26) major depression, and in contrast groups of offspring of parents with major depression alone (n=47), or no mood or anxiety disorders (n=95; total N=306). Psychopathology in the children was assessed by structured diagnostic interviews (K-SADS), and pregnancy and delivery complications were assessed using the developmental history module of the DICA-P. Number of pregnancy complications predicted multiple childhood anxiety disorders independently of parental diagnosis (odds ratio=1.6 [1.4-2.0]). This effect was accounted for by heavy bleeding requiring bed-rest, hypertension, illness requiring medical attention, and serious family problems. Associations remained significant when lifetime child mood and disruptive behavior disorders were covaried. Results suggest that prenatal stressors may increase a child's risk for anxiety disorders beyond the risk conferred by parental psychopathology alone. PMID:15129417

  11. Myocardial infarction complicated by ventricular septal rupture.

    PubMed

    Sahjian, Michael; Ventriglia, Rich; Bolton, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Transporting patients with an ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a fairly common practice for most critical care transport teams. When a STEMI is complicated by ventricular septal rupture, the care can become more challenging, especially if the rupture is not yet diagnosed. This article describes such a transport and reviews the pathophysiology of the process along with treatment options. PMID:22225564

  12. Congenital Tuberculosis Complicated by Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Osowicki, Joshua; Wang, Shiqi; McKenzie, Christopher; Marshall, Carolyn; Gard, Jye; Ke Juin, Wong; Steer, Andrew C; Connell, Tom G

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a male infant with congenital tuberculosis in a nonendemic setting complicated by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, who was treated successfully with antituberculous therapy and corticosteroids. We review the pediatric literature concerning the unusual association of these 2 rare conditions. PMID:26398869

  13. Selecting a Principal: Keep It Complicated!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naso, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    When searching for a new principal, many search committees tend to use the lists of competencies published in the literature and provided by state departments of education as if they were checklists. Instead, they should focus on more complicated competencies, such as acumen, judgment, and ability to manage the dilemmas of practice.

  14. [Intraoperative and postoperative complications of splenectomy].

    PubMed

    Petrović, M; Popovic, M; Knezević, S; Matić, S; Gotić, M; Milovanović, A; Zuvela, M; Artiko, V; Dugalić, V; Ranković, V

    2002-01-01

    Spleen is being surgically removed because of trauma, in diagnostic and-or therapeutical purposes because of the benignant and malignant diseases. The percentage of morbidity during and after splenectomy is relatively low. During surgery might occur bleeding, trauma of the pancreatic tail, stomach, lineal flexure of the colon, left hemidiafragm, left suprarenal gland and upper pole of the left kidney, which must be correspondingly reclaimed during the same intervention. In the early postoperative period, postoperative bleeding, subfrenic abscess, pulmonal atelectasis, bronchopneumonia and left pleural extravasations might occur. Especially is important notification of these events in due time and adequate conservative and surgical treatment. After splenectomy, there is an increase of the number of trombocytes, which might lead to the tromboembolic complications. In the prevention of these complications in the postoperative period prolonged antiagregation therapy is suggested. Postsplenectomy sepsis is very late, general complication of splenectomy, which occurs because of the lower immunity in the child age. To prevent these complications, partial splenectomies, reimplantations of the spleen, prolonged application of the penicillin medicines after splenectomy and antipneumococcal vaccine are performed. PMID:12587454

  15. Neurologic Complications of Cancer and its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Giglio, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) are very susceptible to cancer and its treatment. The most direct involvement of the nervous system manifests in the development of primary brain and spinal cord tumors. Many cancers exhibit a propensity toward spread to the CNS, and brain metastases are common problems seen in malignancies such as lung, breast, and melanoma. Such spread may involve the brain or spine parenchyma or the subarachnoid space. In the PNS, spread is usually through direct infiltration of nerve roots, plexi, or muscle by neighboring malignancies. In some cases, cancer has sudden, devastating effects on the nervous system: epidural spinal cord compression or cord transection from pathologic fractures of vertebra involved by cancer; increased intracranial pressure from intracranial mass lesion growth and edema; and uncontrolled seizure activity as a result of intracranial tumors (status epilepticus), which are neuro-oncologic emergencies. The best known indirect or remote effects of cancer on the nervous system are the neurologic paraneoplastic syndromes. Cancer can also result in a hypercoagulable state causing cerebrovascular complications. Treatment of cancer can have neurologic complications. The commonest of these complications are radiation-induced injury to the brain, spine, and peripheral nerves and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The suppressant effect of cancer and its treatment on the body’s immune system can result in infectious complications within the nervous system. PMID:20425608

  16. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Majdoub, Karim Ibn; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100 000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:26161211

  17. Laparoscopic gastric band removal complicated by splenosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gregory; Schoucair, Ramy; Shimlati, Rasha; Rached, Linda; Khoury, George

    2016-08-01

    In any patient, the occurrence of postsplenectomy splenosis can complicate the planning of further surgeries. In our case, the gastric sleeve procedure was aborted, as it would have put the patient's life in danger. Therefore, only the gastric band was removed, eliminating future erosion. PMID:27525091

  18. Computer Batch Files Shorten Many Complicated Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deppa, Joan

    1987-01-01

    Defines "batch files," claiming that they can shorten many complicated computer procedures. Describes how batch file was created using the computer program "PC-Write" to streamline the process of creating a work disk and increase students' computer literacy. Lists and discusses each element in the file. Provides references for more information.…

  19. Using Programmable Calculators to Evaluate Complicated Formulas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snover, Stephen L.; Spikell, Mark A.

    The application of the programmable calculator to evaluating complicated formulas is illustrated by considering the formula for finding the area of any triangle when only the lengths of the three sides are known. Other advantages of the programmable calculator are discussed such as freeing the student to explore more challenging problems and…

  20. Management of common postoperative complications: delirium.

    PubMed

    Javedan, Houman; Tulebaev, Samir

    2014-05-01

    Delirium is a common postoperative surgical complication associated with poor outcomes. The complexity of delirium demands that each patient be assessed individually and a tailored prevention and treatment regimen be put in place. Nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies are available to achieve this goal. PMID:24721366

  1. Complications of lower blepharoplasty and midface lifting.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Robert M; Kotlus, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Lower eyelid blepharoplasty and midface lifting share a complex anatomy, which should be mastered before attempting these types of surgeries. In recent years, there have been significant contributions to rejuvenating this area. A thorough understanding of the rejuvenative approaches and their outcomes is imperative. Thus, the problem must be preoperatively evaluated to offer the appropriate technique and minimize complications. PMID:25440742

  2. Factors associated with immediate abortion complications.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, L E; McMain-Klein, M; Colodny, N; Fellows, G F; Lamont, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with increased risk of immediate complications from induced abortion. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of a provincial database. SETTING: All Ontario general hospitals in which abortions are performed and all free-standing abortion clinics in Ontario. POPULATION: Women in Ontario aged 15 to 44 years who underwent an induced abortion in the province (without concurrent sterilization) between Jan. 1, 1992, and Dec. 31, 1993. OUTCOME MEASURES: Recording of complications at the time of the procedure, gestational age, type of procedure, place of abortion (hospital or clinic), and patient's age, parity and history of previous abortion (spontaneous or induced). RESULTS: During the study period 83 469 abortions were performed that met our inclusion criteria. Immediate complications were reported in 571 cases (0.7%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that, after other variables were controlled for, the patient's age, parity and history of previous abortions (spontaneous or induced) were not significant risk factors for immediate complications; however, gestational age, method of abortion and place of abortion were significant risk factors (p < 0.001). The odds ratio (OR) for having a complication from abortion was 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02 to 1.63) between 9 and 12 weeks, compared with having one after abortion at 9 weeks or earlier, and increased to 3.3 (95% CI 2.23 to 5.00) after abortion between 17 and 20 weeks. Compared with surgical dilatation and curettage (D&C), instillation of saline and instillation of prostaglandins were more likely to be associated with immediate complications (OR 24.0, 95% CI 13.22 to 43.70, and OR 11.7, 95% CI 6.43 to 21.18, respectively), whereas both suction D&C and insertion of a laminaria tent were less likely to be associated with immediate complications (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.67, and OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.52, respectively). Compared with women who had an abortion

  3. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Complications in Transvaginal Approach in Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Komorowski, Andrzej L; Alba Mesa, Francisco; Bała, Małgorzata M; Mituś, Jerzy W; Wysocki, Wojciech M

    2015-12-01

    Transvaginal access is the most popular natural orifice translumenal technique in the minimally invasive surgery. Reviews on non-gynecological transvaginal approach morbidities reveal that rates vary greatly. A systematic review of transvaginal approach in non-gynecological intraabdominal procedures was carried out to assess the risk of complications. A systematic search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library from the inception of these databases to March 2012. The following keywords were searched: "transvaginal", "NOTES", "single incision", and "single port". From the total of 231 potentially eligible abstracts, 87 papers were retrieved and evaluated as fulfilling the eligibility criteria. The final analysis included 32 articles. The overall complications rate was 4.4 %, and complications related to the transvaginal port reached 2.4 %. Conversion rate to open surgery was 3.4 %. The incidence of postoperative urinary tract infection was 0.8 %. The mean operative time was 119 min. The mean hospital stay was 3.1 days (range 6 h-12 days). The technique of transvaginal access can offer several advantages for a patient and is associated with an acceptable rate of complications. PMID:27011470

  4. The care and keeping of vascular access for home hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Faratro, Rose; Jeffries, Janine; Nesrallah, Gihad E; MacRae, Jennifer M

    2015-04-01

    Creating and maintaining a healthy vascular access is a critical factor in successful home hemodialysis (HD). This article aims to serve as a "how-to manual" regarding vascular access issues for both patients and health-care providers in a home HD program. This document outlines cannulation options for patients with arteriovenous access and describes troubleshooting techniques for potential complications; strategies are suggested to help patients overcome fear of cannulation and address problems associated with difficult cannulation. Technical aspects of central venous catheter care, as well as a guide to troubleshooting catheter complications, are covered in detail. Monitoring for access-related complications of stenosis, infection, and thrombosis is a key part of every home HD program. Key performance and quality indicators are important mechanisms to ensure patient safety in home HD and should be used during routine clinic visits. PMID:25925828

  5. Assessing standards of vascular access device care.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Rose

    Vascular access devices (VADs) are essential in health care as they provide vital access for treatment including the infusion of medication, fluids, blood products and nutritional supplements. However, their invasive nature predisposes patients to potential complications, primarily bloodstream infections. This article examines the current standards of VAD care and assesses compliance with current guidelines (national and trust policy) in one hospital setting utilising a practice audit. The audit was conducted in a 500-bed district general hospital over 6 non-consecutive week days. The medical division where the audit took place had 13 wards with 288 beds. A total of 120 VADs were audited, averaging n=9.2 per ward (with a range of 4-18 on each ward). The results demonstrated a collective non-compliance rate of 48%. Although overall compliance was 52%, a poor standard of care was highlighted across the division for all components of the care elements. The post-insertion care of VADs is an essential component of a comprehensive strategy to prevent complications. Consequently, initiatives such as audit, education and feedback should be used in an effort to improve practice and maintain optimal care. PMID:25904534

  6. Advanced access appointments

    PubMed Central

    Hudec, John C.; MacDougall, Steven; Rankin, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine the effects of advanced access (same-day physician appointments) on patient and provider satisfaction and to determine its association with other variables such as physician income and patient emergency department use. DESIGN Patient satisfaction survey and semistructured interviews with physicians and support staff; analysis of physician medical insurance billings and patient emergency department visits. SETTING Cape Breton, NS. PARTICIPANTS Patients, physicians, and support staff of 3 comparable family physician practices that had not implemented advanced access and an established advanced access practice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-reported provider and patient satisfaction, physician office income, and patients’ emergency department use. RESULTS The key benefits of implementation of advanced access were an increase in provider and patient satisfaction levels, same or greater physician office income, and fewer less urgent (triage level 4) and nonurgent (triage level 5) emergency department visits by patients. CONCLUSION Currently within the Central Cape Breton Region, 33% of patients wait 4 or more days for urgent appointments. Findings from this study can be used to enhance primary care physician practice redesign. This research supports many benefits of transitioning to an advanced access model of patient booking. PMID:20944024

  7. ISDC Data Access Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D.; Borkowski, J.; Contessi, T.; Lock, T.; Rohlfs, R.; Walter, R.

    The ISDC Data Access Layer (DAL) is an ANSI C and \\fortran 90 compatible library under development in support of the ESA INTEGRAL mission data analysis software. DALs primary purpose is to isolate the analysis software from the specifics of the data formats while at the same time providing new data abstraction and access capabilities. DAL supports the creation and manipulation of hierarchical data sets which may span multiple files and, in theory, multiple computer systems. A number of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) are supported by DAL that allow software to view and access data at different levels of complexity. DAL also allows data sets to reside on disk, in conventional memory or in shared memory in a way that is transparent to the user/application.

  8. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  9. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  10. Access to space studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is currently considering possible directions in Earth-to-orbit vehicle development under a study called 'Access to Space.' This agency-wide study is considering commercial launch vehicles, human transportation, space station logistics, and other space transportation requirements over the next 40 years. Three options are being considered for human transportation: continued use of the Space Shuttle; development of a small personnel carrier (personnel logistics system (PLS)); or development of an advanced vehicle such as a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO). Several studies related to the overall Access to Space study are reported in this document.

  11. Accessibility | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Smokefree.gov is committed to providing access to all individuals—disabled or not—who are seeking information on its Web sites. To provide this information, the smokefree.gov Web site has been designed to comply with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (as amended). Section 508 requires that all individuals with disabilities (whether they are federal government employees or members of the general public) have access to and use of information and data comparable to that provided to individuals without disabilities, unless an undue burden would be imposed.

  12. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Complicated by Sinistral Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kaley, Kristin; Lamb, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is known for vague symptoms that lead to a delay in diagnosis, and hence most cases are found at an advanced stage. Many complications can happen secondary to pancreatic cancer including diabetes, malabsorption, and deep venous thrombosis. Sinistral (segmental or left-sided) portal hypertension (SPH) refers to portal hypertension confined to the left-sided segment of the portal venous system namely the splenic side, and the most common etiology is splenic vein thrombosis (SVT). We present here a case of a 66-year-old male with advanced pancreatic cancer who died due to bleeding secondary to SVT. We advise physicians caring for these patients to be aware of this complication, which may also be the manifestation of an undiagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:27555987

  13. Complications of alcohol withdrawal: pathophysiological insights.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, L A; Boutros, N; Petrakis, I L; Krystal, J H

    1998-01-01

    Disease processes or events that accompany acute alcohol withdrawal (AW) can cause significant illness and death. Some patients experience seizures, which may increase in severity with subsequent AW episodes. Another potential AW complication is delirium tremens, characterized by hallucinations, mental confusion, and disorientation. Cognitive impairment and delirium may lead to a chronic memory disorder (i.e., Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome). Psychiatric problems associated with withdrawal include anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. In addition, alterations in physiology, mood, and behavior may persist after acute withdrawal has subsided, motivating relapse to heavy drinking. Recent advances in neurobiology may support the development of improved medications to decrease the risk of AW complications and support long-term sobriety. PMID:15706735

  14. Iatrogenic aortic pseudoaneurysm: a forgotten complication.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Samuel; Bico, Pedro; Almeida, António R; Laranjeira Santos, Álvaro; Banazol, Nuno; Fragata, José; Rabaçal, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta are a rare complication of cardiac surgery. However, the poor prognosis associated with this condition if untreated makes early diagnosis and treatment important. We present the case of a 66-year-old woman who had undergone mitral valvuloplasty 12 days previously, who was admitted with a diagnosis of new-onset atrial fibrillation. The transthoracic echocardiogram showed a clot in the right atrium and anticoagulation was initiated, followed by antibiotic therapy. After further investigation, the patient was diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta and underwent surgical repair, followed by six weeks of antibiotic therapy. She was readmitted six months later for an abscess of the lower sternum and mediastinum. After a conservative approach with antibiotics and local drainage failed, recurrence of a large pseudoaneurysm compressing the superior vena cava was documented. A third operation was performed to debride the infected tissue and to place an aortic allograft. There were no postoperative complications. PMID:24508151

  15. Non-malignant complications of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Holmes, G K

    1996-05-01

    Patients with coeliac disease are at increased risk of developing complications which increase morbidity and mortality. Emphasis on malignant complications has often overshadowed the non-malignant risks, which have received relatively little attention, although some of these can be very troublesome and even life-threatening. This article points out that a large population of unidentified or neglected coeliac patients is at potential risk. The challenge is to identify this group by case-finding or screening programmes in selected populations, so that they can be offered a gluten-free diet and other treatments which will not only improve general health but may also prevent or reduce the development of health problems. The non-malignant risks are outlined and bone and neuropsychiatric disturbances considered in more detail because of recent developments in these areas. PMID:8783765

  16. Morcellation complications: From direct trauma to inoculation.

    PubMed

    Noel, Nyia L; Isaacson, Keith B

    2016-08-01

    Morcellation is the fragmentation of tissue to facilitate removal of the specimen through small incision in minimally invasive surgery. This technique is not unique to gynecology and is used in general surgery with the goal of improved surgical outcomes including decreased pain, cost, hospital length of stay, and rapid return to normal activities and work. Gynecologic laparoscopic power morcellation (LPM) has come under increased scrutiny over the last 2 years due to widespread attention to a known but rare complication, an unanticipated dissemination of malignancy, namely occult uterine leiomyosarcoma. This chapter focuses on complications associated with gynecologic tissue morcellation from inoculation of benign or malignant tissue fragments within the peritoneal cavity and direct trauma from morcellation techniques. We also include a review of the various morcellation techniques from knife to electrical and the use of intraperitoneal specimen containment systems. PMID:26879674

  17. Common Prosthetic Implant Complications in Fixed Restorations.

    PubMed

    Link-Bindo, Elyce E; Soltys, James; Donatelli, David; Cavanaugh, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Many clinicians consider implants to be one of the most important innovations in dental care. Even so, over the past 40 years of implant dentistry, complications have been a constant struggle for restorative dentists, surgeons, and patients alike. Implant-related problems can be particularly challenging and frustrating, especially given that an implant is thought to be a "lifetime" solution expected to yield minimal difficulties. This, however, is not necessarily the case with prosthetic restorations. With innovations in implant technology continuing to rapidly advance, maintaining knowledge of all the latest developments can be challenging for clinicians. The purpose of this article is to provide a basic understanding of the treatment, management, and prevention of common prosthetic and technical implant complications seen in the office of a restorative dentist. PMID:27548395

  18. Cutaneous and systemic complications associated with tattooing.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Tattooing can result in a wide variety of complications, whose prevalence and incidence remain still unclear. Hypersensitivity reactions (or allergies) to tattoo pigments are currently the most common complication on a tattoo, however they are not predictable. Infections are nowadays directly related to the lack of asepsis and hygiene during the tattooing procedure or during the healing phase. Patients with a known cutaneous disease should be warned of a potential risk of localization of their disease to the tattoo. A skin eruption restricted to a tattoo may reveal sarcoidosis. Patients with chronic conditions and/or impaired immunity should discuss with their physician about the possibility and when to have a tattoo. PMID:27160631

  19. The twisted diversion: a paralyzing complication

    PubMed Central

    Hiew, Kenneth; Glendinning, Richard; Parr, Nigel; Kumar, Manal

    2013-01-01

    Ileal conduit remains a widely used urinary diversion performed after radical cystectomy. However, complications of ileal conduits remain an important concern in urological surgery. We report a rare case of an ileal conduit stricture, which can have grim complications if unobserved during the operation. Following an initial operation of radical cystectomy and ileal conduit formation in France in 2011, an 80-year-old male travelled back to the UK after 4 months of general weakness and limb paralysis. Initial blood test shows life-threatening hyperkalemia and worsened renal function. Subsequent ultrasound KUB scan and loopogram revealed obstructive uropathy. The initial management includes intravenous antibiotics and bilateral nephrostomies were inserted to aid diversion of urine. A thorough surgical exploration revealed a twisted, fibrous mesenteric band adhered to the proximal part of the ileal conduit. Only one case report of ileal conduit stenosis was described many years after the procedure. PMID:24963928

  20. [Complicated febrile convulsion vs herpes-encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Millner, M

    1993-01-01

    Since Acyclovir is available a sufficient treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis exists. Febrile convulsions may occur as the initial manifestation of an encephalitis, particularly of an HSV encephalitis. Within 25 months out of 151 children with febrile convulsions five children with complicated febrile convulsions were admitted at the pediatric department of Graz. In all children HSV antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were negative and the diagnosis of an HSV encephalitis was made by positive CSF HSV polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Therefore, in any suspected case, i.e. in any case of a complicated febrile convulsion, CSF should be investigated including a HSV PCR to rapidly confirm or exclude HSV encephalitis. PMID:8386831

  1. Prevention of complications in neck dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kerawala, Cyrus J; Heliotos, Manolis

    2009-01-01

    Background The neck dissection has remained a pivotal aspect of head and neck cancer management for over a century. During this time its role has expanded from a purely therapeutic option into an elective setting, in part promoted by efforts to reduce its morbidity. Objectives This review will consider the potential complications of neck dissection and on the basis of the available evidence describe both their management and prevention. Conclusion Although the neck dissection continues to provide clinicians with a method of addressing cervical disease, its reliability and safety can only be assured if surgeons remain cognisant of the potential complications and aim to minimise such morbidity by appropriate management in the peri-operative period. PMID:19822010

  2. Neurosurgical management for complicated catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Drazin, Doniel; Westley Phillips, H; Shirzadi, Ali; Drazin, Noam; Schievink, Wouter

    2014-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune condition involving arterial and venous thrombosis. An unusual APS variant, catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS), includes rapid multi-organ failure from widespread small vessel thrombosis. Central nervous system complications arise in one-third of CAPS patients. In rare cases, CAPS co-manifests with cerebellar hemorrhage presenting a neurosurgical emergency. We present a 65-year-old woman with CAPS-related cerebellar hematoma, co-morbid idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, deep vein thrombosis and altered mental status, with treatment complicated by thrombocytopenia. The patient suddenly deteriorated, secondary to a cerebellar subdural hematoma, and underwent decompression and excision of the hematoma. After recovery in the intensive care unit, she developed a new spontaneous epidural hematoma requiring additional surgery. Management of these patients is hematologically complex and often requires a multi-disciplinary team of physicians. This patient provides an important learning point for clinicians - consider CAPS when hemorrhage and thrombosis are present. PMID:24269552

  3. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  4. Portal hypertension complicating myelofibrosis: reversal following splenectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Lukie, B. E.; Card, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    Portal hypertension occurs in approximately 10% of patients with myelofibrosis. Increased portal blood flow secondary to splenomegaly has been proposed to explain its development. In a 60-year-old woman with proven myelofibrosis of 10 years' duration and gross splenomegaly, portal hypertension developed with esophageal varices and ascites. There was no demonstrable obstruction to portal blood flow. Following splenectomy the ascites and esophageal varices disappeared. Despite the presence of splenic myeloid metaplasia, splenectomy did not impair the patient's hematologic status. Portal hypertension complicating myelofibrosis has a poor prognosis, so careful attention should be given to its detection. Splenectomy may be preferable to portal-systemic shunting in the management of this complication. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:907949

  5. Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole; Deviere, Jacques; Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis.

  6. Neurocritical care complications of pregnancy and puerperum.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jennifer A; Ahmed, Wamda

    2014-12-01

    Neurocritical care complications of pregnancy and puerperum such as preeclampsia/eclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, seizures, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, postpartum angiopathy, cerebral sinus thrombosis, amniotic fluid emboli, choriocarcinoma, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are rare but can be devastating. These conditions can present a challenge to physicians because pregnancy is a unique physiologic state, most therapeutic options available in the intensive care unit were not studied in pregnant patients, and in many situations, physicians need to deliver care to both the mother and the fetus, simultaneously. Timely recognition and management of critical neurologic complications of pregnancy/puerperum can be life saving for both the mother and fetus. PMID:25123793

  7. [Complications of corneal lamellar refractive surgery].

    PubMed

    Kohnen, T; Remy, M

    2015-12-01

    Techniques available for corneal lamellar refractive surgery are laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) using a microkeratome or femtosecond laser incision followed by excimer laser corneal ablation, and femtosecond laser-assisted refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx). These treatments are nowadays considered to be safe and effective standard procedures for surgical correction of mild to moderate ametropia. Possible complications include too small or decentered optical zones, intraoperative flap cutting errors and postoperative inflammation (e.g. diffuse lamellar keratitis, DLK), epithelial or flap folds, epithelial ingrowths or iatrogenic ectasia. The occurrence of complications may be significantly reduced by compliance to corresponding standards of indication and treatment that are based on current scientific knowledge. PMID:26613941

  8. Complications associated with cutaneous aesthetic procedures.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Daniela; Ruzicka, Thomas; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, a plethora of novel therapeutic approaches to fight signs of aging and to influence external body appearance have become available in aesthetic dermatology. Extensive research in this field has led to advanced understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the aging face. To successfully address the complex age-related alterations anti-aging treatment nowadays calls for a multi-faceted approach. Most frequently utilized aesthetic procedures include the use of botulinum toxin, a variety of filling substances, microneedling (collagen induction therapy), chemical peeling, lasers, radiofrequency, thread facelift and injectional lipolysis with phosphatidylcholine/deoxycholate among others. Unfortunately, many clinicians still lack in-depth understanding of potential complications, risk factors and side effects associated with minimal-invasive procedures. The following review aims to give a broad overview of nowadays most frequently used approaches in the dermato-aesthetic field and their related complications. PMID:26177157

  9. Migrants' access to healthcare.

    PubMed

    Norredam, Marie

    2011-10-01

    There are strong pragmatic and moral reasons for receiving societies to address access to healthcare for migrants. Receiving societies have a pragmatic interest in sustaining migrants' health to facilitate integration; they also have a moral obligation to ensure migrants' access to healthcare according to international human rights principles. The intention of this thesis is to increase the understanding of migrants' access to healthcare by exploring two study aims: 1) Are there differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy I and II); and 2) Why are there possible differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy III and IV). The thesis builds on different methodological approaches using both register-based retrospective cohort design, cross-sectional design and survey methods. Two different measures of access were used to explore differences: 1) cancer stage at diagnosis as a clinical outcome and 2) emergency room (ER) contacts as a utilisation measure. Both informal and formal barriers to access were studied to explore why possible differences existed including: 1) motivation for using ER; and 2) asylum seekers' healthcare entitlements. Different definitions of migration and ethnicity were investigated including: country of birth and residence status. Substudy I showed a tendency towards more advanced stage at diagnosis or unknown stage among most subgroups of migrant women with a history of cancer compared to non-migrant women. Sub-study II found that some migrants (those born in Somalia, Turkey and Ex-Yugoslavia) use ER services more frequently than do non-migrants whereas others have the same or lower utilisation levels. As a consequence, substudy III was undertaken, which documented that more migrant within all subgroups had considered contacting a primary caregiver before visiting the ER compared to non-migrants, but that migrants experienced communication problems herein

  10. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications.

    PubMed

    Dipoce, J; Bernheim, A; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-02-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  11. Otological complications associated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Kitamura, Ken

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the features of otological complications for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) and the risk factors for these complications. We enrolled 1115 patients (776 males and 339 females; age 5-89 years) who underwent HBOT. All otological symptoms experienced during HBOT sessions were evaluated, and risk factors were analysed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Otoscopic findings and interventions for otological complications were assessed in 58 symptomatic patients who visited the Otolaryngology Department. Otological symptoms were experienced by 165 (14.8 %) of the 1115 patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis identified ages of >60 years and female sex as independent risk factors, whereas patients with sports injuries were at lower risk than those with other primary diseases, except for severe infectious disease. Eighty-two patients (49.7 %) suffered from symptoms at the first HBOT session. The most prevalent symptoms were otalgia (157/165), followed by ear fullness (13/165), hearing loss (12/165) and tinnitus (3/165). One patient experienced vertigo and deterioration of the bone-conduction pure-tone thresholds, suggesting inner ear barotrauma. In 116 ears of the 58 symptomatic patients, abnormal otoscopic findings were recognized in 58 ears (50.0 %). Twenty-seven of the 58 ears required myringotomy or tube insertion, and HBOT was stopped in eight ears in four patients. Of the remaining 58 ears with normal otoscopic findings, 51 received no treatment. Physicians should be aware of both middle and inner ear barotrauma as potential complications of HBOT. PMID:26650550

  12. Unusual septoplasty complication: Streptococcus viridans endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Leonard, D W; Thompson, D H

    1998-10-01

    Infection is an infrequently reported complication following septoplasty and septorhinoplasty. Among the recognized but rare infections are toxic shock syndrome, spinal osteomyelitis, meningitis, septic cavernous sinus thrombosis and endocarditis. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose these infections early and thereby minimize morbidity and mortality. We present a case of endocarditis following septoplasty in a patient who had no identifiable preoperative risk factors but who experienced recurrent fever and chills postoperatively. PMID:9818534

  13. Femtosecond-assisted LASIK: Complications and Management.

    PubMed

    Perez-Straziota, Claudia; Randleman, J Bradley

    2016-01-01

    FS-assisted LASIK has become the preferred method for LASIK flap creation due to the precision, accuracy, and reproducibility of the flap creation. Thinner, planar flaps may help prevent cases of post-LASIK ectasia and may have a superior refractive outcome. However, FS flap creation has several unique complications that require early recognition and optimal timely management for the best visual outcomes. PMID:26938338

  14. Limy Bile Syndrome Complicated with Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Koca, Yavuz Savas; Koca, Tugba; Barut, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Limy bile is a relatively rare condition, in which a radiopaque material is visible in the gallbladder on plain radiography or computerized tomography. Cases of complicated hyperparathyroidism are extremely rare. We report a patient with right upper quadrant and epigastric pain and extremity weakness in whom abdominal tomography showed limy bile in the gallbladder and laboratory values showed high levels of serum calcium and parathormone. PMID:25821626

  15. Pulmonary gangrene as a complication of mucormycosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zagoria, R.J.; Choplin, R.H.; Karstaedt, N.

    1985-06-01

    Pulmonary gangrene, a rare complication of pneumonia occurs when vascular thrombosis leads to necrosis of a large portion of lung. The devitalized lung is then sloughed into a cavity, resulting in a characteristic radiographic appearance. The previously reported cases of pulmonary gangrene have been associated with either bacterial or tuberculous pneumonia; the authors describe a case resulting from mucormycosis. In addition to the plain-film findings, the computed tomographic (CT) appearance is described.

  16. Unusual Bilateral Paramolars Associated with Clinical Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sulabha, A. N.; Sameer, C.

    2015-01-01

    Paramolars are rare supernumerary structures of maxillofacial complex that occur buccally or lingually near the molar row. Predominantly these occur singly; bilateral presentation is very rare. This paper reports two unusual bilateral presentations of paramolars with clinical complication and its management. One of the cases in the present paper also documents the cooccurrence of bilateral paramolars and microdontia of single tooth and one of its paramolars presented with multilobed crown with an anomalous buccal tubercle. PMID:26078890

  17. Noncoding RNAs in diabetes vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Beltrami, Cristina; Angelini, Timothy G; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder and is recognised as a dominant health threat of our time. Diabetes induces a widespread damage of the macro- and microvasculature in different organs and tissues and disrupts the endogenous vascular repair mechanisms, thus causing diffuse and severe complications. Moreover, diabetic patients respond poorly to surgical interventions aiming to "revascularise" (i.e., to restore blood flow supply) the ischemic myocardium or lower limbs. The molecular causes underpinning diabetes vascular complications are still underappreciated and druggable molecular targets for therapeutic interventions have not yet clearly emerged. Moreover, diabetes itself and diabetes complications are often silent killers, requiring new prognostic, diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for use in the clinical practice. Noncoding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) have opened the field capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focuses at the ncRNA roles in diabetes vascular complications. Furthermore, we discuss the potential value of ncRNAs as clinical biomarkers, and we examine the possibilities for therapeutic intervention targeting ncRNs in diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue titled: Non-coding RNAs. PMID:25536178

  18. THROMBOEMBOLIC COMPLICATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC SHOULDER SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Dal Molin, Siluê Franzoni

    2015-01-01

    Although thromboembolic phenomena are frequent complications in lower-limb surgery, there are only two cases of pulmonary thromboembolism following shoulder arthroscopy in the literature. We describe the case of a 76-year-old patient with pulmonary embolism in both lungs after shoulder arthroscopy. No vascular abnormalities were found and no origin for the thrombus was detected. The exact cause of the thromboembolism remains unknown. PMID:27022559

  19. Management of Cardiopulmonary Complications of Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Prabha; Vashishtha, C.; Nasa, M.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced portal hypertension accompanying end-stage liver disease results in an altered milieu due to inadequate detoxification of blood from splanchnic circulation by the failing liver. The portosystemic shunts with hepatic dysfunction result in an increased absorption and impaired neutralisation of the gastrointestinal bacteria and endotoxins leads to altered homeostasis with multiorgan dysfunction. The important cardiopulmonary complications are cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension, and right-sided hydrothorax. PMID:21994850

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Low, Keynes TA; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  1. Chronic Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehari, Alem; Klings, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common genetic hemolytic anemia worldwide, affects 250,000 births annually. In the United States, SCD affects approximately 100,000 individuals, most of African descent. Hemoglobin S (HbS) results from a glutamate-to-valine mutation of the sixth codon of the β-hemoglobin allele; the homozygous genotype (HbSS) is associated with the most prevalent and severe form of the disease. Other SCD genotypes include HbSC, composed of one HbS allele and one HbC (glutamate-to-lysine mutation) allele; and HbS-β-thalassemia(0) or HbS-β-thalassemia(+), composed of one HbS allele and one β-thalassemia allele with absent or reduced β-chain production, respectively. Despite advances in care, median survival remains in the fifth decade, due in large part to chronic complications of the disease. Chronic pulmonary complications in SCD are major contributors to this early mortality. Although our understanding of these conditions has improved much over the past 10 to 15 years, there remains no specific treatment for pulmonary complications of SCD. It is unclear whether conventional treatment regimens directed at non-SCD populations have equivalent efficacy in patients with SCD. This represents a critical research need. In this review, the authors review the state-of-the-art understanding of the following pulmonary complications of SCD: (1) pulmonary hypertension; (2) venous thromboembolic disease; (3) sleep-disordered breathing; (4) asthma and recurrent wheezing; and (5) pulmonary function abnormalities. This review highlights the advances as well as the knowledge gaps in this field to update clinicians and other health care providers and to garner research interest from the medical community. PMID:26836905

  2. Deep enteroscopy - indications, diagnostic yield and complications.

    PubMed

    Moeschler, Oliver; Mueller, Michael Karl

    2015-02-01

    Since its introduction in 2001 capsule endoscopy opened up the small bowel for diagnostic approaches followed by double balloon enteroscopy which enabled the endoscopic community to perform therapeutic interventions in the whole small intestine. In this review the scientific developments related to indications, diagnostic yield and complications of the last years between the competing devices double ballon enteroscopy, single balloon enteroscopy and spiral enteroscopy are illustrated. PMID:25663758

  3. Medical Complications of Tattoos: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Islam, Parvez S; Chang, Christopher; Selmi, Carlo; Generali, Elena; Huntley, Arthur; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-04-01

    Tattoos are defined as the introduction of exogenous pigments into the dermis in order to produce a permanent design. This process may occur unintentional or may be deliberately administered for cosmetic or medical reasons. Tattoos have been around for over 5000 years and over time have evolved to represent a common cosmetic practice worldwide. Currently, adverse reactions are relatively rare and generally unpredictable and predominantly include immune-mediated reactions and skin infections. Along with better healthcare standards and more stringent public health mandates such as the provision of disposable needles, major infectious complications related to hepatitis and human retroviral infections have decreased significantly. When they do occur, skin infections are most frequently associated with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The aim of this study is to review the types and rates of medical complications of permanent tattoos. PubMed search and search dates were open ended. Acute local inflammation is the most common complication, but infections, allergic contact dermatitis, and other inflammatory or immune responses that are not well-characterized may occur. As many patients with immune reactions to tattoos do not react on skin or patch testing, it is postulated that the antigens contained in dyes or pigments are such small molecules that they need to be haptenized in order to become immunogenic. Red ink is associated more frequently with long-term reactions, including granulomatous and pseudolymphomatous phenomena or morphea-like lesions and vasculitis. Exacerbation of preexisting psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and pyoderma gangrenosum may occur after tattooing. There is no well-defined association between cancer and tattoos. The treatment of tattoo-related complications may include local destructive measures (cryotherapy, electro-surgery, dermabrasion, chemical destruction, ablative laser destruction), surgical excision, and thermolysis of the

  4. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications

    PubMed Central

    Dipoce, J; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-01-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications.

    PubMed

    Low, Keynes T A; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  6. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  7. How to prolong the patency of vascular access.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Sidney; Saint, Lindsey; Shenoy, Surendra

    2015-01-01

    Prolonging the patency and limiting the complications of a functioning hemodialysis (HD) access require a multidisciplinary approach. It begins with careful access planning that is executed and continually reinforced by physicians and facility staff encouraging active patient participation. Vascular access (VA) dysfunctions identified by regular monitoring and surveillance need further evaluation. Color duplex ultrasound is evolving as the primary tool to evaluate functional implication of the structural problems in the VA. While ease of scheduling makes endovascular management attractive, definitive surgical management provides better longevity and should be used when indicated. Timing of intervention and selection of technique depend on optimal use of available expertise and the nature of the problem. Avoiding a bridging HD catheter should be a priority while prolonging access patency and improving patient safety. PMID:25676299

  8. Role of sonography in assessing complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Starzyńska, Teresa; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Kładny, Józef

    2014-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which was introduced to the arsenal of surgical procedures in the middle of the 1980s, is a common alternative for conventional cholecystectomy. Its primary advantage is less invasive character which entails shorter hospitalization and faster recovery. Nevertheless, the complications of both procedures are comparable and encompass multiple organs and tissues. The paper presents ultrasound presentation of the surgical bed after laparoscopic cholecystectomy and of complications associated with this procedure. In the first week following the surgery, the presence of up to 60 ml of fluid in the removed gallbladder bed should be considered normal in certain patients. The fluid will gradually absorb. In single cases, slight amounts of fluid are detected in the peritoneal cavity, which also should not be alarming. Carbon dioxide absorbs from the peritoneal cavity within two days. Ultrasound assessment of the surgical bed after cholecystectomy is inhibited by hemostatic material left during the surgery. Its presentation may mimic an abscess. In such cases, the decisive examination is magnetic resonance imaging but not computed tomography. On the other hand, rapidly accumulating fluid around the liver is an alarming symptom, particularly when there is inadequate blood supply or when peritoneum irritation symptoms develop. Depending on the suspected cause of the patient's deteriorating condition, it is essential to perform urgent computed tomography angiography, celiac angiography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. The character of the fluid collection may be determined by its ultrasound-guided puncture. This procedure allows for aspiration of fluid and placement of a drain. Moreover, transabdominal ultrasound examination after laparoscopic cholecystectomy may contribute to the identification of: dropped stones in the right hypochondriac region, residual fragment of the gallbladder

  9. Ocular Complications of Leprosy in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Raga A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to identify the main ocular- and vision-threatening complications of leprosy in Yemen. Methods: This is a cross-sectional observational study which took place from February to July 2010. Leprosy patients attending the Skin and Venereal Diseases Hospital in the City of Light in Taiz, Yemen, who consented to participate in the study, were enrolled. Detailed demographic and medical histories were taken and clinical examination findings were recorded. A detailed eye examination, including visual acuity (VA), slit-lamp, and fundus examinations, was conducted on each patient by a qualified ophthalmologist. Results: A total of 192 patients (180 male, 12 female, with a male to female ratio of 15:1) were included in the study. The majority of the patients (157; 81.8%) were over 40 years. Over two-thirds of the patients (129; 67.2%) had had leprosy for more than 20 years. Ocular complications were found in 97% of cases; 150 (39.1%) of the patients’ eyes had at least one pathology. Eyelid involvement was the most common problem observed in 102 (26.5%) patients. Half of the eyes (192; 50%) had a VA of <6/60. The main cause of blindness among these patients was corneal opacity detected in 69 out of 192 patients (35.9%). Conclusion: Ocular complications are frequent among leprosy patients in Yemen. They are true vision-threatening lesions. It is important to prevent these lesions through early diagnosis and adequate treatment. PMID:23275842

  10. Predicting atrial fibrillation and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Alvaro; Norby, Faye L.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia associated with an increased risk of stroke and other complications. Identifying individuals at higher risk of developing AF in the community is now possible using validated predictive models that take into account clinical variables and circulating biomarkers. These models have shown adequate performance in racially and ethnically diverse populations. Similarly, risk stratification schemes predict incidence of ischemic stroke in persons with AF, assisting clinicians and patients in decisions regarding oral anticoagulation use. Complementary schemes have been developed to predict the risk of bleeding in AF patients taking vitamin K antagonists. However, major gaps in our ability to predict AF and its complications exist. Additional research should refine models for AF prediction and determine their value to improve population health and clinical outcomes, advance our ability to predict stroke and other complications in AF patients, and develop predictive models for bleeding events and other adverse effects in patients using non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants. PMID:27008924

  11. Etiology, treatment, and complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Munante-Cardenas, Jose Luis; Facchina Nunes, Paulo Henrique; Passeri, Luis Augusto

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate some epidemiological characteristics, surgical treatment methods, and complications of cases involving mandibular fractures. Records from 119 patients treated for mandibular fractures between January 2006 and December 2011 were analyzed. We find mandibular fractures mostly affect Caucasian (72.2%) men (80.7%). The mean age of the patients was 28.1 years. Road traffic accidents (RTA) caused the most fractures (49.5%), followed by physical violence, including gunshot wounds (21%). Motorcycle accidents were the most common cause of RTA (76.2%). The most affected mandibular regions were the parasymphysis (26.9%) and the mandible angle (25.1%). Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments were applied (90.4% and 9.6%, respectively). The most common surgical approach was the intraoral (64.9%), using the 2.0-mm fixation system (88.0%). Complications such as postoperative infections, malocclusion, and paresthesia occurred in 36 patients (30.2%). This research revealed interesting features about the etiology of mandibular fractures that were mostly associated with RTA. Severity of the trauma and noncompliance of the patients were factors that contributed to the development of postoperative complications. PMID:25643329

  12. [Pulmonary complications in adult sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Maître, B; Mekontso-Dessap, A; Habibi, A; Bachir, D; Parent, F; Godeau, B; Galacteros, F

    2011-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autosomal genetic condition which represents the most frequent genetic disease in Île-de-France and Caribbean islands. The main clinical manifestations can be divided into infectious disease, hemolytic anemia and vaso-occlusive events. Pulmonary complications represent 20 to 30% of mortality due to sickle cell and can be divided into acute and chronic events. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is an acute lung injury often preceded by a vaso-occlusive crisis and triggered by different factors including: hypoventilation, pulmonary infectious disease and vascular occlusions. These occlusions can be secondary to fat embolism, thrombosis or sickling. Treatment is mainly supportive combining oxygen supplementation adequate hydration analgesia and sedation. Exchange transfusion may be indicated in severe forms of ACS, characterized by a right ventricular dysfunction and acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary hypertension is the most serious chronic complication. Its frequency is estimated at 6% in adult patients and is more often described in patients with venous ulcers and higher levels of chronic hemolysis. Prognosis is poor with 12.5% of patients dying in the first two years following diagnosis irrespective of the actual pulmonary artery pressure level. There are currently limited data on the effects of any treatment modality. Other respiratory complications such as sleep disorders and nocturnal hypoxemia, infiltrative lung disease and exertional dyspnea are described and should be considered. PMID:21402228

  13. Endocrine complications following pediatric bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Josephine; Lewis, Victor; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Stephure, David K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for various diseases can lead to endocrine system dysfunction owing to preparative regimens involving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We assessed the prevalence of post-BMT endocrine complications in children treated at the Alberta Children's Hospital (ACH) from 1991 to 2001. Time of onset of endocrine dysfunction, underlying disease processes, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and age at BMT were characterized. Subjects of <18 years of age at the time of allogeneic or autologous BMT for whom 1-year follow-up through the ACH and a chart were available for review were included in the study. Subjects with a pre-existing endocrine condition were excluded. Of the 194 pediatric BMT procedures performed at the ACH between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 2001, 150 complete charts were available for review. Sixty five subjects received follow-up care at other centers and were excluded. Therefore, a total of 85 subjects were included in the review. The prevalence of endocrine complications identified was: primary hypothyroidism 1.2%, compensated hypothyroidism 7.0%, hyperthyroidism 2.4%, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism 22.4%, abnormal bone density 2.4%, and secondary diabetes mellitus 1.2%. These findings emphasize the need to screen for endocrine system dysfunction, particularly hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, in children who have undergone BMT. Children need long-term follow-up so that endocrine complications can be diagnosed and treated promptly. PMID:21823531

  14. Complex dynamics in learning complicated games

    PubMed Central

    Galla, Tobias; Farmer, J. Doyne

    2013-01-01

    Game theory is the standard tool used to model strategic interactions in evolutionary biology and social science. Traditionally, game theory studies the equilibria of simple games. However, is this useful if the game is complicated, and if not, what is? We define a complicated game as one with many possible moves, and therefore many possible payoffs conditional on those moves. We investigate two-person games in which the players learn based on a type of reinforcement learning called experience-weighted attraction (EWA). By generating games at random, we characterize the learning dynamics under EWA and show that there are three clearly separated regimes: (i) convergence to a unique fixed point, (ii) a huge multiplicity of stable fixed points, and (iii) chaotic behavior. In case (iii), the dimension of the chaotic attractors can be very high, implying that the learning dynamics are effectively random. In the chaotic regime, the total payoffs fluctuate intermittently, showing bursts of rapid change punctuated by periods of quiescence, with heavy tails similar to what is observed in fluid turbulence and financial markets. Our results suggest that, at least for some learning algorithms, there is a large parameter regime for which complicated strategic interactions generate inherently unpredictable behavior that is best described in the language of dynamical systems theory. PMID:23297213

  15. Update on complications in pediatric anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    De Francisci, Giovanni; Papasidero, Angela Elisa; Spinazzola, Giorgia; Galante, Dario; Caruselli, Marco; Pedrotti, Dino; Caso, Antonio; Lambo, Massimo; Melchionda, Matteo; Faticato, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    Complications in pediatric anesthesia can happen, even in our modern hospitals with the most advanced equipment and skilled anesthesiologists. It is important, albeit in a tranquil and reassuring way, to inform parents of the possibility of complications and, in general, of the anesthetic risks. This is especially imperative when speaking to the parents of children who will be operated on for minor procedures: in our experience, they tend to think that the anesthesia will be a light anesthesia without risks. Often the surgeons tell them that the operation is very simple without stressing the fact that it will be done under general anesthesia which is identical to the one we give for major operations. Different is the scenario for the parents of children who are affected by malignant neoplasms: in these cases they already know that the illness is serious. They have this tremendous burden and we choose not to add another one by discussing anesthetic risks, so we usually go along with the examination of the child without bringing up the possibility of complications, unless there is some specific problem such as a mediastinal mass. PMID:23667731

  16. Teeth syndrome: diagnosis, complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Benzarti, Sofien; Boussen, Monia; Maalla, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Teeth syndrome or fight bite is a specific entity in hand surgery that is little known. It includes infectious complications of the hand following a fist against the teeth. Neglected or misdiagnosed this injury frequently leads to serious complications that could compromise the function of the hand. A retrospective study was performed on 20 patients treated for teeth syndrome at our department, during a period of 12 years (January 2003 to April 2015). All young adults with a mean age of 28 years and a significant male predominance. The dominant side was involved in 15 patients. Lesions were divided into 4 cases of simple dorsal wounds facing the MP joint, 8 cases of dorsal hand cellulitis, and 8 cases of arthritis and osteoarthritis of the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint of the long fingers. The index was the most affected finger. Treatment consisted in debridement of necrotic tissues, stabilization with external fixation for arthritis, skin reconstruction was performed secondarily. Result was assessed as good in 60% of cases. Clenched fist injuries to the mouth (teeth syndrome or fight bite) are known as being the worst human bites. Usually treated as minor injuries, without realizing a breach of the joint capsule, a lesion of the extensor tendon, or a contamination by oral flora. Any patient with a wound near the joint of the hand and was involved in a fight, need an appropriate evaluation and a specialized treatment to avoid serious complications. PMID:26834924

  17. Laryngeal complications by orotracheal intubation: Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Luiz Alberto Alves; de Cavalho, Glauber Barbosa; Brito, Valeska Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Sumamry Introduction: The injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation are common in our way and widely told by literature. Generally the pipe rank of or consequence of its permanence in the aerial ways of the patient is caused by accidents in. It has diverse types of larynx injuries, caused for multiple mechanisms. Objective: To verify, in literature, the main causes of laryngeal complications after- orotracheal intubation and its mechanisms of injury. Revision of Literature: The searched databases had been LILACS, BIREME and SCIELO. Were updated, books and theses had been used, delimiting itself the period enters 1953 the 2009. The keywords used for the search of articles had been: complications, injuries, larynx, intubation, endotracheal, orotracheal, granulomas, stenosis. 59 references had been selected. The used criteria of inclusion for the choice of articles had been the ones that had shown to the diverse types of injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation and its pathophysiology. Final Considerations: This revision of literature was motivated by the comment in the practical clinic of a great number of laryngeal sequels in patients submitted to the orotracheal intubation. Of that is ahead important the knowledge, for the professionals of the area of health, the types of complications and its causes, with intention to prevent them, adopting measured of prevention of these injuries. PMID:25991942

  18. Complications Following BellaGen™ Injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Park, Kui Young; Li, Kapsok; Seo, Seong Jun; Hong, Chang Kwun

    2011-12-01

    BellaGen™ is an injectable acellular dermal matrix granule derived from donated human skin tissue that was recently developed for soft tissue augmentation. Its use has been sporadically reported in penile girth enhancement procedures. Many cases of complications have been reported after injecting acellular dermal matrices like AlloDerm or SureDerm™ but few reports on complications associated with BellaGen™ injection. We report here on penile skin inflammation and necrosis following augmentation phalloplasty with BellaGen™, which developed 3 days after the injection and persisted for more than 2 weeks. The patient had a 15 year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and he was treated with oral antibiotics and wet dressings with KMNO4 solution to combine preservation of the remaining penile soft tissue with debridement of avascular tissue. The lesion improved with this treatment, but the patient experienced pain for about 2 weeks. All patients should be informed of the potential complications with the use of injectable acellular dermal matrices before treatment. Patient selection for augmentation is also important to have the most desirable results. PMID:22346264

  19. Ileal cannulation and associated complications in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hill, R C; Ellison, G W; Burrows, C F; Bauer, J E; Carbia, B

    1996-02-01

    Accurate measurement of small intestinal digestibility is important in dogs because it allows the formulation of pet foods that provide optimal nutrition at minimal cost. Digestibility measured by comparing nutrient intake to fecal excretion in intact animals does not distinguish small intestinal digestion from large intestinal bacterial fermentation. Ileal cannulation allows small intestinal digestion to be measured alone by comparing nutrient intake with ileal excretion of chyme. Nevertheless, ileal cannulation and its associated complications are not well documented in dogs. We describe the implantation of a simple T-cannula in the ileum of nine dogs for an average duration of 26 weeks. Established cannulas were well tolerated, and one dog retained the cannula for 14 months. Nevertheless, ileal effluent proved extremely caustic, and the incidence of complications in the immediate postoperative period was high. Only one dog had an unremarkable postoperative course. Complications included abscessation and cannula extrusion, followed by severe excoriation and ulceration of the skin. This excoriation could be prevented only by immediate surgical closure of the fistula. Chronic ileal cannulation is therefore a viable technique in dogs, but careful monitoring of the cannula site is essential. Dogs should be subjected to this procedure only if adequate veterinary and nursing care is available. It is preferable to maintain a colony of long-term cannulated dogs rather than to implant cannulas as needed. PMID:8699825

  20. Diabetic foot complications: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Giurini, John M; Lyons, Thomas E

    2005-09-01

    Foot complications in patients with diabetes mellitus are a challenge to the health care industry. A great deal of expenditure is due to the management of diabetic foot complications. This places a great burden on the health care industry. It also places a great burden on those diabetic patients with foot complications and their families. Therefore, their effective management in an efficient manner is crucial to our patients. To deal with these problems, a dedicated, knowledgeable, and experienced multidisciplinary team is key. Intervention at the earliest possible time yields the best outcome. Prevention is the focus for those with no ulcerations. For those with ulcerations, prompt recognition and treatment is key. The importance of classifying ulcerations according to size, depth, presence or absence of infection, and vascular status can not be overstated. Proper offloading is vital for those with neuropathic lesions. Recognition of patients with a component of ischemia and vascular intervention to increase perfusion will aid in wound healing. Of course deep infection requires immediate drainage. All efforts of those in the multidisciplinary team are directed at the restoration and maintenance of an ulcer-free foot which is important in enabling our patients to maintain their ambulatory status. PMID:16100098