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Sample records for access site-related complications

  1. Access related complications during anterior exposure of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Gary A; Pawar, Abhijit Y

    2013-01-01

    The new millennium has witnessed the emergence of minimally invasive, non-posterior based surgery of the lumbar spine, in particular via lateral based methodologies to discectomy and fusion. In contrast, and perhaps for a variety of reasons, anterior motion preservation (non-fusion) technologies are playing a comparatively lesser, though incompletely defined, role at present. Lateral based motion preservation technologies await definition of their eventual role in the armamentarium of minimally invasive surgical therapies of the lumbar spine. While injury to the major vascular structures remains the most serious and feared complication of the anterior approach, this occurrence has been nearly eliminated by the use of lateral based approaches for discectomy and fusion cephalad to L5-S1. Whether anterior or lateral based, non-posterior approaches to the lumbar spine share certain access related pitfalls and complications, including damage to the urologic and neurologic structures, as well as gastrointestinal and abdominal wall issues. This review will focus on the recognition, management and prevention of these anterior and lateral access related complications. PMID:23362471

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  3. With "Access Codes", Textbook Pricing Gets More Complicated than Ever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    The story of one University of Maine student's quest for a reasonably priced textbook reveals just how complicated course materials have become as the textbook industry makes its awkward transition from print to digital. The student is Luke Thomas, a senior majoring in business on the Orono campus, who last semester took a 250-person introductory…

  4. A method to minimize complications in endodontic access cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Zelikow, Robert; Cozzarelli-Moldauer, Gina; Keiner, Steven; Hardigan, Patrick C

    2008-06-01

    This article presents a method of avoiding some operative errors in endodontic-access cavity preparation. Utilizing the radiograph, a line representing the coronal extension of the image of the coronal two-thirds of the root canal(s) is drawn on the facial surface of the crown (Fig. 1). This line determines the proper angulation of the bur to facilitate entry into the pulp chamber in proper mesio-distal orientation, thereby reducing the likelihood of mesial and distal gouging and perforating. Marking the tooth to be treated prior to rubber-dam placement help in preventing treatment of an incorrect tooth. Two studies utilizing Nova Southeastern University College of Dental Medicine (NSUCDM) second-year dental students (D-2), one utilizing University of Florida, College of Dentistry (UFCD) second year dental students (D2) and one utilizing NSUCDM Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) faculty and students were undertaken to evaluate the method. Evaluation was by endodontic teachers. Results indicate use of the line-drawing method may facilitate more ideal access cavities than those prepared without the method. Welch's t-test, chi-square test and estimating equations were employed. One study showed significant difference between control and test groups (p less than 045). All studies indicated a difference. Further testing of the method is indicated. This valuable tool should be considered for use in teaching and practice.

  5. Delivery Complications Associated With Prenatal Care Access for Medicaid-Insured Mothers in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Bennett, Kevin J.; Probst, Janice C.

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy complications affect many women. It is likely that some complications can be avoided through routine primary and prenatal care of reasonable quality. The authors examined access to health care during pregnancy for mothers insured by Medicaid. The access indicator is potentially avoidable maternity complications (PAMCs). Potentially…

  6. Retrograde Tibiopedal Access as a Bail-Out Procedure for Endovascular Intervention Complications

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Retrograde pedal access has been well described in the literature as a secondary approach for limb salvage in critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients. In this manuscript we are presenting a case where retrograde tibiopedal access has been used as a bail-out procedure for the management of superficial femoral artery (SFA) intervention complications. Procedure/Technique. After development of a perforation while trying to cross the totally occluded mid SFA using the conventional CFA access, we were able to cross the mid SFA lesion after accessing the posterior tibial artery in a retrograde fashion and delivered a self-expanding stent which created a flap that sealed the perforation without the need for covered stent. Conclusion. Retrograde tibiopedal access is a safe and effective approach for delivery of stents from the distal approach and so can be used as a bail-out technique for SFA perforation. PMID:27803837

  7. Ultrasonography as a guide during vascular access procedures and in the diagnosis of complications.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, A; Manca, T; Vercelli, A; Braghieri, A; Magnacavallo, A

    2013-10-29

    Vascular access used in the treatment of patients involves central and peripheral vein accesses and arterial accesses. Catheterization of central veins is widely used in clinical practice; it is a necessary part of the treatment of patients in various settings. The most commonly involved vessels are the internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral veins. The mechanical, infectious, and thrombotic complications of central venous catheterization are markedly reduced when the procedure is performed with real-time ultrasound guidance or (to a slightly lesser extent) ultrasound assistance. Ultrasound guidance is also used to create peripheral venous accesses, for catheterization of peripheral veins and for peripheral insertion of central venous catheters. In this setting, it increases the catheterization success rate, especially during difficult procedures (e.g., obese patients, children) and reduces complications such as catheter-related infections and venous thrombosis. Arterial cannulation is used for invasive monitoring of arterial pressure and for access during diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Ultrasound guidance reduces the risk of catheterization failure and complications. It is especially useful for arterial catheterization procedures performed in the absence of a palpable pulse (e.g., patient in shock, ECMO). Imaging support is being used increasingly to facilitate the creation of vascular accesses under difficult conditions, in part because of the growing use of ultrasonography as a bedside procedure. In clinical settings where patients are becoming increasingly vulnerable as a result of advanced age and/or complex disease, the possibility to reduce the risks associated with these invasive procedures should motivate clinicians to acquire the technical skills needed for routine use of sonographic support during vascular access procedures.

  8. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Walser, Eric M.

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  9. [A rare complication of permanent venous access: constriction, fracture and embolization of the catheter].

    PubMed

    Groebli, Y; Wuthrich, P; Tschantz, P; Beguelin, P; Piguet, D

    1998-01-01

    The pinch off syndrome due to squeezing of the implanted catheter is a rare complication of permanent venous access devices (0.1 to 1% of the cases). The cause is a mechanical catheter's compression in the costo-clavicular space, when implanted too medially in the subclavian vein. In case of lack of venous reflux or injection difficulties, sometimes complicated by local pain, a radiological control must be obtained to demonstrate signs of compression or beginning of fracture. Significant damage to the system is shown be extravasation of radioopaque contrast medium. The suspicion of catheter damage justifies early replacement of the system to avoid right heart or pulmonary artery embolism. The electron microscopic scanning tends to prove that the catheter's rupture is caused by a fatigue process. PMID:9655009

  10. Complications of Minimally Invasive, Tubular Access Surgery for Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    The object of the study was to review the author's large series of minimally invasive spine surgeries for complication rates. The author reviewed a personal operative database for minimally access spine surgeries done through nonexpandable tubular retractors for extradural, nonfusion procedures. Consecutive cases (n = 1231) were reviewed for complications. There were no wound infections. Durotomy occurred in 33 cases (2.7% overall or 3.4% of lumbar cases). There were no external or symptomatic internal cerebrospinal fluid leaks or pseudomeningoceles requiring additional treatment. The only motor injuries were 3 C5 root palsies, 2 of which resolved. Minimally invasive spine surgery performed through tubular retractors can result in a low wound infection rate when compared to open surgery. Durotomy is no more common than open procedures and does not often result in the need for secondary procedures. New neurologic deficits are uncommon, with most observed at the C5 root. Minimally invasive spine surgery, even without benefits such as less pain or shorter hospital stays, can result in considerably lower complication rates than open surgery. PMID:25097785

  11. Vascular Complications and Bleeding After Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Performed Through Open Surgical Access.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence; Akodad, Mariama; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Gandet, Thomas; Lattuca, Benoit; Schmutz, Laurent; Gervasoni, Richard; Nogue, Erika; Nagot, Nicolas; Levy, Gilles; Maupas, Eric; Robert, Gabriel; Targosz, Frederic; Vernhet, Hélène; Cayla, Guillaume; Albat, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Major vascular complications (VC) remain frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and may be associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of VC after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive open surgical access strategy. From 2010 to 2014, we included in a monocentric registry all consecutive patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI. The procedures were performed with 16Fr to 20Fr sheath systems. VC were evaluated within 30 days and classified as major or minor according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition. The study included 396 patients, 218 were women (55%), median age was 85 years (81 to 88), and the median logistic Euroscore was 15.2% (11 to 23). The balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT and the self-expandable Medtronic Core Valve prosthesis were used in 288 (72.7%) and 108 patients (27.3%), respectively. The total length of the procedure was 68 ± 15 minutes including 13 ± 5 minutes for the open surgical access. Major and minor VC were observed in 9 (2.3%) and 16 patients (4%), respectively, whereas life-threatening and major bleeding concerned 18 patients (4.6%). The median duration of hospitalization was 5 days (interquartile range 2 to 7), significantly higher in patients with VC (7 days [5 to 15], p <0.001). Mortality at 1-month and 1-year follow-up (n = 26, 6.6%; and n = 67, 17.2%, respectively) was not related to major or minor VC (p = 0.6). In multivariable analysis, only diabetes (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 6.1, p = 0.034) and chronic kidney failure (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 9.0, p = 0.046) were predictive of VC, whereas body mass index, gender, Euroscore, and lower limb arteriopathy were not. In conclusion, minimal rate of VC and bleeding can be obtained after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive surgical strategy, with a particular advantage observed in high-risk bleeding patients.

  12. Vascular Complications and Bleeding After Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Performed Through Open Surgical Access.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence; Akodad, Mariama; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Gandet, Thomas; Lattuca, Benoit; Schmutz, Laurent; Gervasoni, Richard; Nogue, Erika; Nagot, Nicolas; Levy, Gilles; Maupas, Eric; Robert, Gabriel; Targosz, Frederic; Vernhet, Hélène; Cayla, Guillaume; Albat, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Major vascular complications (VC) remain frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and may be associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of VC after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive open surgical access strategy. From 2010 to 2014, we included in a monocentric registry all consecutive patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI. The procedures were performed with 16Fr to 20Fr sheath systems. VC were evaluated within 30 days and classified as major or minor according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition. The study included 396 patients, 218 were women (55%), median age was 85 years (81 to 88), and the median logistic Euroscore was 15.2% (11 to 23). The balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT and the self-expandable Medtronic Core Valve prosthesis were used in 288 (72.7%) and 108 patients (27.3%), respectively. The total length of the procedure was 68 ± 15 minutes including 13 ± 5 minutes for the open surgical access. Major and minor VC were observed in 9 (2.3%) and 16 patients (4%), respectively, whereas life-threatening and major bleeding concerned 18 patients (4.6%). The median duration of hospitalization was 5 days (interquartile range 2 to 7), significantly higher in patients with VC (7 days [5 to 15], p <0.001). Mortality at 1-month and 1-year follow-up (n = 26, 6.6%; and n = 67, 17.2%, respectively) was not related to major or minor VC (p = 0.6). In multivariable analysis, only diabetes (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 6.1, p = 0.034) and chronic kidney failure (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 9.0, p = 0.046) were predictive of VC, whereas body mass index, gender, Euroscore, and lower limb arteriopathy were not. In conclusion, minimal rate of VC and bleeding can be obtained after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive surgical strategy, with a particular advantage observed in high-risk bleeding patients. PMID

  13. Relationship of local i.v. complications and the method of intermittenti.v. access.

    PubMed

    Hunter, E S; Bell, E; Staub, M A; Coyle, G

    1995-01-01

    Infiltration, infection, phlebitis, and thrombophlebitis are considered the most frequent complications of i.v. therapy. The purpose of our study was to determine if a difference existed in incidence of complications during i.v. infusions depending on whether the i.v. tubing is directly connected to the infusion device or the tubing is connected to the latex port of an i.v. lock using a needle. Background information, mehtod followed, and results obtained in the study are discussed.

  14. Percutaneous Transsplenic Access to the Portal Vein for Management of Vascular Complication in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hee Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein for management of vascular complication in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Between Sept 2009 and April 2011, percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein was attempted in nine patients with chronic liver disease. Splenic vein puncture was performed under ultrasonographic guidance with a Chiba needle, followed by introduction of a 4 to 9F sheath. Four patients with hematemesis or hematochezia underwent variceal embolization. Another two patients underwent portosystemic shunt embolization in order to improve portal venous blood flow. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver. The percutaneous transsplenic access site was closed using coils and glue. Results: Percutaneous transsplenic splenic vein catheterization was performed successfully in all patients. Gastric or jejunal varix embolization with glue and lipiodol mixture was performed successfully in four patients. In two patients with a massive portosystemic shunt, embolization of the shunting vessel with a vascular plug, microcoils, glue, and lipiodol mixture was achieved successfully. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver; however, only one patient was treated successfully. Complete closure of the percutaneous transsplenic tract was achieved using coils and glue without bleeding complication in all patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein can be an alternative route for portography and further endovascular management in patients for whom conventional approaches are difficult or impossible.

  15. Opening of Dead Sea Scrolls Archive Underlines Problems That Can Complicate Access to Research Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, Ellen K.

    1991-01-01

    The Huntington Library (California) decision to make generally accessible, for the first time, copies of photographs of the Dead Sea Scrolls, previously tightly controlled by a small group of editors, is hailed as breaking a scholarly monopoly over an important intellectual resource, reaffirming the mission of the research library and the…

  16. Safety and efficacy of using the Viabahn endoprosthesis for percutaneous treatment of vascular access complications after transfemoral aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Ole; Arnous, Samer; Sandholt, Benjamin; Brooks, Matthew; Biasco, Luigi; Franzen, Olaf; Lönn, Lars; Bech, Bo; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-04-15

    Vascular access complications (VACs) remain one of the biggest challenges when performing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This study aimed to investigate the short- and medium-term safety and efficacy of the Viabahn endoprosthesis (Gore, Flagstaff, AZ) when used to treat TAVI-induced vascular injury. Over a 40-month period, 354 patients underwent true percutaneous transfemoral (TF)-TAVI using a CoreValve and Prostar-XL closure system; this was our study population. A VAC leading to acute intervention occurred in 72 patients (20.3%) - of these, 18 were managed by balloon angioplasty, 48 were treated by Viabahn stenting (technical success rate 98%), and 6 needed surgical intervention. Overall, this approach resulted in a major VAC rate of 3.1% (n = 11) in our study cohort. Length of hospitalization and 30-day mortality rates were comparable in patients with a VAC treated by Viabahn stenting versus patients without vascular complications. Two patients (4.5%) presented with new-onset claudication; one of them had the stent implanted covering the deep femoral artery (DFA). At medium-term follow-up (median 372 days; range 55 to 978 days) duplex ultrasound showed 100% patency of the Viabahn endoprostheses with no signs of stent fracture or in-stent stenosis/occlusion. In conclusion, the use of self-expanding covered stents is safe and effective in case of TF-TAVI-induced vascular injury, with good short- and medium-term outcomes. Importantly, coverage of the DFA should be avoided. If confirmed by long-term (>5 years) follow-up studies, this strategy for treating TAVI-induced VAC may be used routinely in high-risk patients. PMID:25728645

  17. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  18. Enterococcus faecalis endophthalmitis as a metastatic complication of hemodialysis vascular access-related sepsis: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Osman Zikrullah; Kara, Ekrem; Belice, Tahir; Ayaz, Teslime; Baydur Sahin, Serap; Ozturk, Cinar; Yildirim, Safak; Metin, Yavuz; Sahutoglu, Tuncay

    2016-07-01

    Catheter and/or arteriovenous (A-V) graft-related bacteremia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among hemodialysis (HD) patients. Endocarditis, septic arthritis, epidural abscess, septic embolism, and osteomyelitis are the most common complications of catheter and/or A-V graft-related bacteremia; however, endogenous endophthalmitis is rarely seen. To the best of our knowledge, Enterococcus faecalis is the first case report in this population. We hereby report a case of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by E. faecalis as a complication of catheter and/or A-V graft-related bacteremia in a diabetic patient, who was undergoing HD for 5 years. We also discuss the etiology, clinical features, and outcomes of endogenous endophthalmitis in HD patients with a brief review of the literature. Although broad-spectrum parenteral (intravenous and intravitreal) antibiotics were used for 4 weeks, evisceration of the left eye could not be avoided. Endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare but rapidly blinding complication of catheter and/or A-V graft-related bacteremia in HD patients. It can develop as a result of silent catheter and/or A-V graft infections, which may lead to recurrent bacteremia. E. faecalis should be considered as a pathogen in this population who had recent history of catheter or A-V graft procedure. PMID:26346615

  19. How to avoid risks for patients in minimal-access trials: Avoiding complications in clinical first-in-human studies by example of the ADBEE study.

    PubMed

    Cezar, Cristina; Korell, Matthias; Tchartchian, Garri; Ziegler, Nicole; Senshu, Kazuhisa; Herrmann, Anja; Larbig, Angelika; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-08-01

    A clinical trial is a prospective study designed to establish the safety and efficacy of investigational devices in humans, in accordance with the strict guidelines of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA; USA) or European Medicines Agency (EMA; Europe). Before a clinical first-in-human study is initiated, preclinical studies of the investigational product are mandatory, and the results should be sufficient to indicate that the investigational device is acceptably safe for the proposed evaluation in human subjects. The present paper describes an experience of clinical trials, highlighting ways of avoiding possible complications in clinical first-in-human studies. For a better approach to our aim, we exemplified a prospective, randomized, single-blind study, ADBEE. The primary objective was to assess the safety of the ADBLOCK system when used as an adjunct to laparoscopic primary removal of myomas in women wishing to improve pregnancy outcomes.

  20. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  1. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  2. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... and your baby are healthy. What is preexisting diabetes? About 9 out of 100 women (9 percent) ...

  3. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  4. Outdoor comfort study in Rio de Janeiro: site-related context effects on reported thermal sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, E.; Drach, P.; Broede, P.

    2016-08-01

    Aimed at climate-responsive urban design for tropical areas, the paper attempts to answer the question whether the site-related context affects in some way the perceptual assessment of the microclimate by users of outdoor spaces. Our hypothesis was that visual cues resulting from urban design are important components of the outdoor thermal perception. Monitoring was carried out alongside the administration of standard comfort questionnaires throughout summer periods in 2012-2015 in pedestrian areas of downtown Rio de Janeiro (22° 54 10 S, 43° 12 27 W), Brazil. Campaigns took place at different points, pre-defined in respect of urban geometry attributes. For the measurements, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station was employed to which a gray globe thermometer was attached. Two thermal indices were used for assessing the overall meteorological conditions and comfort levels in the outdoor locations: physiological equivalent temperature (PET) and universal thermal climate index (UTCI). Our results suggest that thermal sensation in Rio depends to a large extent on the thermal environment as described by air temperature, PET, or UTCI, and that urban geometry (expressed by the sky-view factor (SVF)) may modify this relationship with increased building density associated to warmer sensation votes under moderate heat stress conditions. This relationship however reverses under strong heat stress with warmer sensations in less obstructed locations, and disappears completely under still higher heat stress, where meteorological conditions, and not the site's SVF, will drive thermal sensation.

  5. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes.

  6. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  7. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  8. Web Accessibility and Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz

    Access to, and movement around, complex online environments, of which the World Wide Web (Web) is the most popular example, has long been considered an important and major issue in the Web design and usability field. The commonly used slang phrase ‘surfing the Web’ implies rapid and free access, pointing to its importance among designers and users alike. It has also been long established that this potentially complex and difficult access is further complicated, and becomes neither rapid nor free, if the user is disabled. There are millions of people who have disabilities that affect their use of the Web. Web accessibility aims to help these people to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with, as well as contribute to, the Web, and thereby the society in general. This accessibility is, in part, facilitated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) currently moving from version one to two. These guidelines are intended to encourage designers to make sure their sites conform to specifications, and in that conformance enable the assistive technologies of disabled users to better interact with the page content. In this way, it was hoped that accessibility could be supported. While this is in part true, guidelines do not solve all problems and the new WCAG version two guidelines are surrounded by controversy and intrigue. This chapter aims to establish the published literature related to Web accessibility and Web accessibility guidelines, and discuss limitations of the current guidelines and future directions.

  9. [Complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Ramadan, E; Chaimoff, C

    1992-04-15

    92% of our first 60 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were successful. Postoperative complications included fever in 10 cases (17%), urinary retention in 5 (8%), intraabdominal abscess in 2 (3%), biliary leakage in 1 (2%) and unexplained abdominal pain in 10 (17%). Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has obvious advantages, it also has major as well as minor complications. PMID:1398315

  10. Facial flap complications.

    PubMed

    Zoumalan, Richard A; Murakami, Craig S

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of fundamental concepts can help decrease the chance of complications in plastic surgery. Local flap reconstruction for facial defects has many pitfalls. This article describes common complications in local flap reconstruction of the face and describes strategies that prevent problems.

  11. Bulimia Nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Rylander, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    As with anorexia nervosa, there are many medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa. In bulimia nervosa, these complications are a direct result of both the mode and the frequency of purging behaviours. For the purposes of this article, we will review in detail the many complications of the two major modes of purging, namely, self-induced vomiting and laxative abuse; these two account for more than 90% of purging behaviours in bulimia nervosa. Some of these complications are potentially extremely dangerous and need to be well understood to effectively treat patients with bulimia nervosa. Other methods of purging, such as diuretic abuse, are much less frequently utilized and will only be mentioned briefly. In a subsequent article, the treatments of these medical complications will be presented.

  12. Anorexia nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Brown, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other mental health disorders, eating disorders have a high prevalence of concomitant medical complications. Specifically, patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) have a litany of medical complications which are commonly present as part of their eating disorders. Almost every body system can be adversely, affected by this state of progressive malnutrition. Moreover, some of the complications can have permanent adverse effects even after there is a successful program of nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration. Within this article we will review all body systems affected by AN. There is also salient information about both, how to diagnose these medical complications and which are the likely ones to result in permanent sequelae if not diagnosed and addressed early in the course of AN. In a subsequent article, the definitive medical treatment for these complications will be presented in a clinically practical manner.

  13. [Complications in pediatric anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Becke, K

    2014-07-01

    As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia. PMID:25004872

  14. [Complications of blepharoplasty].

    PubMed

    Morax, S

    2004-06-01

    Blepharoplasty complications are infrequent, most often minor and transitory, rarely major and permanent with functional or esthetic consequences. Treatment is above all preventive: screening at risk patients with a history of ophthalmic problems, but also general illnesses that would contraindicate blepharoplasty. Patients must be informed of possible risks through informative booklets with the most important points underlined. Complications can be purely ophthalmological, the more serious sequelae being partial or complete visual loss due to ischemic optical neuropathy, with very poor prognosis, or more rarely compression of the ocular globe by intraorbital hemorrhage, which has a better prognosis provided the origins are quickly recognized and treated immediately. Other visual complications include oculomotor problems, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, epiphora, and chemosis of lymphatic origin. Eyelid complications are more frequent: ptosis on the upper eyelid or lagophthalmia caused by incorrect resection of the skin, scarring and eyelid fold anomalies. The most serious esthetic complication is the malposition of the lower eyelid, which can manifest as retraction, lagophthalmia, ectropion, deformation of the external canthus, or lower eyelid tissue relaxation. These malpositions are quite often minor, sometimes reversible, but at times major, with psychological, esthetic and functional consequences that are difficult for the patient. Other local complications also arise: enophthalmia with a sunken lid, as well as under- and overcorrection. General complications can include scarring related to pigmentation problems and residual hematomas, and exceptionally infections going as far as the orbital fat tissue. Finally, other complications are related to new laser surgical techniques that are responsible for ectropion of the lower eyelid and even burns or residual redness, or complications related to periocular injections of filling material. A comprehensive review of

  15. Patency and complications of translumbar dialysis catheters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. Results There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/min) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter and total catheter were 65, 84 and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6 and 12 months were 43%, 25% and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion This study data suggests that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  16. The groin hit: complications of intravenous drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Roszler, M H; McCarroll, K A; Donovan, K R; Rashid, T; Kling, G A

    1989-05-01

    We are seeing an increased number of complications in intravenous drug abusers who resort to injecting the groin for vascular access (the "groin hit"). Vascular complications include venous thrombosis, arteriovenous fistula, mycotic aneurysm, ruptured pseudoaneurysm, and dissecting hematoma. Soft tissue complications include cellulitis and abscess. The latter may dissect into the extraperitoneal space. Skeletal complications include osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. This paper illustrates the radiographic spectrum of these complications. An algorithm will illustrate the radiographic evaluation of a groin mass in a drug addict. PMID:2727357

  17. Complications of glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christina; Westphal, Manfred; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Even with current advances in adjunctive therapies, including radiation, chemotherapy, and various clinical trials of gene therapy and immunotherapy, surgical resection remains one of the most effective treatment for intra-axial gliomas. Survival in these patients has been shown to be related to the extent of resection. In some cases, it can provide cures of long-term remission; in others, it can provide disease control when combined with the above adjunctive treatments. However, surgical resection carries its own risks and complications. These complications can be broadly divided into neurologic, regional, and systemic, including direct cortical and vascular injury, surgical wound complications, and postsurgical medical complications. Certain patient characteristics, including Karnofsky performance status score (KPS) and pathology of the tumor, have been shown to have an impact on the risk of postsurgical complications. Advancement in preoperative and intraoperative adjunct technology such as cortical mapping and navigation has improved the surgeon's ability to safely and maximally resect the tumors. It is therefore important to understand the perioperative complications after craniotomy and tumor resection and factors affecting morbidity and mortality in order for surgeons to optimally select and counsel patients who will benefit the most from surgical resection. This chapter will focus on the complications associated with craniotomy for intrinsic glioma and ways of avoiding these events.

  18. Accessibility Videos.

    PubMed

    Kurppa, Ari; Nordlund, Marika

    2016-01-01

    It can be difficult to understand accessibility, if you do not have the personal experience. The Accessibility Centre ESKE produced short videos which demonstrate the meaning of accessibility in different situations. Videos will raise accessibility awareness of architects, other planners and professionals in the construction field and maintenance. PMID:27534282

  19. Complications Following Radical Nephroureterectomy.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M

    2016-05-01

    Radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) is the gold standard treatment strategy for bulky, high-grade, or muscle-invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Many patients with UTUC who require RNU are elderly, comorbid, and at risk for perioperative complications. Recognition of likelihood and extent of such complications guides preoperative counseling, decision-making process for major surgery, and perioperative care. A critical review of such data is essential, given the inevitable impact of complications on hospital duration, need for readmission, resource utilization, and costs associated with management. PMID:26968416

  20. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  1. Complications of Measles (Rubeola)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Complications of Measles Language: English ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Language: English Español (Spanish) File ...

  2. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  3. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  4. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  5. On complicity theory.

    PubMed

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value.

  6. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  7. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  8. Complications of auricular correction.

    PubMed

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  9. Fetoscopic management of complicated monochorionic twins.

    PubMed

    Chmait, Ramen; Kontopoulos, Eftichia; Quintero, Rubén

    2009-12-01

    Operative fetoscopy is a surgical approach to the in utero treatment of fetal or placental abnormalities. The approach is on the basis of combined use of ultrasound and endoscopy and minimally invasive access into the womb. Operative fetoscopy is associated with significantly less risk of preterm birth, neonatal morbidity, and maternal morbidity as compared with open fetal surgery. A wide variety of fetal conditions have been surgically managed via operative fetoscopy, particularly complicated monochorionic twin gestations. The aim of this chapter is to review the current status and future direction of operative fetoscopy for the treatment of complicated monochorionic twin pregnancies. PMID:20393415

  10. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  11. Quality, Range, and Legibility in Web Sites Related to Orofacial Functions

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Ferrari, Deborah Viviane; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Plenty of information about health is available on the Internet; however, quality and legibility are not always evaluated. Knowledge regarding orofacial functions can be considered important for the population because it allows proper stimulus, early diagnosis, and prevention of the oral myofunctional alterations during early infancy. Objective The aim was evaluate the quality, legibility, and range of Web sites available in Brazilian Portuguese regarding the orofacial functions. Methods Selected Web sites with information directed to parents/caregivers of babies regarding breast-feeding, feeding after 6 months, deleterious oral habits, and breathing and speech were studied. The Web sites were evaluated through the application of Flesch Reading Ease Test and aspects of the Health on the Net (HON) modified code (HONCode); the range of the subjects addressed was compared with other aspects of infant development. Results From the access of 350 pages of the Internet, 35 Web sites were selected and 315 excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. In relation to legibility, Web sites scored an average of 61.23% in the Flesch Test, and the application of the modified HONCode showed an average of 6.43 points; an average of 2.49 subjects were found per Web site evaluated, with information on breast-feeding being more frequent and subjects such as breathing and speech less frequent. Conclusions Web sites that deal with orofacial functions presented standard legibility classification. Only half of the ethical principles were considered by the modified HONCode in their majority, and most addressed subjects after “breast-feeding” were presented with restricted range. PMID:25992036

  12. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  13. Ophthalmic complications of dengue.

    PubMed

    Chan, David P L; Teoh, Stephen C B; Tan, Colin S H; Nah, Gerard K M; Rajagopalan, Rajesh; Prabhakaragupta, Manjunath K; Chee, Caroline K L; Lim, Tock H; Goh, Kong Y

    2006-02-01

    We report 13 cases of ophthalmic complications resulting from dengue infection in Singapore. We performed a retrospective analysis of a series of 13 patients with dengue fever who had visual impairment. Investigations included Humphrey automated visual field analyzer, Amsler charting, fundus fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Twenty-two eyes of 13 patients were affected. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years. Visual acuity varied from 20/25 to counting fingers only. Twelve patients (92.3%) noted central vision impairment. Onset of visual impairment coincided with the nadir of serum thrombocytopenia. Ophthalmologic findings include macular edema and blot hemorrhages (10), cotton wool spots (1), retinal vasculitis (4), exudative retinal detachment (2), and anterior uveitis (1). All patients recovered visual acuity to 20/30 or better with residual central scotoma by 12 weeks. These new complications suggest a widening spectrum of ophthalmic complications in dengue infection.

  14. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  15. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise.

  16. Three-dimensional MDCT angiography for the assessment of arteriovenous grafts and fistulas in hemodialysis access.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S; Raman, S P; Fishman, E K

    2016-03-01

    Arteriovenous grafts and fistulas are placed for long-term hemodialysis access, and their associated complications can lead to considerable morbidity. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) images provide accurate delineation of hemodialysis access anatomy and show potential complications. This review makes the reader more familiar with vascular access anatomy and configurations, describes the appearance of access complications encountered on MDCT, and discusses endovascular and surgical treatment options for complications, which should aid in post-treatment evaluation. PMID:26868603

  17. Complications employing the holmium:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Beaghler, M; Poon, M; Ruckle, H; Stewart, S; Weil, D

    1998-12-01

    We report the operative and early postoperative complications and limitations in 133 patients treated with the holmium laser. Complications included urinary tract infection (N = 3), postoperative bradycardia (1), inverted T-waves (1), intractable flank pain (1), urinary retention (1), inability to access a lower-pole calix with a 365-microm fiber (9), stone migration (5), and termination of procedure because of poor visibility (2). No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred, and no complications were directly attributable to the laser. The holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. In our initial experience, the holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of urinary pathology. Use of laser fibers larger than 200 microm occasionally limits deflection of the endoscope into a lower-pole or dependent calix.

  18. Mechanical complications of long-term Tesio catheters.

    PubMed

    Ndzengue, A; Kessaris, N; Dosani, T; Mustafa, N; Papalois, V; Hakim, N S

    2009-01-01

    Vascular access catheters such as Tesio-Caths are preferentially inserted in the internal jugular vein and serve as access for hemodialysis. Complications related to the removal of these types of lines are uncommon. We report four patients in whom the tip of the Tesio-Cath broke and was left stuck in the superior vena cava. Although there is no defined limit to the maximum length of stay of vascular access catheters for dialysis, the possibility of catheter entrapment should be considered. It remains to be determined whether removing Tesio-Caths every 16- 18 months is beneficial in avoiding this complication.

  19. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. PMID:27289254

  20. Interpreting Dream Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollub, Dan

    1984-01-01

    Explains different complications, i.e., emotional behavior, speech, and symbolism, suggesting that emotional behavior in dreams is either genuine or opposite from emotional reality. Dream speech delineates boundaries between the conscious and unconscious. Symbolism in dreams presents abstract concepts visually. (BH)

  1. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  2. Complications from radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhermain, Frédéric; Barani, Igor J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) of the brain is associated with significant stigma in the neuro-oncology community. This is primarily because of the potentially severe complications with which it may be associated. These complications, especially in subacute and latent settings, are often unpredictable, potentially progressive, and irreversible. The onset of complications may start from the first fraction of 2 Gy, continuing over several months after end of RT with persistent drowsiness and apathy. It may also extend over many years with progressive onset of neurocognitive impairments such as memory decline, and diminished focus/attention. For long-term survivors, such as young patients irradiated for a favorable low-grade glioma, quality of life can be seriously impacted by RT. It is essential, as in the pediatric field, to propose patient-specific regimens from the very outset of therapy. The use of molecular biomarkers to better predict survival, control of comorbidities along with judicious use of medications such as steroids and antiepileptics, improved targeting with the help of modern imaging and RT techniques, modulation of the dose, and fractionation aimed at limiting integral dose to the healthy brain all have the potential to minimize treatment-related complications while maintaining the therapeutic efficacy for which RT is known. Sparing "radiosensitive" areas such as hippocampi could have a modest but measurable impact with regard to cognitive preservation, an effect that can possibly be enhanced when used in conjunction with memantine and/or donepezil. PMID:26948357

  3. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  4. Complications of collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Patricia; Goldberg, David J

    2014-12-01

    As the skin ages, a deficiency in collagen occurs, thus injectable collagen products have become a sensible and popular option for dermal filling and volume enhancement. Several types of collagen have been developed over the years, including animal sources such as bovine and porcine collagen, as well as human-based sources derived from pieces of the patient's own skin, cadaver skin, and later cultured from human dermal fibroblasts. While collagen overall has a relatively safe, side effect profile, there are several complications, both early and late onset, that practitioners and patients should be aware of. Early complications, occurring within days of the procedure, can be divided into non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity reactions. The non-hypersensitive reactions include injection site reactions, discoloration, maldistribution, infection, skin necrosis, and the very rare but dreaded risk of vision loss, whereas the hypersensitivity reactions present usually as delayed type IV reactions, but can also rarely present as an immediate type I reaction. Late complications, occurring within weeks to even years after injection, include granuloma formation, foreign body reactions, and infection secondary to atypical mycobacteria or biofilms. This review will give a detailed overview of the complications secondary to cutaneous collagen injections.

  5. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotoučová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  6. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  7. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  8. Complications and Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... successfully cure SCD. Complications from hydroxyurea therapy and stem cell transplants are rare but can be serious or life-threatening. People with SCD and their families should ask their doctors about the benefits and risks of each. Read more about treatment ...

  9. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  10. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  11. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  12. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  13. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  14. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Louise E; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question.

  15. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  16. Complications of vasectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Awsare, Ninaad S.; Krishnan, Jai; Boustead, Greg B.; Hanbury, Damian C.; McNicholas, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vasectomy is a common method of sterilisation. However, it is less popular than tubal ligation world-wide. It is also a frequent cause of litigation relating to its complications. This article reviews the early and late risks associated with the procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data collection was done using the internet to search Medline for obtaining evidence-based medicine reviews. Cross-references were obtained from key articles. Websites of government bodies and medical associations were searched for guidelines relating to vasectomy. DISCUSSION: Early complications include haematoma, wound and genito-urinary infections, and traumatic fistulae. Vasectomy failure occurs in 0-2% of patients. Late recanalisation causes failure in 0.2% of vasectomies. Significant chronic orchalgia may occur in up to 15% of men after vasectomy, and may require epididyectomy or vasectomy reversal. Antisperm antibodies develop in a significant proportion of men post-vasectomy, but do not increase the risk of immune-complex or atherosclerotic heart disease. Similarly, vasectomy does not enhance risk of testicular or prostate cancer. Vasectomy has a lower mortality as compared to tubal occlusion, but is still significantly high in non-industrialised countries because of infections. CONCLUSIONS: Vasectomy, though safe and relatively simple, requires a high level of expertise to minimise complications. Adequate pre-operative counselling is essential to increase patient acceptability of this method of permanent contraception. PMID:16263006

  17. Unusual complication after genioplasty.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Rafael Linard; Sá, Carlos Diego Lopes; Esses, Diego Felipe Silveira; Becker, Otávio Emmel; Soares, Eduardo Costa Studart; de Oliveira, Rogerio Belle

    2014-01-01

    Facial beauty depends on shape, proportion, and harmony between the facial thirds. The chin is one of the most important components of the inferior third and has an important role on the definition of facial aesthetic and harmony in both frontal and lateral views. There are 2 principal therapeutic approaches that one can choose to treat mental deformities, alloplastic implants, and mental basilar ostectomy, also known as genioplasty. The latest is more commonly used because of great versatility in the correction of three-dimensional deformities of the chin and smaller taxes of postoperative complications. Possible transoperative and postoperative complications of genioplasty include mental nerve lesion, bleeding, damage to tooth roots, bone resorption of the mobilized segment, mandibular fracture, ptosis of the lower lip, and failure to stabilize the ostectomized segment. The study presents 2 cases of displacement of the osteotomized segment after genioplasty associated with facial trauma during postoperative orthognathic surgery followed by rare complications with no reports in the literature. PMID:24621765

  18. Vascular Complications Associated with Transfemoral Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Hines, George L; Jaspan, Vita; Kelly, Brian J; Calixte, Rose

    2016-06-01

    Background Transfemoral aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a novel technique for treating aortic stenosis, yet vascular complications are yet to be delineated. Objectives This study aims to study the vascular complications of TAVR with Edwards Sapien valves (Edwards Lifesciences Corp., Irvine, CA). Methods We performed a retrospective evaluation of TAVR patients. Standard demographics, femoral vessel and sheath size, access type (femoral cut-down [FC], percutaneous access [PFA], and iliac conduit [IC]), and treatment method were recorded. Complications were defined by the Valve Academic Research Consortium Criteria. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. Results A total of 99 patients underwent TAVR between February 15, 2012 and July 17, 2013 with an Edwards Sapien valve. Out of which, 48 were males with a mean age of 83 ± 7 years. Overall, 33 had FC, 58 had PFA, and 6 had an IC. A total of 17 major (2 aortic and 15 iliac) and 38 minor complications (36 access and 2 emboli) occurred. Aortic complications were managed by open repair (OR, 1) or percutaneous repair (PR, 1). Overall, 12 iliac injuries were managed by PR and 3 by OR. Out of the 33 groin complications in FC patients 8 (24%) were treated by OR, whereas 30 (52%) of the 58 groin complications in PTA patients were treated by PR. There were no differences in transfusion requirements or length of stay. Conclusion Vascular complications of TAVR are common with most being minor, related to access site and causing no immediate sequelae. Iliac injury can be managed by PR or OR. Aortic injury is associated with significant mortality. These findings increase vascular surgeons' awareness of these complications and how to manage them. PMID:27231425

  19. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  20. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  1. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  2. Intraoperative anesthetic complications.

    PubMed

    Milam, S B

    1987-01-01

    Intraoperative anesthetic complications can be prevented or minimized if the anesthetist is able to anticipate such problems in the preanesthetic period. Therefore, an adequate preanesthetic medical history that includes previous anesthetic experiences and past and current drug therapy is extremely important. Furthermore, the anesthetist must be properly trained to anticipate undesirable reactions to anesthetic agents. The signs of an impending disaster are subtle and nonspecific in the anesthetized patient. Therefore, continuous vigilance of the patient's physiologic status coupled with a high index of suspicion are essential to safe anesthetic management of dental patients. PMID:3468015

  3. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. PMID:26903190

  4. [Complications of hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    The most common and serious complications of haemorrhoids include perianal thrombosis and incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids with subsequent thrombosis. They are characterised by severe pain in the perianal region possibly with bleeding. In a short history of the perianal thrombosis, acute surgical incision or excision is indicated, which can result in rapid relief of the painful symptoms. In incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids, emergency haemorrhoidectomy may also be indicated. Segmental haemorrhoidectomy in the most affected quadrants followed by further elective surgery for haemorrhoids in the next stage is preferred.

  5. Complicated Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David T

    2016-10-01

    More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply. All will require highly individualized resuscitations. PMID:27600129

  6. [Acute complications of abortion].

    PubMed

    Obel, E

    1976-02-01

    The complications accompanying the various methods of abortion as studied in different surveys are reported. In studies of dilation and curettage (D and C) and vaccuum aspiration (VA), lethality ranges from .5 to 2.9 deaths/100,000 cases. Metrorrhagia occurred in 2.5-6% of the D and C cases studied and in 2.9-3.5% of the VA cases. The bleeding was accompanied by infection in most cases where abortive tissue remained in the uterus, which occured in .4-.8% of the D and C cases and in .6-.9% of the VA cases studied. Postabortive bleeding occurred through the 10th day in up to 25% of the patients and was related to the length of the gestation period before abortion. Pelvic infection, mostly of the endometrium, occurred in about 1.4% of the D and C patients and in .3-1.2% of the VA patients. 1.4% of the D and C patients and .6% of the VA patients experienced a rise in body temperature as the only complication of abortion. Perforation of the uterus occurred in about .8% of the D and C patients and in .1-.6% of VA patients. Lesions of the cervix had to be sutured in .1% of the D and C group and .3% of the VA group. Saline instillation, used for abortions in the second trimest er, had a mortality rate of about 20/100,000 cases. Since the success rate of saline instillation is 90-98%, complications are more frequent, often requiring treatment with oxytocin or curettage. Extensive bleeding occurred in 2.3-4%. Curettage of the placenta was required in about 2.1-16.9% of the cases. Pelvic inflammation occurred in about 2.5% and temperature elevation in 1-3.4%. Abdominal hysterotomies had a lethality of 208/100,000. Pelvic hemorrhage occurred in 31%, inflammation in 4.7%, temperature elevation in 13%, and febrile reactions in 31% of the abdominal hysterotomies studied. It is necessary to establish international definitions of abortion complications for better documentation, and postoperative observations should be recorded more conscientiously. PMID:1251502

  7. Complicated intestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Miller, R C

    1979-05-01

    In this group of 45 intestinal atresia patients (duodenum, 16; jejunum, 24; ileum five) at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, individual hospitalizations ranged up to 245 days. Twelve patients required multiple operations, and the overall mortality rate was 22% (ten patients). While the patients with duodenal atresia had the greatest incidence of other congenital anomalies, including Down's syndrome, the patients with jejunal atresia presented with the most challenging surgical problems. Of the 24 jejunal atresia patients, only three had a single, simple area of obstruction. The remainder were complicated by other gastrointestinal lesions (five patients), by multiple areas of atresia (seven patients) including those in one surviving patient with 22 separate atretic segments, and by the Christmas tree deformity (nine patients). Intraoperative management of the complicated atresia should include: 1) grouping of multiple atresias during resection, 2) adequate resection of the dilated proximal atonic loop, 3) end-to-end anastomoses, 4) avoidance of intraluminal catheters, 5) additional resection of a segment of the distal loop in the Christmas tree deformity and 6) consideration of the shish kebab technique for multiple atretic webs. Postoperative management should involve early intravenous nutrition and repeated exploration for continued obstruction.

  8. Gaining Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses issues schools and universities have encountered in complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and making their facilities more accessible to the disabled. The ADA's vagueness and the architect's need for understanding the regulations is highlighted. (GR)

  9. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  10. Capital access.

    PubMed

    Towne, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    To maintain their viability, hospitals are being compelled to invest in big capital projects such as information technology and renovation and construction. This gatefold examines the trends in credit and capital, and how they affect hospitals' access to money.

  11. Respiratory Complication in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Vijaya S; Ansari, Sikandar; Fisher, Micah

    2016-07-01

    Cirrhosis, the twelfth leading cause of death, accounts for 1.1% of all deaths in the United States. Although there are multiple pulmonary complications associated with liver disease, the most important complications that cause significant morbidity and mortality are hepatopulmonary syndrome, hepatic hydrothorax, and portopulmonary hypertension. Patients with cirrhosis who complain of dyspnea should be evaluated for these complications. This article reviews these complications. PMID:27339676

  12. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  13. Neuromuscular complications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Grisold, A; Löscher, W N

    2016-08-15

    Cancer is becoming a treatable and even often curable disease. The neuromuscular system can be affected by direct tumor invasion or metastasis, neuroendocrine, metabolic, dysimmune/inflammatory, infections and toxic as well as paraneoplastic conditions. Due to the nature of cancer treatment, which frequently is based on a DNA damaging mechanism, treatment related toxic side effects are frequent and the correct identification of the causative mechanism is necessary to initiate the proper treatment. The peripheral nervous system is conventionally divided into nerve roots, the proximal nerves and plexus, the peripheral nerves (mono- and polyneuropathies), the site of neuromuscular transmission and muscle. This review is based on the anatomic distribution of the peripheral nervous system, divided into cranial nerves (CN), motor neuron (MND), nerve roots, plexus, peripheral nerve, the neuromuscular junction and muscle. The various etiologies of neuromuscular complications - neoplastic, surgical and mechanic, toxic, metabolic, endocrine, and paraneoplastic/immune - are discussed separately for each part of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:27423586

  14. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  15. Cardiovascular complications in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Vitale, G; Pivonello, R; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2004-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are increased in acromegaly. In fact, GH and IGF-I excess induces a specific cardiomyopathy. The early stage of acromegaly is characterized by the hyperkinetic syndrome (high heart rate and increased systolic output). Frequently, concentric biventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction occur in acromegaly, leading to an impaired systolic function ending in heart failure if the disease is untreated or unsuccessfully untreated. Besides, abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and of valves have been also described in acromegaly. The coexistence of other complications, such as arterial hypertension and diabetes, aggravates the acromegalic cardiomyopathy. The suppression of GH/IGF-I following an efficacious therapy could decrease left ventricular mass and improve cardiac function. In conclusion, a careful evaluation of cardiac function, morphology and activity seems to be mandatory in acromegaly.

  16. Complications of collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh-James

    2008-03-21

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:18350593

  17. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  18. Complications of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gasche, C

    2000-01-01

    Complications in inflammatory bowel disease determine the severity of disease as well as the complexities of medical or surgical treatment opportunities. Therefore, in known inflammatory bowel disease, the prevention, the early detection and the adequate therapeutic response to certain complications are important goals in the follow-up of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Disease complications are separated into intestinal and extraintestinal complications. Intestinal complications are somewhat disease specific, which means that they occur exclusively in either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis (e.g., enteric fistulas are particularly found in Crohn's disease and toxic megacolon in ulcerative colitis). Most extraintestinal complications occur in both forms of inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., anemia, thromboembolic events or osteoporosis). The current knowledge on pathogenesis, diagnostic tools, prevention and treatment of certain intestinal and extraintestinal complications is reviewed. PMID:10690585

  19. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  20. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  1. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  2. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  3. A site-related suitability analysis for the production of biomass as a contribution to sustainable regional land-use.

    PubMed

    Förster, Michael; Helms, Yvonne; Herberg, Alfred; Köppen, Antje; Kunzmann, Kathrin; Radtke, Dörte; Ross, Lutz; Itzerott, Sibylle

    2008-04-01

    The use of renewable energy in Europe offers the possibility of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and contributes to energy security and independence. With the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and a variety of recently introduced national directives supporting renewable energy sources in the European Union, the economic attractiveness of bioenergy production has distinctly increased. This article combines an economic evaluation of biomass production with site-related natural conditions of the Havelland region, situated in the north-east area of Germany. Two methods for evaluating site-specific potential biomass yields were compared. For three example biomass crops, evaluations of yield estimations at agricultural lots for site-optimized suitability (SOS) and conventional suitability (CS) were carried out. Both modelling approaches were compared. The results of the GIS modelling indicate that the financial support for increasing the use of renewable energy with the German feed-in system, called Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG), will possibly lead to an increased cultivation of crops with high biomass output. This monocultural orientation of farming practices and the negative effects on the ecosystem could act in opposition to other environmental initiatives of the EU. The outputs of the SOS analysis show that high biomass production could be integrated into environmental policy proposals. Therefore, new EU policy should take modified subsidies into consideration in order to avoid developing conflicts between small-scale changes in landscape ecosystems caused by large-scale transformations in energy policy.

  4. A Site-Related Suitability Analysis for the Production of Biomass as a Contribution to Sustainable Regional Land-Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Michael; Helms, Yvonne; Herberg, Alfred; Köppen, Antje; Kunzmann, Kathrin; Radtke, Dörte; Ross, Lutz; Itzerott, Sibylle

    2008-04-01

    The use of renewable energy in Europe offers the possibility of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and contributes to energy security and independence. With the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and a variety of recently introduced national directives supporting renewable energy sources in the European Union, the economic attractiveness of bioenergy production has distinctly increased. This article combines an economic evaluation of biomass production with site-related natural conditions of the Havelland region, situated in the north-east area of Germany. Two methods for evaluating site-specific potential biomass yields were compared. For three example biomass crops, evaluations of yield estimations at agricultural lots for site-optimized suitability (SOS) and conventional suitability (CS) were carried out. Both modelling approaches were compared. The results of the GIS modelling indicate that the financial support for increasing the use of renewable energy with the German feed-in system, called Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG), will possibly lead to an increased cultivation of crops with high biomass output. This monocultural orientation of farming practices and the negative effects on the ecosystem could act in opposition to other environmental initiatives of the EU. The outputs of the SOS analysis show that high biomass production could be integrated into environmental policy proposals. Therefore, new EU policy should take modified subsidies into consideration in order to avoid developing conflicts between small-scale changes in landscape ecosystems caused by large-scale transformations in energy policy.

  5. Infantile hemangiomas, complications and treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Carol Erin; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2016-03-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common vascular tumors of infancy. While the majority regress without the need for intervention, approximately 10%, often site dependent, can cause serious complications and require treatment. IH complications can be categorized as life threatening, obstructive, ulcerative or disfiguring. Life threatening complications include airway and hepatic IHs. Functional complications obstructing vital structures or impairing function include periocular, nasal, labial, parotid, auricular, and breast IHs. Local complications arise from ulceration or those in cosmetically sensitive areas. Therapeutic options for complicated IHs include pharmacologic (topical or systemic), surgical, or laser interventions. Topical agents are best employed for small, superficial, and localized IHs; while systemic therapy is reserved for larger IHs and those with more aggressive growth characteristics with propranolol as first-line therapy. PMID:27607318

  6. Complications of hyaluronic acid fillers.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Michael J; Solish, Nowell

    2009-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid filler use, user groups, and indications have expanded significantly in the past several years. This group of fillers is extremely safe in experienced hands. Complications are infrequent but can be devastating. There can be no substitution for recognized and specific training. Prompt recognition and proper treatment of serious complication can moderate and even prevent serious sequelae. This article describes the most frequent and serious complications, their prevention, and treatment.

  7. Varicella complicated by scarlet fever.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Taner; Parlak, Ali Haydar; Kocabay, Kenan

    2003-10-01

    We report a 3-year-old boy with varicella complicated by cellulitis and scarlet fever. He developed a typical rash of scarlet fever following the onset of varicella. Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated from the ulcers due to varicella. The present case suggests that scarlet fever may rarely develop following varicella and should be considered in children with complicated varicella.

  8. [Complications caused by intravenous therapy].

    PubMed

    Quirós Luque, José María; Gago Fornells, Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Nursing professionals must know everything related to complications caused by intravenous therapy including the ways to prevent and solve these complications. We need not forget that nurses are the ones mainly responsible for the insertion, manipulation, removal and care of catheters.

  9. Complications of Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Mariña Naveiro; Naveiro Rilo, José Cesáreo; Paredes, Aida González; Aguilar Romero, María Teresa; Parra, Jorge Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the frequency of complications during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and identify associated risk factors. Methods: A descriptive observational study was performed between January 2000 and December 2012 and included all gynecologic laparoscopies performed at our center. Variables were recorded for patient characteristics, indication for surgery, length of hospital stay (in days), major and minor complications, and conversions to laparotomy. To identify risk factors and variables associated with complications, crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of all 2888 laparoscopies included, most were procedures of moderate difficulty (adnexal surgery) (54.2%). The overall frequency of major complications was 1.93%, and that of minor complications was 4.29%. The level of technical difficulty and existence of prior abdominal surgery were associated with a higher risk of major complications and conversions to laparotomy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic gynecologic surgery is associated with a low frequency of complications but is a procedure that is not without risk. Greater technical difficulty and prior surgery were factors associated with a higher frequency of complications. PMID:25392659

  10. Biliary Complications After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Sanjay; Kalloo, Anthony N.

    2002-04-01

    The incidence of biliary complications after liver transplant is estimated to be 8% to 20%. Post-liver transplant biliary complications may lead to acute and chronic liver injury. The early recognition and prompt treatment of such complications improves the long-term survival of the patient and graft. An understanding of the type of biliary reconstruction, the rationale for creating a particular anastomosis, and the technical difficulties in reconstructing the biliary tract are important in assessing and managing complications after liver transplant. Because the clinical presentation of these patients may be subtle, the physician must be aggressive and thoughtful in ordering and interpreting the diagnostic tests. Important points to remember are 1) that noninvasive examinations may fail to detect small obstructions or leaks, 2) a liver biopsy often is performed prior to cholangiography to exclude rejection and ischemia, and 3) the liver biopsy can miss an extrahepatic obstruction by misinterpreting portal inflammation as rejection. Biliary leaks and strictures are the most common biliary complications following liver transplant. Less common complications include ampullary dysfunction and stone/sludge formation. The effective management of biliary complications following a liver transplant depends on understanding the natural history, the prognosis, and the available therapeutic options for each type of complication.

  11. [Urinary complications after anorectal surgery].

    PubMed

    Iusuf, T; Sârbu, V; Cristache, C; Popescu, R; Botea, F; Panait, L

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of urinary complications after various anorectal operations was studied in a group of 273 patients. The overall prevalence of urinary complications was 26.7%; most of these complications affected men between 41 and 50, mainly after hemorrhoidectomy. In 10.6% of patients, bladder catheterization was needed. These urinary complications result from nervous reflexes originating from the anus and determined by the operative trauma and/or rectal distinction. In the treatment of these urinary complications, the role of the muses is essential for reassuring the patients. Parasympathomimetic drugs are often efficient. Urinary catheterization must be delayed until the 18th hour. Fluid restriction may be useful to prevent urinary retention. PMID:14870531

  12. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  13. Complications of the Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Delaney, Ruth; Petkin, Kalojan; Lafosse, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    The Latarjet procedure is an operation performed either arthroscopically or open for recurrent anterior shoulder instability, in the setting of glenoid bone loss; with good to excellent functional results. Despite excellent clinical results, the complication rates are reported between 15 and 30 %. Intraoperative complications such as graft malpositioning, neurovascular injury, and graft fracture can all be mitigated with meticulous surgical technique and understanding of the local anatomy. Nonunion and screw breakage are intermediate-term complications that occur in less than 5 % of patients. The long-term complications such as graft osteolysis are still an unsolved problem, and future research is required to understand the etiology and best treatment option. Recurrent instability after the Latarjet procedure can be managed with iliac crest bone graft reconstruction of the anterior glenoid. Shoulder arthritis is another complication reported after the Latarjet procedure, which poses additional challenges to both the surgeon and patient.

  14. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-dialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-dialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency-dialysis access; Chronic kidney failure-dialysis access; Chronic renal failure-dialysis access

  15. [Artificial nutrition in children (I): enteral access].

    PubMed

    Estevão-Costa, José

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate nutritional support is crucial in the therapeutic approach of multiple conditions, which justifies the frequent and increasing use of specific access routes for enteral and parenteral nutrition. This article reviews the relevant literature concerning indications, procedures, effectiveness and complications of enteral access routes in children. The decision between gastric and postpyloric access, and between nasogastric tube and gastrostomy is thoroughly discussed. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is the most commonly used technique when a long-term gastric access is required, given its efficacy and safety although the associated morbidity is not negligible;laparoscopic gastrostomy emerges as a potentially advantageous alternative.

  16. Complications of pneumoconiosis: radiologic overview.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae Sup; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hyo Rim; Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee; Ko, Jeong Min; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Arakawa, Hiroaki; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2013-10-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure.

  17. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  18. Management and complications of stomas.

    PubMed

    Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management.

  19. [Rare complication after stapled hemorrhoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Šuchá, R; Duchoň, R; Pinďák, D; Dolník, J

    2013-09-01

    Statistics show that more than half of the population suffers from hemorrhoids at different clinical stages. Only a small percentage of them (5 to 10%) require surgical treatment. The gold standard is open hemorrhoidectomy (most commonly Milligan-Morgan operation). Circular stapled hemorrhoidopexy by Longo is an alternative to conventional hemorrhoidectomy. The main advantages of this procedure are: less postoperative pain, earlier return to work and to social life. The complication rate is similar to open hemorrhoidectomy. This method, however, also brings new kinds of complications, some of them potentially life-threatening. Our case report presents one of these rare complications.

  20. PEG tubes: dealing with complications.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Hardip; Thompson, Rosie

    A percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube can be used to deliver nutrition, hydration and medicines directly into the patient's stomach. Patients will require a tube if they are unable to swallow safely, putting them at risk of aspiration of food, drink and medicines into their lungs. It is vital that nurses are aware of the complications that may arise when caring for a patient with a PEG tube. It is equally important that nurses know how to deal with these complications or from where tc seek advice. This article provides a quick troubleshooting guide to help nurses deal with complications that can arise with PEG feeding.

  1. Psychological complications of pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Mitchell, Elisha R

    2011-12-01

    Psychological complications associated with pediatric obesity include low self-esteem, depression, body dissatisfaction, loss-of-control eating, unhealthy and extreme weight control behaviors, impaired social relationships, obesity stigma, and decreased health-related quality of life. Bioecological models offer a framework for understanding the interaction between pediatric obesity and psychological complications and illustrate system-level approaches for prevention and intervention. As the medical setting is often the first point of contact for families, pediatricians are instrumental in the identification and referral of children with psychological complications. Motivational interviewing, patient talking points, brief screening measures, and referral resources are important tools in this process. PMID:22093858

  2. Extraction of the radial artery during transradial coronary angiography: an unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ful, Akram; Benharroch, Daniel; Henkin, Yaakov

    2003-06-01

    The transradial approach is currently an accepted alternative for vascular access during percutaneous coronary interventions. Access-site complications, such as mild hematoma, hematic effusions, and reduced or absent radial pulse, have been reported. We report the occurrence of total extraction of the radial artery during sheath removal. The occurrence of this complication emphasizes the need for meticulous attention and prudence when a patient complains of local pain during sheath extraction.

  3. Liver Transplant: Complications/Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... can develop a complication requiring return to the operating room for repair or other procedures to open up the new connections. Rejection: Your immune system helps fight infections. It does this by recognizing ...

  4. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... two complications of diabetes: nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor circulation. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your ... you may not detect an injury or irritation. Poor circulation in your feet reduces your ability to ...

  5. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, E; Sharma, S; Lal, S; Allan, P J

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with potential life-threatening medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with anorexia nervosa, highlights associated diagnostic pitfalls and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to management. PMID:27166107

  6. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long term complications of diabetes To use the sharing ... sores and infections. If it goes on too long, your toes, foot, or leg may need to ...

  7. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, E; Sharma, S; Lal, S; Allan, P J

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with potential life-threatening medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with anorexia nervosa, highlights associated diagnostic pitfalls and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to management.

  8. Exhausting Multiple Hemodialysis Access Failures

    PubMed Central

    Bolleke, Erjola; Seferi, Saimir; Rroji, Merita; Idrizi, Alma; Barbullushi, Myftar; Thereska, Nestor

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Vascular access is often considered the Achilles heel the of hemodialysis because of its impact on morbidity, all cause mortality and finally costs of these patients. The most common complication of permanent hemodialysis (HD) vascular access is thrombosis, with some cases being related to hypercoagulability states. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APAS) is a cause of increased thrombotic tendency, and this may complicate the management of such patients on HD. Case report: We describe a 41-year-old woman with end stage renal disease (ESRD) from Adult Polycystic Kidney Disease who was referred to our tertiary care center for treatment and selection of renal replacement therapy form. It was thought to initiate with peritoneal dialysis considering her actual conditions. She was putted on hemodialysis for several sessions, and a subclavian cathether was her first vascular access. The surgeon created an arterio-venous fistula which did not mature. After the implantation of the peritoneal cathether she started peritoneal dialysis and continued living with that for 2 years. She felt exhausted and because of a grave peritonitis episode accompanied with procedure failure and a long hospitalization she was transferred to hemodialysis. Renal transplantation was not possible because she didn’t have a kidney donation. She was maintained on regular HD, but her dialysis care was complicated by recurrent vascular access failures. She had multiple interventions for arterio-venous fistulas and grafts but almost all of them failed due to thrombosis to the extent that only one access site was available for her routine renal replacement treatment. A thorough thrombophilia screen confirmed the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. A diagnosis of APAS was made and she was anticoagulated with warfarin. The AVG made in this last available site is still working from 18 months. If it fails we have no answers and solutions for her. Conclusion: The presence of

  9. A case of complicated otomastoiditis.

    PubMed

    Atzeni, Mario; Iozzi, Chiara; Pinna, Monica; Benetti, Gian Luca; Scazzeri, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a child who, at her first episode of clinically evident acute otitis media, has developed a bilateral mastoiditis, though with unilateral simptomatology. The mastoiditis was complicated by the spontaneous drainage of the postauricular abscess in the subcutaneous tissue. According to the literature, we believe that the temporal bone computed tomography scan is the fundamental examination to properly define an anusual case of mastoiditis, plan adequate therapy (medical o surgical), and rule out other possible complications. PMID:26714780

  10. Pneumothorax complicating isolated clavicle fracture.

    PubMed

    Hani, Redouane; Ennaciri, Badr; Jeddi, Idriss; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Isolated clavicle fractures are among the commonest of traumatic fractures in the emergency department. Complications of isolated clavicle fractures are rare. Pneumothorax has been described as a complication of a fractured clavicle only rarely in English literature. In all the reported cases, the pneumothorax was treated by a thoracostomy and the clavicle fracture was treated conservatively. In our case, the pneumothorax required a chest drain insertion and the clavicle fracture was treated surgically with good result.

  11. Unusual complications of quinalphos poisoning.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia.

  12. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23762661

  13. [Artificial nutrition in children (II): parenteral access].

    PubMed

    Estevão-Costa, José

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial when the use of the gastrointestinal tract is not feasible. This article addresses the main techniques for parenteral access in children, its indications, insertion details and maintenance, and complications. The type of venous access is mainly dictated by the expected duration of parenteral nutrition and by the body weight/stature. The peripheral access is viable and advantageous for parenteral nutrition of short duration (< 2 weeks); a tunneled central venous catheter (Broviac) is usually necessary in long-term parenteral nutrition (> 3 weeks); a peripherally introduced central catheter is an increasingly used alternative. Parenteral accesses are effective and safe, but the morbidity and mortality is not negligible particularly in cases of short bowel syndrome. Most complications are related to the catheter placement and maintenance care, and can be largely avoided when the procedures are carried out by experienced staff under strict protocols.

  14. The genetics of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Emma; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-05-01

    The rising global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality that is attributable to the complications of chronic hyperglycaemia. These complications include blindness, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Current therapeutic options for chronic hyperglycaemia reduce, but do not eradicate, the risk of these complications. Success in defining new preventative and therapeutic strategies hinges on an improved understanding of the molecular processes involved in the development of these complications. This Review explores the role of human genetics in delivering such insights, and describes progress in characterizing the sequence variants that influence individual predisposition to diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Numerous risk variants for microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported, but very few have shown robust replication. Furthermore, only limited evidence exists of a difference in the repertoire of risk variants influencing macrovascular disease between those with and those without diabetes. Here, we outline the challenges associated with the genetic analysis of diabetic complications and highlight ongoing efforts to deliver biological insights that can drive translational benefits.

  15. A case of micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy with macro complication.

    PubMed

    Dede, Onur; Utangaç, Mazhar; Dağguli, Mansur; Hatipoğlu, Namık Kemal; Sancaktutar, Ahmet Ali; Bodakçı, Mehmet Nuri

    2015-06-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is accepted as the standard management approach for kidney stones that are either refractory to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy or are >2 cm in diameter. The recently developed micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (microperc) technique provides intrarenal access under full vision using an optic instrument with a smaller calibration. A lesser amount of bleeding has been reported with the use of this method. Here we present a case of a bleeding complication on postoperative day 15 after a microperc procedure used to treat a left kidney stone. The complication led to retention of bloody urine in the bladder and required transfusion of 5 units of whole blood.

  16. A case of micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy with macro complication.

    PubMed

    Dede, Onur; Utangaç, Mazhar; Dağguli, Mansur; Hatipoğlu, Namık Kemal; Sancaktutar, Ahmet Ali; Bodakçı, Mehmet Nuri

    2015-06-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is accepted as the standard management approach for kidney stones that are either refractory to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy or are >2 cm in diameter. The recently developed micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (microperc) technique provides intrarenal access under full vision using an optic instrument with a smaller calibration. A lesser amount of bleeding has been reported with the use of this method. Here we present a case of a bleeding complication on postoperative day 15 after a microperc procedure used to treat a left kidney stone. The complication led to retention of bloody urine in the bladder and required transfusion of 5 units of whole blood. PMID:26328211

  17. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: indications, technique, complications and management.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-06-28

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the "pull" technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  18. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: Indications, technique, complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the “pull” technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  19. Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes ... Volunteer Center American Diabetes Month® American Diabetes Association Alert Day® Become a Member Advocacy Home Take Action ...

  20. Brain MRI Findings in Neurological Complications of Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Cabaj, Astra; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika; Duczkowska, Agnieszka; Duczkowski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The amount of people living with cancer is increasing; they live longer and have thus a higher risk of developing neurological complications. Magnetic resonance as a diagnostic procedure of choice in detecting the reasons of neurological/psychiatric symptoms in oncological patients is nowadays relatively easily accessible. Early diagnosis established by radiologists familiar with neurological entities that may follow cancer treatment allow clinicians to provide proper treatment, even if the diagnosis seems unbelievable. The review of MR images of acute and chronic neurological complications of cancer treatment from the authors' own archive is the focus of this report. Neurological complications of cancer can be metastatic and non-metastatic; the first cannot be considered as a treatment complication, the latter can be chemoor radiotherapy-induced, acute, chronic and delayed. In our material we dealt with complications with dramatic course (stroke, PRES, acute leukoencephalopathy, Wernicke's encephalopathy) and with cases with milder and/or longer course (neuro-infections, chronic leukoencephalopathy, telangiectasias and/or cavernous hemangiomas, second tumors: glioma and meningioma after irradiation). The central nervous system is very susceptible to complications of systemic cancer and its treatment. Even though the first thought of clinicians and radiologists after a patient's first neurological/psychiatric symptoms appears concerns the metastatic spread of the disease, they need to have an understanding that there are a number of other causes of such symptoms. The knowledge of entities which can be expected and diagnostic experience prevent clinicians from making wrong diagnosis. PMID:27629856

  1. Surgery for Diabetic Eye Complications.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, María H; Acaba, Luis A; Acaba, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    New modalities for the treatment of diabetic eye complications have emerged in the past decade. Nevertheless, many severe diabetic retinopathy complications can only be treated with vitreoretinal surgery. Technological advances in pars plana vitrectomy have expanded the gamut of pathologies that can be successfully treated with surgery. The most common pathologies managed surgically include vitreous opacities and traction retinal detachment. The indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincisional surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic tractional retinal detachment will be discussed. With the availability of new microincisional vitrectomy technology, wide angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Complications of soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Ranella J; Stier, Meghan

    2008-09-01

    The wide variety of dermal fillers presently available has revolutionized treatment options for patients seeking a refreshed appearance. Soft tissue fillers include both bovine and human collagens, the hyaluronans, calcium hydroxyapatite, poly-L-lactic acid, and synthetic polymers. However, soft tissue augmentation is never risk-free, and as these procedures have increased in prevalence, complications have been more frequently reported. This article describes a range of complications resulting from dermal filler injections, reviews key case studies, and discusses possible treatment options for adverse effects. While biodegradable fillers offer the least risk for the patient, location, allergic reactions, granulomas, necrosis, and infection are all serious complications that must be considered before performing soft tissue augmentation with any approved dermal filler.

  3. Complications of measles during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Atmar, R L; Englund, J A; Hammill, H

    1992-01-01

    Twelve pregnant women and one woman who had just given birth were hospitalized with measles in Houston between 1988 and 1990. The most common and serious maternal complication was pneumonitis (seven patients). Other maternal complications included hepatitis (seven patients), premature labor (four patients), spontaneous abortion (one patient), and death (one patient). For four of 13 patients, all of whom had severe measles and pneumonitis due to measles virus, an adverse fetal outcome such as abortion or prematurity was associated with their conditions. Historical accounts describing maternal sequelae of measles have suggested more severe disease in pregnant women, although this observation has not always been confirmed by more recent reports in developed countries. The clinical course in our patients suggests that measles during pregnancy may be associated with serious complications.

  4. Surgery for Diabetic Eye Complications.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, María H; Acaba, Luis A; Acaba, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    New modalities for the treatment of diabetic eye complications have emerged in the past decade. Nevertheless, many severe diabetic retinopathy complications can only be treated with vitreoretinal surgery. Technological advances in pars plana vitrectomy have expanded the gamut of pathologies that can be successfully treated with surgery. The most common pathologies managed surgically include vitreous opacities and traction retinal detachment. The indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincisional surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic tractional retinal detachment will be discussed. With the availability of new microincisional vitrectomy technology, wide angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from proliferative diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27612846

  5. [Complications of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, G J; David, R D; Fuchs, A M

    1989-01-01

    The authors reviewed treatments performed worldwide using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy since its introduction in West Germany in 1980 to determine the efficacy of this treatment modality and its potential risks. The prevention of complications related to patients or shock wave energy are discussed, as well as the cardiovascular complications related to immersion, prevention of lesions to nearby organs, treatment of ESWL-induced bleeding, treatment of post-ESWL ureteral obstruction, prevention and treatment of infection, and long-term biological effects. Currently, less than 5% of patients are excluded from treatment with ESWL due to technical reasons or increased risk of periprocedural complications. Patients with cardiac pacemakers have been treated safely. Calcifications of the ipsilateral renal artery or aorta are considered only relative contraindications. However, certain technical limitations exist; i.e., the Dornier HM-3 cannot support patients weighing more than 135 kg., and patient height is also a limiting factor. There is an impressively low incidence of complications related to the energy of the shock wave. The severity and extent of damage are dose- and pressure-dependent. The potential for induction of cardiac arrhythmias secondary to the shock wave exists; however, effective prevention is achieved by coupling the shock wave discharge to the electrocardiogram. Complications of immersion are also extremely rare and can be avoided by careful preoperative evaluation. Damage to nearby organs such as pulmonary, gastric, duodenal or colonic contusions, constitute a very infrequent complication. Elevations of liver enzymes have also been noted post-lithotripsy. However, all these changes were transient and had no significant clinical consequences. Management of post-ESWL ureteral obstruction is by endourological procedures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Pulmonary Complications due to Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shirinzadeh, Abulfazl; Talebi, Yashar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal carcinoma is the scourge of human beings. Pulmonary complications in patients who have undergone operation are common (20-30% of cases) and there are no suitable tools and ways to predict these complications. Methods During a period of 10 years, from March 1998 to February 2007, 200 patients (150 male and 50 female) underwent Esophagectomy due to esophageal carcinoma in thoracic surgery ward retrospectively. Complications include the length of hospitalization, mechanical ventilation, morbidity and mortality. Patients’ risk factors include age, preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, stage of the disease and preoperative spirometry condition. Results We grouped our patients into three categories: Normal (FEV1 ≥ 80% predicted), mildly impaired (FEV1 65% to 79% predicted), more severely impaired (FEV1 < 65% predicted).Although almost all patients had radiographic pulmonary abnormalities, significant pulmonary complications occurred in 40 patients (20%) which underwent Esophagectomy. Pleural effusion and atelectasia in 160 patients (80%). 24 patients needed chest-tube insertion. 20 patients (10%) developed ARDS. 14 patients (7%) developed chylothorax. 20 patients (10%) of patients died during their postoperative hospital stay. 30 patients (15%) required mechanical ventilation for greater than 48 hours. Conclusion We reviewed a number of preoperative clinical variables to determine whether they contributed to postoperative pulmonary complications as well as other outcomes. In general, age, impaired pulmonary function especially in those patients with FEV1 less than 65% predicted was associated with prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS). In fact pulmonary complications rate after Esophagectomy are high and there was associated mortality and morbidity. PMID:24250962

  7. Surgical complications of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beyga, Z T; Kahan, B D

    1998-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, kidney transplantation has evolved tremendously, from an experimental procedure with barely 50% allograft acceptance to a highly refined management program with a success rate of 80-90%. Not only has the overall rate of complications decreased to less than 5%, due to more secure technical approaches, but also advances in immunosuppressive regimens have reduced the morbidity associated with the procedure. This contribution, addressing all stages of the transplant process (donor nephrectomy, benchwork preparation, and implantation) assesses potential pitfalls and technical misadventures that must be avoided in order to assure the patient of a complication-free course.

  8. Complications from international surgery tourism.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Mark M; Alizadeh, Kaveh

    2011-08-01

    Medical tourism is an increasing trend, particularly in cosmetic surgery. Complications resulting from these procedures can be quite disruptive to the healthcare industry in the United States since patients often seek treatment and have no compensation recourse from insurance. Despite the increasing number of plastic surgery patients seeking procedures abroad, there have been little reported data concerning outcomes, follow-up, or complication rates. Through a survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) members, the authors provide data on trends to help define the scope of the problem. PMID:21813883

  9. Complications from international surgery tourism.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Mark M; Alizadeh, Kaveh

    2011-08-01

    Medical tourism is an increasing trend, particularly in cosmetic surgery. Complications resulting from these procedures can be quite disruptive to the healthcare industry in the United States since patients often seek treatment and have no compensation recourse from insurance. Despite the increasing number of plastic surgery patients seeking procedures abroad, there have been little reported data concerning outcomes, follow-up, or complication rates. Through a survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) members, the authors provide data on trends to help define the scope of the problem.

  10. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  11. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  12. Complications of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Steinberg, John S

    2013-12-01

    The diabetic foot is at high risk for complications because of its role in ambulation. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can lead to chronic foot ulcers, which are at high risk for infection, in part attributable to areas of high pressure caused by lack of tolerance of the soft tissue and bone and joint deformity. If left untreated, infection and ischemia lead to tissue death, culminating in amputation. Treatment strategies include antibiosis, topical therapies, offloading, debridement, and surgery. A multidisciplinary team approach is necessary in the prevention and treatment of complications of the diabetic foot.

  13. Transapical access: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Blumenstein, Johannes; Van Linden, Arnaud; Arsalan, Mani; Moellmann, Helge; Liebtrau, Christoph; Walther, Thomas; Kempfert, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid evolution of transcatheter aortic valve implantation over the past few years, transapical access has evolved to be a routine approach for the implantation of transcatheter aortic valve prostheses. The approach itself has demonstrated feasibility, safety and reproducibility associated with low complication rates. As the access allows for relatively large profile devices and owing to the short anatomical distance to both the mitral and the aortic valve, the apical approach facilitates a wide range of interventions. Thus, minimally invasive transapical access can be considered as a versatile platform for the development of new transcatheter aortic or mitral devices.

  14. Exotic encounters with dental implants: managing complications with unidentified systems.

    PubMed

    Mattheos, N; Janda, M Schittek

    2012-06-01

    As the application of dental implants increases worldwide, so is the number of technical and biological complications that general dental practitioners will be called to manage, while maintaining implant patients. In addition, the greater patient mobility encountered today combined with a growing trend of 'dental implant tourism' will very often result in situations where the dentist is requested to deal with complications in implants placed elsewhere and which sometimes might be of an 'exotic' system one cannot directly recognize. Such a situation can pose significant challenges to even experienced clinicians. The challenges are not only in the scientific field, but often include professional and ethical implications. This case report will discuss strategies for the management of implant complications in cases of unidentified implant systems. Critical factors in such situations would be the clinician's experience and special training, the correct radiographic technique, as well as access to the appropriate tools and devices. PMID:22624768

  15. Risk Factors for Complications of Traumatic Injuries.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Júnior, Wagner; Saleh, Carmen Mohamad Rida; Whitaker, Iveth Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Complications in hospitalized trauma patients are major causes of morbidity and mortality. The aims of this study were to identify the in-hospital trauma patients' complications and identify the risk factors for complications in this population. A retrospective analysis was conducted in a sample from a Brazilian hospital. The sample consisted of 407 patients, 194 (47.66%) of whom had records of complications. The most common complications were infections (41.80%). The risk factors related to the complications were age, length of hospital stay, external causes, and injury severity. The complications were frequent in this sample, and the risk for complications was characterized by multiple factors. PMID:27618375

  16. Bodylifting: indications, technique and complications.

    PubMed

    Jones, B M; Toft, N J

    2008-07-01

    Bodylifting is often considered a high-risk surgical procedure. There is a widely held perception is that the operation is both time consuming and physically demanding for the surgeon, with, potentially, a long recovery and high complication rate for the patient. The senior author's experience of 16 consecutive bodylift procedures does not reflect this. Fourteen female patients and two male patients underwent Lockwood-type bodylifting procedures at two different hospitals over a 5 year period. Patients studied were unsuitable for a standard abdominoplasty either because of excess lateral abdominal tissue, or had undergone significant weight loss and developed redundant folds of skin in a circumferential pattern around the waistline. The average Body Mass Index (BMI) prior to surgery was 26.7. Mean surgical time and hospital stay was 4.2 hrs and 3.5 days respectively. No patient required blood transfusion. The follow up period was between 3 and 24 months. Levels of patient satisfaction were high and complications few. Only one patient required minor revisional surgery. No major complications were recorded. The commonest problem, seroma, developed in 4 out of 16 patients and was managed by simple aspiration. This study supports the effectiveness of the lower body lift as a procedure with the potential to produce an outcome unachievable by other means with a low incidence of minor complications.

  17. Complicating the Concept of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Levitt, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues against a simple, reified view of culture as a set of ideas and norms belonging to a group or nation, and considers the implications of a more complicated concept for discussion of world culture and the global/local nexus. Most anthropologists define culture as the making of meaning, with an emphasis on the process itself as…

  18. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  19. Inflammatory duodenal necrosis complicating gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Dina; Lee, Geraint J.; Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Drake, David

    2016-01-01

    Babies with gastroschisis have an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that can lead to short bowel syndrome, a long-term parenteral nutrition requirement, and its associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent duodenal ischemia and necrosis associated with gastroschisis in the absence of NEC totalis. PMID:27695214

  20. The complication of pneumatic retinopexy.

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, G F; Tornambe, P E; Brinton, D A; Flood, T P; Green, S; Grizzard, W S; Hammer, M E; Leff, S R; Mascuilli, L; Morgan, C M

    1990-01-01

    There have been 26 published series with a total of 1274 detachments operated with pneumatic retinopexy. Eighty percent were reattached with a single procedure and 98% with reoperations. New breaks occurred in 13% and PVR in 4%. The complications published in 101 papers on pneumatic retinopexy in the last 5 years are analyzed as to frequency, prevention, management, and results. PMID:2095021

  1. Complications of occipital bone pneumatization.

    PubMed

    Moss, Mary; Biggs, Michael; Fagan, Paul; Forer, Martin; Davis, Martin; Roche, Jim

    2004-06-01

    Four cases of occipital bone pneumatization and subsequent complications are described, which include a pathological fracture of C1 and the occipital bone, spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema and pneumatocele formation. Reviews of the published literature and possible aetiological factors have been discussed. PMID:15230770

  2. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  3. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  4. Facial filler and neurotoxin complications.

    PubMed

    Nettar, Kartik; Maas, Corey

    2012-06-01

    Botulinum neuromodulators and injectable dermal fillers have become part of the armamentarium in the treatment of facial aging. Their successful use requires a fundamental knowledge of anatomy and physiology and a sound understanding of their risks and complications. Although neuromodulators and fillers continue to demonstrate a strong record of safety, several notable risks exist.

  5. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  6. Inflammatory duodenal necrosis complicating gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Dina; Lee, Geraint J.; Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Drake, David

    2016-01-01

    Babies with gastroschisis have an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that can lead to short bowel syndrome, a long-term parenteral nutrition requirement, and its associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent duodenal ischemia and necrosis associated with gastroschisis in the absence of NEC totalis.

  7. Not to Complicate Matters, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    The writer discusses the current academic enthrallment with complicating seemingly every aspect of every event or phenomenon, arguing that the fashion elevates confusion from a transitional stage into an end goal. Rather than scholarly clarification, says Jacoby, people celebrate the fact that everything can be "problematized," rejoicing in…

  8. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

    2013-05-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  9. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer

  10. Superior thyroid artery pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula following attempted internal jugular venous access and its management

    PubMed Central

    Khera, Pushpinder Singh; Moses, Vinu; Ahmed, Munawwar; Kakde, Shailesh

    2015-01-01

    Vascular injury during common jugular venous (IJV) access is a rare complication, usually involving injury to the common carotid artery. We describe a previously unreported complication of iatrogenic injury of IJV access involving a branch of the superior thyroid artery, and its endovascular management. PMID:25709159

  11. [Infectious complications in necrotizing pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Werner, J; Büchler, M W

    2007-10-01

    Patients with CT evidence of more than 50 % necrosis, or an increased CRP or procalcitonin are at risk of developing severe pancreatitis and septic complications and should be monitored in an intensive care unit. ERCP and sphincterotomy are indicated in patients with biliary pancreatitis and impacted gall stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. In septic patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, a FNA should be performed for differentiation of sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis. Adequate volume resuscitation and analgesic treatment are the most important treatment of acute pancreatitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces septic complications in severe necrotizing pancreatitis and should be started early. Surgical therapy is indicated in patients with infected pancreatic necrosis. The surgical technique of choice is open necrosectomy with postoperative closed lavage of the lesser sac.

  12. Complications of splenic tissue reimplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Tzoracoleftherakis, E.; Alivizatos, V.; Kalfarentzos, F.; Androulakis, J.

    1991-01-01

    Splenic tissue reimplantation employing the omental implantation technique was applied in 23 patients undergoing splenectomy for traumatic or iatrogenic splenic injury. Four complications were encountered after autotransplantation (17.4%). Two of these consisted of small bowel obstruction due to postoperative adhesions and were successfully managed by lysis of the adhesions. The other two complications were aseptic necrosis of the splenic transplants and were treated with ablation of the autolysed transplants. A case of abnormal splenic tissue reimplantation in a male patient with unsuspected myelofibrosis is also discussed. He underwent an emergency laparotomy for rupture of a subcapsular splenic haematoma. It is concluded that splenic tissue implantation in the greater omentum is associated with important early morbidity and this should be taken into account whenever application of the method is considered. Images Figure 1 PMID:2018325

  13. Hepatic abscess complicating ulceroglandular tularemia.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, M; Lamothe, F; Ishak, M; Côté, J; Breton, G; Villeneuve, J P; D'Amico, P

    1983-12-15

    In a patient with the clinical features of classic ulceroglandular tularemia a solitary hepatic abscess was found during an ultrasound examination. Hepatic tularemia has rarely been reported since the advent of specific therapy, which prevents the disease from reaching the disseminated state. This case, however, shows that the liver can be involved early in the course of tularemia. Increased serum levels of hepatic enzymes may be the only sign of such a complication.

  14. Permanent makeup: indications and complications.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2008-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, simulating makeup, have become very popular in the last decades; the technique of micropigmentation consists of implantation of pigment into the skin using a tattoo pen. The procedure can also be used to camouflage vitiligo, to mask scars, and as an adjunct to reconstructive surgery. Risks and complications include infections, allergic reactions, scarring, fanning, fading, and dissatisfaction about color and shape. Lasers offer the best cosmetic result for removal of unwanted tattoos.

  15. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  16. Post-heart transplant complications.

    PubMed

    Birati, Edo Y; Rame, J Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    Managing patients after heart transplantation is challenging, since these patients have unique clinical complications (associated with the immunosuppressive therapy and cardiac allograft rejection) together with atypical clinical presentations for infection and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Survival rates have improved substantially with the use of new immunosuppressive drugs. High vigilance, early diagnosis, and appropriate intervention for allograft-related and non-allograft-related syndromes with significant morbidity and mortality are the keys to long-term survival of patients after transplantation. PMID:24996612

  17. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  18. Thromboembolic complications of thyroid storm

    PubMed Central

    Min, T; Benjamin, S; Cozma, L

    2014-01-01

    Summary Thyroid storm is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of hyperthyroidism. Early recognition and prompt treatment are essential. Atrial fibrillation can occur in up to 40% of patients with thyroid storm. Studies have shown that hyperthyroidism increases the risk of thromboembolic events. There is no consensus with regard to the initiation of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation in severe thyrotoxicosis. Anticoagulation is not routinely initiated if the risk is low on a CHADS2 score; however, this should be considered in patients with thyroid storm or severe thyrotoxicosis with impending storm irrespective of the CHADS2 risk, as it appears to increase the risk of thromboembolic episodes. Herein, we describe a case of thyroid storm complicated by massive pulmonary embolism. Learning points Diagnosis of thyroid storm is based on clinical findings. Early recognition and prompt treatment could lead to a favourable outcome.Hypercoagulable state is a recognised complication of thyrotoxicosis.Atrial fibrillation is strongly associated with hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm.Anticoagulation should be considered for patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and atrial fibrillation irrespective of the CHADS2 score.Patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and clinical evidence of thrombosis should be immediately anticoagulated until hyperthyroidism is under control. PMID:24683480

  19. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  20. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-07-14

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  1. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  2. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živković, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  3. Laparoscopic surgery complications: Postoperative peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Drăghici, L; Drăghici, I; Ungureanu, A; Copăescu, C; Popescu, M; Dragomirescu, C

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Complications within laparoscopic surgery, similar to classic surgery are inevitable and require immediate actions both to diminish intraoperative risks and to choose the appropriate therapeutic attitude. Peritonitis and hemorrhagic incidents are both part of the complications aspect of laparoscopic surgery. Fortunately, the incidence is limited, thus excluding the rejection of celioscopic methods. Patient’s risks and benefits are to be analyzed carefully prior recommending laparoscopic surgery. Materials and methods: This study presents a statistical analysis of peritonitis consecutive to laparoscopic surgery, experience of „Sf. Ioan” Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, and Department of Surgery (2000-2010). Results:There were 180 (0,96%) complicated situations requiring reinterventions, from a total of 18676 laparoscopic procedures. 106 cases (0,56%) represented different grades of postoperative peritonitis. Most frequently, there were consecutive laparoscopic appendicectomia and colecistectomia. During the last decade, few severe cases of peritonitis followed laparoscopic bariatric surgical procedures. Conclusions: This study reflects the possibility of unfavorable evolution of postoperative peritonitis comparing with hemorrhagic incidents within laparoscopic surgery. PMID:23049630

  4. The Cardiac Complications of Methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Cunningham, Neil J; MacIsaac, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Methamphetamines are increasingly popular drugs of abuse in Australia, and are rising in purity. The rising popularity and purity of methamphetamines has notably increased demands upon Australian medical services. Methamphetamines are sympathomimetic amines with a range of adverse effects upon multiple organ systems. Cardiovascular complications are the second leading cause of death in methamphetamine abusers, and there appears to be a high prevalence of cardiac pathology. Cardiovascular pathology frequently seen in methamphetamine abusers includes hypertension, aortic dissection, acute coronary syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy. The rising prevalence of methamphetamine abuse is likely to increase the burden of cardiovascular pathology in Australians. A National Parliamentary Enquiry was opened in March 2015 to address concerns regarding the medical and social impacts of methamphetamine abuse. From April 2015, a National 'Ice Taskforce' was also created in parallel. Reversal of cardiac pathology appears to be achievable with abstinence from methamphetamines and initiation of appropriate treatment. It is key to appreciate that the pathogenesis of methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications arises as a result of the specific toxic effects of methamphetamines. Clinical management is hence individualised; suggested management approaches for methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications are detailed within this article.

  5. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communications & IT Access to information and communication technology (ICT) is addressed by Board standards and guidelines issued ... Engineer (November 3) Access Board Approves Rules on ICT Refresh and Medical Diagnostic Equipment (September 14) Access ...

  6. Modified Retroperitoneal Access for Percutaneous Intervention after Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Lawrence H H

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous access to the surgical bed after pancreaticoduodenectomy can be a challenge, due to the post-operative anatomy alteration. However, immediate complications, such as surgical bed abscess or suspected tumor recurrence, are often best accessed percutaneously, as open surgical or endoscopic approaches are often difficult, if not impossible. We, hereby, describe a safe approach that is highly replicable, in accessing the surgical bed for percutaneous intervention, following pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:23690711

  7. Nosocomial infections in dialysis access.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Alexander; Trevino, Sergio; Marschall, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections in patients requiring renal replacement therapy have a high impact on morbidity and mortality. The most dangerous complication is bloodstream infection (BSI) associated with the vascular access, with a low BSI risk in arteriovenous fistulas or grafts and a comparatively high risk in central venous catheters. The single most important measure for preventing BSI is therefore the reduction of catheter use by means of early fistula formation. As this is not always feasible, prevention should focus on educational efforts, hand hygiene, surveillance of dialysis-associated events, and specific measures at and after the insertion of catheters. Core measures at the time of insertion include choosing the optimal site of insertion, the use of maximum sterile barrier precautions, adequate skin antisepsis, and the choice of catheter type; after insertion, access care needs to ensure hub disinfection and regular dressing changes. The application of antimicrobial locks is reserved for special situations. Evidence suggests that bundling a selection of the aforementioned measures can significantly reduce infection rates. The diagnosis of central line-associated BSI (CLABSI) is based on clinical signs and microbiological findings in blood cultures ideally drawn both peripherally and from the catheter. The prompt installation of empiric antibiotic treatment covering the most commonly encountered organisms is key regarding CLABSI treatment. Catheter removal is recommended in complicated cases or if cultures yield Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, Pseudomonas or fungi. In other cases, guide wire exchange or catheter salvage strategies with antibiotic lock solutions may be acceptable alternatives. PMID:25676304

  8. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  9. Strabismus complications from local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Guyton, David L

    2008-01-01

    Strabismus developing after retrobulbar or peribulbar anesthesia for both anterior and posterior segment eye surgery may be due to myotoxicity to an extraocular muscle from the local anesthetic agent. Initial paresis often causes diplopia immediately after surgery, but later progressive segmental fibrosis occurs, and/or hypertrophy of the muscle, producing diplopia in the opposite direction from the direction of the initial diplopia. The inferior rectus muscle is most commonly affected. Usually a large recession on an adjustable suture of the involved muscle(s) yields good alignment. Using topical anesthesia or sub-Tenon's anesthesia can avoid this complication.

  10. Neonatal meningitis complicating with pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anita; Agrawal, Satish C

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocephalus is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the cranial cavity. This gas may arise either from a trauma, a tumor, a surgical, or a diagnostic procedure or occasionally from an infection. Pneumocephalus as a complication of bacterial meningitis, in absence of trauma or a procedure, is extremely rare, particularly in a newborn. A case of pneumocephalus occurring in a baby, suffering from neonatal meningitis, acquired probably through unsafe cutting and tying of the cord, is reported here. Cutting, tying, and care of the umbilical cord is of utmost importance to prevent neonatal infection as the same is a potential cause of serious anaerobic infections, besides tetanus. PMID:24741257

  11. Neurological complication of dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Murthy, J M K

    2010-01-01

    Dengue infection is endemic in more than 100 countries, mostly in the developing world. Recent observations indicate that the clinical profile of dengue is changing, and that neurological manifestations are being reported more frequently. The exact incidence of various neurological complications is uncertain. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations is multiple and includes: neurotrophic effect of the dengue virus, related to the systemic effects of dengue infection, and immune mediated. In countries endemic to dengue, it will be prudent to investigate for dengue infection in patients with fever and acute neurological manifestations. There is need for understanding of the pathogenesis of various neurological manifestations.

  12. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  13. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  14. Infectious Complications After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria Del Pilar; Martin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the standard of care for patients with decompensated cirrhosis and for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. More than 6000 liver transplants are performed annually in the United States. High patient and graft survival rates have been achieved in great part due to the availability of potent immunosuppressive agents. Systemic immunosuppression has rendered the liver recipient susceptible to de novo infections as well as reactivation of preexisting latent infections. Infections occurring during the first month post-OLT are usually nosocomial, donor-derived, or the result of a perioperative complication. The development of opportunistic infections (OIs) such as Aspergillus and the reactivation of latent infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more frequent 1 to 6 months posttransplant, when the net state of immunosuppression is the highest. Immunosuppressive therapy is tapered 6 to 12 months post-OLT; therefore, infections occurring during that time period and afterward generally resemble those of the general population. Screening strategies applied to determine the risk of an infection after transplantation and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy have reduced the incidence of OIs after OLT. This article will review the various causes of infection post-OLT and the therapies used to manage complications. PMID:27134589

  15. Complications of rigid internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Chris A; Lin, Kant Y

    2009-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, there have been many advances in the development of bone fixation systems used in the practice of craniomaxillofacial surgery. As surgical practices have evolved, the complications of each technologic advance have changed accordingly. Interfragmentary instability of interosseous wiring has been replaced by the risk of exposure, infection, and palpability of plate and screw fixation systems. The improved rigidity of plate fixation requires anatomic alignment of fracture fragments. Failure to obtain proper alignment has led to the phenomenon known as "open internal fixation" of fracture fragments without proper reduction. The size of the plates has decreased to minimize palpability and exposure. However limitations in their application have been encountered due to the physiologic forces of the muscles of mastication and bone healing. In the pediatric population, the long-standing presence of plates in the cranial vault resulted in reports of transcranial migration and growth restriction. These findings led to the development of resorbable plating systems, which are associated with self-limited plate palpability and soft tissue inflammatory reactions. Any rigid system including these produces growth restriction in varying amounts. In this discussion, we review the reported complication rates of miniplating and microplating systems as well as absorptive plating systems in elective and traumatic craniofacial surgery.

  16. Hemorrhagic complications of severe pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Stroud, W H; Cullom, J W; Anderson, M C

    1981-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage associated with pancreatitis is a rare but frequently lethal complication. Fifteen patients with this complication are presented. Bleeding occurred in four patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, in three patients with pancreatic abscesses, in seven patients with pseudocysts, and in one patient with chronic relapsing pancreatitis following longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy. The initial presentation of hemorrhage was gastrointestinal in eight patients and retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal in seven. Abdominal pain with associated nausea and vomiting was present in all patients on admission. Duration of symptoms prior to hospitalization averaged 6 days. During hospitalization the 15 patients received a total of 512 units of blood for transfusions ranging from 8 to 177 units. Admission amylase values were of no benefit in assessing severity of the disease, but application of Ranson's criteria accurately predicted both severity and prognosis. The common denominator in all cases of bleeding appeared to be the presence of an overwhelming or continuing inflammatory process with necrosis and erosion of adjacent vascular and visceral structures. The overall mortality rate in the series was 53.3%. Those patients with hemorrhage associated with pseudocyst formation had the highest survival rates, whereas those with necrotizing pancreatitis and hemorrhage had an extremely poor response to aggressive medical and/or surgical management.

  17. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Apr 27,2016 Complications The possibility of ... problems that did not show up right away. Prevention There is no known prevention for Kawasaki disease. ...

  18. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  19. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within 'post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy' on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  20. Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159391.html Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty Nightly breathing ... 15, 2016 WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea may increase the risk of serious complications ...

  1. Complications in Musculoskeletal Intervention: Important Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David T.; Dubois, Melissa; Tutton, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) intervention has proliferated in recent years among various subspecialties in medicine. Despite advancements in image guidance and percutaneous technique, the risk of complication has not been fully eliminated. Overall, complications in MSK interventions are rare, with bleeding and infection the most common encountered. Other complications are even rarer. This article reviews various complications unique to musculoskeletal interventions, assists the reader in understanding where pitfalls lie, and highlights ways to avoid them. PMID:26038623

  2. Common complications of pediatric neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Skalsky, Andrew J; Dalal, Pritha B

    2015-02-01

    Children with pediatric neuromuscular disorders experience common complications, primarily due to immobility and weakness. Musculoskeletal complications include hip dysplasia with associated hip subluxation or dislocation, neuromuscular scoliosis, and osteoporosis and resulting fractures. Constipation, gastroesophageal reflux, and obesity and malnutrition are commonly experienced gastrointestinal complications. Disordered sleep also is frequently observed, which affects both patients and caregivers. PMID:25479776

  3. COMPLICATIONS REQUIRING HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    WRZESINSKI, Aline; CORRÊA, Jéssica Moraes; FERNANDES, Tainiely Müller Barbosa; MONTEIRO, Letícia Fernandes; TREVISOL, Fabiana Schuelter; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The actual gold standard technique for obesity treatment is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, complications may occur and the surgeon must be prepared for them. Aim: To evaluate retrospectively the complications occurrence and associated factors in patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Methods: In this study, 469 medical charts were considered, from patients and from data collected during outpatient consultations. The variables considered were gender, age, height, pre-operatory BMI, pre-operatory weight, pre-operatory comorbidities, time of hospital stay, postoperative complications that demanded re-admission to the hospital and the time elapsed between the procedure and the complication. The patients' follow up was, at least, one year. Results: The incidence of postoperative complications that demanded a hospital care was 24,09%. The main comorbidity presented in this sample was hepatic steatosis. The comorbidity that was associated with the postoperative period was type 2 diabetes. There was a tendency for the female gender be related to the complications. The cholecystectomy was the most frequent complication. Complications occurred during the first year in 57,35%. Conclusion: The most frequent complication was the need to perform a cholecystectomy, where the most frequent comorbidity was hepatic steatosis. Over half the complications occurred during the first year postoperatively. Type 2 diabetes was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications; women had the highest incidence; body mass index was not associated with the occurrence of complications. PMID:26537263

  4. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  5. [Prevention and treatment of intraoperative complications of thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Lampl, L

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve a minimal complication rate there is a need for a comprehensive strategy. This means in the first line preventive steps which include patient positioning, suitable approaches and access, an appropriately qualified surgical team as well as a carefully planned dissection and preparation. Furthermore, a supply of additional instrumentation, such as thrombectomy catheters, special vascular clamps and even extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and a heart-lung machine (HLM) in cases of centrally located lesions should be on stand-by. Control instruments, such as a bronchoscope and esophagoscope should not be forgotten. In selected cases a preoperative embolization (vascular malformation) or cream swallow (thoracic duct injury) can be helpful. Special interventions to overcome complications arising are described for the chest wall, lung parenchyma, pulmonary vessels, great vessels, bronchial arteries, trachea and bronchi, esophagus, thoracic duct, heart, vertebral column and sternum corresponding to the topography.

  6. Infantile haemangioma: a complicated disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mingke; Qi, Xianqin; Dai, Yuxin; Wang, Shuqing; Quan, Zhiwei; Liu, Yingbin; Ou, Jingmin

    2015-06-01

    Infantile haemangiomas (IH) are common benign vascular tumors of childhood. They are characterised by rapid growth during the first year of life and slow regression that is usually completed by 7-10 years of age. The underlying mechanism of action of IH is aberrant angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, and involves the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. IH become a challenge if they are part of a syndrome, are located in certain areas of the body, or if complications develop. The beta-adrenergic receptor blocker propranolol is a promising new candidate for first-line systemic therapy. This review focuses on the clinical characteristics, pathogenesis and management of IH.

  7. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Gauhar; Lee, Jessica D

    2013-10-01

    Infective endocarditis is an infection of the inner surface or endocardium of the heart, in most instances involving the heart valves or the mural portion of the endocardium. As nonbacterial organisms such as rickettsia, fungi, and even viruses may also cause endocarditis, the term "infective endocarditis" is preferred over the older terminology of "bacterial endocarditis." Despite advancements in medical treatment and surgical therapies over the last few decades, infective endocarditis continues to be associated with a poor prognosis. There are many different factors affecting the clinical outcome in patient with infective endocarditis, including the type of organism and its virulence, patient characteristics, comorbid illness, time to diagnosis and treatment, indications for surgery, and time to surgery when indicated. In this article, we will review the epidemiology of endocarditis, the neurologic complications of infective endocarditis, and the current therapeutic strategies.

  8. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications.

  9. Neurologic complications of cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Roeltgen, David; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are an uncommon cause for neurologic disease, but if undiagnosed can be associated with devastating neurologic consequences. Primary cardiac tumors, both benign and neoplastic, and metastatic tumors occur. Primary cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with neurologic embolic complications. Metastatic cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with valvular distraction, arrhythmia, diminished cardiac output and indirect neurological dysfunction. Primary and metastatic cardiac tumors may result in cerebral metastatic disease. Atrial myxoma, a benign primary cardiac tumor, is the most common cardiac tumor associated with neurologic disease, and most commonly causes cerebral embolization and stroke. The use of thrombolytic therapy for these strokes is controversial. Additionally, delayed manifestations, including aneurysm formation and intracranial hemorrhage, are possible. Aneurysm formation has been described as occurring after removal of the primary tumor. The availability of noninvasive cardiac imaging has significantly helped decrease the neurologic morbidity of cardiac tumors and has led to frequent successful intervention. PMID:24365298

  10. Skeletal Complications of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Abigail A.; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  11. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD.

  12. Neurologic complications of scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Newton, H B

    2001-06-01

    Recreational scuba diving has become a popular sport in the United States, with almost 9 million certified divers. When severe diving injury occurs, the nervous system is frequently involved. In dive-related barotrauma, compressed or expanding gas within the ears, sinuses and lungs causes various forms of neurologic injury. Otic barotrauma often induces pain, vertigo and hearing loss. In pulmonary barotrauma of ascent, lung damage can precipitate arterial gas embolism, causing blockage of cerebral blood vessels and alterations of consciousness, seizures and focal neurologic deficits. In patients with decompression sickness, the vestibular system, spinal cord and brain are affected by the formation of nitrogen bubbles. Common signs and symptoms include vertigo, thoracic myelopathy with leg weakness, confusion, headache and hemiparesis. Other diving-related neurologic complications include headache and oxygen toxicity.

  13. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications. PMID:18160357

  14. ORTHOPEDIC COMPLICATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Lúcia Lei Munhoz; Godoy, Alexandre Leme; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba Domingos; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; de Almeida Silva, Camila; Martino, Patricia Bernardelli; Gutierrez, Eliana Bataggia; Gianna, Maria Clara; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    The considerable increase of the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the age of highly-powerful antiretroviral treatment results in important metabolic and bone-joint changes resulting from a long-lasting viral infection time and from this treatment. The most common orthopaedic complications are bone mineralization changes, osteonecrosis, carpal tunnel syndrome and gleno-humeral adhesive capsulitis, with different clinical presentation features, natural disease progression and therapeutic response compared to the overall population. Literature reports are initial, and the experience of the multidisciplinary service of the University of Sao Paulo's Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology enables us a more indepth knowledge about the various pathologies involved and the development of treatment protocols that are appropriate to these diagnoses. PMID:27004170

  15. [Infection complicated with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Ken-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are believed to be suspected to be immunocompromized hosts. Many reports have pointed out that diabetic patients are susceptible to certain infections such as surgical site infections, malignant otitis externa, mucormycosis, and necrotizing fasciitis. But their etiology seems to be non-uniform, heterogenous and individualized. Above all, obesity-related infections are also increasing accompanied with the recent rising incidence of obesity. Further studies should be addressed about the relationships between infections and diabetes which include the factors of body mass index, life style, degree of diabetes complications, and poor glycemic control duration. They could live a normal life the same as healthy subjects if good glycemic control is achieved without hypoglycemia. PMID:26666157

  16. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  17. Intravascular access in pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; Fischer, R

    1988-11-01

    All cases of patients aged less than 48 months who presented in cardiac arrest to the Hennepin County Medical Center's emergency department (ED) during the years 1984 to 1986 were reviewed retrospectively. The ED record, initial and subsequent chest radiographs, hospital charts, and autopsy reports were analyzed. A total of 33 cases were reviewed. The average patient age was 5 months. The average time needed to establish intravascular access was 7.9 +/- 4.2 minutes. Success rates were 77% for central venous catheterization, 81% for surgical vein cutdown, 83% for intraosseous infusion, and 17% for percutaneous peripheral catheterization. Percutaneous peripheral catheterization, when successful, and bone marrow needle placement were the fastest methods of obtaining intravascular access. There were no major immediate complications, and delayed complications were minimal. Attempts at peripheral intravenous catheter placement should be brief, with rapid progression to intraosseous infusion if peripheral attempts are not successful. PMID:3178949

  18. LAPAROSCOPIC SALPINGECTOMY IN TWO CAPTIVE LEOPARDS (PANTHERA PARDUS) USING A SINGLE PORTAL ACCESS SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Marthinus J; Monnet, Eric; Kirberger, Robert M; Schoeman, Johan P

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic salpingectomy was performed in two adult leopards (Panthera pardus) using a single portal access system, with a multicannulated single-incision laparoscopic surgery port, without any complications. The poorly developed ovarian bursa provided easy access to the uterine tube for salpingectomy. Laparoscopic salpingectomy can be safely performed in the leopard using a single portal access system.

  19. LAPAROSCOPIC SALPINGECTOMY IN TWO CAPTIVE LEOPARDS (PANTHERA PARDUS) USING A SINGLE PORTAL ACCESS SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Marthinus J; Monnet, Eric; Kirberger, Robert M; Schoeman, Johan P

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic salpingectomy was performed in two adult leopards (Panthera pardus) using a single portal access system, with a multicannulated single-incision laparoscopic surgery port, without any complications. The poorly developed ovarian bursa provided easy access to the uterine tube for salpingectomy. Laparoscopic salpingectomy can be safely performed in the leopard using a single portal access system. PMID:26667558

  20. Current topics on vascular access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Tordoir, J H M; Van Der Sande, F M; De Haan, M W

    2004-09-01

    Vascular access remains the lifeline for end-stage renal failure patients, which have been treated by chronic intermittent hemodialysis. Due to the steady increase in the number of patients with difficulties to create access, in particular in elderly with various comorbidities, the need for more insight and regulations have evolved into the publications of the American and European guidelines. From the latter it may be obvious that an adequate preoperative assessment followed by the creation of autogenous arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) is far better and preferred to the implantation of grafts. Vascular access maintenance by monitoring and elective percutanuous or surgical revision is of utmost importance to keep the access site functional. Despite up-to-date measures for vascular access maintenance, various complications may treaten not only the access site but also quality and expectance of life. Thrombotic occlusion remains a major event, leading to permanent failure in 10% of AVFs and 20% of grafts each year. Interventional (percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and/or stent implantation) or surgical revision of thrombosed accesses have similar outcomes with a high rate of reinterventions. The elderly diabetic population with peripheral arteriosclerotic obstructive disease is in particular prone to angio-access induced handischemia. When not timely and properly treated this may lead to minor or major amputation, further hampering quality of life. Also, the enormous application in the past 2 decades of acute central venous lines has lead to a significant increase of central venous obstruction with concomittent morbidity and problems creating vascular access in the upper extremities. Radiological intervention in these cases is a primary option, leaving surgical reconstruction as a second best method. It may be obvious that creation and maintenance of hemodialysis vascular access has become an important and time-consuming speciality. Only an up

  1. Thermal stress and diabetic complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko

    1995-06-01

    Activities of erythrocyte aldose reductase were compared in 34 normal subjects, 45 diabetic patients, and nine young men following immersion in water at 25, 39, and 42° C. Mean basal enzyme activity was 1.11 (SEM 0.12) U/g Hb and 2.07 (SEM 0.14) U/g Hb in normal controls and diabetic patients, respectively ( P<0.0001). Activities of the enzyme showed a good correlation with hemaglobin A1 (HbA1) concentrations ( P<0.01) but not with fasting plasma glucose concentrations. After immersion at 42° C for 10 min, enzyme activity was increased by 37.6% ( P<0.01); however, the activity decreased by 52.2% ( P<0.005) after immersion for 10 min at 39° C and by 47.0% ( P<0.05) at 25° C. These changes suggest that heat stress might aggravate diabetic complications, and body exposure to hot environmental conditions is not recommended for diabetic patients.

  2. Cardiac complications in thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Auger, Dominique; Pennell, Dudley J

    2016-03-01

    The myocardium is particularly susceptible to complications from iron loading in thalassemia major. In the first years of life, severe anemia leads to high-output cardiac failure and death if not treated. The necessary supportive blood transfusions create loading of iron that cannot be naturally excreted, and this iron accumulates within tissues, including the heart. Free unbound iron catalyzes the formation of toxic hydroxyl radicals, which damage cells and cause cardiac dysfunction. Significant cardiac siderosis may present by the age of 10 and may lead to acute clinical heart failure, which must be treated urgently. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequently encountered iron-related arrhythmia. Iron chelation is effective at removing iron from the myocardium, at the expense of side effects that hamper compliance to therapy. Monitoring of myocardial iron content is mandatory for clinical management of cardiac risk. T2* cardiac magnetic resonance measures myocardial iron and is the strongest biomarker for prediction of heart failure and arrhythmic events. It has been calibrated to human myocardial tissue iron concentration and is highly reproducible across all magnetic resonance scanner vendors. As survival and patient age increases, endothelial dysfunction and diabetes may become new factors in the cardiovascular health of thalassemia patients. Promising new imaging technology and therapies could ameliorate the long-term prognosis.

  3. Zebrafish sex: a complicated affair

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Woei Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we provide a detailed overview of studies on the elusive sex determination (SD) and gonad differentiation mechanisms of zebrafish (Danio rerio). We show that the data obtained from most studies are compatible with polygenic sex determination (PSD), where the decision is made by the allelic combinations of several loci. These loci are typically dispersed throughout the genome, but in some teleost species a few of them might be located on a preferential pair of (sex) chromosomes. The PSD system has a much higher level of variation of SD genotypes both at the level of gametes and the sexual genotype of individuals, than that of the chromosomal sex determination systems. The early sexual development of zebrafish males is a complicated process, as they first develop a ‘juvenile ovary’, that later undergoes a transformation to give way to a testis. To date, three major developmental pathways were shown to be involved with gonad differentiation through the modulation of programmed cell death. In our opinion, there are more pathways participating in the regulation of zebrafish gonad differentiation/transformation. Introduction of additional powerful large-scale genomic approaches into the analysis of zebrafish reproduction will result in further deepening of our knowledge as well as identification of additional pathways and genes associated with these processes in the near future. PMID:24148942

  4. Cardiovascular complications of respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Crook, Errol D; Taylor, Herman A; Badr, M Safwan

    2007-11-01

    A major burden of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory diseases can be directly related to the cardiovascular (CV) complications of these disorders. Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies link reduced lung function and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Hypoxia-induced increased sympathetic activity, blood viscosity, or inflammation, among other factors, may mediate the underlying pathogenesis. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been implicated by association in multiple CV diseases including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. However, the exact contribution of SDB, including obstructive and central sleep apneas, to the development of cardiovascular diseases is not fully understood. In this context, the contribution of the new large, prospective, Jackson Heart Study could be significant in that it is designed to answer several of these questions, specifically in the African American population. This review examines the current evidence that links both reduced lung function and SDB to CV diseases. PMID:18004091

  5. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  6. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  7. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  8. Open Access and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shawn; Schmidt, Christian; Das, Chhaya; Tucker, Philip W

    2006-01-01

    Uncensored exchange of scientific results hastens progress. Open Access does not stop at the removal of price and permission barriers; still, censorship and reading disabilities, to name a few, hamper access to information. Here, we invite the scientific community and the public to discuss new methods to distribute, store and manage literature in order to achieve unfettered access to literature. PMID:16956402

  9. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  10. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akkuş, Selami; Uğurlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  11. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access. PMID:25751545

  12. Post-liver Transplant Biliary Complications.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Tegpal; Pastrana, Mariel; Sandhu, Bimaljit

    2012-03-01

    Biliary tract complications remain a common source of morbidity and mortality in liver transplant (LT) recipients with an estimated incidence of 5-30% after orthotopic LT and a mortality rate of up to 10%. Biliary complications after LT may be related to various factors including hepatic artery thrombosis or stenosis, ischemia reperfusion injury, immunologic injury, infections, donor pool, and technical issues which include imperfect anastomosis and T-tube-related complications. Management of the detected biliary complications includes nonsurgical and surgical methods. A majority of these post transplant biliary complications can be treated with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. If unsuccessful, a percutaneous intervention or surgery may be required. In this article, we review the incidence, clinical presentation, and management of the main types of biliary complications.

  13. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  14. The conscious access hypothesis: Explaining the consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    The phenomenon of conscious awareness or consciousness is complicated but fascinating. Although this concept has intrigued the mankind since antiquity, exploration of consciousness from scientific perspectives is not very old. Among myriad of theories regarding nature, functions and mechanism of consciousness, off late, cognitive theories have received wider acceptance. One of the most exciting hypotheses in recent times has been the “conscious access hypotheses” based on the “global workspace model of consciousness”. It underscores an important property of consciousness, the global access of information in cerebral cortex. Present article reviews the “conscious access hypothesis” in terms of its theoretical underpinnings as well as experimental supports it has received. PMID:19771300

  15. Arteriographic complications in the DSA era.

    PubMed

    Waugh, J R; Sacharias, N

    1992-01-01

    Prospective data were collected on complications associated with intraarterial digital subtraction angiography in 2,475 consecutive patients at a 650-bed Melbourne teaching hospital. Carotid or cerebral studies were performed in 939 patients, and the prevalence of stroke (ie, permanent neurologic deficit) was 0.3%. The overall prevalence of systemic complications was 1.8%, with no patients requiring hemodialysis because of renal failure. Comparison was made with previously reported complication rates for conventional film angiography. PMID:1727290

  16. The management of dermal filler complications.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Catherine P

    2009-05-01

    Injectable fillers have gained widespread acceptance among the public and provide a nonsurgical means of rejuvenating the face. As the demand for fillers increases, facial plastic surgeons must become not only expert injectors but also experts in managing the complications of fillers. Little scientific data exists regarding the incidence of complications, and more adverse effects may be seen with longer-term follow-up of patients. The purpose of this article is to review the most commonly encountered complications and management thereof.

  17. Periorbital Injectables: Understanding and Avoiding Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Catherine J

    2016-01-01

    Periorbital rejuvenation with neurotoxins and dermal fillers address several aging changes. Safe and effective results require a thorough understanding of periorbital anatomy, proper injection techniques, and complications of these products. Prompt recognition and treatment of complications can minimize their adverse impacts. Complications can be divided into ischaemic and non-ischaemic effects. Hylauronidase, an enzyme that degrades hyaluronic acid, may improve outcomes after intravascular hyaluronic acid fillers. PMID:27398006

  18. Management of complications of extensor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Kristina; Pipicelli, Joey; Grewal, Ruby

    2015-05-01

    Treatment goals for the management of extensor tendon injuries include restoration of function, minimizing disability, and decreasing the risk of complications. These goals can be achieved with an accurate understanding of the zone-specific concerns for extensor tendon injuries, early referral to hand therapy, and active communication between hand surgeons and therapists. This article reviews extensor tendon injuries by zone, outlines optimal management strategies that help prevent complications, and describes the treatment of these complications. PMID:25934204

  19. Spontaneous ileal perforation complicating low anorectal malformation.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, TiJesuni; Igoche, Matthias; Anyanwu, Pascal; Ameh, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Anorectal malformation is a common anomaly in neonates. Although colorectal perforations have been reported as a complication, ileal perforation is rarely encountered. This is a report of a 2-day-old boy presenting with a low anorectal malformation, complicated with ileal perforation, necessitating laparotomy and ileal repair. Anoplasty was done for the low anomaly. Early presentation and prompt treatment of anorectal malformations is important to prevent such potential life threatening complication. PMID:26168757

  20. Transorbital Neuroendoscopic Management of Sinogenic Complications Involving the Frontal Sinus, Orbit, and Anterior Cranial Fossa

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae H.; Sardesai, Maya G.; Ferreira, Manuel; Moe, Kris S.

    2012-01-01

    Transnasal endoscopic surgery has remained at the forefront of surgical management of sinogenic complications involving the frontal sinus, orbit, and anterior skull base. However, the difficulty in accessing certain areas of these anatomical regions can potentially limit its use. Transorbital neuroendoscopic surgery (TONES) was recently introduced to transgress the limits of transnasal endoscopic surgery; the access that it provides could add additional surgical pathways for treating sinogenic complications involving the frontal sinus, orbit, and anterior cranial fossa. We describe a prospective series of 13 patients who underwent TONES for the management of various sinogenic complications, including epidural abscess, orbital abscess, and fronto-orbital mucocele or mucopyocele, as well as subperiosteal abscess presenting with orbital apex syndrome. The primary outcome measurement was the efficacy of TONES in treating these pathologies. TONES provided effective access to the frontal sinus, orbit, and the anterior cranial fossa. All patients demonstrated postoperative resolution of initial clinical symptoms with well-hidden surgical scars. There were no ophthalmologic complications or recurrence of pathology. Based on our experience, TONES appears to provide a valuable addition to the current surgical armamentarium for treating selected complications of sinusitis. PMID:24294556

  1. Implantable Port Devices, Complications and outcome in Pediatric Cancer, a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, H; Ghorbanpor, M; Tanasan, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral blood vessels, due to availability are used for many years in cancer patients, however in patients with potentially harmful drugs to skin (vesicant drugs) or difficult accessibility to vessels, the use of implantable port (totally implantable venous access port-TIVAP) devices with central vascular access are important. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, 85 pediatric cancer patients younger than 16 years, with TIVAP implantation, were followed for their complications and outcome. In addition to demographic data, patients’ port complications were assessed and compared with published articles. Results Mean days of implanted port usage were 531 ± 358 days in all patients. This period was 287 ±194 days in complicated patients. Complications included as infection (tunnel infection and catheter related blood-stream infection), malfunction and thrombosis, skin erosion, tube avulsion, and tube adhesion to the adjacent vessels were seen in 30.6% of patients. Conclusion According to the published data and this experience, the most common complications in TIVAP are infection and catheter malfunction. It is important to notice that in order to prolong its efficacious life, effective sterilization methods, prevention of clot formation and trauma, are the most useful measures. PMID:27222696

  2. Discovering Diabetes Complications: an Ontology Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Daghistani, Tahani; Shammari, Riyad Al; Razzak, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a serious disease that spread in the world dramatically. The diabetes patient has an average of risk to experience complications. Take advantage of recorded information to build ontology as information technology solution will help to predict patients who have average of risk level with certain complication. It is helpful to search and present patient’s history regarding different risk factors. Discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Method: We designed ontology based model, using adult diabetes patients’ data, to discover the rules of diabetes with its complications in disease to disease relationship. Result: Various rules between different risk factors of diabetes Patients and certain complications generated. Furthermore, new complications (diseases) might be discovered as new finding of this study, discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Conclusion: The system can identify the patients who are suffering from certain risk factors such as high body mass index (obesity) and starting controlling and maintaining plan. PMID:26862251

  3. Massive hiatus hernia complicated by jaundice.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Ruelan V; D'Netto, Trevor J; Hook, Henry C; Falk, Gregory L; Vivian, SarahJayne

    2015-01-01

    Giant para-oesophageal hernia may include pancreas with pancreatic complication and rarely jaundice. Repair is feasible and durable by laparoscopy. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is diagnostic. PMID:26246452

  4. Preventing infective complications relating to induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Mary, Nirmala; Mahmood, Tahir A

    2010-08-01

    Infective complications following induced abortions are still a common cause of morbidity and mortality. This review focusses on defining the strategies to improve care of women seeking an induced abortion and to reduce infective complications. We have considered the evidence for screening and cost-effectiveness for antibiotic prophylaxis. Current evidence suggests that treating all women with prophylactic antibiotics in preference to screening and treating is the most cost-effective way of reducing infective complications following induced abortions. The final strategy to prevent infective complications should be individualized for each region/area depending on the prevalence of organisms causing pelvic infections and the resources available.

  5. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  6. Selective digital venous hypertension: A rare complication of hemodialysis arteriovenous fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, L.C.; Manstein, C.; Somers, R.; Cope, C.

    1983-04-01

    We report and document angiographically a case of selective venous hypertension, masquerading as an infection, which involved the three middle digits of the right hand in a patient with an access arteriovenous (AV) fistula. This complication arose following hemodialysis and was resolved after resection of the right radial artery at the site of AV fistula and re-anastomosis.

  7. Chylous Ascites: A Rare Complication of Thoracic Duct Embolization for Chylothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Gaba, Ron C. Owens, Charles A.; Bui, James T.; Carrillo, Tami C.; Knuttinen, M. Grace

    2011-02-15

    Thoracic duct embolization represents a safe and effective method to treat postsurgical chylothorax. Complications of this procedure are rare despite transabdominal puncture of lymphatic channels for thoracic duct access, and chylous ascites is unreported. Herein, we describe a case of chylous ascites formation after lymphatic puncture and attempted cannulation. Our management approach is also discussed.

  8. Access to care save lives.

    PubMed

    Blaney, C L

    1994-02-01

    Emergency treatment of such major complications of pregnancy as obstructed labor, hemorrhage, infection, hypertension disorders, and the effects of unsafe abortion, helps ameliorate morbidity and prevent mortality. Access to life-saving treatment (e.g., antibiotics, Cesarean sections, and blood transfusions) in developing countries is limited. Maternal mortality in one area of The Gambia, for example, is 2200 per 100,000 births. Improving access to care depends upon the availability of these services in communities, trained health personnel, service improvements, transportation provision, and community education. Detection of complications and early referral to an appropriate facility with a supportive and professional environment is key to saving lives. Political will and public pressure are needed before improvement in services can be successfully accomplished; politicians may ignore women with low status. Barriers to care are physical, cultural, technical, and economic. Cost or distance from home may prevent women from seeking care. Infection, hemorrhage, and uterine injury are frequently related to unsafe abortions, particularly among teenage women. Hospitals must be equipped with a reliable management system, surgical facilities, and clinical services. The WHO recommends upgrading community health centers with trained personnel, adequate supervision, and equipment. In Uganda, midwives are specially trained in advanced skills for use in remote areas: administration of oxytocin to evacuate the uterus and reduce bleeding, use of antibiotics for infections, and surgical repair of vaginal tears. Nurses in Zaire are trained to do Cesarean sections. In Sierra Leone and Nigeria, doctors are encouraged to receive training in obstetrics and to be posted in rural areas. In Sierra Leone, young men are trained to bring pregnant women in to care on stretchers. Maternity waiting homes near hospitals are another means to save lives. Lack of permission from a male relative may

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension Complicating Fibrosing Mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Seferian, Andrei; Steriade, Alexandru; Jaïs, Xavier; Planché, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Amar, David; Jovan, Roland; Fadel, Elie; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibrosing mediastinitis is caused by a proliferation of fibrous tissue in the mediastinum with encasement of mediastinal viscera and compression of mediastinal bronchovascular structures. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of fibrosing mediastinitis caused by extrinsic compression of the pulmonary arteries and/or veins. We have conducted a retrospective observational study reviewing clinical, functional, hemodynamic, radiological characteristics, and outcome of 27 consecutive cases of PH associated with fibrosing mediastinitis diagnosed between 2003 and 2014 at the French Referral Centre for PH. Fourteen men and 13 women with a median age of 60 years (range 18–84) had PH confirmed on right heart catheterization. The causes of fibrosing mediastinitis were sarcoidosis (n = 13), tuberculosis-infection confirmed or suspected (n = 9), mediastinal irradiation (n = 2), and idiopathic (n = 3). Sixteen patients (59%) were in NYHA functional class III and IV. Right heart catheterization confirmed moderate to severe PH with a median mean pulmonary artery pressure of 42 mm Hg (range 27–90) and a median cardiac index of 2.8 L/min/m2 (range 1.6–4.3). Precapillary PH was found in 22 patients, postcapillary PH in 2, and combined postcapillary and precapillary PH in 3. Severe extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries (>60% reduction in diameter) was evidenced in 2, 8, and 12 patients at the main, lobar, or segmental levels, respectively. Fourteen patients had at least one severe pulmonary venous compression with associated pleural effusion in 6 of them. PAH therapy was initiated in 7 patients and corticosteroid therapy (0.5–1 mg/kg/day) was initiated in 3 patients with sarcoidosis, with 9 other being already on low-dose corticosteroids. At 1-year follow-up, 3 patients had died and among the 21 patients evaluated, 3 deteriorated, 14 were stable, and only 4 patients with sarcoidosis improved (4 receiving corticosteroids and 1

  10. Role of endoscopy in the conservative management of biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lisotti, Andrea; Fusaroli, Pietro; Caletti, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients receiving liver transplantation could be significantly affected by biliary complications, including strictures, leaks, stones and bilomas; early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions lead to markedly reduction in morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic gold standard is represented by conservative approaches, both endoscopic and percutaneous, based on the type of biliary reconstruction, the local availability of the procedures and specific expertise. In patients with previous transplantation, the difficult biliary access and the possible presence of concomitant complications (mainly strictures) further restrict the efficacy of the endoscopic and percutaneous treatments; on the other hand, surgery should generally be avoided because of the even increased morbidity and mortality due to technical and clinical issues. Here we review the most common biliary complications occurring after liver transplantation and discuss available treatment options including future perspectives such as endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary access in patients with Roux-en-Y choledocho-jejunostomy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for difficult stones. PMID:26730271

  11. Intraosseous access in trauma by air medical retrieval teams.

    PubMed

    Sheils, Mark; Ross, Mark; Eatough, Noel; Caputo, Nicholas D

    2014-01-01

    Trauma accounts for a significant portion of overall mortality globally. Hemorrhage is the second major cause of mortality in the prehospital environment. Air medical retrieval services throughout the world have been developed to help improve the outcomes of patients suffering from a broad range of medical conditions, including trauma. These services often utilize intraosseous (IO) devices as an alternative means for access of both medically ill and traumatically injured patients in austere environments. However, studies have suggested that IO access cannot reach acceptable rates for massive transfusion. We review the subject to find the answer of whether IO access should be performed by air medical teams in the prehospital setting, or would central venous (CVC) access be more appropriate? We decided to assess the literature for capacity of IO access to meet resuscitation requirements in the prehospital management of trauma. We also decided to compare the insertion and complication characteristics of IO and CVC access. PMID:25049187

  12. Access to modern contraception.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael J; Stanback, John; Shelton, James

    2006-06-01

    Access to modern contraception has become a recognized human right, improving the health and well-being of women, families and societies worldwide. However, contraceptive access remains uneven. Irregular contraceptive supply, limited numbers of service delivery points and specific geographic, economic, informational, psychosocial and administrative barriers (including medical barriers) undermine access in many settings. Widening the range of providers enabled to offer contraception can improve contraceptive access, particularly where resources are most scarce. International efforts to remove medical barriers include the World Health Organization's Medical Eligibility Criteria. Based on the best available evidence, these criteria provide guidance for weighing the risks and benefits of contraceptive choice among women with specific clinical conditions. Clinical job aids can also improve access. More research is needed to further elucidate the pathways for expanding contraceptive access. Further progress in removing medical barriers will depend on systems for improving provider education and promoting evidence-based contraceptive service delivery. PMID:16443395

  13. Acupuncture-induced pneumothorax: the hidden complication.

    PubMed

    Brogan, R J; Mushtaq, F

    2015-05-01

    Acupuncture can be associated with potentially life-threatening complications. Although rare, we feel that potential complications are not being conveyed to patients. We present a case of acupuncture-induced pneumothorax and describe some changes to acupuncture practice that we would like to see implemented.

  14. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates.

  15. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-11-16

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk factors of these complications include the type, dose and mode of administration of sedative agents, as well as the patient's age and underlying medical diseases. Complications attributed to moderate and deep sedation levels are more often associated with cardiovascular and respiratory systems. However, sedation-related complications during GIE procedures are commonly transient and of a mild degree. The risk for these complications while providing any level of sedation is greatest when caring for patients already medically compromised. Significant unwanted complications can generally be prevented by careful pre-procedure assessment and preparation, appropriate monitoring and support, as well as post-procedure management. Additionally, physicians must be prepared to manage these complications. This article will review sedation-related complications during moderate and deep sedation for GIE procedures and also address their appropriate management. PMID:24255744

  16. Complications and their management in endometriosis surgery.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Yucel; Uslu, Husamettin

    2015-08-01

    Endometriosis is a common chronic disease mostly seen in young women. Endometriosis surgery may be considered as rather challenging in gynecology. In this article, we tried to emphasize on basic concepts of endometriosis surgery, the best surgical method that should be applied and the complications and the management of the complications.

  17. Infected renal hematoma complicating anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Morduchowicz, G; Rabinovitz, M; Neuman, M; Pitlik, S

    1987-03-01

    We describe a case of spontaneous infection of a renal hematoma complicating warfarin sodium anticoagulant therapy. The infected hematoma was successfully drained by sonar-guided fine-needle aspiration. All reported cases of renal hematomas complicating anticoagulant therapy are reviewed.

  18. [Complications in the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Eggeling, S

    2015-05-01

    The therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax is a common necessity in hospitals of all care hierarchies In addition to sufficient primary treatment by placement of a thorax drainage, knowledge of complicationg constellations, recognition of complications and irregular courses during the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax are of fundamental importance for achieving a satisfactory treatment outcome. Furthermore, the enlightenment of patients regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, possible measures for influencing the recurrence rate and information about future behavioral and lifestyle modifications are important. The principal complications during hospital treatment can be subdivided into complications of the surgical placement of the thorax drain and relief of the pleural cavity, problems in the management of treatment of the pleural negative pressure, the possibly demanding management of a persisting air leak and the individualized decision-making with respect to an interventional or operative procedure. The most common complicating constellations and possible complications during the inpatient hospital stay are described, the.

  19. Complications of stomas: their aetiology and management.

    PubMed

    Watson, Angus J M; Nicol, Laura; Donaldson, Susan; Fraser, Cathie; Silversides, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The formation of a stoma is an essential part of many colorectal operations. Despite the frequency with which these surgeries are performed and the number of specialists involved in stoma care, complications are still common. This article investigates the most common complications, explains the reasons for their occurrence and suggests potential management options. Common stoma complications were identified by the colorectal/ stoma clinical nurse specialist (CSCNS) and a literature search was performed using a variety of online databases, including Medline and CINAHL using the keywords stoma, complications, prolapse, ischaemia, retraction, hernia and stenosis. Articles used were selected on the basis of relevance to the topic. The commonest complications of stomas included skin irritation, prolapse, retraction, ischaemia, hernia and stenosis.

  20. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-08-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

  1. Complications of Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Shikha; Rao, Kavita; Natrajan, Sundaram

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linking of corneal collagen (CXL) is a promising approach for the treatment of keratoconus and secondary ectasia. Several long-term and short-term complications of CXL have been studied and documented. The possibility of a secondary infection after the procedure exists because the patient is subjected to epithelial debridement and the application of a soft contact lens. Formation of temporary corneal haze, permanent scars, endothelial damage, treatment failure, sterile infiltrates, and herpes reactivation are the other reported complications of this procedure. Cross-linking is a low-invasive procedure with low complication and failure rate but it may have direct or primary complications due to incorrect technique application or incorrect patient's inclusion and indirect or secondary complications related to therapeutic soft contact lens, patient's poor hygiene, and undiagnosed concomitant ocular surface diseases. PMID:22254130

  2. Early postoperative complications following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Andrea R; Platz, Klaus-Peter; Kremer, Bernd

    2004-10-01

    Liver transplantation is a highly successful treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. However, serious postoperative complications can significantly compromise patient survival. Complications can be technical, medical, or immunological in nature. The risk of developing early postoperative complications is associated with the patient's preoperative condition, the quality of the donor liver, the quality of the donor and recipient procedure, initial graft function, and perioperative anaesthesiological and intensive care management. The patient's preoperative condition can include gastrointestinal bleeding, acute renal failure, a requirement for cathecholamines or mechanical ventilation, and prolonged encephalopathy for the most detrimental risk factors for developing early postoperative complications. The necessity for prolonged mechanical ventilation or the requirement for reintubation after transplantation can significantly increase the risk of developing pneumonia, sepsis, and multiple organ dysfunction. A decrease in infectious and other complications can be achieved by early postoperative enteral nutition, including the application of probiotics. PMID:15494284

  3. [Complications in the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Eggeling, S

    2015-05-01

    The therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax is a common necessity in hospitals of all care hierarchies In addition to sufficient primary treatment by placement of a thorax drainage, knowledge of complicationg constellations, recognition of complications and irregular courses during the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax are of fundamental importance for achieving a satisfactory treatment outcome. Furthermore, the enlightenment of patients regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, possible measures for influencing the recurrence rate and information about future behavioral and lifestyle modifications are important. The principal complications during hospital treatment can be subdivided into complications of the surgical placement of the thorax drain and relief of the pleural cavity, problems in the management of treatment of the pleural negative pressure, the possibly demanding management of a persisting air leak and the individualized decision-making with respect to an interventional or operative procedure. The most common complicating constellations and possible complications during the inpatient hospital stay are described, the. PMID:25995086

  4. Reoperative venous access.

    PubMed

    Juno, Russell J; Knott, Andrew W; Racadio, John; Warner, Brad W

    2003-05-01

    The maintenance of long-term venous access is critical to the livelihood of children in a variety of clinical situations, especially those who are dependent on parenteral nutrition. Whereas the traditional routes of either peripheral or central venous access are initially adequate, most of these sites eventually succumb to the pitfalls associated with long-term venous access. This review provides a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach to the management of reoperative venous access with regard to preoperative planning and imaging and specific techniques in interventional radiology and surgery.

  5. Access Interface Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fager, Susan; Beukelman, David R.; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jakobs, Tom; Baker, John

    2013-01-01

    Individuals who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices to support their communication often have physical movement challenges that require alternative methods of access. Technology that supports access, particularly for those with the most severe movement deficits, have expanded substantially over the years. The purposes of this article are to review the state of the science of access technologies that interface with augmentative and alternative communication devices and to propose a future research and development agenda that will enhance access options for people with limited movement capability due to developmental and acquired conditions. PMID:22590797

  6. Channel Access in Erlang

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.

    2013-10-13

    We have developed an Erlang language implementation of the Channel Access protocol. Included are low-level functions for encoding and decoding Channel Access protocol network packets as well as higher level functions for monitoring or setting EPICS process variables. This provides access to EPICS process variables for the Fermilab Acnet control system via our Erlang-based front-end architecture without having to interface to C/C++ programs and libraries. Erlang is a functional programming language originally developed for real-time telecommunications applications. Its network programming features and list management functions make it particularly well-suited for the task of managing multiple Channel Access circuits and PV monitors.

  7. Updating realistic access.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Mike

    2010-05-01

    Nearly six years ago Ira Mellman, then Editor-in-Chief of the JCB, published an editorial entitled "Providing realistic access" (1). It described the Journal's efforts to reconcile its subscription-based business model with the goal of providing public access to scholarly journal content. Since then, developments in the public-access movement are bringing us closer to the ideal of universal public access. But will there still be a place for selective journals like the JCB when we achieve that objective? PMID:20375430

  8. AccessAbility @ Cleveland Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mates, Barbara T.

    2003-01-01

    Describes several programs that were developed by staff at the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Library to be accessible to users with disabilities. Highlights include a Braille reading program; sensory garden; poetry club; book club based on talking books; wheelchair athletics; touching museum artifacts; and a mobile library for users who could not visit…

  9. The Prone Position During Surgery and its Complications: A Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Melissa M.; Ho, Yik-Hong; Rozen, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery in the prone position is often a necessity when access to posterior anatomic structures is required. However, many complications are known to be associated with this type of surgery, as physiologic changes occur with increased pressure to anterior structures. While several studies have discussed postoperative vision loss, much fewer studies with lower levels of evidence have addressed other complications. A systematic literature review was conducted using 2 different databases, and 53 papers were regarded as appropriate for inclusion. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed. Thirteen complications were identified. Postoperative vision loss and cardiovascular complications, including hypovolemia and cardiac arrest, had the most number of studies and highest level of evidence. Careful planning for optimal positioning, padding, timing, as well as increased vigilance are evidence-based recommendations where operative prone positioning is required. PMID:25692433

  10. Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Felecia; De Oliver, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This case study researches the degree to which the location and services offered by a multicampus university, geographically situated consistent with the commercial principles of a large mass-market enterprise, facilitate access for educationally underserved groups. First, the necessity of democratizing educational access to an underprivileged…

  11. Accessing the Microform Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindler, Stan

    1985-01-01

    Characterizes types of indexing programs used by Research Publications, Inc. and describes provision of access to four major projects: "The Official Washington Post Index" (provides access to newspaper and microfilm edition); "The Eighteenth Century"; "The Declassified Documents Reference System" (ongoing fiche project abstracted and indexed…

  12. Planning for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassell, Marianne Kotch

    This practical manual provides useful, concrete ideas and suggestions to help public libraries make libraries more accessible to persons with disabilities. Most suggestions are for persons who have difficulty with mobility. Reviews of pertinent laws and regulations are followed by concrete, step-by step suggestions for planning for accessibility,…

  13. Intellectual Access to Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsin-Liang; Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1999-01-01

    The increased availability of digital images is accompanied by a need for solutions to the problems inherent in indexing them for retrieval. Problems in image description and access are discussed, with a perspective on traditional and new solutions. Recent developments in intellectual access to images are surveyed and contrasted with…

  14. Granting Each Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Linda Lucas

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes federal legislation regarding equal access for students with disabilities and discusses environmental barriers to accessibility in the library media center. Solutions to these design problems are suggested in the following areas: material formats and space requirements; the physical setting, including furniture, floor coverings,…

  15. Improving School Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Few things are more important for school safety and security than controlling access to buildings and grounds. It is relatively easy to incorporate effective access control measures in new school designs but more difficult in existing schools, where most building and site features cannot be readily altered or reconfigured. The National…

  16. Alternatives to Indwelling Catheters Cause Unintended Complications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jessica; Harvey, Ellen M; Lollar, Daniel I; Bradburn, Eric H; Hamill, Mark E; Collier, Bryan R; Love, Katie M

    2016-08-01

    To reduce the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), limiting use of indwelling catheters is encouraged with alternative collection methods and early removal. Adverse effects associated with such practices have not been described. We also determined if CAUTI preventative measures increase the risk of catheter-related complications. We hypothesized that there are complications associated with early removal of indwelling catheters. We described complications associated with indwelling catheterization and intermittent catheterization, and compared complication rates before and after policy updates changed catheterization practices. We performed retrospective cohort analysis of trauma patients admitted between August 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013 who required indwelling catheter. Associations between catheter days and adverse outcomes such as infection, bladder overdistention injury, recatheterization, urinary retention, and patients discharged with indwelling catheter were evaluated. The incidence of CAUTI and the total number of catheter days pre and post policy change were similar. The incidence rate of urinary retention and associated complications has increased since the policy changed. Practices intended to reduce the CAUTI rate are associated with unintended complications, such as urinary retention. Patient safety and quality improvement programs should monitor all complications associated with urinary catheterization practices, not just those that represent financial penalties. PMID:27657581

  17. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology.

  18. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  19. Complications of Distal Biceps Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nirav H.; Volpi, Alex; Lynch, T. Sean; Patel, Ronak M.; Cerynik, Douglas L.; Schickendantz, Mark S.; Jones, Morgan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anatomic reinsertion of the distal biceps is critical for restoring flexion and supination strength. Single- and double-incision surgical techniques have been reported, analyzing complications and outcomes measures. Which technique results in superior clinical outcomes and the lowest associated complications remains unclear. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that rerupture rates would be similar between the 2 techniques, while nerve complications would be higher for the single-incision technique and heterotopic ossification would be more frequent with the double-incision technique. Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review was conducted using the PubMed, MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), SPORTSDiscus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases to identify articles reporting distal biceps ruptures up to August 2013. We included English-language articles on adult patients with a minimum of 3 cases reporting single- and double-incision techniques. Frequencies of each complication as a percentage of total cases were calculated. Fisher exact tests were used to test the association between frequencies for each repair method, with P < .05 considered statistically significant. Odds ratios with 95% CIs were also computed. Results: A total of 87 articles met the inclusion criteria. Lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve neurapraxia was the most common complication in the single-incision group, occurring in 77 of 785 cases (9.8%). Heterotopic ossification was the most common complication in the double-incision group, occurring in 36 of 498 cases (7.2%). Conclusion: The overall frequency of reported complications is higher for single-incision distal biceps repair than for double-incision repair. The frequencies of rerupture and nerve complications are both higher for single-incision repairs while the frequency of heterotopic ossification is higher for

  20. Interventional Management of Vascular Renal Transplant Complications.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Kanti Pallav; LaBerge, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Renal transplantation is the therapy of choice in patients with end stage renal disease. Although transplant rejection remains the most common complication after renal transplantation, vascular anatomical complications occur in 1%-23% of renal transplant recipients. Interventional radiologists play an important role in the management of these complications. This review discusses the role of image-guided interventions within the context of multidisciplinary patient management. Particular emphasis is given to anatomical considerations unique to this patient population, techniques used for image-guided interventions, and outcomes of image-guided interventions. PMID:27641457

  1. [Orthognathic surgery: surgical failures and complications].

    PubMed

    Guyot, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery procedures mark the endpoint of lengthy orthodontic-surgical preparations and herald the completion of treatment for patients and their families. The main types of procedure are full maxillary Le Fort I osteotomies, mandibular osteotomies and chin surgery. To ensure a successful outcome, all require a favorable environment and extreme technical skill. But, like all surgical operations, they are also subject to peri- and post-operative complications resulting from treatment hazards or errors. Whatever the cause, surgical complications can entail failures in the management of the malformation. By seeking to understand and analyzing these complications, we can already help to prevent and reduce the contingent risks of failure.

  2. Medical complications of self-induced vomiting.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carrie A; Mehler, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa, often characterized by self-induced vomiting, is complicated by medical manifestations that affect nearly every organ system in the body. Effects range from superficial skin and dental findings to esophageal pathology, electrolyte abnormalities, cardiac arrhythmias, and in extreme cases, death. Ultimately, cessation of vomiting is necessary to cure most associated medical complications. Improper management of medical complications may lead to significant psychological distress to the patient. Fortunately, efficacious treatments do exist both to ease symptoms and ideally help the patient make a smooth transition to cessation of self-induced vomiting behavior.

  3. Complications in hair-restoration surgery.

    PubMed

    Konior, Raymond J

    2013-08-01

    Most complications associated with hair restoration are completely preventable and arise from variables that are directly controlled by the surgeon and the patient. Physicians who thoroughly grasp the nuances of modern surgical techniques and fully understand the physiologic dynamics of the balding process are least likely to generate a physician-controlled error. Highly motivated, well-educated patients who carefully follow instructions and take an active role in the postoperative recovery process minimize the chance of patient-controlled errors. This article discusses potential complications associated with surgical hair restoration, and the roles of the patient and physician in minimizing the risk of complications.

  4. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders.

  5. [Unusual abdominal complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt].

    PubMed

    Guillén, A; Costa, J M; Castelló, I; Claramunt, E; Cardona, E

    2002-10-01

    The most common complications after CSF shunting to treat hydrocephalus are shunt infection and obstruction. Although ventriculoperitoneal (VP) diversion of the CSF using artificial shunt devices is an accepted method for the management of hydrocephalus, high rates of various complications have been reported, ranging from 24% to 47%. Among these, abdominal complications account for approximately 25%. The incidence of bowel perforation by shunt-catheter is known to be as low as 0.1-0.7%. We describe a case of migration af a peritoneal catheter through a congenital hernia of Morgagni.

  6. Maternal complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Vidushi; Agarwal, Nutan

    2016-09-01

    Maternal complications of diabetes in pregnancy include obstetric complications such as pre-eclampsia, preterm labour, polyhydramnios, increased operative delivery and increased infective morbidity. These can be minimized with optimal glycaemic control. Additionally, pregnancies with overt/pregestational diabetes may have diabetes related complications such as hypoglycaemia, worsening of retinopathy, nephropathy and diabetic ketoacidosis. Women with pre-existing diabetic vasculopathy should be managed with multi-disciplinary approach with maternal and foetal surveillance to detect any deterioration. Such patients have a poor pregnancy outcome. Gastropathy and coronary artery disease in diabetics is a contraindication to pregnancy. PMID:27582159

  7. Macrovascular complications in pregnancy and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Rakesh Kumar; Pydi, Venu Madhavi

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses macrovascular conditions which may occur during pregnancy complicated by diabetes. It describes the effect of dyslipidaemia and hypertension on foeto-maternal outcomes and explores the pathogenesis of these states. PMID:27582155

  8. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa - the spectrum of complications.

    PubMed

    Murat-Sušić, Slobodna; Husar, Karmela; Skerlev, Mihael; Marinović, Branka; Babić, Irena

    2011-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by skin and mucosal fragility and blister formation. A wide variety of extracutaneous manifestations can develop as well as various complications of the disease such as severe anemia, growth retardation, esophageal stenosis, mutilating deformities of hands and feet, glomerulonephritis leading to chronic renal failure, and many others. One of the most important and often occurring complications is the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas that grow and metastasize quickly. The objective of this paper is to give dermatologists a review of major complications encountered in patients with epidermolysis bullosa. Since these complications occur so often and can be considered to be part of the clinical picture, it is mandatory to develop a multidisciplinary well-educated team involved in follow-up and treatment of these patients. PMID:22185926

  9. [Early postoperative complications after scoliosis surgery].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Caballero Macarrón, C; Burgos Flores, J; Martos Sánchez, I; Pérez Palomino, A; Vázquez Martínez, J L; Alvarez Rojas, E; Fernández Pineda, L; Vellibre Vargas, D

    2006-03-01

    Several medical complications can occur after scoliosis surgery in children and adolescents. New surgical techniques have allowed greater degrees of scoliosis correction but have also increased the possibility of postsurgical deficit due to their greater aggressivity. We analyzed the early postsurgical complications of scoliosis surgery in a pediatric intensive care unit over a 10-year period. Seventy-six surgical procedures were performed. Of these, no complications occurred in 55 (73%). Chest X-ray revealed pulmonary atelectasia in 8 patients (10%) and pleural effusion in 7 patients (9%). Symptoms and signs of infection related to surgery were observed in only 6 children (8%). The absence of severe medical complications may be related to new surgical techniques and an experienced team. PMID:16527092

  10. Complications of bronchoscopy: A concise synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, David L; Richard, Kathleen M; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Flexible and rigid bronchoscopes are used in diagnosis, therapeutics, and palliation. While their use is widespread, effective, and generally safe; there are numerous potential complications that can occur. Mechanical complications of bronchoscopy are primarily related to airway manipulations or bleeding. Systemic complications arise from the procedure itself, medication administration (primarily sedation), or patient comorbidities. Attributable mortality rates remain low at < 0.1% for fiberoptic and rigid bronchoscopy. Here we review the complications (classified as mechanical or systemic) of both rigid and flexible bronchoscopy in hope of making practitioners who are operators of these tools, and those who consult others for interventions, aware of potential problems, and pitfalls in order to enhance patient safety and comfort. PMID:26557489

  11. Ocular Complications of Diabetes and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Lee, Darren J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose (BG). DM is a global epidemic and the prevalence is anticipated to continue to increase. The ocular complications of DM negatively impact the quality of life and carry an extremely high economic burden. While systemic control of BG can slow the ocular complications they cannot stop them, especially if clinical symptoms are already present. With the advances in biodegradable polymers, implantable ocular devices can slowly release medication to stop, and in some cases reverse, diabetic complications in the eye. In this review we discuss the ocular complications associated with DM, the treatments available with a focus on localized treatments, and what promising treatments are on the horizon. PMID:27119078

  12. Orbital complications in functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Corey, J P; Bumsted, R; Panje, W; Namon, A

    1993-11-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery can result in both minor and major complications. Among these, orbital complications--including retroorbital hematoma--are among the most feared. Injuries can be direct or indirect from pulling on diseased structures. A retrospective chart review of 616 endoscopic sinus procedures revealed eight orbital complications in seven patients. These included two medial rectus injuries, five orbital hemorrhages, and one nasolacrimal duct injury. Predisposing factors may include hypertension, lamina papyracia dehiscences, extensive polypoid disease, previous surgery, inability to visualize the maxillary ostia, violent coughing or sneezing, and chronic steroid use. Suggested management in the literature includes lateral canthotomy, steroids, and mannitol with ophthalmologic consultation. Opening of the wound by means of an external ethmoidectomy incision has also been suggested. We suggest that adding orbital decompression by means of multiple incisions into the periorbita should be added for fully effective relief. A "management" tree of decision parameters relevant to orbital complications is presented.

  13. Ocular Complications of Diabetes and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Lee, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose (BG). DM is a global epidemic and the prevalence is anticipated to continue to increase. The ocular complications of DM negatively impact the quality of life and carry an extremely high economic burden. While systemic control of BG can slow the ocular complications they cannot stop them, especially if clinical symptoms are already present. With the advances in biodegradable polymers, implantable ocular devices can slowly release medication to stop, and in some cases reverse, diabetic complications in the eye. In this review we discuss the ocular complications associated with DM, the treatments available with a focus on localized treatments, and what promising treatments are on the horizon. PMID:27119078

  14. Multiple Access Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) strawman design uses a hybrid Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA)/Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) implementation. TDMA is used for the forward direction (from Suppliers to Users), and FDMA for the return direction (from Users to Suppliers). An alternative architecture is proposed that will require minimal real time coordination and yet provide a fast access method by using random access Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). The CDMA system issues are addressed such as connecting suppliers and users, both of whom may be located anywhere in the CONUS, when the user terminals are constrained in size and weight; and providing efficient traffic routing under highly variable traffic requirements. It is assumed that bandwidth efficiency is not of paramount importance. CDMA or Spread Spectrum Multiple Access (SSMA) communication is a method in which a group of carriers operate at the same nominal center frequency but are separable from each other by the low cross correlation of the spreading codes used. Interference and multipath rejection capability, ease of selective addressing and message screening, low density power spectra for signal hiding and security, and high resolution ranging are among the benefits of spread spectrum communications.

  15. A Rare Hydrocephalus Complication: Cortical Blindness.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Emre; Göçmen, Rahşan; Işıkay, Ayşe İlksen; Tekşam, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Cortical blindness related to bilateral occipital lobe infarction is an extremely rare complication of hydrocephalus. Compression of the posterior cerebral artery, secondary to tentorial herniation, is the cause of occipital infarction. Particularly in children and mentally ill patients, cortical blindness may be missed. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is important. We present herein a child of ventricular shunt malfunction complicated by cortical blindness. PMID:27411424

  16. Neurologic Complications of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The rate and outcomes of neurologic complications of patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to identify these parameters in ECMO patients. Methods All patients receiving ECMO were selected from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 2001-2011. The rate and outcomes of neurologic complications [acute ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), and seizures] among these patients was determined. Discharge status, mortality, length of stay, and hospitalization costs were compared between patients with and without neurologic complications using chi-squared tests for categorical variables and Student's t-test for continuous variables. Results In total, 23,951 patients were included in this study, of which 2,604 (10.9%) suffered neurologic complications of seizure (4.1%), stroke (4.1%), or ICH (3.6%). When compared to patients without neurologic complications, acute ischemic stroke patients had significantly higher rates of discharge to a long-term facility (12.2% vs. 6.8%, p<0.0001) and a significantly longer mean length of stay (41.6 days vs. 31.9 days, p<0.0001). ICH patients had significantly higher rates of discharge to a long-term facility (9.5% vs. 6.8%, p=0.007), significantly higher mortality rates (59.7% vs. 50.0%, p<0.0001), and a significantly longer mean length of stay (41.8 days vs. 31.9 days) compared to patients without neurologic complications. These outcomes did not differ significantly between seizure patients and patients without neurologic complications. Conclusions Given the increasing utilization of ECMO and the high costs and poor outcomes associated with neurologic complications, more research is needed to help determine the best way to prevent these sequelae in this patient population. PMID:26320848

  17. Parenteral nutrition: risks, complications, and management.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Patricia H; Gilbert, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving modality, but one that also carries risks for potentially life-threatening complications. Comprehensive management of patients receiving parenteral nutrition includes careful selection of candidates, individualizing formulas to meet patients' unique needs, monitoring response to therapy, and implementing strategies designed to avoid complications. Measures to mitigate the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections are particularly important. As with all complex therapies, a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach promotes optimal outcomes. PMID:22222292

  18. Complications of selective laser trabeculoplasty: a review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Selective laser trabeculoplasty is a laser treatment to treat glaucoma. It was initially indicated for open-angle glaucoma but has been proven to be efficacious for various types of glaucoma. This review article summarizes the few rare complications that can be seen with selective laser trabeculoplasty. It also makes recommendations on how to avoid these problems and how to treat patients when these rare complications arise. PMID:26834456

  19. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur.

  20. Perinatal Complications and Aging Indicators by Midlife

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Avshalom; Ambler, Antony; Belsky, Daniel W.; Chapple, Simon; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Israel, Salomon; Poulton, Richie; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Rivera, Christine D.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Wolke, Dieter; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal complications predict increased risk for morbidity and early mortality. Evidence of perinatal programming of adult mortality raises the question of what mechanisms embed this long-term effect. We tested a hypothesis related to the theory of developmental origins of health and disease: that perinatal complications assessed at birth predict indicators of accelerated aging by midlife. METHODS: Perinatal complications, including both maternal and neonatal complications, were assessed in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort (N = 1037), a 38-year, prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. Two aging indicators were assessed at age 38 years, objectively by leukocyte telomere length (TL) and subjectively by perceived facial age. RESULTS: Perinatal complications predicted both leukocyte TL (β = −0.101; 95% confidence interval, −0.169 to −0.033; P = .004) and perceived age (β = 0.097; 95% confidence interval, 0.029 to 0.165; P = .005) by midlife. We repeated analyses with controls for measures of family history and social risk that could predispose to perinatal complications and accelerated aging, and for measures of poor health taken in between birth and the age-38 follow-up. These covariates attenuated, but did not fully explain the associations observed between perinatal complications and aging indicators. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide support for early-life developmental programming by linking newborns’ perinatal complications to accelerated aging at midlife. We observed indications of accelerated aging “inside,” as measured by leukocyte TL, an indicator of cellular aging, and “outside,” as measured by perceived age, an indicator of declining tissue integrity. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying perinatal programming of adult aging is needed. PMID:25349321

  1. Obesity, pregnancy complications, and birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Nicole E; Spong, Catherine Y

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is an increasingly common complication of pregnancy with over half of all women in the United States starting pregnancy overweight or obese. Obese women face unique physiological changes during pregnancy, and these women and their neonates are at increased risk for perinatal morbidity and mortality. In this review, we discuss physiological alterations in obese pregnant women and examine obesity-related antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum complications along with management options.

  2. Advanced sialoendoscopy techniques, rare findings, and complications.

    PubMed

    Nahlieli, Oded

    2009-12-01

    This article presents and discusses advanced minimally invasive sialoendoscopy and combined methods: endoscopy, endoscopic-assisted techniques, and external-lithotripsy combined procedures. It also presents rare situations and complications encountered during sialoendoscopic procedures. Sialoendoscopy is a relatively novel technique, which adds significant new dimensions to the surgeon's armamentarium for management of inflammatory salivary gland diseases. Because of the rapid development in minimally invasive surgical techniques, surgeons are capable of more facilely treating complicated inflammatory and obstructive conditions of the salivary glands.

  3. A Rare Hydrocephalus Complication: Cortical Blindness.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Emre; Göçmen, Rahşan; Işıkay, Ayşe İlksen; Tekşam, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Cortical blindness related to bilateral occipital lobe infarction is an extremely rare complication of hydrocephalus. Compression of the posterior cerebral artery, secondary to tentorial herniation, is the cause of occipital infarction. Particularly in children and mentally ill patients, cortical blindness may be missed. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is important. We present herein a child of ventricular shunt malfunction complicated by cortical blindness.

  4. Metabolic complications of organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, A M

    2001-07-01

    The clinical manifestations of acute organophosphate (OP) and carbamate poisoning have already been well described. Most of these reports were on the cardiac, neurologic, respiratory and other clinical complications of these compounds. However, very little attention has been given to the metabolic aspects of this problem, particularly those accompanying carbamate poisoning. This paper describes the metabolic complications seen in 84 adult patients after acute poisoning with these compounds.

  5. Respiratory complications during artificial barbiturate coma.

    PubMed

    Ducati, A; Signoroni, G; Meli, M; Lobascio, A E; Massei, R; Infuso, L

    1981-01-01

    Artificial barbiturate coma was induced in 13 patients with disorders of consciousness from traumatic or spontaneous diseases. Early respiratory complications consisting with Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) were found in 10 out of these 13 patients; on the contrary, only 2 out of 13 patients, treated with routine intensive care therapy without barbiturate, showed analogous respiratory complications. The literature on the subject and the possible pathophysiological mechanism of respiratory distress are discussed.

  6. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur. PMID:27514084

  7. Electrosurgical Settings and Vaginal Cuff Complications

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Megan L.; Rao, Rama; Manahan, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: After being encouraged to change the technique for opening the vaginal cuff during robotic surgery, this study was performed to determine the correlation between vaginal cuff complications and electrosurgical techniques. Methods: The study group consisted of patients who had their vaginal cuffs opened with a cutting current compared to the group of patients having their vaginal cuff opened with a coagulation current. Data were collected on 150 women who underwent robotic surgery for endometrial cancer. All patients received preoperative antibiotics. Data, including operative time, type of electrosurgery used, estimated blood loss, transfusion rate, and complications, were collected from the patients' records. Results: Surgeries in 150 women and the associated complications were studied. The mean age of the patients was not significantly different between the groups (P = .63). The mean body mass index was 38 kg/m2 in the coagulation arm and 36 kg/m2 in the cutting arm (P = .03). Transfusion was not required. Estimated blood loss and operative time were not significantly different in the coagulation versus the cutting arms (P = .29 and .5; respectively). No patients in the cutting arm and 4 patients (with 5 complications) in the coagulation arm had cuff complications (P = .02). Conclusions: Complications involving the vaginal cuff appear to occur more frequently when the vagina is entered by using electrosurgery with coagulation versus cutting in this cohort of patients undergoing robot-assisted surgery for endometrial cancer.. PMID:26681912

  8. Standardizing the reporting of percutaneous nephrolithotomy complications

    PubMed Central

    Violette, Philippe D.; Denstedt, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate reporting of complications is an essential component to critical appraisal and innovation in surgery and specifically with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We review the evolution of complication reporting for PCNL and suggest future directions for innovation. A selective review was carried out using Pubmed. Key search terms and their combinations included percutaneous, anatrophic, nephrolithotomy, PCNL, complications, Clavien, Martin score, bleeding, bowel injury, perforation, fever, sepsis. The references from relevant papers and reviews as well as AUA and EAU guidelines were also scanned for inclusion. PCNL has become the procedure of choice for large renal stones owing to decreased morbidity over alternative procedures. Both common and rare complications have been described in large case series, small randomized controlled trials, and case reports in an unstandardized form. Although these reports have provided an informative starting point, a standardized complication reporting methodology is necessary to enable appropriate comparisons between institutions, time periods, or innovations in technique. The Clavien-Dindo grading system has become widely accepted in urology and has facilitated the study of PCNL complications. Future research should focus on adaptions of this system to render it more comprehensive and applicable to PCNL. PMID:24497689

  9. Clinical review: Vascular access for fluid infusion in children

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Nikolaus A

    2004-01-01

    The current literature on venous access in infants and children for acute intravascular access in the routine situation and in emergency or intensive care settings is reviewed. The various techniques for facilitating venous cannulation, such as application of local warmth, transillumination techniques and epidermal nitroglycerine, are described. Preferred sites for central venous access in infants and children are the external and internal jugular veins, the subclavian and axillary veins, and the femoral vein. The femoral venous cannulation appears to be the most safe and reliable technique in children of all ages, with a high success and low complication rates. Evidence from the reviewed literature strongly supports the use of real-time ultrasound techniques for venous cannulation in infants and children. Additionally, in emergency situations the intraosseous access has almost completly replaced saphenous cutdown procedures in children and has decreased the need for immediate central venous access. PMID:15566619

  10. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks

    Guest Editors Jun Zheng, University of Ottawa Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

    Background

    With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the

  11. Hospice Services for Complicated Grief and Depression: Results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela R.; Aldridge, Melissa D.; Johnson-Hürzeler, Rosemary; Kaplan, Daniel; Bruce, Martha L.; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe the prevalence of screening for complicated grief (CG) and depression in hospice and access to bereavement therapy and to examine whether screening and access to therapy varied according to hospice organizational characteristics or staff training and involvement. DESIGN Cross-sectional national survey conducted from 2008 to 2009. SETTING United States. PARTICIPANTS Hospices (N = 591). MEASUREMENTS Whether hospices screened for depression or CG at the time of death or provided access to bereavement therapy (individual or group). Organizational characteristics included region, chain status, ownership, and patient volume. Staffing-related variables included training length and meeting attendance requirements. RESULTS Fifty-five percent of hospices provided screening for CG and depression and access to bereavement therapy, 13% provided screening but not access to bereavement therapy, 24% provided access to bereavement therapy but not screening, and 8% neither screened nor provided access to bereavement therapy. Hospices with 100 patients per day or more were significantly more likely to provide screening and access to bereavement therapy. CONCLUSION Hospices appear to have high capacity to provide screening for CG and depression and to deliver group and individual therapy, but data are needed on whether screeners are evidence based and whether therapy addresses CG or depression specifically. Future work could build upon existing infrastructure to ensure use of well-validated screeners and evidence-based therapies. PMID:26456597

  12. Burdick's Technique for Biliary Access Revisited.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Rai, Vijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The precut sphincterotomy is used to facilitate selective biliary access in cases of difficult biliary cannulation. Needle-knife precut papillotomy is the standard of care but is associated with a high rate of complications such as pancreatitis, duodenal perforation, bleeding, etc. Sometimes during bowing of the sphincterotome/cannula and the use of guide wire to facilitate biliary cannulation, inadvertent formation of a false passage occurs in the 10 to 11 o'clock direction. Use of this step to access the bile duct by the intramucosal incision technique was first described by Burdick et al., and since then two more studies have also substantiated the safety and efficacy of this non-needle type of precut sphincterotomy. In this review, we discuss this non-needle technique of precut sphincterotomy and also share our experience using this "Burdick's technique." PMID:25674522

  13. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  14. HRP Data Accessibility 2009

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Clarence Sams spoke at the 2009 Human Research Program's Investigators Workshop on the current status of Data Accessibility. In this presentation he discusses the content of the Human Life Scie...

  15. Accessibility and assistive products

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Porrero, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Accessibility and assistive products and technologies are needed to ensure the rights of persons with disabilities and older persons. Many developments have been implemented in laws, standards, markets and from the consumers perspective, at international, European and national levels. The real issue is that not all the potential users benefit from the use of assistive products or accessible measures. Discussion Innovative methods are needed to allow all potential users to have real advantage of assistive technologies and accessible and design for all facilities. Best practices will be presented and existing gaps and recommendations will be discussed. Cost-benefits aspects will also be presented. Conclusion In order to get advantages from opportunities of globalization, hard work and responsibilities of all stakeholders are needed, so that assistive products and accessibility reach a whole range of situations and environments and contribute to ensure quality of life in a society for all.

  16. Extra- and intrathoracic access.

    PubMed

    Lazarides, Miltos K; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    The most complex patients requiring vascular access are those with bilateral central vein occlusions. Endovascular repair of the central lesions when feasible allow upper extremity use for access. When endovascular repair is not feasible, femoral vein transposition should be the next choice. When lower limb access sites have been exhausted or are contraindicated as in obese patients and in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease, a range of extrathoracic "exotic" extra-anatomic access procedures as the necklace cross-chest arteriovenous (AV) grafts, the ipsilateral axillo-axillary loops, the brachial-jugular AV grafts, the axillo-femoral AV grafts or even intra-thoracic ones as the right atrial AV bypasses represent the vascular surgeon's last resort. The selection among those extra-anatomical chest-wall procedures should be based upon each patient's anatomy or patient-specific factors. PMID:24817469

  17. Access cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Adams, N; Tomson, P L

    2014-03-01

    Each stage of root canal treatment should be carried out to the highest possible standard. The access cavity is arguably the most important technical stage, as subsequent preparation of the root canal(s) can be severely comprised if this is not well executed. Inadequate access can lead to canals being left untreated, poorly disinfected, difficult to shape and obturate, and may ultimately lead to the failure of the treatment. This paper highlights common features in root canal anatomy and outlines basic principles for locating root canals and producing a good access cavity. It also explores each phase of the preparation in detail and offers suggestions of instruments that have been specifically designed to overcome potential difficulties in the process. Good access design and preparation will result in an operative environment which will facilitate cleaning, shaping and obturation of the root canal system in order to maximise success.

  18. Remote Access Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Erin

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Remote Access Astronomy Project, a computerized optical telescope and dial-in data distribution system that places high-quality images and image processing techniques into computer workstations in junior and high school classrooms. (PR)

  19. Adapting Web Browsers for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Paul; Birkmire, Mike

    This paper examines ways to make World Wide Web browsers accessible for individuals with disabilities, and through them, gain access to the information on the Web. It discusses which browsers can be made more accessible and evaluates different types of input. Mouse access, keyboard access, and voice input are reviewed. Processing aids, such as…

  20. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  1. Analysis of Vascular Access in Haemodialysis Patients - Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular access is the key in successful management of chronic haemodialysis (HD) patients. Though native arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is considered the access of choice, many patients in our country initiate haemodialysis through central venous catheter (CVC). There is paucity of data on vascular access in haemodialysis patients from southern India. Aim Aim of the present study was to review our experience of vascular access in Haemodialysis patients (both central venous catheters and arteriovenous fistula) and to assess its success rate and common complications. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted between January 2014 and December 2014 in our institute. A total of 50 patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) underwent vascular access intervention during the above period. Results A temporary venous catheter (96%) in the right internal jugular vein was the most common mode of initiation of haemodialysis with 34.48% incidence of catheter related sepsis. Fifty percent of catheters were removed electively with mean duration of catheter survival of 77.23 ± 14.8 days. Wrist AVF (60%) was the most common site of AVF creation followed by arm (30%), mid-forearm (7.5%) and leg (2.5%). Complications include distal oedema (17.5%) and venous hypertension (2.5%). Primary failure occurred in 25% of patients and was more common in diabetic, elderly (>60 years) and in distal fistulas. Elderly patients (>60 years) starting dialysis with a CVC were more likely to be CVC dependent at 90 days. Conclusion Late presentation and delayed diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) necessitates dialysis initiation through temporary catheter. Dialysis catheter with its attendant complications further adds to the morbidity, mortality, health care burden and costs. Early nephrology referral and permanent access creation in the pre dialysis stage could avert the unnecessary complications and costs of catheter. PMID:26557553

  2. Access to health care

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Martin; Maltais, Danielle; Hudon, Catherine; Lapointe, Lise; Ntetu, Antoine Lutumba

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access. DESIGN Qualitative study with focus groups. SETTING Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions. METHODS For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held. MAIN FINDINGS The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access. CONCLUSION Systematic callbacks, family physicians’ personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:16926944

  3. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  4. Hydroperitoneum: A Rare Complication Performing Endoscopic Combined Intrarenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Federico; Falsaperla, Mario; Saita, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recently endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery (ECIRS) has been introduced as an innovative approach for the treatment of complex single, multiple, and staghorn urolithiasis, which reveals to be a viable alternative to standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Although considered to be a versatile, safe, and efficient endoscopic procedure, it is not free from complications. We would like to report two rare cases of hydroperitoneum that occurred during ECIRS and their management. Case Presentation: Two female patients, respectively, of 75 and 41 years of age, underwent ECIRS procedure for the treatment of complex staghorn kidney urolithiasis, previously evaluated by noncontrast computed tomography (CT) scan. A combined retrograde-percutaneous access to the intrarenal collecting system, under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance with the additional assistance of Endovision technique, was performed. At the end of the procedures, both patients revealed a taut and globous abdomen, and a perioperative CT and ultrasonography revealed the presence of intraperitoneal liquid. Both patients were effectively treated with immediate positioning of abdominal drain with rapid improvement of the clinical presentation. Conclusion: To our knowledge these are the first two cases of hydroperitoneum occurring during ECIRS and reported in the literature. An early detection of the complication and its prompt treatment revealed to be crucial to effectively prevent morbidity. PMID:27579417

  5. Research on recurrent pregnancy complications: a clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Smulian, John C

    2007-07-01

    Research on recurrent pregnancy complications is essential to help clinicians provide appropriate counselling and guide the management of patients with a history of adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, recurrence research is complex, in both its execution and interpretation. The paucity of appropriate data sets accessible for study of recurrent pregnancy outcomes presents significant challenges in performing recurrence research. This is further compounded by the different perspectives on recurrence between epidemiologists and clinicians. The interpretation of risk, whether it is absolute risk, relative risk or population-attributable fraction, underlies the often opposing perspectives of researchers and clinicians. Because clinicians acutely feel the need to provide appropriate counselling and management strategies when there has been a previous pregnancy complication, it is necessary that all those involved in research and care for these women work together to address gaps in our knowledge for recurrent pregnancy outcomes. In this way, we can develop a better understanding of disease processes, counsel patients better, design management plans and, ultimately, achieve better outcomes for our patients.

  6. How to perform transcaval access and closure for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Robert J; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Greenbaum, Adam B

    2015-12-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications.

  7. How to perform transcaval access and closure for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Robert J; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Greenbaum, Adam B

    2015-12-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  8. How to Perform Transcaval Access and Closure for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Robert J.; Babaliaros, Vasilis C.; Greenbaum, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous trans-catheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  9. Complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Bao, Rong-Hua; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Huo-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study focused on a number of factors that have been implicated in calcaneal complications and find the incidence of wound complications. Methods: This was a retrospective study. A total of 162 patients (176 feet) who underwent calcaneal fractures between 2007 and 2012 were included. The patient’s personal details, age, time from injury to surgery, cause of injury, type of fracture, operative details, operating and tourniquet times were collected from hospital computers and paper records. Evidence of complications including wound infection, wound necrosis, pain, malunion, nonunion, impingement, loss of fixation, ect were studied. Results: Forty-seven of one hundred and seventy-six fractures (26.704%) had complications, wound infection was noted in seven fractures (3.977%), twelve fractures developed necrosis (6.818%), 14 fractures (7.955%) developed pain. Malunion was found in five fractures (2.841%), nonunion in two fractures (1.136%) and loss of fixation in four fractures (2.272%). Three neurologic injury was also seen in our study (1.705%). Operating time, time from injury to surgery and type of fracture had some association with complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures, which showed a statistically significant improvement (P=0.000, 0.031, 0.020, respectively), but there were no evidence that age and tourniquet time affect the incidence of complication after calcaneal fracture surgery (P=0.119, 0.682, respectively). Conclusions: Despite developments in the surgical treatment of calcaneal fracture, wound complications still remain inevitable. Advanced imaging techniques, less invasive surgical procedures, wealth of anatomical knowledge, surgical experience and better postoperative care should be ensured.

  10. A surgeon’s nightmare: Complications

    PubMed Central

    Gemici, Kazım; Okuş, Ahmet; Yıldız, Melda; Şahin, Mustafa; Bilgi, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our study aimed to determine the physically and psychologically most difficult complication resulting in chronic discomfort and occurring sensationally in the postoperative period of operations performed frequently in the daily surgical routine. Material and Methods: We performed a survey among surgeons who participated in the 19th National Surgery Congress. The questions were related to the complications encountered in the frequent procedures performed in the daily general surgery routine and resulting in chronic life discomfort but which are not life threatening. Three hundred and sixty general surgeons participated in the survey and they were asked which complication among the given ones was the most difficult for a surgeon to manage physically and psychologically. The received answers were recorded and evaluated with descriptive statistical analysis. Results: Among the surgeons who participated in the survey, 345 were male (96%) and 15 female (4%); 218 (61%) general surgeons served in universities whereas 112 (30%) surgeons served in other public institutes and 30 (9%) served in private hospitals. With regard to the ranking of the complications that are most difficult to manage by the surgeons, pain and hemorrhage developing after hemorrhoidectomy were in the first place with 90 (25%) votes, whereas persistent hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy was in the second place with 73 (20%) votes. Furthermore, 286 (80%) surgeons stated that the complications did not discourage them from performing the same operation again. Conclusion: Our results indicated that among the determined complications of operations performed in daily surgery routine, pain and hemorrhage developing after hemorrhoidectomy were the most difficult to manage. In addition, it was observed that complications did not discourage surgeons to perform the same operation again, contrary to popular belief. PMID:26170757

  11. Nutritional Predictors of Complications Following Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David C.; Riggs, Stephen B.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Matthews, Jonathan E.; Woods, Michael E.; Wallen, Eric M.; Pruthi, Raj S.; Smith, Angela B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of preoperative nutritional status on the development of surgical complications following cystectomy using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). Methods We performed a retrospective review of the NSQIP 2005–2012 Participant Use Data Files. ACS-NSQIP collects data on 135 variables, including pre- and intraoperative data and 30-day post-operative complications and mortality on all major surgical procedures at participating institutions. Preoperative albumin (<3.5 or >3.5 g/dl), weight loss 6 months before surgery (>10%), and BMI were identified as nutritional variables within the database. The overall complication rate was calculated and predictors of complications were identified using multivariable logistic regression models. Results 1,213 patients underwent cystectomy for bladder cancer between 2005–2012. The overall 30-day complication rate was 55.1% (n=668). While 14.7% (n=102) had a preoperative albumin <3.5 g/dL, 3.4% had >10% weight loss in the 6 months prior to surgery, and the mean BMI was 28 kg/m2. After controlling for age, sex, medical comorbidities, medical resident involvement, operation year, operative time and prior operation, only albumin <3.5g/dl was a significant predictor of experiencing a postoperative complication (p=0.03). This remained significant when albumin was evaluated as a continuous variable (p=0.02) Conclusions Poor nutritional status measured by serum albumin is predictive of an increased rate of surgical complications following radical cystectomy. This finding supports the importance of preoperative nutritional status in this population and highlights the need for the development of effective nutritional interventions in the preoperative setting. PMID:25240535

  12. Complications related to pubic hair removal

    PubMed Central

    DEMARIA, Andrea L.; FLORES, Marissa; HIRTH, Jacqueline M.; BERENSON, Abbey B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the prevalence and correlates of complications related to pubic hair removal among a diverse clinical sample of women attending a public clinic. Study Design Women (aged 16 to 40 years) who received care from April to June 2012 at two publicly funded clinics completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire (n=369). After excluding women with missing data, analyses were conducted on 333 women. Additional measures were retrieved through a medical chart review. Chi-square and multivariable logistic regression were used to analyze participant characteristics, pubic hair removal behaviors, and complications related to pubic hair removal. Results Most women (87%) admitted to current removal of at least some pubic hair, while the remainder responded that they had removed pubic hair in the past. Under or normal weight women were more likely to report total pubic hair removal than overweight or obese women. The majority (60%) had experienced at least one health complication due to removal, of which the most common were epidermal abrasion and ingrown hairs. Black and Hispanic women were less likely than white women to report complications. Overweight or obese women were almost twice as likely to report a complication and almost 3 times as likely if they were also total removers. Only 4% had seen a healthcare provider for a complication related to hair removal and only 4% discussed safe removal practices with their doctor. Conclusions Minor complications commonly occur as a result of pubic hair removal. Gynecological visits could provide a safe environment for women to discuss pubic hair removal practices. PMID:24486227

  13. Complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Bao, Rong-Hua; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Huo-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study focused on a number of factors that have been implicated in calcaneal complications and find the incidence of wound complications. Methods: This was a retrospective study. A total of 162 patients (176 feet) who underwent calcaneal fractures between 2007 and 2012 were included. The patient’s personal details, age, time from injury to surgery, cause of injury, type of fracture, operative details, operating and tourniquet times were collected from hospital computers and paper records. Evidence of complications including wound infection, wound necrosis, pain, malunion, nonunion, impingement, loss of fixation, ect were studied. Results: Forty-seven of one hundred and seventy-six fractures (26.704%) had complications, wound infection was noted in seven fractures (3.977%), twelve fractures developed necrosis (6.818%), 14 fractures (7.955%) developed pain. Malunion was found in five fractures (2.841%), nonunion in two fractures (1.136%) and loss of fixation in four fractures (2.272%). Three neurologic injury was also seen in our study (1.705%). Operating time, time from injury to surgery and type of fracture had some association with complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures, which showed a statistically significant improvement (P=0.000, 0.031, 0.020, respectively), but there were no evidence that age and tourniquet time affect the incidence of complication after calcaneal fracture surgery (P=0.119, 0.682, respectively). Conclusions: Despite developments in the surgical treatment of calcaneal fracture, wound complications still remain inevitable. Advanced imaging techniques, less invasive surgical procedures, wealth of anatomical knowledge, surgical experience and better postoperative care should be ensured. PMID:27648028

  14. Access to an optimal treatment. Current situation.

    PubMed

    Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F; Silvestre, Adriana M R; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2015-03-01

    Access to an optimal treatment is determined by several factors, like availability, pricing/funding, and acceptability. In Latin America (LA), one of the regions with more disparities particularly on healthcare in the world, access is affected by other factors, including socio-demographic factors like poverty, living in rural regions, and/or health coverage. Regarding rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an inadequate access to specialists leads to diagnosis and treatment delays diminishing the probability of remission or control. Unfortunately, in almost every LA country, there are cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants without rheumatologists; furthermore, a primary care reference system is present in only about half the countries. In the public health system, coverage of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs occurs for less than 10 % of the patients in about half of the countries. Also, as healthcare providers based their funding decisions mainly in direct costs instead of on patient-centered healthcare quality indicators, access to new drugs is more complicated in this region than in high-income countries. More accurate epidemiological data from LA need to be obtained in order to improve the management of patients with rheumatic diseases in general and RA in particular.

  15. Access to an optimal treatment. Current situation.

    PubMed

    Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F; Silvestre, Adriana M R; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2015-03-01

    Access to an optimal treatment is determined by several factors, like availability, pricing/funding, and acceptability. In Latin America (LA), one of the regions with more disparities particularly on healthcare in the world, access is affected by other factors, including socio-demographic factors like poverty, living in rural regions, and/or health coverage. Regarding rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an inadequate access to specialists leads to diagnosis and treatment delays diminishing the probability of remission or control. Unfortunately, in almost every LA country, there are cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants without rheumatologists; furthermore, a primary care reference system is present in only about half the countries. In the public health system, coverage of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs occurs for less than 10 % of the patients in about half of the countries. Also, as healthcare providers based their funding decisions mainly in direct costs instead of on patient-centered healthcare quality indicators, access to new drugs is more complicated in this region than in high-income countries. More accurate epidemiological data from LA need to be obtained in order to improve the management of patients with rheumatic diseases in general and RA in particular. PMID:26188617

  16. Atom-Role-Based Access Control Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weihong; Huang, Richeng; Hou, Xiaoli; Wei, Gang; Xiao, Shui; Chen, Yindong

    Role-based access control (RBAC) model has been widely recognized as an efficient access control model and becomes a hot research topic of information security at present. However, in the large-scale enterprise application environments, the traditional RBAC model based on the role hierarchy has the following deficiencies: Firstly, it is unable to reflect the role relationships in complicated cases effectively, which does not accord with practical applications. Secondly, the senior role unconditionally inherits all permissions of the junior role, thus if a user is under the supervisor role, he may accumulate all permissions, and this easily causes the abuse of permission and violates the least privilege principle, which is one of the main security principles. To deal with these problems, we, after analyzing permission types and role relationships, proposed the concept of atom role and built an atom-role-based access control model, called ATRBAC, by dividing the permission set of each regular role based on inheritance path relationships. Through the application-specific analysis, this model can well meet the access control requirements.

  17. Mini-access for retroperitoneal laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Gaur, D D; Gopichand, M; Dubey, M; Jhunjhunwala, V

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the feasibility of primary mini-access to the retroperitoneal space to perform certain retroperitoneoscopic procedures in which an enlarged port is not required for extraction of the specimen. Mini-laparoscopy or needlescopic laparoscopy has been performed in the past via the transperitoneal route, but this has not yet been reported for a retroperitoneoscopic procedure. Through a 5-mm primary access and 3- or 5-mm secondary ports, retroperitoneoscopic surgery was performed in seven adults for ureterolithotomy, renal biopsy, simple nephrectomy, nephropexy, cyst decortication, or drainage of a subphrenic abscess. The access technique used was a mini-version of a previously described percutaneous access technique with some modifications. The retroperitoneoscopic procedure was successful in all seven patients, and no complications developed. The operative time, blood loss, analgesic intake, and length of hospital stay were comparable with those of a standard retroperitoneoscopic procedure. However, the cosmetic results were better. Mini-retroperitoneoscopy is feasible and is a better alternative for patients in whom the whole procedure can be performed through 5-mm or smaller ports.

  18. [Complicated jejunoileal diverticulosis. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Rogati, L; Bosco, A; Destradis, E; Ciaccio, V; Pucciarini, L G; Tristaino, B

    1991-01-01

    The diverticulosis of jejunum ileum is an uncommon pathology, that is often revealed just from the complications which it presents. The clinical case reported by the Authors describes a woman who reached to admission for a serious condition of shock secondary to a jejunum bleeding diverticulosis and who underwent an intestinal resection. The patient was discharged home on IX p.o. day. From the review of literature results that the incidence of the diverticulosis of jejunum ileum consists of 0.1%-0.11% of all the gastrointestinal's diverticula and the predominance is for the female, especially in the middle age. The diverticulosis of jejunum ileum can be congenital or acquired; the first one came to the antimesenteric side of the intestines, the second one to the mesenteric side of the same. The diverticulosis is generally asymptomatic, but often produces many complications as the intestinal occlusion, secondary to a bridle, a volvulus, an invagination, also if the peritonitis caused by a diverticulosis's perforation represents the most frequent complication of them. Others rarest complications are the massive haemorrhage of diverticula, the stagnant loop syndrome, the malabsorption's syndrome due to lack of B12 vitamin and growth of bacteria within them, the diverticulitis caused by infection. The therapy of all complicated cases of jejunum ileum diverticula is necessarily the surgery only and exactly the intestinal resection.

  19. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zvěřina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Skřivan, Jiří; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  20. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W.; Kelly, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS). We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise. PMID:26697063

  1. Avoiding Complications in Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay Singh; Ratre, Shailendra; Kher, Yatin

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic neurosurgical techniques hold the potential for reducing morbidity. But they are also associated with limitations such as the initial learning curve, proximal blind spot, visual obscurity, difficulty in controlling bleeding, disorientation, and loss of stereoscopic image. Although some of the surgical techniques in neuroendoscopy and microsurgery are similar, endoscopy requires additional skills. A thorough understanding of endoscopic techniques and their limitations is required to get maximal benefit. Knowledge of possible complications and techniques to avoid such complications can improve results in endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). The surgeon must be able to manage complications and have a second strategy such as a cerebrospinal fluid shunt if ETV fails. It is better to abandon the procedure if there is disorientation or a higher risk of complications such as bleeding or a thick and opaque floor without any clear visualization of anatomy. Attending live workshops, practice on models and simulators, simpler case selection in the initial learning curve, and hands-on cadaveric workshops can reduce complications. Proper case selection, good surgical technique, and better postoperative care are essential for a good outcome in ETV. Although it is difficult to make a preoperative diagnosis of complex hydrocephalus (combination of communicating and obstructive), improving methods to detect the exact type of hydrocephalus before surgery could increase the success rate of ETV and avoid an unnecessary ETV procedure in such cases. PMID:26140421

  2. Complications of tube thoracostomy in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, R

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To assess the complication rate of tube thoracostomy in trauma. To consider whether this rate is high enough to support a selective reduction in the indications for tube thoracostomy in trauma. Methods—A retrospective case series of all trauma patients who underwent tube thoracostomy during a 12 month period at a large UK teaching hospital with an accident and emergency (A&E) department seeing in excess of 125 000 new patients/year. These patients were identified using the hospital audit department computerised retrieval system supplemented by a hand search of both the data collected for the Major Trauma Outcome Study and the A&E admission unit log book. The notes were assessed with regard to the incidence of complications, which were divided into insertional, infective, and positional. Results—Fifty seven chest drains were placed in 47 patients over the 12 month period. Seven patients who died within 48 hours of drain insertion were excluded. The commonest indications for tube thoracostomy were pneumothorax (54%) and haemothorax (20%); 90% of tubes were placed as a result of blunt trauma. The overall complication rate of the procedure was 30%. There were no insertional complications and only one (2%) major complication, which was empyema thoracis. Conclusion—This study reveals no persuasive evidence to support a selective reduction in the indications for tube thoracostomy in trauma. A larger study to confirm or refute these findings must be performed before any change in established safe practice. PMID:10718232

  3. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  4. Nutritional considerations for other complications of diabetes.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, S

    1992-01-01

    The long-term complications of diabetes can have a devastating effect on an individual's self-esteem and outlook on life. Some preliminary studies have suggested that normalization of blood glucose levels may prevent or reverse the complications of diabetes in some individuals. Nutrition and diabetes meal planning play a critical role toward achieving this normalization. It is our job as diabetes educators to fully assess a patient's eating and life-style habits, as well as to recognize any complications from diabetes that the patient may be coping with at this time. Depending on the type of complication, diet alterations may need to be made to meet the patient's current needs, ie, reducing fiber content of the diet temporarily in patients with mild gastroparesis, or increasing the protein content of the diet in patients with nephropathy and a foot ulcer. By setting positive, attainable goals, the individual with diabetes may lead a healthier, more productive life in which the complications from diabetes can be prevented, reduced, or better tolerated. PMID:1296903

  5. Congenital thrombophilia associated to obstetric complications.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Cynthia; García-Aguirre, Gerardo; Hernández, Carmen; Vega, Olynka; Borbolla, José R; Collados, María T

    2002-10-01

    During pregnancy there are hemostatic changes that result in a hypercoagulable state and can have thrombotic consequences. This condition can be aggravated in women who are carriers of congenital thrombophilic factors. This thrombotic tendency can manifest as thrombotic lesions in the placenta with compromise of utero-placental circulation, which are common characteristics present in obstetric complications, such as preeclampsia/eclampsia, miscarriage, fetal loss, intrauterine growth retardation, and abruptio placentae. In this paper we review data concerning about the association of congenital thrombophilia in pregnancy with obstetric complications, mainly preeclampsia and fetal loss, focusing in factor V Leiden and its related activated protein C resistance, prothrombin mutation G20210A and hyperhomocysteinemia related with C677T mutation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. Although factor V Leiden has been the thrombophilic factor most studied, all three thrombophilic mutations have been related with obstetric complications; however, contradictory results about the specific association of each mutation with each type of obstetric complication are described. These discrepancies could obey to the ethnic difference of the studied groups, or to the fact that some studies were performed in closed populations with few migratory movement, where the genetic pool is relatively homogeneous, as well as the different inclusion and exclusion criteria. Even though this variability is present, the significance of recognizing true associations between these thrombophilic mutations and obstetric complications is essential in order to determine the likelihood of routinely screening for these conditions in pregnant women with risk factors for thrombosis and for carrying out specific prophylactic measures.

  6. Radiocephalic Fistula Complicated by Distal Ischemia: Treatment by Ulnar Artery Dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, Alain; Novelli, Luigi Rovani, Xavier; Carreres, Thierry; Bourquelot, Pierre; Hermelin, Alain; Angel, C.; Beyssen, B.

    2010-02-15

    Hand ischemic steal syndrome due to a forearm arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. However, its frequency is increasing with the rise in numbers of elderly and diabetic patients. This complication, which is more common for proximal than for distal accesses, can be very severe and may cause loss of hand function, damage to fingers, and even amputation of fingers or the hand. Its treatment is difficult and often leads to access loss. We report here a case of severe hand ischemia related to a radiocephalic fistula successfully treated by ulnar artery dilatation.

  7. Ventriculomammary shunt: an unusual ventriculoperitoneal shunt complication.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Johnson, Jeremiah N; Morcos, Jacques J

    2015-02-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunctions are common and can result in significant consequences for patients. Despite the prevalence of breast augmentation surgery and breast surgery for other pathologies, few breast related VP shunt complications have been reported. A 54-year-old woman with hydrocephalus post-subarachnoid hemorrhage returned 1 month after VP shunt placement complaining of painful unilateral breast enlargement. After investigation, it was determined that the distal VP shunt catheter had migrated from the peritoneal cavity into the breast and wrapped around her breast implant. The breast enlargement was the result of cerebrospinal fluid retention. We detail this unusual case and review all breast related VP shunt complications reported in the literature. To avoid breast related complications related to VP shunt procedures, it is important to illicit pre-procedural history regarding breast implants, evade indwelling implants during catheter tunneling and carefully securing the abdominal catheter to prevent retrograde catheter migration to the breast.

  8. A review of complications of odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these "space infections" has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms "odontogenic infections," "complications," and "risk factors." PMID:27390486

  9. Complications and Great Escapes: Equipment and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Rory; Buckenham, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    All endovascular procedures have the potential for complications. The primary aims should always be avoidance of preventable complications and to minimize the impact of any complication. The core principles of an effective preventive strategy are: involving the interventional and clinical teams in a clear outline of the procedure and its potential adverse outcomes; ensuring an adequate inventory of required and backup equipment; the use of “time-out” to minimize wrong patient/wrong side adverse events; and an active audit program to identify areas of improvement. In the event of an adverse outcome there are many strategies that can be employed to rectify the situation or minimize the iatrogenic injury. This article provides a case-based discussion highlighting some of these techniques and how they can be used in a clinical setting. PMID:25435662

  10. Delayed reproductive complications after induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Dalaker, K; Lichtenberg, S M; Okland, G

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken regarding subsequent pregnancy in 619 women who had their preceding pregnancy terminated by legal abortion, compared with an age- and parity-matched group of 619 women who continued with the pregnancy to delivery. The groups were compared for complications such as first and second trimester abortion, cervical incompetence, pre-term delivery, ectopic pregnancy and sterility. The total complication rate was 24.3 per cent in the abortion group, and 20.2 per cent in the controls. No significant difference was found between the two groups for any of the parameters examined, except for a significantly higher rate of complications amongst women who had not had a previous delivery: 25.5 per cent as opposed to 13.2 per cent in the control group.

  11. Strategies to reduce pulmonary complications after esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weijs, Teus J; Ruurda, Jelle P; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard AP; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Luyer, Misha DP

    2013-01-01

    Esophagectomy, the surgical removal of all or part of the esophagus, is a surgical procedure that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary complications are an especially important postoperative problem. Therefore, many perioperative strategies to prevent pulmonary complications after esophagectomy have been investigated and introduced in daily clinical practice. Here, we review these strategies, including improvement of patient performance and technical advances such as minimally invasive surgery that have been implemented in recent years. Furthermore, interventions such as methylprednisolone, neutrophil elastase inhibitor and epidural analgesia, which have been shown to reduce pulmonary complications, are discussed. Benefits of the commonly applied routine nasogastric decompression, delay of oral intake and prophylactic mechanical ventilation are unclear, and many of these strategies are also evaluated here. Finally, we will discuss recent insights and new developments aimed to improve pulmonary outcomes after esophagectomy. PMID:24151374

  12. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  13. Major orbital complications of endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rene, C; Rose, G; Lenthall, R; Moseley, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The paranasal sinuses are intimately related to the orbit and consequently sinus disease or surgery may cause severe orbital complications. Complications are rare but can result in serious morbidity, the most devastating of which is severe visual loss.
METHODS—A retrospective review was undertaken of four cases of severe orbital trauma during endoscopic sinus surgery.
RESULTS—All the cases suffered medial rectus damage, one had additional injury to the inferior rectus and oblique, and two patients were blinded as a result of direct damage to the optic nerve or its blood supply.
CONCLUSION—Some ophthalmic complications of endoscopic sinus surgery are highlighted, the mechanisms responsible are discussed, and recommendations for prevention, early recognition, and management are proposed. 

 PMID:11316724

  14. Complications of the external (combination) rhinoplasty approach.

    PubMed

    Burgess, L P; Everton, D M; Quilligan, J J; Charles, G; Lepore, M L; Van Sant, T E; Yim, D W

    1986-10-01

    More rhinoplastic surgeons are using the external (combination) rhinoplasty approach for selected patients. Although several large series report few complications, the initial experience of newcomers may be different. A series of 26 external rhinoplasty approaches was examined, representing the initial experience of supervised residents. The most common complication was incising the anterior margin of the lower lateral cartilage at the juncture of the lateral and medial crura. To prevent this problem, it is recommended that the skin be elevated off the lower lateral cartilages from both a medial direction up over the domes and a lateral direction downward. To repair this complication, a figure-of-eight suture is used to reapproximate the incision.

  15. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  16. Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular disease complication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independent risk factors for the development of diabetic cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested that hyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance, the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction, the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the downregulation of miRs participated in vessel generation and recovery as well as the balance of endotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation, and increased generation of advanced glycosylation end products pathway, play an important role in inducing diabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehension of pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offer base for developing new therapeutic ways preventing diabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper we mainly reviewed present information about the possible pathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication. PMID:25685278

  17. Reduction of erosion risk in adult patients with implanted venous access ports.

    PubMed

    Burris, Jennifer; Weis, Mary

    2014-08-01

    One of the most common venous access devices used in patients with cancer is the implanted venous access port. Although incidences of infection and thrombosis are the most commonly reported complications, erosion rates of venous access ports are estimated at almost 1%. This article describes how evidence-based interdisciplinary interventions decreased port erosions for a regional health center from 3.2% to less than 1%.

  18. Perioperative complications in revision hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, E; Guingand, O; Terracher, R; Mazel, C

    2001-01-01

    Revision hip surgery now constitutes 10-30% of all joint procedures. The morbidity and associated with this demanding operation are not well established. The goal of this paper is to determine these rates and to identify some predictive factors.
    The complication rate ranges from 31,5 to more than 77% in the literature. Life threatening complications represent 1,8 to 8% of these, leading to death in about 1,6%. ASA score and age above 75 appear to be correlated with medical complications. The injection rate varies from 1 to 5,8%, and may be as high as 14% in cases with a past history of infection. Heterotopic ossification occurred in 13 to 65%, reaching severity in 3,3 to 8,3%.
    Surgical complications include dislocation and femoral injuries. Dislocations occur in almost 10%, leading to revision in1-4,2%. Age and the number of previous surgical operations appear to be significant risk factors. Femoral injuries (perforations or femoral fractures) occur in 6-37%, especially in impaction grafting technique and when uncemented implants are used. Age over 75 years and femoral defects appear to be significant risk factors for femoral fractures.
    The rate of complications in revision hip surgery continues to be high, but successful clinical outcome can be attained even in elderly patients. Attentive preoperative exams, good prevention of technical pitfalls, the experience of the surgeon and the use of specific tools may decrease these complications and make this demanding procedure safer.

  19. Carpal tunnel release complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Greco, R J; Curtsinger, L J

    1993-06-01

    We report a 31-year-old diabetic woman who underwent carpal tunnel release for median nerve compression followed by a laparoscopic tubal ligation. The procedure was complicated by a severe postoperative necrotizing fasciitis infection of the carpal tunnel release incision. This has not been previously reported. The wound was poorly responsive to antibiotic therapy and serial wound debridements. Control of the woman's infection required total excision of the palmar skin and fascia. Complicating factors in this case included the woman's long history of insulin-dependent diabetes and a concomitant clean-contaminated procedure.

  20. Pregnancy complications following legally induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Obel, E B

    1979-01-01

    The frequency of pregnancy and delivery complications in women whose previous pregnancy had been terminated by a legally induced abortion is evaluated in a prospective and a retrospective study. Bleeding before 28 weeks of gestation and retention of placenta or placental tissue occurred more frequently after legal abortion that in a control group matched for age, parity, and socio-economic status. Other pregnancy and delivery complications did not occur more frequently after legal abortion. It is of particular interest that the study could not demonstrate an increased frequency of low birth weight among women whose previous pregnancy had been terminated by legal abortion.

  1. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Neal; Nguyen, Nhat; DePasquale, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser. PMID:24839446

  2. Methods and complications of nasoenteral intubation.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Owen; Grecu, Bianca; Sinha, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Nasoenteral intubation is among the most common procedures performed by clinicians across all medical specialties. The most common technique for nasoenteral intubation is blind passage, as it does not require the use of sophisticated or expensive medical equipment. Unfortunately, blind placement too frequently results in trauma and is a source of significant morbidity and mortality. It is apparent that altered mental status, a preexisting endotracheal tube, and critical illness put a patient in a higher risk group for malposition and complications. Nasoenteral intubation should be attempted only with an understanding of the possibility for difficult placement and the potential complications that can arise from trauma or malposition.

  3. Complications when augmenting the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, Paul; Melnick, Philip R; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary posterior edentulous region presents a challenge when planning for restoring missing teeth with a dental implant. The available bone in such cases is often not dense and not adequate for the placement of a properly sized implant because of maxillary sinus pneumatization and alveolar bone loss. Maxillary sinus lift is a predictable procedure to provide adequate bone height for the purpose of implant placement. However, complications are encountered during or after the execution of the sinus lift procedure. In this article, the prevention and management of maxillary sinus complications are discussed. PMID:25434561

  4. Endocrine and Metabolic Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jammah, Anwar A.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapeutic option for obese patients; however, it carries substantial risks, including procedure-related complications, malabsorption, and hormonal disturbance. Recent years have seen an increase in the bariatric surgeries performed utilizing either an independent or a combination of restrictive and malabsorptive procedures. We review some complications of bariatric procedures more specifically, hypoglycemia and osteoporosis, the recommended preoperative assessment and then regular follow up, and the therapeutic options. Surgeon, internist, and the patient must be aware of the multiple risks of this kind of surgery and the needed assessment and follow up. PMID:26458852

  5. Cutaneous complications related to permanent decorative tattooing.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    Decorative tattooing involves the introduction of exogenous pigments and/or dyes into the dermis to produce a permanent design. Practiced for thousands of years, it has gained tremendous popularity during the past 20 years, especially among the young. Tattoo-associated cutaneous complications have only been reported since the end of the 19th Century. With the increased prevalence of tattooed individuals, dermatologists have witnessed increasing numbers of patients presenting with complaints about their tattoos. Complications primarily include infections, hypersensitivity reaction to tattoo pigments, benign and sometimes malignant tumors arising on tattoos, and the localization of various dermatoses to tattoos. PMID:20441423

  6. Cancer and the kidney: complications of neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Fer, M.F.; McKinney, T.D.; Richardson, R.L.; Hande, K.R.; Oldham, R.K.; Greco, F.A.

    1981-10-01

    Various renal complications occur during the course of neoplastic disease. The therapeutic and prognostic implications differ according to the reversibility of both the underlying malignancy and the superimposed complications in the kidney. Since the mechanisms of renal failure vary significantly in patients with different types of malignancy, it is essential to avoid generalizations about etiologic factors or likely outcomes of the disease processes. The pathophysiologic abnormalities should be determined in each patient, and the reversibility of both the neoplastic and problems assessed before therapeutic decisions are made. This often requires a team effort by the internist, oncologist, nephrologist, urologist and, most importantly, the patient.

  7. Two unusual complications of neuroleptic malignant syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, A.; Harrison, C. A.; Davies, H. G.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but well described complication of the administration of antipsychotic agents. Compartment syndrome, with increased pressures within the confined space of fascial sheaths leading to compression damage of the contained tissue, similarly is well described. Brachial plexus injuries caused by patient malposition are also very rare but a few cases have been reported. We report a case where these three complications occurred together. This was attributable to the patient developing NMS whilst asleep in the prone position overnight. PMID:23983420

  8. Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Kaouthar; Boussada, Rafik; Chaker, Lilia; Ouarda, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small- and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented in studies, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce. We report the occurrence of a giant aortic aneurysm involving the horizontal part of aortic arch in a 28-month-old boy diagnosed with KD. This complication was managed by steroids therapy in the beginning. Because of mechanical complication and potential risk of rupture, surgery was undertaken. PMID:25298695

  9. Late complications of Hodgkin's disease management

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Bookman, M.A.; Longo, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In the past several decades, Hodgkin's disease has been transformed from a uniformly fatal illness to one that can be treated with the expectation of long-term remission or cure in the majority of patients. Because patients now survive for long periods after curative intervention, various complications have been identified. The spectrum of complications following curative therapy is quite diverse and includes immunologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, thyroid, and gonadal dysfunction. In addition, second malignant neoplasms in the form of acute leukemia as well as secondary solid tumors have now been documented to occur with increased frequency in patients cured of Hodgkin's disease. 80 references.

  10. Complications of Therapy in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kofman, Oscar S.

    1983-01-01

    Despite several more effective combinations, the incidence of disability and intractable complications from levodopa therapy for Parkinson's disease is unchanged. Many of these appear to be related to the development of denervation hypersensitivity as well as to drug tolerance and loss of effect. They include dyskinesia, `wearing off' phenomenon, `on-off' phenomenon, and various psychic changes. More current forms of therapy with bromocriptine and drug holidays are described, emphasizing methods of preventing and controlling the incapacitating complications associated with long term drug therapy. Some future therapeutic considerations are also described. PMID:21286582

  11. Compartment syndrome complicating tibial tubercle avulsion.

    PubMed

    Pape, J M; Goulet, J A; Hensinger, R N

    1993-10-01

    Avulsion of the tibial tubercle is an uncommon physeal injury. Complications from this fracture are infrequent. Adolescent boys developed compartment syndrome after tibial tubercle avulsion. Injury to the soft tissue surrounding the tibial tubercle avulsion may be more extensive than is usually appreciated. The anatomy of the proximal tibia and the tibial tubercle with nearby branches of the anterior tibial recurrent artery suggest a predisposing factor for the development of compartment syndrome. Compartment syndrome should be added to the list of possible complications of tibial tubercle avulsion fractures.

  12. [The "buried bumper" syndrome--a rare complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy].

    PubMed

    Gawenda, M; Schmidt, R; Schönau, E

    1996-07-01

    Since initially being described in 1980, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has had a dramatic impact on enteral access and alimentation techniques. Knowledge of the problems makes it possible to lower the complication rate of this method. We report a case of partial penetration of the gastric wall by the internal bolster of the tube. We focus on the prevention, recognition, and management of this PEG-related problem.

  13. Management of Multiple Myeloma Complicated by Hepatitis C Virus Reactivation: The Role of New Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mahale, Parag; Thomas, Sheeba K; Kyvernitakis, Andreas; Torres, Harrys A

    2016-01-01

    Reactivation of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been reported in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. In this study, we report the first case, to our knowledge, of thalidomide-induced acute exacerbation and reactivation of chronic HCV infection complicating management of multiple myeloma. Sofosbuvir-based antiviral therapy helped achieve viral clearance and normalization of liver enzymes, thus allowing access to future potentially life-saving chemotherapy agents. PMID:26885541

  14. Management of Multiple Myeloma Complicated by Hepatitis C Virus Reactivation: The Role of New Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Parag; Thomas, Sheeba K.; Kyvernitakis, Andreas; Torres, Harrys A.

    2016-01-01

    Reactivation of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been reported in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. In this study, we report the first case, to our knowledge, of thalidomide-induced acute exacerbation and reactivation of chronic HCV infection complicating management of multiple myeloma. Sofosbuvir-based antiviral therapy helped achieve viral clearance and normalization of liver enzymes, thus allowing access to future potentially life-saving chemotherapy agents. PMID:26885541

  15. Access to space studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is currently considering possible directions in Earth-to-orbit vehicle development under a study called 'Access to Space.' This agency-wide study is considering commercial launch vehicles, human transportation, space station logistics, and other space transportation requirements over the next 40 years. Three options are being considered for human transportation: continued use of the Space Shuttle; development of a small personnel carrier (personnel logistics system (PLS)); or development of an advanced vehicle such as a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO). Several studies related to the overall Access to Space study are reported in this document.

  16. Surgical anatomy of the retroperitoneal spaces, Part V: Surgical applications and complications.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, Petros; Skandalakis, John E

    2010-04-01

    Knowledge of the surgical anatomy of the retroperitoneum is crucial for surgery of the retroperitoneal organs. Surgery is essential for treatment of retroperitoneal pathologies. The list of these diseases is extensive and comprises acute and chronic inflammatory processes (abscess, injury, hematoma, idiopathic fibrosis), metastatic neoplasms, and primary neoplasms from fibroadipose tissue, connective tissue, smooth and striated muscle, vascular tissue, somatic and sympathetic nervous tissue, extraadrenal chromaffin tissue, and lymphatic tissue. The retroperitoneum can be approached and explored by several routes, including the transperitoneal route and the extraperitoneal route. The retroperitoneal approach to the iliac fossa is used for ectopic renal transplantation. Safe and reliable primary retroperitoneal access can be performed for laparoscopic exploration. The anatomic complications of retroperitoneal surgery are the complications of the organs located in several compartments of the retroperitoneal space. Complications may arise from incisions to the somatic wall, somatic nerves, blood and lymphatic vessels, lymph nodes, visceral autonomous plexuses, and neighboring splanchna.

  17. Review of the Complications Associated with Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Guide to the Dental Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lena; Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Akintoye, Sunday O

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Focus on risk factors, improved diagnostic methods and effective management strategies have made it possible to successfully treat OPC. However, the 5-year survival rate has not improved for several years due to multiple treatment complications, tissue morbidity, loss of function and diminished quality of life. Survivors are faced with complications like oral mucositis, hyposalivation, osteoradionecrosis; tissue fibrosis, morbidity from jaw resection; disfigurement and loss of function that further diminish quality of life. The aim of this review is to highlight major complications associated with treatment of OPC via a literature search and review of available options for identification and management of these complications. Data Sources Relevant publications on oral complications of OPC therapy were thoroughly reviewed from the literature published between the years 1988 and 2012. Material and Method We evaluated reported incidence, prevalence and risk factors for oral complications of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for OPC. The authors conducted electronic search using English language databases namely PubMed Plus, Medline (Pre-Medline and Medline), Cochrane Database of systematic reviews (evidence-based medicine), Dentistry & Oral sciences source, AccessScience, Embase, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews Multifile, Google Scholar, ISI Journal Citation Reports, Ovid Multi-Database. Conclusion We identified the most common complications associated with the treatment of oral cancers. Based on the information gathered, there is evidence that survival of OPC extends beyond eradication of the diseased tissue. Understanding the potential treatment complications and utilizing available resources to prevent and minimize them are important. Caring for OPC survivors should be a multidisciplinary team approach involving the dentist, oncologist, internist and social worker to improve the currently

  18. Considerations and complications after Bells' palsy.

    PubMed

    Nemet, Arie Y; Vinker, Shlomo

    2015-12-01

    We present a retrospective, observational study of all patients diagnosed with Bells' palsy (BP) at the Central District of Clalit Health Services from 2003 through to 2012. BP is associated with several complications. We evaluated clinical characteristics including the number of patient visits to general physicians (GP), otolaryngologists, ophthalmologists and neurologists, medications prescribed in the acute phase of BP (steroids and antiviral agents), and the ophthalmic diagnoses. A total of 4463 patients with the diagnosis of BP were included. The incidence per 100,000/year was 87.0, and it increased with age. Patients had significantly more visits to all specialists at 6 months after the BP event. Steroid treatment was prescribed to 50.4% of the patients and antiviral agents to 65.5%. Both treatments were associated with older patient age and female sex. The rate of post BP lagophthalmos and keratitis was 3.45% and 0.63% at 1-3 months, respectively, and both were more likely to develop in older patients. Steroid and/or antiviral treatments were not associated with a decrease in ophthalmic complications. BP may cause ophthalmic complications at a low rate, which are associated with older age. Steroids and antiviral agents appeared to have no effect on ophthalmic complications. PMID:26314659

  19. Computer Batch Files Shorten Many Complicated Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deppa, Joan

    1987-01-01

    Defines "batch files," claiming that they can shorten many complicated computer procedures. Describes how batch file was created using the computer program "PC-Write" to streamline the process of creating a work disk and increase students' computer literacy. Lists and discusses each element in the file. Provides references for more information.…

  20. [Bulimia nervosa, a pathology with multiple complications].

    PubMed

    Mignot-Bedetti, Mathilde; Blanchet-Collet, Corinne; Moro, Marie Rose

    2015-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder associating binge eating with inappropriate compensatory methods. Patients suffer from multiple organic, psychological and social complications. Of these, the somatic consequences are numerous and of varying degrees of seriousness. Regular monitoring is therefore essential in order to identify them and treat them.

  1. Pericardiectomy for Pleuropericardial Effusion Complicating Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Quarti, Andrea; de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Soura, Elli; Pozzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Severe pericardial effusion is a rare complication of bacterial pneumonia and it usually disappears under medical treatment. Herein we report a case of a girl with a congenital immunodeficient syndrome and bacterial pneumonia, who developed recurrent and life-threatening pericardial effusion refractory to medical treatment. She was finally treated with pericardiectomy. PMID:20585369

  2. Impetigo: aetiology, complications and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Philip

    This article describes impetigo, and outlines differential diagnoses, likely complications associated with impetigo and signs and symptoms. Main treatments for impetigo are highlighted, with explanations of when these treatments are useful and when they may not be the best choice. Anxieties that accompany impetigo in a family context and ways in which an appreciation of these anxieties may enhance the care provided are examined.

  3. Intestinal stomas: indications, management, and complications.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sean T; Vogel, Jon D

    2012-01-01

    The ability to appropriately construct and care for an ostomy is crucial to good colorectal surgical practice. Enterostomal therapy is critical to the successful management of ostomies and their complications. Although associated with morbidity, a well-constructed ostomy can provide our patients with a good, durable QoL.

  4. Laparoscopic gastric band removal complicated by splenosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gregory; Schoucair, Ramy; Shimlati, Rasha; Rached, Linda; Khoury, George

    2016-08-01

    In any patient, the occurrence of postsplenectomy splenosis can complicate the planning of further surgeries. In our case, the gastric sleeve procedure was aborted, as it would have put the patient's life in danger. Therefore, only the gastric band was removed, eliminating future erosion. PMID:27525091

  5. Legionnaire's pneumonia complicating a thermal burn.

    PubMed

    Signorini, M; Grappolini, S; Lo Cicero, S; Candiani, P; Klinger, M; Donati, L

    1989-12-01

    The report describes a patient with 45 per cent BSA burns who developed Legionnaire's disease 3 days after the acute injury. The diagnosis of this life-threatening complication was late because most of its signs and symptoms can be encountered in the burned patient. This delay could have been fatal to the patient and required the evacuation of the burn centre for disinfection.

  6. Hiatal Hernia as a Total Gastrectomy Complication

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruna do Nascimento; de Oliveira, Marcos Belotto; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer, gastric cancer is the third leading cause of death among men and the fifth among women in Brazil. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment. The most serious complications associated with surgery are fistulas and dehiscence of the jejunal-esophageal anastomosis. Hiatal hernia refers to herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm, though this occurrence is rarely reported as a complication in gastrectomy. Case Report A 76-year-old man was diagnosed with intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. He underwent a total laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy on May 19, 2015. The pathology revealed a pT4pN3 gastric adenocarcinoma. The patient became clinically stable and was discharged 10 days after surgery. He was subsequently started on adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy; however, 9 days after the second cycle, he was brought to the emergency room with nausea and severe epigastric pain. A CT scan revealed a hiatal hernia with signs of strangulation. The patient underwent emergent repair of the hernia and suffered no postoperative complications. He was discharged from the hospital 9 days after surgery. Conclusion Hiatal hernia is not well documented, and its occurrence in the context of gastrectomy is an infrequent complication. PMID:27293395

  7. Minimal Brain Dysfunction: Associations with Perinatal Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Paul L.

    Examined with over 28,000 7-year-old children whose mothers registered for prenatal care was the relationship between perinatal complications and such characteristics as poor school achievement, hyperactivity, and neurological soft signs associated with the diagnosis of minimal brain dysfunction (MBD). Ten perinatal antecedents were studied:…

  8. [Endoscopic third ventriculostomy: complications and failures].

    PubMed

    Massimi, L; Di Rocco, C; Tamburrini, G; Caldarelli, M; Iannelli, A

    2004-04-01

    Endoscopic third-ventriculostomy (ETV) became the treatment of choice for non-communicating hydrocephalus and its effectiveness is largely reported. On the contrary, specific articles on complications and failures of this technique are very rare and this review aims at supplying further information about it. Therefore, an analysis of the main and up-to-date series is made and exhaustive data about complications and failures of ETV and about their incidence are obtained. The overall frequency rate of complications is 6-20%. Their severity may vary either because of the length of the damage (transient or permanent) or the value of the involved structures (basilar artery, areas of the CNS, hypothalamus) or the importance of the injury (from subclinical sequelae to fatal complications). Moreover, this study showed both the risk that the endoscopic procedure must be suspended (intra-operative failure) and the risk of an early (before 1 month) or delayed (even some years after the intervention) narrowing of the ventriculostomy. The rate of and the reasons for failure have been analysed and the success of a second ETV has been estimated. The results of this analysis suggest that the children proposed for ETV are carefully selected and meticulously studied during the follow-up.

  9. Safety and Complications of Medical Thoracoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nour Moursi Ahmed, Shimaa; Mohammadien, Hamdy Ali; Tanikawa, Yoshimasa; Tsuboi, Rie; Sugiyama, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To highlight the possible complications of medical thoracoscopy (MT) and how to avoid them. Methods. A retrospective and prospective analysis of 127 patients undergoing MT in Nagoya Medical Center (NMC) and Toyota Kosei Hospital. The data about complications was obtained from the patients, notes on the computer system, and radiographs. Results. The median age was 71.0 (range, 33.0–92.0) years and 101 (79.5%) were males. The median time with chest drain after procedure was 7.0 (range, 0.0–47.0) days and cases with talc poudrage were 30 (23.6%). Malignant histology was reported in 69 (54.3%), including primary lung cancer in 35 (27.5), mesothelioma in 18 (14.2), and metastasis in 16 (12.6). 58 (45.7%) revealed benign pleural diseases and TB was diagnosed in 15 (11.8%). 21 (16.5%) patients suffered from complications including lung laceration in 3 (2.4%), fever in 5 (3.9%) (due to hospital acquired infection (HAI) in 2, talc poudrage in 2, and malignancy in 1), HAI in 2 (1.6%), prolonged air-leak in 14 (11.0%), and subcutaneous emphysema in 1 (0.8%). Conclusions. MT is generally a safe procedure. Lung laceration is the most serious complication and should be managed well. HAI is of low risk and can be controlled by medical treatment. PMID:27413774

  10. Treatment of delayed chylothorax complicating oesophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Nadesan, Sukumar; Ming, Teoh C; Thangaveloo, Gunasegaran; Jasmi, Ali Yaakub

    2005-04-01

    A patient with carcinoma of the cardia underwent Ivor-Lewis oesophagogastrectomy. He developed right chylothorax postoperatively, which is a rare complication. Attempts to treat the chylothorax by conservative means and thoracoscopic ligation failed. Finally, pleurodesis using bleomycin successfully sealed the leak and he was discharged.

  11. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors, mortality and morbidity in children with CKD. PMID:17120060

  12. Measuring Leakage From Large, Complicated Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottemiller, S.

    1987-01-01

    Test chamber improvised from large bag. Cumulative sizes of leaks in large, complicated machinery measure with relatively simple variation of helium leak-checking technique. When used to check Space Shuttle main engine, new technique gave repeatable and correct results within 0.5 stdin.3/min (1.4 x 10 negative to the seventh power stdm3/s).

  13. Selecting a Principal: Keep It Complicated!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naso, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    When searching for a new principal, many search committees tend to use the lists of competencies published in the literature and provided by state departments of education as if they were checklists. Instead, they should focus on more complicated competencies, such as acumen, judgment, and ability to manage the dilemmas of practice.

  14. A Complication of Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankit; Charles, Loren; Ritchie, James

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of tibial nerve impingement by an anteroposterior screw inserted for stabilization of a posterior malleolar fracture. This specific complication has not previously been described in published studies, although numerous reports have described various forms of peripheral nerve entrapment. We discuss the merits of fixation of these fractures using a posterolateral approach.

  15. Pseudocyst mass at neck: complication after tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Tanpowpong, K; Balachandra, S; Nitiyanant, P

    1994-07-01

    Neck mass after the tracheostomy is a rare complication. A case report of pseudocyst at the left paratracheal area was presented and this has not yet been reported in the English literature. We proposed the pathophysiology of this condition and prevention methods.

  16. Safety and Complications of Medical Thoracoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nour Moursi Ahmed, Shimaa; Saka, Hideo; Mohammadien, Hamdy Ali; Alkady, Ola; Oki, Masahide; Tanikawa, Yoshimasa; Tsuboi, Rie; Aoyama, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To highlight the possible complications of medical thoracoscopy (MT) and how to avoid them. Methods. A retrospective and prospective analysis of 127 patients undergoing MT in Nagoya Medical Center (NMC) and Toyota Kosei Hospital. The data about complications was obtained from the patients, notes on the computer system, and radiographs. Results. The median age was 71.0 (range, 33.0-92.0) years and 101 (79.5%) were males. The median time with chest drain after procedure was 7.0 (range, 0.0-47.0) days and cases with talc poudrage were 30 (23.6%). Malignant histology was reported in 69 (54.3%), including primary lung cancer in 35 (27.5), mesothelioma in 18 (14.2), and metastasis in 16 (12.6). 58 (45.7%) revealed benign pleural diseases and TB was diagnosed in 15 (11.8%). 21 (16.5%) patients suffered from complications including lung laceration in 3 (2.4%), fever in 5 (3.9%) (due to hospital acquired infection (HAI) in 2, talc poudrage in 2, and malignancy in 1), HAI in 2 (1.6%), prolonged air-leak in 14 (11.0%), and subcutaneous emphysema in 1 (0.8%). Conclusions. MT is generally a safe procedure. Lung laceration is the most serious complication and should be managed well. HAI is of low risk and can be controlled by medical treatment. PMID:27413774

  17. Laparoscopic gastric band removal complicated by splenosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gregory; Schoucair, Ramy; Shimlati, Rasha; Rached, Linda; Khoury, George

    2016-08-01

    In any patient, the occurrence of postsplenectomy splenosis can complicate the planning of further surgeries. In our case, the gastric sleeve procedure was aborted, as it would have put the patient's life in danger. Therefore, only the gastric band was removed, eliminating future erosion.

  18. Spontaneous thrombosis of a pseudoaneurysm complicating pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Vanlangenhove, P; Defreyne, L; Kunnen, M

    1999-01-01

    Patients with a visceral aneurysm are at high risk for acute transpapillary, intra-, or retroperitoneal hemorrhage, necessitating either surgical or endovascular therapy. We report an instance of spontaneous thrombosis of a pseudoaneurysm complicating pancreatitis before endovascular treatment could be performed. Causality and the literature of spontaneous thrombosis in pseudoaneurysms are discussed.

  19. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Complications in Transvaginal Approach in Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Komorowski, Andrzej L; Alba Mesa, Francisco; Bała, Małgorzata M; Mituś, Jerzy W; Wysocki, Wojciech M

    2015-12-01

    Transvaginal access is the most popular natural orifice translumenal technique in the minimally invasive surgery. Reviews on non-gynecological transvaginal approach morbidities reveal that rates vary greatly. A systematic review of transvaginal approach in non-gynecological intraabdominal procedures was carried out to assess the risk of complications. A systematic search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library from the inception of these databases to March 2012. The following keywords were searched: "transvaginal", "NOTES", "single incision", and "single port". From the total of 231 potentially eligible abstracts, 87 papers were retrieved and evaluated as fulfilling the eligibility criteria. The final analysis included 32 articles. The overall complications rate was 4.4 %, and complications related to the transvaginal port reached 2.4 %. Conversion rate to open surgery was 3.4 %. The incidence of postoperative urinary tract infection was 0.8 %. The mean operative time was 119 min. The mean hospital stay was 3.1 days (range 6 h-12 days). The technique of transvaginal access can offer several advantages for a patient and is associated with an acceptable rate of complications. PMID:27011470

  20. Dialysis access pseudoaneurysm: endovascular treatment with a covered stent

    PubMed Central

    Centola, Marco; Ferraresi, Roberto; Danzi, Gian B

    2010-01-01

    Iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms of the brachial artery are rare complications of haemodialysis access procedures and can lead to substantial morbidity and mortality if not managed promptly; however, surgery is also associated with the potential risk of severe complications. We describe the clinical and radiological findings relating to a dialysed patient who developed a huge iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm of the brachial artery (due to an inadvertent artery puncture), which was successfully treated by means of the percutaneous implantation of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stent. PMID:22778110

  1. Managing Information Resources for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Computer Accommodation.

    This handbook presents guidance for federal managers and other personnel who are unfamiliar with the policy and practice of information accessibility to accommodate users with disabilities and to provide for their effective access to information resources. It addresses federal requirements for accessibility, adopting accessibility as a sound…

  2. Digital Scholarship and Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losoff, Barbara; Pence, Harry E.

    2010-01-01

    Open access publications provide scholars with unrestricted access to the "conversation" that is the basis for the advancement of knowledge. The large number of open access journals, archives, and depositories already in existence demonstrates the technical and economic viability of providing unrestricted access to the literature that is the…

  3. Steps Toward Campus Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges, Washington, DC.

    Photo-essays focus on the progress colleges and universities have made in achieving program accessibility for handicapped persons in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Both common problems and innovative solutions to unique problems are included. "People We Never See" introduces the challenge higher education faces to…

  4. ACCESS Project: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, Heiko

    2015-04-01

    The ACCESS project addressed the development, testing, and demonstration of the proposed advanced technologies and the associated emission and fuel economy improvement at an engine dynamometer and on a full-scale vehicle. Improve fuel economy by 25% with minimum performance penalties Achieve SULEV level emissions with gasoline Demonstrate multi-mode combustion engine management system

  5. Managing access block.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Peter; Scown, Paul; Campbell, Donald

    2002-01-01

    There is pessimism regarding the ability of the Acute Health Sector to manage access block for emergency and elective patients. Melbourne Health suffered an acute bed crisis in 2001 resulting in record ambulance diversions and emergency department (ED) delays. We conducted an observational study to reduce access block for emergency patients whilst maintaining elective throughput at Melbourne Health. This involved a clinician-led taskforce using previously proven principles for organisational change to implement 51 actions to improve patient access over a three-month period. The primary outcome measures were ambulance diversion, emergency patients waiting more than 12 hours for an inpatient bed, elective throughput and theatre cancellations. Despite a reduction in multi-day bed numbers all primary objectives were met, ambulance diversion decreased to minimal levels, 12-hour waits decreased by 40% and elective throughput was maintained. Theatre cancellations were also minimised. We conclude that access block can be improved by clinician-led implementation of proven process improvements over a short time frame. The ability to sustain change over the longer term requires further study.

  6. Partners: Promoting Accessible Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Janet; Gravink, Jill

    1995-01-01

    The Promoting Accessible Recreation through Networking, Education, Resources and Services (PARTNERS) Project, a partnership between Northeast Passage, the University of New Hampshire, and Granite State Independent Living Foundation, helps create barrier-free recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The paper describes PARTNERS and…

  7. Internet 2 Access Grid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet 2 Initiative, which is based on collaboration among universities, businesses, and government, focuses on the Access Grid, a Computational Grid that includes interactive multimedia within high-speed networks to provide resources to enable remote collaboration among the research community. (Author/LRW)

  8. Accessibility Standards, Illustrated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael A.

    The book sets forth Illinois environmental accessibility standards for disabled persons based on observation and interview data. Photographs, drawings, and detailed floor plans are included in sections dealing with human data (including space requirements for maneuvering wheelchairs, color blindness, incontinence, and severe auditory or visual…

  9. College Access Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    College Access Marketing (CAM) is a relatively new phenomenon that seeks to positively influence the college-going rate. This report defines CAM, describes CAM examples, and discusses how CAM seeks to counter barriers to college. It explores four main elements of CAM: information, marketing, advocacy, and social mobilization. Further, it…

  10. Serving up Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    When low-income students returned to Chicago public schools this fall, many had better access to technology, thanks to a public-private partnership. Chicago families with children enrolled in the National School Lunch Program are eligible for subsidized computers and Internet connections through an agreement between the city and telecom giant…

  11. Unique Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  12. CAS. Controlled Access Security

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, B.; Pomeroy, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Security Alarm System is a data acquisition and control system which collects data from intrusion sensors and displays the information in a real-time environment for operators. The Access Control System monitors and controls the movement of personnel with the use of card readers and biometrics hand readers.

  13. How data can help reduce vascular access events.

    PubMed

    Swails-Climer, Mary

    2012-11-01

    Thrombosis is the leading cause of access dysfunction and is expensive to treat. In 2011, only 10 AV access capable patients in our center were placed on a bridge catheter because of our ability to assess health and proactively use angioplasty to keep it open. Surveillance also helped us follow the progression of new fistula maturation and helped us decide on early intervention to prevent total, access failure. The Sparrow Center documented successful results with the selection of a new surveillance system that dramatically improved the quality of patient care and financial viability of the center. For dialysis center staffs looking for ways to operate more efficiently and at the same time reduce the incidence of vascular access complications caused by thrombosis, a data-driven surveillance device along with clinical monitoring protocols seems to provide a cost effective approach to addressing this critical area of patient care.

  14. Vascular Access Creation and Care--Perspective From India.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Krishnaswamy; Lobo, Valentine; Balasubramaniam, Jeyaraj; Mahaldar, Amol; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Kumbar, Lalathaksha

    2015-11-01

    India has one of the fastest growing economies in the world and is home to nearly one sixth of world's population. Chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension are common. Kidney disease is a known complication of these chronic diseases and is on the rise. Improving affordability with advanced care delivery has led to the increasing use of maintenance hemodialysis. Along with this hemodialysis comes the inevitable need for vascular access. Interventional nephrology in India is a fast-evolving discipline and promises to be a critical component of hemodialysis care in the future. This review provides a background on the current state of the CKD burden in India and the various vascular access options in use currently. In addition, we describe the experience of 2 centers in western and southern India in managing vascular access needs in hopes that they will serve as a model of the proliferation of vascular access care throughout India and in other developing countries. PMID:26524952

  15. Vascular Access Creation and Care--Perspective From India.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Krishnaswamy; Lobo, Valentine; Balasubramaniam, Jeyaraj; Mahaldar, Amol; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Kumbar, Lalathaksha

    2015-11-01

    India has one of the fastest growing economies in the world and is home to nearly one sixth of world's population. Chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension are common. Kidney disease is a known complication of these chronic diseases and is on the rise. Improving affordability with advanced care delivery has led to the increasing use of maintenance hemodialysis. Along with this hemodialysis comes the inevitable need for vascular access. Interventional nephrology in India is a fast-evolving discipline and promises to be a critical component of hemodialysis care in the future. This review provides a background on the current state of the CKD burden in India and the various vascular access options in use currently. In addition, we describe the experience of 2 centers in western and southern India in managing vascular access needs in hopes that they will serve as a model of the proliferation of vascular access care throughout India and in other developing countries.

  16. Brachial Artery Access for Percutaneous Renal Artery Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaukanen, Erkki T.; Manninen, Hannu I.; Matsi, Pekka J.; Soeder, Heini K.

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the suitability of transbrachial access for endovascular renal artery interventions. Methods: During 37 consecutive endovascular renal artery interventions, the transbrachial approach was used on nine patients (mean age 63 years; range 41-76 years) for 11 renal artery procedures on native kidneys and one percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) on a transplanted kidney. The reason for using transbrachial access was a steep aorta-renal angle in five, and severe aorta-iliac atherosclerosis in the remaining patients. In addition to the intervention catheter in the left brachial artery, an additional nonselective catheter for controlling the procedure was inserted transfemorally (six patients) or via the contralateral brachial artery. Results: Eleven interventions (six PTAs, five stents) were successfully completed. The one failure resulted from impenetrable subclavian artery stenosis. The only major complication was a brachial artery pseudoaneurysm requiring surgical treatment. Conclusion: Transbrachial access is an effective and relatively safe technique for renal artery interventions when transfemoral access is not possible.

  17. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  18. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on large amounts of purified nuclei as starting material. This complicates analysis of trace clinical tissue samples that are often stored frozen. We have developed an alternative nuclease based procedure to bypass nuclear preparation to interrogate nuclease accessible regions in frozen tissue samples. Results Here we introduce a novel technique that specifically identifies Tissue Accessible Chromatin (TACh). The TACh method uses pulverized frozen tissue as starting material and employs one of the two robust endonucleases, Benzonase or Cyansase, which are fully active under a range of stringent conditions such as high levels of detergent and DTT. As a proof of principle we applied TACh to frozen mouse liver tissue. Combined with massive parallel sequencing TACh identifies accessible regions that are associated with euchromatic features and accessibility at transcriptional start sites correlates positively with levels of gene transcription. Accessible chromatin identified by TACh overlaps to a large extend with accessible chromatin identified by DNase I using nuclei purified from freshly isolated liver tissue as starting material. The similarities are most pronounced at highly accessible regions, whereas identification of less accessible regions tends to be more divergence between nucleases. Interestingly, we show that some of the differences between DNase I and Benzonase relate to their intrinsic sequence biases and accordingly accessibility of CpG islands is probed more efficiently using TACh. Conclusion The TACh methodology identifies accessible chromatin derived from frozen tissue samples. We propose that this simple, robust approach can be applied across a broad range of

  19. [Intraosseous access in adults--an alternative if conventional vascular access is difficult?].

    PubMed

    Isbye, Dan Lou; Nielsen, Søren Loumann

    2006-08-21

    Intraosseous infusion is widely used in children, but its use in adults is much less common. This is probably because another vascular access can usually be achieved, and also because of lack of knowledge of the technique. Placement in adults is a quick procedure with a high rate of success. Drugs and fluids do not change the pharmacodynamics or pharmacokinetics of intraosseous administration, and anything can be given. Infusion rates have been achieved that in part make fluid resuscitation possible. Its uses are many and the contraindications few; complications are rare when simple guidelines are followed. PMID:16942698

  20. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  1. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  2. Quantifying Access Disparities in Response Plans

    PubMed Central

    Indrakanti, Saratchandra; Mikler, Armin R.; O’Neill, Martin; Tiwari, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    Effective response planning and preparedness are critical to the health and well-being of communities in the face of biological emergencies. Response plans involving mass prophylaxis may seem feasible when considering the choice of dispensing points within a region, overall population density, and estimated traffic demands. However, the plan may fail to serve particular vulnerable subpopulations, resulting in access disparities during emergency response. For a response plan to be effective, sufficient mitigation resources must be made accessible to target populations within short, federally-mandated time frames. A major challenge in response plan design is to establish a balance between the allocation of available resources and the provision of equal access to PODs for all individuals in a given geographic region. Limitations on the availability, granularity, and currency of data to identify vulnerable populations further complicate the planning process. To address these challenges and limitations, data driven methods to quantify vulnerabilities in the context of response plans have been developed and are explored in this article. PMID:26771551

  3. Avoiding and Managing Intraoperative Complications During Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Lim, Moe R; Brodke, Darrel S; Lee, Joon Y

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intraoperative complications during cervical spine surgery is low; however, if they do occur, intraoperative complications have the potential to cause considerable morbidity and mortality. Spine surgeons should be familiar with methods to minimize intraoperative complications. If they do occur, surgeons must be prepared to immediately treat each potential complication to reduce any associated morbidity. PMID:27049196

  4. Avoiding and Managing Intraoperative Complications During Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Lim, Moe R; Brodke, Darrel S; Lee, Joon Y

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of intraoperative complications in cervical spine surgery is low. However, when they do occur, such complications have the potential for causing considerable morbidity and mortality. Spine surgeons should be familiar with methods of minimizing such complications. Furthermore, if they do occur, surgeons must be prepared to immediately treat each potential complication to reduce any associated morbidity. PMID:26519429

  5. Endoscopic management of acute colorectal anastomotic complications with temporary stent.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Maher A

    2009-01-01

    Acute postoperative anastomotic complications following colorectal resection include leak and obstruction. Often an operation is necessary to treat these complications. The role of endoluminal procedures to treat these complications has been limited. This article illustrates that such an approach is technically feasible and can be used to treat some colorectal anastomotic complications.

  6. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  7. Vascular access for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Chalhoub, Serge; Langston, Cathy E; Poeppel, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Vascular access is the first and most basic requirement for successful extracorporeal renal replacement therapy (ERRT). Dual-lumen catheters are the most commonly used method of vascular access for ERRT in veterinary patients. An adequately functioning dialysis catheter allows for smooth and efficient patient management, whereas a poorly functioning catheter frustrates the technician, doctor, and patient. These catheters are fairly quick to place but require meticulous care for optimal function. The most common complications are thrombosis and infection. Monitoring catheter performance should be a routine part of dialysis patient care. PMID:21251515

  8. Vascular access for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Chalhoub, Serge; Langston, Cathy E; Poeppel, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Vascular access is the first and most basic requirement for successful extracorporeal renal replacement therapy (ERRT). Dual-lumen catheters are the most commonly used method of vascular access for ERRT in veterinary patients. An adequately functioning dialysis catheter allows for smooth and efficient patient management, whereas a poorly functioning catheter frustrates the technician, doctor, and patient. These catheters are fairly quick to place but require meticulous care for optimal function. The most common complications are thrombosis and infection. Monitoring catheter performance should be a routine part of dialysis patient care.

  9. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Complicated by Sinistral Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kaley, Kristin; Lamb, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is known for vague symptoms that lead to a delay in diagnosis, and hence most cases are found at an advanced stage. Many complications can happen secondary to pancreatic cancer including diabetes, malabsorption, and deep venous thrombosis. Sinistral (segmental or left-sided) portal hypertension (SPH) refers to portal hypertension confined to the left-sided segment of the portal venous system namely the splenic side, and the most common etiology is splenic vein thrombosis (SVT). We present here a case of a 66-year-old male with advanced pancreatic cancer who died due to bleeding secondary to SVT. We advise physicians caring for these patients to be aware of this complication, which may also be the manifestation of an undiagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:27555987

  10. Cutaneous and systemic complications associated with tattooing.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Tattooing can result in a wide variety of complications, whose prevalence and incidence remain still unclear. Hypersensitivity reactions (or allergies) to tattoo pigments are currently the most common complication on a tattoo, however they are not predictable. Infections are nowadays directly related to the lack of asepsis and hygiene during the tattooing procedure or during the healing phase. Patients with a known cutaneous disease should be warned of a potential risk of localization of their disease to the tattoo. A skin eruption restricted to a tattoo may reveal sarcoidosis. Patients with chronic conditions and/or impaired immunity should discuss with their physician about the possibility and when to have a tattoo. PMID:27160631

  11. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  12. The twisted diversion: a paralyzing complication

    PubMed Central

    Hiew, Kenneth; Glendinning, Richard; Parr, Nigel; Kumar, Manal

    2013-01-01

    Ileal conduit remains a widely used urinary diversion performed after radical cystectomy. However, complications of ileal conduits remain an important concern in urological surgery. We report a rare case of an ileal conduit stricture, which can have grim complications if unobserved during the operation. Following an initial operation of radical cystectomy and ileal conduit formation in France in 2011, an 80-year-old male travelled back to the UK after 4 months of general weakness and limb paralysis. Initial blood test shows life-threatening hyperkalemia and worsened renal function. Subsequent ultrasound KUB scan and loopogram revealed obstructive uropathy. The initial management includes intravenous antibiotics and bilateral nephrostomies were inserted to aid diversion of urine. A thorough surgical exploration revealed a twisted, fibrous mesenteric band adhered to the proximal part of the ileal conduit. Only one case report of ileal conduit stenosis was described many years after the procedure. PMID:24963928

  13. Common Prosthetic Implant Complications in Fixed Restorations.

    PubMed

    Link-Bindo, Elyce E; Soltys, James; Donatelli, David; Cavanaugh, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Many clinicians consider implants to be one of the most important innovations in dental care. Even so, over the past 40 years of implant dentistry, complications have been a constant struggle for restorative dentists, surgeons, and patients alike. Implant-related problems can be particularly challenging and frustrating, especially given that an implant is thought to be a "lifetime" solution expected to yield minimal difficulties. This, however, is not necessarily the case with prosthetic restorations. With innovations in implant technology continuing to rapidly advance, maintaining knowledge of all the latest developments can be challenging for clinicians. The purpose of this article is to provide a basic understanding of the treatment, management, and prevention of common prosthetic and technical implant complications seen in the office of a restorative dentist. PMID:27548395

  14. Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole; Deviere, Jacques; Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis.

  15. A complicated case of altered sensorium

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Kushaal; KN, Shivashankara; Chakraborty, Joydeep; Umakanth, Shashikiran

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis and malaria are two common diseases afflicting the population of the Indian subcontinent. Both are associated with fatal neurological complications. Clinically, it may be difficult to differentiate between the two, except for that the focal neurological complications are more common with central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis than with cerebral malaria. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman who presented with a history of fever and altered sensorium of short duration. She was initially treated for falciparum malaria on the basis of positive peripheral smear and normal CT scan of the brain, but later on diagnosed to have CNS tuberculosis on the basis of persistence of symptoms, development of focal neurological symptoms and MRI of the brain showing multiple tuberculomas. She improved significantly with a course of antitubercular treatment (ATT) and systemic corticosteroids. PMID:23955980

  16. Morcellation complications: From direct trauma to inoculation.

    PubMed

    Noel, Nyia L; Isaacson, Keith B

    2016-08-01

    Morcellation is the fragmentation of tissue to facilitate removal of the specimen through small incision in minimally invasive surgery. This technique is not unique to gynecology and is used in general surgery with the goal of improved surgical outcomes including decreased pain, cost, hospital length of stay, and rapid return to normal activities and work. Gynecologic laparoscopic power morcellation (LPM) has come under increased scrutiny over the last 2 years due to widespread attention to a known but rare complication, an unanticipated dissemination of malignancy, namely occult uterine leiomyosarcoma. This chapter focuses on complications associated with gynecologic tissue morcellation from inoculation of benign or malignant tissue fragments within the peritoneal cavity and direct trauma from morcellation techniques. We also include a review of the various morcellation techniques from knife to electrical and the use of intraperitoneal specimen containment systems. PMID:26879674

  17. Iatrogenic aortic pseudoaneurysm: a forgotten complication.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Samuel; Bico, Pedro; Almeida, António R; Laranjeira Santos, Álvaro; Banazol, Nuno; Fragata, José; Rabaçal, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta are a rare complication of cardiac surgery. However, the poor prognosis associated with this condition if untreated makes early diagnosis and treatment important. We present the case of a 66-year-old woman who had undergone mitral valvuloplasty 12 days previously, who was admitted with a diagnosis of new-onset atrial fibrillation. The transthoracic echocardiogram showed a clot in the right atrium and anticoagulation was initiated, followed by antibiotic therapy. After further investigation, the patient was diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta and underwent surgical repair, followed by six weeks of antibiotic therapy. She was readmitted six months later for an abscess of the lower sternum and mediastinum. After a conservative approach with antibiotics and local drainage failed, recurrence of a large pseudoaneurysm compressing the superior vena cava was documented. A third operation was performed to debride the infected tissue and to place an aortic allograft. There were no postoperative complications. PMID:24508151

  18. Neurologic complication after anterior sciatic nerve block.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shruti; Hadzic, Admir; Vloka, Jerry D; Cafferty, Maureen S; Moucha, Calin S; Santos, Alan C

    2005-05-01

    The lack of reported complications related to lower extremity peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs) may be related to the relatively infrequent application of these techniques and to the fact that most such events go unpublished. Our current understanding of the factors that lead to neurologic complications after PNBs is limited. This is partly the result of our inability to conduct meaningful retrospective studies because of a lack of standard and objective monitoring and documentation procedures for PNBs. We report a case of permanent injury to the sciatic nerve after sciatic nerve block through the anterior approach and discuss mechanisms that may have led to the injury. Intraneural injection and nerve injury can occur in the absence of pain on injection and it may be heralded by high injection pressure (resistance).

  19. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications

    PubMed Central

    Dipoce, J; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-01-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  20. [Oligomeganephronic renal hypoplasia complicated by glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Kan'shina, N F; Rykov, V A; Lakhno, P A

    1990-01-01

    Clinico-anatomical data of a rare condition congenital oligomeganephronic renal hypoplasia with a glomerulonephritis as a complication are available for a 13-year-old girl who died of chronic renal failure. Large aglomerular zones consisting of primitive canaliculi in a loose stroma were observed in kidneys that were decreased in size. The glomeruli were few in number, some of them of a large size (2-2.5-fold), firmly attached to the capsule, with pronounced extracapillary proliferation.

  1. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications.

    PubMed

    Dipoce, J; Bernheim, A; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-02-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  2. Solutions to complications of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Zinner, Ira D; Markovits, Stanley; Jansen, Curtis E; Shapiro, Herbert J; Reid, Patrick E

    2010-01-01

    Restorative dentists face challenges when implant dentistry is performed without a surgical template. Manufactured component parts (particularly screws, gold cylinders, and the implant bodies themselves) can also cause problems during these procedures. These problems will occur regardless of the mode of retention used for the prosthesis, since the same metals are involved and nearly all implant restorations have a screw somewhere. Managing these complications is essential to avoid treatment failures. PMID:20829167

  3. Chronic Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehari, Alem; Klings, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common genetic hemolytic anemia worldwide, affects 250,000 births annually. In the United States, SCD affects approximately 100,000 individuals, most of African descent. Hemoglobin S (HbS) results from a glutamate-to-valine mutation of the sixth codon of the β-hemoglobin allele; the homozygous genotype (HbSS) is associated with the most prevalent and severe form of the disease. Other SCD genotypes include HbSC, composed of one HbS allele and one HbC (glutamate-to-lysine mutation) allele; and HbS-β-thalassemia(0) or HbS-β-thalassemia(+), composed of one HbS allele and one β-thalassemia allele with absent or reduced β-chain production, respectively. Despite advances in care, median survival remains in the fifth decade, due in large part to chronic complications of the disease. Chronic pulmonary complications in SCD are major contributors to this early mortality. Although our understanding of these conditions has improved much over the past 10 to 15 years, there remains no specific treatment for pulmonary complications of SCD. It is unclear whether conventional treatment regimens directed at non-SCD populations have equivalent efficacy in patients with SCD. This represents a critical research need. In this review, the authors review the state-of-the-art understanding of the following pulmonary complications of SCD: (1) pulmonary hypertension; (2) venous thromboembolic disease; (3) sleep-disordered breathing; (4) asthma and recurrent wheezing; and (5) pulmonary function abnormalities. This review highlights the advances as well as the knowledge gaps in this field to update clinicians and other health care providers and to garner research interest from the medical community. PMID:26836905

  4. Facial pressure sore complicated by mandibular osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Obisesan, O

    1999-10-01

    A case is reported of an 85-year-old woman with mandibular osteomyelitis secondary to a submental pressure sore. The main aetiological factors in the development of the pressure sore were dementia and severe senile kyphosis. Pressure sores are rare in the head and neck region and, though osteomyelitis is a common complication at other anatomical sites, it has not been previously reported in the mandible.

  5. Intra cranial complications of tuberculous otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, M.; Johnny, J. Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most common infections in the world. It is seen that tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is almost secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis. In this review we have tried to deal with all the aspects of the intra cranial complications of TOM such as tuberculoma, otitic hydrocephalus, brain abscess and tuberculous meningitis. The aspects covered in this review are the pathology, clinical features, and investigations of the intra cranial manifestations. PMID:26015748

  6. [Scoring of postoperative complications in coloproctology].

    PubMed

    Gaj, Fabio; Trecca, Antonello

    2007-01-01

    Surgical procedures for anorectal diseases are numerous, and the most important question is how to guarantee these patients an adequate follow-up in order to establish the real efficacy of the treatment and the effective incidence of side effects related to the procedures. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a scoring system with analysis of the quality of life and measurement of the severity of short- and long-term complications which might be useful in the followup of patients surgically treated for anorectal diseases. The authors followed 200 patients and performed 90 hemorrhoidectomy, 50 surgical interventions for anal fissures, 30 fistulectomy and 30 surgical interventions for rectocele. After surgery, patients were followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months using a numerical questionnaire regarding short- and long-term complications and quality of life. During the follow-up after treatment 120 were regularly monitored while 80 were not. In the monitored cases it was observed that greater severity of short- and long-term complications was significantly associated with poor quality of life. The mean values of quality of life recorded at the various observation times up to the end of follow-up significantly differed in comparison to the mean values observed before surgery (5 vs. 8.5 vs. 9 vs. 8.9, p = 0.05). The quality of life after surgical treatment did not significantly improve, however, in the monitoring checks at 12 months as compared to those at 3 and 6 months (8.5 vs. 9 vs. 8.9, p = ns). The quality of life and the numerical value of severity of complications are useful follow-up indices of the principal surgically treated, proctological diseases.

  7. Delayed postoperative hemorrhage complicating chalazion surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Procope, J. A.; Kidwell, E. D.

    1994-01-01

    Chalazion surgery is a common minor ophthalmic surgical procedure used to treat chalazia after conservative measures have failed. Complications are infrequent and generally easily managed with minimal morbidity. This article presents an atypical case of an elderly woman with a history of hypertension who experienced sudden profuse hemorrhaging 10 days after chalazion surgery. The clinical findings are presented along with a brief overview of the relevant vascular anatomy of the eyelid and a discussion of possible etiologic factors. PMID:7807576

  8. Unusual Bilateral Paramolars Associated with Clinical Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sulabha, A. N.; Sameer, C.

    2015-01-01

    Paramolars are rare supernumerary structures of maxillofacial complex that occur buccally or lingually near the molar row. Predominantly these occur singly; bilateral presentation is very rare. This paper reports two unusual bilateral presentations of paramolars with clinical complication and its management. One of the cases in the present paper also documents the cooccurrence of bilateral paramolars and microdontia of single tooth and one of its paramolars presented with multilobed crown with an anomalous buccal tubercle. PMID:26078890

  9. Otological complications associated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Kitamura, Ken

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the features of otological complications for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) and the risk factors for these complications. We enrolled 1115 patients (776 males and 339 females; age 5-89 years) who underwent HBOT. All otological symptoms experienced during HBOT sessions were evaluated, and risk factors were analysed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Otoscopic findings and interventions for otological complications were assessed in 58 symptomatic patients who visited the Otolaryngology Department. Otological symptoms were experienced by 165 (14.8 %) of the 1115 patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis identified ages of >60 years and female sex as independent risk factors, whereas patients with sports injuries were at lower risk than those with other primary diseases, except for severe infectious disease. Eighty-two patients (49.7 %) suffered from symptoms at the first HBOT session. The most prevalent symptoms were otalgia (157/165), followed by ear fullness (13/165), hearing loss (12/165) and tinnitus (3/165). One patient experienced vertigo and deterioration of the bone-conduction pure-tone thresholds, suggesting inner ear barotrauma. In 116 ears of the 58 symptomatic patients, abnormal otoscopic findings were recognized in 58 ears (50.0 %). Twenty-seven of the 58 ears required myringotomy or tube insertion, and HBOT was stopped in eight ears in four patients. Of the remaining 58 ears with normal otoscopic findings, 51 received no treatment. Physicians should be aware of both middle and inner ear barotrauma as potential complications of HBOT. PMID:26650550

  10. Medical Complications of Tattoos: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Islam, Parvez S; Chang, Christopher; Selmi, Carlo; Generali, Elena; Huntley, Arthur; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-04-01

    Tattoos are defined as the introduction of exogenous pigments into the dermis in order to produce a permanent design. This process may occur unintentional or may be deliberately administered for cosmetic or medical reasons. Tattoos have been around for over 5000 years and over time have evolved to represent a common cosmetic practice worldwide. Currently, adverse reactions are relatively rare and generally unpredictable and predominantly include immune-mediated reactions and skin infections. Along with better healthcare standards and more stringent public health mandates such as the provision of disposable needles, major infectious complications related to hepatitis and human retroviral infections have decreased significantly. When they do occur, skin infections are most frequently associated with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The aim of this study is to review the types and rates of medical complications of permanent tattoos. PubMed search and search dates were open ended. Acute local inflammation is the most common complication, but infections, allergic contact dermatitis, and other inflammatory or immune responses that are not well-characterized may occur. As many patients with immune reactions to tattoos do not react on skin or patch testing, it is postulated that the antigens contained in dyes or pigments are such small molecules that they need to be haptenized in order to become immunogenic. Red ink is associated more frequently with long-term reactions, including granulomatous and pseudolymphomatous phenomena or morphea-like lesions and vasculitis. Exacerbation of preexisting psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and pyoderma gangrenosum may occur after tattooing. There is no well-defined association between cancer and tattoos. The treatment of tattoo-related complications may include local destructive measures (cryotherapy, electro-surgery, dermabrasion, chemical destruction, ablative laser destruction), surgical excision, and thermolysis of the

  11. Bilateral giant abdominoscrotal hydroceles complicated by appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Yarram, Sai G; Dipietro, Michael A; Graziano, Kathleen; Mychaliska, George B; Strouse, Peter J

    2005-12-01

    Abdominoscrotal hydrocele is a rare entity, with fewer than 100 cases reported in children. Bilateral abdominoscrotal hydroceles are even less common, with 14 cases reported in children. Various complications of abdominoscrotal hydrocele have been reported in the literature. We present a 4-month-old boy with bilateral giant abdominoscrotal hydroceles who developed appendicitis apparently because of obstruction from the right hydrocele. We discuss the various imaging modalities used to establish the diagnosis and plan the operative approach.

  12. Pulmonary gangrene as a complication of mucormycosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zagoria, R.J.; Choplin, R.H.; Karstaedt, N.

    1985-06-01

    Pulmonary gangrene, a rare complication of pneumonia occurs when vascular thrombosis leads to necrosis of a large portion of lung. The devitalized lung is then sloughed into a cavity, resulting in a characteristic radiographic appearance. The previously reported cases of pulmonary gangrene have been associated with either bacterial or tuberculous pneumonia; the authors describe a case resulting from mucormycosis. In addition to the plain-film findings, the computed tomographic (CT) appearance is described.

  13. Medical Complications of Tattoos: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Islam, Parvez S; Chang, Christopher; Selmi, Carlo; Generali, Elena; Huntley, Arthur; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-04-01

    Tattoos are defined as the introduction of exogenous pigments into the dermis in order to produce a permanent design. This process may occur unintentional or may be deliberately administered for cosmetic or medical reasons. Tattoos have been around for over 5000 years and over time have evolved to represent a common cosmetic practice worldwide. Currently, adverse reactions are relatively rare and generally unpredictable and predominantly include immune-mediated reactions and skin infections. Along with better healthcare standards and more stringent public health mandates such as the provision of disposable needles, major infectious complications related to hepatitis and human retroviral infections have decreased significantly. When they do occur, skin infections are most frequently associated with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The aim of this study is to review the types and rates of medical complications of permanent tattoos. PubMed search and search dates were open ended. Acute local inflammation is the most common complication, but infections, allergic contact dermatitis, and other inflammatory or immune responses that are not well-characterized may occur. As many patients with immune reactions to tattoos do not react on skin or patch testing, it is postulated that the antigens contained in dyes or pigments are such small molecules that they need to be haptenized in order to become immunogenic. Red ink is associated more frequently with long-term reactions, including granulomatous and pseudolymphomatous phenomena or morphea-like lesions and vasculitis. Exacerbation of preexisting psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and pyoderma gangrenosum may occur after tattooing. There is no well-defined association between cancer and tattoos. The treatment of tattoo-related complications may include local destructive measures (cryotherapy, electro-surgery, dermabrasion, chemical destruction, ablative laser destruction), surgical excision, and thermolysis of the

  14. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  15. Complications of nephropathia epidemica: three cases.

    PubMed

    Forslund, T; Saltevo, J; Anttinen, J; Auvinen, S; Brummer-Korvenkontio, M; Korhonen, A; Poutiainen, M

    1992-07-01

    Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Scandinavia is called nephropathia epidemica (NE), and is caused by the Puumala-virus, which belongs to the Hanta-virus genus. The clinical course of NE is mostly benign, complications are uncommon, and deaths are rarely observed. We report the cases of three patients who developed serious complications in the course of NE caused by the Puumala-virus. One patient died within 24 h after admission, another developed progressive neuromuscular dysfunction (Guillain-Barré syndrome) which required auxiliary ventilation for several weeks before a slow recovery, and a third patient developed empty sella syndrome with pituitary gland insufficiency. In the first two cases the diagnosis of NE was confirmed by a rapid avidity assay for IgG antibody against Puumala-virus. In the third case the clinical course, and demonstration of NE immunity 16 years later, suggested that NE might have caused the hypopituitarism. Some patients with NE caused by the Puumala-virus may require intensive-care treatment, and the development of late complications such as empty sella syndrome and hypopituitarism should be taken into consideration.

  16. Pancreatic transplantation: Radiologic evaluation of vascular complications

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, J.F.; Hunter, D.W.; Kuni, C.C.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Letourneau, J.G. )

    1991-03-01

    Transplantation of the pancreas is an increasingly common therapeutic option for preventing or delaying complications of type I diabetes mellitus. The authors studied the relative roles of various radiologic examinations in diagnosing vascular complications in these grafts including arterial and venous thrombosis, stenosis, and anastomotic leak (the most common vascular factors that necessitate pancreatectomy of the transplant), as defined with pathologic or arteriographic data. The results of 78 scintigraphic flow studies, 40 abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scans, 27 sonograms, and eight color Doppler studies were evaluated in 52 patients who received a total of 27 cadaveric and 26 living-donor grafts over a 12-year period. These results were correlated with the data from 45 gross and microscopic pathologic studies and 37 arteriograms to determine their relative value in enabling detection of graft thrombosis and other vascular complications. Scintigraphy, CT, sonography, and color Doppler were all sensitive in detection of generalized graft abnormalities but lacked specificity in defining the underlying etiologic factors.

  17. [Primary radial head arthroplasty in trauma : Complications].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Horlohé, K; Buschbeck, S; Wincheringer, D; Weißenberger, M; Hoffmann, R

    2016-10-01

    Radial head fractures are common injuries in elbow trauma. Non-displaced fractures are best treated conservatively. Simple but displaced fractures require anatomic reduction and fixation, typically using screws. The treatment course for complex fractures with multiple fragments is still being debated, as results are less predictable. Radial head resection is not advised if concomitant injuries of the coronoid process or the collateral ligaments with instability are present. Favorable outcomes following open reduction and fixation using plates were reported recently. However, complication rates are very high. Radial head replacement is a valuable tool in treating complex fractures of the radial head with predominantly good and excellent results. Patients who suffer radial head fractures are typically of a younger age, resulting in high functional demands. Certainly, unspecific and specific complications related to radial head arthroplasty were reported in up to 40 % of cases in an acute fracture setting. This article highlights common complications in radial head arthroplasty and aims to present strategies to avoid them. PMID:27600571

  18. Complex dynamics in learning complicated games.

    PubMed

    Galla, Tobias; Farmer, J Doyne

    2013-01-22

    Game theory is the standard tool used to model strategic interactions in evolutionary biology and social science. Traditionally, game theory studies the equilibria of simple games. However, is this useful if the game is complicated, and if not, what is? We define a complicated game as one with many possible moves, and therefore many possible payoffs conditional on those moves. We investigate two-person games in which the players learn based on a type of reinforcement learning called experience-weighted attraction (EWA). By generating games at random, we characterize the learning dynamics under EWA and show that there are three clearly separated regimes: (i) convergence to a unique fixed point, (ii) a huge multiplicity of stable fixed points, and (iii) chaotic behavior. In case (iii), the dimension of the chaotic attractors can be very high, implying that the learning dynamics are effectively random. In the chaotic regime, the total payoffs fluctuate intermittently, showing bursts of rapid change punctuated by periods of quiescence, with heavy tails similar to what is observed in fluid turbulence and financial markets. Our results suggest that, at least for some learning algorithms, there is a large parameter regime for which complicated strategic interactions generate inherently unpredictable behavior that is best described in the language of dynamical systems theory.

  19. [Thrombotic complications in the nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Keusch, G

    1989-08-01

    Thromboembolic episodes are one of the most serious complications in patients with nephrotic syndrome, with an overall incidence of 25%. The most frequent site of thrombosis is the renal vein, with a reported incidence varying from 2-42%. Arterial thromboses are much less common than venous thromboses, with an overall incidence of 3%. Clinical course of renal vein thrombosis may be acute or chronic. Renal venography is the method of choice in its diagnosis. Duplex scanning, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may be as accurate as venography. Once the diagnosis of renal vein thrombosis is established, anticoagulation therapy should be started. Thrombectomy or thrombolytic therapy seem to have little to offer over oral anticoagulation. The increased incidence of thrombotic complications in nephrotic syndrome may be due to a hypercoagulable state distinguished by an increase in coagulation factors (V, VIII, X and fibrinogen); a decrease in the levels of coagulation inhibitors (antithrombin III, protein S); an increase in alpha 2-antiplasmin activity; and exaggerated platelet adhesiveness and aggregation. This pre-thrombotic state may be aggravated by additional rheological factors (immobilization, diuretic therapy etc.). Serum albumin has been found to be an appropriate parameter to assess the risk of thrombosis development in these patients. A serum albumin level below 20 g/l carries a high risk of thromboembolic complications. Prophylactic anticoagulation therapy is therefore indicated in patients with serum albumin below 20 g/l.

  20. Complications Following BellaGen™ Injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Park, Kui Young; Li, Kapsok; Seo, Seong Jun; Hong, Chang Kwun

    2011-12-01

    BellaGen™ is an injectable acellular dermal matrix granule derived from donated human skin tissue that was recently developed for soft tissue augmentation. Its use has been sporadically reported in penile girth enhancement procedures. Many cases of complications have been reported after injecting acellular dermal matrices like AlloDerm or SureDerm™ but few reports on complications associated with BellaGen™ injection. We report here on penile skin inflammation and necrosis following augmentation phalloplasty with BellaGen™, which developed 3 days after the injection and persisted for more than 2 weeks. The patient had a 15 year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and he was treated with oral antibiotics and wet dressings with KMNO4 solution to combine preservation of the remaining penile soft tissue with debridement of avascular tissue. The lesion improved with this treatment, but the patient experienced pain for about 2 weeks. All patients should be informed of the potential complications with the use of injectable acellular dermal matrices before treatment. Patient selection for augmentation is also important to have the most desirable results. PMID:22346264

  1. Laryngeal complications by orotracheal intubation: Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Luiz Alberto Alves; de Cavalho, Glauber Barbosa; Brito, Valeska Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Sumamry Introduction: The injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation are common in our way and widely told by literature. Generally the pipe rank of or consequence of its permanence in the aerial ways of the patient is caused by accidents in. It has diverse types of larynx injuries, caused for multiple mechanisms. Objective: To verify, in literature, the main causes of laryngeal complications after- orotracheal intubation and its mechanisms of injury. Revision of Literature: The searched databases had been LILACS, BIREME and SCIELO. Were updated, books and theses had been used, delimiting itself the period enters 1953 the 2009. The keywords used for the search of articles had been: complications, injuries, larynx, intubation, endotracheal, orotracheal, granulomas, stenosis. 59 references had been selected. The used criteria of inclusion for the choice of articles had been the ones that had shown to the diverse types of injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation and its pathophysiology. Final Considerations: This revision of literature was motivated by the comment in the practical clinic of a great number of laryngeal sequels in patients submitted to the orotracheal intubation. Of that is ahead important the knowledge, for the professionals of the area of health, the types of complications and its causes, with intention to prevent them, adopting measured of prevention of these injuries. PMID:25991942

  2. Epigenetics: mechanisms and implications for diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Mark E; El-Osta, Assam

    2010-12-10

    Epigenetic modifications regulate critical functions that underlie chromosome metabolism. Understanding the molecular changes to chromatin structure and the functional relationship with altered signaling pathways is now considered to represent an important conceptual challenge to explain diabetes and the phenomenon of metabolic or hyperglycemic memory. Although it remains unknown as to the specific molecular mechanisms whereby hyperglycemic memory leads to the development of diabetic vascular complications, emerging evidence now indicates that critical gene-activating epigenetic changes may confer future cell memories. Chemical modification of the H3 histone tail of lysine 4 and 9 has recently been identified with gene expression conferred by hyperglycemia. The persistence of these key epigenetic determinants in models of glycemic variability and the development of diabetic complications has been associated with these primary findings. Transient hyperglycemia promotes gene-activating epigenetic changes and signaling events critical in the development and progression of vascular complications. As for the role of specific epigenomic changes, it is postulated that further understanding enzymes involved in writing and erasing chemical changes could transform our understanding of the pathways implicated in diabetic vascular injury providing new therapeutic strategies. PMID:21148447

  3. [Ocular complications of giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Liozon, E; Ly, K-H; Robert, P-Y

    2013-07-01

    Permanent visual loss (PVL) is the most dreaded complication of giant cell arteritis (GCA). It results from anterior ischemic optic neuropathy or, less commonly, retinal artery occlusion. This complication still occurs in 14 to 20% of patients and is typically devastating and permanent, although it is highly preventable by an early diagnosis of giant cell arteritis and appropriate glucocorticoid treatment. Transient ischemic symptoms such as amaurosis fugax, episodes of blurred vision or diplopia may occur, either heralding visual loss or remaining isolated. In studies, the main predictors of PVL are jaw claudication, amaurosis fugax, lack of systemic "B" symptoms, a modestly increased ESR and a higher haemoglobin level. The evaluation of a GCA patient with PVL includes emergency fundoscopy completed by fluorescein angiography, immediate erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and complete blood count. Treatment is extremely urgent mainly because, if left untreated, GCA is associated with visual loss in the fellow eye within days in up to 50% of individuals. Treatment may begin with high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone, followed by oral prednisone administered at 1 mg/kg per day. Daily adjunctive aspirin orally may be added since it has been shown, in retrospective studies, to protect against stroke and visual loss. Although treatment duration of complicated GCA is not codified, an initial PVL deserves close monitoring of patient's systemic symptoms, ESR and CRP to avoid relapses due to a significant risk of late recurrence of visual loss during steroid tapering. PMID:23523078

  4. Does post septoplasty nasal packing reduce complications?

    PubMed

    Naghibzadeh, Bijan; Peyvandi, Ali Asghar; Naghibzadeh, Ghazal

    2011-01-01

    The main issues in nasal surgery are to stabilize the nose in the good position after surgery and preserve the cartilages and bones in the favorable situation and reduce the risk of deviation recurrence. Also it is necessary to avoid the synechia formation, nasal valve narrowing, hematoma and bleeding. Due to the above mentioned problems and in order to solve and minimize them nasal packing, nasal splint and nasal mold have been advised. Patients for whom the nasal packing used may faced to some problems like naso-pulmonary reflex, intractable pain, sleep disorder, post operation infection and very dangerous complication like toxic shock syndrome. We have two groups of patients and three surgeons (one of the surgeons used post operative nasal packing in his patients and the two others surgeons did not).Complications and morbidities were compared in these two groups. Comparing the two groups showed that the rate of complication and morbidities between these two groups were same and the differences were not valuable, except the pain and discomfort post operatively and at the time of its removal. Nasal packing has several risks for the patients while its effects are not studied. Septoplasty can be safely performed without postoperative nasal packing. Nasal packing had no main findings that compensated its usage. Septal suture is one of the procedures that can be used as alternative method to nasal packing. Therefore the nasal packing after septoplasty should be reserved for the patients with increased risk of bleeding. PMID:21425063

  5. Endocrine complications following pediatric bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Josephine; Lewis, Victor; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Stephure, David K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for various diseases can lead to endocrine system dysfunction owing to preparative regimens involving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We assessed the prevalence of post-BMT endocrine complications in children treated at the Alberta Children's Hospital (ACH) from 1991 to 2001. Time of onset of endocrine dysfunction, underlying disease processes, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and age at BMT were characterized. Subjects of <18 years of age at the time of allogeneic or autologous BMT for whom 1-year follow-up through the ACH and a chart were available for review were included in the study. Subjects with a pre-existing endocrine condition were excluded. Of the 194 pediatric BMT procedures performed at the ACH between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 2001, 150 complete charts were available for review. Sixty five subjects received follow-up care at other centers and were excluded. Therefore, a total of 85 subjects were included in the review. The prevalence of endocrine complications identified was: primary hypothyroidism 1.2%, compensated hypothyroidism 7.0%, hyperthyroidism 2.4%, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism 22.4%, abnormal bone density 2.4%, and secondary diabetes mellitus 1.2%. These findings emphasize the need to screen for endocrine system dysfunction, particularly hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, in children who have undergone BMT. Children need long-term follow-up so that endocrine complications can be diagnosed and treated promptly. PMID:21823531

  6. Diabetic foot complications: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Giurini, John M; Lyons, Thomas E

    2005-09-01

    Foot complications in patients with diabetes mellitus are a challenge to the health care industry. A great deal of expenditure is due to the management of diabetic foot complications. This places a great burden on the health care industry. It also places a great burden on those diabetic patients with foot complications and their families. Therefore, their effective management in an efficient manner is crucial to our patients. To deal with these problems, a dedicated, knowledgeable, and experienced multidisciplinary team is key. Intervention at the earliest possible time yields the best outcome. Prevention is the focus for those with no ulcerations. For those with ulcerations, prompt recognition and treatment is key. The importance of classifying ulcerations according to size, depth, presence or absence of infection, and vascular status can not be overstated. Proper offloading is vital for those with neuropathic lesions. Recognition of patients with a component of ischemia and vascular intervention to increase perfusion will aid in wound healing. Of course deep infection requires immediate drainage. All efforts of those in the multidisciplinary team are directed at the restoration and maintenance of an ulcer-free foot which is important in enabling our patients to maintain their ambulatory status.

  7. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation: outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Sanna, C; Saracco, G M; Reggio, D; Moro, F; Ricchiuti, A; Strignano, P; Mirabella, S; Ciccone, G; Salizzoni, M

    2009-05-01

    Biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) still remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The most frequent complications are strictures and leakages in OLT cases with duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction (D-D), which can be treated with dilatation or stent placement during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), although this procedure is burdened with potentially severe complications, such as retroperitoneal perforation, acute pancreatitis, septic cholangitis, bleeding, recurrence of stones, strictures due to healing process. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome of this treatment and the complications related to the procedure. Among 1634 adult OLTs, we compared postprocedural complications and mortality rates with a group of 5852 nontransplanted patients (n-OLTs) who underwent ERCP. Of 472 (28,8%) post-OLT biliary complications, 319 (67.6%) occurred in D-D biliary anstomosis cases and 94 (29.5%) patients underwent 150 ERCP sessions. Among 49/80 patients (61.2%) who completed the procedure, ERCP treatment was successful. Overall complication rate was 10.7% in OLT and 12.8% in n-OLT (P = NS). Compared with the n-OLT group, post-ERCP bleeding was more frequent in OLT (5.3% vs 1.3%, P = .0001), while the incidence of pancreatitis was lower (4.7% vs 9.6%, P = .04). Procedure-related mortality rate was 0% in OLT and 0.1% in n-OLT (P = NS). ERCP is a safe procedure for post-OLT biliary complications in the presence of a D-D anastomosis. Morbidity and mortality related with this procedure are acceptable and similar to those among nontransplanted population. PMID:19460551

  8. Remote access thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Mohamed, Hossam Eldin; Kadi, Abida; Walvekar, Rohan R.

    2015-01-01

    Robot assisted thyroid surgery has been the latest advance in the evolution of thyroid surgery after endoscopy assisted procedures. The advantage of a superior field vision and technical advancements of robotic technology have permitted novel remote access (trans-axillary and retro-auricular) surgical approaches. Interestingly, several remote access surgical ports using robot surgical system and endoscopic technique have been customized to avoid the social stigma of a visible scar. Current literature has displayed their various advantages in terms of post-operative outcomes; however, the associated financial burden and also additional training and expertise necessary hinder its widespread adoption into endocrine surgery practices. These approaches offer excellent cosmesis, with a shorter learning curve and reduce discomfort to surgeons operating ergonomically through a robotic console. This review aims to provide details of various remote access techniques that are being offered for thyroid resection. Though these have been reported to be safe and feasible approaches for thyroid surgery, further evaluation for their efficacy still remains. PMID:26425450

  9. Legal restrictions and complications of abortion: insights from data on complication rates in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rolnick, Joshua A; Vorhies, John S

    2012-08-01

    Although US federal law requires all American states to permit abortion within their borders, states retain authority to impose restrictions.We used hospital discharge data to study the rates of major abortion complications in 23 states from 2001 to 2008 and their relationship to two laws: (i) restrictions on Medicaid – the state insurance programs for the poor – funding, and (ii) mandatory delays before abortion. Of 131 000 000 discharges in the data set, 10 980 involved an abortion complication. The national rate for complications was 1.90 per 1000 abortions (95 per cent CI: 1.57–2.23). Eleven states required mandatory delays and 12 restricted funding for Medicaid participants. After controlling for socioeconomic characteristics and the pregnancy complication rate, legal restrictions were associated with lower complication rates: mandatory delays (OR 0.79(0.65–0.95)) and restricted Medicaid funding (OR 0.74 (0.61–0.90)). This result may reflect the fact that states without restrictions perform a higher percentage of second-trimester abortions. This study is the first to assess the association between legal restrictions on abortion and complication rates.

  10. Complications to Avoid with Pre-Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a high risk of osteoporosis. Alzheimer’s disease Poor blood sugar control appears to have some effect on the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease later in life. The reasons why are still ... cells are fueled by glucose and when the cells cannot access the fuel ...

  11. Thrombophilia and the risk for hemodialysis vascular access thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Greg A; Wells, Philip S; Young, Darlene; Perkins, Sherry L; Pilkey, Rachel M; Clinch, Jennifer J; Rodger, Marc A

    2005-04-01

    Vascular access thrombosis is the most common and costly complication in hemodialysis patients. The role of thrombophilia in access thrombosis is not established. A case-control study was conducted of 419 hemodialysis patients to determine whether thrombophilia was associated with arteriovenous fistula or graft thrombosis. Participants were enrolled from three in-center and five satellite dialysis units associated with a Canadian academic health science center that provides dialysis services in a catchment area of one million. Patients were tested for factor V Leiden, prothrombin gene mutation, factor XIII genotype, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotype, lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibody, factor VIII, homocysteine, and lipoprotein (a) concentrations. Overall, 59 (55%) patients with access thrombosis had at least one thrombophilia compared with 122 (39%) patients without access thrombosis (unadjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.98). After controlling for important risk factors, the association between any thrombophilia and access thrombosis remained (adjusted OR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.47 to 3.99). For each additional thrombophilic disorder, the odds of access thrombosis increased significantly (adjusted OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.34 to 2.61). This study suggests that thrombophilia is associated with access thrombosis in dialysis patients. Large, multicenter, prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm the observations from this case-control study. PMID:15728780

  12. Vascular access through the intraosseous route in pediatric emergencies

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Ricardo Américo Ribeiro; Melo, Clayton Lima; Dantas, Raquel Batista; Delfim, Luciana Valverde Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining venous access in critically ill children is an essential procedure to restore blood volume and administer drugs during pediatric emergencies. The first option for vascular access is through a peripheral vein puncture. If this route cannot be used or if a prolonged period of access is necessary, then the intraosseous route is an effective option for rapid and safe venous access. The present work is a descriptive and exploratory literature review. The study's aim was to describe the techniques, professional responsibilities, and care related to obtaining venous access via the intraosseous route in pediatric emergencies. We selected 22 articles (published between 2000 and 2011) that were available in the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS) and MEDLINE databases and the SciELO electronic library, in addition to the current protocol of cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the American Heart Association (2010). After the literature search, data were pooled and grouped into the following categories of analysis: historical aspects and physiological principles; indications, benefits, and contraindications; professional assignments; technical principles; care during the access; and possible complications. The results of the present study revealed that the intraosseous route is considered the main secondary option for vascular access during the emergency response because the technique is quick and easily executed, presents several non-collapsible puncture sites, and enables the rapid and effective administration of drugs and fluid replacement. PMID:23917941

  13. Emergency surgical revascularisation for coronary angioplasty complications.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, J A; Davies, S W; Balcon, R; Layton, C; Magee, P; Rothman, M T; Timmis, A D; Wright, J E; Walesby, R K

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate trends in referrals for emergency operations after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) complications; to analyse morbidity and mortality and assess the influence of PTCA backup on elective surgery. DESIGN--A retrospective analysis of patients requiring emergency surgical revascularisation within 24 hours of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. PATIENTS--Between January 1980 and December 1990, 75 patients requiring emergency surgery within 24 hours of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. SETTING--A tertiary referral centre and postgraduate teaching hospital. RESULTS--57 patients (76%) were men, the mean age was 55 (range 29-73) years, and 30 (40%) had had a previous myocardial infarction. Before PTCA, 68 (91%) had severe angina, 59 (79%) had multivessel disease, and six (8%) had a left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 40%. A mean of 2.1 grafts (range one to five) were performed; the internal mammary artery was used in only one patient. The operative mortality was 9% and inhospital mortality was 17%. There was a need for cardiac massage until bypass was established in 19 patients (25%): this was the most important outcome determinant (P = 0.0051) and was more common in those patients with multivessel disease (P = 0.0449) and in women (P = 0.0388). In 10 of the 19 cases a vacant operating theatre was unavailable, the operation being performed in the catheter laboratory or anaesthetic room. These 19 patients had an operative mortality of 32% and inhospital mortality of 47%, compared with 2% and 7% respectively for the 56 patients who awaited the next available operating theatre. Complications included myocardial infarction, 19 patients (25%); arrhythmias, 10 patients (3%); and gross neurological event, two patients (3%). The mean intensive care unit stay was 2.6 days (range 1 to 33 days) and the mean duration of hospital admission was 13 days (range 5-40 days). CONCLUSIONS--Patients undergoing

  14. After Access: Underrepresented Students' Postmatriculation Perceptions of College Access Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Means, Darris R.; Pyne, Kimberly B.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the perceived impact of college-going capital gained during participation in a college access program. In three, semistructured interviews spanning the first-year college experience, 10 first-year college students who participated in a college access program articulate the value of access programming and also raise…

  15. Vascular access for hemodialysis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Domenico; Benedetto, Filippo; Mondello, Placido; Pipitò, Narayana; Barillà, David; Spinelli, Francesco; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Cernaro, Valeria; Buemi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    A well-functioning vascular access (VA) is a mainstay to perform an efficient hemodialysis (HD) procedure. There are three main types of access: native arteriovenous fistula (AVF), arteriovenous graft, and central venous catheter (CVC). AVF, described by Brescia and Cimino, remains the first choice for chronic HD. It is the best access for longevity and has the lowest association with morbidity and mortality, and for this reason AVF use is strongly recommended by guidelines from different countries. Once autogenous options have been exhausted, prosthetic fistulae become the second option of maintenance HD access alternatives. CVCs have become an important adjunct in maintaining patients on HD. The preferable locations for insertion are the internal jugular and femoral veins. The subclavian vein is considered the third choice because of the high risk of thrombosis. Complications associated with CVC insertion range from 5% to 19%. Since an increasing number of patients have implanted pacemakers and defibrillators, usually inserted via the subclavian vein and superior vena cava into the right heart, a careful assessment of risk and benefits should be taken. Infection is responsible for the removal of about 30%–60% of HD CVCs, and hospitalization rates are higher among patients with CVCs than among AVF ones. Proper VA maintenance requires integration of different professionals to create a VA team. This team should include a nephrologist, radiologist, vascular surgeon, infectious disease consultant, and members of the dialysis staff. They should provide their experience in order to give the best options to uremic patients and the best care for their VA. PMID:25045278

  16. Nasolacrimal Polyurethane Stent: Complications with CT Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Isabel T.; Paul, Laura; Grande, Carlos

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate initial results in patients with epiphora secondary to obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct treated by placement of a polyurethane stent, and to discuss the technical problems and complications arising during the procedure, with visualization of the anatomy of the drainage apparatus using computed tomography (CT). Methods: We inserted 20 polyurethane Song stents under fluoroscopic guidance after dacryocystography in 19 patients with grade 3-4 epiphora caused by idiopathic obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct. CT scans were obtained following stent placement in all patients. Results: We focus on the technical problems and complications that arose during these procedures. During negotiation of the guidewire past the obstruction at the level of the junction of the duct with the lacrimal sac, the guidewire created a false passage in a posterior suborbital direction in two cases and towards the posterior midline in another. In all cases the guidewire was withdrawn and reinserted through the proper anatomic route without further difficulty or complications. In two cases the stent was improperly positioned wholly or partially outside the nasolacrimal system (one medially, one posteriorly). In one case the stent was removed and reinserted; in the other it remains in place and functional. CT was performed in all these cases to ensure proper anatomic alignment and determine what had gone wrong. The epiphora was completely resolved in 13 cases and partially relieved in four; there were three cases of stent obstruction. Epistaxis of short duration (1 hr) occurred in seven patients and headache in one. Conclusions: Treatment of epiphora with polyurethane stents is a technique that is well tolerated by patients and achieves a high success rate, yet problems in placement may be encountered. Though no major consequences for patients are involved, cognizance of such difficulties is important to avoid incorrect positioning of stents.

  17. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nentwich, Martin M; Ulbig, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the most frequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and the most common cause of blindness in the working-age population. In the next 15 years, the number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected to increase significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 million people in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to be suffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence 7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people with diabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts for an increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e., exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema. PMID:25897358

  18. [Complications after intramedullary nailing of the tibia].

    PubMed

    Pobłocki, Krzysztof; Domaradzki, Marcin; Gawdzik, Jerzy; Prochacki, Paweł; Rajewski, Rajmund

    2011-01-01

    As demonstrated by the experience, treatment of fractures of the tibial intramedullary nail proved to be the most advantageous method of operating as: put the rod runs in the biomechanical axis of the limb, is inside of the bone, is a minimally invasive procedure (carried out with small cuts). Initially, the method of intramedullary nailing was used for the treatment of fractures of the shaft center of the tibia. However, the development of surgical techniques has meant that the method can also be used to treat fractures of the proximal and distal tibia. The most common complications of surgical treatment by this method, apart from infection include: changing the limb axis, rotation of the factions against each other, and degenerative changes in the knee depend on the introduction of nail art. The aim of this study is to analyze in order to treat patients with lower leg fractures using intramedullary nailing. It was carried out based on the collected medical records and clinical examination, which included 45 patients. It was found that the most common complication observed after treatment was varus tibial fragments (5 cases - 11% of respondents). Less commonly observed disorder in the form of the axis of rotation of the limb (1 case) and anteflexion -1 case. During the test showed that the axis of the limb abnormalities were associated with the initial surgery. There was no significant progression of the axis of the limb abnormalities in the period from the date of surgery to complete primary union. Complications in the form of secondary osteoarthritis of the knee reported in studies of other authors, did not occur in any of the analyzed in the work cases. PMID:22420180

  19. Surgical Versus Percutaneous Femoral Access for Delivery of Large-Bore Cardiovascular Devices (from the PARTNER Trial).

    PubMed

    McCabe, James M; Huang, Pei-Hsiu; Cohen, David J; Blackstone, Eugene H; Welt, Frederick G P; Davidson, Michael J; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Eng, Marvin H; Allen, Keith B; Xu, Ke; Lowry, Ashley M; Lei, Yang; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Brown, David L; Mack, Michael J; Webb, John G; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B; Eisenhauer, Andrew C

    2016-05-15

    It is unclear if surgical exposure confers a risk advantage compared with a percutaneous approach for patients undergoing endovascular procedures requiring large-bore femoral artery access. From the randomized controlled Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve trials A and B and the continued access registries, a total of 1,416 patients received transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement, of which 857 underwent surgical, and 559 underwent percutaneous access. Thirty-day rates of major vascular complications and quality of life scores were assessed. Propensity matching was used to adjust for unmeasured confounders. Overall, there were 116 major vascular complications (8.2%). Complication rates decreased dramatically during the study period. In unadjusted analysis, major vascular complications were significantly less common in the percutaneous access group (35 [6.3%] vs 81 [9.5%] p = 0.032). However, among 292 propensity-matched pairs, there was no difference in major vascular complications (22 [7.5%] vs 28 [9.6%], p = 0.37). Percutaneous access was associated with fewer total in-hospital vascular complications (46 [16%] vs 66 [23%], p = 0.036), shorter median procedural duration (97 interquartile range [IQR 68 to 166] vs 121 [IQR 78 to 194] minutes, p <0.0001), and median length of stay (4 [IQR 2 to 8] vs 6 [IQR 3 to 10] days, p <0.0001). There were no significant differences in quality of life scores at 30 days. Surgical access for large-bore femoral access does not appear to confer any advantages over percutaneous access and may be associated with more minor vascular complications. PMID:27036077

  20. Emergency intravenous access through the femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Swanson, R S; Uhlig, P N; Gross, P L; McCabe, C J

    1984-04-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of femoral venous catheterization for resuscitation of critically ill patients in the emergency department setting. From May 1982 to April 1983, 100 attempts were made at percutaneous insertion of a large-bore catheter into the femoral veins of patients presenting to our emergency department in cardiac arrest or requiring rapid fluid resuscitation. Eighty-nine attempts were successful. Insertion was generally considered easy, and flow rates were excellent. The only noted complications were four arterial punctures and one minor groin hematoma. This study suggests that short-term percutaneous catheterization of the femoral vein provides rapid, safe, and effective intravenous access. PMID:6703430

  1. [Pulmonary complications of malaria: An update].

    PubMed

    Cabezón Estévanez, Itxasne; Górgolas Hernández-Mora, Miguel

    2016-04-15

    Malaria is the most important parasitic disease worldwide, being a public health challenge in more than 90 countries. The incidence of pulmonary manifestations has increased in recent years. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is the most severe form within the pulmonary complications of malaria, with high mortality despite proper management. This syndrome manifests with sudden dyspnoea, cough and refractory hypoxaemia. Patients should be admitted to intensive care units and treated with parenteral antimalarial drug treatment and ventilatory and haemodynamic support without delay. Therefore, dyspnoea in patients with malaria should alert clinicians, as the development of respiratory distress is a poor prognostic factor.

  2. Acute myocardial infarction complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, L.B.J.; Otterspoor, L.C.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    An acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of a subarachnoid haemorrhage. The combination of these two conditions imposes important treatment dilemmas. We describe two patients with this combination of life-threatening conditions. Patient 1 was treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention followed by clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Six months after discharge the patient's memory and orientation had almost completely recovered. Patient 2 was treated with aspirin until coiling of the aneurysm could be performed. After successful coiling low-molecular-weight heparin was added. One week later the patient died due to a free wall rupture. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:284-7.19789696) PMID:19789696

  3. Bone and metabolic complications of urinary diversions.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; Muñoz Delgado, Eva Golmayo

    2015-02-01

    Hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is a complication of urinary diversion using ileum or colon. Its prevalence ranges from 25% and 46% depending on the procedure used and renal function of the patient. It is a consequence of intestinal fluid and electrolyte exchange between intestinal mucosa and urine. The main mechanism is absorption of ammonium and chloride from urine. Long-term chronic metabolic acidosis in these patients may lead to impaired bone metabolism and osteomalacia. Regular monitoring of pH, chlorine, bicarbonate, and calcium-phosphorus metabolism is therefore essential for early diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Walaa A.; Hashel, Jasem Y. Al; Kilany, Ayman; Altailji, Samira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between Parkinsonism and BS has already been reported in only three patients worldwide. CASE SUMMARY: We report a 39-years old Kuwaiti female who presented with parkinsonian features and mononeuropathy (carpal tunnel syndrome) 3 years after a vertical sleeve gastrectomy operation. CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms. PMID:27275313

  5. Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; House, Andrew; Gorini, Antonio; Santoboni, Alberto; Russo, Domenico; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death represent main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Pathogenesis includes close linkage between heart and kidneys and involves traditional and non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors. According to a well-established classification of cardiorenal syndrome, cardiovascular involvement in CKD is known as "type-4 cardiorenal syndrome" (chronic renocardiac). The following review makes an overview about epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular complications in CKD patients. PMID:25344016

  6. First Trimester complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Bishwajit

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes is the most prevalent medical condition complicating pregnancy in the world. It carries both acute and long-term health consequences for the mother and her offspring. Both preexisting (type 1 and type 2) and gestational diabetes are a high-risk state for miscarriage, stillbirths and congenital malformations in early pregnancy. Like normal pregnancy, vaginal bleeding, urinary tract infection, abdominopelvic pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms in early pregnancy with preexisting and gestational diabetes. Early diagnosis and appropriate management of the condition is important for improving pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27582160

  7. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Imaging and Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, John M. Vora, Parag; Midia, Mehran; Rawlinson, John

    2008-09-15

    The objective of this study was to highlight technical challenges and potential pitfalls of diagnostic imaging, intervention, and postintervention follow-up of vascular complications of pancreatitis. Diagnostic and interventional radiology imaging from patients with pancreatitis from 2002 to 2006 was reviewed. We conclude that biphasic CT is the diagnostic modality of choice. Catheter angiography may (still) be required to diagnose small pseudoaneurysms. Endovascular coiling is the treatment of choice for pseudoaneurysms. Close clinical follow-up is required, as patients may rebleed/develop aneurysms elsewhere.

  8. Post-transplant hepatic complications: Imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Drudi, F.M.; Pagliara, E.; Cantisani, V.; Arduini, F.; D'Ambrosio, U.; Alfano, G.

    2007-01-01

    Transplantation is considered definitive therapy for acute or chronic irreversible pathologies of the liver, and the increased survival rates are mainly due to improved immunosuppressive therapies and surgical techniques. However, early diagnosis of possible graft dysfunction is crucial to liver graft survival. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of the liver before and after transplant and in the detection of complications such as vascular and biliary diseases, acute and chronic rejection and neoplastic recurrence. Integrated imaging using color-Doppler, CT, MRI and traditional x-ray reach a high level of sensitivity and specificity in the management of transplanted patients. PMID:23395917

  9. An unexpected complication of titanium rib clips.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Han, Serdar

    2014-12-01

    Surgical stabilization of the rib fractures has been successfully performed for the management of pain in multiple rib fractures, fixation of chronically painful nonunion, reduction of overriding ribs, and flail chest cases. Herein we report a patient who was treated with titanium rib clips after a motor vehicle accident leading to pulmonary parenchymal laceration and multiple painful rib fractures. Three of the rib clips were broken 4 months after the operation. The patient underwent the second operation for restabilization of the broken ribs. We review the relevant literature, with particular emphasis on the management of this complication.

  10. Female genital mutilation: perspectives, risks, and complications.

    PubMed

    Morris, R I

    1999-03-01

    Female genital mutilation, traditionally known as female circumcision, is a surgically unnecessary modification of the female genitalia, practiced in nations in Africa, the Arab Peninsula, among some communities in Asia, and among immigrants and refugees from these areas who have settled in other areas. The practice is known across socio-economic classes and among many different ethnic and cultural groups, including Christians, Muslims, Jews, and followers of indigenous African religions. As people from these areas immigrate to North America, health care professionals need to understand the important aspects of this growing problem, including management of complications, cultural attitudes, and sensitivities. PMID:10373987

  11. Placental exosomes in normal and complicated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Murray D; Peiris, Hassendrini N; Kobayashi, Miharu; Koh, Yong Q; Duncombe, Gregory; Illanes, Sebastian E; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    While there is considerable contemporary interest in elucidating the role of placenta-derived extracellular vesicles in normal and complicated pregnancies and their utility as biomarkers and therapeutic interventions, progress in the field is hindered by a lack of standardized extracellular vesicle taxonomy and isolation protocols. The term "extracellular vesicle" is nonspecific and refers to all membrane-bound vesicles from nanometer to micrometer diameters and of different biogenic origins. To meaningfully ascribe biological function and/or diagnostic and therapeutic utility to extracellular vesicles, and in particular exosomes, greater specificity and vesicle characterization is required. The current literature relating to exosome biology must be interpreted in this context. Exosomes are a subtype of extracellular vesicle that are specifically defined by an endosomal biogenesis and particle size (40-120 nm) and density (1.13-1.19 g/mL(-1)). Exosomes are specifically package with signaling molecules (including protein, messenger RNA, microRNA, and noncoding RNA) and are released by exocytosis into biofluid compartments. Exosomes regulate the activity of both proximal and distal target cells, including translational activity, angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, and apoptosis. As such, exosomal signaling represents an integral pathway mediating intercellular communication. During pregnancy, the placenta releases exosomes into the maternal circulation from as early as 6 weeks of gestation. Release is regulated by factors that include both oxygen tension and glucose concentration and correlates with placental mass and perfusion. The concentration of placenta-derived exosomes in maternal plasma increases progressively during gestation. Exosomes isolated from maternal plasma are bioactive in vitro and are incorporated into target cells by endocytosis. While the functional significance of placental exosomes in pregnancy remains to be fully elucidated, available

  12. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity. PMID:12532043

  13. Complications after procedures of photorefractive keratectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierek-Ciaciura, Stanislawa

    1998-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the saveness of the PRK procedures. Material and method: 151 eyes after PRK for correction of myopia and 112 after PRK for correction of myopic astigmatism were examined. All PRK procedures have been performed with an excimer laser manufactured by Aesculap Meditec. Results: Haze, regression, decentration infection and overcorrection were found. Conclusions: The most often complication is regression. Corneal inflammation in the early postoperative period may cause the regression or haze. The greater corrected refractive error the greater haze degree. Haze decreases with time.

  14. Carcinoma of the lung complicating lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Felson, B.; Ralaisomay, G.

    1983-11-01

    The authors have encountered four cases of oil aspiration pneumonia complicated by carcinoma. Each had a clear-cut history of chronic intake of an oily substance, radiographic changes, and histologically documented oil aspiration pneumonia. Lung cancer later appeared in the involved area. A small number of similar cases also have been reported. The implication is that oil aspiration pneumonitis may induce bronchogenic carcinoma, particularly either the alveolar cell or the squamous cell variety. The radiographic diagnosis of the malignant transformation is difficult, and consequently the prognosis is poor.

  15. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  16. Interventional Management of Nonvascular Renal Transplant Complications.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Kanti Pallav; LaBerge, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Nonvascular complications represent a significant source of morbidity following renal transplantation and can be seen in up to 20% of patients. Postoperative problems include urinary tract obstruction or leakage and the development of peritransplant fluid collections. Interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients. Image-guided interventions are used to identify the underlying anatomical problem, relieve immediate symptoms, and allow planning for long-term resolution. In this article, we review the urinary tract anatomy relevant to renal transplantation, procedural techniques for image-guided urinary tract interventions and interventions on peritransplant fluid collections, and expected outcomes following image-guided interventions. PMID:27641456

  17. Delayed complication of a rib fracture.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, J; O'Kane, E; Marquet, J

    1998-04-01

    A 48-year-old man who was kneed in the chest while playing basketball was diagnosed as having an occult rib fracture. Five days after the injury, he was taken to the emergency room with severe midsternal and left upper quadrant and pleuritic chest pain. Left-side chest radiographs and CT scans revealed a pleural effusion, compression atelectasis, and a minimally displaced fracture of the sixth rib. A tube thoracostomy was performed, the pleural cavity was drained, and the patient recovered. His case illustrates the need to be alert for serious complications in apparently ordinary sports-related rib fractures.

  18. Weight changes, medical complications, and performance during an Ironman triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, K; Collins, M; Goedecke, J; Wilson, G; Noakes, T

    2004-01-01

    Background: Subjects exercising without fluid ingestion in desert heat terminated exercise when the total loss in body weight exceeded 7%. It is not known if athletes competing in cooler conditions with free access to fluid terminate exercise at similar levels of weight loss. Objectives: To determine any associations between percentage weight losses during a 224 km Ironman triathlon, serum sodium concentrations and rectal temperatures after the race, and prevalence of medical diagnoses. Methods: Athletes competing in the 2000 and 2001 South African Ironman triathlon were weighed on the day of registration and again immediately before and immediately after the race. Blood pressure and serum sodium concentrations were measured at registration and immediately after the race. Rectal temperatures were also measured after the race, at which time all athletes were medically examined. Athletes were assigned to one of three groups according to percentage weight loss during the race. Results: Body weight was significantly (p<0.0001) reduced after the race in all three groups. Serum sodium concentrations were significantly (p<0.001) higher in athletes with the greatest percentage weight loss. Rectal temperatures were the same in all groups, with only a weak inverse association between temperature and percentage weight loss. There were no significant differences in diagnostic indices of high weight loss or incidence of medical diagnoses between groups. Conclusions: Large changes in body weight during a triathlon were not associated with a greater prevalence of medical complications or higher rectal temperatures but were associated with higher serum sodium concentrations. PMID:15562165

  19. First experiences with the direct anterior approach in lateral decubitus position: learning curve and 1 year complication rate.

    PubMed

    Melman, Wietse P R; Mollen, Bas P; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Verheyen, Cees C P M

    2015-01-01

    The direct anterior approach (DAA) in supine position for hip arthroplasty has been reported to suffer from high complication rates initially. The DAA with the patient in lateral decubitus position is believed to provide better visibility and especially femoral accessibility with potential fewer complications.The first cohort of total hip prostheses, which were implanted by a single surgeon using DAA in lateral decubitus position more than 1 year ago, was analysed retrospectively.In total 182 hip prostheses (172 patients) were analysed. Three consecutive time periods based on equal number of surgical procedures were compared. The technical complication rate and operating time improved significantly between the 3 consecutive groups. The 1 year infection rate was 0.5% and survival rate of 98.9%.This is the first series of patients that were subjected to a hip replacement based on the direct anterior approach in a lateral decubitus position in which decreasing complication rates suggest the presence of a learning curve in surgeons conducting this type of surgery. Initial complication rate was high but decreased significantly in time and was acceptable certainly in the third group of our cohort. An unacceptable complication rate with the straight uncemented stem forced us to discontinue this configuration after only 7 surgical procedures. Complication, infection and revision rates were acceptable for the all cemented hip replacements using a curved anatomical stem. PMID:25684251

  20. Prevention and management of complications in body contouring surgery.

    PubMed

    Gusenoff, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-01

    This patient safety article discusses strategies to prevent, diagnose, and manage complications from body contouring surgery. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative approaches to avoiding, identifying, and treating complications are addressed. Individual complications, such as hematoma, seroma, infection, dehiscence, suture extrusion, deep venous thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism are discussed and a review of complication rates in the body contouring literature is provided. The article addresses procedure-specific complications and pearls to avoiding complications in these cases. Difficult problems such as skin relaxation and management of the disappointed patient are also discussed.