Science.gov

Sample records for access spatial methods

  1. Improving Nearest Neighbour Search in 3d Spatial Access Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhaibaha, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Uznir, U.; Anton, F.; Mioc, D.

    2016-10-01

    Nearest Neighbour (NN) is one of the important queries and analyses for spatial application. In normal practice, spatial access method structure is used during the Nearest Neighbour query execution to retrieve information from the database. However, most of the spatial access method structures are still facing with unresolved issues such as overlapping among nodes and repetitive data entry. This situation will perform an excessive Input/Output (IO) operation which is inefficient for data retrieval. The situation will become more crucial while dealing with 3D data. The size of 3D data is usually large due to its detail geometry and other attached information. In this research, a clustered 3D hierarchical structure is introduced as a 3D spatial access method structure. The structure is expected to improve the retrieval of Nearest Neighbour information for 3D objects. Several tests are performed in answering Single Nearest Neighbour search and k Nearest Neighbour (kNN) search. The tests indicate that clustered hierarchical structure is efficient in handling Nearest Neighbour query compared to its competitor. From the results, clustered hierarchical structure reduced the repetitive data entry and the accessed page. The proposed structure also produced minimal Input/Output operation. The query response time is also outperformed compared to the other competitor. For future outlook of this research several possible applications are discussed and summarized.

  2. Spatial accessibility of primary care: concepts, methods and challenges.

    PubMed

    Guagliardo, Mark F

    2004-02-26

    Primary care is recognized as the most important form of healthcare for maintaining population health because it is relatively inexpensive, can be more easily delivered than specialty and inpatient care, and if properly distributed it is most effective in preventing disease progression on a large scale. Recent advances in the field of health geography have greatly improved our understanding of the role played by geographic distribution of health services in population health maintenance. However, most of this knowledge has accrued for hospital and specialty services and services in rural areas. Much less is known about the effect of distance to and supply of primary care on primary care utilization, particularly in the U.S.For several reasons the shortage of information is particularly acute for urban areas, where the majority of people live. First, explicit definitions and conceptualizations of healthcare access have not been widely used to guide research. An additional barrier to progress has been an overwhelming concern about affordability of care, which has garnered the majority of attention and research resources. Also, the most popular measures of spatial accessibility to care - travel impedance to nearest provider and supply level within bordered areas - lose validity in congested urban areas. Better measures are needed. Fortunately, some advances are occurring on the methodological front. These can improve our knowledge of all types of healthcare geography in all settings, including primary care in urban areas.This paper explains basic concepts and measurements of access, provides some historical background, outlines the major questions concerning geographic accessibility of primary care, describes recent developments in GIS and spatial analysis, and presents examples of promising work.

  3. Evaluating and Comparing Methods for Measuring Spatial Access to Mammography Centers in Appalachia (Re-Revised)

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Joseph; Marshall, Vincent; Tan, Xi; Camacho, Fabian T.; Anderson, Roger; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated spatial access to mammography centers in Appalachia using both traditional access measures and the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method. Methods Ratios of county mammography centers to women age 45 and older, driving time to nearest mammography facility, and various 2SFCA approaches were compared throughout Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, and North Carolina. Results Closest travel time measures favored urban areas. The 2SFCA method produced varied results depending on the parameters chosen. Appalachia areas had greater travel times to their closest mammography center. Appalachia areas in OH and NC had worse 2SFCA scores than non-Appalachia areas of the same states. Conclusion A relative 2SFCA approach, the spatial access ratio (SPAR) method, was recommended because it helped minimize the differences between various 2SFCA approaches. PMID:27445639

  4. Spatial access priority mapping (SAPM) with fishers: a quantitative GIS method for participatory planning.

    PubMed

    Yates, Katherine L; Schoeman, David S

    2013-01-01

    Spatial management tools, such as marine spatial planning and marine protected areas, are playing an increasingly important role in attempts to improve marine management and accommodate conflicting needs. Robust data are needed to inform decisions among different planning options, and early inclusion of stakeholder involvement is widely regarded as vital for success. One of the biggest stakeholder groups, and the most likely to be adversely impacted by spatial restrictions, is the fishing community. In order to take their priorities into account, planners need to understand spatial variation in their perceived value of the sea. Here a readily accessible, novel method for quantitatively mapping fishers' spatial access priorities is presented. Spatial access priority mapping, or SAPM, uses only basic functions of standard spreadsheet and GIS software. Unlike the use of remote-sensing data, SAPM actively engages fishers in participatory mapping, documenting rather than inferring their priorities. By so doing, SAPM also facilitates the gathering of other useful data, such as local ecological knowledge. The method was tested and validated in Northern Ireland, where over 100 fishers participated in a semi-structured questionnaire and mapping exercise. The response rate was excellent, 97%, demonstrating fishers' willingness to be involved. The resultant maps are easily accessible and instantly informative, providing a very clear visual indication of which areas are most important for the fishers. The maps also provide quantitative data, which can be used to analyse the relative impact of different management options on the fishing industry and can be incorporated into planning software, such as MARXAN, to ensure that conservation goals can be met at minimum negative impact to the industry. This research shows how spatial access priority mapping can facilitate the early engagement of fishers and the ready incorporation of their priorities into the decision-making process

  5. Spatial Access Priority Mapping (SAPM) with Fishers: A Quantitative GIS Method for Participatory Planning

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Katherine L.; Schoeman, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial management tools, such as marine spatial planning and marine protected areas, are playing an increasingly important role in attempts to improve marine management and accommodate conflicting needs. Robust data are needed to inform decisions among different planning options, and early inclusion of stakeholder involvement is widely regarded as vital for success. One of the biggest stakeholder groups, and the most likely to be adversely impacted by spatial restrictions, is the fishing community. In order to take their priorities into account, planners need to understand spatial variation in their perceived value of the sea. Here a readily accessible, novel method for quantitatively mapping fishers’ spatial access priorities is presented. Spatial access priority mapping, or SAPM, uses only basic functions of standard spreadsheet and GIS software. Unlike the use of remote-sensing data, SAPM actively engages fishers in participatory mapping, documenting rather than inferring their priorities. By so doing, SAPM also facilitates the gathering of other useful data, such as local ecological knowledge. The method was tested and validated in Northern Ireland, where over 100 fishers participated in a semi-structured questionnaire and mapping exercise. The response rate was excellent, 97%, demonstrating fishers’ willingness to be involved. The resultant maps are easily accessible and instantly informative, providing a very clear visual indication of which areas are most important for the fishers. The maps also provide quantitative data, which can be used to analyse the relative impact of different management options on the fishing industry and can be incorporated into planning software, such as MARXAN, to ensure that conservation goals can be met at minimum negative impact to the industry. This research shows how spatial access priority mapping can facilitate the early engagement of fishers and the ready incorporation of their priorities into the decision

  6. Comparing GIS-based methods of measuring spatial accessibility to health services.

    PubMed

    Yang, Duck-Hye; Goerge, Robert; Mullner, Ross

    2006-02-01

    The inequitable geographic distribution of health care resources has long been recognized as a problem in the United States. Traditional measures, such as a simple ratio of supply to demand in an area or distance to the closest provider, are easy measures for spatial accessibility. However the former one does not consider interactions between patients and providers across administrative borders and the latter does not account for the demand side, that is, the competition for the supply. With advancements in GIS, however, better measures of geographic accessibility, variants of a gravity model, have been applied. Among them are (1) a two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method and (2) a kernel density (KD) method. This microscopic study compared these two GIS-based measures of accessibility in our case study of dialysis service centers in Chicago. Our comparison study found a significant mismatch of the accessibility ratios between the two methods. Overall, the 2SFCA method produced better accessibility ratios. There is room for further improvement of the 2SFCA method-varying the radius of service area according to the type of provider or the type of neighborhood and determining the appropriate weight equation form-still warrant further study.

  7. Finding Food Deserts: A Comparison of Methods Measuring Spatial Access to Food Stores.

    PubMed

    Jaskiewicz, Lara; Block, Daniel; Chavez, Noel

    2016-05-01

    Public health research has increasingly focused on how access to resources affects health behaviors. Mapping environmental factors, such as distance to a supermarket, can identify intervention points toward improving food access in low-income and minority communities. However, the existing literature provides little guidance on choosing the most appropriate measures of spatial access. This study compared the results of different measures of spatial access to large food stores and the locations of high and low access identified by each. The data set included U.S. Census population data and the locations of large food stores in the six-county area around Chicago, Illinois. Six measures of spatial access were calculated at the census block group level and the results compared. The analysis found that there was little agreement in the identified locations of high or low access between measures. This study illustrates the importance of considering the access measure used when conducting research, interpreting results, or comparing studies. Future research should explore the correlation of different measures with health behaviors and health outcomes.

  8. Optimizing the two-step floating catchment area method for measuring spatial accessibility to medical clinics in Montreal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Reducing spatial access disparities to healthcare services is a growing priority for healthcare planners especially among developed countries with aging populations. There is thus a pressing need to determine which populations do not enjoy access to healthcare, yet efforts to quantify such disparities in spatial accessibility have been hampered by a lack of satisfactory measurements and methods. This study compares an optimised and the conventional version of the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method to assess spatial accessibility to medical clinics in Montreal. Methods We first computed catchments around existing medical clinics of Montreal Island based on the shortest network distance. Population nested in dissemination areas were used to determine potential users of a given medical clinic. To optimize the method, medical clinics (supply) were weighted by the number of physicians working in each clinic, while the previous year's medical clinic users were computed by ten years age group was used as weighting coefficient for potential users of each medical clinic (demand). Results The spatial accessibility score (SA) increased considerably with the optimisation method. Within a distance of 1 Km, for instance, the maximum clinic accessible for 1,000 persons is 2.4 when the conventional method is used, compared with 27.7 for the optimized method. The t-test indicates a significant difference between the conventional and the optimized 2SFCA methods. Also, results of the differences between the two methods reveal a clustering of residuals when distance increases. In other words, a low threshold would be associated with a lack of precision. Conclusion Results of this study suggest that a greater effort must be made ameliorate spatial accessibility to medical clinics in Montreal. To ensure that health resources are allocated in the interest of the population, health planners and the government should consider a strategy in the sitting of future

  9. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-11-13

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas.

  10. Mof-Tree: A Spatial Access Method To Manipulate Multiple Overlapping Features.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manolopoulos, Yannis; Nardelli, Enrico; Papadopoulos, Apostolos; Proietti, Guido

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the manipulation of large sets of two-dimensional data representing multiple overlapping features, and presents a new access method, the MOF-tree. Analyzes storage requirements and time with respect to window query operations involving multiple features. Examines both the pointer-based and pointerless MOF-tree representations.…

  11. Mof-Tree: A Spatial Access Method To Manipulate Multiple Overlapping Features.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manolopoulos, Yannis; Nardelli, Enrico; Papadopoulos, Apostolos; Proietti, Guido

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the manipulation of large sets of two-dimensional data representing multiple overlapping features, and presents a new access method, the MOF-tree. Analyzes storage requirements and time with respect to window query operations involving multiple features. Examines both the pointer-based and pointerless MOF-tree representations.…

  12. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-01-01

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas. PMID:26580637

  13. Spatial accessibility of primary health care utilising the two step floating catchment area method: an assessment of recent improvements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The two step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method has emerged in the last decade as a key measure of spatial accessibility, particularly in its application to primary health care access. Many recent ‘improvements’ to the original 2SFCA method have been developed, which generally either account for distance-decay within a catchment or enable the usage of variable catchment sizes. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of various proposed methods within these two improvement groups. Moreover, its assessment focuses on how well these improvements operate within and between rural and metropolitan populations over large geographical regions. Results Demonstrating these improvements to the whole state of Victoria, Australia, this paper presents the first comparison between continuous and zonal (step) decay functions and specifically their effect within both rural and metropolitan populations. Especially in metropolitan populations, the application of either type of distance-decay function is shown to be problematic by itself. Its inclusion necessitates the addition of a variable catchment size function which can enable the 2SFCA method to dynamically define more appropriate catchments which align with actual health service supply and utilisation. Conclusion This study assesses recent ‘improvements’ to the 2SFCA when applied over large geographic regions of both large and small populations. Its findings demonstrate the necessary combination of both a distance-decay function and variable catchment size function in order for the 2SFCA to appropriately measure healthcare access across all geographical regions. PMID:23153335

  14. Spatial accessibility of primary health care utilising the two step floating catchment area method: an assessment of recent improvements.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Matthew R

    2012-11-16

    The two step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method has emerged in the last decade as a key measure of spatial accessibility, particularly in its application to primary health care access. Many recent 'improvements' to the original 2SFCA method have been developed, which generally either account for distance-decay within a catchment or enable the usage of variable catchment sizes. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of various proposed methods within these two improvement groups. Moreover, its assessment focuses on how well these improvements operate within and between rural and metropolitan populations over large geographical regions. Demonstrating these improvements to the whole state of Victoria, Australia, this paper presents the first comparison between continuous and zonal (step) decay functions and specifically their effect within both rural and metropolitan populations. Especially in metropolitan populations, the application of either type of distance-decay function is shown to be problematic by itself. Its inclusion necessitates the addition of a variable catchment size function which can enable the 2SFCA method to dynamically define more appropriate catchments which align with actual health service supply and utilisation. This study assesses recent 'improvements' to the 2SFCA when applied over large geographic regions of both large and small populations. Its findings demonstrate the necessary combination of both a distance-decay function and variable catchment size function in order for the 2SFCA to appropriately measure healthcare access across all geographical regions.

  15. A hybrid 3D spatial access method based on quadtrees and R-trees for globe data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jun; Ke, Shengnan; Li, Xiaomin; Qi, Shuhua

    2009-10-01

    3D spatial access method for globe data is very crucial technique for virtual earth. This paper presents a brand-new maintenance method to index 3d objects distributed on the whole surface of the earth, which integrates the 1:1,000,000- scale topographic map tiles, Quad-tree and R-tree. Furthermore, when traditional methods are extended into 3d space, the performance of spatial index deteriorates badly, for example 3D R-tree. In order to effectively solve this difficult problem, a new algorithm of dynamic R-tree is put forward, which includes two sub-procedures, namely node-choosing and node-split. In the node-choosing algorithm, a new strategy is adopted, not like the traditional mode which is from top to bottom, but firstly from bottom to top then from top to bottom. This strategy can effectively solve the negative influence of node overlap. In the node-split algorithm, 2-to-3 split mode substitutes the traditional 1-to-2 mode, which can better concern the shape and size of nodes. Because of the rational tree shape, this R-tree method can easily integrate the concept of LOD. Therefore, it will be later implemented in commercial DBMS and adopted in time-crucial 3d GIS system.

  16. Measuring spatial equity and access to maternal health services using enhanced two step floating catchment area method (E2SFCA) - a case study of the Indian Sundarbans.

    PubMed

    Vadrevu, Lalitha; Kanjilal, Barun

    2016-06-07

    Inaccessibility due to terrain and lack of transport leaves mothers travelling for long hours before reaching a facility to deliver a child. In the present article we analyzed the issue of spatial inaccessibility and inequity of maternal health services in the Indian Sundarbans where complex topography and repeated climatic adversities make access to health services very difficult. We based the article on the health-GIS study conducted in the Patharpratima Block of the Sundarbans in the year 2012. The region has 87 villages that are inhabited, of which 54 villages are in the deltaic (river locked) region and 33 villages are located in the non-deltaic region of the block. We mapped all public and private maternal health facilities and road and water transport network. For measuring inaccessibility, we use the enhanced two-step floating catchment area method (E2SFCA). For assessing inequity in spatial access, we developed an area-based socioeconomic score and constructed a concentration curve to depict inequity. We used ARC GIS 10.3.1 and Stata 11 software for our analysis. The maternal health facilities are primarily located in the non-deltaic region of the block. On an average it takes 33.81 min to reach the closest maternal health facility. Fifty-two villages out of eighty seven villages have access scores less than the score calculated using Indian Primary Health Standards. Ten villages cannot access any maternal health facility; twenty-six villages have access scores of less than one doctor for 1000 pregnant women; fifty-six villages have access scores less than the block average of 3.54. The access scores are lower among villages in the deltaic region compared to the non-deltaic region. The concentration curve is below the line of equality showing that access scores were lower among villages that were socio-economically disadvantaged. Maternal health facilities are not equitably accessible to the populations that are disadvantaged and living in the remote

  17. Spatial access to residential care resources in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As the population is ageing rapidly in Beijing, the residential care sector is in a fast expansion process with the support of the municipal government. Understanding spatial accessibility to residential care resources by older people supports the need for rational allocation of care resources in future planning. Methods Based on population data and data on residential care resources, this study uses two Geographic Information System (GIS) based methods – shortest path analysis and a two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method to analyse spatial accessibility to residential care resources. Results Spatial accessibility varies as the methods and considered factors change. When only time distance is considered, residential care resources are more accessible in the central city than in suburban and exurban areas. If care resources are considered in addition to time distance, spatial accessibility is relatively poor in the central city compared to the northeast to southeast side of the suburban and exurban areas. The resources in the northwest to southwest side of the city are the least accessible, even though several hotspots of residential care resources are located in these areas. Conclusions For policy making, it may require combining various methods for a comprehensive analysis. The methods used in this study provide tools for identifying underserved areas in order to improve equity in access to and efficiency in allocation of residential care resources in future planning. PMID:22877360

  18. System and Method for Detecting Unauthorized Device Access by Comparing Multiple Independent Spatial-Time Data Sets from Other Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krage, Frederick J. (Inventor); Westmeyer, Paul A. (Inventor); Wertenberg, Russell F. (Inventor); Riegel, Jack F. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An authentication procedure utilizes multiple independent sources of data to determine whether usage of a device, such as a desktop computer, is authorized. When a comparison indicates an anomaly from the base-line usage data, the system, provides a notice that access of the first device is not authorized.

  19. Using Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis Methods to Assess Household Water Access and Sanitation Coverage in the SHINE Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ntozini, Robert; Marks, Sara J.; Mangwadu, Goldberg; Mbuya, Mduduzi N. N.; Gerema, Grace; Mutasa, Batsirai; Julian, Timothy R.; Schwab, Kellogg J.; Humphrey, Jean H.; Zungu, Lindiwe I.

    2015-01-01

    Access to water and sanitation are important determinants of behavioral responses to hygiene and sanitation interventions. We estimated cluster-specific water access and sanitation coverage to inform a constrained randomization technique in the SHINE trial. Technicians and engineers inspected all public access water sources to ascertain seasonality, function, and geospatial coordinates. Households and water sources were mapped using open-source geospatial software. The distance from each household to the nearest perennial, functional, protected water source was calculated, and for each cluster, the median distance and the proportion of households within <500 m and >1500 m of such a water source. Cluster-specific sanitation coverage was ascertained using a random sample of 13 households per cluster. These parameters were included as covariates in randomization to optimize balance in water and sanitation access across treatment arms at the start of the trial. The observed high variability between clusters in both parameters suggests that constraining on these factors was needed to reduce risk of bias. PMID:26602299

  20. Using Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis Methods to Assess Household Water Access and Sanitation Coverage in the SHINE Trial.

    PubMed

    Ntozini, Robert; Marks, Sara J; Mangwadu, Goldberg; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Gerema, Grace; Mutasa, Batsirai; Julian, Timothy R; Schwab, Kellogg J; Humphrey, Jean H; Zungu, Lindiwe I

    2015-12-15

    Access to water and sanitation are important determinants of behavioral responses to hygiene and sanitation interventions. We estimated cluster-specific water access and sanitation coverage to inform a constrained randomization technique in the SHINE trial. Technicians and engineers inspected all public access water sources to ascertain seasonality, function, and geospatial coordinates. Households and water sources were mapped using open-source geospatial software. The distance from each household to the nearest perennial, functional, protected water source was calculated, and for each cluster, the median distance and the proportion of households within <500 m and >1500 m of such a water source. Cluster-specific sanitation coverage was ascertained using a random sample of 13 households per cluster. These parameters were included as covariates in randomization to optimize balance in water and sanitation access across treatment arms at the start of the trial. The observed high variability between clusters in both parameters suggests that constraining on these factors was needed to reduce risk of bias.

  1. Modeling spatial accessibility to parks: a national study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Parks provide ideal open spaces for leisure-time physical activity and important venues to promote physical activity. The spatial configuration of parks, the number of parks and their spatial distribution across neighborhood areas or local regions, represents the basic park access potential for their residential populations. A new measure of spatial access to parks, population-weighted distance (PWD) to parks, combines the advantages of current park access approaches and incorporates the information processing theory and probability access surface model to more accurately quantify residential population's potential spatial access to parks. Results The PWD was constructed at the basic level of US census geography - blocks - using US park and population data. This new measure of population park accessibility was aggregated to census tract, county, state and national levels. On average, US residential populations are expected to travel 6.7 miles to access their local neighborhood parks. There are significant differences in the PWD to local parks among states. The District of Columbia and Connecticut have the best access to local neighborhood parks with PWD of 0.6 miles and 1.8 miles, respectively. Alaska, Montana, and Wyoming have the largest PWDs of 62.0, 37.4, and 32.8 miles, respectively. Rural states in the western and Midwestern US have lower neighborhood park access, while urban states have relatively higher park access. Conclusions The PWD to parks provides a consistent platform for evaluating spatial equity of park access and linking with population health outcomes. It could be an informative evaluation tool for health professionals and policy makers. This new method could be applied to quantify geographic accessibility of other types of services or destinations, such as food, alcohol, and tobacco outlets. PMID:21554690

  2. Accessing Spatial Data Online: Project Alexandria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsgaard, Mary Lynette; Carver, Larry

    1995-01-01

    Describes Project Alexandria, a digital library initiative funded by the National Science Foundation based at the University of California, Santa Barbara, that provides online access to spatial data in a distributed environment with search options by areas of interest on a base map or by text, according to user preference. (Author/LRW)

  3. Investigating the Spatial Dimension of Food Access

    PubMed Central

    Yenerall, Jackie; You, Wen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the sensitivity of food access models to a dataset’s spatial distribution and the empirical definition of food access, which contributes to understanding the mixed findings of previous studies. Data was collected in the Dan River Region in the United States using a telephone survey for individual-level variables (n = 784) and a store audit for the location of food retailers and grocery store quality. Spatial scanning statistics assessed the spatial distribution of obesity and detected a cluster of grocery stores overlapping with a cluster of obesity centered on a grocery store suggesting that living closer to a grocery store increased the likelihood of obesity. Logistic regression further examined this relationship while controlling for demographic and other food environment variables. Similar to the cluster analysis results, increased distance to a grocery store significantly decreased the likelihood of obesity in the urban subsample (average marginal effects, AME = −0.09, p-value = 0.02). However, controlling for grocery store quality nullified these results (AME = −0.12, p-value = 0.354). Our findings suggest that measuring grocery store accessibility as the distance to the nearest grocery store captures variability in the spatial distribution of the health outcome of interest that may not reflect a causal relationship between the food environment and health. PMID:28767093

  4. Methods to measure potential spatial access to delivery care in low- and middle-income countries: a case study in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to skilled attendance at childbirth is crucial to reduce maternal and newborn mortality. Several different measures of geographic access are used concurrently in public health research, with the assumption that sophisticated methods are generally better. Most of the evidence for this assumption comes from methodological comparisons in high-income countries. We compare different measures of travel impedance in a case study in Ghana’s Brong Ahafo region to determine if straight-line distance can be an adequate proxy for access to delivery care in certain low- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings. Methods We created a geospatial database, mapping population location in both compounds and village centroids, service locations for all health facilities offering delivery care, land-cover and a detailed road network. Six different measures were used to calculate travel impedance to health facilities (straight-line distance, network distance, network travel time and raster travel time, the latter two both mechanized and non-mechanized). The measures were compared using Spearman rank correlation coefficients, absolute differences, and the percentage of the same facilities identified as closest. We used logistic regression with robust standard errors to model the association of the different measures with health facility use for delivery in 9,306 births. Results Non-mechanized measures were highly correlated with each other, and identified the same facilities as closest for approximately 80% of villages. Measures calculated from compounds identified the same closest facility as measures from village centroids for over 85% of births. For 90% of births, the aggregation error from using village centroids instead of compound locations was less than 35 minutes and less than 1.12 km. All non-mechanized measures showed an inverse association with facility use of similar magnitude, an approximately 67% reduction in odds of facility delivery per standard

  5. Methods to measure potential spatial access to delivery care in low- and middle-income countries: a case study in rural Ghana.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Robin C; Gabrysch, Sabine; Laub, Alexandra; Soremekun, Seyi; Manu, Alexander; Kirkwood, Betty R; Amenga-Etego, Seeba; Wiru, Kenneth; Höfle, Bernhard; Grundy, Chris

    2014-06-26

    Access to skilled attendance at childbirth is crucial to reduce maternal and newborn mortality. Several different measures of geographic access are used concurrently in public health research, with the assumption that sophisticated methods are generally better. Most of the evidence for this assumption comes from methodological comparisons in high-income countries. We compare different measures of travel impedance in a case study in Ghana's Brong Ahafo region to determine if straight-line distance can be an adequate proxy for access to delivery care in certain low- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings. We created a geospatial database, mapping population location in both compounds and village centroids, service locations for all health facilities offering delivery care, land-cover and a detailed road network. Six different measures were used to calculate travel impedance to health facilities (straight-line distance, network distance, network travel time and raster travel time, the latter two both mechanized and non-mechanized). The measures were compared using Spearman rank correlation coefficients, absolute differences, and the percentage of the same facilities identified as closest. We used logistic regression with robust standard errors to model the association of the different measures with health facility use for delivery in 9,306 births. Non-mechanized measures were highly correlated with each other, and identified the same facilities as closest for approximately 80% of villages. Measures calculated from compounds identified the same closest facility as measures from village centroids for over 85% of births. For 90% of births, the aggregation error from using village centroids instead of compound locations was less than 35 minutes and less than 1.12 km. All non-mechanized measures showed an inverse association with facility use of similar magnitude, an approximately 67% reduction in odds of facility delivery per standard deviation increase in each measure

  6. Evaluation of spatial accessibility to primary healthcare using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtsho, S.; Corner, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    Primary health care is considered to be one of the most important aspects of the health care system in any country, which directly helps in improving the health of the population. Potential spatial accessibility is a very important component of the primary health care system. One technique for studying spatial accessibility is by computing a gravity-based measure within a geographic information system (GIS) framework. In this study, straight-line distances between the associated population clusters and the health facilities and the provider-to-population ratio were used to compute the spatial accessibility of the population clusters for the whole country. Bhutan has been chosen as the case study area because it is quite easy to acquire and process data for the whole country due to its small size and population. The spatial accessibility measure of the 203 sub-districts shows noticeable disparities in health care accessibility in this country with about only 19 sub-districts achieving good health accessibility ranking. This study also examines a number of different health accessibility policy scenarios which can assist in identifying the most effective health policy from amongst many probable planning scenarios. Such a health accessibility measuring system can be incorporated into an existing spatial health system in developing countries to facilitate the proper planning and equitable distribution of health resources.

  7. Assessing potential spatial accessibility of health services in rural China: a case study of Donghai county

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a great health services disparity between urban and rural areas in China. The percentage of people who are unable to access health services due to long travel times increases. This paper takes Donghai County as the study unit to analyse areas with physician shortages and characteristics of the potential spatial accessibility of health services. We analyse how the unequal health services resources distribution and the New Cooperative Medical Scheme affect the potential spatial accessibility of health services in Donghai County. We also give some advice on how to alleviate the unequal spatial accessibility of health services in areas that are more remote and isolated. Methods The shortest traffic times of from hospitals to villages are calculated with an O-D matrix of GIS extension model. This paper applies an enhanced two-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method to study the spatial accessibility of health services and to determine areas with physician shortages in Donghai County. The sensitivity of the E2SFCA for assessing variation in the spatial accessibility of health services is checked using different impedance coefficient valuesa. Geostatistical Analyst model and spatial analyst method is used to analyse the spatial pattern and the edge effect of potential spatial accessibility of health services. Results The results show that 69% of villages have access to lower potential spatial accessibility of health services than the average for Donghai County, and 79% of the village scores are lower than the average for Jiangsu Province. The potential spatial accessibility of health services diminishes greatly from the centre of the county to outlying areas. Using a smaller impedance coefficient leads to greater disparity among the villages. The spatial accessibility of health services is greater along highway in the county. Conclusions Most of villages are in underserved health services areas. An unequal distribution of health service

  8. Modeling spatial accessibility of immigrants to culturally diverse family physicians.

    PubMed

    Wanga, Lu; Roisman, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This article uses accessibility as an analytical tool to examine health care access among immigrants in a multicultural urban setting. It applies and improves on two widely used accessibility models—the gravity model and the two-step floating catchment area model—in measuring spatial accessibility by Mainland Chinese immigrants in the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area. Empirical data on physician-seeking behaviors are collected through two rounds of questionnaire surveys. Attention is focused on journey to physician location and utilization of linguistically matched family physicians. Based on the survey data, a two-zone accessibility model is developed by relaxing the travel threshold and distance impedance parameters that are traditionally treated as a constant in the accessibility models. General linear models are used to identify relationships among spatial accessibility, geography, and socioeconomic characteristics of Mainland Chinese immigrants. The results suggest a spatial mismatch in the supply of and demand for culturally sensitive care, and residential location is the primary factor that determines spatial accessibility to family physicians. The article yields important policy implications.

  9. Spatial Inequality in the Accessibility to Hospitals in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogirou, S.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to measure the spatial accessibility to public health care facilities in Greece. We look at population groups disaggregated by age and socioeconomic characteristics. The purpose of the analysis is to identify potential spatial inequalities in the accessibility to public hospitals among population groups or service areas. The data refer to the accessibility of all residents to public hospitals in Greece. The spatial datasets include the location of settlements (communities), the administrative boundaries of municipalities and the location of public hospitals. The methodology stems from spatial analysis theory (gravity models), economics theory (inequalities) and geocomputation practice (GIS and programming). Several accessibility measures have been calculated using the newly developed R package SpatialAcc, which is available in CRAN. The results are interesting and tend to show an urban-rural and social class divide: younger, working age population as well as people with the highest educational attainment have better accessibility to public hospitals compared to older or low educated residents. This finding has serious policy making implications and should be taken into account in the future spatial (re)organisation of hospitals in Greece.

  10. [Assessment of the spatial accessibility to the rabies vaccination campaign in Bogotá, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Monsalve, Stefany; Rucinque, Santiago; Polo, Luis; Polo, Gina

    2016-09-01

    The access of Bogota's population to health services is unknown, and this hinders the planning of health prevention strategies. Objective: To estimate the spatial accessibility to the vaccination sites of the 2011 campaign against rabies in Bogotá, Colombia, and to compare its efficiency with two other spatial coverage methodologies. Materials and methods: Spatial accessibility was determined using the two-step floating catchment area model (2SFCA). We calculated spatial coverage by establishing circular buffer zones using Euclidean distances, and irregular zones around the vaccination sites using Dijkstra's algorithm on the city's street network. Results: The spatial coverage of the program was 78.4% using the circular buffer zones, and 60.2% using Dijsktra's algorithm. The spatial accessibility analysis revealed that the periphery of the city had the lowest accessibility to the program. This peripheral area is a very critical zone because it is an urban-rural interface, which represents a risk for the re-introduction of rabies in the city. Conclusions: The 2SFCA spatial accessibility model is an effective tool to identify isolated areas, evaluate health services use more precisely, and provide basis for their strategic location. We concluded that this approach had the potential to improve resource efficiency when planning rabies control programs in urban environments such as Bogotá. The findings emphasize the need for surveillance and intervention in isolated areas with low access to services.

  11. Spatial data discretization methods for geocomputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Feng; Ge, Yong; Wang, Jinfeng

    2014-02-01

    Geocomputation provides solutions to complex geographic problems. Continuous and discrete spatial data are involved in the geocomputational process; however, geocomputational methods for discrete spatial data cannot be directly applied to continuous or mixed spatial data. Therefore, discretization methods for continuous or mixed spatial data are involved in the process. Since spatial data has spatial features, such as association, heterogeneity and spatial structure, these features cannot be handled by traditional discretization methods. Therefore, this work develops feature-based spatial data discretization methods that achieve optimal discretization results for spatial data using spatial information implicit in those features. Two discretization methods considering the features of spatial data are presented. One is an unsupervised method considering autocorrelation of spatial data and the other is a supervised method considering spatial heterogeneity. Discretization processes of the two methods are exemplified using neural tube defects (NTD) for Heshun County in Shanxi Province, China. Effectiveness is also assessed.

  12. Spatial versus sequential correlations for random access coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Marques, Breno; Pawłowski, Marcin; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Random access codes are important for a wide range of applications in quantum information. However, their implementation with quantum theory can be made in two very different ways: (i) by distributing data with strong spatial correlations violating a Bell inequality or (ii) using quantum communication channels to create stronger-than-classical sequential correlations between state preparation and measurement outcome. Here we study this duality of the quantum realization. We present a family of Bell inequalities tailored to the task at hand and study their quantum violations. Remarkably, we show that the use of spatial and sequential quantum correlations imposes different limitations on the performance of quantum random access codes: Sequential correlations can outperform spatial correlations. We discuss the physics behind the observed discrepancy between spatial and sequential quantum correlations.

  13. Spatial Accessibility to Health Care Services: Identifying under-Serviced Neighbourhoods in Canadian Urban Areas.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tayyab Ikram; Bell, Scott; Wilson, Kathi

    2016-01-01

    Urban environments can influence many aspects of health and well-being and access to health care is one of them. Access to primary health care (PHC) in urban settings is a pressing research and policy issue in Canada. Most research on access to healthcare is focused on national and provincial levels in Canada; there is a need to advance current understanding to local scales such as neighbourhoods. This study examines spatial accessibility to family physicians using the Three-Step Floating Catchment Area (3SFCA) method to identify neighbourhoods with poor geographical access to PHC services and their spatial patterning across 14 Canadian urban settings. An index of spatial access to PHC services, representing an accessibility score (physicians-per-1000 population), was calculated for neighborhoods using a 3km road network distance. Information about primary health care providers (this definition does not include mobile services such as health buses or nurse practitioners or less distributed services such as emergency rooms) used in this research was gathered from publicly available and routinely updated sources (i.e. provincial colleges of physicians and surgeons). An integrated geocoding approach was used to establish PHC locations. The results found that the three methods, Simple Ratio, Neighbourhood Simple Ratio, and 3SFCA that produce City level access scores are positively correlated with each other. Comparative analyses were performed both within and across urban settings to examine disparities in distributions of PHC services. It is found that neighbourhoods with poor accessibility scores in the main urban settings across Canada have further disadvantages in relation to population high health care needs. The results of this study show substantial variations in geographical accessibility to PHC services both within and among urban areas. This research enhances our understanding of spatial accessibility to health care services at the neighbourhood level. In

  14. A spatial analysis of variations in health access: linking geography, socio-economic status and access perceptions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This paper analyses the relationship between public perceptions of access to general practitioners (GPs) surgeries and hospitals against health status, car ownership and geographic distance. In so doing it explores the different dimensions associated with facility access and accessibility. Methods Data on difficulties experienced in accessing health services, respondent health status and car ownership were collected through an attitudes survey. Road distances to the nearest service were calculated for each respondent using a GIS. Difficulty was related to geographic distance, health status and car ownership using logistic generalized linear models. A Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) was used to explore the spatial non-stationarity in the results. Results Respondent long term illness, reported bad health and non-car ownership were found to be significant predictors of difficulty in accessing GPs and hospitals. Geographic distance was not a significant predictor of difficulty in accessing hospitals but was for GPs. GWR identified the spatial (local) variation in these global relationships indicating locations where the predictive strength of the independent variables was higher or lower than the global trend. The impacts of bad health and non-car ownership on the difficulties experienced in accessing health services varied spatially across the study area, whilst the impacts of geographic distance did not. Conclusions Difficulty in accessing different health facilities was found to be significantly related to health status and car ownership, whilst the impact of geographic distance depends on the service in question. GWR showed how these relationships were varied across the study area. This study demonstrates that the notion of access is a multi-dimensional concept, whose composition varies with location, according to the facility being considered and the health and socio-economic status of the individual concerned. PMID:21787394

  15. Spatial accessibility to specific sport facilities and corresponding sport practice: the RECORD Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity is considered as a major component of a healthy lifestyle. However, few studies have examined the relationships between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and sport practice with a sufficient degree of specificity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the spatial accessibility to specific types of sports facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports after carefully controlling for various individual socio-demographic characteristics and neighborhood socioeconomic variables. Methods Data from the RECORD Study involving 7290 participants recruited in 2007–2008, aged 30–79 years, and residing in the Paris metropolitan area were analyzed. Four categories of sports were studied: team sports, racket sports, swimming and related activities, and fitness. Spatial accessibility to sport facilities was measured with two complementary approaches that both take into account the street network (distance to the nearest facility and count of facilities around the dwelling). Associations between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports were assessed using multilevel logistic regression after adjusting for individual and contextual characteristics. Results High individual education and high household income were associated with the practice of racket sports, swimming or related activities, and fitness over the previous 7 days. The spatial accessibility to swimming pools was associated with swimming and related sports, even after adjustment for individual/contextual factors. The spatial accessibility to facilities was not related to the practice of other sports. High neighborhood income was associated with the practice of a racket sport and fitness. Conclusions Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that integrates educational, financial, and geographical aspects. Our work supports the evidence that strategies to increase participation in sport

  16. Measuring Spatial Accessibility of Health Care Providers – Introduction of a Variable Distance Decay Function within the Floating Catchment Area (FCA) Method

    PubMed Central

    Groneberg, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We integrated recent improvements within the floating catchment area (FCA) method family into an integrated ‘iFCA`method. Within this method we focused on the distance decay function and its parameter. So far only distance decay functions with constant parameters have been applied. Therefore, we developed a variable distance decay function to be used within the FCA method. We were able to replace the impedance coefficient β by readily available distribution parameter (i.e. median and standard deviation (SD)) within a logistic based distance decay function. Hence, the function is shaped individually for every single population location by the median and SD of all population-to-provider distances within a global catchment size. Theoretical application of the variable distance decay function showed conceptually sound results. Furthermore, the existence of effective variable catchment sizes defined by the asymptotic approach to zero of the distance decay function was revealed, satisfying the need for variable catchment sizes. The application of the iFCA method within an urban case study in Berlin (Germany) confirmed the theoretical fit of the suggested method. In summary, we introduced for the first time, a variable distance decay function within an integrated FCA method. This function accounts for individual travel behaviors determined by the distribution of providers. Additionally, the function inherits effective variable catchment sizes and therefore obviates the need for determining variable catchment sizes separately. PMID:27391649

  17. Measuring Spatial Accessibility of Health Care Providers - Introduction of a Variable Distance Decay Function within the Floating Catchment Area (FCA) Method.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jan; Groneberg, David A

    2016-01-01

    We integrated recent improvements within the floating catchment area (FCA) method family into an integrated 'iFCA`method. Within this method we focused on the distance decay function and its parameter. So far only distance decay functions with constant parameters have been applied. Therefore, we developed a variable distance decay function to be used within the FCA method. We were able to replace the impedance coefficient β by readily available distribution parameter (i.e. median and standard deviation (SD)) within a logistic based distance decay function. Hence, the function is shaped individually for every single population location by the median and SD of all population-to-provider distances within a global catchment size. Theoretical application of the variable distance decay function showed conceptually sound results. Furthermore, the existence of effective variable catchment sizes defined by the asymptotic approach to zero of the distance decay function was revealed, satisfying the need for variable catchment sizes. The application of the iFCA method within an urban case study in Berlin (Germany) confirmed the theoretical fit of the suggested method. In summary, we introduced for the first time, a variable distance decay function within an integrated FCA method. This function accounts for individual travel behaviors determined by the distribution of providers. Additionally, the function inherits effective variable catchment sizes and therefore obviates the need for determining variable catchment sizes separately.

  18. Making Spatial Statistics Service Accessible On Cloud Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, X.; Wu, J.; Li, T.; Zhong, Y.; Gao, X.

    2014-04-01

    Web service can bring together applications running on diverse platforms, users can access and share various data, information and models more effectively and conveniently from certain web service platform. Cloud computing emerges as a paradigm of Internet computing in which dynamical, scalable and often virtualized resources are provided as services. With the rampant growth of massive data and restriction of net, traditional web services platforms have some prominent problems existing in development such as calculation efficiency, maintenance cost and data security. In this paper, we offer a spatial statistics service based on Microsoft cloud. An experiment was carried out to evaluate the availability and efficiency of this service. The results show that this spatial statistics service is accessible for the public conveniently with high processing efficiency.

  19. Measuring spatial accessibility of urban parks: a case study of Qingdao City, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Haiwei; Song, Yongjun; Kong, Fanhua; Qi, Yi

    2007-06-01

    Urban parks are the important recreation site for citizens, viewed as basal green infrastructure and crucial amenities in urban areas, and usually perform important ecological and socio-economic functions. With socio-economic development, Chinese people and governments pay much more attention to urban green spaces, especially urban parks, and more and more citizens have the desire for contact with nature, and are willing to live and work close to urban parks. Consequently, governments plan to optimize urban parks allocation in order to meet citizens' increasing needs. Quantification of accessibility of urban parks is a prerequisite to appraise and allocate them with equity as a tool for decision-making in planning. In this paper, supported by Remote Sensing and GIS, the accessibility of urban parks based on high resolution data was analyzed with minimum nearest distance method at the house level and container method at block groups scale, through a case study of Qingdao city, China. The distances between houses (origins) and urban parks (destinations) are measured as the Euclidian (straight-line) distance. Four levels of access, very good, good, poor and very poor, were classified based on the distance between residence and the nearest urban park, and the area of urban park per capita. Results demonstrate that the spatial patterns of accessibility are consentaneous on the whole by using two different methods, for the spatial pattern is relation to the distribution of urban parks. However, the accurateness in results is quite different. The accessibility of urban parks acquired by the minimum nearest distance method is more accurate and appropriate than under the container method. The results calculated with the container measure show that 58.07 % of block groups have very poor or poor access level, which means the accessibility of urban parks is not good in Qingdao city as a whole. In addition, the spatial pattern of the accessibility is not equipoise. The southern

  20. U.S. Geological Survey spatial data access

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faundeen, John L.; Kanengieter, Ronald L.; Buswell, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has done a progress review on improving access to its spatial data holdings over the Web. The USGS EROS Data Center has created three major Web-based interfaces to deliver spatial data to the general public; they are Earth Explorer, the Seamless Data Distribution System (SDDS), and the USGS Web Mapping Portal. Lessons were learned in developing these systems, and various resources were needed for their implementation. The USGS serves as a fact-finding agency in the U.S. Government that collects, monitors, analyzes, and provides scientific information about natural resource conditions and issues. To carry out its mission, the USGS has created and managed spatial data since its inception. Originally relying on paper maps, the USGS now uses advanced technology to produce digital representations of the Earth’s features. The spatial products of the USGS include both source and derivative data. Derivative datasets include Digital Orthophoto Quadrangles (DOQ), Digital Elevation Models, Digital Line Graphs, land-cover Digital Raster Graphics, and the seamless National Elevation Dataset. These products, created with automated processes, use aerial photographs, satellite images, or other cartographic information such as scanned paper maps as source data. With Earth Explorer, users can search multiple inventories through metadata queries and can browse satellite and DOQ imagery. They can place orders and make payment through secure credit card transactions. Some USGS spatial data can be accessed with SDDS. The SDDS uses an ArcIMS map service interface to identify the user’s areas of interest and determine the output format; it allows the user to either download the actual spatial data directly for small areas or place orders for larger areas to be delivered on media. The USGS Web Mapping Portal provides views of national and international datasets through an ArcIMS map service interface. In addition, the map portal posts news about new

  1. The Impact of Varying Statutory Arrangements on Spatial Data Sharing and Access in Regional NRM Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudyal, D. R.; McDougall, K.; Apan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial information plays an important role in many social, environmental and economic decisions and increasingly acknowledged as a national resource essential for wider societal and environmental benefits. Natural Resource Management is one area where spatial information can be used for improved planning and decision making processes. In Australia, state government organisations are the custodians of spatial information necessary for natural resource management and regional NRM bodies are responsible to regional delivery of NRM activities. The access and sharing of spatial information between government agencies and regional NRM bodies is therefore as an important issue for improving natural resource management outcomes. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the current status of spatial information access, sharing and use with varying statutory arrangements and its impacts on spatial data infrastructure (SDI) development in catchment management sector in Australia. Further, it critically examined whether any trends and significant variations exist due to different institutional arrangements (statutory versus non-statutory) or not. A survey method was used to collect primary data from 56 regional natural resource management (NRM) bodies responsible for catchment management in Australia. Descriptive statistics method was used to show the similarities and differences between statutory and non-statutory arrangements. The key factors which influence sharing and access to spatial information are also explored. The results show the current statutory and administrative arrangements and regional focus for natural resource management is reasonable from a spatial information management perspective and provides an opportunity for building SDI at the catchment scale. However, effective institutional arrangements should align catchment SDI development activities with sub-national and national SDI development activities to address catchment management issues. We found minor

  2. Tools for Online Access and Manipulation of Spatial Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, W.; Daly, C.; Doggett, M. K.

    2004-12-01

    Oregon State University's Spatial Climate Analysis Service (SCAS) is dedicated to the spatial analysis and mapping of climate. Using the well-known PRISM climate mapping system, SCAS has created digital climate data sets for the US, Canada, parts of Asia and Europe, and elsewhere. Major projects include official USDA precipitation maps for the US, and a new US climate atlas. SCAS also maintains and regularly updates an ongoing monthly time series of digital precipitation, temperature, and dew point maps for the conterminous US, spanning 1895-present. Many PRISM data sets are made accessible to the public online via Web tools that allow users to views map images, download grids, and explore the data. The Minnesota Mapserver has been implemented to allow users to view and query map layers, and create monthly climate time series over the past century for individual grid cells. Time series data are presented as downloadable graphs and tables. Mapserver is also being used by SCAS in a separate Web application, which is geared towards agriculture. In this application, spatial climate and soils data are used to produce suitability maps for various crop species. In the future, we envision greater use of MapServer capabilities for spatial data quality control activities. SCAS is cooperating with the several institutions in developing the WestMap initiative. WestMap aims to provide an easily accessible, comprehensive package of 1 km monthly (or better) resolution climate data series, with associated accuracy estimates, online analysis tools, and educational resources to the highly diverse user communities of climate data stakeholders in the United States.

  3. Spatial Accessibility to Health Care Services: Identifying under-Serviced Neighbourhoods in Canadian Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Tayyab Ikram; Bell, Scott; Wilson, Kathi

    2016-01-01

    Background Urban environments can influence many aspects of health and well-being and access to health care is one of them. Access to primary health care (PHC) in urban settings is a pressing research and policy issue in Canada. Most research on access to healthcare is focused on national and provincial levels in Canada; there is a need to advance current understanding to local scales such as neighbourhoods. Methods This study examines spatial accessibility to family physicians using the Three-Step Floating Catchment Area (3SFCA) method to identify neighbourhoods with poor geographical access to PHC services and their spatial patterning across 14 Canadian urban settings. An index of spatial access to PHC services, representing an accessibility score (physicians-per-1000 population), was calculated for neighborhoods using a 3km road network distance. Information about primary health care providers (this definition does not include mobile services such as health buses or nurse practitioners or less distributed services such as emergency rooms) used in this research was gathered from publicly available and routinely updated sources (i.e. provincial colleges of physicians and surgeons). An integrated geocoding approach was used to establish PHC locations. Results The results found that the three methods, Simple Ratio, Neighbourhood Simple Ratio, and 3SFCA that produce City level access scores are positively correlated with each other. Comparative analyses were performed both within and across urban settings to examine disparities in distributions of PHC services. It is found that neighbourhoods with poor accessibility scores in the main urban settings across Canada have further disadvantages in relation to population high health care needs. Conclusions The results of this study show substantial variations in geographical accessibility to PHC services both within and among urban areas. This research enhances our understanding of spatial accessibility to health care

  4. [Minimum Standards for the Spatial Accessibility of Primary Care: A Systematic Review].

    PubMed

    Voigtländer, S; Deiters, T

    2015-12-01

    Regional disparities of access to primary care are substantial in Germany, especially in terms of spatial accessibility. However, there is no legally or generally binding minimum standard for the spatial accessibility effort that is still acceptable. Our objective is to analyse existing minimum standards, the methods used as well as their empirical basis. A systematic literature review was undertaken of publications regarding minimum standards for the spatial accessibility of primary care based on a title word and keyword search using PubMed, SSCI/Web of Science, EMBASE and Cochrane Library. 8 minimum standards from the USA, Germany and Austria could be identified. All of them specify the acceptable spatial accessibility effort in terms of travel time; almost half include also distance(s). The travel time maximum, which is acceptable, is 30 min and it tends to be lower in urban areas. Primary care is, according to the identified minimum standards, part of the local area (Nahbereich) of so-called central places (Zentrale Orte) providing basic goods and services. The consideration of means of transport, e. g. public transport, is heterogeneous. The standards are based on empirical studies, consultation with service providers, practical experiences, and regional planning/central place theory as well as on legal or political regulations. The identified minimum standards provide important insights into the effort that is still acceptable regarding spatial accessibility, i. e. travel time, distance and means of transport. It seems reasonable to complement the current planning system for outpatient care, which is based on provider-to-population ratios, by a gravity-model method to identify places as well as populations with insufficient spatial accessibility. Due to a lack of a common minimum standard we propose - subject to further discussion - to begin with a threshold based on the spatial accessibility limit of the local area, i. e. 30 min to the next primary

  5. Assessment and Evaluation Methods for Access Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Dallas

    2014-01-01

    This article serves as a primer for assessment and evaluation design by describing the range of methods commonly employed in library settings. Quantitative methods, such as counting and benchmarking measures, are useful for investigating the internal operations of an access services department in order to identify workflow inefficiencies or…

  6. Assessment and Evaluation Methods for Access Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Dallas

    2014-01-01

    This article serves as a primer for assessment and evaluation design by describing the range of methods commonly employed in library settings. Quantitative methods, such as counting and benchmarking measures, are useful for investigating the internal operations of an access services department in order to identify workflow inefficiencies or…

  7. Toward Accessing Spatial Structure from Building Information Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, C.; Bhatt, M.

    2011-08-01

    Data about building designs and layouts is becoming increasingly more readily available. In the near future, service personal (such as maintenance staff or emergency rescue workers) arriving at a building site will have immediate real-time access to enormous amounts of data relating to structural properties, utilities, materials, temperature, and so on. The critical problem for users is the taxing and error prone task of interpreting such a large body of facts in order to extract salient information. This is necessary for comprehending a situation and deciding on a plan of action, and is a particularly serious issue in time-critical and safety-critical activities such as firefighting. Current unifying building models such as the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), while being comprehensive, do not directly provide data structures that focus on spatial reasoning and spatial modalities that are required for high-level analytical tasks. The aim of the research presented in this paper is to provide computational tools for higher level querying and reasoning that shift the cognitive burden of dealing with enormous amounts of data away from the user. The user can then spend more energy and time in planning and decision making in order to accomplish the tasks at hand. We present an overview of our framework that provides users with an enhanced model of "built-up space". In order to test our approach using realistic design data (in terms of both scale and the nature of the building models) we describe how our system interfaces with IFC, and we conduct timing experiments to determine the practicality of our approach. We discuss general computational approaches for deriving higher-level spatial modalities by focusing on the example of route graphs. Finally, we present a firefighting scenario with alternative route graphs to motivate the application of our framework.

  8. Beam steering using CGHs in spatial multiplexing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jin-Seon; Kim, Nam

    2002-09-01

    In spatial multiplexing method, the steering devices for reference wave and object wave are necessary. A new scheme applying computer-generated holograms(CGHs) to the steering device is proposed. The beam steering device using CGHs can be performed simultaneously the coarse address function directing the reading or writing beams to the suitable layer and the fine address function corresponding to the particular holographic page within the chosen common volume unit. This new scheme is compared with both the beam steering method using spatial/angular multiplex AODs and the mechanically steered method in terms of access time, cost, and efficiency.

  9. Research Investigation of Information Access Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrichs, John H.; Sharkey, Thomas W.; Lim, Jeen-Su

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the satisfaction of library users at Wayne State University who utilize alternative information access methods. The LibQUAL+[TM] desired and perceived that satisfaction ratings are used to determine the user's "superiority gap." By focusing limited library resources to address "superiority gap" issues identified by each…

  10. Research Investigation of Information Access Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrichs, John H.; Sharkey, Thomas W.; Lim, Jeen-Su

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the satisfaction of library users at Wayne State University who utilize alternative information access methods. The LibQUAL+[TM] desired and perceived that satisfaction ratings are used to determine the user's "superiority gap." By focusing limited library resources to address "superiority gap" issues identified by each…

  11. Accessibility versus Accuracy in Retrieving Spatial Memory: Evidence for Suboptimal Assumed Headings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerramsetti, Ashok; Marchette, Steven A.; Shelton, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Orientation dependence in spatial memory has often been interpreted in terms of accessibility: Object locations are encoded relative to a reference orientation that affords the most accurate access to spatial memory. An open question, however, is whether people naturally use this "preferred" orientation whenever recalling the space. We…

  12. Accessibility versus Accuracy in Retrieving Spatial Memory: Evidence for Suboptimal Assumed Headings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerramsetti, Ashok; Marchette, Steven A.; Shelton, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Orientation dependence in spatial memory has often been interpreted in terms of accessibility: Object locations are encoded relative to a reference orientation that affords the most accurate access to spatial memory. An open question, however, is whether people naturally use this "preferred" orientation whenever recalling the space. We…

  13. Multivariate semiparametric spatial methods for imaging data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaihou; Cao, Guanqun; Cohen, Ronald A

    2017-04-01

    Univariate semiparametric methods are often used in modeling nonlinear age trajectories for imaging data, which may result in efficiency loss and lower power for identifying important age-related effects that exist in the data. As observed in multiple neuroimaging studies, age trajectories show similar nonlinear patterns for the left and right corresponding regions and for the different parts of a big organ such as the corpus callosum. To incorporate the spatial similarity information without assuming spatial smoothness, we propose a multivariate semiparametric regression model with a spatial similarity penalty, which constrains the variation of the age trajectories among similar regions. The proposed method is applicable to both cross-sectional and longitudinal region-level imaging data. We show the asymptotic rates for the bias and covariance functions of the proposed estimator and its asymptotic normality. Our simulation studies demonstrate that by borrowing information from similar regions, the proposed spatial similarity method improves the efficiency remarkably. We apply the proposed method to two neuroimaging data examples. The results reveal that accounting for the spatial similarity leads to more accurate estimators and better functional clustering results for visualizing brain atrophy pattern.Functional clustering; Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); Penalized B-splines; Region of interest (ROI); Spatial penalty.

  14. Two-Step Optimization for Spatial Accessibility Improvement: A Case Study of Health Care Planning in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Tian, Lingling; Luo, Lei; Yi, Hong

    2017-01-01

    A recent advancement in location-allocation modeling formulates a two-step approach to a new problem of minimizing disparity of spatial accessibility. Our field work in a health care planning project in a rural county in China indicated that residents valued distance or travel time from the nearest hospital foremost and then considered quality of care including less waiting time as a secondary desirability. Based on the case study, this paper further clarifies the sequential decision-making approach, termed “two-step optimization for spatial accessibility improvement (2SO4SAI).” The first step is to find the best locations to site new facilities by emphasizing accessibility as proximity to the nearest facilities with several alternative objectives under consideration. The second step adjusts the capacities of facilities for minimal inequality in accessibility, where the measure of accessibility accounts for the match ratio of supply and demand and complex spatial interaction between them. The case study illustrates how the two-step optimization method improves both aspects of spatial accessibility for health care access in rural China. PMID:28484707

  15. Spatial analysis of elderly access to primary care services

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Lee R; Root, Elisabeth; Anselin, Luc; Lozano-Gracia, Nancy; Koschinsky, Julia

    2006-01-01

    Background Admissions for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs) are considered preventable admissions, because they are unlikely to occur when good preventive health care is received. Thus, high rates of admissions for ACSCs among the elderly (persons aged 65 or above who qualify for Medicare health insurance) are signals of poor preventive care utilization. The relevant geographic market to use in studying these admission rates is the primary care physician market. Our conceptual model assumes that local market conditions serving as interventions along the pathways to preventive care services utilization can impact ACSC admission rates. Results We examine the relationships between market-level supply and demand factors on market-level rates of ACSC admissions among the elderly residing in the U.S. in the late 1990s. Using 6,475 natural markets in the mainland U.S. defined by The Health Resources and Services Administration's Primary Care Service Area Project, spatial regression is used to estimate the model, controlling for disease severity using detailed information from Medicare claims files. Our evidence suggests that elderly living in impoverished rural areas or in sprawling suburban places are about equally more likely to be admitted for ACSCs. Greater availability of physicians does not seem to matter, but greater prevalence of non-physician clinicians and international medical graduates, relative to U.S. medical graduates, does seem to reduce ACSC admissions, especially in poor rural areas. Conclusion The relative importance of non-physician clinicians and international medical graduates in providing primary care to the elderly in geographic areas of greatest need can inform the ongoing debate regarding whether there is an impending shortage of physicians in the United States. These findings support other authors who claim that the existing supply of physicians is perhaps adequate, however the distribution of them across the landscape may not be

  16. Spatial Analysis Methods for Health Promotion and Education.

    PubMed

    Chaney, Robert A; Rojas-Guyler, Liliana

    2016-05-01

    This article provides a review of spatial analysis methods for use in health promotion and education research and practice. Spatial analysis seeks to describe or make inference about variables with respect to the places they occur. This includes geographic differences, proximity issues, and access to resources. This is important for understanding how health outcomes differ from place to place; and in terms of understanding some of the environmental underpinnings of health outcomes data by placing it in context of geographic location. This article seeks to promote spatial analysis as a viable tool for health promotion and education research and practice. Four more commonly used spatial analysis techniques are described in-text. An illustrative example of motor vehicle collisions in a large metropolitan city is presented using these techniques. The techniques discussed are as follows: descriptive mapping, global spatial autocorrelation, cluster detection, and identification and spatial regression analysis. This article provides useful information for health promotion and education researchers and practitioners seeking to examine research questions from a spatial perspective.

  17. Fractals and Spatial Methods for Mining Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Nina; Emerson, Charles; Quattrochi, Dale

    2003-01-01

    The rapid increase in digital remote sensing and GIS data raises a critical problem -- how can such an enormous amount of data be handled and analyzed so that useful information can be derived quickly? Efficient handling and analysis of large spatial data sets is central to environmental research, particularly in global change studies that employ time series. Advances in large-scale environmental monitoring and modeling require not only high-quality data, but also reliable tools to analyze the various types of data. A major difficulty facing geographers and environmental scientists in environmental assessment and monitoring is that spatial analytical tools are not easily accessible. Although many spatial techniques have been described recently in the literature, they are typically presented in an analytical form and are difficult to transform to a numerical algorithm. Moreover, these spatial techniques are not necessarily designed for remote sensing and GIS applications, and research must be conducted to examine their applicability and effectiveness in different types of environmental applications. This poses a chicken-and-egg problem: on one hand we need more research to examine the usability of the newer techniques and tools, yet on the other hand, this type of research is difficult to conduct if the tools to be explored are not accessible. Another problem that is fundamental to environmental research are issues related to spatial scale. The scale issue is especially acute in the context of global change studies because of the need to integrate remote-sensing and other spatial data that are collected at different scales and resolutions. Extrapolation of results across broad spatial scales remains the most difficult problem in global environmental research. There is a need for basic characterization of the effects of scale on image data, and the techniques used to measure these effects must be developed and implemented to allow for a multiple scale assessment of

  18. Fractals and Spatial Methods for Mining Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Nina; Emerson, Charles; Quattrochi, Dale

    2003-01-01

    The rapid increase in digital remote sensing and GIS data raises a critical problem -- how can such an enormous amount of data be handled and analyzed so that useful information can be derived quickly? Efficient handling and analysis of large spatial data sets is central to environmental research, particularly in global change studies that employ time series. Advances in large-scale environmental monitoring and modeling require not only high-quality data, but also reliable tools to analyze the various types of data. A major difficulty facing geographers and environmental scientists in environmental assessment and monitoring is that spatial analytical tools are not easily accessible. Although many spatial techniques have been described recently in the literature, they are typically presented in an analytical form and are difficult to transform to a numerical algorithm. Moreover, these spatial techniques are not necessarily designed for remote sensing and GIS applications, and research must be conducted to examine their applicability and effectiveness in different types of environmental applications. This poses a chicken-and-egg problem: on one hand we need more research to examine the usability of the newer techniques and tools, yet on the other hand, this type of research is difficult to conduct if the tools to be explored are not accessible. Another problem that is fundamental to environmental research are issues related to spatial scale. The scale issue is especially acute in the context of global change studies because of the need to integrate remote-sensing and other spatial data that are collected at different scales and resolutions. Extrapolation of results across broad spatial scales remains the most difficult problem in global environmental research. There is a need for basic characterization of the effects of scale on image data, and the techniques used to measure these effects must be developed and implemented to allow for a multiple scale assessment of

  19. Spatial methods for deriving crop rotation history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Warrant, George W.; Trippe, Kristin M.; Whittaker, Gerald W.; Anderson, Nicole P.; Sullivan, Clare S.

    2017-08-01

    Benefits of converting 11 years of remote sensing classification data into cropping history of agricultural fields included measuring lengths of rotation cycles and identifying specific sequences of intervening crops grown between final years of old grass seed stands and establishment of new ones. Spatial and non-spatial methods were complementary. Individual-year classification errors were often correctable in spreadsheet-based non-spatial analysis, whereas their presence in spatial data generally led to exclusion of fields from further analysis. Markov-model testing of non-spatial data revealed that year-to-year cropping sequences did not match average frequencies for transitions among crops grown in western Oregon, implying that rotations into new grass seed stands were influenced by growers' desires to achieve specific objectives. Moran's I spatial analysis of length of time between consecutive grass seed stands revealed that clustering of fields was relatively uncommon, with high and low value clusters only accounting for 7.1 and 6.2% of fields.

  20. Spatial accessibility to physical activity facilities and to food outlets and overweight in French youth.

    PubMed

    Casey, R; Chaix, B; Weber, C; Schweitzer, B; Charreire, H; Salze, P; Badariotti, D; Banos, A; Oppert, J-M; Simon, C

    2012-07-01

    Some characteristics of the built environment have been associated with obesity in youth. Our aim was to determine whether individual and environmental socio-economic characteristics modulate the relation between youth overweight and spatial accessibility to physical activity (PA) facilities and to food outlets. Cross-sectional study. 3293 students, aged 12 ± 0.6 years, randomly selected from eastern France middle schools. Using geographical information systems (GIS), spatial accessibility to PA facilities (urban and nature) was assessed using the distance to PA facilities at the municipality level; spatial accessibility to food outlets (general food outlets, bakeries and fast-food outlets) was calculated at individual level using the student home address and the food outlets addresses. Relations of weight status with spatial accessibility to PA facilities and to food outlets were analysed using mixed logistic models, testing potential direct and interaction effects of individual and environmental socio-economic characteristics. Individual socio-economic status modulated the relation between spatial accessibility to PA facilities and to general food outlets and overweight. The likelihood of being overweight was higher when spatial accessibility to urban PA facilities and to general food outlets was low, but in children of blue-collar-workers only. The odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval) for being overweight of blue-collar-workers children compared with non-blue-collar-workers children was 1.76 (1.25-2.49) when spatial accessibility to urban PA facilities was low. This OR was 1.86 (1.20-2.86) when spatial accessibility to general food outlets was low. There was no significant relationship of overweight with either nature PA facilities or other food outlets (bakeries and fast-food outlets). These results indicate that disparities in spatial accessibility to PA facilities and to general food outlets may amplify the risk of overweight in socio

  1. 5 CFR 297.202 - Methods of access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... records at the option of the Office or agency to another more convenient Federal facility. (b) Generally... PROCEDURES FOR PERSONNEL RECORDS Request for Access § 297.202 Methods of access. (a) The methods for allowing access to records, when such access has been granted by the Office or agency, are: (1) Inspection in...

  2. Direct Access by Spatial Position in Visual Memory. 1. Synopsis of Principal Findings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-20

    AiQi 218 DIRECT ACCESS BY SPATIAL POSITION IN VISUAL MEMORY 1 1/1 SYNOPSIS OF PRINCIPAL FINDINGS(U) PENNSYLVANIA UNIV PPHILADELPHIA S STERNBERG ET...IRR04204 RR04206-01 11 TITLE (Include SecuriY Claw ficat,@n) Direct Access by Spatial Position in Visual Memory: 1. Synopsis of Principal Findings 12...034 -amJanuary 20. 1986 , ? ’ I~ Direct Access by Spatial Position In Visual Memory: 1. Synopsis of Principal gfdings 1. Introduction In recent years

  3. Spatial Access to Emergency Services in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A GIS-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tansley, Gavin; Schuurman, Nadine; Amram, Ofer; Yanchar, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Injury is a leading cause of the global disease burden, accounting for 10 percent of all deaths worldwide. Despite 90 percent of these deaths occurring in low and middle-income countries (LMICs), the majority of trauma research and infrastructure development has taken place in high-income settings. Furthermore, although accessible services are of central importance to a mature trauma system, there remains a paucity of literature describing the spatial accessibility of emergency services in LMICs. Using data from the Service Provision Assessment component of the Demographic and Health Surveys of Namibia and Haiti we defined the capabilities of healthcare facilities in each country in terms of their preparedness to provide emergency services. A Geographic Information System-based network analysis method was used to define 5- 10- and 50-kilometer catchment areas for all facilities capable of providing 24-hour care, higher-level resuscitative services or tertiary care. The proportion of a country’s population with access to each level of service was obtained by amalgamating the catchment areas with a population layer. A significant proportion of the population of both countries had poor spatial access to lower level services with 25% of the population of Haiti and 51% of the population of Namibia living further than 50 kilometers from a facility capable of providing 24-hour care. Spatial access to tertiary care was considerably lower with 51% of Haitians and 72% of Namibians having no access to these higher-level services within 50 kilometers. These results demonstrate a significant disparity in potential spatial access to emergency services in two LMICs compared to analogous estimates from high-income settings, and suggest that strengthening the capabilities of existing facilities may improve the equity of emergency services in these countries. Routine collection of georeferenced patient and facility data in LMICs will be important to understanding how spatial

  4. High-Resolution Spatial Distribution and Estimation of Access to Improved Sanitation in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Peng; Anderson, John D.; Leitner, Michael; Rheingans, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to sanitation facilities is imperative in reducing the risk of multiple adverse health outcomes. A distinct disparity in sanitation exists among different wealth levels in many low-income countries, which may hinder the progress across each of the Millennium Development Goals. Methods The surveyed households in 397 clusters from 2008–2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Surveys were divided into five wealth quintiles based on their national asset scores. A series of spatial analysis methods including excess risk, local spatial autocorrelation, and spatial interpolation were applied to observe disparities in coverage of improved sanitation among different wealth categories. The total number of the population with improved sanitation was estimated by interpolating, time-adjusting, and multiplying the surveyed coverage rates by high-resolution population grids. A comparison was then made with the annual estimates from United Nations Population Division and World Health Organization /United Nations Children's Fund Joint Monitoring Program for Water Supply and Sanitation. Results The Empirical Bayesian Kriging interpolation produced minimal root mean squared error for all clusters and five quintiles while predicting the raw and spatial coverage rates of improved sanitation. The coverage in southern regions was generally higher than in the north and east, and the coverage in the south decreased from Nairobi in all directions, while Nyanza and North Eastern Province had relatively poor coverage. The general clustering trend of high and low sanitation improvement among surveyed clusters was confirmed after spatial smoothing. Conclusions There exists an apparent disparity in sanitation among different wealth categories across Kenya and spatially smoothed coverage rates resulted in a closer estimation of the available statistics than raw coverage rates. Future intervention activities need to be tailored for both different wealth categories and nationally

  5. The approaches to measuring the potential spatial access to urban health services revisited: distance types and aggregation-error issues.

    PubMed

    Apparicio, Philippe; Gelb, Jérémy; Dubé, Anne-Sophie; Kingham, Simon; Gauvin, Lise; Robitaille, Éric

    2017-08-23

    The potential spatial access to urban health services is an important issue in health geography, spatial epidemiology and public health. Computing geographical accessibility measures for residential areas (e.g. census tracts) depends on a type of distance, a method of aggregation, and a measure of accessibility. The aim of this paper is to compare discrepancies in results for the geographical accessibility of health services computed using six distance types (Euclidean and Manhattan distances; shortest network time on foot, by bicycle, by public transit, and by car), four aggregation methods, and fourteen accessibility measures. To explore variations in results according to the six types of distance and the aggregation methods, correlation analyses are performed. To measure how the assessment of potential spatial access varies according to three parameters (type of distance, aggregation method, and accessibility measure), sensitivity analysis (SA) and uncertainty analysis (UA) are conducted. First, independently of the type of distance used except for shortest network time by public transit, the results are globally similar (correlation >0.90). However, important local variations in correlation between Cartesian and the four shortest network time distances are observed, notably in suburban areas where Cartesian distances are less precise. Second, the choice of the aggregation method is also important: compared with the most accurate aggregation method, accessibility measures computed from census tract centroids, though not inaccurate, yield important measurement errors for 10% of census tracts. Third, the SA results show that the evaluation of potential geographic access may vary a great deal depending on the accessibility measure and, to a lesser degree, the type of distance and aggregation method. Fourth, the UA results clearly indicate areas of strong uncertainty in suburban areas, whereas central neighbourhoods show lower levels of uncertainty. In order to

  6. Terminology access methods leveraging LDAP resources.

    PubMed

    Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2004-01-01

    Health terminologies have become more complex, more massive, and more ubiquitous in the modern healthcare enterprise. Present technology makes the use of these terminologies by humans, unaided by machines, virtually impossible. However, system and message interoperability can be severely compromised if the software services deploying terminology content and interfaces are themselves non-standard. We review some characteristics for good terminology services and introduce an open-source, robust, widely deployed and widely available software resource to underpin terminology service implementations. The Lightweight Directory Access Protocol, or LDAP, is compared with alternative technologies. We describe a reference implementation of terminology services built around the HL7 Common Terminology Services using LDAP methods. We propose that LDAP is well suited as a common platform for federated, synchronized, and algorithmically distributed terminology content from multiple sources.

  7. Spatial error in geocoding physician location data from the AMA Physician Masterfile: implications for spatial accessibility analysis.

    PubMed

    McLafferty, Sara; Freeman, Vincent L; Barrett, Richard E; Luo, Lan; Shockley, Alisa

    2012-04-01

    The accuracy of geocoding hinges on the quality of address information that serves as input to the geocoding process; however errors associated with poor address quality are rarely studied. This paper examines spatial errors that arise due to incorrect address information with respect to physician location data in the United States. Studies of spatial accessibility to physicians in the U.S. typically rely on data from the American Medical Association's Physician Masterfile. These data are problematic because a substantial proportion of physicians only report a mailing address, which is often the physician's home (residential) location, rather than the address for the location where health care is provided. The incorrect geocoding of physicians' practice locations based on inappropriate address information results in a form of geocoding error that has not been widely analyzed. Using data for the Chicago metropolitan region, we analyze the extent and implications of geocoding error for measurement of spatial accessibility to primary care physicians. We geocode the locations of primary care physicians based on mailing addresses and office addresses. The spatial mismatch between the two is computed at the county, zip code and point location scales. Although mailing and office address locations are quite close for many physicians, they are far apart (>20 km) for a substantial minority. Kernel density estimation is used to characterize the spatial distribution of physicians based on office and mailing addresses and to identify areas of high spatial mismatch between the two. Errors are socially and geographically uneven, resulting in overestimation of physician supply in some high-income suburban communities, and underestimation in certain central city locations where health facilities are concentrated. The resulting errors affect local measures of spatial accessibility to primary care, biasing statistical analyses of the associations between spatial access to care and

  8. High-Resolution Spatial Distribution and Estimation of Access to Improved Sanitation in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Jia, Peng; Anderson, John D; Leitner, Michael; Rheingans, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Access to sanitation facilities is imperative in reducing the risk of multiple adverse health outcomes. A distinct disparity in sanitation exists among different wealth levels in many low-income countries, which may hinder the progress across each of the Millennium Development Goals. The surveyed households in 397 clusters from 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Surveys were divided into five wealth quintiles based on their national asset scores. A series of spatial analysis methods including excess risk, local spatial autocorrelation, and spatial interpolation were applied to observe disparities in coverage of improved sanitation among different wealth categories. The total number of the population with improved sanitation was estimated by interpolating, time-adjusting, and multiplying the surveyed coverage rates by high-resolution population grids. A comparison was then made with the annual estimates from United Nations Population Division and World Health Organization /United Nations Children's Fund Joint Monitoring Program for Water Supply and Sanitation. The Empirical Bayesian Kriging interpolation produced minimal root mean squared error for all clusters and five quintiles while predicting the raw and spatial coverage rates of improved sanitation. The coverage in southern regions was generally higher than in the north and east, and the coverage in the south decreased from Nairobi in all directions, while Nyanza and North Eastern Province had relatively poor coverage. The general clustering trend of high and low sanitation improvement among surveyed clusters was confirmed after spatial smoothing. There exists an apparent disparity in sanitation among different wealth categories across Kenya and spatially smoothed coverage rates resulted in a closer estimation of the available statistics than raw coverage rates. Future intervention activities need to be tailored for both different wealth categories and nationally where there are areas of greater needs when

  9. Spatial analysis of the distribution, risk factors and access to medical resources of patients with hepatitis B in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yuliang; Ren, Fu; Liang, Shi; Zhang, Jinghua; Lin, De-Nan

    2014-11-07

    Considering the high morbidity of hepatitis B in China, many epidemiological studies based on classic medical statistical analysis have been started but lack spatial information. However, spatial information such as the spatial distribution, autocorrelation and risk factors of the disease is of great help in studying patients with hepatitis B. This study examined 2851 cases of hepatitis B that were hospitalized in Shenzhen in 2010 and studied the spatial distribution, risk factors and spatial access to health services using spatial interpolation, Pearson correlation analysis and the improved two-step floating catchment area method. The results showed that the spatial distribution of hepatitis B, along with risk factors as well as spatial access to the regional medical resources, was uneven and mainly concentrated in the south and southwest of Shenzhen in 2010. In addition, the distribution characteristics of hepatitis B revealed a positive correlation between four types of service establishments and risk factors for the disease. The Pearson correlation coefficients are 0.566, 0.515, 0.626, 0.538 corresponding to bath centres, beauty salons, massage parlours and pedicure parlours (p < 0.05). Additionally, the allocation of medical resources for hepatitis B is adequate, as most patients could be treated at nearby hospitals.

  10. Spatial Analysis of the Distribution, Risk Factors and Access to Medical Resources of Patients with Hepatitis B in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Yuliang; Ren, Fu; Liang, Shi; Zhang, Jinghua; Lin, De-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Considering the high morbidity of hepatitis B in China, many epidemiological studies based on classic medical statistical analysis have been started but lack spatial information. However, spatial information such as the spatial distribution, autocorrelation and risk factors of the disease is of great help in studying patients with hepatitis B. This study examined 2851 cases of hepatitis B that were hospitalized in Shenzhen in 2010 and studied the spatial distribution, risk factors and spatial access to health services using spatial interpolation, Pearson correlation analysis and the improved two-step floating catchment area method. The results showed that the spatial distribution of hepatitis B, along with risk factors as well as spatial access to the regional medical resources, was uneven and mainly concentrated in the south and southwest of Shenzhen in 2010. In addition, the distribution characteristics of hepatitis B revealed a positive correlation between four types of service establishments and risk factors for the disease. The Pearson correlation coefficients are 0.566, 0.515, 0.626, 0.538 corresponding to bath centres, beauty salons, massage parlours and pedicure parlours (p < 0.05). Additionally, the allocation of medical resources for hepatitis B is adequate, as most patients could be treated at nearby hospitals. PMID:25386954

  11. Assessing spatial and nonspatial factors for healthcare access: towards an integrated approach to defining health professional shortage areas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fahui; Luo, Wei

    2005-06-01

    This research considers both spatial and nonspatial factors in examining accessibility to primary healthcare in Illinois. Spatial access emphasizes the importance of geographic barrier between consumer and provider, and nonspatial factors include nongeographic barriers or facilitators such as age, sex, ethnicity, income, social class, education and language ability. The population and socioeconomic data are from the 2000 Census, and the primary care physician data for the same year are provided by the American Medical Association. First, a two-step floating catchment area method implemented in Geographic Information Systems is used to measure spatial accessibility based on travel time. Secondly, the factor analysis method is used to group various sociodemographic variables into three factors: (1) socioeconomic disadvantages, (2) sociocultural barriers and (3) high healthcare needs. Finally, spatial and nonspatial factors are integrated to identify areas with poor access to primary healthcare. The research is intended to develop an integrated approach for defining Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSA) that may help the US Department of Health and Human Services and state health departments improve HPSA designation.

  12. Spatial accessibility to specific sport facilities and corresponding sport practice: the RECORD Study.

    PubMed

    Karusisi, Noëlla; Thomas, Frédérique; Méline, Julie; Chaix, Basile

    2013-04-20

    Physical activity is considered as a major component of a healthy lifestyle. However, few studies have examined the relationships between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and sport practice with a sufficient degree of specificity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the spatial accessibility to specific types of sports facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports after carefully controlling for various individual socio-demographic characteristics and neighborhood socioeconomic variables. Data from the RECORD Study involving 7290 participants recruited in 2007-2008, aged 30-79 years, and residing in the Paris metropolitan area were analyzed. Four categories of sports were studied: team sports, racket sports, swimming and related activities, and fitness. Spatial accessibility to sport facilities was measured with two complementary approaches that both take into account the street network (distance to the nearest facility and count of facilities around the dwelling). Associations between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports were assessed using multilevel logistic regression after adjusting for individual and contextual characteristics. High individual education and high household income were associated with the practice of racket sports, swimming or related activities, and fitness over the previous 7 days. The spatial accessibility to swimming pools was associated with swimming and related sports, even after adjustment for individual/contextual factors. The spatial accessibility to facilities was not related to the practice of other sports. High neighborhood income was associated with the practice of a racket sport and fitness. Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that integrates educational, financial, and geographical aspects. Our work supports the evidence that strategies to increase participation in sport activities should improve the spatial and

  13. Public housing relocations in Atlanta, Georgia, and declines in spatial access to safety net primary care.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Hannah L F; Wodarski, Stephanie; Cummings, Janet; Hunter-Jones, Josalin; Karnes, Conny; Ross, Zev; Druss, Ben; Bonney, Loida E

    2012-11-01

    This analysis investigates changes in spatial access to safety-net primary care in a sample of US public housing residents relocating via the HOPE VI initiative from public housing complexes to voucher-subsidized rental units; substance misusers were oversampled. We used gravity-based models to measure spatial access to care, and used mixed models to assess pre-/post-relocation changes in access. Half the sample experienced declines in spatial access of ≥ 79.83%; declines did not vary by substance misuse status. Results suggest that future public housing relocation initiatives should partner with relocaters, particularly those in poor health, to help them find housing near safety-net clinics.

  14. Assessing the disparity in spatial access to hospital care in ethnic minority region in Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuli; Pan, Jay

    2016-08-17

    There is a great disparity in spatial accessibility to hospital care between ethnic minority and non-minority regions in China. Being one of the basic social demands, spatial access to hospital care in minority regions draws increasing attention in China in recent years. We performed this study to have a better understanding of spatial access to hospital care in ethnic minority region in China, and to guide the allocation of government investment in the future. Sichuan Province, southwest of China was selected as a sample to examine the difference in hospital access between ethnic minority and non-minority region in China. We applied the shortest path analysis and the enhanced two-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method under ArcGIS 9.3 environment. In Sichuan, healthcare access in ethnic minority region is worse than in non-minority region in terms of time to hospital and the value of spatial accessibility. There is relatively greater inequality in access to doctors and health professionals than in access to hospital beds. In ethnic minority region, the balance between primary, secondary, and tertiary hospitals, as well as between public and private hospitals, is less even, compared with the non-minority region. The disparity within ethnic minority region is larger than in non-minority region. The combination of shortest path analysis and E2SFCA method is superior to the traditional county ratio method in assessing spatial access to healthcare. Compared to the non-minority region, ethnic minority region rely more heavily on government investment to provide healthcare. In ethnic minority region, the current distribution of primary, secondary and tertiary hospitals is inappropriate, and there is an urgent shortage of healthcare personnel. We therefore recommend that the government use preferential policies to encourage more social capital investment in ethnic minority region, use government investment as a supplement to build a more equitable healthcare market

  15. Assessment of the spatial accessibility to health professionals at French census block level.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Kihal, Wahida; Le Meur, Nolwenn; Souris, Marc; Deguen, Séverine

    2016-08-02

    The evaluation of geographical healthcare accessibility in residential areas provides crucial information to public policy. Traditional methods - such as Physician Population Ratios (PPR) or shortest travel time - offer only a one-dimensional view of accessibility. This paper developed an improved indicator: the Index of Spatial Accessibility (ISA) to measure geographical healthcare accessibility at the smallest available infra-urban level, that is, the Îlot Regroupé pour des Indicateurs Statistiques. This study was carried out in the department of Nord, France. Healthcare professionals are geolocalized using postal addresses available on the French state health insurance website. ISA is derived from an Enhanced Two-Step Floating Catchment Area (E2FCA). We have constructed a catchment for each healthcare provider, by taking into account residential building centroids, car travel time as calculated by Google Maps and the edge effect. Principal Component Analyses (PCA) were used to build a composite ISA to describe the global accessibility of different kinds of health professionals. We applied our method to studying geographical healthcare accessibility for pregnant women, by selecting three types of healthcare provider: general practitioners, gynecologists and midwives. A total of 3587 healthcare providers are potentially able to provide care for inhabitants of the department of Nord. On average there are 92 general practitioners, 22 midwives and 21 gynecologists per 100,000 residents. The composite ISA for the three types of healthcare provider is 39 per 100,000 residents. A comparative analysis between ISA and physician-population ratios indicates that ISA represents a more even distribution whereas the physician-population ratios show an 'all-or-nothing' approach. ISA is a multidimensional and improved measure, which combines the volume of services relative to population size with the proximity of services relative to the population's location, available at the

  16. VIEWCACHE: An incremental database access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, Nick; Sellis, Timoleon

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to illustrate the concept of incremental access to distributed databases. An experimental database management system, ADMS, which has been developed at the University of Maryland, in College Park, uses VIEWCACHE, a database access method based on incremental search. VIEWCACHE is a pointer-based access method that provides a uniform interface for accessing distributed databases and catalogues. The compactness of the pointer structures formed during database browsing and the incremental access method allow the user to search and do inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are dereferenced.

  17. VIEWCACHE: An incremental database access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, Nick; Sellis, Timoleon

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to illustrate the concept of incremental access to distributed databases. An experimental database management system, ADMS, which has been developed at the University of Maryland, in College Park, uses VIEWCACHE, a database access method based on incremental search. VIEWCACHE is a pointer-based access method that provides a uniform interface for accessing distributed databases and catalogues. The compactness of the pointer structures formed during database browsing and the incremental access method allow the user to search and do inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are dereferenced.

  18. VIEWCACHE: An incremental pointer-based access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, N.; Sellis, Timos

    1993-01-01

    One of the biggest problems facing NASA today is to provide scientists efficient access to a large number of distributed databases. Our pointer-based incremental data base access method, VIEWCACHE, provides such an interface for accessing distributed datasets and directories. VIEWCACHE allows database browsing and search performing inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. This organization and processing is especially suitable for managing Astrophysics databases which are physically distributed all over the world. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are cached. VIEWCACHE includes spatial access methods for accessing image datasets, which provide much easier query formulation by referring directly to the image and very efficient search for objects contained within a two-dimensional window. We will develop and optimize a VIEWCACHE External Gateway Access to database management systems to facilitate database search.

  19. VIEWCACHE: An incremental pointer-based access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, N.; Sellis, Timos

    1992-01-01

    One of biggest problems facing NASA today is to provide scientists efficient access to a large number of distributed databases. Our pointer-based incremental database access method, VIEWCACHE, provides such an interface for accessing distributed data sets and directories. VIEWCACHE allows database browsing and search performing inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. This organization and processing is especially suitable for managing Astrophysics databases which are physically distributed all over the world. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are cached. VIEWCACHE includes spatial access methods for accessing image data sets, which provide much easier query formulation by referring directly to the image and very efficient search for objects contained within a two-dimensional window. We will develop and optimize a VIEWCACHE External Gateway Access to database management systems to facilitate distributed database search.

  20. VIEWCACHE: An incremental pointer-based access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, N.; Sellis, Timos

    1993-01-01

    One of the biggest problems facing NASA today is to provide scientists efficient access to a large number of distributed databases. Our pointer-based incremental data base access method, VIEWCACHE, provides such an interface for accessing distributed datasets and directories. VIEWCACHE allows database browsing and search performing inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. This organization and processing is especially suitable for managing Astrophysics databases which are physically distributed all over the world. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are cached. VIEWCACHE includes spatial access methods for accessing image datasets, which provide much easier query formulation by referring directly to the image and very efficient search for objects contained within a two-dimensional window. We will develop and optimize a VIEWCACHE External Gateway Access to database management systems to facilitate database search.

  1. VIEWCACHE: An incremental pointer-based access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, N.; Sellis, Timos

    1992-01-01

    One of biggest problems facing NASA today is to provide scientists efficient access to a large number of distributed databases. Our pointer-based incremental database access method, VIEWCACHE, provides such an interface for accessing distributed data sets and directories. VIEWCACHE allows database browsing and search performing inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. This organization and processing is especially suitable for managing Astrophysics databases which are physically distributed all over the world. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are cached. VIEWCACHE includes spatial access methods for accessing image data sets, which provide much easier query formulation by referring directly to the image and very efficient search for objects contained within a two-dimensional window. We will develop and optimize a VIEWCACHE External Gateway Access to database management systems to facilitate distributed database search.

  2. Method for Accessing Distributed Heterogeneous Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    A scenario of relational, hierarchial, and network data bases is presented and a distributed access view integrated data base system (DAVID) is described for uniformly accessing data bases which are heterogeneous and physically distributed. The DAVID system is based on data base logic so that the relational approach is generalized to the heterogeneous approach. The global data manager is explained as are global data manipulation languages which can operate on all the data bases and can query the data dictionary and the data directory.

  3. Method for Accessing Distributed Heterogeneous Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    A scenario of relational, hierarchial, and network data bases is presented and a distributed access view integrated data base system (DAVID) is described for uniformly accessing data bases which are heterogeneous and physically distributed. The DAVID system is based on data base logic so that the relational approach is generalized to the heterogeneous approach. The global data manager is explained as are global data manipulation languages which can operate on all the data bases and can query the data dictionary and the data directory.

  4. What versus where: Investigating how autobiographical memory retrieval differs when accessed with thematic versus spatial information.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Signy; Chu, Sonja

    2017-09-01

    Autobiographical memory research has investigated how cueing distinct aspects of a past event can trigger different recollective experiences. This research has stimulated theories about how autobiographical knowledge is accessed and organized. Here, we test the idea that thematic information organizes multiple autobiographical events whereas spatial information organizes individual past episodes by investigating how retrieval guided by these two forms of information differs. We used a novel autobiographical fluency task in which participants accessed multiple memory exemplars to event theme and spatial (location) cues followed by a narrative description task in which they described the memories generated to these cues. Participants recalled significantly more memory exemplars to event theme than to spatial cues; however, spatial cues prompted faster access to past memories. Results from the narrative description task revealed that memories retrieved via event theme cues compared to spatial cues had a higher number of overall details, but those recalled to the spatial cues were recollected with a greater concentration on episodic details than those retrieved via event theme cues. These results provide evidence that thematic information organizes and integrates multiple memories whereas spatial information prompts the retrieval of specific episodic content from a past event.

  5. Labour and residential accessibility: a Bayesian analysis based on Poisson gravity models with spatial effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, M. P.; Beamonte, M. A.; Gargallo, P.; Salvador, M. J.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we measure jointly the labour and the residential accessibility of a basic spatial unit using a Bayesian Poisson gravity model with spatial effects. The accessibility measures are broken down into two components: the attractiveness component, which is related to its socio-economic and demographic characteristics, and the impedance component, which reflects the ease of communication within and between basic spatial units. For illustration purposes, the methodology is applied to a data set containing information about commuters from the Spanish region of Aragón. We identify the areas with better labour and residential accessibility, and we also analyse the attractiveness and the impedance components of a set of chosen localities which allows us to better understand their mobility patterns.

  6. Location-allocation and accessibility models for improving the spatial planning of public health services.

    PubMed

    Polo, Gina; Acosta, C Mera; Ferreira, Fernando; Dias, Ricardo Augusto

    2015-01-01

    This study integrated accessibility and location-allocation models in geographic information systems as a proposed strategy to improve the spatial planning of public health services. To estimate the spatial accessibility, we modified the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) model with a different impedance function, a Gaussian weight for competition among service sites, a friction coefficient, distances along a street network based on the Dijkstra's algorithm and by performing a vectorial analysis. To check the accuracy of the strategy, we used the data from the public sterilization program for the dogs and cats of Bogot´a, Colombia. Since the proposed strategy is independent of the service, it could also be applied to any other public intervention when the capacity of the service is known. The results of the accessibility model were consistent with the sterilization program data, revealing that the western, central and northern zones are the most isolated areas under the sterilization program. Spatial accessibility improvement was sought by relocating the sterilization sites using the maximum coverage with finite demand and the p-median models. The relocation proposed by the maximum coverage model more effectively maximized the spatial accessibility to the sterilization service given the non-uniform distribution of the populations of dogs and cats throughout the city. The implementation of the proposed strategy would provide direct benefits by improving the effectiveness of different public health interventions and the use of financial and human resources.

  7. Location-Allocation and Accessibility Models for Improving the Spatial Planning of Public Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Gina; Acosta, C. Mera; Ferreira, Fernando; Dias, Ricardo Augusto

    2015-01-01

    This study integrated accessibility and location-allocation models in geographic information systems as a proposed strategy to improve the spatial planning of public health services. To estimate the spatial accessibility, we modified the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) model with a different impedance function, a Gaussian weight for competition among service sites, a friction coefficient, distances along a street network based on the Dijkstra’s algorithm and by performing a vectorial analysis. To check the accuracy of the strategy, we used the data from the public sterilization program for the dogs and cats of Bogot´a, Colombia. Since the proposed strategy is independent of the service, it could also be applied to any other public intervention when the capacity of the service is known. The results of the accessibility model were consistent with the sterilization program data, revealing that the western, central and northern zones are the most isolated areas under the sterilization program. Spatial accessibility improvement was sought by relocating the sterilization sites using the maximum coverage with finite demand and the p-median models. The relocation proposed by the maximum coverage model more effectively maximized the spatial accessibility to the sterilization service given the non-uniform distribution of the populations of dogs and cats throughout the city. The implementation of the proposed strategy would provide direct benefits by improving the effectiveness of different public health interventions and the use of financial and human resources. PMID:25775411

  8. Intravenous access: a comparison of two methods.

    PubMed

    Duffy, B L; Lee, J S

    1983-05-01

    The reliability in providing a continued venous route to the circulation is compared between a winged needle (Abbott "Butterfly--23 INT") and a plastic catheter (Jelco Teflon "Catheter Placement Unit", 22 gauge). The catheter remained within the vein in all cases and had a much lower incidence of total obstruction during the study period. Where an intravenous infusion is not in place, a plastic catheter provides a more reliable access route to the circulation than does a winged needle.

  9. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  10. Access and Use of FIA Data Through FIA Spatial Data Services

    Treesearch

    Elizabeth LaPoint

    2005-01-01

    Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Spatial Data Services (SDS) was established in May 2002 to facilitate outside access to FIA data and allow use of georeferenced plot data while protecting the confidentiality of plot locations. Modification of the Food Security Act of 1985 legislated the protection of information on plot location and ownership. Penalties were put in...

  11. Spatial accessibility of the population to urban health centres in Kermanshah, Islamic Republic of Iran: a geographic information systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Reshadat, S; Saedi, S; Zangeneh, A; Ghasemi, S R; Gilan, N R; Karbasi, A; Bavandpoor, E

    2015-09-08

    Geographic information systems (GIS) analysis has not been widely used in underdeveloped countries to ensure that vulnerable populations have accessibility to primary health-care services. This study applied GIS methods to analyse the spatial accessibility to urban primary-care centres of the population in Kermanshah city, Islamic Republic of Iran, by age and sex groups. In a descriptive-analytical study over 3 time periods, network analysis, mean centre and standard distance methods were applied using ArcGIS 9.3. The analysis was based on a standard radius of 750 m distance from health centres, walking speed of 1 m/s and desired access time to health centres of 12.5 mins. The proportion of the population with inadequate geographical access to health centres rose from 47.3% in 1997 to 58.4% in 2012. The mean centre and standard distance mapping showed that the spatial distribution of health centres in Kermanshah needed to be adjusted to changes in population distribution.

  12. Geographical accessibility and spatial coverage modeling of the primary health care network in the Western Province of Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary health care is essential in improving and maintaining the health of populations. It has the potential to accelerate achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and fulfill the “Health for All” doctrine of the Alma-Ata Declaration. Understanding the performance of the health system from a geographic perspective is important for improved health planning and evidence-based policy development. The aims of this study were to measure geographical accessibility, model spatial coverage of the existing primary health facility network, estimate the number of primary health facilities working under capacity and the population underserved in the Western Province of Rwanda. Methods This study uses health facility, population and ancillary data for the Western Province of Rwanda. Three different travel scenarios utilized by the population to attend the nearest primary health facility were defined with a maximum travelling time of 60 minutes: Scenario 1 – walking; Scenario 2 – walking and cycling; and Scenario 3 – walking and public transportation. Considering these scenarios, a raster surface of travel time between primary health facilities and population was developed. To model spatial coverage and estimate the number of primary health facilities working under capacity, the catchment area of each facility was calculated by taking into account population coverage capacity, the population distribution, the terrain topography and the travelling modes through the different land categories. Results Scenario 2 (walking and cycling) has the highest degree of geographical accessibility followed by Scenario 3 (walking and public transportation). The lowest level of accessibility can be observed in Scenario 1 (walking). The total population covered differs depending on the type of travel scenario. The existing primary health facility network covers only 26.6% of the population in Scenario 1. In Scenario 2, the use of a bicycle greatly increases the

  13. Lunar archive panoramas: modern image processing and access to the historic data based on spatial context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, Natalia; Kokhanov, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Zubarev, Anatoliy; Nadezhdina, Irina; Patraty, Vyacheslav; Karachevtseva, Irina; Garov, Andrey; Matveev, Evgeniy

    The objectives of our work are to fully exploit the historic Soviet Lunokhod data and use the results for scientific and public purposes. Unfortunately, many of the relevant operational parameters of the Lunokhods missions are lost. Modern photogrammetry is a key to solving these issues, providing analysis techniques, not available at the time of the early lunar missions. For this purpose we use special developed software, GIS tools and high-resolution LRO data [1]. Results of new image processing of historic data are part of PRoViDE project (Planetary Robotics Vision Data Exploitation) which aims to assemble a major portion of the imaging data gathered from different vehicles and probes on planetary surfaces into a unique database, bringing them into a spatial context and providing access to a complete set of 3D vision products (http://www.provide-space.eu/). Our technology of archive panorama processing allows us to recover lost information of Soviet lunar missions and study lunar landing site imagery by state-of-the-art photogrammetric techniques. Our main task is to perform lunar panoramas in measurement form based on photogrammetry and geoanalyses methods, and then involve them in more detailed morphometric analyses [2] and 3D-modeling of lunar surface based on LROC NAC image processing [3]. The results of our work are various types of new products: panoramas in different projections, updated metadata with recovering parameters, and ortho-panoramas, which can be used for quantitative geomorphology assessment based on spatial tools [4]. All data products obtained as a result of the study are to be placed into Planetary data storage which is developing as Geodesy and Cartography Node [5]. Access to archive lunar data will be organized via Geo-portal (http://cartsrv.mexlab.ru/geoportal/) using authorization service, which provided data security and user control. Planetary spatial information system can integrate various types of data for planets and their

  14. Formation of spatial thinking skills through different training methods.

    PubMed

    Kornkasem, Sorachai; Black, John B

    2015-09-01

    Spatial training can be durable and transferable if the training involves cognitive process-based tasks. The current study explored different spatial training methods and investigated the sequences of process-based mental simulation that was facilitated by various structures of external spatial representation, 3D technology, spatial cues, and/or technical languages. A total of 115 Columbia University's students were conducted through three experiments using a between-subjects design to examine the effects of spatial training methods on spatial ability performance. The conditions for training environments included 3D-virtual and 3D-physical interactions with abstract (nonsense-geometric) and concrete (everyday-object) contents. Overall, learners in the treatment conditions improved in their spatial skills significantly more than those in the control conditions. Particularly, 3D-direct-manipulation conditions in the third experiment added promising results about the specific sequences during spatial thinking formation processes.

  15. An Investigation of Access Area Engineering Methods for AUTOVON.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    LEVUV TN 22-81 DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING CENTER DTIC ELECTE TECHNICAL NOTE NO. 22-81 FEBO 9 W AN INVESTIGATION OF ACCESS AREAENGINEERING...CATALOG NUMBER DCEC TN 22-81 4. TITLE (nd Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED AN INVESTIGATION OF ACCESS AREA Technical Note ENGINEERING METHODS...itf necee.ar ad Identify by block numiber) In this technical note we compare both qualitatively and quantatively, the two methods (AT&T and DCA’s

  16. Method and apparatus for globally-accessible automated testing

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sharing integrated testing services with a plurality of autonomous remote clients is disclosed. In the disclosed method, in response to an access request message, a process controller transmits an access enabling message to the remote client. The access enabling message includes instructions performable by a remote client to generate test equipment commands. A process controller interprets and transforms these commands into automated test instrument suite commands, which are provided to laboratory modules to perform the indicated tests. Test data results are then obtained and transmitted to the remote client.

  17. New Earth Science Data and Access Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, John F.; Weinstein, Beth E.; Farnham, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, working with its domestic and international partners, provides scientific data and analysis to improve life here on Earth. NASA provides science data products that cover a wide range of physical, geophysical, biochemical and other parameters, as well as services for interdisciplinary Earth science studies. Management and distribution of these products is administered through the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), which all hold data within a different Earth science discipline. This paper will highlight selected EOS datasets and will focus on how these observations contribute to the improvement of essential services such as weather forecasting, climate prediction, air quality, and agricultural efficiency. Emphasis will be placed on new data products derived from instruments on board Terra, Aqua and ICESat as well as new regional data products and field campaigns. A variety of data tools and services are available to the user community. This paper will introduce primary and specialized DAAC-specific methods for finding, ordering and using these data products. Special sections will focus on orienting users unfamiliar with DAAC resources, HDF-EOS formatted data and the use of desktop research and application tools.

  18. Geographical accessibility and spatial coverage modeling of the primary health care network in the Western Province of Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Huerta Munoz, Ulises; Källestål, Carina

    2012-09-17

    . When considering Scenario 3, the total population served is 34.3%. Significant spatial variations in geographical accessibility and spatial coverage were observed across the three travel scenarios. The analysis demonstrates that regardless of which travel scenario is used, the majority of the population in the Western Province does not have access to the existing primary health facility network. Our findings also demonstrate the usefulness of GIS methods to leverage multiple datasets from different sources in a spatial framework to provide support to evidence-based planning and resource allocation decision-making in developing countries.

  19. Daytime Locations in Spatial Mismatch: Job Accessibility and Employment at Reentry From Prison.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Naomi F; Lens, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    Individuals recently released from prison confront many barriers to employment. One potential obstacle is spatial mismatch-the concentration of low-skilled, nonwhite job-seekers within central cities and the prevalence of relevant job opportunities in outlying areas. Prior research has found mixed results about the importance of residential place for reentry outcomes. In this article, we propose that residential location matters for finding work, but this largely static measure does not capture the range of geographic contexts that individuals inhabit throughout the day. We combine novel, real-time GPS information on daytime locations and self-reported employment collected from smartphones with sophisticated measures of job accessibility to test the relative importance of spatial mismatch based on residence and daytime locations. Our findings suggest that the ability of low-skilled, poor, and urban individuals to compensate for their residential deficits by traveling to job-rich areas is an overlooked and salient consideration in spatial mismatch perspectives.

  20. Listeners use speaker identity to access representations of spatial perspective during online language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Ryskin, Rachel A; Wang, Ranxiao Frances; Brown-Schmidt, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about how listeners represent another person's spatial perspective during language processing (e.g., two people looking at a map from different angles). Can listeners use contextual cues such as speaker identity to access a representation of the interlocutor's spatial perspective? In two eye-tracking experiments, participants received auditory instructions to move objects around a screen from two randomly alternating spatial perspectives (45° vs. 315° or 135° vs. 225° rotations from the participant's viewpoint). Instructions were spoken either by one voice, where the speaker's perspective switched at random, or by two voices, where each speaker maintained one perspective. Analysis of participant eye-gaze showed that interpretation of the instructions improved when each viewpoint was associated with a different voice. These findings demonstrate that listeners can learn mappings between individual talkers and viewpoints, and use these mappings to guide online language processing.

  1. Overcoming Spatial and Temporal Barriers to Public Access Defibrillators Via Optimization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Christopher L F; Demirtas, Derya; Brooks, Steven C; Morrison, Laurie J; Chan, Timothy C Y

    2016-08-23

    Immediate access to an automated external defibrillator (AED) increases the chance of survival for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Current deployment usually considers spatial AED access, assuming AEDs are available 24 h a day. The goal of this study was to develop an optimization model for AED deployment, accounting for spatial and temporal accessibility, to evaluate if OHCA coverage would improve compared with deployment based on spatial accessibility alone. This study was a retrospective population-based cohort trial using data from the Toronto Regional RescuNET Epistry cardiac arrest database. We identified all nontraumatic public location OHCAs in Toronto, Ontario, Canada (January 2006 through August 2014) and obtained a list of registered AEDs (March 2015) from Toronto Paramedic Services. Coverage loss due to limited temporal access was quantified by comparing the number of OHCAs that occurred within 100 meters of a registered AED (assumed coverage 24 h per day, 7 days per week) with the number that occurred both within 100 meters of a registered AED and when the AED was available (actual coverage). A spatiotemporal optimization model was then developed that determined AED locations to maximize OHCA actual coverage and overcome the reported coverage loss. The coverage gain between the spatiotemporal model and a spatial-only model was computed by using 10-fold cross-validation. A total of 2,440 nontraumatic public OHCAs and 737 registered AED locations were identified. A total of 451 OHCAs were covered by registered AEDs under assumed coverage 24 h per day, 7 days per week, and 354 OHCAs under actual coverage, representing a coverage loss of 21.5% (p < 0.001). Using the spatiotemporal model to optimize AED deployment, a 25.3% relative increase in actual coverage was achieved compared with the spatial-only approach (p < 0.001). One in 5 OHCAs occurred near an inaccessible AED at the time of the OHCA. Potential AED use was significantly improved

  2. Tritium planigraphy: From the accessible surface to the spatial structure of a protein

    PubMed Central

    Bogacheva, Elena N.; Gol’danskii, Vitalii I.; Shishkov, Alexander V.; Galkin, Alexander V.; Baratova, Ludmila A.

    1998-01-01

    The method of tritium planigraphy, which provides comprehensive information on the accessible surface of macromolecules, allows an attempt at reconstructing the three-dimensional structure of a protein from the experimental data on residue accessibility for labeling. The semiempirical algorithm proposed for globular proteins involves (i) predicting theoretically the secondary structure elements (SSEs), (ii) experimentally determining the residue-accessibility profile by bombarding the whole protein with a beam of hot tritium atoms, (iii) generating the residue-accessibility profiles for isolated SSEs by computer simulation, (iv) locating the contacts between SSEs by collating the experimental and simulated accessibility profiles, and (v) assembling the SSEs into a compact model via these contact regions in accordance with certain rules. For sperm whale myoglobin, carp and pike parvalbumins, the λ cro repressor, and hen egg lysozyme, this algorithm yields the most realistic models when SSEs are assembled sequentially from the amino to the carboxyl end of the protein chain. PMID:9501168

  3. Spatial Accessibility of Drug Treatment Facilities and the Effects on Locus of Control, Drug Abuse, and Service Use among Heroin-Injecting Mexican American Men

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Dennis; Torres, Luis R.; Guerrero, Erick G.; Mauldin, Rebecca; Bordnick, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study explores the spatial accessibility of outpatient drug treatment facilities and the potential relationship with drug abuse-related outcomes among Mexican American heroin users. Methods Secondary data on 219 current and former heroin-injecting Mexican American men aged 45 and older were drawn from a research study in Houston, Texas. We used geographic information systems (GIS) to derive two spatial accessibility measures: distance from one’s place of residence to the closest drug treatment facility (in minutes); and the number of facilities within a 10-minute driving distance from one’s place of residence. Exploratory logistic regression analyses examined the association between the spatial accessibility of drug treatment facilities and several drug abuse-related outcomes: internal locus of control (LOC); perceived chances and worries of injecting in the next six months; treatment utilization; and location of last heroin purchase. Results Participants with greater spatial access to treatment programs were more likely to report a higher chance of injecting in the near future. However, while current heroin users were more worried about injecting in the next six months, greater spatial access to treatment programs seemed to have a buffering effect. Finally, those who lived closer to a treatment programs were more likely to have last purchased heroin inside the neighborhood versus outside the neighborhood. Spatial accessibility was not associated with internal LOC or treatment utilization. Conclusion The findings showed that the presence of outpatient treatment facilities—particularly services in Spanish—may influence perceived risk of future heroin use and purchasing behaviors among Mexican American men. Implications for future spatially-informed drug abuse research and the planning of culturally and linguistically responsive drug treatment programs are discussed. PMID:24440123

  4. Exploring the relationship between food access and foodborne illness by using spatial analysis.

    PubMed

    Newbold, Bruce; Watson, Susannah; Mackay, Kevin; Isaacs, Sandy

    2013-09-01

    There is some evidence that neighborhood deprivation increases residents' risk of foodborne illnesses. Because urban areas with the least available access to adequate amounts of nutritious or affordable food options (or "food deserts") also tend to be the most deprived areas within a city, it is hypothesized that food access and foodborne illness risk are linked. However, the complexity of tracking numbers and sources of gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses often leads researchers to speculate about reasons for disproportionate rates of pathogen outbreaks among demographic groups. This study explores the suitability of existing data to examine associations between food deserts and the spatial distribution of GI illnesses in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. A spatial analysis by using GIS software methodology was used to identify and map food retail outlets and accessibility, as well as GI illness outbreaks and sales of antidiarrhea, antinausea, and rehydration products (used as a proxy for GI cases) within the city, based on available data. Statistical analysis of the maps shows no statistical relationship between location, access to food outlets, and rates of GI illness. The analysis points to shortfalls and gaps in the existing data, which leaves us unable to draw conclusions either supporting or refuting our hypothesis. This article includes recommendations to improve the current system of illness reporting and to continue to refine the definition and process of mapping food access issues. A more comprehensive set of data would enable municipalities to more easily identify groups most at risk, depending on exposures and the type of pathogen, and reduce the occurrence of foodborne disease.

  5. Methods for spatial localization in NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Several unique coil configurations were developed that have applications in nuclear magnetic resonance. These include a number of designs appropriate for use as rf surface coils, and two configurations developed as NMR magnets. The magnetic field profiles were calculated for each of these designs, from which field strength and homogeneity information were obtained. The rf coil configurations modelled include the opposed loop, opposed half loop, bicycle wheel, opposed bicycle wheel, and semi-toroid. The opposed loop design was studied in detail in terms of the theoretical spatial sensitivity and selectivity it offers. A number of NMR experiments were performed to test the validity of these theoretical calculations. This configuration produces a field that is substantially reduced near the coil itself, compared with the field produced by a single loop surface coil, but that rises to a maximum along the coil axis yielding a somewhat homogeneous region that may be used to achieve a degree of spatial localization. Several comparison schemes are used to evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of both the single loop and the opposed loop coil. The opposed coil concept also has been applied to the design of magnets. The results of calculations on the homogeneity and field strength possible with an opposed solenoid magnet are presented.

  6. Spatial accessibility to vaccination sites in a campaign against rabies in São Paulo city, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Polo, Gina; Acosta, Carlos Mera; Dias, Ricardo Augusto

    2013-08-01

    It is estimated that the city of São Paulo has over 2.5 million dogs and 560 thousand cats. These populations are irregularly distributed throughout the territory, making it difficult to appropriately allocate health services focused on these species. To reasonably allocate vaccination sites, it is necessary to identify social groups and their access to the referred service. Rabies in dogs and cats has been an important zoonotic health issue in São Paulo and the key component of rabies control is vaccination. The present study aims to introduce an approach to quantify the potential spatial accessibility to the vaccination sites of the 2009 campaign against rabies in the city of São Paulo and solve the overestimation associated with the classic methodology that applies buffer zones around vaccination sites based on Euclidean (straight-line) distance. To achieve this, a Gaussian-based two-step floating catchment area method with a travel-friction coefficient was adapted in a geographic information system environment, using distances along a street network based on Dijkstra's algorithm (short path method). The choice of the distance calculation method affected the results in terms of the population covered. In general, areas with low accessibility for both dogs and cats were observed, especially in densely populated areas. The eastern zone of the city had higher accessibility values compared with peripheral and central zones. The Gaussian-based two-step floating catchment method with a travel-friction coefficient was used to assess the overestimation of the straight-line distance method, which is the most widely used method for coverage analysis. We conclude that this approach has the potential to improve the efficiency of resource use when planning rabies control programs in large urban environments such as São Paulo. The findings emphasize the need for surveillance and intervention in isolated areas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A mobile agent approach to access and represent remote spatial information in LBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhixiang; Li, Qingquan; Luo, Zhi; Geng, Xuexian

    2005-10-01

    The mobile computing based Location based Service (LBS) technology has been increasingly grown in the past decade; however there still exist some important constraints that complicate work with a mobile spatial information system. The limited resources in the mobile computing terminals would restrict some features that are available on the traditional computing technology. This paper will explores the use of a cooperative, distributed multi-agent systems (Java Agent Development Framework, JADE) to improve the efficiency of accessing and represent remote spatial information in mobile terminals and fixed terminal which support Java runtime environment (JRE), because that JADE system has following features: distributed agent platform, graphical user interface to manage several agents and agent containers form remote host, supporting to execution of multiple, parallel and concurrent agent activities via behavior model, FIPA-compliant platform including AMS (Agent Management System), DF (Directory Facilitator) and ACC (Agent Communication Channel), Efficient transport of ACL messages inside same agent system, library of FIPA interaction protocols ready to be used, FIPA-compliant naming service and supporting for application-defined content languages and ontology. An agile and flexible agent based approach for accessing and representing remote spatial information is proposed in this paper, mobile agent system architecture in LBS is presented, and a prototype system is given to shown that JADE makes this approach feasible and effective.

  8. Neighborhood racial composition, neighborhood poverty, and the spatial accessibility of supermarkets in metropolitan Detroit.

    PubMed

    Zenk, Shannon N; Schulz, Amy J; Israel, Barbara A; James, Sherman A; Bao, Shuming; Wilson, Mark L

    2005-04-01

    We evaluated the spatial accessibility of large "chain" supermarkets in relation to neighborhood racial composition and poverty. We used a geographic information system to measure Manhattan block distance to the nearest supermarket for 869 neighborhoods (census tracts) in metropolitan Detroit. We constructed moving average spatial regression models to adjust for spatial autocorrelation and to test for the effect of modification of percentage African American and percentage poor on distance to the nearest supermarket. Distance to the nearest supermarket was similar among the least impoverished neighborhoods, regardless of racial composition. Among the most impoverished neighborhoods, however, neighborhoods in which African Americans resided were, on average, 1.1 miles further from the nearest supermarket than were White neighborhoods. Racial residential segregation disproportionately places African Americans in more-impoverished neighborhoods in Detroit and consequently reduces access to supermarkets. However, supermarkets have opened or remained open close to middle-income neighborhoods that have transitioned from White to African American. Development of economically disadvantaged African American neighborhoods is critical to effectively prevent diet-related diseases among this population.

  9. Method for spatially distributing a population

    DOEpatents

    Bright, Edward A [Knoxville, TN; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [Knoxville, TN; Coleman, Phillip R [Knoxville, TN; Dobson, Jerome E [Lawrence, KS

    2007-07-24

    A process for spatially distributing a population count within a geographically defined area can include the steps of logically correlating land usages apparent from a geographically defined area to geospatial features in the geographically defined area and allocating portions of the population count to regions of the geographically defined area having the land usages, according to the logical correlation. The process can also include weighing the logical correlation for determining the allocation of portions of the population count and storing the allocated portions within a searchable data store. The logically correlating step can include the step of logically correlating time-based land usages to geospatial features of the geographically defined area. The process can also include obtaining a population count for the geographically defined area, organizing the geographically defined area into a plurality of sectors, and verifying the allocated portions according to direct observation.

  10. Statistical methods for bivariate spatial analysis in marked points. Examples in spatial epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Souris, Marc; Bichaud, Laurence

    2011-12-01

    This article presents methods to analyze global spatial relationships between two variables in two different sets of fixed points. Analysis of spatial relationships between two phenomena is of great interest in health geography and epidemiology, especially to highlight competing interest between phenomena or evidence of a common environmental factor. Our general approach extends the Moran and Pearson indices to the bivariate case in two different sets of points. The case where the variables are Boolean is treated separately through methods using nearest neighbors distances. All tests use Monte-Carlo simulations to estimate their probability distributions, with options to distinguish spatial and no spatial correlation in the special case of identical sets analysis. Implementation in a Geographic Information System (SavGIS) and real examples are used to illustrate these spatial indices and methods in epidemiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative analysis of the spatial analysis methods for hotspot identification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Liu, Pan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Spatial analysis technique has been introduced as an innovative approach for hazardous road segments identification (HRSI). In this study, the performance of two spatial analysis methods and four conventional methods for HRSI was compared against three quantitative evaluation criteria. The spatial analysis methods considered in this study include the local spatial autocorrelation method and the kernel density estimation (KDE) method. It was found that the empirical Bayesian (EB) method and the KDE method outperformed other HRSI approaches. By transferring the kernel density function into a form that was analogous to the form of the EB function, we further proved that the KDE method can eventually be considered a simplified version of the EB method in which crashes reported at neighboring spatial units are used as the reference population for estimating the EB-adjusted crashes. Theoretically, the KDE method may outperform the EB method in HRSI when the neighboring spatial units provide more useful information on the expected crash frequency than a safety performance function does. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Spatially Modelling the Association Between Access to Recreational Facilities and Exercise: The ‘Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis’

    PubMed Central

    Berchuck, Samuel I.; Warren, Joshua L.; Herring, Amy H.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Moore, Kari A.B.; Ranchod, Yamini K.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Numerous studies have investigated the relationship between the built environment and physical activity. However these studies assume that these relationships are invariant over space. In this study, we introduce a novel method to analyze the association between access to recreational facilities and exercise allowing for spatial heterogeneity. In addition, this association is studied before and after controlling for crime, a variable that could explain spatial heterogeneity of associations. We use data from the Chicago site of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis of 781 adults aged 46 years and over. A spatially varying coefficient Tobit regression model is implemented in the Bayesian setting to allow for the association of interest to vary over space. The relationship is shown to vary over Chicago, being positive in the south but negative or null in the north. Controlling for crime weakens the association in the south with little change observed in northern Chicago. The results of this study indicate that spatial heterogeneity in associations of environmental factors with health may vary over space and deserve further exploration. PMID:26877598

  13. Systems and methods for knowledge discovery in spatial data

    DOEpatents

    Obradovic, Zoran; Fiez, Timothy E.; Vucetic, Slobodan; Lazarevic, Aleksandar; Pokrajac, Dragoljub; Hoskinson, Reed L.

    2005-03-08

    Systems and methods are provided for knowledge discovery in spatial data as well as to systems and methods for optimizing recipes used in spatial environments such as may be found in precision agriculture. A spatial data analysis and modeling module is provided which allows users to interactively and flexibly analyze and mine spatial data. The spatial data analysis and modeling module applies spatial data mining algorithms through a number of steps. The data loading and generation module obtains or generates spatial data and allows for basic partitioning. The inspection module provides basic statistical analysis. The preprocessing module smoothes and cleans the data and allows for basic manipulation of the data. The partitioning module provides for more advanced data partitioning. The prediction module applies regression and classification algorithms on the spatial data. The integration module enhances prediction methods by combining and integrating models. The recommendation module provides the user with site-specific recommendations as to how to optimize a recipe for a spatial environment such as a fertilizer recipe for an agricultural field.

  14. Optimal Spatial Interpolation Method for precipitation data in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yating, Chen

    2017-04-01

    The spatial distribution of precipitation plays a key role for water resources management and flood & drought prediction. In this study, based on precipitation data (1981-2010) and DEM data from 2160 meteorological stations of China, we will produce a nice spatial distribution of precipitation of China by using eight interpolation methods, including Inverse Distance Weight method, Radial Basis Function method, Global Polynomial Interpolation method, Local Polynomial Interpolation method, Ordinary Kriging method, Simple Kriging method, Universal Kriging method and Empirical Bayesian Kriging method. By using cross-validation, we find that (a) The Empirical Bayesian Kriging method is optimal for the whole China. (b) For different land types, the Radial Basis Function method is optimal for plain areas, while the Empirical Bayesian Kriging method is optimal for mountainous areas. (c) The optimal methods for Yellow River basin, Yangtze river basin and Pearl River basin are Universal Kriging method, Ordinary Kriging method, Empirical Bayesian Kriging method, respectively.

  15. Race, spatial mismatch, and job accessibility: evidence from a plant relocation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Roberto M

    2008-09-01

    One of the most prominent explanations for minority underachievement in the labor market is what has been termed the spatial mismatch hypothesis. The original formulation of the hypothesis by John Kain focused on the effects of racially segregated housing on workers' labor market outcomes assuming race-neutral employers. This paper reports the results of a case study designed to test Kain's original conception of this important hypothesis within the context of a longitudinal analysis of a relocating food processing plant. Because the workers in this study did not choose the firm's new location, the relocation can be treated as an exogenous, demand-side shock to the local labor market. This natural experiment design solves the major problem of extant approaches to the theory, i.e., the selective migration of minorities to areas with high concentrations of jobs. The study design also eliminates the confounding factor of non-race-neutral employers using space as a means to discriminate against minorities since the circumstances of this move make us confident that the firm is not moving for racial motives. We find support in favor of Kain's version of the spatial mismatch hypothesis. Despite the firm's best intentions and work to minimize the impact of the spatial disruption caused by the relocation, the racial segregation of the area's housing market hampered minorities' adjustments to the relocation. Consistent with Kain's formulation, spatially discriminating employers are not needed to produce race differences in job accessibility; racially segregated housing markets alone can generate such outcomes.

  16. Spatial-spectral method for classification of hyperspectral images.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Tianxu; Yan, Luxin; Zhang, Xiaolong; Fang, Houzhang; Liu, Hai

    2013-03-15

    Spatial-spectral approach with spatially adaptive classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. The rotation-invariant spatial texture information for each object is exploited and incorporated into the classifier by using the modified local Gabor binary pattern to distinguish different types of classes of interest. The proposed method can effectively suppress anisotropic texture in spatially separate classes as well as improve the discrimination among classes. Moreover, it becomes more robust with the within-class variation. Experimental results on the classification of three real hyperspectral remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  17. Spatial-Temporal dynamics of surface water flooding and consequences for emergency services accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Ian; Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Bosher, Lee; Wilby, Rob; Yang, Lili; Ryley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas are increasingly susceptible to surface water flooding, with more intense precipitation and intensification of land development. Flooding has both direct impacts i.e. locations inundated with water, and indirect impacts i.e. transport networks, utility e.g. electricity/water services etc. The direct areas flooded evolve in space through the event, and are predicted by standard inundation models. However, the wider indirect impacts and the spatial-temporal patterns are less constrained and it is these that are needed to manage the impacts in real-time. This paper focusses on the Category One responders of the Fire and Rescue and Ambulance Services in the City of Leicester, East Midlands, UK. Leicester is ranked 16th out of 4215 settlements at risk of surface water flooding in the UK based upon the population at risk (15,200 people) (DEFRA, 2009). The analysis undertaken involved overlaying the flood extent with the Integrated Transport Network (ITN) data within a GIS framework. Then a simple transport routing algorithm was used to predict the travel time from specific nodes representing ambulance or fire stations to different parts of the city. Flood magnitudes with 1:20, 1:100 and 1:1000 return periods have been investigated. Under a scenario of no flooding, 100% of the city is accessible by the six fire stations in the city. However, in the 1 in 20 year surface water flood event the peak inundation results in 66.5% being accessible in the 10 minute permitted time and 6% is totally inaccessible. This falls to 40% and 13% respectively for the 1 in 100 year event. Maps show the area of the city that are accessible by two or more stations within the permitted response time, which shows these areas are the most resilient to surface water flooding. However, it isn't just the peak water depths at every location which impacts accessibility within the city but the spatial-temporal patterns of the inundation. The areas within the 10 minute response time expand

  18. Assessing spatial access to public and private hospitals in Sichuan, China: The influence of the private sector on the healthcare geography in China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jay; Zhao, Hanqing; Wang, Xiuli; Shi, Xun

    2016-12-01

    In 2009, the Chinese government launched a new round of healthcare reform, which encourages development of private hospitals. Meanwhile, many public hospitals in China also became increasingly profit-oriented. These trends have led to concerns about social justice and regional disparity. However, there is a lack of empirical scientific analysis to support the debate. We started to fill this gap by conducting a regional-level analysis of spatial variation in spatial access to hospitals in the Sichuan Province. Such variation is an important indication of (in) equity in healthcare resource allocation. Using data of 2012, we intended to provide a snapshot of the situation that was a few years later since the new policies had set out. We employed two methods to quantify the spatial access: the nearest-neighbor method and the enhanced two-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method. We recognized two sub-regions of Sichuan: the rural West Sichuan and the well-developed East Sichuan. We classified the hospitals using both ownership and level. We applied the analysis to the resulting groups of hospitals and their combinations in the two sub-regions. The two sub-regions have a high contrast in the spatial access to hospitals, in terms of both quantity and spatial pattern. Public hospitals still dominated the service in the province, especially in the West Sichuan, which had been solely relying on public hospitals. Private hospitals only occurred in the East Sichuan, and at the primary level, they had surpassed public hospitals in terms of spatial accessibility. However, the governmental health expenditures seemed to be disconnected with the actual situation of the spatial access to hospitals. The government should continue carrying on its responsibility in allocating healthcare resources, be cautious about marketizing public hospitals, and encourage private hospitals to expand into rural areas. Methodologically, the results from the two methods are concurring but not

  19. Emissions from residential combustion considering end-uses and spatial constraints: Part I, methods and spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winijkul, Ekbordin; Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a framework to attribute national-level atmospheric emissions in the year 2010 from the residential sector, one of the largest energy-related sources of aerosol emissions. We place special emphasis on end-uses, dividing usage into cooking, heating, lighting, and others. This study covers regions where solid biomass fuel provides more than 50% of total residential energy: Latin America, Africa, and Asia (5.2 billion people in 2010). Using nightlight data and population density, we classify five land types: urban, electrified rural with forest access, electrified rural without forest access, non-electrified rural with forest access, and non-electrified rural without forest access. We then apportion national-level residential fuel consumption among all land-types and end-uses, and assign end-use technologies to each combination. The resulting calculation gives spatially-distributed emissions of particulate matter, black carbon, organic carbon, nitrogen oxides, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Within this study region, about 13% of the energy is consumed in urban areas, and 45% in non-urban land near forests. About half the energy is consumed in land without access to electricity. Cooking accounts for 54% of the consumption, heating for 9%, and lighting only 2%, with unidentified uses making up the remainder. Because biofuel use is assumed to occur preferentially where wood is accessible and electricity is not, our method shifts emissions to land types without electrification, compared with previous methods. The framework developed here is an important first step in acknowledging the role of household needs and local constraints in choosing energy provision. Although data and relationships described here need further development, this structure offers a more physically-based understanding of residential energy choices and, ultimately, opportunities for emission reduction.

  20. Small-Area Estimation of Spatial Access to Care and Its Implications for Policy.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Monica; Isett, Kim; Serban, Nicoleta; Swann, Julie

    2015-10-01

    Local or small-area estimates to capture emerging trends across large geographic regions are critical in identifying and addressing community-level health interventions. However, they are often unavailable due to lack of analytic capabilities in compiling and integrating extensive datasets and complementing them with the knowledge about variations in state-level health policies. This study introduces a modeling approach for small-area estimation of spatial access to pediatric primary care that is data "rich" and mathematically rigorous, integrating data and health policy in a systematic way. We illustrate the sensitivity of the model to policy decision making across large geographic regions by performing a systematic comparison of the estimates at the census tract and county levels for Georgia and California. Our results show the proposed approach is able to overcome limitations of other existing models by capturing patient and provider preferences and by incorporating possible changes in health policies. The primary finding is systematic underestimation of spatial access, and inaccurate estimates of disparities across population and across geography at the county level with respect to those at the census tract level with implications on where to focus and which type of interventions to consider.

  1. METHODS FOR MULTI-SPATIAL SCALE CHARACTERIZATION OF RIPARIAN CORRIDORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the application of aerial photography and GIS technology to develop flexible and transferable methods for multi-spatial scale characterization and analysis of riparian corridors. Relationships between structural attributes of riparian corridors and indicator...

  2. Measuring access to primary care appointments: a review of methods

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Wendy; Elwyn, Glyn; Edwards, Peter; Edwards, Adrian; Emmerson, Melody; Hibbs, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Background Patient access to primary care appointments is not routinely measured despite the increasing interest in this aspect of practice activity. The generation of standardised data (or benchmarks) for access could inform developments within primary care organisations and act as a quality marker for clinical governance. Logically the setting of targets should be based on a sound system of measurement. The practicalities of developing appropriate measures need debate. Therefore we aimed to search for and compare methods that have been published or are being developed to measure patient access to primary care appointments, with particular focus on finding methods using appointment system data. Method A search and review was made of the primary care literature from 1990 to 2001, which included an assessment of online resources (websites) and communication with recognised experts. The identified methods were assessed. Results The published literature in this specific area was not extensive but revealed emerging interest in the late 1990s. Two broad approaches to the measurement of waiting times to GP appointments were identified. Firstly, appointment systems in primary care organisations were analysed in differing ways to provide numerical data and, secondly, patient perceptions (reports) of access were evaluated using survey techniques. Six different methods were found which were based on appointment systems data. Conclusion The two approaches of either using patient questionnaires or appointment system data are methods that represent entirely different aims. The latter method when used to represent patient waiting times for 'routine' elective appointments seems to hold promise as a useful tool and this avoids the definitional problems that surround 'urgent' appointments. The purpose for which the data is being collected needs to be borne in mind and will determine the chosen methods of data retrieval and representation. PMID:12846934

  3. Interaction of ecological and angler processes: experimental stocking in an open access, spatially structured fishery.

    PubMed

    Mee, Jonathan A; Post, John R; Ward, Hillary; Wilson, Kyle L; Newton, Eric; Cantin, Ariane

    2016-09-01

    Effective management of socioecological systems requires an understanding of the complex interactions between people and the environment. In recreational fisheries, which are prime examples of socioecological systems, anglers are analogous to mobile predators in natural predator-prey systems, and individual fisheries in lakes across a region are analogous to a spatially structured landscape of prey patches. Hence, effective management of recreational fisheries across large spatial scales requires an understanding of the dynamic interactions among ecological density dependent processes, landscape-level characteristics, and angler behaviors. We focused on the stocked component of the open access rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fishery in British Columbia (BC), and we used an experimental approach wherein we manipulated stocking densities in a subset of 34 lakes in which we monitored angler effort, fish abundance, and fish size for up to seven consecutive years. We used an empirically derived relationship between fish abundance and fish size across rainbow trout populations in BC to provide a measure of catch-based fishing quality that accounts for the size-abundance trade off in this system. We replicated our experimental manipulation in two regions known to have different angler populations and broad-scale access costs. We hypothesized that angler effort would respond to variation in stocking density, resulting in spatial heterogeneity in angler effort but homogeneity in catch-based fishing quality within regions. We found that there is an intermediate stocking density for a given lake or region at which angler effort is maximized (i.e., an optimal stocking density), and that this stocking density depends on latent effort and lake accessibility. Furthermore, we found no clear effect of stocking density on our measure of catch-based fishing quality, suggesting that angler effort homogenizes catch-related attributes leading to an eroded relationship between

  4. Highly accurate spatial mode generation using spatial cross modulation method for mode division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Hiroki; Okamoto, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Goto, Yuta; Tomita, Akihisa

    2016-02-01

    We propose a spatial mode generation technology using spatial cross modulation (SCM) for mode division multiplexing (MDM). The most well-known method for generating arbitrary complex amplitude fields is to display an off-axis computer-generated hologram (CGH) on a spatial light modulator (SLM). However, in this method, a desired complex amplitude field is obtained with first order diffraction light. This critically lowers the light utilization efficiency. On the other hand, in the SCM, the desired complex field is provided with zeroth order diffraction light. For this reason, our technology can generate spatial modes with large light utilization efficiency in addition to high accuracy. In this study, first, a numerical simulation was performed to verify that the SCM is applicable for spatial mode generation. Next, we made a comparison from two view points of the coupling efficiency and the light utilization between our technology and the technology using an off-axis amplitude hologram as a representative complex amplitude generation method. The simulation results showed that our technology can achieve considerably high light utilization efficiency while maintaining the enough coupling efficiency comparable to the technology using an off-axis amplitude hologram. Finally, we performed an experiment on spatial modes generation using the SCM. Experimental results showed that our technology has the great potential to realize the spatial mode generation with high accuracy.

  5. Method and apparatus for managing access to a memory

    DOEpatents

    DeBenedictis, Erik

    2017-08-01

    A method and apparatus for managing access to a memory of a computing system. A controller transforms a plurality of operations that represent a computing job into an operational memory layout that reduces a size of a selected portion of the memory that needs to be accessed to perform the computing job. The controller stores the operational memory layout in a plurality of memory cells within the selected portion of the memory. The controller controls a sequence by which a processor in the computing system accesses the memory to perform the computing job using the operational memory layout. The operational memory layout reduces an amount of energy consumed by the processor to perform the computing job.

  6. Spatial econometrics functions in R: Classes and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivand, Roger

    Placing spatial econometrics and more generally spatial statistics in the context of an extensible data analysis environment such as R exposes similarities and differences between traditions of analysis. This can be fruitful, and is explored here in relation to prediction and other methods usually applied to fitted models in R. Objects in R may be assigned a class attribute, including fitted model objects. Such fitted model objects may be provided with methods allowing them to be displayed, compared, and used for prediction, and it is of interest to see whether fitted spatial models can be treated in the same way.

  7. Kinds of access: different methods for report reveal different kinds of metacognitive access

    PubMed Central

    Overgaard, Morten; Sandberg, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    In experimental investigations of consciousness, participants are asked to reflect upon their own experiences by issuing reports about them in different ways. For this reason, a participant needs some access to the content of her own conscious experience in order to report. In such experiments, the reports typically consist of some variety of ratings of confidence or direct descriptions of one's own experiences. Whereas different methods of reporting are typically used interchangeably, recent experiments indicate that different results are obtained with different kinds of reporting. We argue that there is not only a theoretical, but also an empirical difference between different methods of reporting. We hypothesize that differences in the sensitivity of different scales may reveal that different types of access are used to issue direct reports about experiences and metacognitive reports about the classification process. PMID:22492747

  8. Institutions in transitioning peri-urban communities: spatial differences in groundwater access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Sharlene L.; Hermans, Leon M.

    2016-05-01

    Urbanization creates challenges for water management in an evolving socio-economic context. This is particularly relevant in transitioning peri-urban areas like Khulna, Bangladesh where competing demands have put pressure on local groundwater resources. Users are unable to sufficiently meet their needs through existing institutions. These institutions provide the rules for service provision and act as guidelines for actors to resolve their water related issues. However, the evolving peri-urban context can produce fragmented institutional arrangements. For example in Khulna, water supply is based on urban and rural boundaries that has created water access issues for peri-urban communities. This has motivated local actors to manage their groundwater needs in various ways. General institutional theories are well developed in literature, yet little is known about institutions in transitioning peri-urban areas. Institutions that fail to adapt to changing dynamics run the risk of becoming obsolete or counter-productive, hence the need for investigating institutional change mechanisms in this context. This paper examines peri-urban case studies from Khulna using the Institutional Analysis and Development framework to demonstrate how institutions have contributed to spatial differences in groundwater access with local actors investing in formal and informal institutional change as a means of accessing groundwater.

  9. Association between neighborhood need and spatial access to food stores and fast food restaurants in neighborhoods of Colonias

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Joseph R; Horel, Scott; Han, Daikwon; Huber, John C

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which neighborhood needs (socioeconomic deprivation and vehicle availability) are associated with two criteria of food environment access: 1) distance to the nearest food store and fast food restaurant and 2) coverage (number) of food stores and fast food restaurants within a specified network distance of neighborhood areas of colonias, using ground-truthed methods. Methods Data included locational points for 315 food stores and 204 fast food restaurants, and neighborhood characteristics from the 2000 U.S. Census for the 197 census block group (CBG) study area. Neighborhood deprivation and vehicle availability were calculated for each CBG. Minimum distance was determined by calculating network distance from the population-weighted center of each CBG to the nearest supercenter, supermarket, grocery, convenience store, dollar store, mass merchandiser, and fast food restaurant. Coverage was determined by calculating the number of each type of food store and fast food restaurant within a network distance of 1, 3, and 5 miles of each population-weighted CBG center. Neighborhood need and access were examined using Spearman ranked correlations, spatial autocorrelation, and multivariate regression models that adjusted for population density. Results Overall, neighborhoods had best access to convenience stores, fast food restaurants, and dollar stores. After adjusting for population density, residents in neighborhoods with increased deprivation had to travel a significantly greater distance to the nearest supercenter or supermarket, grocery store, mass merchandiser, dollar store, and pharmacy for food items. The results were quite different for association of need with the number of stores within 1 mile. Deprivation was only associated with fast food restaurants; greater deprivation was associated with fewer fast food restaurants within 1 mile. CBG with greater lack of vehicle availability had slightly better access to more supercenters

  10. Daytime Locations in Spatial Mismatch: Job Accessibility and Employment at Reentry From Prison

    PubMed Central

    Lens, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals recently released from prison confront many barriers to employment. One potential obstacle is spatial mismatch—the concentration of low-skilled, nonwhite job-seekers within central cities and the prevalence of relevant job opportunities in outlying areas. Prior research has found mixed results about the importance of residential place for reentry outcomes. In this article, we propose that residential location matters for finding work, but this largely static measure does not capture the range of geographic contexts that individuals inhabit throughout the day. We combine novel, real-time GPS information on daytime locations and self-reported employment collected from smartphones with sophisticated measures of job accessibility to test the relative importance of spatial mismatch based on residence and daytime locations. Our findings suggest that the ability of low-skilled, poor, and urban individuals to compensate for their residential deficits by traveling to job-rich areas is an overlooked and salient consideration in spatial mismatch perspectives. PMID:28224468

  11. Creating widely accessible spatial interfaces: mobile VR for managing persistent pain.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, David; Korsakov, Fedor; Jolton, Joseph; Keefe, Francis J; Haley, Alex; Keefe, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    Using widely accessible VR technologies, researchers have implemented a series of multimodal spatial interfaces and virtual environments. The results demonstrate the degree to which we can now use low-cost (for example, mobile-phone based) VR environments to create rich virtual experiences involving motion sensing, physiological inputs, stereoscopic imagery, sound, and haptic feedback. Adapting spatial interfaces to these new platforms can open up exciting application areas for VR. In this case, the application area was in-home VR therapy for patients suffering from persistent pain (for example, arthritis and cancer pain). For such therapy to be successful, a rich spatial interface and rich visual aesthetic are particularly important. So, an interdisciplinary team with expertise in technology, design, meditation, and the psychology of pain collaborated to iteratively develop and evaluate several prototype systems. The video at http://youtu.be/mMPE7itReds demonstrates how the sine wave fitting responds to walking motions, for a walking-in-place application.

  12. Estimating spatial accessibility to facilities on the regional scale: an extended commuting-based interaction potential model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the study of the relationships between individual health-related behaviours (e.g. food intake and physical activity) and measurements of spatial accessibility to the associated facilities (e.g. food outlets and sport facilities). The aim of this study is to propose measurements of spatial accessibility to facilities on the regional scale, using aggregated data. We first used a potential accessibility model that partly makes it possible to overcome the limitations of the most frequently used indices such as the count of opportunities within a given neighbourhood. We then propose an extended model in order to take into account both home and work-based accessibility for a commuting population. Results Potential accessibility estimation provides a very different picture of the accessibility levels experienced by the population than the more classical "number of opportunities per census tract" index. The extended model for commuters increases the overall accessibility levels but this increase differs according to the urbanisation level. Strongest increases are observed in some rural municipalities with initial low accessibility levels. Distance to major urban poles seems to play an essential role. Conclusions Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that should integrate some aspects of travel behaviour. Our work supports the evidence that the choice of appropriate accessibility indices including both residential and non-residential environmental features is necessary. Such models have potential implications for providing relevant information to policy-makers in the field of public health. PMID:21219597

  13. Evaluation of AMOEBA: a spectral-spatial classification method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, Susan K.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Bryant, J.

    1982-01-01

    Muitispectral remotely sensed images have been treated as arbitrary multivariate spectral data for purposes of clustering and classifying. However, the spatial properties of image data can also be exploited. AMOEBA is a clustering and classification method that is based on a spatially derived model for image data. In an evaluation test, Landsat data were classified with both AMOEBA and a widely used spectral classifier. The test showed that irrigated crop types can be classified as accurately with the AMOEBA method as with the generally used spectral method ISOCLS; the AMOEBA method, however, requires less computer time.

  14. Rapid simulation of spatial epidemics: a spectral method.

    PubMed

    Brand, Samuel P C; Tildesley, Michael J; Keeling, Matthew J

    2015-04-07

    Spatial structure and hence the spatial position of host populations plays a vital role in the spread of infection. In the majority of situations, it is only possible to predict the spatial spread of infection using simulation models, which can be computationally demanding especially for large population sizes. Here we develop an approximation method that vastly reduces this computational burden. We assume that the transmission rates between individuals or sub-populations are determined by a spatial transmission kernel. This kernel is assumed to be isotropic, such that the transmission rate is simply a function of the distance between susceptible and infectious individuals; as such this provides the ideal mechanism for modelling localised transmission in a spatial environment. We show that the spatial force of infection acting on all susceptibles can be represented as a spatial convolution between the transmission kernel and a spatially extended 'image' of the infection state. This representation allows the rapid calculation of stochastic rates of infection using fast-Fourier transform (FFT) routines, which greatly improves the computational efficiency of spatial simulations. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of this fast spectral rate recalculation (FSR) method with two examples: an idealised scenario simulating an SIR-type epidemic outbreak amongst N habitats distributed across a two-dimensional plane; the spread of infection between US cattle farms, illustrating that the FSR method makes continental-scale outbreak forecasting feasible with desktop processing power. The latter model demonstrates which areas of the US are at consistently high risk for cattle-infections, although predictions of epidemic size are highly dependent on assumptions about the tail of the transmission kernel.

  15. A Method of Spatial Mapping and Reclassification for High-Spatial-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Classification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guizhou; Liu, Jianbo; He, Guojin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on a strategic mechanism of spatial mapping and reclassification. The proposed method includes four steps. First, the multispectral image is classified by a traditional pixel-based classification method (support vector machine). Second, the panchromatic image is subdivided by watershed segmentation. Third, the pixel-based multispectral image classification result is mapped to the panchromatic segmentation result based on a spatial mapping mechanism and the area dominant principle. During the mapping process, an area proportion threshold is set, and the regional property is defined as unclassified if the maximum area proportion does not surpass the threshold. Finally, unclassified regions are reclassified based on spectral information using the minimum distance to mean algorithm. Experimental results show that the classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on the spatial mapping mechanism and reclassification strategy can make use of both panchromatic and multispectral information, integrate the pixel- and object-based classification methods, and improve classification accuracy. PMID:24453808

  16. Evaluation methods for association rules in spatial knowlegde base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, X.; Ji, X.

    2014-04-01

    Association rule is an important model in data mining. It describes the relationship between predicates in transactions, makes the expression of knowledge hidden in data more specific and clear. While the developing and applying of remote sensing technology and automatic data collection tools in recent decades, tremendous amounts of spatial and non-spatial data have been collected and stored in large spatial database, so association rules mining from spatial database becomes a significant research area with extensive applications. How to find effective, reliable and interesting association rules from vast information for helping people analyze and make decision has become a significant issue. Evaluation methods measure spatial association rules with evaluation criteria. On the basis of analyzing the existing evaluation criteria, this paper improved the novelty evaluation method, built a spatial knowledge base, and proposed a new evaluation process based on the support-confidence evaluation system. Finally, the feasibility of the new evaluation process was validated by an experiment with real-world geographical spatial data.

  17. Spatial analysis of cattle and shoat population in Ethiopia: growth trend, distribution and market access.

    PubMed

    Leta, Samson; Mesele, Frehiwot

    2014-01-01

    The livestock subsector has an enormous contribution to Ethiopia's national economy and livelihoods of many Ethiopians. The subsector contributes about 16.5% of the national Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and 35.6% of the agricultural GDP. It also contributes 15% of export earnings and 30% of agricultural employment. The livestock subsector currently support and sustain livelihoods for 80% of all rural population. The GDP of livestock related activities valued at 59 billion birr. Ethiopian livestock population trends, distribution and marketing vary considerably across space and time due to a variety of reasons. This study was aimed to assess cattle and shoat population growth trend, distribution and their access to market. Regression analysis was used to assess the cattle and shoat population growth trend and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques were used to determine the spatial distribution of cattle and shoats, and their relative access to market. The data sets used are agricultural census (2001/02) and annual CSA agricultural sample survey (1995/96 to 2012/13). In the past eighteen years, the livestock population namely cattle, sheep and goat grew from 54.5 million to over 103.5 million with average annual increment of 3.4 million. The current average national cattle, sheep and goat population per km(2) are estimated to be 71, 33 and 29 respectively (excluding Addis Ababa, Afar and Somali regions). From the total livestock population the country owns about 46% cattle, 43% sheep and 40% goats are reared within 10 km radius from major livestock market centres and all-weather roads. On the other hand, three fourth of the country's land mass which comprises 15% of the cattle, 20% of the sheep and 21% of goat population is not accessible to market (greater than 30 km from major livestock market centres). It is found that the central highland regions account for the largest share of livestock population and also more accessible to market. Defining the

  18. [Ectopic parathyroid glands. Imaging methods and surgical access].

    PubMed

    Fialová, M; Adámková, J; Adámek, S; Libánský, P; Kubinyi, J

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the benefits of imaging methods in localizing ectopic parathyroid glands in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. The ectopic localizations are discussed within the context of the orthotopic norm. In the sample of 123 patients, a 23% rate of ectopic parathyroid glands was detected. Three selected case studies are presented, supporting the benefit of SPECT/CT imaging in terms of surgical access strategy selection.

  19. Spatial Release From Masking in Simulated Cochlear Implant Users With and Without Access to Low-Frequency Acoustic Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Mathias; Hohmann, Volker; Jürgens, Tim

    2015-01-01

    For normal-hearing listeners, speech intelligibility improves if speech and noise are spatially separated. While this spatial release from masking has already been quantified in normal-hearing listeners in many studies, it is less clear how spatial release from masking changes in cochlear implant listeners with and without access to low-frequency acoustic hearing. Spatial release from masking depends on differences in access to speech cues due to hearing status and hearing device. To investigate the influence of these factors on speech intelligibility, the present study measured speech reception thresholds in spatially separated speech and noise for 10 different listener types. A vocoder was used to simulate cochlear implant processing and low-frequency filtering was used to simulate residual low-frequency hearing. These forms of processing were combined to simulate cochlear implant listening, listening based on low-frequency residual hearing, and combinations thereof. Simulated cochlear implant users with additional low-frequency acoustic hearing showed better speech intelligibility in noise than simulated cochlear implant users without acoustic hearing and had access to more spatial speech cues (e.g., higher binaural squelch). Cochlear implant listener types showed higher spatial release from masking with bilateral access to low-frequency acoustic hearing than without. A binaural speech intelligibility model with normal binaural processing showed overall good agreement with measured speech reception thresholds, spatial release from masking, and spatial speech cues. This indicates that differences in speech cues available to listener types are sufficient to explain the changes of spatial release from masking across these simulated listener types. PMID:26721918

  20. Spatial Release From Masking in Simulated Cochlear Implant Users With and Without Access to Low-Frequency Acoustic Hearing.

    PubMed

    Williges, Ben; Dietz, Mathias; Hohmann, Volker; Jürgens, Tim

    2015-12-30

    For normal-hearing listeners, speech intelligibility improves if speech and noise are spatially separated. While this spatial release from masking has already been quantified in normal-hearing listeners in many studies, it is less clear how spatial release from masking changes in cochlear implant listeners with and without access to low-frequency acoustic hearing. Spatial release from masking depends on differences in access to speech cues due to hearing status and hearing device. To investigate the influence of these factors on speech intelligibility, the present study measured speech reception thresholds in spatially separated speech and noise for 10 different listener types. A vocoder was used to simulate cochlear implant processing and low-frequency filtering was used to simulate residual low-frequency hearing. These forms of processing were combined to simulate cochlear implant listening, listening based on low-frequency residual hearing, and combinations thereof. Simulated cochlear implant users with additional low-frequency acoustic hearing showed better speech intelligibility in noise than simulated cochlear implant users without acoustic hearing and had access to more spatial speech cues (e.g., higher binaural squelch). Cochlear implant listener types showed higher spatial release from masking with bilateral access to low-frequency acoustic hearing than without. A binaural speech intelligibility model with normal binaural processing showed overall good agreement with measured speech reception thresholds, spatial release from masking, and spatial speech cues. This indicates that differences in speech cues available to listener types are sufficient to explain the changes of spatial release from masking across these simulated listener types.

  1. Methods for Data-based Delineation of Spatial Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, John E.

    2012-10-01

    In data analysis, it is often useful to delineate or segregate areas of interest from the general population of data in order to concentrate further analysis efforts on smaller areas. Three methods are presented here for automatically generating polygons around spatial data of interest. Each method addresses a distinct data type. These methods were developed for and implemented in the sample planning tool called Visual Sample Plan (VSP). Method A is used to delineate areas of elevated values in a rectangular grid of data (raster). The data used for this method are spatially related. Although VSP uses data from a kriging process for this method, it will work for any type of data that is spatially coherent and appears on a regular grid. Method B is used to surround areas of interest characterized by individual data points that are congregated within a certain distance of each other. Areas where data are “clumped” together spatially will be delineated. Method C is used to recreate the original boundary in a raster of data that separated data values from non-values. This is useful when a rectangular raster of data contains non-values (missing data) that indicate they were outside of some original boundary. If the original boundary is not delivered with the raster, this method will approximate the original boundary.

  2. Phase demodulation from a spatial carrier fringe pattern by spatial-temporal fringes method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Bin; Feng, Guoying; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2016-12-01

    Phase extraction from a single fringe pattern is a valuable but challenging task. In this paper, a spatial carrier phase-shifting algorithm based on spatial-temporal fringes method is proposed to demodulate the phase from a single carrier interfergram. Firstly, two phase-shifted fringe patterns are composed from the original interferogram shifting by several pixels their starting position. Secondly, these two phase shift fringes are fused into one spatial-temporal fringes (STF) image. Then, the modulating phase is calculated from the frequency spectrum of the STF image. Meanwhile, the main factors, such as the level of random noise, the carrier frequency values and angle of fringe pattern are analyzed and discussed in the simulations, and experimental results are given to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. The proposed method is effective, accurate and immune to external disturbance and vibration, which greatly promotes the application in the on-line detection fields.

  3. Analytical resource assessment method for continuous (unconventional) oil and gas accumulations - The "ACCESS" Method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, Robert A.; revised by Charpentier, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) periodically assesses petroleum resources of areas within the United States and the world. The purpose of this report is to explain the development of an analytic probabilistic method and spreadsheet software system called Analytic Cell-Based Continuous Energy Spreadsheet System (ACCESS). The ACCESS method is based upon mathematical equations derived from probability theory. The ACCESS spreadsheet can be used to calculate estimates of the undeveloped oil, gas, and NGL (natural gas liquids) resources in a continuous-type assessment unit. An assessment unit is a mappable volume of rock in a total petroleum system. In this report, the geologic assessment model is defined first, the analytic probabilistic method is described second, and the spreadsheet ACCESS is described third. In this revised version of Open-File Report 00-044 , the text has been updated to reflect modifications that were made to the ACCESS program. Two versions of the program are added as appendixes.

  4. Spatial Fourier transform method for evaluating SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, P.C.; Bruno, A.C.; Paulsen, C.C.; Symko, O.G.

    1987-08-01

    A simple method of measuring the spatial transfer function of a gradiometer, consisting of a flux transformer coupled to a SQUID, is presented and it is compared with theoretical predictions. Based, on this approach, a new method of reporting a gradiometer's performance is proposed; the rejection factor is expressed in decibels obtained directly from the transfer function plot.

  5. Sann: solvent accessibility prediction of proteins by nearest neighbor method.

    PubMed

    Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2012-07-01

    We present a method to predict the solvent accessibility of proteins which is based on a nearest neighbor method applied to the sequence profiles. Using the method, continuous real-value prediction as well as two-state and three-state discrete predictions can be obtained. The method utilizes the z-score value of the distance measure in the feature vector space to estimate the relative contribution among the k-nearest neighbors for prediction of the discrete and continuous solvent accessibility. The Solvent accessibility database is constructed from 5717 proteins extracted from PISCES culling server with the cutoff of 25% sequence identities. Using optimal parameters, the prediction accuracies (for discrete predictions) of 78.38% (two-state prediction with the threshold of 25%), 65.1% (three-state prediction with the thresholds of 9 and 36%), and the Pearson correlation coefficient (between the predicted and true RSA's for continuous prediction) of 0.676 are achieved An independent benchmark test was performed with the CASP8 targets where we find that the proposed method outperforms existing methods. The prediction accuracies are 80.89% (for two state prediction with the threshold of 25%), 67.58% (three-state prediction), and the Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.727 (for continuous prediction) with mean absolute error of 0.148. We have also investigated the effect of increasing database sizes on the prediction accuracy, where additional improvement in the accuracy is observed as the database size increases. The SANN web server is available at http://lee.kias.re.kr/~newton/sann/. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. An incremental database access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, Nicholas; Sellis, Timos

    1994-01-01

    We investigated a number of design and performance issues of interoperable database management systems (DBMS's). The major results of our investigation were obtained in the areas of client-server database architectures for heterogeneous DBMS's, incremental computation models, buffer management techniques, and query optimization. We finished a prototype of an advanced client-server workstation-based DBMS which allows access to multiple heterogeneous commercial DBMS's. Experiments and simulations were then run to compare its performance with the standard client-server architectures. The focus of this research was on adaptive optimization methods of heterogeneous database systems. Adaptive buffer management accounts for the random and object-oriented access methods for which no known characterization of the access patterns exists. Adaptive query optimization means that value distributions and selectives, which play the most significant role in query plan evaluation, are continuously refined to reflect the actual values as opposed to static ones that are computed off-line. Query feedback is a concept that was first introduced to the literature by our group. We employed query feedback for both adaptive buffer management and for computing value distributions and selectivities. For adaptive buffer management, we use the page faults of prior executions to achieve more 'informed' management decisions. For the estimation of the distributions of the selectivities, we use curve-fitting techniques, such as least squares and splines, for regressing on these values.

  7. A spectral method for spatial downscaling | Science Inventory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Complex computer models play a crucial role in air quality research. These models are used to evaluate potential regulatory impacts of emission control strategies and to estimate air quality in areas without monitoring data. For both of these purposes, it is important to calibrate model output with monitoring data to adjust for model biases and improve spatial prediction. In this paper, we propose a new spectral method to study and exploit complex relationships between model output and monitoring data. Spectral methods allow us to estimate the relationship between model output and monitoring data separately at different spatial scales, and to use model output for prediction only at the appropriate scales. The proposed method is computationally efficient and can be implemented using standard software. We apply the method to compare Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model output with ozone measurements in the United States in July, 2005. We find that CMAQ captures large-scale spatial trends, but has low correlation with the monitoring data at small spatial scales. The National Exposure Research Laboratory′s (NERL′s)Atmospheric Modeling Division (AMAD) conducts research in support of EPA′s mission to protect human health and the environment. AMAD′s research program is engaged in developing and evaluating predictive atmospheric models on all spatial and temporal scales for forecasting the Nation′s air quality and for assessing ch

  8. ERSYS-SPP access method subsystem design specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weise, R. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The STARAN special purpose processor (SPP) is a machine allowing the same operation to be performed on up to 512 different data elements simultaneously. In the ERSYS system, it is to be attached to a 4341 plug compatible machine (PCM) to do certain existing algorithms and, at a later date, to perform other to be specified algorithms. That part of the interface between the 4341 PCM and the SPP located in the 4341 PCM is known as the SPP access method (SPPAM). Access to the SPPAM will be obtained by use of the NQUEUE and DQUEUE commands. The subsystem design specification is to incorporate all applicable design considerations from the ERSYS system design specification and the Level B requirements documents relating to the SPPAM. It is intended as a basis for the preliminary design review and will expand into the subsystem detailed design specification.

  9. Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Toshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatiotemporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions and adapted in two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. The first target is a steady solution to the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bistable systems in which localized solutions coexist and a model for spanwise-localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to isolated branches known as "isolas" are found with continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. The second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for streamwise-localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed.

  10. Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramura, Toshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatiotemporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions and adapted in two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. The first target is a steady solution to the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bistable systems in which localized solutions coexist and a model for spanwise-localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to isolated branches known as "isolas" are found with continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. The second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for streamwise-localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed.

  11. Method and Apparatus for Improved Spatial Light Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soutar, Colin (Inventor); Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for modulating a light beam in an optical processing system is described. Preferably, an electrically-controlled polarizer unit and/or an analyzer unit are utilized in combination with a spatial light modulator and a controller. Preferably, the spatial light modulator comprises a pixelated birefringent medium such as a liquid crystal video display. The combination of the electrically controlled polarizer unit and analyzer unit make it simple and fast to reconfigure the modulation described by the Jones matrix of the spatial light modulator. A particular optical processing objective is provided to the controller. The controller performs calculations and supplies control signals to the polarizer unit, the analyzer unit, and the spatial light modulator in order to obtain the optical processing objective.

  12. Method and Apparatus for Improved Spatial Light Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colin, Soutar (Inventor); Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for modulating a light beam in an optical processing system is described. Preferably, an electrically-controlled polarizer unit and/or an analyzer unit are utilized in combination with a spatial light modulator and a controller. Preferably, the spatial light modulator comprises a pixelated birefringent medium such as a liquid crystal video display. The combination of the electrically controlled polarizer unit and analyzer unit make it simple and fast to reconfigure the modulation described by the Jones matrix of the spatial light modulator. A particular optical processing objective is provided to the controller. The controller performs calculations and supplies control signals to the polarizer unit, the analyzer unit, and the spatial light modulator in order to obtain die optical processing objective.

  13. Spatial analysis of fluvial terraces in GRASS GIS accessing R functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józsa, Edina

    2017-04-01

    dataset it is possible to interpolate a new digital elevation model approximating the former terraced valley surface using the Ordinary Kriging method (Troiani, F. and Della Seta, M. 2011). The applicability of the algorithm was tested on the northern foreland of Gerecse Mountains, an antecedent valley section of the Danube, with terrace remnants expected in 6 to 8 altitude ranges. Methodological issues arising from determining the optimal threshold values were explored using an artificial hillslope model, while the terrace profiles and terrace-top surfaces raster generated from the digital elevation model were validated with the previous findings of traditional geomorphological surveys. This research was supported by the Human Capacities Grant Management Office and the Hungarian Ministry of Human Capacities in the framework of the NTP-NFTÖ-16 project. References: Bivand, R.S. et al. (2008). Applied Spatial Data Analysis with R. New York: Springer. 378 p. Demoulin, A. et al. (2007). An automated method to extract fluvial terraces from digital elevation models: The Vesdre valley, a case study in eastern Belgium. - Geomorphology 91 (1-2): 51-64. Troiani, E. and Della Seta, M. (2011). Geomorphological response of fluvial and coastal terraces to Quaternary tectonics and climate as revealed by geostatistical topographic analysis. - Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 36: 1193-1208.

  14. Nanotube structures, methods of making nanotube structures, and methods of accessing intracellular space

    DOEpatents

    VanDersarl, Jules J.; Xu, Alexander M.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Tayebi, Noureddine

    2016-02-23

    In accordance with the purpose(s) of the present disclosure, as embodied and broadly described herein, embodiments of the present disclosure, in one aspect, relate to methods of making a structure including nanotubes, a structure including nanotubes, methods of delivering a fluid to a cell, methods of removing a fluid to a cell, methods of accessing intracellular space, and the like.

  15. Spatial inequity in access to healthcare facilities at a county level in a developing country: a case study of Deqing County, Zhejiang, China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Cheng, Jianquan; Lu, Yuqi; Huang, Zhenfang; Cao, Fangdong

    2015-08-19

    The inequities in healthcare services between regions, urban and rural, age groups and diverse income groups have been growing rapidly in China. Equal access to basic medical and healthcare services has been recognized as "a basic right of the people" by Chinese government. Spatial accessibility to healthcare facilities has received huge attention in Chinese case studies but been less studied particularly at a county level due to limited availability of high-resolution spatial data. This study is focused on measuring spatial accessibility to healthcare facilities in Deqing County. The spatial inequity between the urban (town) and rural is assessed and three scenarios are designed and built to examine which scenario is instrumental for better reducing the spatial inequity. This study utilizes highway network data, Digital Elevation Model (DEM), location of hospitals and clinics, 2010 census data at the finest level - village committee, residential building footprint and building height. Areal weighting method is used to disaggregate population data from village committee level to residential building cell level. Least cost path analysis is applied to calculate the travel time from each building cell to its closest healthcare facility. Then an integral accessibility will be calculated through weighting the travel time to the closest facility between three levels. The spatial inequity in healthcare accessibility between the town and rural areas is examined based on the coverages of areas and populations. The same method is used to compare three scenarios aimed at reducing such spatial inequity - relocation of hospitals, updates of weighting values, and the combination of both. 50.03% of residents can reach a county hospital within 15 min by driving, 95.77% and 100% within 30 and 60 min respectively. 55.14% of residents can reach a town hospital within 5 min, 98.04% and 100% within 15 and 30 min respectively. 57.86% of residential building areas can reach a village

  16. Development of a comprehensive measure of spatial access to HIV provider services, with application to Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Sharoda; Kramer, Michael R; Rosenberg, Eli S; Sanchez, Travis H; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2016-01-01

    No existing measures of HIV care access consider both spatial proximity to services and provider-related characteristics in a single measure. We developed and applied a tool to: (1) quantify spatial access to HIV care services (supply) and (2) identify underserved areas with respect to HIV cases (demand), by travel mode, in Atlanta. Building on a study of HIV care engagement, data from an HIV care provider database, and HIV case counts by zip code tabulation area (ZCTA) from AIDSVu.org, we fit a discrete choice model to estimate practice characteristics most salient in defining patient care access. Modified spatial gravity modeling quantified supply access based on discrete choice model results separately for travel by car and by public transportation. Relative access scores were calculated by ZCTA, and underserved areas (defined as having low supply access and high HIV case count) were identified for each travel mode. Characteristics retained in the final model included: travel distance, available provider-hours, availability of ancillary services, and whether Ryan White patients were accepted. HIV provider supply was higher in urban versus suburban/rural areas for both travel modes, with lower supply access if traveling by public transportation. Underserved areas were concentrated in south and east Atlanta if traveling by public transportation, overlapping with many areas of high poverty. Approximately 7.7 %, if traveling by car, and 64.3 %, if traveling by public transportation, of Atlanta-based persons with diagnosed HIV infection resided in underserved areas. These findings highlight underserved areas in south and east Atlanta if traveling by public transit. Conceptualizing access to medical services spatially and by travel mode may help bridge gaps between patient needs and service availability and improve HIV outcomes.

  17. A suite of methods for representing activity space in a healthcare accessibility study

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Jill E; Spencer, John; Preisser, John S; Gesler, Wilbert M; Arcury, Thomas A

    2005-01-01

    Background "Activity space" has been used to examine how people's habitual movements interact with their environment, and can be used to examine accessibility to healthcare opportunities. Traditionally, the standard deviational ellipse (SDE), a Euclidean measure, has been used to represent activity space. We describe the construction and application of the SDE at one and two standard deviations, and three additional network-based measures of activity space using common tools in GIS: the road network buffer (RNB), the 30-minute standard travel time polygon (STT), and the relative travel time polygon (RTT). We compare the theoretical and methodological assumptions of each measure, and evaluate the measures by examining access to primary care services, using data from western North Carolina. Results Individual accessibility is defined as the availability of healthcare opportunities within that individual's activity space. Access is influenced by the shape and area of an individual's activity space, the spatial distribution of opportunities, and by the spatial structures that constrain and direct movement through space; the shape and area of the activity space is partly a product of how it is conceptualized and measured. Network-derived measures improve upon the SDE by incorporating the spatial structures (roads) that channel movement. The area of the STT is primarily influenced by the location of a respondent's residence within the road network hierarchy, with residents living near primary roads having the largest activity spaces. The RNB was most descriptive of actual opportunities and can be used to examine bypassing. The area of the RTT had the strongest correlation with a healthcare destination being located inside the activity space. Conclusion The availability of geospatial technologies and data create multiple options for representing and operationalizing the construct of activity space. Each approach has its strengths and limitations, and presents a different

  18. New Methods of Entanglement with Spatial Modes of Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    NEW METHODS OF ENTANGLEMENT WITH SPATIAL MODES OF LIGHT COLGATE UNIVERSITY FEBRUARY 2014 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...PROJECT NUMBER T2QC 5e. TASK NUMBER CO 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER LG 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Colgate University 13 Oak

  19. Hydrological model uncertainty due to spatial evapotranspiration estimation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xuan; Lamačová, Anna; Duffy, Christopher; Krám, Pavel; Hruška, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) continues to be a difficult process to estimate in seasonal and long-term water balances in catchment models. Approaches to estimate ET typically use vegetation parameters (e.g., leaf area index [LAI], interception capacity) obtained from field observation, remote sensing data, national or global land cover products, and/or simulated by ecosystem models. In this study we attempt to quantify the uncertainty that spatial evapotranspiration estimation introduces into hydrological simulations when the age of the forest is not precisely known. The Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM) was implemented for the Lysina headwater catchment, located 50°03‧N, 12°40‧E in the western part of the Czech Republic. The spatial forest patterns were digitized from forest age maps made available by the Czech Forest Administration. Two ET methods were implemented in the catchment model: the Biome-BGC forest growth sub-model (1-way coupled to PIHM) and with the fixed-seasonal LAI method. From these two approaches simulation scenarios were developed. We combined the estimated spatial forest age maps and two ET estimation methods to drive PIHM. A set of spatial hydrologic regime and streamflow regime indices were calculated from the modeling results for each method. Intercomparison of the hydrological responses to the spatial vegetation patterns suggested considerable variation in soil moisture and recharge and a small uncertainty in the groundwater table elevation and streamflow. The hydrologic modeling with ET estimated by Biome-BGC generated less uncertainty due to the plant physiology-based method. The implication of this research is that overall hydrologic variability induced by uncertain management practices was reduced by implementing vegetation models in the catchment models.

  20. Investigating disparities in spatial accessibility to and characteristics of sport facilities: direction, strength, and spatial scale of associations with area income.

    PubMed

    Billaudeau, Nathalie; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Simon, Chantal; Charreire, Hélène; Casey, Romain; Salze, Paul; Badariotti, Dominique; Banos, Arnaud; Weber, Christiane; Chaix, Basile

    2011-01-01

    We conducted an environmental justice study of the spatial distribution of sport facilities, a major resource for physical activity, in the Paris Region in France. Comprehensive data of the French Census of Sport Facilities allowed us to investigate disparities not only in the spatial accessibility to facilities, but also in the characteristics of these facilities. We found that the associations between area income and the presence of facilities or favorable characteristics of these facilities varied from positive to negative depending on the facilities and on the characteristics examined. Sensitivity analyses defining area income in circular areas of different radii permitted a refined identification of areas underserved in sport facilities.

  1. Examination of how neighborhood definition influences measurements of youths' access to tobacco retailers: a methodological note on spatial misclassification.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Dustin T; Kawachi, Ichiro; Subramanian, S V; Aldstadt, Jared; Melly, Steven J; Williams, David R

    2014-02-01

    Measurements of neighborhood exposures likely vary depending on the definition of "neighborhood" selected. This study examined the extent to which neighborhood definition influences findings regarding spatial accessibility to tobacco retailers among youth. We defined spatial accessibility to tobacco retailers (i.e., tobacco retail density, closest tobacco retailer, and average distance to the closest 5 tobacco retailers) on the basis of circular and network buffers of 400 m and 800 m, census block groups, and census tracts by using residential addresses from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset (n = 1,292). Friedman tests (to compare overall differences in neighborhood definitions) were applied. There were differences in measurements of youths' access to tobacco retailers according to the selected neighborhood definitions, and these were marked for the 2 spatial proximity measures (both P < 0.01 for all differences). For example, the median average distance to the closest 5 tobacco retailers was 381.50 m when using specific home addresses, 414.00 m when using census block groups, and 482.50 m when using census tracts, illustrating how neighborhood definition influences the measurement of spatial accessibility to tobacco retailers. These analyses suggest that, whenever possible, egocentric neighborhood definitions should be used. The use of larger administrative neighborhood definitions can bias exposure estimates for proximity measures.

  2. Examination of How Neighborhood Definition Influences Measurements of Youths' Access to Tobacco Retailers: A Methodological Note on Spatial Misclassification

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Dustin T.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Subramanian, S.V.; Aldstadt, Jared; Melly, Steven J.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of neighborhood exposures likely vary depending on the definition of “neighborhood” selected. This study examined the extent to which neighborhood definition influences findings regarding spatial accessibility to tobacco retailers among youth. We defined spatial accessibility to tobacco retailers (i.e., tobacco retail density, closest tobacco retailer, and average distance to the closest 5 tobacco retailers) on the basis of circular and network buffers of 400 m and 800 m, census block groups, and census tracts by using residential addresses from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset (n = 1,292). Friedman tests (to compare overall differences in neighborhood definitions) were applied. There were differences in measurements of youths' access to tobacco retailers according to the selected neighborhood definitions, and these were marked for the 2 spatial proximity measures (both P < 0.01 for all differences). For example, the median average distance to the closest 5 tobacco retailers was 381.50 m when using specific home addresses, 414.00 m when using census block groups, and 482.50 m when using census tracts, illustrating how neighborhood definition influences the measurement of spatial accessibility to tobacco retailers. These analyses suggest that, whenever possible, egocentric neighborhood definitions should be used. The use of larger administrative neighborhood definitions can bias exposure estimates for proximity measures. PMID:24148710

  3. Daily Access to Sucrose Impairs Aspects of Spatial Memory Tasks Reliant on Pattern Separation and Neural Proliferation in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, Amy C.; Morris, Margaret J.; Westbrook, Reginald Frederick

    2016-01-01

    High sugar diets reduce hippocampal neurogenesis, which is required for minimizing interference between memories, a process that involves "pattern separation." We provided rats with 2 h daily access to a sucrose solution for 28 d and assessed their performance on a spatial memory task. Sucrose consuming rats discriminated between objects…

  4. ViSA: A Neurodynamic Model for Visuo-Spatial Working Memory, Attentional Blink, and Conscious Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simione, Luca; Raffone, Antonino; Wolters, Gezinus; Salmas, Paola; Nakatani, Chie; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2012-01-01

    Two separate lines of study have clarified the role of selectivity in conscious access to visual information. Both involve presenting multiple targets and distracters: one "simultaneously" in a spatially distributed fashion, the other "sequentially" at a single location. To understand their findings in a unified framework, we propose a…

  5. Daily Access to Sucrose Impairs Aspects of Spatial Memory Tasks Reliant on Pattern Separation and Neural Proliferation in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, Amy C.; Morris, Margaret J.; Westbrook, Reginald Frederick

    2016-01-01

    High sugar diets reduce hippocampal neurogenesis, which is required for minimizing interference between memories, a process that involves "pattern separation." We provided rats with 2 h daily access to a sucrose solution for 28 d and assessed their performance on a spatial memory task. Sucrose consuming rats discriminated between objects…

  6. ViSA: A Neurodynamic Model for Visuo-Spatial Working Memory, Attentional Blink, and Conscious Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simione, Luca; Raffone, Antonino; Wolters, Gezinus; Salmas, Paola; Nakatani, Chie; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2012-01-01

    Two separate lines of study have clarified the role of selectivity in conscious access to visual information. Both involve presenting multiple targets and distracters: one "simultaneously" in a spatially distributed fashion, the other "sequentially" at a single location. To understand their findings in a unified framework, we propose a…

  7. COMPUTATIONAL EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR MEASURING THE SPATIAL EXTENT OF NEURAL ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Mahnam, Amin; Hashemi, S. Mohammad Reza; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-01-01

    Knowing of the spatial extent of neural activation around extracellular stimulating electrodes is necessary to ensure that only the desired neurons are activated or to determine which neurons are responsible for an observed response. Various approaches have been used to estimate the current-distance relationship and thereby the spatial extent of activation resulting from extracellular stimulation. However, these approaches all require underlying assumptions and simplifications, and since the actual extent of activation cannot be directly measured, the impact of deviations from these assumptions cannot be determined. We implemented a computer-based model of excitation of a population of nerve fibers and used the model to evaluate a range of approaches proposed for measuring the spatial extent of neural activation. The estimates with each method were compared with measurements of the true spatial extent of activation that were accessible in the simulations to quantify the accuracy of the estimates and to determine the dependence of accuracy on measurement parameters (interelectrode distance, stimulation amplitude, noise). A newly proposed method, based on the refractory interaction technique, provided the most accurate and most robust estimates of the spatial extent of neural activation. PMID:18606455

  8. Spatial distribution and accessibility to public sector tertiary care teaching hospitals in Karachi: A Geographic Information Systems application.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Masood Ali; Ali, Mir Shabbar

    2016-07-01

    Optimal utilization of specialized curative healthcare services is contingent on spatial access to tertiary-care hospitals by the targeted population. The objectives of this study were to determine the spatial distribution of public sector tertiary-care teaching hospitals in Karachi, and to use GIS and network analysis for modeling the accessibility to these hospitals for Karachi residents. Maps of three, six, and nine kilometer buffers were created around the five selected hospitals to determine which towns of Karachi are either entirely or partially covered/accessible. Most of the towns in Karachi were covered either partially or completely by the three buffers and service areas of 3,6, and 9 kilometers around the five selected hospitals. This study highlights the limitations of using publicly available data for road network, and the need for creating and making available in public domain, comprehensive road network vector dataset in conjunction with population breakdowns by administrative subdivisions.

  9. Method and apparatus for granting processors access to a resource

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Salapura, Valentina

    2010-03-16

    An apparatus and method for granting one or more requesting entities access to a resource in a predetermined time interval. The apparatus includes a first circuit receiving one or more request signals, and implementing logic for assigning a priority to the one or more request signals, and, generating a set of first_request signals based on the priorities assigned. One or more priority select circuits for receiving the set of first_request signals and generating corresponding one or more fixed grant signals representing one or more highest priority request signals when asserted during the predetermined time interval. A second circuit device receives the one or more fixed grant signals generates one or more grant signals associated with one or more highest priority request signals assigned, the grant signals for enabling one or more respective requesting entities access to the resource in the predetermined time interval, wherein the priority assigned to the one or more request signals changes each successive predetermined time interval. In one embodiment, the assigned priority is based on a numerical pattern, the first circuit changing the numerical pattern with respect to the first_request signals generated at each successive predetermined time interval.

  10. Super Spatial Resolution (SSR) method for scintigraphic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinci, G.; Massari, R.; Scandellari, M.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes an innovative patented Super Spatial Resolution (SSR) method applied to scintigraphic devices. The aim of Super Resolution (SR) techniques is to enhance the resolution of an imaging system, using information from several images. SR reconstruction may be considered as a second generation problem of Image Restoration. It combines several slightly different Low Resolution (LR) images to obtain a High Resolution (HR) image. SR techniques are, widely, described in scientific literature mainly for applications in video communication, object recognition and image compression. In this paper we focus to apply the SR task to the scintigraphic imaging. Specifically, it is described as a patented method that uses a High Resolution Scintigraphic Camera (HRSC) to collect and process a set of scintigraphic images, in view of obtaining a very high resolution image. The HRSC device, which is currently used in Medical Imaging, is based on a parallel square holes collimator and on a Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes (PSPMT). The SSR method is applied to the synthetic images of three different phantoms, to verify the effective spatial resolution values. The results confirm that it is possible to achieve optimal spatial resolution values at different depths, useful in small object and small animal imaging. Our study confirms the feasibility of a very high resolution system in scintigraphic imaging and the possibility to have gamma cameras using the SSR method, to perform clinical applications on patients.

  11. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  12. Comparison of methods to estimate water access: a pilot study of a GPS-based approach in low resource settings.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Amber L

    2016-09-20

    Most water access studies involve self-reported measures such as time spent or simple spatial measures such as Euclidean distance from home to source. GPS-based measures of access are often considered actual access and have shown little correlation with self-reported measures. One main obstacle to widespread use of GPS-based measurement of access to water has been technological limitations (e.g., battery life). As such, GPS-based measures have been limited by time and in sample size. The aim of this pilot study was to develop and test a novel GPS unit, (≤4-week battery life, waterproof) to measure access to water. The GPS-based method was pilot-tested to estimate number of trips per day, time spent and distance traveled to source for all water collected over a 3-day period in five households in south-western Uganda. This method was then compared to self-reported measures and commonly used spatial measures of access for the same households. Time spent collecting water was significantly overestimated using a self-reported measure, compared to GPS-based (p < 0.05). In contrast, both the GIS Euclidean distances to nearest and actual primary source significantly underestimated distances traveled, compared to the GPS-based measurement of actual travel paths to water source (p < 0.05). Households did not consistently collect water from the source nearest their home. Comparisons between the GPS-based measure and self-reported meters traveled were not made, as respondents did not feel that they could accurately estimate distance. However, there was complete agreement between self-reported primary source and GPS-based. Reliance on cross-sectional self-reported or simple GIS measures leads to misclassification in water access measurement. This new method offers reductions in such errors and may aid in understanding dynamic measures of access to water for health studies.

  13. Widely accessible method for superresolution fluorescence imaging of living systems

    PubMed Central

    Dedecker, Peter; Mo, Gary C. H.; Dertinger, Thomas; Zhang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Superresolution fluorescence microscopy overcomes the diffraction resolution barrier and allows the molecular intricacies of life to be revealed with greatly enhanced detail. However, many current superresolution techniques still face limitations and their implementation is typically associated with a steep learning curve. Patterned illumination-based superresolution techniques [e.g., stimulated emission depletion (STED), reversible optically-linear fluorescence transitions (RESOLFT), and saturated structured illumination microscopy (SSIM)] require specialized equipment, whereas single-molecule–based approaches [e.g., stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM), and fluorescence-PALM (F-PALM)] involve repetitive single-molecule localization, which requires its own set of expertise and is also temporally demanding. Here we present a superresolution fluorescence imaging method, photochromic stochastic optical fluctuation imaging (pcSOFI). In this method, irradiating a reversibly photoswitching fluorescent protein at an appropriate wavelength produces robust single-molecule intensity fluctuations, from which a superresolution picture can be extracted by a statistical analysis of the fluctuations in each pixel as a function of time, as previously demonstrated in SOFI. This method, which uses off-the-shelf equipment, genetically encodable labels, and simple and rapid data acquisition, is capable of providing two- to threefold-enhanced spatial resolution, significant background rejection, markedly improved contrast, and favorable temporal resolution in living cells. Furthermore, both 3D and multicolor imaging are readily achievable. Because of its ease of use and high performance, we anticipate that pcSOFI will prove an attractive approach for superresolution imaging. PMID:22711840

  14. A cross-sectional ecological study of spatial scale and geographic inequality in access to drinking-water and sanitation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiyu; Bain, Robert E S; Mansour, Shawky; Wright, Jim A

    2014-11-26

    Measuring inequality in access to safe drinking-water and sanitation is proposed as a component of international monitoring following the expiry of the Millennium Development Goals. This study aims to evaluate the utility of census data in measuring geographic inequality in access to drinking-water and sanitation. Spatially referenced census data were acquired for Colombia, South Africa, Egypt, and Uganda, whilst non-spatially referenced census data were acquired for Kenya. Four variants of the dissimilarity index were used to estimate geographic inequality in access to both services using large and small area units in each country through a cross-sectional, ecological study. Inequality was greatest for piped water in South Africa in 2001 (based on 53 areas (N) with a median population (MP) of 657,015; D = 0.5599) and lowest for access to an improved water source in Uganda in 2008 (N = 56; MP = 419,399; D = 0.2801). For sanitation, inequality was greatest for those lacking any facility in Kenya in 2009 (N = 158; MP = 216,992; D = 0.6981), and lowest for access to an improved facility in Uganda in 2002 (N = 56; MP = 341,954; D = 0.3403). Although dissimilarity index values were greater for smaller areal units, when study countries were ranked in terms of inequality, these ranks remained unaffected by the choice of large or small areal units. International comparability was limited due to definitional and temporal differences between censuses. This five-country study suggests that patterns of inequality for broad regional units do often reflect inequality in service access at a more local scale. This implies household surveys designed to estimate province-level service coverage can provide valuable insights into geographic inequality at lower levels. In comparison with household surveys, censuses facilitate inequality assessment at different spatial scales, but pose challenges in harmonising water and sanitation typologies across countries.

  15. Spatial access to sterile syringes and the odds of injecting with an unsterile syringe among injectors: a longitudinal multilevel study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Hannah; Des Jarlais, Don; Ross, Zev; Tempalski, Barbara; Bossak, Brian H; Friedman, Samuel R

    2012-08-01

    Despite the 2010 repeal of the ban on spending federal monies to fund syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in the U.S.A., these interventions--and specifically SEP site locations--remain controversial. To further inform discussions about the location of SEP sites, this longitudinal multilevel study investigates the relationship between spatial access to sterile syringes distributed by SEPs in New York City (NYC) United Hospital Fund (UHF) districts and injecting with an unsterile syringe among injectors over time (1995-2006). Annual measures of spatial access to syringes in each UHF district (N = 42) were created using data on SEP site locations and site-specific syringe distribution data. Individual-level data on unsterile injecting among injectors (N = 4,067) living in these districts, and on individual-level covariates, were drawn from the Risk Factors study, an ongoing cross-sectional study of NYC drug users. We used multilevel models to explore the relationship of district-level access to syringes to the odds of injecting with an unsterile syringe in >75% of injection events in the past 6 months, and to test whether this relationship varied by district-level arrest rates (per 1,000 residents) for drug and drug paraphernalia possession. The relationship between district-level access to syringes and the odds of injecting with an unsterile syringe depended on district-level arrest rates. In districts with low baseline arrest rates, better syringe access was associated with a decline in the odds of frequently injecting with an unsterile syringe (AOR, 0.95). In districts with no baseline syringe access, higher arrest rates were associated with increased odds of frequently injecting with an unsterile syringe (AOR, 1.02) When both interventions were present, arrest rates eroded the protective effects of spatial access to syringes. Spatial access to syringes in small geographic areas appears to reduce the odds of injecting with an unsterile syringe among local

  16. Optimizing spatial filters with kernel methods for BCI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiacai; Tang, Jianjun; Yao, Li

    2007-11-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) is a communication or control system in which the user's messages or commands do not depend on the brain's normal output channels. The key step of BCI technology is to find a reliable method to detect the particular brain signals, such as the alpha, beta and mu components in EEG/ECOG trials, and then translate it into usable control signals. In this paper, our objective is to introduce a novel approach that is able to extract the discriminative pattern from the non-stationary EEG signals based on the common spatial patterns(CSP) analysis combined with kernel methods. The basic idea of our Kernel CSP method is performing a nonlinear form of CSP by the use of kernel methods that can efficiently compute the common and distinct components in high dimensional feature spaces related to input space by some nonlinear map. The algorithm described here is tested off-line with dataset I from the BCI Competition 2005. Our experiments show that the spatial filters employed with kernel CSP can effectively extract discriminatory information from single-trial EGOG recorded during imagined movements. The high recognition of linear discriminative rates and computational simplicity of "Kernel Trick" make it a promising method for BCI systems.

  17. Mapping the spatial variability of plant diversity in a tropical forest: comparison of spatial interpolation methods.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Stefanoni, J Luis; Ponce-Hernandez, Raul

    2006-06-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution of plant species is essential to conservation and forest managers in order to identify high priority areas such as vulnerable species and habitats, and designate areas for reserves, refuges and other protected areas. A reliable map of the diversity of plant species over the landscape is an invaluable tool for such purposes. In this study, the number of species, the exponent Shannon and the reciprocal Simpson indices, calculated from 141 quadrat sites sampled in a tropical forest were used to compare the performance of several spatial interpolation techniques used to prepare a map of plant diversity, starting from sample (point) data over the landscape. Means of mapped classes, inverse distance functions, kriging and co-kriging, both, applied over the entire studied landscape and also applied within vegetation classes, were the procedures compared. Significant differences in plant diversity indices between classes demonstrated the usefulness of boundaries between vegetation types, mapped through satellite image classification, in stratifying the variability of plant diversity over the landscape. These mapped classes, improved the accuracy of the interpolation methods when they were used as prior information for stratification of the area. Spatial interpolation by co-kriging performed among the poorest interpolators due to the poor correlation between the plant diversity variables and vegetation indices computed by remote sensing and used as covariables. This indicated that the latter are not suitable covariates of plant diversity indices. Finally, a within-class kriging interpolator yielded the most accurate estimates of plant diversity values. This interpolator not only provided the most accurate estimates by accounting for the indices' intra-class variability, but also provided additional useful interpretations of the structure of spatial variability of diversity values through the interpretation of their semi-variograms. This

  18. Methods of photoelectrode characterization with high spatial and temporal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, Daniel V.; Baxter, Jason B.; John, Jimmy; Lewis, Nathan S.; Moffat, Thomas P.; Ogitsu, Tadashi; O'Neil, Glen D.; Pham, Tuan Anh; Talin, A. Alec; Velazquez, Jesus M.; Wood, Brandon C.

    2015-06-19

    Here, materials and photoelectrode architectures that are highly efficient, extremely stable, and made from low cost materials are required for commercially viable photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting technology. A key challenge is the heterogeneous nature of real-world materials, which often possess spatial variation in their crystal structure, morphology, and/or composition at the nano-, micro-, or macro-scale. Different structures and compositions can have vastly different properties and can therefore strongly influence the overall performance of the photoelectrode through complex structure–property relationships. A complete understanding of photoelectrode materials would also involve elucidation of processes such as carrier collection and electrochemical charge transfer that occur at very fast time scales. We present herein an overview of a broad suite of experimental and computational tools that can be used to define the structure–property relationships of photoelectrode materials at small dimensions and on fast time scales. A major focus is on in situ scanning-probe measurement (SPM) techniques that possess the ability to measure differences in optical, electronic, catalytic, and physical properties with nano- or micro-scale spatial resolution. In situ ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, used to probe carrier dynamics involved with processes such as carrier generation, recombination, and interfacial charge transport, are also discussed. Complementing all of these experimental techniques are computational atomistic modeling tools, which can be invaluable for interpreting experimental results, aiding in materials discovery, and interrogating PEC processes at length and time scales not currently accessible by experiment. In addition to reviewing the basic capabilities of these experimental and computational techniques, we highlight key opportunities and limitations of applying these tools for the development of PEC materials.

  19. Methods of photoelectrode characterization with high spatial and temporal resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Esposito, Daniel V.; Baxter, Jason B.; John, Jimmy; ...

    2015-06-19

    Here, materials and photoelectrode architectures that are highly efficient, extremely stable, and made from low cost materials are required for commercially viable photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting technology. A key challenge is the heterogeneous nature of real-world materials, which often possess spatial variation in their crystal structure, morphology, and/or composition at the nano-, micro-, or macro-scale. Different structures and compositions can have vastly different properties and can therefore strongly influence the overall performance of the photoelectrode through complex structure–property relationships. A complete understanding of photoelectrode materials would also involve elucidation of processes such as carrier collection and electrochemical charge transfer that occurmore » at very fast time scales. We present herein an overview of a broad suite of experimental and computational tools that can be used to define the structure–property relationships of photoelectrode materials at small dimensions and on fast time scales. A major focus is on in situ scanning-probe measurement (SPM) techniques that possess the ability to measure differences in optical, electronic, catalytic, and physical properties with nano- or micro-scale spatial resolution. In situ ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, used to probe carrier dynamics involved with processes such as carrier generation, recombination, and interfacial charge transport, are also discussed. Complementing all of these experimental techniques are computational atomistic modeling tools, which can be invaluable for interpreting experimental results, aiding in materials discovery, and interrogating PEC processes at length and time scales not currently accessible by experiment. In addition to reviewing the basic capabilities of these experimental and computational techniques, we highlight key opportunities and limitations of applying these tools for the development of PEC materials.« less

  20. Reconceptualising Access in Education Policy: Method and Mindset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vongalis-Macrow, Athena

    2010-01-01

    Enhancing access to education and knowledge is a long-held principle enshrined in education policy. Access to education offers leverage for educational attainment and achievement, at the individual and social levels. In policy, the term equates with concepts of inclusion, social justice and equity. Over the last decades, as education policy has…

  1. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  2. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-11-23

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  3. Comparison of RF spectrum prediction methods for dynamic spectrum access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovarskiy, Jacob A.; Martone, Anthony F.; Gallagher, Kyle A.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic spectrum access (DSA) refers to the adaptive utilization of today's busy electromagnetic spectrum. Cognitive radio/radar technologies require DSA to intelligently transmit and receive information in changing environments. Predicting radio frequency (RF) activity reduces sensing time and energy consumption for identifying usable spectrum. Typical spectrum prediction methods involve modeling spectral statistics with Hidden Markov Models (HMM) or various neural network structures. HMMs describe the time-varying state probabilities of Markov processes as a dynamic Bayesian network. Neural Networks model biological brain neuron connections to perform a wide range of complex and often non-linear computations. This work compares HMM, Multilayer Perceptron (MLP), and Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) algorithms and their ability to perform RF channel state prediction. Monte Carlo simulations on both measured and simulated spectrum data evaluate the performance of these algorithms. Generalizing spectrum occupancy as an alternating renewal process allows Poisson random variables to generate simulated data while energy detection determines the occupancy state of measured RF spectrum data for testing. The results suggest that neural networks achieve better prediction accuracy and prove more adaptable to changing spectral statistics than HMMs given sufficient training data.

  4. A random spatial sampling method in a rural developing nation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonrandom sampling of populations in developing nations has limitations and can inaccurately estimate health phenomena, especially among hard-to-reach populations such as rural residents. However, random sampling of rural populations in developing nations can be challenged by incomplete enumeration of the base population. Methods We describe a stratified random sampling method using geographical information system (GIS) software and global positioning system (GPS) technology for application in a health survey in a rural region of Guatemala, as well as a qualitative study of the enumeration process. Results This method offers an alternative sampling technique that could reduce opportunities for bias in household selection compared to cluster methods. However, its use is subject to issues surrounding survey preparation, technological limitations and in-the-field household selection. Application of this method in remote areas will raise challenges surrounding the boundary delineation process, use and translation of satellite imagery between GIS and GPS, and household selection at each survey point in varying field conditions. This method favors household selection in denser urban areas and in new residential developments. Conclusions Random spatial sampling methodology can be used to survey a random sample of population in a remote region of a developing nation. Although this method should be further validated and compared with more established methods to determine its utility in social survey applications, it shows promise for use in developing nations with resource-challenged environments where detailed geographic and human census data are less available. PMID:24716473

  5. Rural veteran access to healthcare services: investigating the role of information and communication technologies in overcoming spatial barriers.

    PubMed

    Schooley, Benjamin L; Horan, Thomas A; Lee, Pamela W; West, Priscilla A

    2010-04-01

    This multimethod pilot study examined patient and practitioner perspectives on the influence of spatial barriers to healthcare access and the role of health information technology in overcoming these barriers. The study included a survey administered to patients attending a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health visit, and a focus group with VA care providers. Descriptive results and focus group findings are presented. Spatial distance is a significant factor for many rural veterans when seeking healthcare. For this sample of rural veterans, a range of telephone, computer, and Internet technologies may become more important for accessing care as Internet access becomes more ubiquitous and as younger veterans begin using the VA health system. The focus group highlighted the negative impact of distance, economic considerations, geographic barriers, and specific medical conditions on access to care. Lack of adequate technology infrastructure was seen as an obstacle to utilization. This study discusses the need to consider distance, travel modes, age, and information technology infrastructure and adoption when designing health information technology to care for rural patients.

  6. Rural Veteran Access to Healthcare Services: Investigating the Role of Information and Communication Technologies in Overcoming Spatial Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Schooley, Benjamin L; Horan, Thomas A; Lee, Pamela W; West, Priscilla A

    2010-01-01

    This multimethod pilot study examined patient and practitioner perspectives on the influence of spatial barriers to healthcare access and the role of health information technology in overcoming these barriers. The study included a survey administered to patients attending a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health visit, and a focus group with VA care providers. Descriptive results and focus group findings are presented. Spatial distance is a significant factor for many rural veterans when seeking healthcare. For this sample of rural veterans, a range of telephone, computer, and Internet technologies may become more important for accessing care as Internet access becomes more ubiquitous and as younger veterans begin using the VA health system. The focus group highlighted the negative impact of distance, economic considerations, geographic barriers, and specific medical conditions on access to care. Lack of adequate technology infrastructure was seen as an obstacle to utilization. This study discusses the need to consider distance, travel modes, age, and information technology infrastructure and adoption when designing health information technology to care for rural patients. PMID:20697468

  7. Toward a Next Generation of Widely Accessible Spatial Interfaces: Mobile VR Environments for Patients with Persistent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, David; Korsakov, Fedor; Jolton, Joseph; Keefe, Francis J.; Haley, Alex; Keefe, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a series of multi-modal spatial interfaces and virtual environments that can be implemented with widely accessible virtual reality (VR) technologies. The results demonstrate and evaluate the new degree to which rich virtual experiences involving motion sensing, physiological inputs, stereoscopic imagery, sound, and haptic feedback can now be created using low-cost (e.g., mobile phone based) VR environments. Adapting spatial interfaces to these new platforms can open up exciting new application areas for VR. This is demonstrated through a series of prototype systems aimed at delivering in-home VR therapies to patients suffering from persistent pain conditions (e.g. arthritis pain, cancer pain). A rich spatial interface and visual aesthetic is particularly important for the success of these applications; thus an interdisciplinary team with expertise in technology, design, meditation, and the psychology of pain worked together to iteratively develop and evaluate the current prototypes. PMID:24807994

  8. A random spatial sampling method in a rural developing nation.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Michelle C; Bream, Kent D W; Barg, Frances K; Branas, Charles C

    2014-04-10

    Nonrandom sampling of populations in developing nations has limitations and can inaccurately estimate health phenomena, especially among hard-to-reach populations such as rural residents. However, random sampling of rural populations in developing nations can be challenged by incomplete enumeration of the base population. We describe a stratified random sampling method using geographical information system (GIS) software and global positioning system (GPS) technology for application in a health survey in a rural region of Guatemala, as well as a qualitative study of the enumeration process. This method offers an alternative sampling technique that could reduce opportunities for bias in household selection compared to cluster methods. However, its use is subject to issues surrounding survey preparation, technological limitations and in-the-field household selection. Application of this method in remote areas will raise challenges surrounding the boundary delineation process, use and translation of satellite imagery between GIS and GPS, and household selection at each survey point in varying field conditions. This method favors household selection in denser urban areas and in new residential developments. Random spatial sampling methodology can be used to survey a random sample of population in a remote region of a developing nation. Although this method should be further validated and compared with more established methods to determine its utility in social survey applications, it shows promise for use in developing nations with resource-challenged environments where detailed geographic and human census data are less available.

  9. A Spatially Explicit Method for Prioritizing AIS Surveillance ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Choosing where to sample for aquatic invasive species (AIS) is a daunting challenge in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Management resources are finite hence it is important that monitoring efforts concentrate on those sites with the highest risk of introduction based on transparent criteria and assumptions and the best available data. Here we describe the development of a site prioritization method designed to address such challenges. The U.S. waters of the Great Lakes and tributaries were divided into standardized management units (9 km x 9 km). An index of invasion pressure was defined using a standardized set of spatial surrogates to estimate cumulative propagule pressure for each management unit. Weighting multipliers were applied to the attributed spatial surrogate data so that both historic patterns and future predicted patterns of introduction were incorporated into the final calculation of the index of invasion pressure for each management unit. Of the total of 5,953 management units in the U.S. Great Lakes basin (land and water), about 1,800 units have attributes resulting in index scores greater than zero. The site prioritization method can be used to select surveillance priorities for fish, invertebrates, and/or plants across the U.S. waters of the Great Lakes basin. not applicable

  10. Quantitative methods in electroencephalography to access therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Roseane Costa; Fontenele, Andrea Martins Melo; Carmo, Luiza Helena Araújo do; Ribeiro, Aurea Celeste da Costa; Sales, Fábio Henrique Silva; Monteiro, Sally Cristina Moutinho; Sousa, Ana Karoline Ferreira de Castro

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacometrics or Quantitative Pharmacology aims to quantitatively analyze the interaction between drugs and patients whose tripod: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and disease monitoring to identify variability in drug response. Being the subject of central interest in the training of pharmacists, this work was out with a view to promoting this idea on methods to access the therapeutic response of drugs with central action. This paper discusses quantitative methods (Fast Fourier Transform, Magnitude Square Coherence, Conditional Entropy, Generalised Linear semi-canonical Correlation Analysis, Statistical Parametric Network and Mutual Information Function) used to evaluate the EEG signals obtained after administration regimen of drugs, the main findings and their clinical relevance, pointing it as a contribution to construction of different pharmaceutical practice. Peter Anderer et. al in 2000 showed the effect of 20mg of buspirone in 20 healthy subjects after 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8h after oral ingestion of the drug. The areas of increased power of the theta frequency occurred mainly in the temporo-occipital - parietal region. It has been shown by Sampaio et al., 2007 that the use of bromazepam, which allows the release of GABA (gamma amino butyric acid), an inhibitory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system could theoretically promote dissociation of cortical functional areas, a decrease of functional connectivity, a decrease of cognitive functions by means of smaller coherence (electrophysiological magnitude measured from the EEG by software) values. Ahmad Khodayari-Rostamabad et al. in 2015 talk that such a measure could be a useful clinical tool potentially to assess adverse effects of opioids and hence give rise to treatment guidelines. There was the relation between changes in pain intensity and brain sources (at maximum activity locations) during remifentanil infusion despite its potent analgesic effect. The statement of mathematical and computational

  11. Temporal trends in spatial access to pharmacies that sell over-the-counter syringes in New York City health districts: relationship to local racial/ethnic composition and need.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Hannah L F; Bossak, Brian H; Tempalski, Barbara; Friedman, Samuel R; Des Jarlais, Don C

    2009-11-01

    Pharmacies that sell over-the-counter (OTC) syringes are a major source of sterile syringes for injection drug users in cities and states where such sales are legal. In these cities and states, however, black injectors are markedly less likely to acquire syringes from pharmacies than white injectors. The present analysis documents spatial and temporal trends in OTC pharmacy access in New York City health districts over time (2001-2006) and investigates whether these trends are related to district racial/ethnic composition and to local need for OTC pharmacies. For each year of the study period, we used kernel density estimation methods to characterize spatial access to OTC pharmacies within each health district. Higher values on this measure indicate better access to these pharmacies. "Need" was operationalized using two different measures: the number of newly diagnosed injection-related AIDS cases per 10,000 residents (averaged across 1999-2001), and the number of drug-related hospital discharges per 10,000 residents (averaged across 1999-2001). District sociodemographic characteristics were assessed using 2000 US decennial census data. We used hierarchical linear models (HLM) for descriptive and inferential analyses and investigated whether the relationship between need and temporal trajectories in the Expanded Syringe Access Demonstration Program access varied by district racial/ethnic composition, controlling for district poverty rates. HLM analyses indicate that the mean spatial access to OTC pharmacies across New York City health districts was 12.71 in 2001 and increased linearly by 1.32 units annually thereafter. Temporal trajectories in spatial access to OTC pharmacies depended on both need and racial/ethnic composition. Within high-need districts, OTC pharmacy access was twice as high in 2001 and increased three times faster annually, in districts with higher proportions of non-Hispanic white residents than in districts with low proportions of these

  12. k-tree method for high-speed spatial normalization.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, J L; Kochunov, P V; Fox, P T; Nickerson, D

    1998-01-01

    The general approach to spatial normalization using a deformation field is presented. Current high degree-of-freedom deformation methods are extremely time-consuming (10-40 hr), and a k-tree method is proposed to greatly reduce this time. A general k-tree method for analysis of source and target images and synthesis of deformation fields is described. The k-tree method simplifies scale control and feature extraction and matching, making it highly efficient. A two-dimensional (2-D), or quadtree, application program was developed for preliminary testing. The k-tree method was evaluated with 2-D images to test rotating ability, nonhomologous region matching, inner and outer brain-structure independence, and feasibility with human brain images. The results of these tests indicate that a three-dimensional (3-D), or octree, method is feasible. Preliminary work with an octree application program indicates that a processing time of under 10 min for 256(3) image arrays is attainable on a Sun Ultra30 workstation.

  13. A spatial shape constrained clustering method for mammographic mass segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jian-Yong; Yang, Xu-Lei; Cao, Ai-Ze

    2015-01-01

    A novel clustering method is proposed for mammographic mass segmentation on extracted regions of interest (ROIs) by using deterministic annealing incorporating circular shape function (DACF). The objective function reported in this study uses both intensity and spatial shape information, and the dominant dissimilarity measure is controlled by two weighting parameters. As a result, pixels having similar intensity information but located in different regions can be differentiated. Experimental results shows that, by using DACF, the mass segmentation results in digitized mammograms are improved with optimal mass boundaries, less number of noisy patches, and computational efficiency. An average probability of segmentation error of 7.18% for well-defined masses (or 8.06% for ill-defined masses) was obtained by using DACF on MiniMIAS database, with 5.86% (or 5.55%) and 6.14% (or 5.27%) improvements as compared to the standard DA and fuzzy c-means methods.

  14. Laparoscopic access overview: Is there a safest entry method?

    PubMed

    Bianchi, G; Martorana, E; Ghaith, A; Pirola, G M; Rani, M; Bove, P; Porpiglia, F; Manferrari, F; Micali, S

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopy is a minimally invasive technique to access the abdominal cavity, for diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Optimizing the access technique is an important step for laparoscopic procedures. The aim of this study is to assess the outcomes of different laparoscopic access techniques and to identify the safest one. Laparoscopic access questionnaire was forwarded via e-mail to the 60 centers who are partners in working group for laparoscopic and robotic surgery of the Italian Urological Society (SIU) and their American and European reference centers. The response rate was 68.33%. The total number of procedures considered was 65.636. 61.5% of surgeons use Veress needle to create pneumoperitoneum. Blind trocar technique is the most commonly used, but has the greatest number of complications. Optical trocar technique seems to be the safest, but it's the less commonly used. The 28,2% of surgeons adopt open Hasson's technique. Total intra-operative complications rate was 3.3%. Open conversion rate was 0.33%, transfusion rate was 1.13%, and total post-operative complication rate was 2.53%. Laparoscopic access is a safe technique with low complication rate. Most of complications can be managed conservatively or laparoscopically. The choice of access technique can affect the rate and type of complications and should be planned according to surgeon experience, safety of each technique and patient characteristics. All access types have perioperative complications. According with our study, optical trocar technique seems to be the safest. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Landscape-scale accessibility of livestock to tigers: implications of spatial grain for modeling predation risk to mitigate human-carnivore conflict.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer R B; Jhala, Yadvendradev V; Jena, Jyotirmay; Schmitz, Oswald J

    2015-03-01

    Innovative conservation tools are greatly needed to reduce livelihood losses and wildlife declines resulting from human-carnivore conflict. Spatial risk modeling is an emerging method for assessing the spatial patterns of predator-prey interactions, with applications for mitigating carnivore attacks on livestock. Large carnivores that ambush prey attack and kill over small areas, requiring models at fine spatial grains to predict livestock depredation hot spots. To detect the best resolution for predicting where carnivores access livestock, we examined the spatial attributes associated with livestock killed by tigers in Kanha Tiger Reserve, India, using risk models generated at 20, 100, and 200-m spatial grains. We analyzed land-use, human presence, and vegetation structure variables at 138 kill sites and 439 random sites to identify key landscape attributes where livestock were vulnerable to tigers. Land-use and human presence variables contributed strongly to predation risk models, with most variables showing high relative importance (≥0.85) at all spatial grains. The risk of a tiger killing livestock increased near dense forests and near the boundary of the park core zone where human presence is restricted. Risk was nonlinearly related to human infrastructure and open vegetation, with the greatest risk occurring 1.2 km from roads, 1.1 km from villages, and 8.0 km from scrubland. Kill sites were characterized by denser, patchier, and more complex vegetation with lower visibility than random sites. Risk maps revealed high-risk hot spots inside of the core zone boundary and in several patches in the human-dominated buffer zone. Validation against known kills revealed predictive accuracy for only the 20 m model, the resolution best representing the kill stage of hunting for large carnivores that ambush prey, like the tiger. Results demonstrate that risk models developed at fine spatial grains can offer accurate guidance on landscape attributes livestock should

  16. Landscape-scale accessibility of livestock to tigers: implications of spatial grain for modeling predation risk to mitigate human–carnivore conflict

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer R B; Jhala, Yadvendradev V; Jena, Jyotirmay; Schmitz, Oswald J

    2015-01-01

    Innovative conservation tools are greatly needed to reduce livelihood losses and wildlife declines resulting from human–carnivore conflict. Spatial risk modeling is an emerging method for assessing the spatial patterns of predator–prey interactions, with applications for mitigating carnivore attacks on livestock. Large carnivores that ambush prey attack and kill over small areas, requiring models at fine spatial grains to predict livestock depredation hot spots. To detect the best resolution for predicting where carnivores access livestock, we examined the spatial attributes associated with livestock killed by tigers in Kanha Tiger Reserve, India, using risk models generated at 20, 100, and 200-m spatial grains. We analyzed land-use, human presence, and vegetation structure variables at 138 kill sites and 439 random sites to identify key landscape attributes where livestock were vulnerable to tigers. Land-use and human presence variables contributed strongly to predation risk models, with most variables showing high relative importance (≥0.85) at all spatial grains. The risk of a tiger killing livestock increased near dense forests and near the boundary of the park core zone where human presence is restricted. Risk was nonlinearly related to human infrastructure and open vegetation, with the greatest risk occurring 1.2 km from roads, 1.1 km from villages, and 8.0 km from scrubland. Kill sites were characterized by denser, patchier, and more complex vegetation with lower visibility than random sites. Risk maps revealed high-risk hot spots inside of the core zone boundary and in several patches in the human-dominated buffer zone. Validation against known kills revealed predictive accuracy for only the 20 m model, the resolution best representing the kill stage of hunting for large carnivores that ambush prey, like the tiger. Results demonstrate that risk models developed at fine spatial grains can offer accurate guidance on landscape attributes livestock

  17. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods.

    PubMed

    Maximov, Ivan I; Vinding, Mads S; Tse, Desmond H Y; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Shah, N Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community.

  18. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, Ivan I.; Vinding, Mads S.; Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Shah, N. Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community.

  19. Numerical Weather Predictions Evaluation Using Spatial Verification Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegoulias, I.; Pytharoulis, I.; Kotsopoulos, S.; Kartsios, S.; Bampzelis, D.; Karacostas, T.

    2014-12-01

    During the last years high-resolution numerical weather prediction simulations have been used to examine meteorological events with increased convective activity. Traditional verification methods do not provide the desired level of information to evaluate those high-resolution simulations. To assess those limitations new spatial verification methods have been proposed. In the present study an attempt is made to estimate the ability of the WRF model (WRF -ARW ver3.5.1) to reproduce selected days with high convective activity during the year 2010 using those feature-based verification methods. Three model domains, covering Europe, the Mediterranean Sea and northern Africa (d01), the wider area of Greece (d02) and central Greece - Thessaly region (d03) are used at horizontal grid-spacings of 15km, 5km and 1km respectively. By alternating microphysics (Ferrier, WSM6, Goddard), boundary layer (YSU, MYJ) and cumulus convection (Kain-­-Fritsch, BMJ) schemes, a set of twelve model setups is obtained. The results of those simulations are evaluated against data obtained using a C-Band (5cm) radar located at the centre of the innermost domain. Spatial characteristics are well captured but with a variable time lag between simulation results and radar data. Acknowledgements: This research is co­financed by the European Union (European Regional Development Fund) and Greek national funds, through the action "COOPERATION 2011: Partnerships of Production and Research Institutions in Focused Research and Technology Sectors" (contract number 11SYN_8_1088 - DAPHNE) in the framework of the operational programme "Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship" and Regions in Transition (OPC II, NSRF 2007-­-2013).

  20. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  1. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  2. Shapes, spectra and new methods in nonlinear spatial optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Can

    For a myriad of optical applications, the quality of the light source is poor and the beam is inherently spatially partially-coherent. For this broad class of systems, wave dynamics depends not only on the wave intensity, but also on its distribution of spatial frequencies. Unfortunately, this entire spectrum of problems has often been overlooked - for reasons of theoretical ease or experimental difficulties. Here, we remedy this by demonstrating a novel experimental setup which, for the first time, allows arbitrarily modulation of the spatial spectra of light to obtain any distribution of interest. Using modulation instability as an example, we isolate the effect of different spectral shapes and observe distinct beam dynamics. Next, we turn to a thermodynamic description of the long-term evolution of statistical fields. For quantum systems, a major consequence is Bose-Einstein Condensation. However, recent theoretical studies have suggested that quantum mechanics is not necessary for the condensation process: classical waves with random phases can also self-organize into a coherent state. Starting from a random ensemble, nonlinear interactions can lead to a turbulent energy cascade towards longer spatial scales. In complete analogy with the kinetics of a gas system, there is a statistical dynamics of waves in which particle velocities map to wavepacket k-vectors while collisions are mimicked by four-wave mixing. As with collisions, each wave interaction is formally reversible, yet entropy principles mandate that the ensemble evolves towards an equilibrium state of maximum disorder. The result is an equipartition of energy, in the form of a Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum, with information about the condensation process recorded in small-scale fluctuations. Here, we give the first experimental observation of the condensation of classical waves in any media. Using classical light in a self-defocusing photorefractive, we observe all aspects of the condensation process

  3. Evaluating E-Learning Accessibility by Automated and Student-Centered Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Kari L.; Owston, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The use of learning technologies is becoming ubiquitous in higher education. As a result, there is a pressing need to develop methods to evaluate their accessibility to ensure that students do not encounter barriers to accessibility while engaging in e-learning. In this study, sample online units were evaluated for accessibility by automated tools…

  4. Bayesian method with spatial constraint for retinal vessel segmentation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiyong; Adel, Mouloud; Bourennane, Salah

    2013-01-01

    A Bayesian method with spatial constraint is proposed for vessel segmentation in retinal images. The proposed model makes the assumption that the posterior probability of each pixel is dependent on posterior probabilities of their neighboring pixels. An energy function is defined for the proposed model. By applying the modified level set approach to minimize the proposed energy function, we can identify blood vessels in the retinal image. Evaluation of the developed method is done on real retinal images which are from the DRIVE database and the STARE database. The performance is analyzed and compared to other published methods using a number of measures which include accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. The proposed approach is proved to be effective on these two databases. The average accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity on the DRIVE database are 0.9529, 0.7513, and 0.9792, respectively, and for the STARE database 0.9476, 0.7147, and 0.9735, respectively. The performance is better than that of other vessel segmentation methods.

  5. Spatial cross modulation method using a random diffuser and phase-only spatial light modulator for constructing arbitrary complex fields.

    PubMed

    Shibukawa, Atsushi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Tomita, Akihisa

    2014-02-24

    We propose a spatial cross modulation method using a random diffuser and a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM), by which arbitrary complex-amplitude fields can be generated with higher spatial resolution and diffraction efficiency than off-axis and double-phase computer-generated holograms. Our method encodes the original complex object as a phase-only diffusion image by scattering the complex object using a random diffuser. In addition, all incoming light to the SLM is consumed for a single diffraction order, making a diffraction efficiency of more than 90% possible. This method can be applied for holographic data storage, three-dimensional displays, and other such applications.

  6. Response Surface Methods for Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatial ly-re solved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/-30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-light, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center.

  7. The method of in vivo evaluation of hemostasis: Spatial thrombodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tuktamyshov, Rasikh; Zhdanov, Renad

    2015-12-01

    Coagulation is a cascade of reactions that eventually leads to formation of thrombin and fibrin. The two most frequently used tests to describe the coagulation system are activated partial thromboplastin time and international normalized ratio. Both tests are performed in vitro by mixing coagulation factors and measuring the time until the clot forms, but neither represents the biology of coagulation in vivo. To assess the diagnostic potential of thrombodynamics. Publications from potentially relevant journals were searched in Medline and by hand. In the spatial clot growth assay, hypercoagulability was characterized by quantitative and qualitative changes. It identified hypercoagulation in rats with induced microvascular thrombosis. The method was used to study coagulation in hemophilia after inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor. It may be used in platelet-free, platelet-poor, and platelet-rich plasma. In a small study the assay was able to predict thrombosis in patients with sepsis. Thrombodynamics is a promising method for measuring coagulation by imitation of in vivo conditions, and is being used in basic research. More work and correlative clinical investigations are still required to determine whether this method will be clinically useful in the future.

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease in Nigeria: An Evaluation of the Spatial Accessibility to Healthcare for Diagnosed Cases in Edo State

    PubMed Central

    Oviasu, Osaretin; Rigby, Janette E.; Ballas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing problem in Nigeria, presenting challenges to the nation’s health and economy. This study evaluates the accessibility to healthcare in Edo State of CKD patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2009. Using cost analysis techniques within a geographical information system, an estimated travel time to the hospital was used to examine the spatial accessibility of diagnosed patients to available CKD healthcare in the state. The results from the study indicated that although there was an annual rise in the number of diagnosed cases, there were no significant changes in the proportion of patients that were diagnosed at the last stage of CKD. However, there were indications that the travel time to the hospital for CKD treatment might be a contributing factor to the number of diagnosed CKD cases. This implies that the current structure for CKD management within the state might not be adequate. PMID:28299133

  9. Measurement of spatial distribution of total and accessible porosity in sedimentary rocks using isotopic radiation transmission: device design and testing.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Ranjit K; Hussein, Esam M A; Al, Tom A

    2010-03-01

    An isotopic radiation transmission technique for quantifying the spatial distribution of porosity in sedimentary rocks is presented. A device was designed and constructed to examine rock samples of volumes sufficiently large for studying solute migration in rocks, so that a one-millimeter spatial resolution is attained with measurement acquisition time of one point per second. The paper demonstrates how the device was optimized for these specifications, while abiding by the restrictions implicit in the utilization of the exponential law of radiation attenuation to quantify physical parameters. Total porosity was obtained from measurements of radiation attenuation in dry samples, while solute-accessible porosity was determined from measurements with samples saturated with either KNO(3) or KI solutions. Results are presented for three different rock types to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the technique. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation and minority composition are associated with better potential spatial access to the ground-truthed food environment in a large rural area.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Joseph R; Horel, Scott

    2008-03-01

    Little is known about spatial inequalities and potential access to the food environment in rural areas. In this study, we assessed the food environment in a 6-county rural region of Texas (11,567 km2) through ground-truthed methods that included direct observation and on-site Global Positioning System technology to examine the relationship between neighborhood inequalities (e.g., socioeconomic deprivation and minority composition) and network distance from all 101 rural neighborhoods to the nearest food store (FS). Neighborhood deprivation was determined from socioeconomic characteristics using 2000 census block group (CBG) data. Network distances were calculated from the population-weighted center of each CBG to the nearest supermarket, grocery, convenience, and discount store. Multiple regression models examined associations among deprivation, minority composition, population density, and network distance to the nearest FS. The median distance to the nearest supermarket was 14.9 km one way (range 0.12 to 54.0 km). The distance decreased with increasing deprivation, minority composition, and population density. The worst deprived neighborhoods with the greatest minority composition had better potential spatial access to the nearest FS. For >20% of all rural residents, their neighborhoods were at least 17.7 km from the nearest supermarket or full-line grocery or 7.6 km from the nearest convenience store. This makes food shopping a challenge, especially in rural areas that lack public transportation and where many have no vehicular access. Knowledge of potential access to the food environment is essential for combining environmental approaches and health interventions so that families, especially those in rural areas, can make healthier food choices.

  11. The OakMapper WebGIS: improved access to sudden oak death spatial data

    Treesearch

    K. Tuxen; M. Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Access to timely and accurate sudden oak death (SOD) location data is critical for SOD monitoring, management and research. Several websites (hereafter called the OakMapper sites) associated with sudden oak death monitoring efforts have been maintained with up-todate SOD location information for over five years, providing information and maps of the most current...

  12. Spatial-phase code-division multiple-access system with multiplexed Fourier holography switching for reconfigurable optical interconnection.

    PubMed

    Takasago, K; Takekawa, M; Shirakawa, A; Kannari, F

    2000-05-10

    A new, to our knowledge, space-variant optical interconnection system based on a spatial-phase code-division multiple-access technique with multiplexed Fourier holography is described. In this technique a signal beam is spread over wide spatial frequencies by an M-sequence pseudorandom phase code. At a receiver side a selected signal beam is properly decoded, and at the same time its spatial pattern is shaped with a Fourier hologram, which is recorded by light that is encoded with the same M-sequence phase mask as the desired signal beam and by light whose spatial beam pattern is shaped to a signal routing pattern. Using the multiplexed holography, we can simultaneously route multisignal flows into individually specified receiver elements. The routing pattern can also be varied by means of switching the encoding phase code or replacing the hologram. We demonstrated a proof-of-principle experiment with a doubly multiplexed hologram that enables simultaneous routing of two signal beams. Using a numerical model, we showed that the proposed scheme can manage more than 250 routing patterns for one signal flow with one multiplexed hologram at a signal-to-noise ratio of ~5.

  13. Mapping Population-Level Spatial Access to Essential Surgical Care in Ghana Using Availability of Bellwether Procedures.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Barclay T; Tansley, Gavin; Gyedu, Adam; Ofosu, Anthony; Donkor, Peter; Appiah-Denkyira, Ebenezer; Quansah, Robert; Clarke, Damian L; Volmink, Jimmy; Mock, Charles

    2016-08-17

    Conditions that can be treated by surgery comprise more than 16% of the global disease burden. However, 5 billion people do not have access to essential surgical care. An estimated 90% of the 87 million disability-adjusted life-years incurred by surgical conditions could be averted by providing access to timely and safe surgery in low-income and middle-income countries. Population-level spatial access to essential surgery in Ghana is not known. To assess the performance of bellwether procedures (ie, open fracture repair, emergency laparotomy, and cesarean section) as a proxy for performing essential surgery more broadly, to map population-level spatial access to essential surgery, and to identify first-level referral hospitals that would most improve access to essential surgery if strengthened in Ghana. Population-based study among all households and public and private not-for-profit hospitals in Ghana. Households were represented by georeferenced census data. First-level and second-level referral hospitals managed by the Ministry of Health and all tertiary hospitals were included. Surgical data were collected from January 1 to December 31, 2014. All procedures performed at first-level referral hospitals in Ghana in 2014 were used to sort each facility into 1 of the following 3 hospital groups: those without capability to perform all 3 bellwether procedures, those that performed 1 to 11 of each procedure, and those that performed at least 12 of each procedure. Candidates for targeted capability improvement were identified by cost-distance and network analysis. Of 155 first-level referral hospitals managed by the Ghana Health Service and the Christian Health Association of Ghana, 123 (79.4%) reported surgical data. Ninety-five (77.2%) did not have the capability in 2014 to perform all 3 bellwether procedures, 24 (19.5%) performed 1 to 11 of each bellwether procedure, and 4 (3.3%) performed at least 12. The essential surgical procedure rate was greater in bellwether

  14. Mapping Population-Level Spatial Access to Essential Surgical Care in Ghana Using Availability of Bellwether Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Barclay T.; Tansley, Gavin; Gyedu, Adam; Ofosu, Anthony; Donkor, Peter; Appiah-Denkyira, Ebenezer; Quansah, Robert; Clarke, Damian L.; Volmink, Jimmy; Mock, Charles

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Conditions that can be treated by surgery comprise more than 16% of the global disease burden. However, 5 billion people do not have access to essential surgical care. An estimated 90% of the 87 million disability-adjusted life-years incurred by surgical conditions could be averted by providing access to timely and safe surgery in low-income and middle-income countries. Population-level spatial access to essential surgery in Ghana is not known. OBJECTIVES To assess the performance of bellwether procedures (ie, open fracture repair, emergency laparotomy, and cesarean section) as a proxy for performing essential surgery more broadly, to map population-level spatial access to essential surgery, and to identify first-level referral hospitals that would most improve access to essential surgery if strengthened in Ghana. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Population-based study among all households and public and private not-for-profit hospitals in Ghana. Households were represented by georeferenced census data. First-level and second-level referral hospitals managed by the Ministry of Health and all tertiary hospitals were included. Surgical data were collected from January 1 to December 31, 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All procedures performed at first-level referral hospitals in Ghana in 2014 were used to sort each facility into 1 of the following 3 hospital groups: those without capability to perform all 3 bellwether procedures, those that performed 1 to 11 of each procedure, and those that performed at least 12 of each procedure. Candidates for targeted capability improvement were identified by cost-distance and network analysis. RESULTS Of 155 first-level referral hospitals managed by the Ghana Health Service and the Christian Health Association of Ghana, 123 (79.4%) reported surgical data. Ninety-five (77.2%) did not have the capability in 2014 to perform all 3 bellwether procedures, 24 (19.5%) performed 1 to 11 of each bellwether procedure, and 4 (3

  15. Spatial accessibility in suboptimally configured health care systems: a modified two-step floating catchment area (M2SFCA) metric.

    PubMed

    Delamater, Paul L

    2013-11-01

    The floating catchment area (FCA) family of metrics employ principles from gravity-based models to incorporate supply, demand, and distance in their characterization of the spatial accessibility of health care resources. Unlike traditional gravity models, the FCA metrics provide an output in highly interpretable container-like units (e.g., physicians per person). This work explores two significant issues related to FCA metrics. First, the Three Step Floating Catchment Area is critically examined. Next, the research shows that all FCA metrics contain an underlying assumption that supply locations are optimally configured to meet the needs of the population within the system. Because truly optimal configurations are highly unlikely in real-world health care systems, a modified two-step floating catchment area (M2SFCA) metric is offered to address this issue. The M2SFCA is built upon previous FCA metrics, but allows for spatial accessibility to be discounted as a result of the suboptimal configuration of health care facilities within the system. The utility of the new metric is demonstrated through simulated data examples and a case study exploring acute care hospitals in Michigan. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spatial contrast sensitivity - Effects of age, test-retest, and psychophysical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, Kent E.; Jaffe, Myles J.; Caruso, Rafael C.; Demonasterio, Francisco M.

    1988-01-01

    Two different psychophysical methods were used to test the spatial contrast sensitivity in normal subjects from five age groups. The method of adjustment showed a decline in sensitivity with increasing age at all spatial frequencies, while the forced-choice procedure showed an age-related decline predominantly at high spatial frequencies. It is suggested that a neural component is responsible for this decline.

  17. Spatial and temporal variability of Antarctic precipitation from atmospheric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Cullather, R.L.; Bromwich, D.H.; Van Woert, M.L.

    1998-03-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of net precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation/sublimation) for Antarctica derived from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts operational analyses via the atmospheric moisture budget is assessed in comparison to a variety of glaciological and meteorological observations and datasets. For the 11-yr period 1985-95, the average continental value is 151 mm yr{sup {minus}1} water equivalent. Large regional differences with other datasets are identified, and the sources of error are considered. Interannual variability in the Southern Ocean storm tracks is found to be an important mechanism for enhanced precipitation minus evaporation (P-E) in both east and west Antarctica. In relation to the present findings, an evaluation of the rawinsonde method for estimating net precipitation in east Antarctica is conducted. Estimates of P-E using synthetic rawinsondes derived from the analyses are found to compare favorably to glaciological estimates. A significant upward trend of 2.4 mm yr{sup {minus}1} is found for the Antarctic continent that is consistent with findings from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, formerly the National Meteorological Center, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis precipitation dataset. Despite large regional discrepancies, the general agreement on the main features of Antarctic precipitation between studies suggests that a threshold has been reached, where the assessment of the smaller terms including evaporation/sublimation and drift snow loss is required to explain the differences. 76 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  18. An address geocoding method for improving rural spatial information infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuchun; Chen, Baisong; Lu, Zhou; Li, Shuhua; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhou, YanBing

    2010-11-01

    The transition of rural and agricultural management from divisional to integrated mode has highlighted the importance of data integration and sharing. Current data are mostly collected by specific department to satisfy their own needs and lake of considering on wider potential uses. This led to great difference in data format, semantic, and precision even in same area, which is a significant barrier for constructing an integrated rural spatial information system to support integrated management and decision-making. Considering the rural cadastral management system and postal zones, the paper designs a rural address geocoding method based on rural cadastral parcel. It puts forward a geocoding standard which consists of absolute position code, relative position code and extended code. It designs a rural geocoding database model, and addresses collection and update model. Then, based on the rural address geocoding model, it proposed a data model for rural agricultural resources management. The results show that the address coding based on postal code is stable and easy to memorize, two-dimensional coding based on the direction and distance is easy to be located and memorized, while extended code can enhance the extensibility and flexibility of address geocoding.

  19. An address geocoding method for improving rural spatial information infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuchun; Chen, Baisong; Lu, Zhou; Li, Shuhua; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhou, Yanbing

    2009-09-01

    The transition of rural and agricultural management from divisional to integrated mode has highlighted the importance of data integration and sharing. Current data are mostly collected by specific department to satisfy their own needs and lake of considering on wider potential uses. This led to great difference in data format, semantic, and precision even in same area, which is a significant barrier for constructing an integrated rural spatial information system to support integrated management and decision-making. Considering the rural cadastral management system and postal zones, the paper designs a rural address geocoding method based on rural cadastral parcel. It puts forward a geocoding standard which consists of absolute position code, relative position code and extended code. It designs a rural geocoding database model, and addresses collection and update model. Then, based on the rural address geocoding model, it proposed a data model for rural agricultural resources management. The results show that the address coding based on postal code is stable and easy to memorize, two-dimensional coding based on the direction and distance is easy to be located and memorized, while extended code can enhance the extensibility and flexibility of address geocoding.

  20. A generic method for improving the spatial interoperability of medical and ecological databases.

    PubMed

    Ghenassia, A; Beuscart, J B; Ficheur, G; Occelli, F; Babykina, E; Chazard, E; Genin, M

    2017-10-03

    The availability of big data in healthcare and the intensive development of data reuse and georeferencing have opened up perspectives for health spatial analysis. However, fine-scale spatial studies of ecological and medical databases are limited by the change of support problem and thus a lack of spatial unit interoperability. The use of spatial disaggregation methods to solve this problem introduces errors into the spatial estimations. Here, we present a generic, two-step method for merging medical and ecological databases that avoids the use of spatial disaggregation methods, while maximizing the spatial resolution. Firstly, a mapping table is created after one or more transition matrices have been defined. The latter link the spatial units of the original databases to the spatial units of the final database. Secondly, the mapping table is validated by (1) comparing the covariates contained in the two original databases, and (2) checking the spatial validity with a spatial continuity criterion and a spatial resolution index. We used our novel method to merge a medical database (the French national diagnosis-related group database, containing 5644 spatial units) with an ecological database (produced by the French National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies, and containing with 36,594 spatial units). The mapping table yielded 5632 final spatial units. The mapping table's validity was evaluated by comparing the number of births in the medical database and the ecological databases in each final spatial unit. The median [interquartile range] relative difference was 2.3% [0; 5.7]. The spatial continuity criterion was low (2.4%), and the spatial resolution index was greater than for most French administrative areas. Our innovative approach improves interoperability between medical and ecological databases and facilitates fine-scale spatial analyses. We have shown that disaggregation models and large aggregation techniques are not necessarily the best ways to

  1. Differential Mobility Spectrometer with Spatial Ion Detector and Methods Related Thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A. (Inventor); Kanik, Isik (Inventor); Duong, Vu A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Differential mobility spectrometer with spatial ion detector and methods related thereto are disclosed. The use of one or more spatial detector within differential mobility spectrometry can provide for the identification and separation of ions with similar mobility and mass.

  2. Measuring access to medicines: a review of quantitative methods used in household surveys

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Medicine access is an important goal of medicine policy; however the evaluation of medicine access is a subject under conceptual and methodological development. The aim of this study was to describe quantitative methodologies to measure medicine access on household level, access expressed as paid or unpaid medicine acquisition. Methods Searches were carried out in electronic databases and health institutional sites; within references from retrieved papers and by contacting authors. Results Nine papers were located. The methodologies of the studies presented differences in the recall period, recruitment of subjects and medicine access characterization. Conclusions The standardization of medicine access indicators and the definition of appropriate recall periods are required to evaluate different medicines and access dimensions, improving studies comparison. Besides, specific keywords must be established to allow future literature reviews about this topic. PMID:20509960

  3. Investigating Granular Structure with Spatial and Temporal Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Eli Thomas

    This dissertation reports studies of the internal structure of jammed granular materials and how granular sound propagation and vibrational modes are influenced by disorder in particle positions and contact forces. We investigate the role of particle scale forces on sound amplitude and speed, how to characterize the bulk pressure via the density of states, and force network modularity. We perform our experiments on a vertical, 2D, photoelastic granular material. Acoustic waves are excited from the bottom of the system and observed via particle scale sensors and a high speed camera. This novel combination of spatial and temporal measurements allows us to observe the role of force chains in sound propagation. The sound amplitude is largest through particles with strong contact forces, and we see that sound travels fastest along high force paths, giving rise to multiple sound speeds. Combining acoustic excitations with a method from thermal physics, we developed a new method to measure the density of modes, D(f). From D( f), we define a critical frequency, fc, that scales with the bulk pressure, and comparing D( f) to Debye scaling, we find an excess of low frequency modes. Disorder in the force chain network and particle configurations plays a crucial role in D(f), as Debye scaling is only recovered for high pressure, hexagonally ordered packings. Finally, we characterize the force network by dividing it into modules of highly connected nodes. These communities become progressively more ordered as the pressure on the system is increased and the force chains become more uniform. Together, these studies illustrate the importance of the force chains in understanding static and dynamic granular properties.

  4. Early warning signals of ecological transitions: methods for spatial patterns.

    PubMed

    Kéfi, Sonia; Guttal, Vishwesha; Brock, William A; Carpenter, Stephen R; Ellison, Aaron M; Livina, Valerie N; Seekell, David A; Scheffer, Marten; van Nes, Egbert H; Dakos, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    A number of ecosystems can exhibit abrupt shifts between alternative stable states. Because of their important ecological and economic consequences, recent research has focused on devising early warning signals for anticipating such abrupt ecological transitions. In particular, theoretical studies show that changes in spatial characteristics of the system could provide early warnings of approaching transitions. However, the empirical validation of these indicators lag behind their theoretical developments. Here, we summarize a range of currently available spatial early warning signals, suggest potential null models to interpret their trends, and apply them to three simulated spatial data sets of systems undergoing an abrupt transition. In addition to providing a step-by-step methodology for applying these signals to spatial data sets, we propose a statistical toolbox that may be used to help detect approaching transitions in a wide range of spatial data. We hope that our methodology together with the computer codes will stimulate the application and testing of spatial early warning signals on real spatial data.

  5. Early Warning Signals of Ecological Transitions: Methods for Spatial Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Brock, William A.; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Livina, Valerie N.; Seekell, David A.; Scheffer, Marten; van Nes, Egbert H.; Dakos, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    A number of ecosystems can exhibit abrupt shifts between alternative stable states. Because of their important ecological and economic consequences, recent research has focused on devising early warning signals for anticipating such abrupt ecological transitions. In particular, theoretical studies show that changes in spatial characteristics of the system could provide early warnings of approaching transitions. However, the empirical validation of these indicators lag behind their theoretical developments. Here, we summarize a range of currently available spatial early warning signals, suggest potential null models to interpret their trends, and apply them to three simulated spatial data sets of systems undergoing an abrupt transition. In addition to providing a step-by-step methodology for applying these signals to spatial data sets, we propose a statistical toolbox that may be used to help detect approaching transitions in a wide range of spatial data. We hope that our methodology together with the computer codes will stimulate the application and testing of spatial early warning signals on real spatial data. PMID:24658137

  6. Neighborhood deprivation, vehicle ownership, and potential spatial access to a variety of fruits and vegetables in a large rural area in Texas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective There has been limited study of all types of food stores, such as traditional (supercenters, supermarkets, and grocery stores), convenience stores, and non-traditional (dollar stores, mass merchandisers, and pharmacies) as potential opportunities for purchase of fresh and processed (canned and frozen) fruits and vegetables, especially in small-town or rural areas. Methods Data from the Brazos Valley Food Environment Project (BVFEP) are combined with 2000 U.S. Census data for 101 Census block groups (CBG) to examine neighborhood access to fruits and vegetables. BVFEP data included identification and geocoding of all food stores (n = 185) in six rural counties in Texas, using ground-truthed methods and on-site assessment of the availability and variety of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables in all food stores. Access from the population-weighted centroid of each CBG was measured using proximity (minimum network distance) and coverage (number of shopping opportunities) for a good selection of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables. Neighborhood inequalities (deprivation and vehicle ownership) and spatial access for fruits and vegetables were examined using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test and multivariate regression models. Results The variety of fruits or vegetables was greater at supermarkets compared with grocery stores. Among non-traditional and convenience food stores, the largest variety was found at dollar stores. On average, rural neighborhoods were 9.9 miles to the nearest supermarket, 6.7 miles and 7.4 miles to the nearest food store with a good variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, respectively, and 4.7 miles and 4.5 miles to a good variety of fresh and processed fruits or vegetables. High deprivation or low vehicle ownership neighborhoods had better spatial access to a good variety of fruits and vegetables, both in the distance to the nearest source and in the number of shopping opportunities. Conclusion Supermarkets and grocery

  7. Assessing the performance of the independence method in modeling spatial extreme rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Feifei; Thibaud, Emeric; Leonard, Michael; Westra, Seth

    2015-09-01

    Spatial statistical methods are often employed to improve precision when estimating marginal distributions of extreme rainfall. Methods such as max-stable and copula models parameterize the spatial dependence and provide a continuous spatial representation. Alternatively, the independence method can be used to estimate marginal parameters without the need for parameterizing the spatial dependence, and this method has been under-utilized in hydrologic applications. This paper investigates the effectiveness of the independence method for marginal parameter estimation of spatially dependent extremes. Its performance is compared with three spatial dependence models (max-stable Brown-Resnick, max-stable Schlather, and Gaussian copula) by means of a simulation study. The independence method is statistically robust in estimating parameters and their associated confidence intervals for spatial extremes with various underlying dependence structures. The spatial dependence models perform comparably with the independence method when the spatial dependence structure is correctly specified; otherwise they exhibit considerably worse performance. We conclude that the independence method is more appealing for modeling the marginal distributions of spatial extremes (e.g., regional estimation of trends in rainfall extremes) due to its greater robustness and simplicity. The four statistical methods are illustrated using a spatial data set comprising 69 subdaily rainfall series from the Greater Sydney region, Australia.

  8. A Spatial Division Clustering Method and Low Dimensional Feature Extraction Technique Based Indoor Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yun; Zhang, Zhongzhao; Meng, Weixiao; Ma, Lin; Wang, Yao

    2014-01-01

    Indoor positioning systems based on the fingerprint method are widely used due to the large number of existing devices with a wide range of coverage. However, extensive positioning regions with a massive fingerprint database may cause high computational complexity and error margins, therefore clustering methods are widely applied as a solution. However, traditional clustering methods in positioning systems can only measure the similarity of the Received Signal Strength without being concerned with the continuity of physical coordinates. Besides, outage of access points could result in asymmetric matching problems which severely affect the fine positioning procedure. To solve these issues, in this paper we propose a positioning system based on the Spatial Division Clustering (SDC) method for clustering the fingerprint dataset subject to physical distance constraints. With the Genetic Algorithm and Support Vector Machine techniques, SDC can achieve higher coarse positioning accuracy than traditional clustering algorithms. In terms of fine localization, based on the Kernel Principal Component Analysis method, the proposed positioning system outperforms its counterparts based on other feature extraction methods in low dimensionality. Apart from balancing online matching computational burden, the new positioning system exhibits advantageous performance on radio map clustering, and also shows better robustness and adaptability in the asymmetric matching problem aspect. PMID:24451470

  9. A spatial division clustering method and low dimensional feature extraction technique based indoor positioning system.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yun; Zhang, Zhongzhao; Meng, Weixiao; Ma, Lin; Wang, Yao

    2014-01-22

    Indoor positioning systems based on the fingerprint method are widely used due to the large number of existing devices with a wide range of coverage. However, extensive positioning regions with a massive fingerprint database may cause high computational complexity and error margins, therefore clustering methods are widely applied as a solution. However, traditional clustering methods in positioning systems can only measure the similarity of the Received Signal Strength without being concerned with the continuity of physical coordinates. Besides, outage of access points could result in asymmetric matching problems which severely affect the fine positioning procedure. To solve these issues, in this paper we propose a positioning system based on the Spatial Division Clustering (SDC) method for clustering the fingerprint dataset subject to physical distance constraints. With the Genetic Algorithm and Support Vector Machine techniques, SDC can achieve higher coarse positioning accuracy than traditional clustering algorithms. In terms of fine localization, based on the Kernel Principal Component Analysis method, the proposed positioning system outperforms its counterparts based on other feature extraction methods in low dimensionality. Apart from balancing online matching computational burden, the new positioning system exhibits advantageous performance on radio map clustering, and also shows better robustness and adaptability in the asymmetric matching problem aspect.

  10. Interspecific interference competition at the resource patch scale: do large herbivores spatially avoid elephants while accessing water?

    PubMed

    Ferry, Nicolas; Dray, Stéphane; Fritz, Hervé; Valeix, Marion

    2016-11-01

    Animals may anticipate and try to avoid, at some costs, physical encounters with other competitors. This may ultimately impact their foraging distribution and intake rates. Such cryptic interference competition is difficult to measure in the field, and extremely little is known at the interspecific level. We tested the hypothesis that smaller species avoid larger ones because of potential costs of interference competition and hence expected them to segregate from larger competitors at the scale of a resource patch. We assessed fine-scale spatial segregation patterns between three African herbivore species (zebra Equus quagga, kudu Tragelaphus strepsiceros and giraffe Giraffa camelopardalis) and a megaherbivore, the African elephant Loxodonta africana, at the scale of water resource patches in the semi-arid ecosystem of Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. Nine waterholes were monitored every two weeks during the dry season of a drought year, and observational scans of the spatial distribution of all herbivores were performed every 15 min. We developed a methodological approach to analyse such fine-scale spatial data. Elephants increasingly used waterholes as the dry season progressed, as did the probability of co-occurrence and agonistic interaction with elephants for the three study species. All three species segregated from elephants at the beginning of the dry season, suggesting a spatial avoidance of elephants and the existence of costs of being close to them. However, contrarily to our expectations, herbivores did not segregate from elephants the rest of the dry season but tended to increasingly aggregate with elephants as the dry season progressed. We discuss these surprising results and the existence of a trade-off between avoidance of interspecific interference competition and other potential factors such as access to quality water, which may have relative associated costs that change with the time of the year. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring spatial uniformity of radiation

    DOEpatents

    Field, Halden

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the spatial uniformity of the intensity of a radiation beam from a radiation source based on a single sampling time and/or a single pulse of radiation. The measuring apparatus includes a plurality of radiation detectors positioned on planar mounting plate to form a radiation receiving area that has a shape and size approximating the size and shape of the cross section of the radiation beam. The detectors concurrently receive portions of the radiation beam and transmit electrical signals representative of the intensity of impinging radiation to a signal processor circuit connected to each of the detectors and adapted to concurrently receive the electrical signals from the detectors and process with a central processing unit (CPU) the signals to determine intensities of the radiation impinging at each detector location. The CPU displays the determined intensities and relative intensity values corresponding to each detector location to an operator of the measuring apparatus on an included data display device. Concurrent sampling of each detector is achieved by connecting to each detector a sample and hold circuit that is configured to track the signal and store it upon receipt of a "capture" signal. A switching device then selectively retrieves the signals and transmits the signals to the CPU through a single analog to digital (A/D) converter. The "capture" signal. is then removed from the sample-and-hold circuits. Alternatively, concurrent sampling is achieved by providing an A/D converter for each detector, each of which transmits a corresponding digital signal to the CPU. The sampling or reading of the detector signals can be controlled by the CPU or level-detection and timing circuit.

  12. Accessing topography-related spatial variability in crop yields using coupled agroecosystem-geomorphic modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatskikh, Dmitri; van Oost, Kristof

    2010-05-01

    A majority of the European arable fields is situated on rolling topographies, characterized by high in-field crop yields variability. In addition, geomorphic research has indicated that considerable within-field redistribution of soil material occurs. However, crop yield prognoses based on agroecosystem modelling typically characterize the soil system as static and as a point, i.e. as a single profile with generally unknown uncertainty. In order to improve the confidence levels for future agroecosystem development, it is essential to include this interaction between geomorphic and crop growth processes and to include uncertainty estimation while presenting the modelling results. We applied a spatially explicit approach in order to analyze relations between geomorphic processes, landscape position and crop growth. For this purpose, we use three computer experiments ("past", assuming homogenous soil properties; "present", time correspondent to the measured year; and "future", in 50 years from "today" assuming the same soil redistribution rates) using downscaling technique. The approach was developed by implicit combination of the FASSET agroecosystem model, dynamically simulated crop growth dependent on meteorological and soil conditions, and the SPEROS geomorphic model, dynamically simulated lateral transfers of soil material and nutrients in the given landscape. To evaluate the approach, site-specific experimental data for croplands from two European locations (Belgium and the UK) were used, differing in climatic conditions, soil properties and management. Besides spatial difference in meteorological and initial soil properties in the fields, twofold water effect on soil-crop modelling system was considered: (1) effect related to differences in water retention as a result of differences in soil properties (e.g. texture, SOM), and (2) effect related to the topographical position. The results clearly show that soil redistribution significantly affected crop yields in

  13. A spatial method to calculate small-scale fisheries effort in data poor scenarios.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew Frederick; Moreno-Báez, Marcia; Giron-Nava, Alfredo; Corominas, Julia; Erisman, Brad; Ezcurra, Exequiel; Aburto-Oropeza, Octavio

    2017-01-01

    To gauge the collateral impacts of fishing we must know where fishing boats operate and how much they fish. Although small-scale fisheries land approximately the same amount of fish for human consumption as industrial fleets globally, methods of estimating their fishing effort are comparatively poor. We present an accessible, spatial method of calculating the effort of small-scale fisheries based on two simple measures that are available, or at least easily estimated, in even the most data-poor fisheries: the number of boats and the local coastal human population. We illustrate the method using a small-scale fisheries case study from the Gulf of California, Mexico, and show that our measure of Predicted Fishing Effort (PFE), measured as the number of boats operating in a given area per day adjusted by the number of people in local coastal populations, can accurately predict fisheries landings in the Gulf. Comparing our values of PFE to commercial fishery landings throughout the Gulf also indicates that the current number of small-scale fishing boats in the Gulf is approximately double what is required to land theoretical maximum fish biomass. Our method is fishery-type independent and can be used to quantitatively evaluate the efficacy of growth in small-scale fisheries. This new method provides an important first step towards estimating the fishing effort of small-scale fleets globally.

  14. A spatial method to calculate small-scale fisheries effort in data poor scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Andrew Frederick; Moreno-Báez, Marcia; Giron-Nava, Alfredo; Corominas, Julia; Erisman, Brad; Ezcurra, Exequiel; Aburto-Oropeza, Octavio

    2017-01-01

    To gauge the collateral impacts of fishing we must know where fishing boats operate and how much they fish. Although small-scale fisheries land approximately the same amount of fish for human consumption as industrial fleets globally, methods of estimating their fishing effort are comparatively poor. We present an accessible, spatial method of calculating the effort of small-scale fisheries based on two simple measures that are available, or at least easily estimated, in even the most data-poor fisheries: the number of boats and the local coastal human population. We illustrate the method using a small-scale fisheries case study from the Gulf of California, Mexico, and show that our measure of Predicted Fishing Effort (PFE), measured as the number of boats operating in a given area per day adjusted by the number of people in local coastal populations, can accurately predict fisheries landings in the Gulf. Comparing our values of PFE to commercial fishery landings throughout the Gulf also indicates that the current number of small-scale fishing boats in the Gulf is approximately double what is required to land theoretical maximum fish biomass. Our method is fishery-type independent and can be used to quantitatively evaluate the efficacy of growth in small-scale fisheries. This new method provides an important first step towards estimating the fishing effort of small-scale fleets globally. PMID:28406918

  15. Assessing the spatial distribution of methadone clinic clients and their access to treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Using Geographic Information System (GIS), the spatial distribution of methadone clinic clients and their utilization of a treatment service in Hong Kong was analysed. A majority (93.7%) of the 63 methadone users recruited were residing in the same district, of which 84.1% spent not more than 15 minutes for traveling. Walking (55.6%) was the commonest transport mode followed by cycling (30.2%). There was no distance decay effect on traveling time, but an association between distance and transport selection could be demonstrated. The residence locations displayed a compact distribution, merging with the general population without any evidence of clustering. Though the distribution of methadone users could have been shaped by the location of clinic, it can also be concluded that methadone clinics at convenient locations are needed if maintenance is a key determinant of service effectiveness. PMID:20602756

  16. Neighborhood deprivation, vehicle ownership, and potential spatial access to a variety of fruits and vegetables in a large rural area in Texas.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Joseph R; Horel, Scott; Dean, Wesley R

    2010-05-25

    There has been limited study of all types of food stores, such as traditional (supercenters, supermarkets, and grocery stores), convenience stores, and non-traditional (dollar stores, mass merchandisers, and pharmacies) as potential opportunities for purchase of fresh and processed (canned and frozen) fruits and vegetables, especially in small-town or rural areas. Data from the Brazos Valley Food Environment Project (BVFEP) are combined with 2000 U.S. Census data for 101 Census block groups (CBG) to examine neighborhood access to fruits and vegetables. BVFEP data included identification and geocoding of all food stores (n = 185) in six rural counties in Texas, using ground-truthed methods and on-site assessment of the availability and variety of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables in all food stores. Access from the population-weighted centroid of each CBG was measured using proximity (minimum network distance) and coverage (number of shopping opportunities) for a good selection of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables. Neighborhood inequalities (deprivation and vehicle ownership) and spatial access for fruits and vegetables were examined using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test and multivariate regression models. The variety of fruits or vegetables was greater at supermarkets compared with grocery stores. Among non-traditional and convenience food stores, the largest variety was found at dollar stores. On average, rural neighborhoods were 9.9 miles to the nearest supermarket, 6.7 miles and 7.4 miles to the nearest food store with a good variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, respectively, and 4.7 miles and 4.5 miles to a good variety of fresh and processed fruits or vegetables. High deprivation or low vehicle ownership neighborhoods had better spatial access to a good variety of fruits and vegetables, both in the distance to the nearest source and in the number of shopping opportunities. Supermarkets and grocery stores are no longer the only

  17. Action Research to Improve Methods of Delivery and Feedback in an Access Grid Room Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Lynne C.; Klass, Lara; Eberhard, Andrew; Stacey, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study which was undertaken to improve the delivery methods and feedback opportunity in honours mathematics lectures which are delivered through Access Grid Rooms. Access Grid Rooms are facilities that provide two-way video and audio interactivity across multiple sites, with the inclusion of smart boards. The…

  18. Action Research to Improve Methods of Delivery and Feedback in an Access Grid Room Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Lynne C.; Klass, Lara; Eberhard, Andrew; Stacey, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study which was undertaken to improve the delivery methods and feedback opportunity in honours mathematics lectures which are delivered through Access Grid Rooms. Access Grid Rooms are facilities that provide two-way video and audio interactivity across multiple sites, with the inclusion of smart boards. The…

  19. Final Report: Advanced Methods for Accessing and Disseminating Nuclear Data, August 13, 1996 - March 15, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Craig A.

    1999-03-15

    Scientific Digital Visions, Inc. developed methods of accessing and dissemination nuclear data contained within the databases of the National Data Center (NNDC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory supporting a long standing and important DOE Program to provide scientists access to NNDC Databases. The NNDC participated as a partner in this effort.

  20. Spatial analysis of agro-ecological data: Detection of spatial patterns combining three different methodical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuer, A.; Casper, M. C.; Vohland, M.

    2009-04-01

    Processes in natural systems and the resulting patterns occur in ecological space and time. To study natural structures and to understand the functional processes it is necessary to identify the relevant spatial and temporal space at which these all occur; or with other words to isolate spatial and temporal patterns. In this contribution we will concentrate on the spatial aspects of agro-ecological data analysis. Data were derived from two agricultural plots, each of about 5 hectares, in the area of Newel, located in Western Palatinate, Germany. The plots had been conventionally cultivated with a crop rotation of winter rape, winter wheat and spring barley. Data about physical and chemical soil properties, vegetation and topography were i) collected by measurements in the field during three vegetation periods (2005-2008) and/or ii) derived from hyperspectral image data, acquired by a HyMap airborne imaging sensor (2005). To detect spatial variability within the plots, we applied three different approaches that examine and describe relationships among data. First, we used variography to get an overview of the data. A comparison of the experimental variograms facilitated to distinguish variables, which seemed to occur in related or dissimilar spatial space. Second, based on data available in raster-format basic cell statistics were conducted, using a geographic information system. Here we could make advantage of the powerful classification and visualization tool, which supported the spatial distribution of patterns. Third, we used an approach that is being used for visualization of complex highly dimensional environmental data, the Kohonen self-organizing map. The self-organizing map (SOM) uses multidimensional data that gets further reduced in dimensionality (2-D) to detect similarities in data sets and correlation between single variables. One of SOM's advantages is its powerful visualization capability. The combination of the three approaches leads to

  1. Louisiana coastal GIS network: Graphical user interface for access to spatial data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hiland, Matteson; McBride, Randolph A.; Davis, Donald; Braud, Dewitt; Streiffer, Henry; Jones, Farrell; Lewis, Anthony; Williams, S.

    1991-01-01

    Louisiana's coastal wetlands support a large percentage of the nation's seafood and fur industries, vast deposits of oil and natural gas, habitat for thousands of species of plants and animals, winter nesting grounds and migratory paths for numerous waterfowl, and many recreational resources enjoyed by residents and tourists. Louisiana's wetlands also have the highest rates of coastal erosion and wetland loss in the nation. While numerous studies across many disciplines have been conducted on both local and regional scales, no complete inventory exists for this information. The Louisiana Coastal Geographic Information System Network (LCGISN) is currently being developed to facilitate access to existing data for coastal zone planners, managers, and researchers. The Louisiana Geological Survey (LGS), in cooperation with the LSU Department of Geography and Anthropology, the Computer Aided Design and Geographic Information Systems Research Laboratory (CADGIS), and others, is pursuing this project under the terms of a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey. LCGISN is an automated system for searching and retrieving geographic, cartographic, and bibliographic data. By linking original programming with an existing GIS software package and an industry standard relational database management system, LCGISN will provide the capability for users to search for data references by interactively defining the area of interest on a displayed map/image reference background. Several agencies will be networked to provide easy access to a wide variety of information. LCGISN, with its headquarters at LGS, will serve as the central node on the network, providing data format conversions, projection and datum transformations, and storage of several of the most commonly used data sets. Thematic mapper data, USGS 7.5-minute quadrangle map boundaries, political and legal boundaries, major transportation routes, and other digital data will provide a base map to aid the user in

  2. Spatial accessibility of drug treatment facilities and the effects on locus of control, drug use, and service use among heroin-injecting Mexican American men.

    PubMed

    Kao, Dennis; Torres, Luis R; Guerrero, Erick G; Mauldin, Rebecca L; Bordnick, Patrick S

    2014-05-01

    This study explores the spatial accessibility of outpatient drug treatment facilities and the potential relationship with drug use-related outcomes among Mexican American heroin users. Secondary data on 219 current and former heroin-injecting Mexican American men aged 45 and older were drawn from a research study in Houston, Texas. We used geographic information systems (GIS) to derive two spatial accessibility measures: distance from one's place of residence to the closest drug treatment facility (in minutes); and the number of facilities within a 10-minute driving distance from one's place of residence. Exploratory logistic regression analyses examined the association between the spatial accessibility of drug treatment facilities and several drug use-related outcomes: internal locus of control (LOC); perceived chances and worries of injecting in the next six months; treatment utilization; and location of last heroin purchase. Participants with greater spatial access to treatment programs were more likely to report a higher chance of injecting in the near future. However, while current heroin users were more worried about injecting in the next six months, greater spatial access to treatment programs seemed to have a buffering effect. Finally, those who lived closer to a treatment programs were more likely to have last purchased heroin inside the neighborhood versus outside the neighborhood. Spatial accessibility was not associated with internal LOC or treatment utilization. The findings showed that the presence of outpatient treatment facilities-particularly services in Spanish-may influence perceived risk of future heroin use and purchasing behaviors among Mexican American men. Implications for future spatially-informed drug use research and the planning of culturally and linguistically responsive drug treatment programs are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Earth System Grid Federation: An Open Infrastructure for Access to Distributed Geo-Spatial Data

    SciTech Connect

    Cinquini, Luca; Crichton, Daniel; Miller, Neill; Mattmann, Chris; Harney, John F; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi; Bell, Gavin; Drach, Bob; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Pascoe, Stephen; Fiore, Sandro; Schweitzer, Roland; Danvil, Sebastian; Morgan, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is a multi-agency, international collaboration that aims at developing the software infrastructure needed to facilitate and empower the study of climate change on a global scale. The ESGF s architecture employs a system of geographically distributed peer nodes, which are independently administered yet united by the adoption of common federation protocols and application programming interfaces (APIs). The cornerstones of its interoperability are the peer-to-peer messaging that is continuously exchanged among all nodes in the federation; a shared architecture and API for search and discovery; and a security infrastructure based on industry standards (OpenID, SSL, GSI and SAML). The ESGF software is developed collaboratively across institutional boundaries and made available to the community as open source. It has now been adopted by multiple Earth science projects and allows access to petabytes of geophysical data, including the entire model output used for the next international assessment report on climate change (IPCC-AR5) and a suite of satellite observations (obs4MIPs) and reanalysis data sets (ANA4MIPs).

  4. MExLab Planetary Geoportal: 3D-access to planetary images and results of spatial data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, I.; Garov, A.

    2015-10-01

    MExLab Planetary Geoportal was developed as Geodesy and Cartography Node which provide access to results of study of celestial bodies such as DEM and orthoimages, as well as basemaps, crater catalogues and derivative products: slope, roughness, crater density (http://cartsrv.mexlab.ru/geoportal). The main feature of designed Geoportal is the ability of spatial queries and access to the contents selecting from the list of available data set (Phobos, Mercury, Moon, including Lunokhod's archive data). Prior version of Geoportal has been developed using Flash technology. Now we are developing new version which will use 3D-API (OpenGL, WebGL) based on shaders not only for standard 3D-functionality, but for 2D-mapping as well. Users can obtain quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the objects in graphical, tabular and 3D-forms. It will bring the advantages of unification of code and speed of processing and provide a number of functional advantages based on GIS-tools such as: - possibility of dynamic raster transform for needed map projection; - effective implementation of the co-registration of planetary images by combining spatial data geometries; - presentation in 3D-form different types of data, including planetary atmospheric measurements, subsurface radar data, ect. The system will be created with a new software architecture, which has a potential for development and flexibility in reconfiguration based on cross platform solution: - an application for the three types of platforms: desktop (Windows, Linux, OSX), web platform (any HTML5 browser), and mobile application (Android, iOS); - a single codebase shared between platforms (using cross compilation for Web); - a new telecommunication solution to connect between modules and external system like PROVIDE WebGIS (http://www.provide-space.eu/progis/). The research leading to these result was partly supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n

  5. Optical Spatial integration methods for ambiguity function generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamura, P. N.; Rebholz, J. J.; Daehlin, O. T.; Lee, T. C.

    1981-01-01

    A coherent optical spatial integration approach to ambiguity function generation is described. It uses one dimensional acousto-optic Bragg cells as input tranducers in conjunction with a space variant linear phase shifter, a passive optical element, to generate the two dimensional ambiguity function in one exposure. Results of a real time implementation of this system are shown.

  6. Women's access needs in maternity care in rural Tasmania, Australia: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ha; Le, Quynh; Terry, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates (i) maternity care access issues in rural Tasmania, (ii) rural women's challenges in accessing maternity services and (iii) rural women's access needs in maternity services. A mixed-method approach using a survey and semi-structured interviews was conducted. The survey explored women's views of rural maternity services from antenatal to postnatal care, while interviews reinforced the survey results and provided insights into the access issues and needs of women in maternity care. The survey was completed by n=210 women, with a response rate of 35%, with n=22 follow-up interviews being conducted. The survey indicated the majority of rural women believed antenatal education and check-ups and postnatal check-ups should be provided locally. The majority of women surveyed also believed in the importance of having a maternity unit in the local hospital, which was further iterated and clarified within the interviews. Three main themes emerged from the interview data, namely (i) lack of access to maternity services, (ii) difficulties in accessing maternity services, and (iii) rural women's access needs. The study suggested that women's access needs are not fully met in some rural areas of Tasmania. Rural women face many challenges when accessing maternity services, including financial burden and risk of labouring en route. The study supports the claim that the closure of rural maternity units shifts cost and risk from the health care system to rural women and their families. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Accessing inoculation methods of maize and wheat with Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Josiane; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Araujo, Ricardo Silva; Hungria, Mariangela

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of inoculants containing Azospirillum is becoming more popular due to increasing reports of expressive gains in grain yields. However, incompatibility with pesticides used in seed treatments represents a main limitation for a successful inoculation. Therefore, in this study we searched for alternatives methods for seed inoculation of maize and wheat, aiming to avoid the direct contact of bacteria with pesticides. Different doses of inoculants containing Azospirillum brasilense were employed to perform inoculation in-furrow, via soil spray at sowing and via leaf spray after seedlings had emerged, in comparison to seed inoculation. Experiments were conducted first under greenhouse controlled conditions and then confirmed in the field at different locations in Brazil. In the greenhouse, most parameters measured responded positively to the largest inoculant dose used in foliar sprays, but benefits could also be observed from both in-furrow and soil spray inoculation. However, our results present evidence that field inoculation with plant-growth promoting bacteria must consider inoculant doses, and point to the need of fine adjustments to avoid crossing the threshold of growth stimulation and inhibition. All inoculation techniques increased the abundance of diazotrophic bacteria in plant tissues, and foliar spray improved colonization of leaves, while soil inoculations favored root and rhizosphere colonization. In field experiments, inoculation with A. brasilense allowed for a 25 % reduction in the need for N fertilizers. Our results have identified alternative methods of inoculation that were as effective as the standard seed inoculation that may represent an important strategy to avoid the incompatibility between inoculant bacteria and pesticides employed for seed treatment.

  8. A spectral-spatial kernel-based method for hyperspectral imagery classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Ge, Hongwei; Gao, Jianqiang

    2017-02-01

    Spectral-based classification methods have gained increasing attention in hyperspectral imagery classification. Nevertheless, the spectral cannot fully represent the inherent spatial distribution of the imagery. In this paper, a spectral-spatial kernel-based method for hyperspectral imagery classification is proposed. Firstly, the spatial feature was extracted by using area median filtering (AMF). Secondly, the result of the AMF was used to construct spatial feature patch according to different window sizes. Finally, using the kernel technique, the spectral feature and the spatial feature were jointly used for the classification through a support vector machine (SVM) formulation. Therefore, for hyperspectral imagery classification, the proposed method was called spectral-spatial kernel-based support vector machine (SSF-SVM). To evaluate the proposed method, experiments are performed on three hyperspectral images. The experimental results show that an improvement is possible with the proposed technique in most of the real world classification problems.

  9. Measuring geographic access to health care: raster and network-based methods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inequalities in geographic access to health care result from the configuration of facilities, population distribution, and the transportation infrastructure. In recent accessibility studies, the traditional distance measure (Euclidean) has been replaced with more plausible measures such as travel distance or time. Both network and raster-based methods are often utilized for estimating travel time in a Geographic Information System. Therefore, exploring the differences in the underlying data models and associated methods and their impact on geographic accessibility estimates is warranted. Methods We examine the assumptions present in population-based travel time models. Conceptual and practical differences between raster and network data models are reviewed, along with methodological implications for service area estimates. Our case study investigates Limited Access Areas defined by Michigan’s Certificate of Need (CON) Program. Geographic accessibility is calculated by identifying the number of people residing more than 30 minutes from an acute care hospital. Both network and raster-based methods are implemented and their results are compared. We also examine sensitivity to changes in travel speed settings and population assignment. Results In both methods, the areas identified as having limited accessibility were similar in their location, configuration, and shape. However, the number of people identified as having limited accessibility varied substantially between methods. Over all permutations, the raster-based method identified more area and people with limited accessibility. The raster-based method was more sensitive to travel speed settings, while the network-based method was more sensitive to the specific population assignment method employed in Michigan. Conclusions Differences between the underlying data models help to explain the variation in results between raster and network-based methods. Considering that the choice of data model/method may

  10. Video Object Segmentation through Spatially Accurate and Temporally Dense Extraction of Primary Object Regions (Open Access)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-03

    fol- low the setup in the literature ([13, 14]), and use 5 (birdfall, cheetah , girl, monkeydog and parachute) of the videos for evaluation (since the...segmentation labeling results of the method, GT is the ground-truth labeling of the video, and F is the (a) Birdfall (b) Cheetah (c) Girl (d) Monkeydog...Video Ours [14] [13] [20] [6] birdfall 155 189 288 252 454 cheetah 633 806 905 1142 1217 girl 1488 1698 1785 1304 1755 monkeydog 365 472 521 563 683

  11. The effect of alkaline pretreatment methods on cellulose structure and accessibility

    DOE PAGES

    Bali, Garima; Meng, Xianzhi; Deneff, Jacob I.; ...

    2014-11-24

    The effects of different alkaline pretreatments on cellulose structural features and accessibility are compared and correlated with the enzymatic hydrolysis of Populus. The pretreatments are shown to modify polysaccharides and lignin content to enhance the accessibility for cellulase enzymes. The highest increase in the cellulose accessibility was observed in dilute sodium hydroxide, followed by methods using ammonia soaking and lime (Ca(OH)2). The biggest increase of cellulose accessibility occurs during the first 10 min of pretreatment, with further increases at a slower rate as severity increases. Low temperature ammonia soaking at longer residence times dissolved a major portion of hemicellulose andmore » exhibited higher cellulose accessibility than high temperature soaking. Moreover, the most significant reduction of degree of polymerization (DP) occurred for dilute sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and ammonia pretreated Populus samples. The study thus identifies important cellulose structural features and relevant parameters related to biomass recalcitrance.« less

  12. The effect of alkaline pretreatment methods on cellulose structure and accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, Garima; Meng, Xianzhi; Deneff, Jacob I.; Sun, Qining; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2014-11-24

    The effects of different alkaline pretreatments on cellulose structural features and accessibility are compared and correlated with the enzymatic hydrolysis of Populus. The pretreatments are shown to modify polysaccharides and lignin content to enhance the accessibility for cellulase enzymes. The highest increase in the cellulose accessibility was observed in dilute sodium hydroxide, followed by methods using ammonia soaking and lime (Ca(OH)2). The biggest increase of cellulose accessibility occurs during the first 10 min of pretreatment, with further increases at a slower rate as severity increases. Low temperature ammonia soaking at longer residence times dissolved a major portion of hemicellulose and exhibited higher cellulose accessibility than high temperature soaking. Moreover, the most significant reduction of degree of polymerization (DP) occurred for dilute sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and ammonia pretreated Populus samples. The study thus identifies important cellulose structural features and relevant parameters related to biomass recalcitrance.

  13. Design and implementation of visualization methods for the CHANGES Spatial Decision Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristal, Irina; van Westen, Cees; Bakker, Wim; Greiving, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The CHANGES Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) is a web-based system aimed for risk assessment and the evaluation of optimal risk reduction alternatives at local level as a decision support tool in long-term natural risk management. The SDSS use multidimensional information, integrating thematic, spatial, temporal and documentary data. The role of visualization in this context becomes of vital importance for efficiently representing each dimension. This multidimensional aspect of the required for the system risk information, combined with the diversity of the end-users imposes the use of sophisticated visualization methods and tools. The key goal of the present work is to exploit efficiently the large amount of data in relation to the needs of the end-user, utilizing proper visualization techniques. Three main tasks have been accomplished for this purpose: categorization of the end-users, the definition of system's modules and the data definition. The graphical representation of the data and the visualization tools were designed to be relevant to the data type and the purpose of the analysis. Depending on the end-users category, each user should have access to different modules of the system and thus, to the proper visualization environment. The technologies used for the development of the visualization component combine the latest and most innovative open source JavaScript frameworks, such as OpenLayers 2.13.1, ExtJS 4 and GeoExt 2. Moreover, the model-view-controller (MVC) pattern is used in order to ensure flexibility of the system at the implementation level. Using the above technologies, the visualization techniques implemented so far offer interactive map navigation, querying and comparison tools. The map comparison tools are of great importance within the SDSS and include the following: swiping tool for comparison of different data of the same location; raster subtraction for comparison of the same phenomena varying in time; linked views for comparison

  14. Spatial and temporal variations in ammonia emissions - a freely accessible model code for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjøth, C. A.; Geels, C.; Berge, H.; Gyldenkærne, S.; Fagerli, H.; Ellermann, T.; Frohn, L. M.; Christensen, J.; Hansen, K. M.; Hansen, K.; Hertel, O.

    2011-01-01

    Deriving a parameterisation of ammonia emissions for use in chemistry-transport models (CTMs) is a complex problem as the emission varies locally as a result of local climate and local agricultural management. In current CTMs such factors are generally not taken into account. This paper demonstrates how local climate and local management can be accounted for in CTMs by applying a modular approach for deriving data as input to a dynamic ammonia emission model for Europe. Default data are obtained from information in the RAINS system, and it is demonstrated how this dynamic emission model based on these input data improves the NH3 calculations in a CTM model when the results are compared with calculations obtained by traditional methods in emission handling. It is also shown how input data can be modified over a specific target region resulting in even further improvement in performance over this domain. The model code and the obtained default values for the modelling experiments are available as a Supplement to this article for use by the modelling community on similar terms as the EMEP CTM model: the GPL license v3.

  15. Method and apparatus for spatially uniform electropolishing and electrolytic etching

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Contolini, Robert J.; Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1992-01-01

    In an electropolishing or electrolytic etching apparatus the anode is separated from the cathode to prevent bubble transport to the anode and to produce a uniform current distribution at the anode by means of a solid nonconducting anode-cathode barrier. The anode extends into the top of the barrier and the cathode is outside the barrier. A virtual cathode hole formed in the bottom of the barrier below the level of the cathode permits current flow while preventing bubble transport. The anode is rotatable and oriented horizontally facing down. An extended anode is formed by mounting the workpiece in a holder which extends the electropolishing or etching area beyond the edge of the workpiece to reduce edge effects at the workpiece. A reference electrode controls cell voltage. Endpoint detection and current shut-off stop polishing. Spatially uniform polishing or etching can be rapidly performed.

  16. Method and apparatus for spatially uniform electropolishing and electrolytic etching

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Contolini, R.J.; Bernhardt, A.F.

    1992-03-17

    In an electropolishing or electrolytic etching apparatus the anode is separated from the cathode to prevent bubble transport to the anode and to produce a uniform current distribution at the anode by means of a solid nonconducting anode-cathode barrier. The anode extends into the top of the barrier and the cathode is outside the barrier. A virtual cathode hole formed in the bottom of the barrier below the level of the cathode permits current flow while preventing bubble transport. The anode is rotatable and oriented horizontally facing down. An extended anode is formed by mounting the workpiece in a holder which extends the electropolishing or etching area beyond the edge of the workpiece to reduce edge effects at the workpiece. A reference electrode controls cell voltage. Endpoint detection and current shut-off stop polishing. Spatially uniform polishing or etching can be rapidly performed. 6 figs.

  17. [Spatial distribution pattern of Chilo suppressalis analyzed by classical method and geostatistics].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zheming; Fu, Wei; Li, Fangyi

    2004-04-01

    Two original samples of Chilo suppressalis and their grid, random and sequence samples were analyzed by classical method and geostatistics to characterize the spatial distribution pattern of C. suppressalis. The limitations of spatial distribution analysis with classical method, especially influenced by the original position of grid, were summarized rather completely. On the contrary, geostatistics characterized well the spatial distribution pattern, congregation intensity and spatial heterogeneity of C. suppressalis. According to geostatistics, the population was up to Poisson distribution in low density. As for higher density population, its distribution was up to aggregative, and the aggregation intensity and dependence range were 0.1056 and 193 cm, respectively. Spatial heterogeneity was also found in the higher density population. Its spatial correlativity in line direction was more closely than that in row direction, and the dependence ranges in line and row direction were 115 and 264 cm, respectively.

  18. Gendered Distances: A Methodological Inquiry into Spatial Analysis as an Instrument for Assessing Gender Equality in Access to Secondary Schools in Mukono District, Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawro, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on how accessibility to secondary schools in the Mukono District of Uganda is related to the sex and gender of the student and the distance that separates the student's home from the school they attend. This research is a methodological inquiry exploring the use of spatial analysis, specifically how cognitive and metric…

  19. Gendered Distances: A Methodological Inquiry into Spatial Analysis as an Instrument for Assessing Gender Equality in Access to Secondary Schools in Mukono District, Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawro, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on how accessibility to secondary schools in the Mukono District of Uganda is related to the sex and gender of the student and the distance that separates the student's home from the school they attend. This research is a methodological inquiry exploring the use of spatial analysis, specifically how cognitive and metric…

  20. Publically accessible decision support system of the spatially referenced regressions on watershed attributes (SPARROW) model and model enhancements in South Carolina

    Treesearch

    Celeste Journey; Anne B. Hoos; David E. Ladd; John W. brakebill; Richard A. Smith

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment program has developed a web-based decision support system (DSS) to provide free public access to the steady-stateSPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) model simulation results on nutrient conditions in streams and rivers and to offer scenario testing capabilities for...

  1. Infrared image segmentation method based on spatial coherence histogram and maximum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songtao; Shen, Tongsheng; Dai, Yao

    2014-11-01

    In order to segment the target well and suppress background noises effectively, an infrared image segmentation method based on spatial coherence histogram and maximum entropy is proposed. First, spatial coherence histogram is presented by weighting the importance of the different position of these pixels with the same gray-level, which is obtained by computing their local density. Then, after enhancing the image by spatial coherence histogram, 1D maximum entropy method is used to segment the image. The novel method can not only get better segmentation results, but also have a faster computation time than traditional 2D histogram-based segmentation methods.

  2. Using spatial accessibility to identify polyclinic service gaps and volume of under-served population in Singapore using Geographic Information System.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lai Yin; Heng, Bee Hoon; Cheah, Jason Tiang Seng; Tan, Chee Beng

    2012-01-01

    Primary care services in Singapore are provided by 18 Government-funded polyclinics and about 1200 private General Practitioners (GPs). This study aims to examine the spatial accessibility to polyclinics and identify service gaps, and suggest optimal sites using Geographic Information System (GIS) to aid in future planning. A national database containing 3.6 million polyclinic visits in 2006 were geo-analysed using ArcView GIS. Patients' travel impedance to the nearest polyclinic was computed using DriveTime to identify areas with the lowest spatial accessibility and highest volume of under-served population. Jurong West and Sembawang were ranked as top areas with poor spatial accessibility to polyclinic services. ArcGIS was used to identify optimal sites with the minimum accumulated distance impedance to this under-served population. If new facilities were set up at these identified sites, volume of visits by Jurong West and Sembawang patients who could access the nearest polyclinics within 4 km Euclidean distance from their residence would total at 123 000 and 93 000, respectively. Future efforts in polyclinic planning should take this into consideration to maximize patients' benefits and minimize patients' travelling costs in order to achieve social equity on healthcare access.

  3. An integrated spatial snap-shot monitoring method for identifying seasonal changes and spatial changes in surface water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittoor Viswanathan, Vidhya; Jiang, Yongjun; Berg, Michael; Hunkeler, Daniel; Schirmer, Mario

    2016-08-01

    Integrated catchment-scale management approaches in large catchments are often hindered due to the poor understanding of the spatially and seasonally variable pathways of pollutants. High-frequency monitoring of water quality at random locations in a catchment is resource intensive and challenging. A simplified catchment-scale monitoring approach is developed in this study, for the preliminary identification of water quality changes - Integrated spatial snap-shot monitoring (ISSM). This multi-parameter monitoring approach is applied using the isotopes of water (δ18O-H2O and δD) and nitrate (δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-) together with the fluxes of nitrate and other solutes, which are used as chemical markers. This method involves selection of few sampling stations, which are identified as the hotspots of water quality changes within the catchment. The study was conducted in the peri-alpine Thur catchment in Switzerland, with two snap-shot campaigns (representative of two widely varying hydrological conditions), in summer 2012 (low flow) and spring 2013 (high flow). Significant spatial (varying with elevation) and seasonal changes in the sources of water were observed between the two seasons. A spatial variation of the sources of nitrate and the solute loads was observed, in tandem with the land use changes in the Thur catchment. There is a seasonal shift in the sources of nitrate, it varies from a strong treated waste water signature during the low flow season to a mixture of other sources (like soil nitrogen derived from agriculture), in the high flow season. This demonstrates the influence of other sources that override the influence of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) during high flow in the Thur River and its tributaries. This method is expected to be a cost-effective alternative, providing snap-shots, that can help in the preliminary identification of the pathways of solutes and their seasonal/spatial changes in catchments.

  4. Retail Food Store Access in Rural Appalachia: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Esther; Johnson, Cassandra; Zenk, Shannon N; Kulbok, Pamela

    2017-05-01

    To describe how characteristics of food retail stores (potential access) and other factors influence self-reported food shopping behavior (realized food access) among low-income, rural Central Appalachian women. Cross-sectional descriptive. Potential access was assessed through store mapping and in-store food audits. Factors influencing consumers' realized access were assessed through in-depth interviews. Results were merged using a convergent parallel mixed methods approach. Food stores (n = 50) and adult women (n = 9) in a rural Central Appalachian county. Potential and realized food access were described across five dimensions: availability, accessibility, affordability, acceptability, and accommodation. Supermarkets had better availability of healthful foods, followed by grocery stores, dollar stores, and convenience stores. On average, participants lived within 10 miles of 3.9 supermarkets or grocery stores, and traveled 7.5 miles for major food shopping. Participants generally shopped at the closest store that met their expectations for food availability, price, service, and atmosphere. Participants' perceptions of stores diverged from each other and from in-store audit findings. Findings from this study can help public health nurses engage with communities to make affordable, healthy foods more accessible. Recommendations are made for educating low-income consumers and partnering with food stores. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. AREA RESTRICTIONS, RISK, HARM, AND HEALTH CARE ACCESS AMONG PEOPLE WHO USE DRUGS IN VANCOUVER, CANADA: A SPATIALLY ORIENTED QUALITATIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Ryan; Cooper, Hannah; Small, Will; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Area restrictions prohibiting people from entering drug scenes or areas where they were arrested are a common socio-legal mechanism employed to regulate the spatial practices of people who use drugs (PWUD). To explore how socio-spatial patterns stemming from area restrictions shape risk, harm, and health care access, qualitative interviews and mapping exercises were conducted with 24 PWUD with area restrictions in Vancouver, Canada. Area restrictions disrupted access to health and social resources (e.g., HIV care) concentrated in drug scenes, while territorial stigma prevented PWUD from accessing supports in other neighbourhoods. Rather than preventing involvement in drug-related activities, area restrictions displaced these activities to other locations and increased vulnerability to diverse risks and harms (e.g., unsafe drug use practices, violence). Given the harms stemming from area restrictions there is an urgent need to reconsider this socio-legal strategy. PMID:26241893

  6. Coaxial random-access reading in multilayered optical data storage systems using a pair of counter-propagating pulse-shaped spatial solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisaka, Masaki

    2017-07-01

    Coaxial random-access reading in multilayered optical data storage using a pair of counter-propagating pulse-shaped spatial solitons was experimentally investigated. Counter-propagating second-harmonic spatial solitons, which are formed by focusing titanium sapphire pulsed lasers, induced nonlinear collision and determined the depth readout address in a strontium barium niobate crystal. The nonlinear interaction between the collision and the locally-reversed crystal domains, which represents single-bit data, changed the spectrum and intensity of the transmitted second-harmonic beam. Coaxial random-access reading associated with the spatial soliton of the multilayered bit datum was demonstrated by scanning collision points along the direction of the depth.

  7. A hybrid method for assessment of soil pollutants spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, D. A.; Medvedev, A. N.; Sergeev, A. P.; Shichkin, A. V.; Buevich, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    The authors propose a hybrid method to predict the distribution of topsoil pollutants (Cu and Cr). The method combines artificial neural networks and kriging. Corresponding computer models were built and tested on real data on example of subarctic regions of Russia. The network structure selection was based on the minimization of the Root-mean-square error between real and predicted concentrations. The constructed models show that the prognostic accuracy of the artificial neural network is higher than in case of the geostatistical (kriging) and deterministic methods. The conclusion is that hybridization of models (artificial neural network and kriging) provides the improvement of the total predictive accuracy.

  8. Detector motion method to increase spatial resolution in photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daehee; Park, Kyeongjin; Lim, Kyung Taek; Cho, Gyuseong

    2017-03-01

    Medical imaging requires high spatial resolution of an image to identify fine lesions. Photon-counting detectors in medical imaging have recently been rapidly replacing energy-integrating detectors due to the former`s high spatial resolution, high efficiency and low noise. Spatial resolution in a photon counting image is determined by the pixel size. Therefore, the smaller the pixel size, the higher the spatial resolution that can be obtained in an image. However, detector redesigning is required to reduce pixel size, and an expensive fine process is required to integrate a signal processing unit with reduced pixel size. Furthermore, as the pixel size decreases, charge sharing severely deteriorates spatial resolution. To increase spatial resolution, we propose a detector motion method using a large pixel detector that is less affected by charge sharing. To verify the proposed method, we utilized a UNO-XRI photon-counting detector (1-mm CdTe, Timepix chip) at the maximum X-ray tube voltage of 80 kVp. A similar spatial resolution of a 55- μm-pixel image was achieved by application of the proposed method to a 110- μm-pixel detector with a higher signal-to-noise ratio. The proposed method could be a way to increase spatial resolution without a pixel redesign when pixels severely suffer from charge sharing as pixel size is reduced.

  9. Spatial and spectral superconvergence of discontinuous Galerkin method for hyperbolic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchandise, Emilie; Chevaugeon, Nicolas; Remacle, Jean-Francois

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the spatial and spectral superconvergence properties of one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law by a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method. The analyses combine classical mathematical arguments with MATLAB experiments. Some properties of the DG schemes are discovered using discrete Fourier analyses: superconvergence of the numerical wave numbers, Radau structure of the X spatial error.

  10. Two Methods of Teaching Spatial Tasks to Disadvantaged Negroes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennels, Max Raymond

    1969-01-01

    An attempt to identify instructional methods based on the "urban Negro Child's interest in concrete and motoric experiences which will help him acquire basic skills and assist him in discovering and responding to sensory experiences. (Author)

  11. 47 CFR 51.321 - Methods of obtaining interconnection and access to unbundled elements under section 251 of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers § 51.321 Methods of obtaining interconnection and access to... or access to unbundled network elements at a particular point upon a request by a telecommunications carrier. (b) Technically feasible methods of obtaining interconnection or access to unbundled...

  12. Multi-views storage model and access methods of conversation history in converged IP messaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meilian; Yang, Dong; Zhou, Xing

    2013-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the requirements of conversation history storage in CPM (Converged IP Messaging) system, a Multi-views storage model and access methods of conversation history are proposed. The storage model separates logical views from physical storage and divides the storage into system managed region and user managed region. It simultaneously supports conversation view, system pre-defined view and user-defined view of storage. The rationality and feasibility of multi-view presentation, the physical storage model and access methods are validated through the implemented prototype. It proves that, this proposal has good scalability, which will help to optimize the physical data storage structure and improve storage performance.

  13. Application of the attribute recognition method for the evaluation of spatial data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qinghui; Chi, Tianhe; Zhong, Dawei

    2006-10-01

    Evaluation of spatial data quality is an important problem in Geographical Information System (GIS) applications and research. Many evaluation criterions of spatial data are involved in the evaluating process, The criterions for judging the quality of spatial data comes from the evaluation process, using such information as positional accuracy, attribute accuracy, logical consistency, temporal accuracy and so on. How to evaluate the quality of spatial data based on these indexes is a problem we are always confronted within GIS applications. In this paper, we construct a model for determining spatial data quality using attribute recognition principles and methods in Attribute Mathematics, which were founded by Cheng Qiansheng. This model overcomes the defects of current evaluation models, and leads to reasonable and reliable results on spatial data quality in GIS as proved by the results of our tests.

  14. Monitoring Method of Cow Anthrax Based on Gis and Spatial Statistical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Yang, Yong; Wang, Hongbin; Dong, Jing; Zhao, Yujun; He, Jianbin; Fan, Honggang

    Geographic information system (GIS) is a computer application system, which possesses the ability of manipulating spatial information and has been used in many fields related with the spatial information management. Many methods and models have been established for analyzing animal diseases distribution models and temporal-spatial transmission models. Great benefits have been gained from the application of GIS in animal disease epidemiology. GIS is now a very important tool in animal disease epidemiological research. Spatial analysis function of GIS can be widened and strengthened by using spatial statistical analysis, allowing for the deeper exploration, analysis, manipulation and interpretation of spatial pattern and spatial correlation of the animal disease. In this paper, we analyzed the cow anthrax spatial distribution characteristics in the target district A (due to the secret of epidemic data we call it district A) based on the established GIS of the cow anthrax in this district in combination of spatial statistical analysis and GIS. The Cow anthrax is biogeochemical disease, and its geographical distribution is related closely to the environmental factors of habitats and has some spatial characteristics, and therefore the correct analysis of the spatial distribution of anthrax cow for monitoring and the prevention and control of anthrax has a very important role. However, the application of classic statistical methods in some areas is very difficult because of the pastoral nomadic context. The high mobility of livestock and the lack of enough suitable sampling for the some of the difficulties in monitoring currently make it nearly impossible to apply rigorous random sampling methods. It is thus necessary to develop an alternative sampling method, which could overcome the lack of sampling and meet the requirements for randomness. The GIS computer application software ArcGIS9.1 was used to overcome the lack of data of sampling sites.Using ArcGIS 9.1 and GEODA

  15. On a comparative study of an accurate spatial discretization method for one-dimensional continuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, K.; Zhu, W. D.; Fan, W.

    2017-07-01

    This work provides an in-depth investigation on advantages of a recently developed, new global spatial discretization method over the assumed modes method, and a clear description of the procedure and validity of the new method and its feasibility for arbitrary boundary conditions. A general formulation of the new spatial discretization method is given for second- and fourth-order continuous systems, whose displacements are divided into internal terms and boundary-induced terms, and two examples that consider the longitudinal vibration of a rod and the transverse vibration of a tensioned Euler-Bernoulli beam are used to demonstrate the new spatial discretization method. In the two examples, natural frequencies, mode shapes, harmonic steady-state responses, and transient responses of the systems are calculated using the new spatial discretization method and the assumed modes method, and results are compared with those from exact analyses. Convergence of the new spatial discretization method is investigated using different sets of trial functions for internal and boundary-induced terms. While the new spatial discretization method has additional degrees of freedom at boundaries of a continuous system compared with other global spatial discretization methods, it has the following advantages: (1) compared with the assumed modes method, the new method gives better results in calculating eigensolutions and dynamic responses of the system, and allows more terms to be retained in a trial function expansion due to the slowly growing condition number of the mass matrix of the system; and (2) compared with the exact eigenfunction expansion method, the new method can use sinusoidal functions as trial functions for the internal term rather than complicated eigenfunctions of the system in the expansion solution.

  16. A stabilized, symmetric Nitsche method for spatially localized plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truster, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    A heterogeneous interface method is developed for combining primal displacement and mixed displacement-pressure formulations across nonconforming finite element meshes to treat volume-preserving plastic flow. When the zone of inelastic response is localized within a larger domain, significant computational savings can be achieved by confining the mixed formulation solely to the localized region. The method's distinguishing feature is that the coupling terms for joining dissimilar element types are derived from a time-discrete free energy functional, which is based on a Lagrange multiplier formulation of the interface constraints. Incorporating residual-based stabilizing terms at the interface enables the condensation of the multiplier field, leading to a symmetric Nitsche formulation in which the interface operators respect the differing character of the governing equations in each region. In a series of numerical problems, the heterogeneous interface method achieved comparable results on coarser meshes as those obtained from applying the mixed formulation throughout the domain.

  17. A random spatial sampling method in a rural developing nation

    Treesearch

    Michelle C. Kondo; Kent D.W. Bream; Frances K. Barg; Charles C. Branas

    2014-01-01

    Nonrandom sampling of populations in developing nations has limitations and can inaccurately estimate health phenomena, especially among hard-to-reach populations such as rural residents. However, random sampling of rural populations in developing nations can be challenged by incomplete enumeration of the base population. We describe a stratified random sampling method...

  18. Methane fugitive emissions quantification using the novel 'plume camera' (spatial correlation) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosson, E.; Rella, C.

    2012-12-01

    Fugitive emissions of methane into the atmosphere are a major concern facing the natural gas production industry. Given that the global warming potential of methane is many times greater than that of carbon dioxide, the importance of quantifying methane emissions becomes clear. The rapidly increasing reliance on shale gas (or other unconventional sources) is only intensifying the interest in fugitive methane releases. Natural gas (which is predominantly methane) is an attractive energy source, as it emits 40% less carbon dioxide per Joule of energy generated than coal. However, if just a small percentage of the natural gas consumed is lost due to fugitive emissions during production, processing, or transport, this global warming benefit is lost (Howarth et al. 2012). It is therefore imperative, as production of natural gas increases, that the fugitive emissions of methane are quantified accurately. Traditional direct measurement techniques often involve physical access of the leak itself to quantify the emissions rate, and are generally require painstaking effort to first find the leak and then quantify the emissions rate. With over half a million natural gas producing wells in the U.S. (U.S. Energy Information Administration), not including the associated processing, storage, and transport facilities, and with each facility having hundreds or even thousands of fittings that can potentially leak, the need is clear to develop methodologies that can provide a rapid and accurate assessment of the total emissions rate on a per-well head basis. In this paper we present a novel method for emissions quantification which uses a 'plume camera' with three 'pixels' to quantify emissions using direct measurements of methane concentration in the downwind plume. By analyzing the spatial correlation between the pixels, the spatial extent of the instantaneous plume can be inferred. This information, when combined with the wind speed through the measurement plane, provides a direct

  19. Spatial temporal clustering for hotspot using kulldorff scan statistic method (KSS): A case in Riau Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudjimartsu, S. A.; Djatna, T.; Ambarwari, A.; Apriliantono

    2017-01-01

    The forest fires in Indonesia occurs frequently in the dry season. Almost all the causes of forest fires are caused by the human activity itself. The impact of forest fires is the loss of biodiversity, pollution hazard and harm the economy of surrounding communities. To prevent fires required the method, one of them with spatial temporal clustering. Spatial temporal clustering formed grouping data so that the results of these groupings can be used as initial information on fire prevention. To analyze the fires, used hotspot data as early indicator of fire spot. Hotspot data consists of spatial and temporal dimensions can be processed using the Spatial Temporal Clustering with Kulldorff Scan Statistic (KSS). The result of this research is to the effectiveness of KSS method to cluster spatial hotspot in a case within Riau Province and produces two types of clusters, most cluster and secondary cluster. This cluster can be used as an early fire warning information.

  20. Prediction of protein solvent accessibility using fuzzy k-nearest neighbor method.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jaehyun; Kim, Seung-Yeon; Lee, Julian

    2005-06-15

    The solvent accessibility of amino acid residues plays an important role in tertiary structure prediction, especially in the absence of significant sequence similarity of a query protein to those with known structures. The prediction of solvent accessibility is less accurate than secondary structure prediction in spite of improvements in recent researches. The k-nearest neighbor method, a simple but powerful classification algorithm, has never been applied to the prediction of solvent accessibility, although it has been used frequently for the classification of biological and medical data. We applied the fuzzy k-nearest neighbor method to the solvent accessibility prediction, using PSI-BLAST profiles as feature vectors, and achieved high prediction accuracies. With leave-one-out cross-validation on the ASTRAL SCOP reference dataset constructed by sequence clustering, our method achieved 64.1% accuracy for a 3-state (buried/intermediate/exposed) prediction (thresholds of 9% for buried/intermediate and 36% for intermediate/exposed) and 86.7, 82.0, 79.0 and 78.5% accuracies for 2-state (buried/exposed) predictions (thresholds of each 0, 5, 16 and 25% for buried/exposed), respectively. Our method also showed slightly better accuracies than other methods by about 2-5% on the RS126 dataset and a benchmarking dataset with 229 proteins. Program and datasets are available at http://biocom1.ssu.ac.kr/FKNNacc/ jul@ssu.ac.kr.

  1. Extra-corporeal blood access, sensing, and radiation methods and apparatuses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, Kent D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The described invention is related to extra-corporeal blood access and radiation methods and apparatuses and, in particular, to subjecting flowing blood to energy in variety of forms, including radiation, electromagnetic force fields or atomic particles. It is directed to methods and apparatuses for accessing flowing blood and for subjecting the blood to electrical conductive, electrostatic or electromagnetic fields or for radiating the blood with some type of radiation, e.g., radio waves, ultrasonic or audio waves, microwaves, IR rays, visible light, UV radiation, x-rays, alpha, beta or gamma rays. An apparatus is employed which includes one or more access ports or windows for radiating blood and/or for sensing/analyzing blood. This invention is useful for killing viruses and bacteria in blood, monitoring blood for medical purposes, genetic modification of blood, and analyzing and/or treating blood components.

  2. Stabilizing the thermal lattice Boltzmann method by spatial filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillissen, J. J. J.

    2016-10-01

    We propose to stabilize the thermal lattice Boltzmann method by filtering the second- and third-order moments of the collision operator. By means of the Chapman-Enskog expansion, we show that the additional numerical diffusivity diminishes in the low-wavnumber limit. To demonstrate the enhanced stability, we consider a three-dimensional thermal lattice Boltzmann system involving 33 discrete velocities. Filtering extends the linear stability of this thermal lattice Boltzmann method to 10-fold smaller transport coefficients. We further demonstrate that the filtering does not compromise the accuracy of the hydrodynamics by comparing simulation results to reference solutions for a number of standardized test cases, including natural convection in two dimensions.

  3. Stabilizing the thermal lattice Boltzmann method by spatial filtering.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, J J J

    2016-10-01

    We propose to stabilize the thermal lattice Boltzmann method by filtering the second- and third-order moments of the collision operator. By means of the Chapman-Enskog expansion, we show that the additional numerical diffusivity diminishes in the low-wavnumber limit. To demonstrate the enhanced stability, we consider a three-dimensional thermal lattice Boltzmann system involving 33 discrete velocities. Filtering extends the linear stability of this thermal lattice Boltzmann method to 10-fold smaller transport coefficients. We further demonstrate that the filtering does not compromise the accuracy of the hydrodynamics by comparing simulation results to reference solutions for a number of standardized test cases, including natural convection in two dimensions.

  4. Fast methods for spatially correlated multilevel functional data

    PubMed Central

    Staicu, Ana-Maria; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new methodological framework for the analysis of hierarchical functional data when the functions at the lowest level of the hierarchy are correlated. For small data sets, our methodology leads to a computational algorithm that is orders of magnitude more efficient than its closest competitor (seconds versus hours). For large data sets, our algorithm remains fast and has no current competitors. Thus, in contrast to published methods, we can now conduct routine simulations, leave-one-out analyses, and nonparametric bootstrap sampling. Our methods are inspired by and applied to data obtained from a state-of-the-art colon carcinogenesis scientific experiment. However, our models are general and will be relevant to many new data sets where the object of inference are functions or images that remain dependent even after conditioning on the subject on which they are measured. Supplementary materials are available at Biostatistics online. PMID:20089508

  5. Fisheye camera method for spatial non-uniformity corrections in luminous flux measurements with integrating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokka, Alexander; Pulli, Tomi; Poikonen, Tuomas; Askola, Janne; Ikonen, Erkki

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a fisheye camera method for determining spatial non-uniformity corrections in luminous flux measurements with integrating spheres. Using a fisheye camera installed into a port of an integrating sphere, the relative angular intensity distribution of the lamp under test is determined. This angular distribution is used for calculating the spatial non-uniformity correction for the lamp when combined with the spatial responsivity data of the sphere. The method was validated by comparing it to a traditional goniophotometric approach when determining spatial correction factors for 13 LED lamps with different angular spreads. The deviations between the spatial correction factors obtained using the two methods ranged from -0.15 % to 0.15%. The mean magnitude of the deviations was 0.06%. For a typical LED lamp, the expanded uncertainty (k = 2 ) for the spatial non-uniformity correction factor was evaluated to be 0.28%. The fisheye camera method removes the need for goniophotometric measurements in determining spatial non-uniformity corrections, thus resulting in considerable system simplification. Generally, no permanent modifications to existing integrating spheres are required.

  6. Seamless full color holographic printing method based on spatial partitioning of SLM.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmin; Stoykova, Elena; Kang, Hoonjong; Hong, Sunghee; Park, Joosup; Park, Jiyong; Hong, Jisoo

    2015-01-12

    The holographic wavefront printer decodes the wavefront coming from a three-dimensional object from a computer generated hologram displayed on a spatial light modulator. By recording this wavefront as an analog volume hologram this printing method is highly suitable for realistic color 3D imaging. We propose in the paper spatial partitioning of the spatial light modulator to perform mosaic delivery of exposures at primary colors for seamless reconstruction of a white light viewable color hologram. The method is verified for a 3 × 3 color partitioning scheme by a wavefront printer with demagnification of the light beam diffracted from the modulator.

  7. The Method behind the Madness: Acquiring Online Journals and a Solution to Provide Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skekel, Donna

    2005-01-01

    Libraries are seeking the best possible solution for integrating online journals into their collections. While exploring the different methods and technology available, many libraries still strive to fulfill the original "library mission" proposed by Charles Cutter in his "Rules for a Dictionary Catalog". Providing comprehensive access to…

  8. Transgressing the Traditional? Teaching and Learning Methods in a Medieval History Access Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Victoria A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a medieval history access course at the University of Glasgow (Scotland) in which non-traditional teaching methods were used, specifically collaborative group work and embedded rhetorical training for essay writing. Questions the idea of discipline-specific pedagogical practice. (Author/DB)

  9. Teens' Survey of Stores in the District of Columbia on Accessibility of Family Planning Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    Access to and availability of contraceptive methods in stores play an important role in the prevention of AIDS, unwanted pregnancies, and other sexually transmitted diseases. Although teens are generally knowledgable about birth control, many encounter barriers when attempting to obtain contraceptive. Forty-five drug stores and 15 convenience…

  10. The Method behind the Madness: Acquiring Online Journals and a Solution to Provide Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skekel, Donna

    2005-01-01

    Libraries are seeking the best possible solution for integrating online journals into their collections. While exploring the different methods and technology available, many libraries still strive to fulfill the original "library mission" proposed by Charles Cutter in his "Rules for a Dictionary Catalog". Providing comprehensive access to…

  11. A Method for Selection of Appropriate Assistive Technology for Computer Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenko, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    Assistive technologies (ATs) for computer access enable people with disabilities to be included in the information society. Current methods for assessment and selection of the most appropriate AT for each individual are nonstandardized, lengthy, subjective, and require substantial clinical experience of a multidisciplinary team. This manuscript…

  12. A Method for Selection of Appropriate Assistive Technology for Computer Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenko, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    Assistive technologies (ATs) for computer access enable people with disabilities to be included in the information society. Current methods for assessment and selection of the most appropriate AT for each individual are nonstandardized, lengthy, subjective, and require substantial clinical experience of a multidisciplinary team. This manuscript…

  13. Joint power and multiple access control for wireless mesh network with Rose projection method.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meiqin; Shang, Lili; Xin, Yalin; Liu, Xiaohua; Wei, Xinjiang

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the utility maximization problem for the downlink of the multi-interface multichannel wireless mesh network with orthogonal frequency division multiple access. A cross-layer joint power and multiple access control algorithm are proposed. Rosen projection matrix is combined with Solodov projection techniques to build a three-memory gradient Rosen projection method, which is applied to solve this optimization problem. The convergence analysis is given and simulations show that the proposed solution achieves significant throughput compared with existing approaches.

  14. Joint Power and Multiple Access Control for Wireless Mesh Network with Rose Projection Method

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meiqin; Shang, Lili; Xin, Yalin; Liu, Xiaohua; Wei, Xinjiang

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the utility maximization problem for the downlink of the multi-interface multichannel wireless mesh network with orthogonal frequency division multiple access. A cross-layer joint power and multiple access control algorithm are proposed. Rosen projection matrix is combined with Solodov projection techniques to build a three-memory gradient Rosen projection method, which is applied to solve this optimization problem. The convergence analysis is given and simulations show that the proposed solution achieves significant throughput compared with existing approaches. PMID:24883384

  15. A Spatially Focused Method for High Density Electrode-Based Functional Brain Mapping Applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Liu, Wentai

    2016-10-01

    Mapping the electric field of the brain with electrodes benefits from its superior temporal resolution but is prone to low spatial resolution property comparing with other modalities such as fMRI, which can directly impact the precision of clinical diagnosis. Simulations show that dense arrays with straightforwardly miniaturized electrodes in terms of size and pitch may not improve the spatial resolution but only strengthen the cross coupling between adjacent channels due to volume conduction. We present a new spatially focused method to improve the electrode spatial selectivity and consequently suppress the neural signal coupling from the sources in the vicinity. Compared with existing spatial filtering methods with fixed coefficients, the proposed method is adaptively optimized for the geometric parameters of the recording electrode arrays, including electrode size, pitch and source depth. The effective spatial bandwidth, characterized as Radius of Half Power, can be reduced by about 70% for ECoG and the case of distant sources scenarios. The proposed method has been applied to the analysis of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) in seizures to study the ictal pathway in the epileptogenic region. The results reveal lucid HFO wavefront propagation in both preictal and ictal stages due to a 75% reduction in the coupling effect. The results also show that a specific power threshold of preictal HFOs is needed in order to initiate an epileptic seizure. This demonstrates that our method indeed facilitates the investigation of complex neurobiological signals preprocessing applications.

  16. A Spatially Focused Method for High Density Electrode-Based Functional Brain Mapping Applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Liu, Wentai

    2016-03-07

    Mapping the electric field of the brain with electrodes benefits from its superior temporal resolution but is prone to low spatial resolution property comparing with other modalities such as fMRI, which can directly impact the precision of clinical diagnosis. Simulations show that dense arrays with straightforwardly miniaturized electrodes in terms of size and pitch may not improve the spatial resolution but only strengthen the cross coupling between adjacent channels due to volume conduction. We present a new spatially focused method to improve the electrode spatial selectivity and consequently suppress the neural signal coupling from the sources in the vicinity. Compared with existing spatial filtering methods with fixed coefficients, the proposed method is adaptively optimized for the geometric parameters of the recording electrode arrays, including electrode size, pitch and source depth. The effective spatial bandwidth, characterized as Radius of Half Power, can be reduced by about 70% for ECoG and the case of distant sources scenarios. The proposed method has been applied to the analysis of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) in seizures to study the ictal pathway in the epileptogenic region. The results reveal lucid HFO wavefront propagation in both preictal and ictal stages due to a 75% reduction in the coupling effect. The results also show that a specific power threshold of preictal HFOs is needed in order to initiate an epileptic seizure. This demonstrates that our method indeed facilitates the investigation of complex neurobiological signals preprocessing applications.

  17. Explaining Accessibility and Satisfaction Related to Healthcare: A Mixed-Methods Approach.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Barona, Pablo; Blaschke, Thomas; Kienberger, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Accessibility and satisfaction related to healthcare services are conceived as multidimensional concepts. These concepts can be studied using objective and subjective measures. In this study, we created two indices: a composite healthcare accessibility index (CHCA) and a composite healthcare satisfaction index (CHCS). To calculate the CHCA index we used three indicators based on three components of multidimensional healthcare accessibility: availability, acceptability and accessibility. In the indicator based on the component of accessibility, we included an innovative perceived time-decay parameter. The three indicators of the CHCA index were weighted through the application of a principal components analysis. To calculate the CHCS index, we used three indicators: the waiting time after the patient arrives at the healthcare service, the quality of the healthcare, and the healthcare service supply. These three indicators making up the CHCA index were weighted by applying an analytical hierarchy process. Three kinds of regressions were subsequently applied in order to explain the CHCA and CHCS indices: namely the Linear Least Squares, Ordinal Logistic, and Random Forests regressions. In these regressions, we used different independent social and health-related variables. These variables represented the predisposing, enabling, and need factors of people´s behaviors related to healthcare. All the calculations were applied to a study area: the city of Quito, Ecuador. Results showed that there are health-related inequalities in regard to healthcare accessibility and healthcare satisfaction in our study area. We also identified specific social factors that explained the indices developed. The present work is a mixed-methods approach to evaluate multidimensional healthcare accessibility and healthcare satisfaction, incorporating a pluralistic perspective, as well as a multidisciplinary framework. The results obtained can also be considered as tools for healthcare and

  18. Topological spatial relation calculation in constrained Delaunay triangulation: an algebraic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiatian; Wang, Chunxiao; Ma, Li; Chen, Hao; Yang, Dehong; Wu, Xuequn

    2009-10-01

    Topological spatial relation between spatial objects is a very important topic for spatial analysis, query and reasoning in Geographic Information Science (GIS). In this paper, an algebraic method using constrained Delaunay triangulation (CDT) for topological spatial relation is presented. In the part of foundational theory, (i) prove CDT is simplicial complex in R2. (ii) import chain structure in CDT and prove including & approximating theorem and reduced including & approximating theorem, and are used for estimating left, middle and right side properties of triangle. (iii) define the region in CDT and establish region algebra (RA), which use the set of region as computational space and use the intersection operator as a binary operation. (iv) describe basic forms of node and chain which are contained in a set of triangles. In the part of spatial relation calculation, (i) describe spatial object as three entries, i.e. exterior, boundary and interior, with left, middle and right of triangle and their combination. (ii) establish the topological spatial relation calculation model-region nine intersection model (R9IM), which is used the intersection operation and the form operation as basic operations. (iii) calculate thirty-three spatial relations of simple objects with R9IM in the practice application of topological examination.

  19. A neural network-based optimal spatial filter design method for motor imagery classification.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Ayhan; Olmez, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel spatial filter design method is introduced. Spatial filtering is an important processing step for feature extraction in motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces. This paper introduces a new motor imagery signal classification method combined with spatial filter optimization. We simultaneously train the spatial filter and the classifier using a neural network approach. The proposed spatial filter network (SFN) is composed of two layers: a spatial filtering layer and a classifier layer. These two layers are linked to each other with non-linear mapping functions. The proposed method addresses two shortcomings of the common spatial patterns (CSP) algorithm. First, CSP aims to maximize the between-classes variance while ignoring the minimization of within-classes variances. Consequently, the features obtained using the CSP method may have large within-classes variances. Second, the maximizing optimization function of CSP increases the classification accuracy indirectly because an independent classifier is used after the CSP method. With SFN, we aimed to maximize the between-classes variance while minimizing within-classes variances and simultaneously optimizing the spatial filter and the classifier. To classify motor imagery EEG signals, we modified the well-known feed-forward structure and derived forward and backward equations that correspond to the proposed structure. We tested our algorithm on simple toy data. Then, we compared the SFN with conventional CSP and its multi-class version, called one-versus-rest CSP, on two data sets from BCI competition III. The evaluation results demonstrate that SFN is a good alternative for classifying motor imagery EEG signals with increased classification accuracy.

  20. EAP-Kerberos: A Low Latency EAP Authentication Method for Faster Handoffs in Wireless Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrelli, Saber; Okabe, Nobuo; Shinoda, Yoichi

    The wireless medium is a key technology for enabling ubiquitous and continuous network connectivity. It is becoming more and more important in our daily life especially with the increasing adoption of networking technologies in many fields such as medical care and transportation systems. Although most wireless technologies nowadays provide satisfying bandwidth and higher speeds, several of these technologies still lack improvements with regard to handoff performance. In this paper, we focus on wireless network technologies that rely on the Extensible Authentication Protocol for mutual authentication between the station and the access network. Such technologies include local area wireless networks (IEEE 802.11) as well as broadband wireless networks (IEEE 802.16). We present a new EAP authentication method based on a three party authentication scheme, namely Kerberos, that considerably shortens handoff delays. Compared to other methods, the proposed method has the advantage of not requiring any changes on the access points, making it readily deployable at reasonable costs.

  1. A Novel Method for Intraoral Access to the Superior Head of the Human Lateral Pterygoid Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Aleli Tôrres; Camilo, Anderson Aparecido; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; DosSantos, Marcos Fabio; da Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes; Monteiro, André Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background. The uncoordinated activity of the superior and inferior parts of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) has been suggested to be one of the causes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement. A therapy for this muscle disorder is the injection of botulinum toxin (BTX), of the LPM. However, there is a potential risk of side effects with the injection guide methods currently available. In addition, they do not permit appropriate differentiation between the two bellies of the muscle. Herein, a novel method is presented to provide intraoral access to the superior head of the human LPM with maximal control and minimal hazards. Methods. Computational tomography along with digital imaging software programs and rapid prototyping techniques were used to create a rapid prototyped guide to orient BTX injections in the superior LPM. Results. The method proved to be feasible and reliable. Furthermore, when tested in one volunteer it allowed precise access to the upper head of LPM, without producing side effects. Conclusions. The prototyped guide presented in this paper is a novel tool that provides intraoral access to the superior head of the LPM. Further studies will be necessary to test the efficacy and validate this method in a larger cohort of subjects. PMID:24963484

  2. Device for high spatial resolution chemical analysis of a sample and method of high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-10-06

    A system and method for analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The system can include at least one pin; a sampling device configured to contact a liquid with a specimen on the at least one pin to form a testing solution; and a stepper mechanism configured to move the at least one pin and the sampling device relative to one another. The system can also include an analytical instrument for determining a chemical composition of the specimen from the testing solution. In particular, the systems and methods described herein enable chemical analysis of specimens, such as tissue, to be evaluated in a manner that the spatial-resolution is limited by the size of the pins used to obtain tissue samples, not the size of the sampling device used to solubilize the samples coupled to the pins.

  3. Ensemble-Based Parameter Estimation in a Coupled GCM Using the Adaptive Spatial Average Method

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, S.; ...

    2014-05-29

    Ensemble-based parameter estimation for a climate model is emerging as an important topic in climate research. And for a complex system such as a coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model, the sensitivity and response of a model variable to a model parameter could vary spatially and temporally. An adaptive spatial average (ASA) algorithm is proposed to increase the efficiency of parameter estimation. Refined from a previous spatial average method, the ASA uses the ensemble spread as the criterion for selecting “good” values from the spatially varying posterior estimated parameter values; these good values are then averaged to give the final globalmore » uniform posterior parameter. In comparison with existing methods, the ASA parameter estimation has a superior performance: faster convergence and enhanced signal-to-noise ratio.« less

  4. Ensemble-Based Parameter Estimation in a Coupled GCM Using the Adaptive Spatial Average Method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, S.; Rong, X.; Jacob, R.; Wu, S.; Lu, F.

    2014-05-29

    Ensemble-based parameter estimation for a climate model is emerging as an important topic in climate research. And for a complex system such as a coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model, the sensitivity and response of a model variable to a model parameter could vary spatially and temporally. An adaptive spatial average (ASA) algorithm is proposed to increase the efficiency of parameter estimation. Refined from a previous spatial average method, the ASA uses the ensemble spread as the criterion for selecting “good” values from the spatially varying posterior estimated parameter values; these good values are then averaged to give the final global uniform posterior parameter. In comparison with existing methods, the ASA parameter estimation has a superior performance: faster convergence and enhanced signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Need for Improved Methods to Collect and Present Spatial Epidemiologic Data for Vectorborne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Rebecca J.

    2007-01-01

    Improved methods for collection and presentation of spatial epidemiologic data are needed for vectorborne diseases in the United States. Lack of reliable data for probable pathogen exposure site has emerged as a major obstacle to the development of predictive spatial risk models. Although plague case investigations can serve as a model for how to ideally generate needed information, this comprehensive approach is cost-prohibitive for more common and less severe diseases. New methods are urgently needed to determine probable pathogen exposure sites that will yield reliable results while taking into account economic and time constraints of the public health system and attending physicians. Recent data demonstrate the need for a change from use of the county spatial unit for presentation of incidence of vectorborne diseases to more precise ZIP code or census tract scales. Such fine-scale spatial risk patterns can be communicated to the public and medical community through Web-mapping approaches. PMID:18258029

  6. A Method to Access Absolute fIPAR fo Vegetation in Spatially Complex Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessman, Carol A.; Nel, Elizabeth M.; Bateson, C. Ann; Asner, Gregory P.

    1998-01-01

    Arid and semi-arid lands compose a large fraction of the earth's terrestrial vegetation, and thereby contribute significantly to global atmospheric-biospheric interactions. The thorny shrubs and small trees in these semi-arid shrub lands have counterparts throughout much of the world's tropical and subtropical zones and have captured substantial areas of the world's former grasslands. The objective of our field and remotely sensed measurements in the semi-arid shrublands of Texas is to monitor interannual variability and directional change in landscape structure, ecosystem processes and atmosphere-biosphere exchanges. To understand the role ecosystems play in controlling the composition of the atmosphere, it is necessary to quantify processes such as photosynthesis and primary production, decomposition and soil carbon storage, and trace gas exchanges. Photosynthesis is the link whereby surface-atmosphere exchanges such as the radiation balance and exchange of heat, moisture, and gas can be inferred. It also describes the efficiency of carbon dioxide exchange and is directly related to the primary production of vegetation. Our efforts in this paper focus on the indirect, quantification of photosynthesis, and thereby carbon flux and net primary production, via remote sensing and direct measurements of intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR).

  7. A Method to Access Absolute fIPAR fo Vegetation in Spatially Complex Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessman, Carol A.; Nel, Elizabeth M.; Bateson, C. Ann; Asner, Gregory P.

    1998-01-01

    Arid and semi-arid lands compose a large fraction of the earth's terrestrial vegetation, and thereby contribute significantly to global atmospheric-biospheric interactions. The thorny shrubs and small trees in these semi-arid shrub lands have counterparts throughout much of the world's tropical and subtropical zones and have captured substantial areas of the world's former grasslands. The objective of our field and remotely sensed measurements in the semi-arid shrublands of Texas is to monitor interannual variability and directional change in landscape structure, ecosystem processes and atmosphere-biosphere exchanges. To understand the role ecosystems play in controlling the composition of the atmosphere, it is necessary to quantify processes such as photosynthesis and primary production, decomposition and soil carbon storage, and trace gas exchanges. Photosynthesis is the link whereby surface-atmosphere exchanges such as the radiation balance and exchange of heat, moisture, and gas can be inferred. It also describes the efficiency of carbon dioxide exchange and is directly related to the primary production of vegetation. Our efforts in this paper focus on the indirect, quantification of photosynthesis, and thereby carbon flux and net primary production, via remote sensing and direct measurements of intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR).

  8. a Three-Step Spatial-Temporal Clustering Method for Human Activity Pattern Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Li, S.; Xu, S.

    2016-06-01

    How people move in cities and what they do in various locations at different times form human activity patterns. Human activity pattern plays a key role in in urban planning, traffic forecasting, public health and safety, emergency response, friend recommendation, and so on. Therefore, scholars from different fields, such as social science, geography, transportation, physics and computer science, have made great efforts in modelling and analysing human activity patterns or human mobility patterns. One of the essential tasks in such studies is to find the locations or places where individuals stay to perform some kind of activities before further activity pattern analysis. In the era of Big Data, the emerging of social media along with wearable devices enables human activity data to be collected more easily and efficiently. Furthermore, the dimension of the accessible human activity data has been extended from two to three (space or space-time) to four dimensions (space, time and semantics). More specifically, not only a location and time that people stay and spend are collected, but also what people "say" for in a location at a time can be obtained. The characteristics of these datasets shed new light on the analysis of human mobility, where some of new methodologies should be accordingly developed to handle them. Traditional methods such as neural networks, statistics and clustering have been applied to study human activity patterns using geosocial media data. Among them, clustering methods have been widely used to analyse spatiotemporal patterns. However, to our best knowledge, few of clustering algorithms are specifically developed for handling the datasets that contain spatial, temporal and semantic aspects all together. In this work, we propose a three-step human activity clustering method based on space, time and semantics to fill this gap. One-year Twitter data, posted in Toronto, Canada, is used to test the clustering-based method. The results show that the

  9. System and Method for Providing Model-Based Alerting of Spatial Disorientation to a Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, Kevin J (Inventor); Mathan, Santosh (Inventor); Johnson, Steve (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system and method monitor aircraft state parameters, for example, aircraft movement and flight parameters, applies those inputs to a spatial disorientation model, and makes a prediction of when pilot may become spatially disoriented. Once the system predicts a potentially disoriented pilot, the sensitivity for alerting the pilot to conditions exceeding a threshold can be increased and allow for an earlier alert to mitigate the possibility of an incorrect control input.

  10. Data Updating Methods for Spatial Data Infrastructure that Maintain Infrastructure Quality and Enable its Sustainable Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, S.; Takemoto, T.; Ito, Y.

    2012-07-01

    The Japanese government, local governments and businesses are working closely together to establish spatial data infrastructures in accordance with the Basic Act on the Advancement of Utilizing Geospatial Information (NSDI Act established in August 2007). Spatial data infrastructures are urgently required not only to accelerate computerization of the public administration, but also to help restoration and reconstruction of the areas struck by the East Japan Great Earthquake and future disaster prevention and reduction. For construction of a spatial data infrastructure, various guidelines have been formulated. But after an infrastructure is constructed, there is a problem of maintaining it. In one case, an organization updates its spatial data only once every several years because of budget problems. Departments and sections update the data on their own without careful consideration. That upsets the quality control of the entire data system and the system loses integrity, which is crucial to a spatial data infrastructure. To ensure quality, ideally, it is desirable to update data of the entire area every year. But, that is virtually impossible, considering the recent budget crunch. The method we suggest is to update spatial data items of higher importance only in order to maintain quality, not updating all the items across the board. We have explored a method of partially updating the data of these two geographical features while ensuring the accuracy of locations. Using this method, data on roads and buildings that greatly change with time can be updated almost in real time or at least within a year. The method will help increase the availability of a spatial data infrastructure. We have conducted an experiment on the spatial data infrastructure of a municipality using those data. As a result, we have found that it is possible to update data of both features almost in real time.

  11. Searching for Suicide Methods: Accessibility of Information About Helium as a Method of Suicide on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Gunnell, David; Derges, Jane; Chang, Shu-Sen; Biddle, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Helium gas suicides have increased in England and Wales; easy-to-access descriptions of this method on the Internet may have contributed to this rise. To investigate the availability of information on using helium as a method of suicide and trends in searching about this method on the Internet. We analyzed trends in (a) Google searching (2004-2014) and (b) hits on a Wikipedia article describing helium as a method of suicide (2013-2014). We also investigated the extent to which helium was described as a method of suicide on web pages and discussion forums identified via Google. We found no evidence of rises in Internet searching about suicide using helium. News stories about helium suicides were associated with increased search activity. The Wikipedia article may have been temporarily altered to increase awareness of suicide using helium around the time of a celebrity suicide. Approximately one third of the links retrieved using Google searches for suicide methods mentioned helium. Information about helium as a suicide method is readily available on the Internet; the Wikipedia article describing its use was highly accessed following celebrity suicides. Availability of online information about this method may contribute to rises in helium suicides.

  12. Real time two-dimensional spatial distribution measurement method of electron temperature and plasma density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Cheol; Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Gun Ho; Chung, Chin Wook

    2009-10-01

    Real time two-dimensional spatial distribution measurement method of electron temperature and plasma density was developed. It is based on a floating probe method [1] because the floating probe has high time resolution. Two-dimensional array of sensors on a 300 mm diameter wafer-shaped printed circuit board (PCB) and a high speed multiplexer circuit were used for real time distribution measurement. The method was tested at various powers and pressures, spatial distributions of the electron temperature and the plasma density could be obtained. And in the measurement results, asymmetric plasma density distributions caused by pumping port effect could be observed. This method can measure spatial distribution of plasma parameters on the wafer in real time without plasma perturbation, therefore it will be expected to improve the uniformity of processing plasmas such as etching and deposition. [4pt] [1] M. H. Lee, S. H. Jang, C. W. Chung, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 033305 (2007).

  13. Object-oriented urban 3D spatial data model organization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-wen; Li, Wen-qing; Lv, Nan; Su, Tao

    2015-12-01

    This paper combined the 3d data model with object-oriented organization method, put forward the model of 3d data based on object-oriented method, implemented the city 3d model to quickly build logical semantic expression and model, solved the city 3d spatial information representation problem of the same location with multiple property and the same property with multiple locations, designed the space object structure of point, line, polygon, body for city of 3d spatial database, and provided a new thought and method for the city 3d GIS model and organization management.

  14. A Chebyshev matrix method for spatial modes of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danabasoglu, G.; Biringen, S.

    1989-01-01

    The Chebyshev matrix collocation method is applied to obtain the spatial modes of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation for Poiseuille flow and the Blausius boundary layer. The problem is linearized by the companion matrix technique for semi-infinite domain using a mapping transformation. The method can be easily adapted to problems with different boundary conditions requiring different transformations.

  15. Validation of the intrinsic spatial efficiency method for non cylindrical homogeneous sources using MC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Ramírez, Pablo Ruiz, Andrés

    2016-07-07

    The Monte Carlo simulation of the gamma spectroscopy systems is a common practice in these days. The most popular softwares to do this are MCNP and Geant4 codes. The intrinsic spatial efficiency method is a general and absolute method to determine the absolute efficiency of a spectroscopy system for any extended sources, but this was only demonstrated experimentally for cylindrical sources. Due to the difficulty that the preparation of sources with any shape represents, the simplest way to do this is by the simulation of the spectroscopy system and the source. In this work we present the validation of the intrinsic spatial efficiency method for sources with different geometries and for photons with an energy of 661.65 keV. In the simulation the matrix effects (the auto-attenuation effect) are not considered, therefore these results are only preliminaries. The MC simulation is carried out using the FLUKA code and the absolute efficiency of the detector is determined using two methods: the statistical count of Full Energy Peak (FEP) area (traditional method) and the intrinsic spatial efficiency method. The obtained results show total agreement between the absolute efficiencies determined by the traditional method and the intrinsic spatial efficiency method. The relative bias is lesser than 1% in all cases.

  16. Method for spatially modulating X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2015-03-10

    A method and apparatus are provided for spatially modulating X-rays or X-ray pulses using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based X-ray optics. A torsionally-oscillating MEMS micromirror and a method of leveraging the grazing-angle reflection property are provided to modulate X-ray pulses with a high-degree of controllability.

  17. Factors in contraceptive method choice in Bangladesh: goals, competence, evaluation and access.

    PubMed

    Mannan, Haider Rashid

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we have extended Bulatao's conceptual framework for selecting the determinants of method choice. Attempts have been made to capture Bulatao's dimensions directly rather than through proxies. The results of logistic regression analysis using the 1996-97 BDHS indicate that as the number of living children increases, women prefer non-terminal efficient methods such as the pill and injectable/IUD/implant and depend less on inefficient methods such as condom and permanent methods such as sterilization. With an increase in marital duration and age, women increasingly prefer sterilization as compared with other modern methods. The results may indicate a strong preference for male children among those in the sample, as women increasingly use permanent methods to prevent pregnancy as the number of living male children increases. Condom use increases with education of both women and their husbands, compared with other modern methods, indicating that more educated couples possibly have the greater understanding necessary to use the method. The better educated are significantly less likely to use sterilization. The two indicators of contraceptive evaluation, side effect and convenience of current modern method, are very important considerations in selecting the pill, injectable/IUD/implant, and condom over other modern methods. On the basis of convenience, women are most likely to use the pill over other modern methods, while they are least likely to use sterilization. Condom is the most preferred method on the basis of side effect. On the other hand, sterilization is the least preferred of other modern methods for the same reason. Sterilization is significantly less common among the Muslims, which is likely due to religious reasons, while condom use is significantly less common among non-Muslims. The two indicators of contraceptive access, accessibility/availability of current modern method and cost of current modern method, are very important considerations in

  18. Simple and accessible analytical methods for the determination of mercury in soil and coal samples.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul Hee; Eom, Yujin; Lee, Lauren Jong-Eun; Lee, Tai Gyu

    2013-09-01

    Simple and accessible analytical methods compared to conventional methods such as US EPA Method 7471B and ASTM-D6414 for the determination of mercury (Hg) in soil and coal samples are proposed. The new methods are consisted of fewer steps without the Hg oxidizing step consequently eliminating a step necessary to reduce excess oxidant. In the proposed methods, a Hg extraction is an inexpensive and accessible step utilizing a disposable test tube and a heating block instead of an expensive autoclave vessel and a specially-designed microwave. Also, a common laboratory vacuum filtration was used for the extracts instead of centrifugation. As for the optimal conditions, first, best acids for extracting Hg from soil and coal samples was investigated using certified reference materials (CRMs). Among common laboratory acids (HCl, HNO3, H2SO4, and aqua regia), aqua regia was most effective for the soil CRM whereas HNO3 was for the coal CRM. Next, the optimal heating temperature and time for Hg extraction were evaluated. The most effective Hg extraction was obtained at 120°C for 30min for soil CRM and at 70°C for 90min for coal CRM. Further tests using selected CRMs showed that all the measured values were within the allowable certification range. Finally, actual soil and coal samples were analyzed using the new methods and the US EPA Method 7473. The relative standard deviation values of 1.71-6.55% for soil and 0.97-12.11% for coal samples were obtained proving that the proposed methods were not only simple and accessible but also accurate.

  19. Ensemble ROCK Methods and Ensemble SWFM Methods for Clustering of Cross Citrus Accessions Based on Mixed Numerical and Categorical Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvionita; Sutikno; Suharsono, A.

    2017-03-01

    Cluster analysis is a technique in multivariate analysis methods that reduces (classifying) data. This analysis has the main purpose to classify the objects of observation into groups based on characteristics. In the process, a cluster analysis is not only used for numerical data or categorical data but also developed for mixed data. There are several methods in analyzing the mixed data as ensemble methods and methods Similarity Weight and Filter Methods (SWFM). There is a lot of research on these methods, but the study did not compare the performance given by both of these methods. Therefore, this paper will be compared the performance between the clustering ensemble ROCK methods and ensemble SWFM methods. These methods will be used in clustering cross citrus accessions based on the characteristics of fruit and leaves that involve variables that are a mixture of numerical and categorical. Clustering methods with the best performance determined by looking at the ratio of standard deviation values within groups (SW) with a standard deviation between groups (SB). Methods with the best performance has the smallest ratio. From the result, we get that the performance of ensemble ROCK methods is better than ensemble SWFM methods.

  20. Action research to improve methods of delivery and feedback in an Access Grid Room environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, Lynne C.; Klass, Lara; Eberhard, Andrew; Stacey, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    This article describes a qualitative study which was undertaken to improve the delivery methods and feedback opportunity in honours mathematics lectures which are delivered through Access Grid Rooms. Access Grid Rooms are facilities that provide two-way video and audio interactivity across multiple sites, with the inclusion of smart boards. The principal aim was to improve the student learning experience, given the new environment. The specific aspects of the course delivery that the study focused on included presentation of materials and provision of opportunities for interaction between the students and between students and lecturers. The practical considerations in the delivery of distance learning are well documented in the literature, and similar problems arise in the Access Grid Room environment; in particular, those of limited access to face-to-face interaction and the reduction in peer support. The nature of the Access Grid Room classes implies that students studying the same course can be physically situated in different cities, and possibly in different countries. When studying, it is important that students have opportunity to discuss new concepts with others; particularly their peers and their lecturer. The Access Grid Room environment also presents new challenges for the lecturer, who must learn new skills in the delivery of materials. The unique nature of Access Grid Room technology offers unprecedented opportunity for effective course delivery and positive outcomes for students, and was developed in response to a need to be able to interact with complex data, other students and the instructor, in real-time, at a distance and from multiple sites. This is a relatively new technology and as yet there has been little or no studies specifically addressing the use and misuse of the technology. The study found that the correct placement of cameras and the use of printed material and smart boards were all crucial to the student experience. In addition, the

  1. Use of two test methods to ensure accurate surface firmness and stability measurements for accessibility.

    PubMed

    Axelson, Peter W; Hurley, Seanna L

    2017-05-27

    The firmness and stability of indoor and outdoor surfacing are critical to the accessibility and safety of all environments for people with mobility impairments and/or who use mobility devices. ASTM F1951 laboratory test procedures include pass/fail criteria for determining playground surface accessibility by comparing the work to propel up a 1:14 (7.1%) grade ramp to that of the test surface in a wheelchair. A portable instrumented surface indenter (ISI) was developed to validate that accessibility results obtained in the laboratory are maintained in the field where the surface is installed and used. Accessibility measurements have been made on indoor and outdoor surfaces tested in the laboratory using both the ASTM F1951 and the ISI over 13 years. Correlations between these two methods were calculated. A strong correlation has been demonstrated for the sum of the ISI firmness and stability results compared to the sum of the ASTM F1951 straight propulsion and turning results (R(2)=0.9006). The portable ISI can be used to verify that the firmness and stability of an installed surface in the field correlates to the accessibility results of the surface tested in the laboratory concurrently according to ASTM F1951 and the ISI. Implications for Rehabilitation The Instrumented Surface Indenter (ISI) allows for surfaces in all environments to be tested for firmness and stability, which is critical for wheelchair user safety, especially during rehabilitation when learning to use a wheelchair. The ISI allows for surfaces in all environments to be tested for firmness and stability, which increases access to all indoor and outdoor surfaces, thereby improving the quality of life for people who have mobility impairments and/or use mobility devices, such as canes, crutches, walkers, and wheelchairs. Using the ISI to test the firmness and stability of installed playground surfaces increases access to playgrounds for children with mobility impairments, facilitating

  2. Access to recreational physical activities by car and bus: an assessment of socio-spatial inequalities in mainland Scotland.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Neil S; Lamb, Karen E; Wang, Yang; Ogilvie, David; Ellaway, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and other chronic conditions linked with low levels of physical activity (PA) are associated with deprivation. One reason for this could be that it is more difficult for low-income groups to access recreational PA facilities such as swimming pools and sports centres than high-income groups. In this paper, we explore the distribution of access to PA facilities by car and bus across mainland Scotland by income deprivation at datazone level. GIS car and bus networks were created to determine the number of PA facilities accessible within travel times of 10, 20 and 30 minutes. Multilevel negative binomial regression models were then used to investigate the distribution of the number of accessible facilities, adjusting for datazone population size and local authority. Access to PA facilities by car was significantly (p<0.01) higher for the most affluent quintile of area-based income deprivation than for most other quintiles in small towns and all other quintiles in rural areas. Accessibility by bus was significantly lower for the most affluent quintile than for other quintiles in urban areas and small towns, but not in rural areas. Overall, we found that the most disadvantaged groups were those without access to a car and living in the most affluent areas or in rural areas.

  3. Access to Recreational Physical Activities by Car and Bus: An Assessment of Socio-Spatial Inequalities in Mainland Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Neil S.; Lamb, Karen E.; Wang, Yang; Ogilvie, David; Ellaway, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and other chronic conditions linked with low levels of physical activity (PA) are associated with deprivation. One reason for this could be that it is more difficult for low-income groups to access recreational PA facilities such as swimming pools and sports centres than high-income groups. In this paper, we explore the distribution of access to PA facilities by car and bus across mainland Scotland by income deprivation at datazone level. GIS car and bus networks were created to determine the number of PA facilities accessible within travel times of 10, 20 and 30 minutes. Multilevel negative binomial regression models were then used to investigate the distribution of the number of accessible facilities, adjusting for datazone population size and local authority. Access to PA facilities by car was significantly (p<0.01) higher for the most affluent quintile of area-based income deprivation than for most other quintiles in small towns and all other quintiles in rural areas. Accessibility by bus was significantly lower for the most affluent quintile than for other quintiles in urban areas and small towns, but not in rural areas. Overall, we found that the most disadvantaged groups were those without access to a car and living in the most affluent areas or in rural areas. PMID:23409012

  4. Single-track absolute position encoding method based on spatial frequency of stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xiansong; Lu, Yancong; Wei, Chunlong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A new method of single-track absolute position encoding based on spatial frequency of stripes is proposed. Instead of using pseudorandom-sequence arranged stripes as in conventional situations, this kind of encoding method stores the location information in the frequency space of the stripes, which means the spatial frequency of stripes varies with position and indicates position. This encoding method has a strong fault-tolerant capability with single-stripe detecting errors. The method can be applied to absolute linear encoders, absolute photoelectric angle encoders or two-dimensional absolute linear encoders. The measuring apparatus includes a CCD image sensor and a microscope system, and the method of decoding this frequency code is based on FFT algorithm. This method should be highly interesting for practical applications as an absolute position encoding method.

  5. Change Detection Method with Spatial and Spectral Information from Deep Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Haobo; Lu, Hui

    2017-04-01

    Change detection is a key application of remote sensing technology. For multi-spectral images, the available spatial information and useful spectral information is both helpful for data analysis, especially change detection tasks. However, it is difficult that how to learn the changed features from spatial and spectral information meantime in one model. In this paper, we proposed a new method which combines 2-dimensional Convolutional Neural Network and 1-dimensional Recurrent Neural Network for learn changed feature. Compared with only using spectral information, the spatial information will be helpful to overcome temporal spectral variance issues. Our method extracts the spatial difference and spectral difference meantime, and these change information will be balanced in final memory cell of our model, and the leaned change information will be exploited to character change features for change detection. Finally, experiments are performed on two multi-temporal datasets, and the results show superior performance on detecting changes with spatial information and spectral information. Index Terms— Change detection, multi-temporal images, recurrent neural network, convolutional neural network , deep learning, spatial information, spectral information

  6. Spatial capture-recapture: a promising method for analyzing data collected using artificial cover objects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutherland, Chris; Munoz, David; Miller, David A.W.; Grant, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Spatial capture–recapture (SCR) is a relatively recent development in ecological statistics that provides a spatial context for estimating abundance and space use patterns, and improves inference about absolute population density. SCR has been applied to individual encounter data collected noninvasively using methods such as camera traps, hair snares, and scat surveys. Despite the widespread use of capture-based surveys to monitor amphibians and reptiles, there are few applications of SCR in the herpetological literature. We demonstrate the utility of the application of SCR for studies of reptiles and amphibians by analyzing capture–recapture data from Red-Backed Salamanders, Plethodon cinereus, collected using artificial cover boards. Using SCR to analyze spatial encounter histories of marked individuals, we found evidence that density differed little among four sites within the same forest (on average, 1.59 salamanders/m2) and that salamander detection probability peaked in early October (Julian day 278) reflecting expected surface activity patterns of the species. The spatial scale of detectability, a measure of space use, indicates that the home range size for this population of Red-Backed Salamanders in autumn was 16.89 m2. Surveying reptiles and amphibians using artificial cover boards regularly generates spatial encounter history data of known individuals, which can readily be analyzed using SCR methods, providing estimates of absolute density and inference about the spatial scale of habitat use.

  7. A simple method for correcting spatially resolved solar intensity oscillation observations for variations in scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, S. M.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A measurement of the intensity distribution in an image of the solar disk will be corrupted by a spatial redistribution of the light that is caused by the earth's atmosphere and the observing instrument. A simple correction method is introduced here that is applicable for solar p-mode intensity observations obtained over a period of time in which there is a significant change in the scattering component of the point spread function. The method circumvents the problems incurred with an accurate determination of the spatial point spread function and its subsequent deconvolution from the observations. The method only corrects the spherical harmonic coefficients that represent the spatial frequencies present in the image and does not correct the image itself.

  8. Violent crime in San Antonio, Texas: an application of spatial epidemiological methods.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Corey S

    2011-12-01

    Violent crimes are rarely considered a public health problem or investigated using epidemiological methods. But patterns of violent crime and other health conditions are often affected by similar characteristics of the built environment. In this paper, methods and perspectives from spatial epidemiology are used in an analysis of violent crimes in San Antonio, TX. Bayesian statistical methods are used to examine the contextual influence of several aspects of the built environment. Additionally, spatial regression models using Bayesian model specifications are used to examine spatial patterns of violent crime risk. Results indicate that the determinants of violent crime depend on the model specification, but are primarily related to the built environment and neighborhood socioeconomic conditions. Results are discussed within the context of a rapidly growing urban area with a diverse population.

  9. Spatial Reuse through Dynamic Power and Routing Control in Common-Channel Random-Access Packet Radio Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    latter stages of this effort. In i°i UlI addition, I would like to acknowledge my parents , Dick and Mickey Stevens, for their encourage- ment and for...Pure Aloha 26 2.3.1.2 Disciplined Aloha 27 2.3.1.3 Slotted Aloha 27 2.3.1.4 Carer Sense Multiple Access 27 2.3.1.5 Busy Tone Multiple Access 28 2.3.2

  10. Methods, compositions and kits for imaging cells and tissues using nanoparticles and spatial frequency heterodyne imaging

    DOEpatents

    Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Wands, Jack R.; Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Ortiz, Vivian

    2016-04-19

    Methods, compositions, systems, devices and kits are provided herein for preparing and using a nanoparticle composition and spatial frequency heterodyne imaging for visualizing cells or tissues. In various embodiments, the nanoparticle composition includes at least one of: a nanoparticle, a polymer layer, and a binding agent, such that the polymer layer coats the nanoparticle and is for example a polyethylene glycol, a polyelectrolyte, an anionic polymer, or a cationic polymer, and such that the binding agent that specifically binds the cells or the tissue. Methods, compositions, systems, devices and kits are provided for identifying potential therapeutic agents in a model using the nanoparticle composition and spatial frequency heterodyne imaging.

  11. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy system and methods for determining spatial locations of defects

    DOEpatents

    Glenn, David F.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Propp, W. Alan; Glenn, Anne W.; Shaw, Peter G.

    2006-08-08

    A method and apparatus for determining spatial locations of defects in a material are described. The method includes providing a plurality of electrodes in contact with a material, applying a sinusoidal voltage to a select number of the electrodes at a predetermined frequency, determining gain and phase angle measurements at other of the electrodes in response to applying the sinusoidal voltage to the select number of electrodes, determining impedance values from the gain and phase angle measurements, computing an impedance spectrum for an area of the material from the determined impedance values, and comparing the computed impedance spectrum with a known impedance spectrum to identify spatial locations of defects in the material.

  12. A contrast source method for nonlinear acoustic wave fields in media with spatially inhomogeneous attenuation.

    PubMed

    Demi, L; van Dongen, K W A; Verweij, M D

    2011-03-01

    Experimental data reveals that attenuation is an important phenomenon in medical ultrasound. Attenuation is particularly important for medical applications based on nonlinear acoustics, since higher harmonics experience higher attenuation than the fundamental. Here, a method is presented to accurately solve the wave equation for nonlinear acoustic media with spatially inhomogeneous attenuation. Losses are modeled by a spatially dependent compliance relaxation function, which is included in the Westervelt equation. Introduction of absorption in the form of a causal relaxation function automatically results in the appearance of dispersion. The appearance of inhomogeneities implies the presence of a spatially inhomogeneous contrast source in the presented full-wave method leading to inclusion of forward and backward scattering. The contrast source problem is solved iteratively using a Neumann scheme, similar to the iterative nonlinear contrast source (INCS) method. The presented method is directionally independent and capable of dealing with weakly to moderately nonlinear, large scale, three-dimensional wave fields occurring in diagnostic ultrasound. Convergence of the method has been investigated and results for homogeneous, lossy, linear media show full agreement with the exact results. Moreover, the performance of the method is demonstrated through simulations involving steered and unsteered beams in nonlinear media with spatially homogeneous and inhomogeneous attenuation. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  13. The analytic common spatial patterns method for EEG-based BCI data.

    PubMed

    Falzon, Owen; Camilleri, Kenneth P; Muscat, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    One of the most important stages in a brain-computer interface (BCI) system is that of extracting features that can reliably discriminate data recorded during different user states. A popular technique used for feature extraction in BCIs is the common spatial patterns (CSP) method, which provides a set of spatial filters that optimally discriminate between two classes of data in the least-squares sense. The method also yields a set of spatial patterns that are associated with the most relevant activity for distinguishing between the two classes. The high recognition rates that have been achieved with the method have led to its widespread adoption in the field. Here, a variant of the CSP method that considers EEG data in its complex form is described. By explicitly considering the amplitude and phase information in the data, the analytic CSP (ACSP) technique can provide a more comprehensive picture of the underlying activity, resulting in improved classification accuracies and more informative spatial patterns than the conventional CSP method. In this paper, we elaborate on the theoretical aspects of the ACSP algorithm and demonstrate the advantages of the method through a number of simulations and through tests on EEG data.

  14. A stochastic simulation method for the assessment of resistive random access memory retention reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Berco, Dan Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2015-12-21

    This study presents an evaluation method for resistive random access memory retention reliability based on the Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm and Gibbs free energy. The method, which does not rely on a time evolution, provides an extremely efficient way to compare the relative retention properties of metal-insulator-metal structures. It requires a small number of iterations and may be used for statistical analysis. The presented approach is used to compare the relative robustness of a single layer ZrO{sub 2} device with a double layer ZnO/ZrO{sub 2} one, and obtain results which are in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. System and method for integrating and accessing multiple data sources within a data warehouse architecture

    DOEpatents

    Musick, Charles R.; Critchlow, Terence; Ganesh, Madhaven; Slezak, Tom; Fidelis, Krzysztof

    2006-12-19

    A system and method is disclosed for integrating and accessing multiple data sources within a data warehouse architecture. The metadata formed by the present method provide a way to declaratively present domain specific knowledge, obtained by analyzing data sources, in a consistent and useable way. Four types of information are represented by the metadata: abstract concepts, databases, transformations and mappings. A mediator generator automatically generates data management computer code based on the metadata. The resulting code defines a translation library and a mediator class. The translation library provides a data representation for domain specific knowledge represented in a data warehouse, including "get" and "set" methods for attributes that call transformation methods and derive a value of an attribute if it is missing. The mediator class defines methods that take "distinguished" high-level objects as input and traverse their data structures and enter information into the data warehouse.

  16. Do public reports of provider performance make their data and methods available and accessible?

    PubMed

    Damberg, Cheryl L; Hyman, David; France, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Public reports of provider performance are widespread and the methods used to generate the provider ratings differ across the sponsoring entities. We examined 115 hospital and 27 physician public reports to determine whether report sponsors made the methods used to score providers available and accessible. While nearly all websites made transparent some of the methods used to assess provider performance, we found substantial variation in the extent to which they fully adhered to recommended methods elements identified in the Consumer-Purchaser Disclosure Project's Patient Charter for performance reporting. Most public reports provided descriptions of the data sources, whether measures were endorsed, and the attribution approach. Least often made transparent were methods descriptions related to advanced provider review and reconsideration of results, reliability assessment, and case-mix adjustment. Future research should do more to identify the core elements that would lead consumer end users to have confidence in public reports.

  17. A new method for obtaining a spatially averaged infiltration rate from rainfall and runoff rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. Y.; van der Molen, W. H.; Rose, C. W.; Parlange, J.-Y.

    1985-11-01

    A new method of obtaining a spatial average value for infiltration from rainfall and runoff rates, is presented. The theory is developed from the general analytic solution to the kinematic flow approximation of overland flow on a plane surface. Application of the method is illustrated both with analytic examples and field experimental data. The former indicates the good accuracy of the method, whilst the latter indicates how difficulties encountered when using experimental data can be overcome.

  18. A numerical method for multigroup slab-geometry discrete ordinates problems with no spatial truncation error

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, R.C. de; Larsen, E.W. )

    1991-01-01

    A generalization of the one-group Spectral Green's Function (SGF) method is developed for multigroup, slab-geometry discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) problems. The multigroup SGF method is free from spatial truncation errors; it generated numerical values for the cell-edge and cell-average angular fluxes that agree with the analytic solution of the multigroup S{sub N} equations. Numerical results are given to illustrate the method's accuracy.

  19. Method and system for spatial data input, manipulation and distribution via an adaptive wireless transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ray (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and system for spatial data manipulation input and distribution via an adaptive wireless transceiver. The method and system include a wireless transceiver for automatically and adaptively controlling wireless transmissions using a Waveform-DNA method. The wireless transceiver can operate simultaneously over both the short and long distances. The wireless transceiver is automatically adaptive and wireless devices can send and receive wireless digital and analog data from various sources rapidly in real-time via available networks and network services.

  20. A multiple-point spatially weighted k-NN method for object-based classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yunwei; Jing, Linhai; Li, Hui; Atkinson, Peter M.

    2016-10-01

    Object-based classification, commonly referred to as object-based image analysis (OBIA), is now commonly regarded as able to produce more appealing classification maps, often of greater accuracy, than pixel-based classification and its application is now widespread. Therefore, improvement of OBIA using spatial techniques is of great interest. In this paper, multiple-point statistics (MPS) is proposed for object-based classification enhancement in the form of a new multiple-point k-nearest neighbour (k-NN) classification method (MPk-NN). The proposed method first utilises a training image derived from a pre-classified map to characterise the spatial correlation between multiple points of land cover classes. The MPS borrows spatial structures from other parts of the training image, and then incorporates this spatial information, in the form of multiple-point probabilities, into the k-NN classifier. Two satellite sensor images with a fine spatial resolution were selected to evaluate the new method. One is an IKONOS image of the Beijing urban area and the other is a WorldView-2 image of the Wolong mountainous area, in China. The images were object-based classified using the MPk-NN method and several alternatives, including the k-NN, the geostatistically weighted k-NN, the Bayesian method, the decision tree classifier (DTC), and the support vector machine classifier (SVM). It was demonstrated that the new spatial weighting based on MPS can achieve greater classification accuracy relative to the alternatives and it is, thus, recommended as appropriate for object-based classification.

  1. Estimation of carotenoid accessibility from carrots determined by an in vitro digestion method.

    PubMed

    Hedrén, E; Diaz, V; Svanberg, U

    2002-05-01

    To develop an in vitro digestion method to assess the impact of heat treatment, particle size and presence of oil on the accessibility (available for absorption) of alpha- and beta-carotene in carrots. Raw and cooked carrots were either homogenized or cut into pieces similar to chewed items in size. The carrot samples, with or without added cooking oil, were exposed to an in vitro digestion procedure. Adding a pepsin-HCl solution at pH 2.0 simulated the gastric phase. In the subsequent intestinal phase, pH was adjusted to 7.5 and a pancreatin-bile extract mixture was added. Carotenoids released from the carrot matrix during the digestion were extracted and quantified on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Three percent of the total beta-carotene content was released from raw carrots in pieces. When homogenized (pulped) 21% was released. Cooking the pulp increased the accessibility to 27%. Addition of cooking oil to the cooked pulp further increased the released amount to 39%. The trends for alpha-carotene were similar to those for beta-carotene. The described in vitro digestion method allows a rapid estimation of carotene accessibility in processed carrots, which may reliably predict in vivo behavior. This study was supported by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) and the International Program in the Chemical Sciences (IPICS), Uppsala University, Sweden.

  2. Implications of construction method and spatial scale on measures of the built environment.

    PubMed

    Strominger, Julie; Anthopolos, Rebecca; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2016-04-28

    Research surrounding the built environment (BE) and health has resulted in inconsistent findings. Experts have identified the need to examine methodological choices, such as development and testing of BE indices at varying spatial scales. We sought to examine the impact of construction method and spatial scale on seven measures of the BE using data collected at two time points. The Children's Environmental Health Initiative conducted parcel-level assessments of 57 BE variables in Durham, NC (parcel N = 30,319). Based on a priori defined variable groupings, we constructed seven mutually exclusive BE domains (housing damage, property disorder, territoriality, vacancy, public nuisances, crime, and tenancy). Domain-based indices were developed according to four different index construction methods that differentially account for number of parcels and parcel area. Indices were constructed at the census block level and two alternative spatial scales that better depict the larger neighborhood context experienced by local residents: the primary adjacency community and secondary adjacency community. Spearman's rank correlation was used to assess if indices and relationships among indices were preserved across methods. Territoriality, public nuisances, and tenancy were weakly to moderately preserved across methods at the block level while all other indices were well preserved. Except for the relationships between public nuisances and crime or tenancy, and crime and housing damage or territoriality, relationships among indices were poorly preserved across methods. The number of indices affected by construction method increased as spatial scale increased, while the impact of construction method on relationships among indices varied according to spatial scale. We found that the impact of construction method on BE measures was index and spatial scale specific. Operationalizing and developing BE measures using alternative methods at varying spatial scales before connecting to

  3. An Indoor Space Partition Method and its Fingerprint Positioning Optimization Considering Pedestrian Accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue; Shi, Yong; Zheng, Xingyu; Long, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Fingerprint positioning method is generally the first choice in indoor navigation system due to its high accuracy and low cost. The accuracy depends on partition density to the indoor space. The accuracy will be higher with higher grid resolution. But the high grid resolution leads to significantly increasing work of the fingerprint data collection, processing and maintenance. This also might decrease the performance, portability and robustness of the navigation system. Meanwhile, traditional fingerprint positioning method use equational grid to partition the indoor space. While used for pedestrian navigation, sometimes a person can be located at the area where he or she cannot access. This paper studied these two issues, proposed a new indoor space partition method considering pedestrian accessibility, which can increase the accuracy of pedestrian position, and decrease the volume of the fingerprint data. Based on this proposed partition method, an optimized algorithm for fingerprint position was also designed. A across linker structure was used for fingerprint point index and matching. Experiment based on the proposed method and algorithm showed that the workload of fingerprint collection and maintenance were effectively decreased, and poisoning efficiency and accuracy was effectively increased

  4. A New Method for the Spatialization of Forest Cover by Fusing Forest Inventory and MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The acquisition of accurate spatial and temporal data on forest cover is the foundation for the sustainable management and utilization of forest resources. Although forest inventory data can provide accurate statistical information about forest type, such data do not give the specific spatial distribution. Remote sensing data provide accurate spatial information, and vegetation indices provide measures of land surface vegetation cover and growth conditions. By fusing these two sources of data, specific information about the spatial distribution of different types of forest can be obtained. Here, in a case study of Heilongjiang Province, we obtained forest dominant species area from the sixth and seventh national forest inventories and MODIS composite remote sensing data for the same periods to study forest cover by developing a spatialization method. Based on pixel features (such as NDVI and near-infrared reflectance) and their relationships with forest types, thresholds between different forest types in the remote sensing information were set according to the statistical data, which allowed the two sets of data to be fused. As a result, we generated forest cover maps for 2000 and 2005 that show the distribution of four forest types. Taking vegetation map of China as reference data, an error matrix analysis shows that the overall classification consistency reaches 76.7%, but only 70% for evergreen needleleaf forest and mixed forest. This study paves the way for further research on improving the accuracy of forest cover classification accuracy, on expanding the spatial and temporal scales of interest, and on quantifying forest dynamics

  5. Genetic-algorithm-based method to optimize spatial profile utilizing characteristics of electrostatic actuator deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Futoshi; Goriki, Shin'ichi; Shimizu, Yukio; Tomizawa, Hiromitsu; Kawato, Sakae; Kobayashi, Takao

    2008-05-01

    Arbitrary spatial beam shaping was demonstrated with a membrane electrostatic actuator type deformable mirror (DM). An automatic closed loop system must optimize such beam shapes as flattop. Well-characterized short pulse laser beam is widely required for a photocathode RF gun or for microscopic processing, etc. We propose a new sophisticated optimizing method based on a genetic algorithm (GA) for spatial shaping. A membrane type DM is driven by electrostatic attraction power, and applied electrode voltages vs displacement of membrane surface have a square function relationship. We prepare discrete electrode voltages to linearly change displacement as a utilized gene of the initial population in GA. Using uniform crossover without mutation in this method, we can make an arbitrary spatial beam shape quasi-flattop.

  6. New methods for quantifying the spatial storage effect: an illustration with desert annuals.

    PubMed

    Sears, Anna L W; Chesson, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Recent theory supports the long-held proposition that coexistence is promoted by species-specific responses to a spatially varying environment. The underlying coexistence mechanism, the spatial storage effect, can be quantified by the covariance between response to the environment and competition. Here, "competition" is generalized to encompass similar processes such as facilitation and apparent competition. In the present study, we use a model field system of desert annual plants to demonstrate this method and to provide insight into the dynamics of the field system. Specifically, we use neighborhood competition experiments to quantify the spatial storage effect and compare it to the separate (but not mutually exclusive) process of neighborhood-scale resource partitioning. As our basic experimental design has been used frequently in community ecology, these methods can be applied to many existing data sets, as well as future field studies.

  7. Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Spatial Attributes of Food Shopping between Residents of Low and High Food Access Areas

    PubMed Central

    Sohi, Inderbir; Bell, Bethany A.; Liu, Jihong; Battersby, Sarah E.; Liese, Angela D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore potential differences in food shopping behaviors and healthy food availability perceptions between residents living in areas with low and high food access. Design A cross-sectional telephone survey to assess food shopping behaviors and perceptions. Data from an eight-county food environment field census used to define the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) healthier food retail tract and USDA ERS (United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service) food desert measure. Participants 968 residents in eight South Carolina counties. Main Outcome Measures Residents’ food shopping behaviors and healthy food availability perceptions. Analysis Linear and logistic regression. Results Compared to residents in high food access areas, residents in low food access areas traveled further to their primary food store (USDA ERS: 8.8 vs. 7.1 miles, p=0.03; CDC: 9.2 vs. 6.1 miles, p<0.001), accumulated more total shopping miles per week; CDC 28.0 vs. 15.4 miles, p<0.001) and showed differences in perceived healthy food availability (p<0.001) and shopping access (p<0.001). Conclusions and Implications These findings lend support to ongoing community and policy interventions aimed at reducing food access disparities. PMID:24560861

  8. Differences in food environment perceptions and spatial attributes of food shopping between residents of low and high food access areas.

    PubMed

    Sohi, Inderbir; Bell, Bethany A; Liu, Jihong; Battersby, Sarah E; Liese, Angela D

    2014-01-01

    To explore potential differences in food shopping behaviors and healthy food availability perceptions between residents living in areas with low and high food access. A cross-sectional telephone survey to assess food shopping behaviors and perceptions. Data from an 8-county food environment field census used to define the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) healthier food retail tract and US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service food desert measure. A total of 968 residents in 8 South Carolina counties. Residents' food shopping behaviors and healthy food availability perceptions. Linear and logistic regression. Compared with residents in high food access areas, residents in low food access areas traveled farther to their primary food store (US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service: 8.8 vs 7.1 miles, P = .03; CDC: 9.2 vs 6.1 miles, P < .001), accumulated more total shopping miles per week (CDC: 28.0 vs 15.4 miles; P < .001), and showed differences in perceived healthy food availability (P < .001) and shopping access (P < .001). These findings lend support to ongoing community and policy interventions aimed at reducing food access disparities. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of Four Spatial Interpolation Methods for Estimating Soil Moisture in a Complex Terrain Catchment

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xueling; Fu, Bojie; Lü, Yihe; Sun, Feixiang; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Min

    2013-01-01

    Many spatial interpolation methods perform well for gentle terrains when producing spatially continuous surfaces based on ground point data. However, few interpolation methods perform satisfactorily for complex terrains. Our objective in the present study was to analyze the suitability of several popular interpolation methods for complex terrains and propose an optimal method. A data set of 153 soil water profiles (1 m) from the semiarid hilly gully Loess Plateau of China was used, generated under a wide range of land use types, vegetation types and topographic positions. Four spatial interpolation methods, including ordinary kriging, inverse distance weighting, linear regression and regression kriging were used for modeling, randomly partitioning the data set into 2/3 for model fit and 1/3 for independent testing. The performance of each method was assessed quantitatively in terms of mean-absolute-percentage-error, root-mean-square-error, and goodness-of-prediction statistic. The results showed that the prediction accuracy differed significantly between each method in complex terrain. The ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighted methods performed poorly due to the poor spatial autocorrelation of soil moisture at small catchment scale with complex terrain, where the environmental impact factors were discontinuous in space. The linear regression model was much more suitable to the complex terrain than the former two distance-based methods, but the predicted soil moisture changed too sharply near the boundary of the land use types and junction of the sunny (southern) and shady (northern) slopes, which was inconsistent with reality because soil moisture should change gradually in short distance due to its mobility in soil. The most optimal interpolation method in this study for the complex terrain was the hybrid regression kriging, which produced a detailed, reasonable prediction map with better accuracy and prediction effectiveness. PMID:23372749

  10. Comparison of four spatial interpolation methods for estimating soil moisture in a complex terrain catchment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xueling; Fu, Bojie; Lü, Yihe; Sun, Feixiang; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Min

    2013-01-01

    Many spatial interpolation methods perform well for gentle terrains when producing spatially continuous surfaces based on ground point data. However, few interpolation methods perform satisfactorily for complex terrains. Our objective in the present study was to analyze the suitability of several popular interpolation methods for complex terrains and propose an optimal method. A data set of 153 soil water profiles (1 m) from the semiarid hilly gully Loess Plateau of China was used, generated under a wide range of land use types, vegetation types and topographic positions. Four spatial interpolation methods, including ordinary kriging, inverse distance weighting, linear regression and regression kriging were used for modeling, randomly partitioning the data set into 2/3 for model fit and 1/3 for independent testing. The performance of each method was assessed quantitatively in terms of mean-absolute-percentage-error, root-mean-square-error, and goodness-of-prediction statistic. The results showed that the prediction accuracy differed significantly between each method in complex terrain. The ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighted methods performed poorly due to the poor spatial autocorrelation of soil moisture at small catchment scale with complex terrain, where the environmental impact factors were discontinuous in space. The linear regression model was much more suitable to the complex terrain than the former two distance-based methods, but the predicted soil moisture changed too sharply near the boundary of the land use types and junction of the sunny (southern) and shady (northern) slopes, which was inconsistent with reality because soil moisture should change gradually in short distance due to its mobility in soil. The most optimal interpolation method in this study for the complex terrain was the hybrid regression kriging, which produced a detailed, reasonable prediction map with better accuracy and prediction effectiveness.

  11. Spatial resolution of proton tomography: Methods, initial phase space and object thickness.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uwe; Pedroni, Eros; Hartmann, Matthias; Besserer, Jürgen; Lomax, Tony

    2012-06-01

    Proton radiography and tomography was investigated since the early 1970s because of its low radiation dose, high density resolution and ability to image directly proton stopping power. However, spatial resolution is still a limiting factor and as a consequence experimental methods and image reconstruction should be optimized to improve position resolution. Spatial resolution of proton radiography and tomography is given by multiple Coloumb scattering (MCS) of the protons in the patient. In this paper we employ an improved MCS model to study the impact of various proton tomographic set-ups on the spatial resolution, such as different combinations of entrance and exit coordinate and angle measurements, respectively, initial particle energy and angular confusion of the incident proton field. It was found that best spatial resolution is obtained by measuring in addition to the entrance and exit coordinates also the entrance and exit angles. However, by applying partial backprojection and by using a perfect proton fan beam a sufficient spatial resolution can be achieved with less experimental complexity (measuring only exit angles). It was also shown that it is essential to use the most probable proton trajectory to improve spatial resolution. A simple straight line connection for image reconstruction results in a spatial resolution which is not clinically sufficient. The percentage deterioration of spatial resolution due to the angular confusion of the incident proton field is less than the phase space in mrad. A clinically realistic proton beam with 10 mrad angular confusion results in a less than 10% loss of spatial resolution. Clinically sufficient spatial resolution can be either achieved with a full measurement of entrance and exit coordinates and angles, but also by using a fan beam with small angular confusion and an exit angle measurement. It is necessary to use the most probable proton path for image reconstruction. A simple straight line connection is in

  12. Evaluation of sliding baseline methods for spatial estimation for cluster detection in the biosurveillance system

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jian; Burkom, Howard; Moniz, Linda; Edgerton, James; Leuze, Michael; Tokars, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    Background The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) BioSense system provides near-real time situational awareness for public health monitoring through analysis of electronic health data. Determination of anomalous spatial and temporal disease clusters is a crucial part of the daily disease monitoring task. Our study focused on finding useful anomalies at manageable alert rates according to available BioSense data history. Methods The study dataset included more than 3 years of daily counts of military outpatient clinic visits for respiratory and rash syndrome groupings. We applied four spatial estimation methods in implementations of space-time scan statistics cross-checked in Matlab and C. We compared the utility of these methods according to the resultant background cluster rate (a false alarm surrogate) and sensitivity to injected cluster signals. The comparison runs used a spatial resolution based on the facility zip code in the patient record and a finer resolution based on the residence zip code. Results Simple estimation methods that account for day-of-week (DOW) data patterns yielded a clear advantage both in background cluster rate and in signal sensitivity. A 28-day baseline gave the most robust results for this estimation; the preferred baseline is long enough to remove daily fluctuations but short enough to reflect recent disease trends and data representation. Background cluster rates were lower for the rash syndrome counts than for the respiratory counts, likely because of seasonality and the large scale of the respiratory counts. Conclusion The spatial estimation method should be chosen according to characteristics of the selected data streams. In this dataset with strong day-of-week effects, the overall best detection performance was achieved using subregion averages over a 28-day baseline stratified by weekday or weekend/holiday behavior. Changing the estimation method for particular scenarios involving different spatial resolution

  13. Estimation of missing rainfall data using spatial interpolation and imputation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radi, Noor Fadhilah Ahmad; Zakaria, Roslinazairimah; Azman, Muhammad Az-zuhri

    2015-02-01

    This study is aimed to estimate missing rainfall data by dividing the analysis into three different percentages namely 5%, 10% and 20% in order to represent various cases of missing data. In practice, spatial interpolation methods are chosen at the first place to estimate missing data. These methods include normal ratio (NR), arithmetic average (AA), coefficient of correlation (CC) and inverse distance (ID) weighting methods. The methods consider the distance between the target and the neighbouring stations as well as the correlations between them. Alternative method for solving missing data is an imputation method. Imputation is a process of replacing missing data with substituted values. A once-common method of imputation is single-imputation method, which allows parameter estimation. However, the single imputation method ignored the estimation of variability which leads to the underestimation of standard errors and confidence intervals. To overcome underestimation problem, multiple imputations method is used, where each missing value is estimated with a distribution of imputations that reflect the uncertainty about the missing data. In this study, comparison of spatial interpolation methods and multiple imputations method are presented to estimate missing rainfall data. The performance of the estimation methods used are assessed using the similarity index (S-index), mean absolute error (MAE) and coefficient of correlation (R).

  14. A spatially offset Raman spectroscopy method for non-destructive detection of gelatin-encapsulated powders

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Non-destructive subsurface detection of encapsulated, coated, or seal-packaged foods and pharmaceuticals can help prevent distribution and consumption of counterfeit or hazardous products. This study used a Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) method to detect and identify urea, ibuprofen, and...

  15. Spatial Visualization Learning in Engineering: Traditional Methods vs. a Web-Based Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrosa, Carlos Melgosa; Barbero, Basilio Ramos; Miguel, Arturo Román

    2014-01-01

    This study compares an interactive learning manager for graphic engineering to develop spatial vision (ILMAGE_SV) to traditional methods. ILMAGE_SV is an asynchronous web-based learning tool that allows the manipulation of objects with a 3D viewer, self-evaluation, and continuous assessment. In addition, student learning may be monitored, which…

  16. Survey of spatial data needs and land use forecasting methods in the electric utility industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A representative sample of the electric utility industry in the United States was surveyed to determine industry need for spatial data (specifically LANDSAT and other remotely sensed data) and the methods used by the industry to forecast land use changes and future energy demand. Information was acquired through interviews, written questionnaires, and reports (both published and internal).

  17. A total station spatial positioning method based on rotary laser scanning and ultrasonic ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Zhu, Jigui; Yu, Zhijing; Zhuge, Jingchang; Xue, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Total station spatial coordinator measuring technology is extensively applied in the large-scale measurement of industrial assembly and manufacturing for its flexibility and adaptability. The existing total station technology has some principal limits such as poor efficiency and single tasking; in order to achieve the total station spatial coordinator measuring technology with the advantages of multi-task, real-time measurement, and high accuracy, this paper presents a novel total station measurement method by using multi-laser plane constraints established through rotating planar planes and distance information obtained with an ultrasonic ranging method. With the spatial divergence angles of the optoelectronic scanning and ultrasonic arrays, this method can measure the spatial coordinates in multi-task and real-time with a single station and a portable target bar. Experimental results show that the proposed method is feasible and valid with satisfactory accuracy. The maximum distance measurement error is less than 0.2 mm in a volume that is 5 m far away from the station.

  18. Spatial Visualization Learning in Engineering: Traditional Methods vs. a Web-Based Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrosa, Carlos Melgosa; Barbero, Basilio Ramos; Miguel, Arturo Román

    2014-01-01

    This study compares an interactive learning manager for graphic engineering to develop spatial vision (ILMAGE_SV) to traditional methods. ILMAGE_SV is an asynchronous web-based learning tool that allows the manipulation of objects with a 3D viewer, self-evaluation, and continuous assessment. In addition, student learning may be monitored, which…

  19. A total station spatial positioning method based on rotary laser scanning and ultrasonic ranging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Zhu, Jigui; Yu, Zhijing; Zhuge, Jingchang; Xue, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Total station spatial coordinator measuring technology is extensively applied in the large-scale measurement of industrial assembly and manufacturing for its flexibility and adaptability. The existing total station technology has some principal limits such as poor efficiency and single tasking; in order to achieve the total station spatial coordinator measuring technology with the advantages of multi-task, real-time measurement, and high accuracy, this paper presents a novel total station measurement method by using multi-laser plane constraints established through rotating planar planes and distance information obtained with an ultrasonic ranging method. With the spatial divergence angles of the optoelectronic scanning and ultrasonic arrays, this method can measure the spatial coordinates in multi-task and real-time with a single station and a portable target bar. Experimental results show that the proposed method is feasible and valid with satisfactory accuracy. The maximum distance measurement error is less than 0.2 mm in a volume that is 5 m far away from the station.

  20. A Study on the Spatial Abilities of Prospective Social Studies Teachers: A Mixed Method Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurt, Eyüp; Tünkler, Vural

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated prospective social studies teachers' spatial abilities. It was conducted with 234 prospective teachers attending Social Studies Teaching departments at Education Faculties of two universities in Central and Southern Anatolia. This study, designed according to the explanatory-sequential design, is a mixed research method,…

  1. Estimating Small-area Populations by Age and Sex Using Spatial Interpolation and Statistical Inference Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Qai, Qiang; Rushton, Gerald; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Bright, Eddie A; Coleman, Phil R

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is to compute population estimates by age and sex for small areas whose boundaries are different from those for which the population counts were made. In our approach, population surfaces and age-sex proportion surfaces are separately estimated. Age-sex population estimates for small areas and their confidence intervals are then computed using a binomial model with the two surfaces as inputs. The approach was implemented for Iowa using a 90 m resolution population grid (LandScan USA) and U.S. Census 2000 population. Three spatial interpolation methods, the areal weighting (AW) method, the ordinary kriging (OK) method, and a modification of the pycnophylactic method, were used on Census Tract populations to estimate the age-sex proportion surfaces. To verify the model, age-sex population estimates were computed for paired Block Groups that straddled Census Tracts and therefore were spatially misaligned with them. The pycnophylactic method and the OK method were more accurate than the AW method. The approach is general and can be used to estimate subgroup-count types of variables from information in existing administrative areas for custom-defined areas used as the spatial basis of support in other applications.

  2. A hybrid spatial-spectral denoising method for infrared hyperspectral images using 2DPCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Ma, Yong; Mei, Xiaoguang; Fan, Fan

    2016-11-01

    The traditional noise reduction methods for 3-D infrared hyperspectral images typically operate independently in either the spatial or spectral domain, and such methods overlook the relationship between the two domains. To address this issue, we propose a hybrid spatial-spectral method in this paper to link both domains. First, principal component analysis and bivariate wavelet shrinkage are performed in the 2-D spatial domain. Second, 2-D principal component analysis transformation is conducted in the 1-D spectral domain to separate the basic components from detail ones. The energy distribution of noise is unaffected by orthogonal transformation; therefore, the signal-to-noise ratio of each component is used as a criterion to determine whether a component should be protected from over-denoising or denoised with certain 1-D denoising methods. This study implements the 1-D wavelet shrinking threshold method based on Stein's unbiased risk estimator, and the quantitative results on publicly available datasets demonstrate that our method can improve denoising performance more effectively than other state-of-the-art methods can.

  3. Performances among various common spatial pattern methods for simultaneous MEG/EEG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Ahn, M.; Jun, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) is a communication pathway between devices (computers) and the human brain. It treats brain signals in a real-time basis and deciphers some of what the human brain is doing to give us certain information. In this work, we develop the BCI system based on simultaneous electroencephalograph (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) using various preprocessing and feature extraction methods along with Fisher linear discriminant analysis (FLDA) classifier. Common spatial pattern (CSP) is a spatial filter whose spatially projected signal has maximum power for one class and minimum power for the other. Each single trial is computed by the variance in the time domain. We choose a proper number of patterns in order to make a feature vector. In this work, 6 CSP patterns, the first three and the last three ones are selected. A feature vector consists of 6 variances of each extracted CSP pattern from projected data. Among various CSP methods, we used normal common spatial patterns (CSP), invariant common spatial patterns (iCSP), and common spectral spatial patterns (CSSP) methods to measure the performances. Simultaneous MEG/EEG datasets (340 channels) for four subjects from Eleckta Vectorview system were digitally acquired at a 1 KHz and 8-30Hz bandpass filtered. Total 340 channels consist of three kinds of channel types such as 102 magnetometers, 204 gradiometers and 40 EEG electrodes. Three different modalities such as EEG-only, MEG-only, and simultaneous MEG and EEG were analyzed in order to study comparative BCI performances on three variants of CSP. Particularly, for simultaneous MEG/EEG data we proposed three different combination ways for BCI and their performances were discussed.

  4. Performances among various common spatial pattern methods for simultaneous MEG/EEG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Ahn, M.; Jun, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) is a communication pathway between devices (computers) and the human brain. It treats brain signals in a real-time basis and deciphers some of what the human brain is doing to give us certain information. In this work, we develop the BCI system based on simultaneous electroencephalograph (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) using various preprocessing and feature extraction methods along with Fisher linear discriminant analysis (FLDA) classifier. Common spatial pattern (CSP) is a spatial filter whose spatially projected signal has maximum power for one class and minimum power for the other. Each single trial is computed by the variance in the time domain. We choose a proper number of patterns in order to make a feature vector. In this work, 6 CSP patterns, the first three and the last three ones are selected. A feature vector consists of 6 variances of each extracted CSP pattern from projected data. Among various CSP methods, we used normal common spatial patterns (CSP), invariant common spatial patterns (iCSP), and common spectral spatial patterns (CSSP) methods to measure the performances. Simultaneous MEG/EEG datasets (340 channels) for four subjects from Eleckta Vectorview system were digitally acquired at a 1 KHz and 8-30Hz bandpass filtered. Total 340 channels consist of three kinds of channel types such as 102 magnetometers, 204 gradiometers and 40 EEG electrodes. Three different modalities such as EEG-only, MEG-only, and simultaneous MEG and EEG were analyzed in order to study comparative BCI performances on three variants of CSP. Particularly, for simultaneous MEG/EEG data we proposed three different combination ways for BCI and their performances were discussed.

  5. [Comparison of various spatial interpolation methods for non-stationary regional soil mercury content].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke-lin; Li, Bao-guo; Lu, Yi-zhong; Zhang, Feng-rong

    2004-05-01

    Accurate delineating of the spatial distribution of soil heavy metal content is essential for pollution assessment and remediation. The objective of this paper is to evaluate various spatial interpolation methods, including ordinary Kriging (OK), simple Kriging (SK), lognormal Kriging (LNK), universal Kriging (UK), disjunctive Kriging (DK) and inverse distance weighting interpolation (IDW) for estimating soil surface Hg content with lognormal distribution, the linear and second-order polynomial trend, and to determine the optimal interpolation method. The predicted errors, statistical feature values and prediction maps obtained by different interpolation methods were compared. The result indicated that first-order trend OK method performed better than both zero and second-order OK methods. Within the method of first-order trend OK, Gaussian semi-variogram model performed better than both the spherical and exponential models. The method using transformed data performed worse than the methods without data transformation because of the 'distortion' effect arising from log transformation. Those with trend effect were better than those without trend effect. First-order trend UK method is the best method among the six methods studied, while the IDW method is the least.

  6. Characterizing Intra-Die Spatial Correlation Using Spectral Density Fitting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Luk, Wai-Shing; Tao, Jun; Yan, Changhao; Zeng, Xuan

    In this paper, a spectral domain method named the SDF (Spectral Density Fitting) method for intra-die spatial correlation function extraction is presented. Based on theoretical analysis of random field, the spectral density, as the spectral domain counterpart of correlation function, is employed to estimate the parameters of the correlation function effectively in the spectral domain. Compared with the existing extraction algorithm in the original spatial domain, the SDF method can obtain the same quality of results in the spectral domain. In actual measurement process, the unavoidable measurement error with arbitrary frequency components would greatly confound the extraction results. A filtering technique is further developed to diminish the high frequency components of the measurement error and recover the data from noise contamination for parameter estimation. Experimental results have shown that the SDF method is practical and stable.

  7. A method of reconstructing the spatial measurement network by mobile measurement transmitter for shipbuilding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Siyang; Lin, Jiarui; Yang, Linghui; Ren, Yongjie; Guo, Yin

    2017-07-01

    The workshop Measurement Position System (wMPS) is a distributed measurement system which is suitable for the large-scale metrology. However, there are some inevitable measurement problems in the shipbuilding industry, such as the restriction by obstacles and limited measurement range. To deal with these factors, this paper presents a method of reconstructing the spatial measurement network by mobile transmitter. A high-precision coordinate control network with more than six target points is established. The mobile measuring transmitter can be added into the measurement network using this coordinate control network with the spatial resection method. This method reconstructs the measurement network and broadens the measurement scope efficiently. To verify this method, two comparison experiments are designed with the laser tracker as the reference. The results demonstrate that the accuracy of point-to-point length is better than 0.4mm and the accuracy of coordinate measurement is better than 0.6mm.

  8. A quick and inexpensive method to quantify spatially variable infiltration capacity for artificial recharge ponds using photographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, Daniele; Barahona-Palomo, Marco; Bolster, Diogo; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    SummaryThe efficiency of artificial surface ponds (SPs) for managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is mostly controlled by the topmost portion of the soil. The most significant soil property controlling recharge is the infiltration capacity (Ic), which is highly variable in space. Assessing its spatial distribution in detail is prohibitive in practice due to high costs, time effort, and limited site accessibility. We present an alternative method for a quick and low-cost quantitative estimation of the spatial distribution of Ic based on satellite images. The fact that hydraulic properties of topsoils and color intensities of digital images depend on some common factors such as moisture content, nature and organization of grains, proportion of iron, and organic and clay content among others, allow us to infer infiltration capacities from color intensities. The relationship between these two variables is site specific and requires calibration. A pilot SP site in Catalonia (Spain) is used as an application example. Two high-resolution digital images of the site are provided at no cost by the local cartographic institute as well as from a popular Internet-based map server. An initial set of local infiltration experiments, randomly located, were found to correlate to color intensities of the digital images. This relationship was then validated against additional independent measurements. The resulting maps of infiltration were then used to estimate the total maximum infiltration of the artificial pond area, the results being consistent with an independent flooding test performed at the site.

  9. Spatial frequency sampling look-up table method for computer-generated hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Huang, Yingqing; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Yan, Xingpeng

    2016-04-01

    A spatial frequency sampling look-up table method is proposed to generate a hologram. The three-dimensional (3-D) scene is sampled as several intensity images by computer rendering. Each object point on the rendered images has a defined spatial frequency. The basis terms for calculating fringe patterns are precomputed and stored in a table to improve the calculation speed. Both numerical simulations and optical experiments are performed. The results show that the proposed approach can easily realize color reconstructions of a 3-D scene with a low computation cost. The occlusion effects and depth information are all provided accurately.

  10. NMR methods for in-situ biofilm metabolism studies: spatial and temporal resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Wind, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    We are developing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy, spectroscopy and combined NMR/optical techniques to the study of biofilms. Objectives include: time and depth-resolved metabolite concentrations with isotropic spatial resolution on the order of 10 microns, metabolic pathways and flux rates, mass transport and ultimately their correlation with gene expression by optical microscopy in biofilms. These methods are being developed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model system, but are equally applicable to other biofilm systems of interest. Thus, spatially resolved NMR of biofilms is expected to contribute significantly to the understanding of adherent cell metabolism.

  11. Spatial and angular domain decomposition algorithms for the curviliner S[sub N] transport theory method

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighat, A. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper surveys several domain decomposition algorithms developed for the 1-D and 2-D curvilinear S[sub N] transport theory methods. The angular and spatial domain decomposition algorithms are incorporated into TWOTRAN-11 (an S[sub N] production code) and the parallel performances of these algorithms are measured on the IBM 3090 multiprocessors, mainly in the [open quote]BATCH[close quote] mode. The measured parallel efficiencies for most test cases are greater than 60%. Further, it is demonstrated that the combined spatial and angular domain decomposition algorithms yield tens of independent tasks without significantly affecting solution convergence. 20 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. A frequency-spatial domain decomposition (FSDD) method for operational modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingmi; Wang, Tong; Tamura, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    Following a brief review of the development of operational modal identification techniques, we describe a new method named frequency-spatial domain decomposition (FSDD), with theoretical background, formulation and algorithm. Three typical applications to civil engineering structures are presented to demonstrate the procedure and features of the method: a large-span stadium roof for finite-element model verification, a highway bridge for damage detection and a long-span cable-stayed bridge for structural health monitoring.

  13. Geographic access to street food sources for dogs and its association with spatial patterns of animal bite injuries in Enugu, Nigeria, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    Olugasa, B O; Okeke, O S; Ishola, O O

    2014-12-01

    Accessibility of street food source to dogs in Enugu, the capital city of Enugu State, south-eastern Nigeria was examined in relation to spatial patterns of animal bite injuries in the city. Retrospective data on animal bite injuries were retrieved from records of selected hospitals in Enugu and its environs during the period 2005-2011. Victim's residence and street point where animal bite incidence occurred were geo-referenced. Street food sources, including garbage disposal points, meat markets, slaughter facilities and public vehicle terminals in the city were observed and geo-referenced. Thematic maps were designed usingArcGIS 10.1. Spatial scan statistics was used to identify cluster pattern of animal bite injuries and fatal rabies cases. Coefficient of area correspondence (Ca) in spatial cluster with selected variables was computed. One hundred and thirty one cases of animal bite injury cases were retrieved with traceable addresses. These comprised cat bites (n = 1, 0.76%), goat bites (n = 1, 0.76%), monkey bites (n = 2, 1.5%) and dog bites (n = 127, 96.98%). Fatal outcomes (n = 4, 3.15%) were recorded. Males within the age group, 0-15 (46.5%) were at the highest risk. A diffused spatial pattern showed that majority of the study area experienced animal bite injury during the study period. A primary cluster of 15.03km radius and a secondary cluster of 1.11 km radius traversed residential and non-residential areas were identified as rabies high- and low-risk areas. Interspecies bites from non-carnivores (goats and monkeys) and resultant deaths with neurologic signs were pathognomonic for rabies-like-illness in Enugu State. High Ca (0.8) showed a strong correlation between access to street food sources for dogs and the distribution of animal bite injuries on humans. While access to street food may support the population of free-roaming dogs, it was also shown to be partly explanatory to spatial patterns of dog bite injury. Public education about responsible pet

  14. Spatial data interoperability for multi-platform GIS based on Oracle Spatial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Zhu, Xinyan

    2006-10-01

    Spatial data sharing among multiple GIS (Geographic Information System) platforms is a fundamental requirement of many GIS applications, yet conventional methods of spatial data interoperability don't adequately consider practical application circumstance, which now becomes a primary barrier to more efficient spatial data sharing among multiple GIS platforms. In this paper, after analyzing the disadvantages of conventional methods and the causation of the disadvantages, and analyzing the principle of spatial data access of ArcGIS, MapInfo and GeoStar based on Oracle Spatial storage, the authors propose a new spatial data interoperability method called Different meta information and Same spatial data Method. This method is based on Oracle Spatial, through which spatial data interoperability for multi-platform of GIS is available. The results of experiments demonstrate that this method is a new simple practical approach adapted for current application circumstance, and it provides us a new idea for spatial data interoperability.

  15. Detection of the power lines in UAV remote sensed images using spectral-spatial methods.

    PubMed

    Bhola, Rishav; Krishna, Nandigam Hari; Ramesh, K N; Senthilnath, J; Anand, Gautham

    2017-09-17

    In this paper, detection of the power lines on images acquired by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) based remote sensing is carried out using spectral-spatial methods. Spectral clustering was performed using Kmeans and Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm to classify the pixels into the power lines and non-power lines. The spectral clustering methods used in this study are parametric in nature, to automate the number of clusters Davies-Bouldin index (DBI) is used. The UAV remote sensed image is clustered into the number of clusters determined by DBI. The k clustered image is merged into 2 clusters (power lines and non-power lines). Further, spatial segmentation was performed using morphological and geometric operations, to eliminate the non-power line regions. In this study, UAV images acquired at different altitudes and angles were analyzed to validate the robustness of the proposed method. It was observed that the EM with spatial segmentation (EM-Seg) performed better than the Kmeans with spatial segmentation (Kmeans-Seg) on most of the UAV images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spatially adaptive stochastic numerical methods for intrinsic fluctuations in reaction-diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Atzberger, Paul J.

    2010-05-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations are introduced for the continuum concentration fields of reaction-diffusion systems. The stochastic partial differential equations account for fluctuations arising from the finite number of molecules which diffusively migrate and react. Spatially adaptive stochastic numerical methods are developed for approximation of the stochastic partial differential equations. The methods allow for adaptive meshes with multiple levels of resolution, Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, and domains having geometries with curved boundaries. A key issue addressed by the methods is the formulation of consistent discretizations for the stochastic driving fields at coarse-refined interfaces of the mesh and at boundaries. Methods are also introduced for the efficient generation of the required stochastic driving fields on such meshes. As a demonstration of the methods, investigations are made of the role of fluctuations in a biological model for microorganism direction sensing based on concentration gradients. Also investigated, a mechanism for spatial pattern formation induced by fluctuations. The discretization approaches introduced for SPDEs have the potential to be widely applicable in the development of numerical methods for the study of spatially extended stochastic systems.

  17. Adaptive spatial carrier frequency method for fast monitoring optical properties of fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokkar, T. Z. N.; El-Farahaty, K. A.; El-Bakary, M. A.; Omar, E. Z.; Agour, M.; Hamza, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an extension of the adaptive spatial carrier frequency method which is proposed for fast measuring optical properties of fibrous materials. The method can be considered as a two complementary steps. In the first step, the support of the adaptive filter shall be defined. In the second step, the angle between the sample under test and the interference fringe system generated by the utilized interferometer has to be determined. Thus, the support of the optical filter associated with the implementation of the adaptive spatial carrier frequency method is accordingly rotated. This method is experimentally verified by measuring optical properties of polypropylene (PP) fibre with the help of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The results show that errors resulting from rotating the fibre with respect to the interference fringes of the interferometer are reduced compared with the traditional band pass filter method. This conclusion was driven by comparing results of the mean refractive index of drown PP fibre at parallel polarization direction obtained from the new and adaptive spatial carrier frequency method.

  18. New Torque Estimation Method Considering Spatial Harmonics and Torque Ripple Reduction in Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Hajime; Tomigashi, Yoshio; Ueyama, Kenji; Inoue, Yukinori; Morimoto, Shigeo

    This paper proposes a new torque estimation method that takes into account the spatial harmonics of permanent magnet synchronous motors and that is capable of real-time estimation. First, the torque estimation equation of the proposed method is derived. In the method, the torque ripple of a motor can be estimated from the average of the torque calculated by the conventional method (cross product of the fluxlinkage and motor current) and the torque calculated from the electric input power to the motor. Next, the effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by simulations in which two kinds of motors with different components of torque ripple are considered. The simulation results show that the proposed method estimates the torque ripple more accurately than the conventional method. Further, the effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by performing on experiment. It is shown that the torque ripple is decreased by using the proposed method to the torque control.

  19. Spatial-light-modulator-based adaptive optical system for the use of multiple phase retrieval methods.

    PubMed

    Lingel, Christian; Haist, Tobias; Osten, Wolfgang

    2016-12-20

    We propose an adaptive optical setup using a spatial light modulator (SLM), which is suitable to perform different phase retrieval methods with varying optical features and without mechanical movement. By this approach, it is possible to test many different phase retrieval methods and their parameters (optical and algorithmic) using one stable setup and without hardware adaption. We show exemplary results for the well-known transport of intensity equation (TIE) method and a new iterative adaptive phase retrieval method, where the object phase is canceled by an inverse phase written into part of the SLM. The measurement results are compared to white light interferometric measurements.

  20. Beyond the SCS-CN method: A theoretical framework for spatially lumped rainfall-runoff response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, M. S.; Parolari, A. J.; McDonnell, J. J.; Porporato, A.

    2016-06-01

    Since its introduction in 1954, the Soil Conservation Service curve number (SCS-CN) method has become the standard tool, in practice, for estimating an event-based rainfall-runoff response. However, because of its empirical origins, the SCS-CN method is restricted to certain geographic regions and land use types. Moreover, it does not describe the spatial variability of runoff. To move beyond these limitations, we present a new theoretical framework for spatially lumped, event-based rainfall-runoff modeling. In this framework, we describe the spatially lumped runoff model as a point description of runoff that is upscaled to a watershed area based on probability distributions that are representative of watershed heterogeneities. The framework accommodates different runoff concepts and distributions of heterogeneities, and in doing so, it provides an implicit spatial description of runoff variability. Heterogeneity in storage capacity and soil moisture are the basis for upscaling a point runoff response and linking ecohydrological processes to runoff modeling. For the framework, we consider two different runoff responses for fractions of the watershed area: "prethreshold" and "threshold-excess" runoff. These occur before and after infiltration exceeds a storage capacity threshold. Our application of the framework results in a new model (called SCS-CNx) that extends the SCS-CN method with the prethreshold and threshold-excess runoff mechanisms and an implicit spatial description of runoff. We show proof of concept in four forested watersheds and further that the resulting model may better represent geographic regions and site types that previously have been beyond the scope of the traditional SCS-CN method.

  1. Estimating Soil Organic Carbon Stocks and Spatial Patterns with Statistical and GIS-Based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Junjun; Jing, Changwei; Lin, Shengpan; Zhang, Cao; Liu, Qiankun; DeGloria, Stephen D.; Wu, Jiaping

    2014-01-01

    Accurately quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) is considered fundamental to studying soil quality, modeling the global carbon cycle, and assessing global climate change. This study evaluated the uncertainties caused by up-scaling of soil properties from the county scale to the provincial scale and from lower-level classification of Soil Species to Soil Group, using four methods: the mean, median, Soil Profile Statistics (SPS), and pedological professional knowledge based (PKB) methods. For the SPS method, SOC stock is calculated at the county scale by multiplying the mean SOC density value of each soil type in a county by its corresponding area. For the mean or median method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated using provincial arithmetic mean or median. For the PKB method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated at the county scale considering soil parent materials and spatial locations of all soil profiles. A newly constructed 1∶50,000 soil survey geographic database of Zhejiang Province, China, was used for evaluation. Results indicated that with soil classification levels up-scaling from Soil Species to Soil Group, the variation of estimated SOC stocks among different soil classification levels was obviously lower than that among different methods. The difference in the estimated SOC stocks among the four methods was lowest at the Soil Species level. The differences in SOC stocks among the mean, median, and PKB methods for different Soil Groups resulted from the differences in the procedure of aggregating soil profile properties to represent the attributes of one soil type. Compared with the other three estimation methods (i.e., the SPS, mean and median methods), the PKB method holds significant promise for characterizing spatial differences in SOC distribution because spatial locations of all soil profiles are considered during the aggregation procedure. PMID:24840890

  2. Estimating soil organic carbon stocks and spatial patterns with statistical and GIS-based methods.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Junjun; Jing, Changwei; Lin, Shengpan; Zhang, Cao; Liu, Qiankun; DeGloria, Stephen D; Wu, Jiaping

    2014-01-01

    Accurately quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) is considered fundamental to studying soil quality, modeling the global carbon cycle, and assessing global climate change. This study evaluated the uncertainties caused by up-scaling of soil properties from the county scale to the provincial scale and from lower-level classification of Soil Species to Soil Group, using four methods: the mean, median, Soil Profile Statistics (SPS), and pedological professional knowledge based (PKB) methods. For the SPS method, SOC stock is calculated at the county scale by multiplying the mean SOC density value of each soil type in a county by its corresponding area. For the mean or median method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated using provincial arithmetic mean or median. For the PKB method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated at the county scale considering soil parent materials and spatial locations of all soil profiles. A newly constructed 1∶50,000 soil survey geographic database of Zhejiang Province, China, was used for evaluation. Results indicated that with soil classification levels up-scaling from Soil Species to Soil Group, the variation of estimated SOC stocks among different soil classification levels was obviously lower than that among different methods. The difference in the estimated SOC stocks among the four methods was lowest at the Soil Species level. The differences in SOC stocks among the mean, median, and PKB methods for different Soil Groups resulted from the differences in the procedure of aggregating soil profile properties to represent the attributes of one soil type. Compared with the other three estimation methods (i.e., the SPS, mean and median methods), the PKB method holds significant promise for characterizing spatial differences in SOC distribution because spatial locations of all soil profiles are considered during the aggregation procedure.

  3. Some Observations on a Static Spatial Remeshing Method Based on Equidistribution Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucez, P.; Vande Wouwer, A.; Schiesser, W. E.

    1996-10-01

    This paper proposes a method of lines solution procedure with time and space adaptation for one-dimensional systems of partial differential equations whose solutions display steep moving fronts. The spatial remeshing algorithm, which is a variation of the method published by Sanz-Serna and Christie and an extension suggested by Revilla, is a static remeshing method based on equidistribution principles. The selection of the several algorithm components, i.e., grid placement criterion, spatial discretization scheme, time integrator, adaptation frequency, and parameter tuning, are investigated and illustrated with several test examples, i.e., the cubic Schrödinger equation, a model of a single-step reaction with diffusion, and a model of flame propagation.

  4. High spatial resolution shortwave infrared imaging technology based on time delay and digital accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jianxin; Wang, Yueming; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong; Yao, Yi; Wang, Shengwei; Zhao, Ding; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

    2017-03-01

    Shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging technology attracts more and more attention by its fascinating ability of penetrating haze and smoke. For application of spaceborne remote sensing, spatial resolution of SWIR is lower compared with that of visible light (VIS) wavelength. It is difficult to balance between the spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio (SNR). Some conventional methods, such as enlarging aperture of telescope, image motion compensation, and analog time delay and integration (TDI) technology are used to gain SNR. These techniques bring in higher cost of satellite, complexity of system or other negative factors. In this paper, time delay and digital accumulation (TDDA) method is proposed to achieve higher spatial resolution. The method can enhance the SNR and non-uniformity of system theoretically. A prototype of SWIR imager consists of opto-mechanical, 1024 × 128 InGaAs detector, and electronics is designed and integrated to prove TDDA method. Both of measurements and experimental results indicate TDDA method can promote SNR of system approximated of the square root of accumulative stage. The results exhibit that non-uniformity of system is also improved by this approach to some extent. The experiment results are corresponded with the theoretical analysis. Based on the experiments results, it is proved firstly that the goal of 1 m ground sample distance (GSD) in orbit of 500 km is feasible with the TDDA stage of 30 for SWIR waveband (0.9-1.7 μm).

  5. Laser speckle imaging of rat retinal blood flow with hybrid temporal and spatial analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Haiying; Yan, Yumei; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2009-02-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of blood flow in retinal circulation will reveal the progression and treatment of ocular disorders, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. A non-invasive and direct BF measurement technique with high spatial-temporal resolution is needed for retinal imaging. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is such a method. Currently, there are two analysis methods for LSI: spatial statistics LSI (SS-LSI) and temporal statistical LSI (TS-LSI). Comparing these two analysis methods, SS-LSI has higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) and TSLSI is less susceptible to artifacts from stationary speckle. We proposed a hybrid temporal and spatial analysis method (HTS-LSI) to measure the retinal blood flow. Gas challenge experiment was performed and images were analyzed by HTS-LSI. Results showed that HTS-LSI can not only remove the stationary speckle but also increase the SNR. Under 100% O2, retinal BF decreased by 20-30%. This was consistent with the results observed with laser Doppler technique. As retinal blood flow is a critical physiological parameter and its perturbation has been implicated in the early stages of many retinal diseases, HTS-LSI will be an efficient method in early detection of retina diseases.

  6. Humanizing access to modern contraceptive methods in national hospitals in Guatemala, Central America.

    PubMed

    Kestler, Edgar; Barrios, Beatriz; Hernández, Elsa M; del Valle, Vinicio; Silva, Alejandro

    2009-07-01

    The overall situation in Guatemala, Central America, regarding programs caring for women's reproductive health has been lagging behind for some decades. Since the year 2000, 56% of Guatemalan families have lived below the poverty line. Guatemala has one of the highest fertility rates (lifetime births per woman) in Latin America and the Caribbean countries, comparable to those observed in less developed countries in Africa. Considering the lack of sex education, poor access to effective contraceptive methods and issues of unwanted pregnancy, Guatemalan women engage in illegal and unsafe abortions, which often causes harm and sometimes death. A key strategy designed to improve women's health is through free and informed access to contraceptive methods that are effective and accepted by Guatemalan women. From July 1, 2003, to December 31, 2006, specially hired trained facilitators visited 22 public hospitals for 1 week to train corresponding physician staff in postabortion counseling, enabling them to assist patients to select and use an effective contraceptive method. To monitor the progress achieved, the trained facilitators returned 4 weeks later. The main purpose of the training was to focus in strengthening the understanding and technical capacity of the hospital staff to implement postabortion contraceptive counseling and to enable women to obtain an effective contraceptive method prior to hospital discharge. Out of 22 hospitals, 21 managed to improve their record for counseling patients admitted for postabortion complications, from 31% to 96%. Furthermore, the percentage of women being discharged from the hospital with an effective contraceptive method rose from 20% to 64% from 2003 to 2006. The successful results obtained during this study to meet postabortion demands by Guatemalan women point out to the urgent need for the government to expand this initiative within the national health system, including health centers nationwide. This is one of the worldwide

  7. On spatial filtering for angle-of-arrival estimation in a scattering environment by eigendecomposition-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changguo; Haber, Fred; Shi, Qun

    1990-06-01

    A method of spatial filtering is proposed as a preprocessor to restore the high resolution performance of eigendecomposition-based methods when used with a linear array for angle-of-arrival (AOA) estimation in the presence of spatially distributed coherent interference (SDCI). Applying the conventional bandpass filters used in the spatial frequency domain, the spatial filtering method effectively suppresses the unwanted coherence interference outside a specified frequency region. Therefore, the success of the method hinges on the assumption that direct arrival and its coherent interference are well separated in spatial frequency (in angle). Under this assumption, the eigendecomposition methods with a spatial filtering preprocessor can give accurate AOA estimates of direct arrivals in spite of the presence of SDCI. Simulation results are shown for the case of scattering from an infinite circular cylinder, using discrete prolate spheroidal sequences as the optimum band-pass preprocessing filters, and a uniformly spaced linear array, in a conjunction with the MUSIC algorithm.

  8. Spatial modelling of periglacial phenomena in Deception Island (Maritime Antarctic): logistic regression and informative value method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Raquel; Vieira, Gonçalo; Caselli, Alberto; Ramos, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Field surveying during the austral summer of 2007/08 and the analysis of a QuickBird satellite image, resulted on the production of a detailed geomorphological map of the Irizar and Crater Lake area in Deception Island (South Shetlands, Maritime Antarctic - 1:10 000) and allowed its analysis and spatial modelling of the geomorphological phenomena. The present study focus on the analysis of the spatial distribution and characteristics of hummocky terrains, lag surfaces and nivation hollows, complemented by GIS spatial modelling intending to identify relevant controlling geographical factors. Models of the susceptibility of occurrence of these phenomena were created using two statistical methods: logistical regression, as a multivariate method; and the informative value as a bivariate method. Success and prediction rate curves were used for model validation. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) was used to quantify the level of performance and prediction of the models and to allow the comparison between the two methods. Regarding the logistic regression method, the AUC showed a success rate of 71% for the lag surfaces, 81% for the hummocky terrains and 78% for the nivation hollows. The prediction rate was 72%, 68% and 71%, respectively. Concerning the informative value method, the success rate was 69% for the lag surfaces, 84% for the hummocky terrains and 78% for the nivation hollows, and with a correspondingly prediction of 71%, 66% and 69%. The results were of very good quality and demonstrate the potential of the models to predict the influence of independent variables in the occurrence of the geomorphological phenomena and also the reliability of the data. Key-words: present-day geomorphological dynamics, detailed geomorphological mapping, GIS, spatial modelling, Deception Island, Antarctic.

  9. Spatially and temporally continuous LAI datasets based on the mixed pixel decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianjun; Wang, Yanying; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Zhengxiang; Guo, Xiaoyi; Yu, Shan; Du, Wala

    2016-01-01

    The leaf area index (LAI) is a key biophysical parameter that determines the state of plant growth. A global LAI has been routinely produced by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). However, the MODIS and AVHRR LAI products cannot be synchronized with the same spatial and temporal resolution. The LAI features are not discernible when a global LAI product is implemented at the regional scale because it has low resolution and different land cover types. To obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of LAI products, an empirical model based on the pixel scale was developed. The approach to generate a long (multi-decade) time series of a 1-km spatial resolution LAI normally integrates both AVHRR and MODIS datasets for different land cover types. In this paper, a regression-based model for generating a vegetation LAI was developed using the AVHRR Global Inventory Modelling and Mapping Studies Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), MODIS LAI and land cover as input data; the model was evaluated by using relevant data from the same period data from 2000 to 2006. The results of this method show a good consistency in LAI values retrieved from the AVHRR NDVI and MODIS LAI. This simple method has no specific-limited data requirements and can provide improved spatial and temporal resolution in a region without ground data.

  10. Research on the spatial analysis method of seismic hazard for island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jing; Jiang, Jitong; Zheng, Qiuhong; Gao, Huiying

    2017-05-01

    Seismic hazard analysis(SHA) is a key component of earthquake disaster prevention field for island engineering, whose result could provide parameters for seismic design microscopically and also is the requisite work for the island conservation planning’s earthquake and comprehensive disaster prevention planning macroscopically, in the exploitation and construction process of both inhabited and uninhabited islands. The existing seismic hazard analysis methods are compared in their application, and their application and limitation for island is analysed. Then a specialized spatial analysis method of seismic hazard for island (SAMSHI) is given to support the further related work of earthquake disaster prevention planning, based on spatial analysis tools in GIS and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model. The basic spatial database of SAMSHI includes faults data, historical earthquake record data, geological data and Bouguer gravity anomalies data, which are the data sources for the 11 indices of the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model, and these indices are calculated by the spatial analysis model constructed in ArcGIS’s Model Builder platform.

  11. Comparison of Three Plot Selection Methods for Estimating Change in Temporally Variable, Spatially Clustered Populations.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, William L.

    2001-07-01

    Monitoring population numbers is important for assessing trends and meeting various legislative mandates. However, sampling across time introduces a temporal aspect to survey design in addition to the spatial one. For instance, a sample that is initially representative may lose this attribute if there is a shift in numbers and/or spatial distribution in the underlying population that is not reflected in later sampled plots. Plot selection methods that account for this temporal variability will produce the best trend estimates. Consequently, I used simulation to compare bias and relative precision of estimates of population change among stratified and unstratified sampling designs based on permanent, temporary, and partial replacement plots under varying levels of spatial clustering, density, and temporal shifting of populations. Permanent plots produced more precise estimates of change than temporary plots across all factors. Further, permanent plots performed better than partial replacement plots except for high density (5 and 10 individuals per plot) and 25% - 50% shifts in the population. Stratified designs always produced less precise estimates of population change for all three plot selection methods, and often produced biased change estimates and greatly inflated variance estimates under sampling with partial replacement. Hence, stratification that remains fixed across time should be avoided when monitoring populations that are likely to exhibit large changes in numbers and/or spatial distribution during the study period. Key words: bias; change estimation; monitoring; permanent plots; relative precision; sampling with partial replacement; temporary plots.

  12. Method to measure the phase modulation characteristics of a liquid crystal spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunlong; Nie, Jinsong; Shao, Li

    2016-11-01

    The universal liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) is widely used in many aspects of optical studies. The working principles and applications of LC-SLM were introduced briefly. The traditional Twyman-Green interference method, which was used to measure the phase modulation characteristics of a liquid spatial light modulator, had some obvious disadvantages in practice. To avoid these issues, the traditional Twyman-Green interference method was improved. Also, a new method to process interference fringes and measure the shift distances and cycles automatically by computers was proposed. The phase modulation characteristics of P512-1064 LC-SLM produced by the Meadowlark Company were measured to verify the validity of the newly proposed method. In addition, in order to compensate and correct the nonlinear characteristics of the phase modulation curve, three universal inverse interpolation methods were utilized. The root mean squared error and residual sum of squares between the calibrated phase modulation curve and the ideal phase modulation curve were reduced obviously by taking advantage of the inverse interpolation methods. Subsequently, the method of shape-preserving subsection cubic interpolation had acquired the best performance with high computation efficiency. Experiments have been performed to verify the validity of the interpolation method. The experimental results showed that the phase modulation characteristics of LC-LSM could be acquired and calibrated automatically with convenience and high efficiency by utilizing the newly proposed processing method.

  13. The application of inverse methods to spatially-distributed acoustic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, K. R.; Nelson, P. A.

    2013-10-01

    Acoustic inverse methods, based on the output of an array of microphones, can be readily applied to the characterisation of acoustic sources that can be adequately modelled as a number of discrete monopoles. However, there are many situations, particularly in the fields of vibroacoustics and aeroacoustics, where the sources are distributed continuously in space over a finite area (or volume). This paper is concerned with the practical problem of applying inverse methods to such distributed source regions via the process of spatial sampling. The problem is first tackled using computer simulations of the errors associated with the application of spatial sampling to a wide range of source distributions. It is found that the spatial sampling criterion for minimising the errors in the radiated far-field reconstructed from the discretised source distributions is strongly dependent on acoustic wavelength but is only weakly dependent on the details of the source field itself. The results of the computer simulations are verified experimentally through the application of the inverse method to the sound field radiated by a ducted fan. The un-baffled fan source with the associated flow field is modelled as a set of equivalent monopole sources positioned on the baffled duct exit along with a matrix of complimentary non-flow Green functions. Successful application of the spatial sampling criterion involves careful frequency-dependent selection of source spacing, and results in the accurate reconstruction of the radiated sound field. Discussions of the conditioning of the Green function matrix which is inverted are included and it is shown that the spatial sampling criterion may be relaxed if conditioning techniques, such as regularisation, are applied to this matrix prior to inversion.

  14. Creating a spatially-explicit index: a method for assessing the global wildfire-water risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinne, François-Nicolas; Parisien, Marc-André; Flannigan, Mike; Miller, Carol; Bladon, Kevin D.

    2017-04-01

    The wildfire-water risk (WWR) has been defined as the potential for wildfires to adversely affect water resources that are important for downstream ecosystems and human water needs for adequate water quantity and quality, therefore compromising the security of their water supply. While tools and methods are numerous for watershed-scale risk analysis, the development of a toolbox for the large-scale evaluation of the wildfire risk to water security has only started recently. In order to provide managers and policy-makers with an adequate tool, we implemented a method for the spatial analysis of the global WWR based on the Driving forces-Pressures-States-Impacts-Responses (DPSIR) framework. This framework relies on the cause-and-effect relationships existing between the five categories of the DPSIR chain. As this approach heavily relies on data, we gathered an extensive set of spatial indicators relevant to fire-induced hydrological hazards and water consumption patterns by human and natural communities. When appropriate, we applied a hydrological routing function to our indicators in order to simulate downstream accumulation of potentially harmful material. Each indicator was then assigned a DPSIR category. We collapsed the information in each category using a principal component analysis in order to extract the most relevant pixel-based information provided by each spatial indicator. Finally, we compiled our five categories using an additive indexation process to produce a spatially-explicit index of the WWR. A thorough sensitivity analysis has been performed in order to understand the relationship between the final risk values and the spatial pattern of each category used during the indexation. For comparison purposes, we aggregated index scores by global hydrological regions, or hydrobelts, to get a sense of regional DPSIR specificities. This rather simple method does not necessitate the use of complex physical models and provides a scalable and efficient tool

  15. Single-access gastrostomy (SAG) dispenses endoscopy or laparoscopy: a simple method under local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Zorron, Ricardo; Cazarim, Davi; Flores, Daniel; Fontes Meyer, Carlos André; de Castro, Leonardo Machado; Kanaan, Eduardo

    2009-12-01

    Gastrostomy for feeding or desobstructive purposes is often performed transendoscopically. However, as endoscopy specialists and instruments are not widely available in community hospitals in Brazil, an alternative method was developed at the authors' institution. Surgical single-access gastrostomy (SAG), performed under local anesthesia and requiring no endoscopic guidance is described. The authors used the SAG technique on 19 patients eligible for gastrostomy, and the data were prospectively documented. After local anesthesia and a 1-cm incision, the gastric wall was localized under direct vision. Purse string sutures were placed to work as a fixed valve to rectus sheath. SAG was feasible in all patients. Minor complications occurred in 3 patients. The mean operative time was 44.2 minutes, and the mean institution of gastrostomy feeding was 27.8 hours. SAG may dispense with the use of endoscopy and laparoscopy, providing a feasible, reproducible, and effective feeding gastrostomy in developing countries where alternative methods are not available.

  16. Accuracy comparison of spatial interpolation methods for estimation of air temperatures in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Shim, K.; Jung, M.; Kim, S.

    2013-12-01

    Because of complex terrain, micro- as well as meso-climate variability is extreme by locations in Korea. In particular, air temperature of agricultural fields are influenced by topographic features of the surroundings making accurate interpolation of regional meteorological data from point-measured data. This study was conducted to compare accuracy of a spatial interpolation method to estimate air temperature in Korean Peninsula with the rugged terrains in South Korea. Four spatial interpolation methods including Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Spline, Kriging and Cokriging were tested to estimate monthly air temperature of unobserved stations. Monthly measured data sets (minimum and maximum air temperature) from 456 automatic weather station (AWS) locations in South Korea were used to generate the gridded air temperature surface. Result of cross validation showed that using Exponential theoretical model produced a lower root mean square error (RMSE) than using Gaussian theoretical model in case of Kriging and Cokriging and Spline produced the lowest RMSE of spatial interpolation methods in both maximum and minimum air temperature estimation. In conclusion, Spline showed the best accuracy among the methods, but further experiments which reflect topography effects such as temperature lapse rate are necessary to improve the prediction.

  17. Modeling and Experimental Methods to Probe the Link between Global Transcription and Spatial Organization of Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Soumya; Libchaber, Albert; Tlusty, Tsvi; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    Genomes are spatially assembled into chromosome territories (CT) within the nucleus of living cells. Recent evidences have suggested associations between three-dimensional organization of CTs and the active gene clusters within neighboring CTs. These gene clusters are part of signaling networks sharing similar transcription factor or other downstream transcription machineries. Hence, presence of such gene clusters of active signaling networks in a cell type may regulate the spatial organization of chromosomes in the nucleus. However, given the probabilistic nature of chromosome positions and complex transcription factor networks (TFNs), quantitative methods to establish their correlation is lacking. In this paper, we use chromosome positions and gene expression profiles in interphase fibroblasts and describe methods to capture the correspondence between their spatial position and expression. In addition, numerical simulations designed to incorporate the interacting TFNs, reveal that the chromosome positions are also optimized for the activity of these networks. These methods were validated for specific chromosome pairs mapped in two distinct transcriptional states of T-Cells (naïve and activated). Taken together, our methods highlight the functional coupling between topology of chromosomes and their respective gene expression patterns. PMID:23049710

  18. Hybrid S{sub N} numerical method free from spatial truncation error for slab lattice calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    In typical lattice cells where a highly absorbing, small fuel element is embedded in the moderator (a large weakly absorbing medium), high-order transport methods become unnecessary. In this paper we describe a hybrid discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) nodal method for slab lattice calculations. This hybrid S{sub N} method combines the convenience of a low-order S{sub N} method in the moderator with a high-order S{sub N} method in the fuel. The idea is based on the fact that in weakly absorbing media whose physical size is several neutron mean free paths in extent, even the S{sub 2} method (P{sub 1} approximation), leads to an accurate result. We use special fuel-moderator interface conditions and the spectral Green`s function (SGF) numerical nodal method completely free from spatial truncation error, to calculate the neutron flux distribution and the disadvantage factor.

  19. A Cut Cell Method for Simulating Spatial Models of Biochemical Reaction Networks in Arbitrary Geometries.

    PubMed

    Strychalski, Wanda; Adalsteinsson, David; Elston, Timothy C

    2010-01-01

    Cells use signaling networks consisting of multiple interacting proteins to respond to changes in their environment. In many situations, such as chemotaxis, spatial and temporal information must be transmitted through the network. Recent computational studies have emphasized the importance of cellular geometry in signal transduction, but have been limited in their ability to accurately represent complex cell morphologies. We present a finite volume method that addresses this problem. Our method uses Cartesian cut cells and is second order in space and time. We use our method to simulate several models of signaling systems in realistic cell morphologies obtained from live cell images and examine the effects of geometry on signal transduction.

  20. Methods for presenting and visualising electrocardiographic data: From temporal signals to spatial imaging.

    PubMed

    Bond, Raymond R; Finlay, Dewar D; Nugent, Chris D; Moore, George; Guldenring, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is a recording of the electrical activity of the heart. It is commonly used to non-invasively assess the cardiac activity of a patient. Since 1938, ECG data has been visualised as 12 scalar traces (known as the standard 12-lead ECG). Although this is known as the standard approach, there has been a myriad of alternative methods proposed to visualise ECG data. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of these methods and to introduce the field of ECG visualisation to early stage researchers. A scientific purpose is to consider the future of ECG visualisation within routine clinical practice. This paper structures the different ECG visualisation methods using four categories, i.e. temporal, vectorial, spatial and interactive. Temporal methods present the data with respect to time, vectorial methods present data with respect to direction and magnitude, spatial methods present data in 2D or 3D space and interactive methods utilise interactive computing to facilitate efficient interrogation of ECG data at different levels of detail. Spatial visualisation has been around since its introduction by Waller and vector based visualisation has been around since the 1920s. Given these approaches have already been given the 'test of time', they are unlikely to be replaced as the standard in the near future. Instead of being replaced, the standard is more likely to be 'supplemented'. However, the design and presentation of these ECG visualisation supplements need to be universally standardised. Subsequent to the development of 'standardised supplements', as a requirement, they could then be integrated into all ECG machines. We recognise that without intuitive software and interactivity on mobile devices (e.g. tablet PCs), it is impractical to integrate the more advanced ECG visualisation methods into routine practice (i.e. epicardial mapping using an inverse solution). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic restricted access to 10% sucrose solution in adolescent and young adult rats impairs spatial memory and alters sensitivity to outcome devaluation.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Michael D; Boakes, Robert A; Rooney, Kieron B; Corbit, Laura H

    2013-08-15

    Although increasing consumption of sugar drinks is recognized as a significant public health concern, little is known about (a) the cognitive effects resulting from sucrose consumption; and (b) whether the long-term effects of sucrose consumption are more pronounced for adolescents. This experiment directly compared performance on a task of spatial learning and memory (the Morris Water Maze) and sensitivity to outcome devaluation following 28 days of 2-h/day access to a 10% sucrose solution in adolescent and young-adult Wistar rats. Sucrose groups developed elevated fasting blood glucose levels after the diet intervention, despite drawing <15% of calories from sucrose and gaining no more weight than controls. In subsequent behavioral testing, sucrose groups were impaired on the Morris Water Maze, with some residual deficits in spatial memory observed more than 6 weeks after the end of sucrose exposure. Further, results from outcome devaluation testing indicated that in the older cohort of rats, those fed sucrose showed reduced sensitivity to devaluation of the outcome, suggestive of differences in instrumental learning following sucrose exposure. Data provide strong evidence that sucrose consumption can induce deficits in spatial cognition and reward-oriented behavior at levels that resemble patterns of sugar drink consumption in young people, and which can remain long after exposure. © 2013.

  2. The Model and Control Methods of Access to Information and Technology Resources of Automated Control Systems in Water Supply Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rytov, M. Yu; Spichyack, S. A.; Fedorov, V. P.; Petreshin, D. I.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a formalized control model of access to information and technological resources of automated control systems at water supply enterprises. The given model considers the availability of various communication links with information systems and technological equipment. There are also studied control methods of access to information and technological resources of automated control systems at water supply enterprises. On the basis of the formalized control model and appropriate methods there was developed a software-hardware complex for rapid access to information and technological resources of automated control systems, which contains an administrator’s automated workplace and ultimate users.

  3. Empirical Assessment of Spatial Prediction Methods for Location Cost Adjustment Factors

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Giovanni C.; Guindani, Michele; D'Incognito, Maria; Zhang, Linlin

    2014-01-01

    In the feasibility stage, the correct prediction of construction costs ensures that budget requirements are met from the start of a project's lifecycle. A very common approach for performing quick-order-of-magnitude estimates is based on using Location Cost Adjustment Factors (LCAFs) that compute historically based costs by project location. Nowadays, numerous LCAF datasets are commercially available in North America, but, obviously, they do not include all locations. Hence, LCAFs for un-sampled locations need to be inferred through spatial interpolation or prediction methods. Currently, practitioners tend to select the value for a location using only one variable, namely the nearest linear-distance between two sites. However, construction costs could be affected by socio-economic variables as suggested by macroeconomic theories. Using a commonly used set of LCAFs, the City Cost Indexes (CCI) by RSMeans, and the socio-economic variables included in the ESRI Community Sourcebook, this article provides several contributions to the body of knowledge. First, the accuracy of various spatial prediction methods in estimating LCAF values for un-sampled locations was evaluated and assessed in respect to spatial interpolation methods. Two Regression-based prediction models were selected, a Global Regression Analysis and a Geographically-weighted regression analysis (GWR). Once these models were compared against interpolation methods, the results showed that GWR is the most appropriate way to model CCI as a function of multiple covariates. The outcome of GWR, for each covariate, was studied for all the 48 states in the contiguous US. As a direct consequence of spatial non-stationarity, it was possible to discuss the influence of each single covariate differently from state to state. In addition, the article includes a first attempt to determine if the observed variability in cost index values could be, at least partially explained by independent socio-economic variables. PMID

  4. Empirical Assessment of Spatial Prediction Methods for Location Cost Adjustment Factors.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Giovanni C; Guindani, Michele; D'Incognito, Maria; Zhang, Linlin

    2013-07-01

    In the feasibility stage, the correct prediction of construction costs ensures that budget requirements are met from the start of a project's lifecycle. A very common approach for performing quick-order-of-magnitude estimates is based on using Location Cost Adjustment Factors (LCAFs) that compute historically based costs by project location. Nowadays, numerous LCAF datasets are commercially available in North America, but, obviously, they do not include all locations. Hence, LCAFs for un-sampled locations need to be inferred through spatial interpolation or prediction methods. Currently, practitioners tend to select the value for a location using only one variable, namely the nearest linear-distance between two sites. However, construction costs could be affected by socio-economic variables as suggested by macroeconomic theories. Using a commonly used set of LCAFs, the City Cost Indexes (CCI) by RSMeans, and the socio-economic variables included in the ESRI Community Sourcebook, this article provides several contributions to the body of knowledge. First, the accuracy of various spatial prediction methods in estimating LCAF values for un-sampled locations was evaluated and assessed in respect to spatial interpolation methods. Two Regression-based prediction models were selected, a Global Regression Analysis and a Geographically-weighted regression analysis (GWR). Once these models were compared against interpolation methods, the results showed that GWR is the most appropriate way to model CCI as a function of multiple covariates. The outcome of GWR, for each covariate, was studied for all the 48 states in the contiguous US. As a direct consequence of spatial non-stationarity, it was possible to discuss the influence of each single covariate differently from state to state. In addition, the article includes a first attempt to determine if the observed variability in cost index values could be, at least partially explained by independent socio-economic variables.

  5. Perturbation Methods in Stability and Norm Analysis of Spatially Periodic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-16

    JANUARY 16, 2006 1 Perturbation Methods in Stability and Norm Analysis of Spatially Periodic Systems Makan Fardad and Bassam Bamieh Abstract We...This work is partially supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-04-1-0207. M. Fardad and B. Bamieh are with the Department of Mechanical and Environmental...Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93105-5070. email: fardad @engineering.ucsb.edu, bamieh@engineering.ucsb.edu. Report

  6. A method for the spatial discretization of parabolic equations in one space variable

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.; Berzins, M.

    1987-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe and analyze a new spatial discretization method for parabolic equations in one space variable: Ordinary and parabolic partial differential equations in one space variable x often have a singularity due to the use of polar cylindrical or spherical coordinates. The method we propose is a simple piecewise nonlinear Galerkin/Petrov-Galerkin method which is second order accurate in space. (It supersedes the method proposed by Skeel). The case m = 1 involves the use of the logarithm function, which is probably the only accurate way to model the logarithmic singularity present in the solution. A code based on a variant of the proposed method has already been included as part of the SPRINT package of Berzins, Dew, and Furzeland. The method that we propose here will be distributed in the next release of the D03P (parabolic equations) section of the NAG Library. 18 refs.

  7. Air temperature and precipitation spatial evaluation in Slovakia using the regularized splain with tension method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulová, K.; Pecho, J.; Šâstný, P.; Faško, P.; Šiška, B.

    2009-09-01

    Over the last few years improvement of various GIS applications that involve spatial processing of climatological and meteorological data has been quite noticeable. This upsurge of interest is related directly to the fall in price of `commercial off-the-shelf' GIS products together with large advances in computer processing ability. GIS methods allow the detailed analysis of spatial patterns of various atmospheric parameters, providing an in depth look into the regularities and variability of weather and climate over time and space. Many climatic parameters, such as air temperature, precipitation and snow cover as well, are strongly dependent on geographical factors such as topography, land use and vegetation height. The paper presented here deals with spatial evaluation of the air temperature mean and mean precipitation totals within normal period 1961-1990 using GIS 3D interpolation methods. Through the homogenization process the utilized data sets were tested using the quality and quantity control procedures particularly concerning the filling and correction all data gaps and shifts recognized in the long time series within the period 1961-1990. Nevertheless, the network of climatological as well as rain gauge stations is quite dense in Slovakia it was needed to use additional supporting points (so-called "virtual stations") particularly in the mountainous regions during the pre-processing stage of spatial analysis. In the case of air temperature analysis the regional approach of statistical regression modeling was applied and available in-situ air temperature measurements were supported by the regularly distributed grid points with spatial resolution 10 × 10 km. In the contrast to the proceeding the precipitation data were advanced with irregular spatial network of "virtual stations". Supplementary data sets represented by grid and virtual points were evaluated using the regional regression function whereby the statistical relation between variables and

  8. Methods for specifying spatial boundaries of cities in the world: The impacts of delineation methods on city sustainability indices.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Yuta; Mori, Koichiro

    2017-08-15

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze how different definitions and methods for delineating the spatial boundaries of cities have an impact on the values of city sustainability indicators. It is necessary to distinguish the inside of cities from the outside when calculating the values of sustainability indicators that assess the impacts of human activities within cities on areas beyond their boundaries. For this purpose, spatial boundaries of cities should be practically detected on the basis of a relevant definition of a city. Although no definition of a city is commonly shared among academic fields, three practical methods for identifying urban areas are available in remote sensing science. Those practical methods are based on population density, landcover, and night-time lights. These methods are correlated, but non-negligible differences exist in their determination of urban extents and urban population. Furthermore, critical and statistically significant differences in some urban environmental sustainability indicators result from the three different urban detection methods. For example, the average values of CO2 emissions per capita and PM10 concentration in cities with more than 1 million residents are significantly different among the definitions. When analyzing city sustainability indicators and disseminating the implication of the results, the values based on the different definitions should be simultaneously investigated. It is necessary to carefully choose a relevant definition to analyze sustainability indicators for policy making. Otherwise, ineffective and inefficient policies will be developed.

  9. Spatial sound field synthesis and upmixing based on the equivalent source method.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Hsu, Hoshen; Wen, Jheng-Ciang

    2014-01-01

    Given scarce number of recorded signals, spatial sound field synthesis with an extended sweet spot is a challenging problem in acoustic array signal processing. To address the problem, a synthesis and upmixing approach inspired by the equivalent source method (ESM) is proposed. The synthesis procedure is based on the pressure signals recorded by a microphone array and requires no source model. The array geometry can also be arbitrary. Four upmixing strategies are adopted to enhance the resolution of the reproduced sound field when there are more channels of loudspeakers than the microphones. Multi-channel inverse filtering with regularization is exploited to deal with the ill-posedness in the reconstruction process. The distance between the microphone and loudspeaker arrays is optimized to achieve the best synthesis quality. To validate the proposed system, numerical simulations and subjective listening experiments are performed. The results demonstrated that all upmixing methods improved the quality of reproduced target sound field over the original reproduction. In particular, the underdetermined ESM interpolation method yielded the best spatial sound field synthesis in terms of the reproduction error, timbral quality, and spatial quality.

  10. Multiphoton fluorescent images with a spatially varying background signal: a ML deconvolution method.

    PubMed

    Crivaro, M; Enjieu-Kadji, H; Hatanaka, R; Nakauchi, S; Bosch, J; Judin, J; Riera, J; Kawashima, R

    2011-06-01

    By means of multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, neuroscientists can look inside the brain deeper than has ever been possible before. Multiphoton fluorescent images, as all optical images, suffer from degradation caused by a variety of sources (e.g. light dispersion and absorption in the tissue, laser fluctuations, spurious photodetection and staining deficiency). From a modelling perspective, such degradations can be considered the sum of stochastic noise and a background signal. Among the methods proposed in the literature to perform image deconvolution in either confocal or multiphoton fluorescent microscopy, Vicidomini et al. (2009) were the first to incorporate models for noise (a Poisson process) and background signal (spatially constant) in the context of regularized inverse problems. Unfortunately, the so-called split-gradient deconvolution method (SGM) they used did not consider possible spatial variations in the background signal. In this paper, we extend the SGM by adding a maximum-likelihood estimation step for the determination of a spatially varying background signal. We demonstrate that the assumption of a constant background is not always valid in multiphoton laser microscopy and by using synthetic and actual multiphoton fluorescent images, we evaluate the face of validity of the proposed method, and compare its accuracy with the previously introduced SGM algorithm.

  11. Comparison of Two Methods for the Generation of Spatially Modulated Ultrasound Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Elegbe, Etana C.; Menon, Manoj G.; McAleavey, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially modulated ultrasound radiation force (SMURF) imaging is an elastographic technique that involves generating a radiation force beam with a lateral intensity variation of a defined spatial frequency. This results in a shear wave of known wavelength. By using the displacements induced by the shear wave and standard Doppler or speckle-tracking methods, the shear wave frequency, and thus material shear modulus, is estimated. In addition to generating a pushing beam pattern with a specified lateral intensity variation, it is generally desirable to induce larger displacements so that the displacement data signal-to-noise ratio is higher. We provide an analysis of two beam forming methods for generating SMURF in an elastic material: the focal Fraunhofer and intersecting plane wave methods. Both techniques generate beams with a defined spatial frequency. However, as a result of the trade-offs associated with each technique, the peak acoustic intensity outputs in the region of interest differs for the same combinations of parameters (e.g., the focal depth, the width of the area of interest, and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient). Assuming limited transducer drive voltage, we provide a decision plot to determine which of the two techniques yields the greater pushing force for a specific configuration. PMID:21768019

  12. Intra-Die Spatial Correlation Extraction with Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method for Multiple Test Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Luk, Wai-Shing; Tao, Jun; Zeng, Xuan; Cai, Wei

    In this paper, a novel intra-die spatial correlation extraction method referred to as MLEMTC (Maximum Likelihood Estimation for Multiple Test Chips) is presented. In the MLEMTC method, a joint likelihood function is formulated by multiplying the set of individual likelihood functions for all test chips. This joint likelihood function is then maximized to extract a unique group of parameter values of a single spatial correlation function, which can be used for statistical circuit analysis and design. Moreover, to deal with the purely random component and measurement error contained in measurement data, the spatial correlation function combined with the correlation of white noise is used in the extraction, which significantly improves the accuracy of the extraction results. Furthermore, an LU decomposition based technique is developed to calculate the log-determinant of the positive definite matrix within the likelihood function, which solves the numerical stability problem encountered in the direct calculation. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method is efficient and practical.

  13. Hotspot detection and spatial distribution of methane emissions from landfills by a surface probe method.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Valencia, Rodrigo; Magana-Rodriguez, Felipe; Cristóbal, Jordi; Thalasso, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    A surface probe method previously developed was used to detect hotspots and to determine spatial variation of methane (CH4) emissions from three landfills located in Mexico, with an intermediate or a final cover, as well as with or without a landfill gas collection system. The method was effective in the three landfills and allowed mapping of CH4 emissions with a resolution of 24-64 measurements per hectare, as well as the detection and quantification of hotspots, with a moderate experimental effort. In the three selected landfills, CH4 emissions were quantified to 10, 72, and 575gm(-2)d(-1). Two straightforward parameters describing the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions were also developed. The first parameter provides the percentage of area responsible for a given percentage of total emissions, while the second parameter assigns a numerical value to flux homogeneity. Together, the emissions map and the spatial distribution parameters offer an appropriate tool to landfill operators willing to begin recovering CH4 emissions or to improve the effectiveness of an existing recovery system. This method may therefore help to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of landfills, which are still the primary option for waste management in developing countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel method of measuring spatial rotation angle using MEMS tilt sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian’an; Zhu, Xin; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Leping

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel method of measuring spatial rotation angle with a dual-axis micro-electro-mechanical systems tilt sensor. When the sensor is randomly mounted on the surface of the rotating object, there are three unpredictable and unknown mounting position parameters: α, the sensor’s swing angle on the measuring plane; β, the angle between the rotation axis and the horizontal plane; and γ, the angle between the measuring plane and the rotation axis. Thus, the sensor’s spatial rotation model is established to describe the relationship between the measuring axis, rotation axis, and horizontal plane, and the corresponding analytical equations are derived. Furthermore, to eliminate the deviation caused by the uncertain direction of the rotation axis, an extra perpendicularly mounted, single-axis tilt sensor is combined with the dual-axis tilt sensor, forming a three-axis tilt sensor. Then, by measuring the sensors’ three tilts and solving the model’s equations, the object’s spatial rotation angle is obtained. Finally, experimental results show that the developed tilt sensor is capable of measuring spatial rotation angle in the range of  ±180° with an accuracy of 0.2° if the angle between the rotation axis and the horizontal plane is less than 75°.

  15. Application of spatial methods to identify areas with lime requirement in eastern Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogunović, Igor; Kisic, Ivica; Mesic, Milan; Zgorelec, Zeljka; Percin, Aleksandra; Pereira, Paulo

    2016-04-01

    With more than 50% of acid soils in all agricultural land in Croatia, soil acidity is recognized as a big problem. Low soil pH leads to a series of negative phenomena in plant production and therefore as a compulsory measure for reclamation of acid soils is liming, recommended on the base of soil analysis. The need for liming is often erroneously determined only on the basis of the soil pH, because the determination of cation exchange capacity, the hydrolytic acidity and base saturation is a major cost to producers. Therefore, in Croatia, as well as some other countries, the amount of liming material needed to ameliorate acid soils is calculated by considering their hydrolytic acidity. For this research, several interpolation methods were tested to identify the best spatial predictor of hidrolitic acidity. The purpose of this study was to: test several interpolation methods to identify the best spatial predictor of hidrolitic acidity; and to determine the possibility of using multivariate geostatistics in order to reduce the number of needed samples for determination the hydrolytic acidity, all with an aim that the accuracy of the spatial distribution of liming requirement is not significantly reduced. Soil pH (in KCl) and hydrolytic acidity (Y1) is determined in the 1004 samples (from 0-30 cm) randomized collected in agricultural fields near Orahovica in eastern Croatia. This study tested 14 univariate interpolation models (part of ArcGIS software package) in order to provide most accurate spatial map of hydrolytic acidity on a base of: all samples (Y1 100%), and the datasets with 15% (Y1 85%), 30% (Y1 70%) and 50% fewer samples (Y1 50%). Parallel to univariate interpolation methods, the precision of the spatial distribution of the Y1 was tested by the co-kriging method with exchangeable acidity (pH in KCl) as a covariate. The soils at studied area had an average pH (KCl) 4,81, while the average Y1 10,52 cmol+ kg-1. These data suggest that liming is necessary

  16. A Method for Improving Temporal and Spatial Resolution of Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, J. S.; Andres, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Using United States data, a method is developed to estimate the monthly consumption of solid, liquid and gaseous fossil fuels for each state in the union. This technique employs monthly sales data to estimate the relative monthly proportions of the total annual national fossil fuel use. These proportions are then used to estimate the total monthly carbon dioxide emissions for each state. To assess the success of this technique, the results from this method are compared with the data obtained from other independent methods. To determine the temporal success of the method, the resulting national time series is compared to the model produced by Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the current model being developed by T. J. Blasing and C. Broniak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The University of North Dakota (UND) method fits well temporally with the results of the CDIAC and current ORNL research. To determine the success of the spatial component, the individual state results are compared to the annual state totals calculated by ORNL. Using ordinary least squares regression, the annual state totals of this method are plotted against the ORNL data. This allows a direct comparison of estimates in the form of ordered pairs against a one-to-one ideal correspondence line, and allows for easy detection of outliers in the results obtained by this estimation method. Analyzing the residuals of the linear regression model for each type of fuel permits an improved understanding of the strengths and shortcomings of the spatial component of this estimation technique. Spatially, the model is successful when compared to the current ORNL research. The primary advantages of this method are its ease of implementation and universal applicability. In general, this technique compares favorably to more labor-intensive methods that rely on more detailed data. The more detailed data is generally not available for most countries in the world. The methodology used

  17. Cross modulation method of transformation of the spatial coherence of pulsed laser radiation in a nonlinear medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsak, M A; Kitsak, A I

    2008-04-30

    The cross modulation method of transformation of the spatial coherence of low-power pulsed laser radiation in a nonlinear medium is proposed. The method is realised experimentally in a multimode optical fibre. The estimates of the degree of spatial coherence of radiation subjected to the phase cross modulation demonstrated the high efficiency of this radiation decorrelation mechanism. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  18. Quantitative Methods to Assess Differential Susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana Natural Accessions to Dickeya dadantii.

    PubMed

    Rigault, Martine; Buellet, Amélie; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline; Fagard, Mathilde; Chardon, Fabien; Dellagi, Alia

    2017-01-01

    Among the most devastating bacterial diseases of plants, soft rot provoked by Dickeya spp. cause crop yield losses on a large range of species with potato being the most economically important. The use of antibiotics being prohibited in most countries in the field, identifying tolerance genes is expected to be one of the most effective alternate disease control approaches. A prerequisite for the identification of tolerance genes is to develop robust disease quantification methods and to identify tolerant plant genotypes. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of the exploitation of Arabidopsis thaliana natural variation to find tolerant genotypes and to develop robust quantification methods. We compared different quantification methods that score either symptom development or bacterial populations in planta. An easy to set up and reliable bacterial quantification method based on qPCR amplification of bacterial DNA was validated. This study demonstrates that it is possible to conduct a robust phenotyping of soft rot disease, and that Arabidopsis natural accessions are a relevant source of tolerance genes.

  19. Review of clinically accessible methods to determine lean body mass for normalization of standardized uptake values.

    PubMed

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van De Wiele, Christophe; Gheysens, Olivier; Pottel, Hans

    2016-03-01

    With the routine use of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans, metabolic activity of tumors can be quantitatively assessed through calculation of SUVs. One possible normalization parameter for the standardized uptake value (SUV) is lean body mass (LBM), which is generally calculated through predictive equations based on height and body weight. (Semi-)direct measurements of LBM could provide more accurate results in cancer populations than predictive equations based on healthy populations. In this context, four methods to determine LBM are reviewed: bioelectrical impedance analysis, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. CT, and magnetic resonance imaging. These methods were selected based on clinical accessibility and are compared in terms of methodology, precision and accuracy. By assessing each method's specific advantages and limitations, a well-considered choice of method can hopefully lead to more accurate SUVLBM values, hence more accurate quantitative assessment of 18F-FDG PET images.

  20. Quantitative Methods to Assess Differential Susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana Natural Accessions to Dickeya dadantii

    PubMed Central

    Rigault, Martine; Buellet, Amélie; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline; Fagard, Mathilde; Chardon, Fabien; Dellagi, Alia

    2017-01-01

    Among the most devastating bacterial diseases of plants, soft rot provoked by Dickeya spp. cause crop yield losses on a large range of species with potato being the most economically important. The use of antibiotics being prohibited in most countries in the field, identifying tolerance genes is expected to be one of the most effective alternate disease control approaches. A prerequisite for the identification of tolerance genes is to develop robust disease quantification methods and to identify tolerant plant genotypes. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of the exploitation of Arabidopsis thaliana natural variation to find tolerant genotypes and to develop robust quantification methods. We compared different quantification methods that score either symptom development or bacterial populations in planta. An easy to set up and reliable bacterial quantification method based on qPCR amplification of bacterial DNA was validated. This study demonstrates that it is possible to conduct a robust phenotyping of soft rot disease, and that Arabidopsis natural accessions are a relevant source of tolerance genes. PMID:28400777

  1. A simple thermal mapping method for seasonal spatial patterns of groundwater-surface water interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anibas, Christian; Buis, Kerst; Verhoeven, Ronny; Meire, Patrick; Batelaan, Okke

    2011-01-01

    SummaryA simple thermal mapping method for simulating seasonal and spatial patterns of groundwater-surface water interaction is developed and tested for a segment of the Aa River, Belgium. Spatially distributed temperature profiles in the hyporheic zone of the river are measured in winter and summer seasons of three consecutive years. Inverse modeling of the one-dimensional heat transport equation is applied to estimate vertical advective fluxes using the numerical STRIVE model and an analytical model. Results of the study show that seasonal flux estimates for summer and winter can be derived with a minimum data input and simulation effort. The estimated fluxes are analyzed via non-parametric statistical tests, while spatial interpolation techniques are used to generate maps of distributed flux exchange. The estimated seepage is compared with volumetric flux obtained from piezometer measurements and output of a groundwater model. The thermal method shows higher discharge rates in winter and that the relative contribution of exfiltration to the river discharge is higher in summer. A higher flux and a more heterogeneous flow pattern are observed in the upper reach of the river compared to the lower reach. This spatial difference shows the importance of the local geomorphology and to a lesser extent the hydrogeologic setting on hyporheic flux exchange in the river. A significantly higher flux is noted on the banks than in the center of the river, which is driven by the relatively high hydraulic conductivity of the river banks. It is concluded that bank flow in groundwater-surface water interaction deserves more attention. The main channel of the Aa River alone accounts for about 15% of the total river discharge at its outlet. As the developed thermal method is cost-effective, simple and fast, it is recommended for use in identifying zones of interest in initial stages of field investigations of groundwater-surface water interaction.

  2. Toward Proper Authentication Methods in Electronic Medical Record Access Compliant to HIPAA and C.I.A. Triangle.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Stephen J; Forkey, Sara; Choi, Young B

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines various methods encompassing the authentication of users in accessing Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). From a methodological perspective, multiple authentication methods have been researched from both a desktop and mobile accessibility perspective. Each method is investigated at a high level, along with comparative analyses, as well as real world examples. The projected outcome of this examination is a better understanding of the sophistication required in protecting the vital privacy constraints of an individual's Protected Health Information (PHI). In understanding the implications of protecting healthcare data in today's technological world, the scope of this paper is to grasp an overview of confidentiality as it pertains to information security. In addressing this topic, a high level overview of the three goals of information security are examined; in particular, the goal of confidentiality is the primary focus. Expanding upon the goal of confidentiality, healthcare accessibility legal aspects are considered, with a focus upon the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). With the primary focus of this examination being access to EMRs, the paper will consider two types of accessibility of concern: access from a physician, or group of physicians; and access from an individual patient.

  3. Review and possible development direction of the methods for modeling of soil pollutants spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, D. A.; Medvedev, A. N.; Sergeev, A. P.; Buevich, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Forecasting of environmental pollutants spatial distribution is a significant field of research in view of the current concerns regarding environment all over the world. Due to the danger to health and environment associated with an increase in pollution of air, soil, water and biosphere, it is very important to have the models that are capable to describe the modern distribution of contaminants and to forecast the dynamic of their spreading in future at different territories. This article addresses the methods, which applied the most often in this field, with an accent on soil pollution. The possible direction of such methods further development is suggested.

  4. A method for selection of appropriate assistive technology for computer access.

    PubMed

    Jenko, Mojca; Matjacic, Zlatko; Vidmar, Gaj; Bester, Janez; Pogacnikb, Matevz; Zupan, Anton

    2010-12-01

    Assistive technologies (ATs) for computer access enable people with disabilities to be included in the information society. Current methods for assessment and selection of the most appropriate AT for each individual are non standardized, lengthy, subjective, and require substantial clinical experience of a multidisciplinary team.This manuscript presents and evaluates an objective approach to test and select an appropriate AT for computer access for people with disabilities. Six user interfaces(standard keyboard, mini and large joystick, mini and large trackball, and head-operated mouse and keyboard) were tested on the control group of 29 people without disabilities and on 63 people with neuromuscular and muscular diseases, using purpose-built software for testing the speed of sentence typing. Different criteria for selecting the optimal AT were tested and compared with the skilled clinician's choice. The learning curves of the people with disabilities proved to follow those of the healthy controls, but with lower performance. Daily computer use was not associated with AT selection, but corresponded nearly perfectly to the level of functional ability of upper limbs. Agreement between clinician's choice and learning-based AT selection was noteworthy,but far from perfect. If partial agreement was taken into account, that is, AT was considered as an ordinal variable based on the corresponding functional ability level, and the second best learning-based choice was taken into account,the agreement was high for highest median typing speed as AT selection criterion. In conclusion, the developed method for AT assessment and selection seems to be an efficient guide for an unskilled clinician to choose an appropriate AT.

  5. A method for quantitative analysis of spatially variable physiological processes across leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Mihai; Frank, Thomas D; DeLucia, Evan H

    2006-11-01

    Many physiological processes are spatially variable across leaf surfaces. While maps of photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, gene expression, water transport, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for individual leaves are readily obtained, analytical methods for quantifying spatial heterogeneity and combining information gathered from the same leaf but with different instruments are not widely used. We present a novel application of tools from the field of geographical imaging to the multivariate analysis of physiological images. Procedures for registration and resampling, cluster analysis, and classification provide a general framework for the analysis of spatially resolved physiological data. Two experiments were conducted to illustrate the utility of this approach. Quantitative analysis of images of chlorophyll fluorescence and the production of ROS following simultaneous exposure of soybean leaves to atmospheric O3 and soybean mosaic virus revealed that areas of the leaf where the operating quantum efficiency of PSII was depressed also experienced an accumulation of ROS. This correlation suggests a causal relationship between oxidative stress and inhibition of photosynthesis. Overlaying maps of leaf surface temperature and chlorophyll fluorescence following a photoinhibition treatment indicated that areas with low operating quantum efficiency of PSII also experienced reduced stomatal conductance (high temperature). While each of these experiments explored the covariance of two processes by overlaying independent images gathered with different instruments, the same procedures can be used to analyze the covariance of information from multiple images. The application of tools from geographic image analysis to physiological processes occurring over small spatial scales will help reveal the mechanisms generating spatial variation across leaves.

  6. A Mobile Outdoor Augmented Reality Method Combining Deep Learning Object Detection and Spatial Relationships for Geovisualization.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jinmeng; Qiao, Yanjun; Ren, Fu; Wang, Junxing; Du, Qingyun

    2017-08-24

    The purpose of this study was to develop a robust, fast and markerless mobile augmented reality method for registration, geovisualization and interaction in uncontrolled outdoor environments. We propose a lightweight deep-learning-based object detection approach for mobile or embedded devices; the vision-based detection results of this approach are combined with spatial relationships by means of the host device's built-in Global Positioning System receiver, Inertial Measurement Unit and magnetometer. Virtual objects generated based on geospatial information are precisely registered in the real world, and an interaction method based on touch gestures is implemented. The entire method is independent of the network to ensure robustness to poor signal conditions. A prototype system was developed and tested on the Wuhan University campus to evaluate the method and validate its results. The findings demonstrate that our method achieves a high detection accuracy, stable geovisualization results and interaction.

  7. A Mobile Outdoor Augmented Reality Method Combining Deep Learning Object Detection and Spatial Relationships for Geovisualization

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Jinmeng; Qiao, Yanjun; Ren, Fu; Wang, Junxing; Du, Qingyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a robust, fast and markerless mobile augmented reality method for registration, geovisualization and interaction in uncontrolled outdoor environments. We propose a lightweight deep-learning-based object detection approach for mobile or embedded devices; the vision-based detection results of this approach are combined with spatial relationships by means of the host device’s built-in Global Positioning System receiver, Inertial Measurement Unit and magnetometer. Virtual objects generated based on geospatial information are precisely registered in the real world, and an interaction method based on touch gestures is implemented. The entire method is independent of the network to ensure robustness to poor signal conditions. A prototype system was developed and tested on the Wuhan University campus to evaluate the method and validate its results. The findings demonstrate that our method achieves a high detection accuracy, stable geovisualization results and interaction. PMID:28837096

  8. Method and device for maximizing memory system bandwidth by accessing data in a dynamically determined order

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wulf, William A. (Inventor); McKee, Sally A. (Inventor); Klenke, Robert (Inventor); Schwab, Andrew J. (Inventor); Moyer, Stephen A. (Inventor); Aylor, James (Inventor); Hitchcock, Charles Young (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A data processing system is disclosed which comprises a data processor and memory control device for controlling the access of information from the memory. The memory control device includes temporary storage and decision ability for determining what order to execute the memory accesses. The compiler detects the requirements of the data processor and selects the data to stream to the memory control device which determines a memory access order. The order in which to access said information is selected based on the location of information stored in the memory. The information is repeatedly accessed from memory and stored in the temporary storage until all streamed information is accessed. The information is stored until required by the data processor. The selection of the order in which to access information maximizes bandwidth and decreases the retrieval time.

  9. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Battiste, Richard L.

    2007-12-25

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into the mold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with the fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a temperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into the mold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  10. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Battiste, Richard L

    2013-12-31

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into th emold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with a fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a termperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into th emold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  11. A ubiquitous method for street scale spatial data collection and analysis in challenging urban environments: mapping health risks using spatial video in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fine-scale and longitudinal geospatial analysis of health risks in challenging urban areas is often limited by the lack of other spatial layers even if case data are available. Underlying population counts, residential context, and associated causative factors such as standing water or trash locations are often missing unless collected through logistically difficult, and often expensive, surveys. The lack of spatial context also hinders the interpretation of results and designing intervention strategies structured around analytical insights. This paper offers a ubiquitous spatial data collection approach using a spatial video that can be used to improve analysis and involve participatory collaborations. A case study will be used to illustrate this approach with three health risks mapped at the street scale for a coastal community in Haiti. Methods Spatial video was used to collect street and building scale information, including standing water, trash accumulation, presence of dogs, cohort specific population characteristics, and other cultural phenomena. These data were digitized into Google Earth and then coded and analyzed in a GIS using kernel density and spatial filtering approaches. The concentrations of these risks around area schools which are sometimes sources of diarrheal disease infection because of the high concentration of children and variable sanitary practices will show the utility of the method. In addition schools offer potential locations for cholera education interventions. Results Previously unavailable fine scale health risk data vary in concentration across the town, with some schools being proximate to greater concentrations of the mapped risks. The spatial video is also used to validate coded data and location specific risks within these “hotspots”. Conclusions Spatial video is a tool that can be used in any environment to improve local area health analysis and intervention. The process is rapid and can be repeated in study

  12. Caveats for the spatial arrangement method: Comment on Hout, Goldinger, and Ferguson (2013).

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Steven; Voorspoels, Wouter; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Storms, Gert

    2016-03-01

    The gold standard among proximity data collection methods for multidimensional scaling is the (dis)similarity rating of pairwise presented stimuli. A drawback of the pairwise method is its lengthy duration, which may cause participants to change their strategy over time, become fatigued, or disengage altogether. Hout, Goldinger, and Ferguson (2013) recently made a case for the Spatial Arrangement Method (SpAM) as an alternative to the pairwise method, arguing that it is faster and more engaging. SpAM invites participants to directly arrange stimuli on a computer screen such that the interstimuli distances are proportional to psychological proximity. Based on a reanalysis of the Hout et al. (2013), data we identify three caveats for SpAM. An investigation of the distributional characteristics of the SpAM proximity data reveals that the spatial nature of SpAM imposes structure on the data, invoking a bias against featural representations. Individual-differences scaling of the SpAM proximity data reveals that the two-dimensional nature of SpAM allows individuals to only communicate two dimensions of variation among stimuli properly, invoking a bias against high-dimensional scaling representations. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that in order to obtain reliable estimates of the group average, SpAM requires more individuals to be tested. We conclude with an overview of considerations that can inform the choice between SpAM and the pairwise method and offer suggestions on how to overcome their respective limitations. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Comparison of stochastic and deterministic methods for mapping groundwater level spatial variability in sparsely monitored basins.

    PubMed

    Varouchakis, Epsilon A; Hristopulos, D T

    2013-01-01

    In sparsely monitored basins, accurate mapping of the spatial variability of groundwater level requires the interpolation of scattered data. This paper presents a comparison of deterministic interpolation methods, i.e. inverse distance weight (IDW) and minimum curvature (MC), with stochastic methods, i.e. ordinary kriging (OK), universal kriging (UK) and kriging with Delaunay triangulation (DK). The study area is the Mires Basin of Mesara Valley in Crete (Greece). This sparsely sampled basin has limited groundwater resources which are vital for the island's economy; spatial variations of the groundwater level are important for developing management and monitoring strategies. We evaluate the performance of the interpolation methods with respect to different statistical measures. The Spartan variogram family is applied for the first time to hydrological data and is shown to be optimal with respect to stochastic interpolation of this dataset. The three stochastic methods (OK, DK and UK) perform overall better than the deterministic counterparts (IDW and MC). DK, which is herein for the first time applied to hydrological data, yields the most accurate cross-validation estimate for the lowest value in the dataset. OK and UK lead to smooth isolevel contours, whilst DK and IDW generate more edges. The stochastic methods deliver estimates of prediction uncertainty which becomes highest near the southeastern border of the basin.

  14. A novel method for detecting association between DNA methylation and diseases using spatial information

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Wai-Ki; Fier, Heide; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Aryee, Martin; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation may represent an important contributor to the missing heritability described in complex trait genetics. However, technology to measure DNA methylation has outpaced statistical methods for analysis. Taking advantage of the recent finding that methylated sites cluster together, we propose a Spatial Clustering Method (SCM) method to detect differentially methylated regions in the genome in case and control studies using spatial location information. This new method compares the distribution of distances in cases and controls between DNA methylation marks in the genomic region of interest. A statistic is computed based on these distances. Proper type I error rate is maintained and statistical significance is evaluated using permutation test. The effectiveness of the SCM we propose is evaluated by a simulation study. By simulating a simple disease model, we demonstrate that SCM has good power to detect differentially methylated regions associated with the disease. Finally, we applied the SCM to an exploratory analysis of chromosome 14 from a colorectal cancer data set and identified statistically significant genomic regions. Identification of these regions should lead to a better understanding of methylated sites and their contribution to disease. The SCM can be used as a reliable statistical method for the identification of differentially methylated regions associated with disease states in exploratory epigenetic analyses. PMID:25250875

  15. Analysis of PVA/AA based photopolymers at the zero spatial frequency limit using interferometric methods.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Sergi; Márquez, Andrés; Méndez, David; Ortuño, Manuel; Neipp, Cristian; Fernández, Elena; Pascual, Inmaculada; Beléndez, Augusto

    2008-05-10

    One of the problems associated with photopolymers as optical recording media is the thickness variation during the recording process. Different values of shrinkages or swelling are reported in the literature for photopolymers. Furthermore, these variations depend on the spatial frequencies of the gratings stored in the materials. Thickness variations can be measured using different methods: studying the deviation from the Bragg's angle for nonslanted gratings, using MicroXAM S/N 8038 interferometer, or by the thermomechanical analysis experiments. In a previous paper, we began the characterization of the properties of a polyvinyl alcohol/acrylamide based photopolymer at the lowest end of recorded spatial frequencies. In this work, we continue analyzing the thickness variations of these materials using a reflection interferometer. With this technique we are able to obtain the variations of the layers refractive index and, therefore, a direct estimation of the polymer refractive index.

  16. Spatially resolved excitation temperature measurements in a hypersonic flow using the hook method.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R J; Ebrahim, N A

    1977-05-01

    The extension of the hook method to include spatial resolution of nonuniformities in the test plane as suggested by Huber (1971) and Sandeman (1971) is demonstrated experimentally by measurements of the variation of the integrated line density of ground state sodium in a flame. Experiments are also described in which the variations in the flow of CO(2) in a hypersonic shock tunnel are spatially resolved along the spectrometer slit. The variations in the hook separations of the 425.4-nm Cr1 resonance and the 434.4-nm CrI 1-eV lower state line are simultaneously measured. The chromium exists as an impurity in the hypersonic flow of CO(2) over a cylinder in a shock tunnel. The populations of the levels so obtained have enabled the comparison of the excitation temperature of the Cr 1-eV level with the calculated gas temperature.

  17. Numerical method for accessing the universal scaling function for a multiparticle discrete time asymmetric exclusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Nicholas; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2005-11-01

    In the universality class of the one-dimensional Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) surface growth, Derrida and Lebowitz conjectured the universality of not only the scaling exponents, but of an entire scaling function. Since and Derrida and Lebowitz’s original publication [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 209 (1998)] this universality has been verified for a variety of continuous-time, periodic-boundary systems in the KPZ universality class. Here, we present a numerical method for directly examining the entire particle flux of the asymmetric exclusion process (ASEP), thus providing an alternative to more difficult cumulant ratios studies. Using this method, we find that the Derrida-Lebowitz scaling function (DLSF) properly characterizes the large-system-size limit (N→∞) of a single-particle discrete time system, even in the case of very small system sizes (N⩽22) . This fact allows us to not only verify that the DLSF properly characterizes multiple-particle discrete-time asymmetric exclusion processes, but also provides a way to numerically solve for quantities of interest, such as the particle hopping flux. This method can thus serve to further increase the ease and accessibility of studies involving even more challenging dynamics, such as the open-boundary ASEP.

  18. Numerical method for accessing the universal scaling function for a multiparticle discrete time asymmetric exclusion process.

    PubMed

    Chia, Nicholas; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2005-11-01

    In the universality class of the one-dimensional Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) surface growth, Derrida and Lebowitz conjectured the universality of not only the scaling exponents, but of an entire scaling function. Since and Derrida and Lebowitz's original publication [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 209 (1998)] this universality has been verified for a variety of continuous-time, periodic-boundary systems in the KPZ universality class. Here, we present a numerical method for directly examining the entire particle flux of the asymmetric exclusion process (ASEP), thus providing an alternative to more difficult cumulant ratios studies. Using this method, we find that the Derrida-Lebowitz scaling function (DLSF) properly characterizes the large-system-size limit (N--> infinity) of a single-particle discrete time system, even in the case of very small system sizes (N< or =22). This fact allows us to not only verify that the DLSF properly characterizes multiple-particle discrete-time asymmetric exclusion processes, but also provides a way to numerically solve for quantities of interest, such as the particle hopping flux. This method can thus serve to further increase the ease and accessibility of studies involving even more challenging dynamics, such as the open-boundary ASEP.

  19. Early Patient Access to Medicines: Health Technology Assessment Bodies Need to Catch Up with New Marketing Authorization Methods.

    PubMed

    Leyens, Lada; Brand, Angela

    National and international medicines agencies have developed innovative methods to expedite promising new medicines to the market and facilitate early patient access. Some of these approval pathways are the conditional approval and the adaptive pathways by the European Medicines Agency (EMA); the Promising Innovative Medicine (PIM) designation and the Early Access to Medicines Scheme (EAMS) by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), as well as the Fast Track, Breakthrough or Accelerated Approval methods by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, at least in Europe, these methods cannot achieve the goal of improving timely access for patients to new medicines on their own; the reimbursement process also has to become adaptive and flexible. In the past 2 years, the effective access (national patient access) to newly approved oncology drugs ranged from 1 to 30 months, with an extremely high variability between European countries. The goal of early patient access in Europe can only be achieved if the national health technology assessment bodies, such as NICE (ENG), HAS (FR), G-BA (DE) or AIFA (IT), provide harmonized, transparent, flexible, conditional and adaptive methods that adopt the level of evidence accepted by the medicines agencies. The efforts from medicines agencies are welcome but will be in vain if health technology assessments do not follow with similar initiatives, and the European 'postcode' lottery will continue.

  20. Early Patient Access to Medicines: Health Technology Assessment Bodies Need to Catch Up with New Marketing Authorization Methods

    PubMed Central

    Leyens, Lada; Brand, Angela

    2016-01-01

    National and international medicines agencies have developed innovative methods to expedite promising new medicines to the market and facilitate early patient access. Some of these approval pathways are the conditional approval and the adaptive pathways by the European Medicines Agency (EMA); the Promising Innovative Medicine (PIM) designation and the Early Access to Medicines Scheme (EAMS) by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), as well as the Fast Track, Breakthrough or Accelerated Approval methods by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, at least in Europe, these methods cannot achieve the goal of improving timely access for patients to new medicines on their own; the reimbursement process also has to become adaptive and flexible. In the past 2 years, the effective access (national patient access) to newly approved oncology drugs ranged from 1 to 30 months, with an extremely high variability between European countries. The goal of early patient access in Europe can only be achieved if the national health technology assessment bodies, such as NICE (ENG), HAS (FR), G-BA (DE) or AIFA (IT), provide harmonized, transparent, flexible, conditional and adaptive methods that adopt the level of evidence accepted by the medicines agencies. The efforts from medicines agencies are welcome but will be in vain if health technology assessments do not follow with similar initiatives, and the European ‘postcode’ lottery will continue. PMID:27238553

  1. Access to Money and Relation to Women's Use of Family Planning Methods Among Young Married Women in Rural India.

    PubMed

    Reed, Elizabeth; Donta, Balaiah; Dasgupta, Anindita; Ghule, Mohan; Battala, Madhusudana; Nair, Saritha; Silverman, Jay; Jadhav, Arun; Palaye, Prajakta; Saggurti, Niranjan; Raj, Anita

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The social positioning (i.e. social status and autonomy) of women in the household facilitates women's access to and decision-making power related to family planning (FP). Women's access to spending money, which may be an indicator of greater social positioning in the household, may also be greater among women who engage in income generating activities for their families, regardless of women's status in the household. However, in both scenarios, access to money may independently afford greater opportunity to obtain family planning services among women. This study seeks to assess whether access to money is associated with FP outcomes independently of women's social positioning in their households. Methods Using survey data from married couples in rural Maharashtra, India (n = 855), crude and adjusted regression was used to assess women's access to their own spending money in relation to past 3 month use of condoms and other forms of contraceptives (pills, injectables, intrauterine device). Results Access to money (59 %) was associated with condom and other contraceptive use (AORs ranged 1.5-1.8). These findings remained significant after adjusting for women's FP decision-making power in the household and mobility to seek FP services. Conclusion While preliminary, findings suggest that access to money may increase women's ability to obtain FP methods, even in contexts where social norms to support women's power in FP decision-making may not be readily adopted.

  2. A new access density definition and its correlation with crash rates by microscopic traffic simulation method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Linjun; Lu, Jian John

    2014-03-01

    Better access management can improve highway safety by reducing potential crashes and conflicts. To make adequate access management decisions, it is essential to understand the impact of different access types on roadway safety, usually represented by the crash rate of a roadway segment. The objective of this paper is to propose a new access density definition reflecting the impact of traffic speed variation of different access types. The traffic speed variation was obtained from a microscopic traffic simulation software package TSIS-CORSIM. A sample roadway Temple Terrace Highway was selected to perform traffic simulation. Access Weight was obtained from traffic speed variation, and access density was obtained from access weight. The proposed access density was then compared with the existing definition by analyzing their correlations with crash rates on one suburban street in Temple Terrace, Florida. The comparison demonstrates that crash rates are more highly correlated with the proposed access density than that in the previous study, which is helpful for Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), United States Department of Transportation (USDOT), and transportation consulting companies to regulate the construction, management and design of roadway segments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chenge Detection Method for Wetland Surface Conditions using NDVI Values of High Spatial Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Shinichi; Suzuki, Kenji

    In this study, a new method has been proposed that can reveal changes of wetland surface condition using high spatial resolution satellite data (IKONOS) for actual wetland managements. The method can detect the wetland surface change based on the NDVI change domain in wetlands using bi-temporal satellite data through analyzing ‘coordinate of NDVI change’. We applied the method to Kawaminami wetland in Miyazaki prefecture for comparing the calculation results and actual state of wetland with observed groundwater level data. As the results, it was able to extract artificial change of the wetland surface precisely and to detect differences of the wetness of the surface in two imageries. For satellite data analysis, it was indicated that utilization of supplementary climate data such as rainfall is important. The proposed method is effective for actual wetland managements, because it is simple and practical.

  4. Improving Access to Long-Acting Contraceptive Methods and Reducing Unplanned Pregnancy Among Women with Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Black, Kirsten I.; Day, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Much has been written about the consequences of substance use in pregnancy, but there has been far less focus on the prevention of unintended pregnancies in women with substance use disorders (SUDs). We examine the literature on pregnancy incidence for women with SUDs, the clinical and economic benefits of increasing access to long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods in this population, and the current hurdles to increased access and uptake. High rates of unintended pregnancies and poor physical and psychosocial outcomes among women with SUDs underscore the need for increased access to, and uptake of, LARC methods among these women. A small number of studies that focused on improving access to contraception, especially LARC, via integrated contraception services predominantly provided in drug treatment programs were identified. However, a number of barriers remain, highlighting that much more research is needed in this area. PMID:27199563

  5. Robust spatialization of soil water content at the scale of an agricultural field using geophysical and geostatistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henine, Hocine; Tournebize, Julien; Laurent, Gourdol; Christophe, Hissler; Cournede, Paul-Henry; Clement, Remi

    2017-04-01

    Research on the Critical Zone (CZ) is a prerequisite for undertaking issues related to ecosystemic services that human societies rely on (nutrient cycles, water supply and quality). However, while the upper part of CZ (vegetation, soil, surface water) is readily accessible, knowledge of the subsurface remains limited, due to the point-scale character of conventional direct observations. While the potential for geophysical methods to overcome this limitation is recognized, the translation of the geophysical information into physical properties or states of interest remains a challenge (e.g. the translation of soil electrical resistivity into soil water content). In this study, we propose a geostatistical framework using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) approach to assimilate geophysical and point-scale data. We especially focus on the prediction of the spatial distribution of soil water content using (1) TDR point-scale measurements of soil water content, which are considered as accurate data, and (2) soil water content data derived from electrical resistivity measurements, which are uncertain data but spatially dense. We used a synthetic dataset obtained with a vertical 2D domain to evaluate the performance of this geostatistical approach. Spatio-temporal simulations of soil water content were carried out using Hydrus-software for different scenarios: homogeneous or heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, and continuous or punctual infiltration pattern. From the simulations of soil water content, conceptual soil resistivity models were built using a forward modeling approach and point sampling of water content values, vertically ranged, were done. These two datasets are similar to field measurements of soil electrical resistivity (using electrical resistivity tomography, ERT) and soil water content (using TDR probes) obtained at the Boissy-le-Chatel site, in Orgeval catchment (East of Paris, France). We then integrated them into a specialization

  6. The Virtual Tray of Objects Task as a novel method to electrophysiologically measure visuo-spatial recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Amico, Francesco; Ambrosini, Ettore; Guillem, François; Mento, Giovanni; Power, Dermot; Pergola, Giulio; Vallesi, Antonino

    2015-12-01

    We explored a novel method to electrophysiologically measure visuo-spatial recognition memory using a modified version of the Virtual Tray of Objects Task (VTOT). Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded from 18 healthy volunteers during performance in the VTOT. Participants were required to detect random repetitions of three-dimensional visual stimuli (OLD) and to refrain from responding to non-repeated stimuli (NEW). Differences in ERP between the NEW and OLD conditions were tested for statistical significance using assumption-free non-parametric analyses. Further, a correlation between ERP and behavioral measures was sought. Significant OLD-NEW effects were found for four ERP components showing distinct spatio-temporal characteristics: a posterior positive component appearing at 100 ms (P100), a left-lateralized negative component peaking at ≈250 ms (N250), a frontal negative component at ≈300-450 ms (FN400), and a right late frontal negativity (rLFN) at ≈500-720 ms. Moreover, individual differences in the OLD-NEW effect computed for the rLFN positively correlated with repeated stimulus recognition efficiency. However, there were no late left parietal P600 old/new effects. These findings suggest that the P100 component might reflect early visual perception processes taking place during performance in the task, whereas the N250 and FN400 components could be linked to stimulus-dependent access to visual memory representations and familiarity-related processes, respectively. In contrast, we propose that the rLFN component could be associated with higher-level cognitive functions, such as attention and monitoring processes. Altogether, our results suggest that the ERP version of the VTOT could play a role in the electrophysiological assessment of visuo-spatial memory and related sub-processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrostatic Introduction Theory Based Spatial Filtering Method for Solid Particle Velocity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuanlong; Tang, Guanghua; Zhou, Bin; Yang, Daoye; Zhang, Jianyong; Wang, Shimin

    2007-06-01

    Electrostatic induction theory based spatial filtering method for particle velocity measurement has the advantages of the simplicity of measurement system and of the convenience of data processing. In this paper, the relationship between solid particle velocity and the power spectrum of the output signal of the electrostatic senor was derived theoretically. And the effects of the length of the electrode, the thickness of the dielectric pipe and its length on the spatial filtering characteristics of the electrostatic sensor were investigated numerically using finite element method. Additionally, as for the roughness and the difficult determination of the peak frequency fmax of the power spectrum characteristics curve of the output signal, a wavelet analysis based filtering method was adopted to smooth the curve, which can determine peak frequency fmax accurately. Finally, the velocity measurement method was applied in a dense phase pneumatic conveying system under high pressure, and the experimental results show that the system repeatability is within ±4% over the gas superficial velocity range of 8.63-18.62 m/s for particle concentration range 0.067-0.130 m3/m3.

  8. A ubiquitous method for street scale spatial data collection and analysis in challenging urban environments: mapping health risks using spatial video in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Andrew; Blackburn, Jason K; Widmer, Jocelyn M; Morris, J Glenn

    2013-04-15

    Fine-scale and longitudinal geospatial analysis of health risks in challenging urban areas is often limited by the lack of other spatial layers even if case data are available. Underlying population counts, residential context, and associated causative factors such as standing water or trash locations are often missing unless collected through logistically difficult, and often expensive, surveys. The lack of spatial context also hinders the interpretation of results and designing intervention strategies structured around analytical insights. This paper offers a ubiquitous spatial data collection approach using a spatial video that can be used to improve analysis and involve participatory collaborations. A case study will be used to illustrate this approach with three health risks mapped at the street scale for a coastal community in Haiti. Spatial video was used to collect street and building scale information, including standing water, trash accumulation, presence of dogs, cohort specific population characteristics, and other cultural phenomena. These data were digitized into Google Earth and then coded and analyzed in a GIS using kernel density and spatial filtering approaches. The concentrations of these risks around area schools which are sometimes sources of diarrheal disease infection because of the high concentration of children and variable sanitary practices will show the utility of the method. In addition schools offer potential locations for cholera education interventions. Previously unavailable fine scale health risk data vary in concentration across the town, with some schools being proximate to greater concentrations of the mapped risks. The spatial video is also used to validate coded data and location specific risks within these "hotspots". Spatial video is a tool that can be used in any environment to improve local area health analysis and intervention. The process is rapid and can be repeated in study sites through time to track spatio

  9. Relating geographical variation in pollination types to environmental and spatial factors using novel statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Ingolf; Bierman, Stijn Martinus; Durka, Walter; Klotz, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The relative frequencies of functional traits of plant species show notable spatial variation, which is often related to environmental factors. Pollination type (insect-, wind- or self-pollination) is a critical trait for plant reproduction and provision of ecosystem services. Here, we mapped the distribution of pollination types across Germany by combining databases on plant distribution and plant pollination types. Applying a new method, we modelled the composition of pollination types using a set of 12 environmental variables as predictors within a Bayesian framework which allows for the analysis of compositional data in the presence of spatial autocorrelation. A clear biogeographical pattern in the distribution of pollination types was revealed which was adequately captured by our model. The most striking relationship was a relative increase in insect-pollination and a corresponding decrease of selfing with increasing altitude. Further important factors were wind speed, geology and land use. We present a powerful tool to analyse the distribution patterns of plant functional types such as pollination types and their relationship with environmental parameters in a spatially explicit framework.

  10. Harmonic Spatial Coherence Imaging: An Ultrasonic Imaging Method Based on Backscatter Coherence

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jeremy J; Jakovljevic, Marko; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2012-01-01

    HSCI and SLSC imaging less sensitive to clutter because it has low spatial coherence. The method is based on the coherence of the second harmonic backscatter. Because the same signals that are used to construct harmonic B-mode images are also used to construct HSCI images, the benefits obtained with harmonic imaging are also applicable to HSCI. Harmonic imaging has been the primary tool for suppressing clutter in diagnostic ultrasound imaging, however second harmonic echoes are not necessarily immune to the effects of clutter. HSCI and SLSC imaging are less sensitive to clutter because it has low spatial coherence. Harmonic Spatial Coherence Imaging shows favorable imaging characteristics such as improved contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), improved speckle signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and better delineation of borders and other structures compared to fundamental and harmonic B-mode imaging. CNRs of up to 1.9 were obtained from in vivo imaging of human cardiac tissue with HSCI, compared to 0.6, 0.9, and 1.5 in fundamental B-mode, harmonic B-mode, and SLSC imaging, respectively. In vivo experiments in human liver tissue demonstrated SNRs of up to 3.4 for HSCI compared to 1.9 for harmonic B-mode. Nonlinear simulations of a heart chamber model were consistent with the in vivo experiments. PMID:22547276

  11. Harmonic spatial coherence imaging: an ultrasonic imaging method based on backscatter coherence.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Jeremy; Jakovljevic, Marko; Pinton, Gianmarco F; Trahey, Gregg E

    2012-04-01

    We introduce a harmonic version of the short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) imaging technique, called harmonic spatial coherence imaging (HSCI). The method is based on the coherence of the second-harmonic backscatter. Because the same signals that are used to construct harmonic B-mode images are also used to construct HSCI images, the benefits obtained with harmonic imaging are also obtained with HSCI. Harmonic imaging has been the primary tool for suppressing clutter in diagnostic ultrasound imaging, however secondharmonic echoes are not necessarily immune to the effects of clutter. HSCI and SLSC imaging are less sensitive to clutter because clutter has low spatial coherence. HSCI shows favorable imaging characteristics such as improved contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), improved speckle SNR, and better delineation of borders and other structures compared with fundamental and harmonic B-mode imaging. CNRs of up to 1.9 were obtained from in vivo imaging of human cardiac tissue with HSCI, compared with 0.6, 0.9, and 1.5 in fundamental B-mode, harmonic B-mode, and SLSC imaging, respectively. In vivo experiments in human liver tissue demonstrated SNRs of up to 3.4 for HSCI compared with 1.9 for harmonic B-mode. Nonlinear simulations of a heart chamber model were consistent with the in vivo experiments.

  12. A Simple Method for Improving the Spatial Resolution in Infrared Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieta, Juha-Pekka; Vaikkinen, Anu; Auno, Samuli; Räikkönen, Heikki; Haapala, Markus; Scotti, Gianmario; Kopra, Jaakko; Piepponen, Petteri; Kauppila, Tiina J.

    2017-06-01

    In mass spectrometry imaging of tissues, the size of structures that can be distinguished is determined by the spatial resolution of the imaging technique. Here, the spatial resolution of IR laser ablation is markedly improved by increasing the distance between the laser and the focusing lens. As the distance between the laser and the lens is increased from 1 to 18 m, the ablation spot size decreases from 440 to 44 μm. This way, only the collimated center of the divergent laser beam is directed on the focusing lens, which results in better focusing of the beam. Part of the laser energy is lost at longer distance, but this is compensated by focusing of the radiation to a smaller area on the sample surface. The long distance can also be achieved by a set of mirrors, between which the radiation travels before it is directed to the focusing lens and the sample. This method for improving the spatial resolution can be utilized in mass spectrometry imaging of tissues by techniques that utilize IR laser ablation, such as laser ablation electrospray ionization, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. A High Spatial Resolution Depth Sensing Method Based on Binocular Structured Light.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huimin; Ge, Chenyang; Xue, Jianru; Zheng, Nanning

    2017-04-08

    Depth information has been used in many fields because of its low cost and easy availability, since the Microsoft Kinect was released. However, the Kinect and Kinect-like RGB-D sensors show limited performance in certain applications and place high demands on accuracy and robustness of depth information. In this paper, we propose a depth sensing system that contains a laser projector similar to that used in the Kinect, and two infrared cameras located on both sides of the laser projector, to obtain higher spatial resolution depth information. We apply the block-matching algorithm to estimate the disparity. To improve the spatial resolution, we reduce the size of matching blocks, but smaller matching blocks generate lower matching precision. To address this problem, we combine two matching modes (binocular mode and monocular mode) in the disparity estimation process. Experimental results show that our method can obtain higher spatial resolution depth without loss of the quality of the range image, compared with the Kinect. Furthermore, our algorithm is implemented on a low-cost hardware platform, and the system can support the resolution of 1280 × 960, and up to a speed of 60 frames per second, for depth image sequences.

  14. A Simple Method for Improving the Spatial Resolution in Infrared Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieta, Juha-Pekka; Vaikkinen, Anu; Auno, Samuli; Räikkönen, Heikki; Haapala, Markus; Scotti, Gianmario; Kopra, Jaakko; Piepponen, Petteri; Kauppila, Tiina J.

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry imaging of tissues, the size of structures that can be distinguished is determined by the spatial resolution of the imaging technique. Here, the spatial resolution of IR laser ablation is markedly improved by increasing the distance between the laser and the focusing lens. As the distance between the laser and the lens is increased from 1 to 18 m, the ablation spot size decreases from 440 to 44 μm. This way, only the collimated center of the divergent laser beam is directed on the focusing lens, which results in better focusing of the beam. Part of the laser energy is lost at longer distance, but this is compensated by focusing of the radiation to a smaller area on the sample surface. The long distance can also be achieved by a set of mirrors, between which the radiation travels before it is directed to the focusing lens and the sample. This method for improving the spatial resolution can be utilized in mass spectrometry imaging of tissues by techniques that utilize IR laser ablation, such as laser ablation electrospray ionization, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization.

  15. [Assessment of overall spatial accuracy in image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy using a spine registration method].

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Uchiyama, Yukio; Komori, Masataka; Hayashi, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung and liver tumors is always performed under image guidance, a technique used to confirm the accuracy of setup positioning by fusing planning digitally reconstructed radiographs with X-ray, fluoroscopic, or computed tomography (CT) images, using bony structures, tumor shadows, or metallic markers as landmarks. The Japanese SBRT guidelines state that bony spinal structures should be used as the main landmarks for patient setup. In this study, we used the Novalis system as a linear accelerator for SBRT of lung and liver tumors. The current study compared the differences between spine registration and target registration and calculated total spatial accuracy including setup uncertainty derived from our image registration results and the geometric uncertainty of the Novalis system. We were able to evaluate clearly whether overall spatial accuracy is achieved within a setup margin (SM) for planning target volume (PTV) in treatment planning. After being granted approval by the Hospital and University Ethics Committee, we retrospectively analyzed eleven patients with lung tumor and seven patients with liver tumor. The results showed the total spatial accuracy to be within a tolerable range for SM of treatment planning. We therefore regard our method to be suitable for image fusion involving 2-dimensional X-ray images during the treatment planning stage of SBRT for lung and liver tumors.

  16. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography perfusion using spatial-temporal Bayesian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ruogu; Raj, Ashish; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2012-03-01

    In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated X-ray radiation dose is of significant concern to patients and operators, especially CT perfusion (CTP) imaging that has higher radiation dose due to its cine scanning technique. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) parameter as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and degrade CT perfusion maps greatly if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. To capture the essential dynamics of CT perfusion, a simple spatial-temporal Bayesian method that uses a piecewise parametric model of the residual function is used, and then the model parameters are estimated from a Bayesian formulation of prior smoothness constraints on perfusion parameters. From the fitted residual function, reliable CTP parameter maps are obtained from low dose CT data. The merit of this scheme exists in the combination of analytical piecewise residual function with Bayesian framework using a simpler prior spatial constrain for CT perfusion application. On a dataset of 22 patients, this dynamic spatial-temporal Bayesian model yielded an increase in signal-tonoise-ratio (SNR) of 78% and a decrease in mean-square-error (MSE) of 40% at low dose radiation of 43mA.

  17. A High Spatial Resolution Depth Sensing Method Based on Binocular Structured Light

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huimin; Ge, Chenyang; Xue, Jianru; Zheng, Nanning

    2017-01-01

    Depth information has been used in many fields because of its low cost and easy availability, since the Microsoft Kinect was released. However, the Kinect and Kinect-like RGB-D sensors show limited performance in certain applications and place high demands on accuracy and robustness of depth information. In this paper, we propose a depth sensing system that contains a laser projector similar to that used in the Kinect, and two infrared cameras located on both sides of the laser projector, to obtain higher spatial resolution depth information. We apply the block-matching algorithm to estimate the disparity. To improve the spatial resolution, we reduce the size of matching blocks, but smaller matching blocks generate lower matching precision. To address this problem, we combine two matching modes (binocular mode and monocular mode) in the disparity estimation process. Experimental results show that our method can obtain higher spatial resolution depth without loss of the quality of the range image, compared with the Kinect. Furthermore, our algorithm is implemented on a low-cost hardware platform, and the system can support the resolution of 1280 × 960, and up to a speed of 60 frames per second, for depth image sequences. PMID:28397759

  18. Switching methods in magnetic random access memory for low power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchang, Han; Jiancheng, Huang; Cheow Hin, Sim; Tran, Michael; Sze Ter, Lim

    2015-06-01

    Effect of saturation magnetization (Ms) of the free layer (FL) on the switching current is analyzed for spin transfer torque (STT) magnetic random access memory (MRAM). For in-plane FL, critical switching current (Ic0) decreases as Ms decreases. However, reduction in Ms also results in a low thermal stability factor (Δ), which must be compensated through increasing shape anisotropy, thus limiting scalability. For perpendicular FL, Ic0 reduction by using low-Ms materials is actually at the expense of data retention. To save energy consumed by STT current, two electric field (EF) controlled switching methods are proposed. Our simulation results show that elliptical FL can be switched by an EF pulse with a suitable width. However, it is difficult to implement this type of switching in real MRAM devices due to the distribution of the required switching pulse widths. A reliable switching method is to use an Oersted field guided switching. Our simulation and experimental results show that the bi-directional magnetization switching could be realized by an EF with an external field as low as  ±5 Oe if the offset field could be removed.

  19. Comparison of Marine Spatial Planning Methods in Madagascar Demonstrates Value of Alternative Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Allnutt, Thomas F.; McClanahan, Timothy R.; Andréfouët, Serge; Baker, Merrill; Lagabrielle, Erwann; McClennen, Caleb; Rakotomanjaka, Andry J. M.; Tianarisoa, Tantely F.; Watson, Reg; Kremen, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The Government of Madagascar plans to increase marine protected area coverage by over one million hectares. To assist this process, we compare four methods for marine spatial planning of Madagascar's west coast. Input data for each method was drawn from the same variables: fishing pressure, exposure to climate change, and biodiversity (habitats, species distributions, biological richness, and biodiversity value). The first method compares visual color classifications of primary variables, the second uses binary combinations of these variables to produce a categorical classification of management actions, the third is a target-based optimization using Marxan, and the fourth is conservation ranking with Zonation. We present results from each method, and compare the latter three approaches for spatial coverage, biodiversity representation, fishing cost and persistence probability. All results included large areas in the north, central, and southern parts of western Madagascar. Achieving 30% representation targets with Marxan required twice the fish catch loss than the categorical method. The categorical classification and Zonation do not consider targets for conservation features. However, when we reduced Marxan targets to 16.3%, matching the representation level of the “strict protection” class of the categorical result, the methods show similar catch losses. The management category portfolio has complete coverage, and presents several management recommendations including strict protection. Zonation produces rapid conservation rankings across large, diverse datasets. Marxan is useful for identifying strict protected areas that meet representation targets, and minimize exposure probabilities for conservation features at low economic cost. We show that methods based on Zonation and a simple combination of variables can produce results comparable to Marxan for species representation and catch losses, demonstrating the value of comparing alternative approaches during

  20. Comparison of marine spatial planning methods in Madagascar demonstrates value of alternative approaches.

    PubMed

    Allnutt, Thomas F; McClanahan, Timothy R; Andréfouët, Serge; Baker, Merrill; Lagabrielle, Erwann; McClennen, Caleb; Rakotomanjaka, Andry J M; Tianarisoa, Tantely F; Watson, Reg; Kremen, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The Government of Madagascar plans to increase marine protected area coverage by over one million hectares. To assist this process, we compare four methods for marine spatial planning of Madagascar's west coast. Input data for each method was drawn from the same variables: fishing pressure, exposure to climate change, and biodiversity (habitats, species distributions, biological richness, and biodiversity value). The first method compares visual color classifications of primary variables, the second uses binary combinations of these variables to produce a categorical classification of management actions, the third is a target-based optimization using Marxan, and the fourth is conservation ranking with Zonation. We present results from each method, and compare the latter three approaches for spatial coverage, biodiversity representation, fishing cost and persistence probability. All results included large areas in the north, central, and southern parts of western Madagascar. Achieving 30% representation targets with Marxan required twice the fish catch loss than the categorical method. The categorical classification and Zonation do not consider targets for conservation features. However, when we reduced Marxan targets to 16.3%, matching the representation level of the "strict protection" class of the categorical result, the methods show similar catch losses. The management category portfolio has complete coverage, and presents several management recommendations including strict protection. Zonation produces rapid conservation rankings across large, diverse datasets. Marxan is useful for identifying strict protected areas that meet representation targets, and minimize exposure probabilities for conservation features at low economic cost. We show that methods based on Zonation and a simple combination of variables can produce results comparable to Marxan for species representation and catch losses, demonstrating the value of comparing alternative approaches during

  1. Geo-Spatial Browse and Distribution of NSF-OPP's Antarctic Ice and Climate Data via the Web: Antarctic Cryosphere Access Portal (A-CAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, R.; Scambos, T.; Haran, T.; Maurer, J.; Bohlander, J.

    2008-12-01

    A prototype of the Antarctic Cryosphere Access Portal (A-CAP) has been released for public use. Developed at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Antarctic Glaciological Data Center (AGDC), A-CAP aims to be a geo-visualization and data download tool for AGDC data and other Antarctic-wide parameters, including glaciology, ice core data, snow accumulation, satellite imagery, digital elevation models (DEMs), sea ice concentration, and many other cryosphere-related scientific measurements. The user can zoom in to a specific region as well as overlay coastlines, placenames, latitude/longitude, and other geographic information. In addition to providing an interactive Web interface, customizable A-CAP map images and source data are also accessible via specific Uniform Resource Locator strings (URLs) to a standard suite of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) services: Web Map Service (WMS), W