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Sample records for accessibility existing facilities

  1. 45 CFR 1214.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1214... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY ACTION § 1214.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency... require the agency to make each of its existing facilities accessible to and usable by individuals...

  2. 45 CFR 2301.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 2301... THE UNITED STATES ARCTIC RESEARCH COMMISSION § 2301.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a... not— (1) Necessarily require the agency to make each of its existing facilities accessible to...

  3. 45 CFR 85.42 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 85.42... SERVICES § 85.42 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each... to make each of its existing facilities accessible to and usable by individuals with handicaps; or...

  4. 45 CFR 2104.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 2104... BY THE COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS § 2104.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General...) Necessarily require the agency to make each of its existing facilities accessible to and usable by...

  5. 45 CFR 1706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1706... Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity... facilities accessible to and usable by handicapped persons; or (2) Require the agency to take any action...

  6. 45 CFR 1803.7 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1803.7... facilities. (a) The Foundation shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when... does not necessarily require the Foundation to make each of its existing facilities accessible to...

  7. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  8. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  9. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  10. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  11. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  12. 45 CFR 2490.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 2490...: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or.... This paragraph does not— (1) Necessarily require the agency to make each of its existing...

  13. 10 CFR 4.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 4.550 Section 4.550 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR...) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve...

  14. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION § 4907.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by...

  15. 12 CFR 268.707 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Board Programs and Activities Because of Physical or Mental Disability § 268.707 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The Board shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with a...

  16. 12 CFR 268.707 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Board Programs and Activities Because of Physical or Mental Disability § 268.707 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The Board shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with a...

  17. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION § 4907.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by...

  18. 12 CFR 268.707 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Board Programs and Activities Because of Physical or Mental Disability § 268.707 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The Board shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with a...

  19. 29 CFR 2205.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural...) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by February 23, 1987, a transition plan setting forth the...

  20. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural...) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by February 23, 1987 a transition plan setting forth the...

  1. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 15.150 Section 15.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides...

  2. 7 CFR 15e.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 15e.150 Section 15e.150 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. 12 CFR 268.707 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Programs and Activities Because of Physical or Mental Disability § 268.707 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The Board shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity... can demonstrate would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or...

  4. 12 CFR 268.707 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Programs and Activities Because of Physical or Mental Disability § 268.707 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The Board shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity... can demonstrate would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or...

  5. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  6. 34 CFR 105.32 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 105.32 Section 105.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR...

  7. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  8. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  9. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  10. 19 CFR 201.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 201.150 Section 201.150 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES OF GENERAL APPLICATION Enforcement of Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in Programs or...

  11. 32 CFR 1807.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Program accessibility: existing facilities. 1807.150 Section 1807.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR...

  12. 32 CFR 1807.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program accessibility: existing facilities. 1807.150 Section 1807.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR...

  13. 32 CFR 1807.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Program accessibility: existing facilities. 1807.150 Section 1807.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR...

  14. 32 CFR 1807.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program accessibility: existing facilities. 1807.150 Section 1807.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR...

  15. 32 CFR 1807.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Program accessibility: existing facilities. 1807.150 Section 1807.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR...

  16. 17 CFR 149.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 149.150 Section 149.150 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157),...

  17. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The... result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial...

  18. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The... result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial...

  19. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The... result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial...

  20. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  1. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  2. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  3. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  4. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  5. 19 CFR 201.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 201.150 Section 201.150 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES OF... appropriate. (c) Time period for compliance. The agency shall comply with the obligations established...

  6. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 530.150 Section 530.150 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE BROADCASTING BOARD OF...

  7. 10 CFR 1041.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1041.150 Section 1041.150 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY § 1041.150...

  8. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 12.150 Section 12.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL...

  9. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 12.150 Section 12.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL...

  10. 41 CFR 51-10.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural...) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program... plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such changes. The agency shall provide...

  11. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 12.150 Section 12.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL...

  12. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate...

  13. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate...

  14. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  15. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1208.150 Section 1208.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION § 1208.150...

  16. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1208.150 Section 1208.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION § 1208.150...

  17. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1208.150 Section 1208.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION § 1208.150...

  18. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1208.150 Section 1208.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION § 1208.150...

  19. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1208.150 Section 1208.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION § 1208.150...

  20. 36 CFR 812.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  1. 22 CFR 219.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  2. 36 CFR 909.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  3. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  4. 45 CFR 1214.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  5. 49 CFR 807.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  6. 29 CFR 1615.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AND IN ACCESSIBILITY OF COMMISSION ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural... among available methods for meeting the requirements of this section, the Commission shall give...

  7. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... handicapped persons receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—1) General. The..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  8. 22 CFR 144.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... persons receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs...

  9. 17 CFR 200.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... individuals with handicaps receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  10. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... handicapped persons receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—1) General. The..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  11. 45 CFR 2104.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... handicapped persons receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs...

  12. 36 CFR 406.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  13. 5 CFR 1850.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... individuals with handicaps receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  14. 7 CFR 15e.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S... plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by May 26, 1994, a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary...

  15. 17 CFR 200.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S... plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by March 6, 1989, a transition plan setting forth the steps...

  16. 34 CFR 1200.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and any regulations implementing it. In... as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by May 26, 1994, a transition...

  17. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and any regulations implementing it. In...) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by February 23, 1987 a transition plan setting forth the...

  18. 36 CFR 1154.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Existing facilities. 1154.150 Section 1154.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD § 1154.150 Program... Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and any regulations implementing it....

  19. 28 CFR 39.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... persons receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services..., use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs or...

  20. 45 CFR 2490.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible...

  1. 45 CFR 2301.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment... other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible to and usable...

  2. 14 CFR 1251.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services..., use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs or...

  3. 5 CFR 1636.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment... other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible to and usable...

  4. 6 CFR 15.50 - Program accessibility; existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... make them accessible to and usable by individuals with a disability where other methods are effective... with a disability receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits,...

  5. 10 CFR 1041.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible... stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible to...

  6. 16 CFR 6.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The Commission may comply with... to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at... accessible rolling stock, or any methods that result in making its programs or activities readily...

  7. 36 CFR 1154.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible... stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible to...

  8. 22 CFR 219.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968... changes shall be made by April 7, 1989, but in any event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan... accessibility, the agency shall develop, by October 7, 1986, a transition plan setting forth the steps...

  9. 15 CFR 8c.50 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S... changes shall be made by July 26, 1991, but in any event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan... accessibility, the agency shall develop, by January 26, 1989, a transition plan setting forth the...

  10. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY... facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity... fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative...

  11. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY... facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity... fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative...

  12. 31 CFR 17.150 - Program accessibility; Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and any regulations implementing it. In... expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be... of this part, a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such changes....

  13. 1 CFR 500.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR EMPLOYMENT POLICY... or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In those circumstances where agency...

  14. 43 CFR 17.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... on the Basis of Handicap in Programs or Activities Conducted by the Department of the Interior § 17... activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  15. 1 CFR 457.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION § 457... activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable... can demonstrate would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or...

  16. 12 CFR 1072.109 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... usable by individuals with disabilities where other methods are effective in achieving compliance with... individuals with disabilities receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits,...

  17. 45 CFR 1170.32 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1170.32 Section 1170.32... ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES Accessibility § 1170.32 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient... require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to...

  18. 28 CFR 41.57 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing facilities. 41.57 Section 41.57... Practices Program Accessibility § 41.57 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... existing facilities or every part of an existing facility accessible to and usable by handicapped...

  19. 14 CFR 1251.301 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; assignment of aides to beneficiaries; home visits; delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites; alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities...

  20. 10 CFR 1040.72 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in conformance...

  1. 10 CFR 1040.72 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in conformance...

  2. 14 CFR 1251.301 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...; assignment of aides to beneficiaries; home visits; delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites; alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities...

  3. 10 CFR 1040.72 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in conformance...

  4. 10 CFR 1040.72 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in conformance...

  5. 45 CFR 1232.14 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1232.14 Section 1232.14... ASSISTANCE Accessibility § 1232.14 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by handicapped persons. (b)...

  6. 45 CFR 1151.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1151.22 Section 1151.22... Prohibited Accessibility § 1151.22 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable...

  7. 45 CFR 1232.14 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1232.14 Section 1232.14... ASSISTANCE Accessibility § 1232.14 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by handicapped persons. (b)...

  8. 45 CFR 84.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 84.22 Section 84.22 Public... facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate its program or activity so that when each part is... a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to...

  9. 10 CFR 4.127 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other services to... social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of...

  10. 22 CFR 142.16 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...., telecommunication device for the deaf) redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other services to... other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and...

  11. 10 CFR 4.127 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other services to... social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of...

  12. 22 CFR 142.16 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...., telecommunication device for the deaf) redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other services to... other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and...

  13. 10 CFR 4.127 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other services to... social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of...

  14. 43 CFR 17.217 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 17.217 Section 17.217... facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate each program or activity so that when each part is... not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility...

  15. 28 CFR 42.521 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing facilities. 42.521 Section 42...-Implementation of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Accessibility § 42.521 Existing facilities. (a... section does not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a...

  16. 28 CFR 42.521 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aids to beneficiaries, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities, or any other method that results in making its program... in existing facilities where other methods are effective in achieving compliance with paragraph...

  17. 28 CFR 35.150 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing facilities. 35.150 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES Program Accessibility § 35.150 Existing facilities. (a) General. A... paragraph does not— (1) Necessarily require a public entity to make each of its existing...

  18. 22 CFR 217.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., can obtain information as to the existence and location of services, activities, and facilities that... services to accessible buildings, alteration of existing facilities, assignment of aids to beneficiaries... that serve handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Time period. A...

  19. 22 CFR 217.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... accessible to and usable by handicapped persons. (b) Methods. A recipient may comply with the requirement of... services to accessible buildings, alteration of existing facilities, assignment of aids to beneficiaries... methods that may result in making its program or activity accessible to handicapped persons. A...

  20. 38 CFR 18.422 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information concerning the existence and location of services, activities, and facilities that are accessible..., reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aids to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration...

  1. 45 CFR 605.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in... in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other social...

  2. 34 CFR 104.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in conformance with the requirements of § 104.23, or any other... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other...

  3. 45 CFR 84.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in conformance with the requirements of § 84.23, or any other methods that... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other...

  4. 45 CFR 605.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in... in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other social...

  5. 22 CFR 142.16 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... vision or hearing, can obtain information as to the existence and location of services, activities, and...., telecommunication device for the deaf) redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other services to... other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and...

  6. 45 CFR 84.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other..., welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other...

  7. 45 CFR 84.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other..., welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other...

  8. 45 CFR 84.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other..., welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other...

  9. 14 CFR § 1251.301 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... buildings; assignment of aides to beneficiaries; home visits; delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites; alteration of existing facilities and construction of...

  10. 10 CFR 611.206 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Existing facilities. 611.206 Section 611.206 Energy... PROGRAM Facility/Funding Awards § 611.206 Existing facilities. The Secretary shall, in making awards to those manufacturers that have existing facilities, give priority to those facilities that are oldest...

  11. 15 CFR 8b.17 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... vision or hearing, can obtain information as to the existence and location of services, activities and... accessible or the aid, benefit, or service must be made available at an alternative accessible site or sites. Accessibility requires nonpersonal aids to make the aid, benefit, or service accessible to mobility...

  12. Systems test facilities existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R.

    1981-01-01

    Systems test facilities (STFS) to test total photovoltaic systems and their interfaces are described. The systems development (SD) plan is compilation of existing and planned STFs, as well as subsystem and key component testing facilities. It is recommended that the existing capabilities compilation is annually updated to provide and assessment of the STF activity and to disseminate STF capabilities, status and availability to the photovoltaics program.

  13. 34 CFR 104.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other...

  14. 34 CFR 104.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other...

  15. 34 CFR 104.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other...

  16. 28 CFR 35.150 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... receive the benefits or services provided by the public entity. (b) Methods—(1) General. A public entity... construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock or other conveyances, or any other methods that... where other methods are effective in achieving compliance with this section. A public entity, in...

  17. 28 CFR 35.150 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... receive the benefits or services provided by the public entity. (b) Methods—(1) General. A public entity... construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock or other conveyances, or any other methods that... where other methods are effective in achieving compliance with this section. A public entity, in...

  18. 28 CFR 35.150 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... receive the benefits or services provided by the public entity. (b) Methods—(1) General. A public entity... construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock or other conveyances, or any other methods that... where other methods are effective in achieving compliance with this section. A public entity, in...

  19. 30 CFR 550.304 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing facilities. 550.304 Section 550.304 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Pollution Prevention and Control § 550.304...

  20. 30 CFR 550.304 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing facilities. 550.304 Section 550.304 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Pollution Prevention and Control § 550.304...

  1. 30 CFR 550.304 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing facilities. 550.304 Section 550.304 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Pollution Prevention and Control § 550.304...

  2. 30 CFR 250.304 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing facilities. 250.304 Section 250.304 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Pollution...

  3. 10 CFR 4.127 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Existing facilities. 4.127 Section 4.127 Energy NUCLEAR... the effective date of this subpart, but in any event, as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition... paragraph (a) of this section, a recipient shall develop a transition plan setting forth the steps...

  4. 10 CFR 1040.72 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Existing facilities. 1040.72 Section 1040.72 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES... three years after the effective date of this subpart. (d) Transition plan. In the event that...

  5. 28 CFR 35.150 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Swimming pools, wading pools, and spas, sections 242 and 1009. (K) Shooting facilities with firing...) Adopting other innovative methods. (4) Swimming pools, wading pools, and spas. The requirements set forth... entity chooses to make structural changes to existing swimming pools, wading pools, or spas built...

  6. Book of Renovations. A Compilation of Drawings Depicting the Most Common Problems and Solutions to Renovating Existing Buildings and Facilities to Make Them Accessible to and Usable by People with Physical Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Bruce H., Ed.

    This booklet presents a compilation of ideas and illustrations intended to solve many accessibility problems of physically handicapped persons using older buildings and facilities which were built before legislation and regulations mandating accessibility for disabled persons were passed. The solutions pictured in the booklet are intended to meet…

  7. Manual for Accessibility: [Conference, Meeting, and Lodging Facilities]. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rehabilitation Association, Alexandria, VA.

    This illustrated manual and survey forms are designed to be used by organizations, hotel and restaurant associations, interested individuals and others as a guide for selecting accessible conference, meeting, and lodging facilities. The guidelines can also be used with existing facilities to identify specific modifications and accommodations. The…

  8. 14 CFR 1251.301 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... as redesign of equipment; reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings; assignment of aides to beneficiaries; home visits; delivery of health, welfare, or other social services...

  9. 38 CFR 18.422 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aids to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare or other...

  10. 38 CFR 18.422 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aids to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare or other...

  11. 38 CFR 18.422 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aids to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of... handicapped persons in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare or other...

  12. 7 CFR 15b.18 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... property, or portions thereof physicially accessible to handicapped individuals. (2) Where accessibility... achieved without causing a substantial impairment, the Secretary shall consider the following factors: (i... if technological advances or other changes so warrant. (3) Where the property is federally owned...

  13. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  14. Access to Public Educational Facilities under the Equal Access Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, R. Craig; Goldblatt, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion centers on the legal bases by which school administrators permit access to public educational facilities by religiously and politically oriented student organizations. It concludes that access should be granted to students whose purposes do not disrupt teaching and learning. (JAM)

  15. Facility Accessibility: Opening the Doors to All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jeffrey C.; Piletic, Cindy K.

    2006-01-01

    A facility developed for fitness, physical activity, recreation, or sport is a vital community resource that contributes to the overall health and wellness of that community's citizens. In order to maximize the benefits derived from these facilities, it is imperative that they be accessible to as wide a range of people as possible. The Americans…

  16. 43 CFR 17.217 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to and usable by handicapped persons. (b) Methods. A recipient may comply with the requirements of... other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, delivery of services at... conformance with the requirements of § 17.218, or any other methods that result in making its program...

  17. 45 CFR 605.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at... in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other social...

  18. 45 CFR 605.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at... in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other social...

  19. 45 CFR 605.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at... in the most integrated setting appropriate. (c) Small health, welfare, or other social...

  20. Research facility access & science education

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, S.P.; Teplitz, V.L.

    1994-10-01

    As Congress voted to terminate the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory in October of 1993, the Department of Energy was encouraged to maximize the benefits to the nation of approximately $2 billion which had already been expended to date on its evolution. Having been recruited to Texas from other intellectually challenging enclaves around the world, many regional scientists, especially physicists, of course, also began to look for viable ways to preserve some of the potentially short-lived gains made by Texas higher education in anticipation of {open_quotes}the SSC era.{close_quotes} In fact, by November, 1993, approximately 150 physicists and engineers from thirteen Texas universities and the SSC itself, had gathered on the SMU campus to discuss possible re-uses of the SSC assets. Participants at that meeting drew up a petition addressed to the state and federal governments requesting the creation of a joint Texas Facility for Science Education and Research. The idea was to create a facility, open to universities and industry alike, which would preserve the research and development infrastructure and continue the educational mission of the SSC.

  1. 43 CFR 3809.434 - How does this subpart apply to pending modifications for new or existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... facility, such as a waste rock repository, leach pad, drill site, or access road; or to modify an existing mine facility such as expansion of a waste rock repository or leach pad. (b) All provisions of...

  2. 43 CFR 3809.434 - How does this subpart apply to pending modifications for new or existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... facility, such as a waste rock repository, leach pad, drill site, or access road; or to modify an existing mine facility such as expansion of a waste rock repository or leach pad. (b) All provisions of...

  3. 43 CFR 3809.434 - How does this subpart apply to pending modifications for new or existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... facility, such as a waste rock repository, leach pad, drill site, or access road; or to modify an existing mine facility such as expansion of a waste rock repository or leach pad. (b) All provisions of...

  4. 43 CFR 3809.434 - How does this subpart apply to pending modifications for new or existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... facility, such as a waste rock repository, leach pad, drill site, or access road; or to modify an existing mine facility such as expansion of a waste rock repository or leach pad. (b) All provisions of...

  5. Using Motion Planning to Determine the Existence of an Accessible Route in a CAD Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Xiaoshan; Han, Charles S.; Law, Kincho H.

    2010-01-01

    We describe an algorithm based on motion-planning techniques to determine the existence of an accessible route through a facility for a wheeled mobility device. The algorithm is based on LaValle's work on rapidly exploring random trees and is enhanced to take into consideration the particularities of the accessible route domain. Specifically, the…

  6. 7 CFR 800.26 - Access to records and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to records and facilities. 800.26 Section 800... Recordkeeping and Access to Facilities § 800.26 Access to records and facilities. (a) Inspection of records and facilities. Prior to the examination of records or inspection of facilities by an authorized...

  7. Seismic evaluation criteria for existing critical industrial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Manrod, W.E.; Hall, W.J.; Beavers, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines for the development of seismic evaluation criteria for existing critical industrial facilities are presented. Critical industrial facilities are considered as those facilities that, if damaged by natural phenomena, could result in the release of substances harmful to the public or the environment, or that could result in what owners consider as unacceptable financial losses. The guidelines are intended to assist in developing evaluation criteria for such facilities, which will result in realistic assessments that are representative of the state-of-the-art.

  8. 23 CFR 810.108 - Designation of existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....102, the Federal Highway Administrator may approve on any Federal-aid system the work necessary to designate existing parking facilities (such as at shopping centers or other public or private locations) for... system the work necessary to designate existing highway lanes as high occupancy vehicle lanes....

  9. 23 CFR 810.108 - Designation of existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....102, the Federal Highway Administrator may approve on any Federal-aid system the work necessary to designate existing parking facilities (such as at shopping centers or other public or private locations) for... system the work necessary to designate existing highway lanes as high occupancy vehicle lanes....

  10. 23 CFR 810.108 - Designation of existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....102, the Federal Highway Administrator may approve on any Federal-aid system the work necessary to designate existing parking facilities (such as at shopping centers or other public or private locations) for... system the work necessary to designate existing highway lanes as high occupancy vehicle lanes....

  11. 23 CFR 810.108 - Designation of existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....102, the Federal Highway Administrator may approve on any Federal-aid system the work necessary to designate existing parking facilities (such as at shopping centers or other public or private locations) for... system the work necessary to designate existing highway lanes as high occupancy vehicle lanes....

  12. 23 CFR 810.108 - Designation of existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....102, the Federal Highway Administrator may approve on any Federal-aid system the work necessary to designate existing parking facilities (such as at shopping centers or other public or private locations) for... system the work necessary to designate existing highway lanes as high occupancy vehicle lanes....

  13. Estimation of marginal costs at existing waste treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Hulgaard, Tore; Hindsgaul, Claus; Riber, Christian; Kamuk, Bettina; Astrup, Thomas F

    2016-04-01

    This investigation aims at providing an improved basis for assessing economic consequences of alternative Solid Waste Management (SWM) strategies for existing waste facilities. A bottom-up methodology was developed to determine marginal costs in existing facilities due to changes in the SWM system, based on the determination of average costs in such waste facilities as function of key facility and waste compositional parameters. The applicability of the method was demonstrated through a case study including two existing Waste-to-Energy (WtE) facilities, one with co-generation of heat and power (CHP) and another with only power generation (Power), affected by diversion strategies of five waste fractions (fibres, plastic, metals, organics and glass), named "target fractions". The study assumed three possible responses to waste diversion in the WtE facilities: (i) biomass was added to maintain a constant thermal load, (ii) Refused-Derived-Fuel (RDF) was included to maintain a constant thermal load, or (iii) no reaction occurred resulting in a reduced waste throughput without full utilization of the facility capacity. Results demonstrated that marginal costs of diversion from WtE were up to eleven times larger than average costs and dependent on the response in the WtE plant. Marginal cost of diversion were between 39 and 287 € Mg(-1) target fraction when biomass was added in a CHP (from 34 to 303 € Mg(-1) target fraction in the only Power case), between -2 and 300 € Mg(-1) target fraction when RDF was added in a CHP (from -2 to 294 € Mg(-1) target fraction in the only Power case) and between 40 and 303 € Mg(-1) target fraction when no reaction happened in a CHP (from 35 to 296 € Mg(-1) target fraction in the only Power case). Although average costs at WtE facilities were highly influenced by energy selling prices, marginal costs were not (provided a response was initiated at the WtE to keep constant the utilized thermal capacity). Failing to systematically

  14. Helping Principals Make Better Use of Existing Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredrickson, John H.

    The findings of two studies establish some deleterious effects of unsatisfactory physical environment on school children. However, modern technology enables the exercise of total environmental control in new and existing facilities. Between the realities of today and the exceptations of tomorrow we have a transitional model--the open plan concept.…

  15. 33 CFR 127.701 - Security on existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Security § 127.701 Security on...

  16. Community variation in adolescent access to indoor tanning facilities.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ardis L; Carlos, Heather A; Sarnoff, Rachel A

    2013-04-01

    Melanoma rates among younger women in New Hampshire (NH) are rising. In urban studies, youth proximity to tanning facilities has been linked to indoor tanning, a proven cause of melanoma. Youth access has not been examined in rural settings. To determine on a statewide basis the influence of rurality and community income level on female students' ease of access to tanning facilities, all NH tanning facilities (N = 261) and high schools (N = 77) in 2011 were spatially and statistically analyzed to determine schools with more facilities within 2 miles of the school and greater capacity (fewer female students per facility), for indoor tanning. Schools above the state-wide average for both measures were classified as "Easy Access" to indoor tanning. Among NH high schools, 74 % have 1 or more tanning facility within two miles and 22 % have "Easy Access" to tanning facilities. Ease of access did not differ by rurality. Lower-income school status was an independent predictor of both greater capacity and "Easy Access". While urban and rural teens have similar access to indoor tanning, female students in lower-income communities have easier access. Variations in access by community size and income must be considered in planning interventions to address youth indoor tanning.

  17. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Randy Bohachek; Charles Park; Bruce Wallace; Phil Winston; Steve Marschman

    2013-04-01

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  18. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Bohachek, Randy; Wallace, Bruce; Winston, Phil; Marschman, Steve

    2013-04-30

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  19. 62. RAILROAD FACILITIES, TRUCKING PASSAGE, MAIL TRANSPORT AREA, ACCESS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. RAILROAD FACILITIES, TRUCKING PASSAGE, MAIL TRANSPORT AREA, ACCESS TO POST OFFICE BUILDING, VIEW TO WEST - Terminal Tower Building, Cleveland Union Terminal, 50 Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

    2013-09-20

    Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as “delayed access,” this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

  1. 39 CFR 255.8 - Access to postal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 255.8 Access to postal facilities. (a) Legal requirements and policy—(1) ABA Standards. Where the design standards of the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) of 1968, 42 U.S.C. 4151 et seq., do not apply... facilities not legally required to conform to ABA standards when it determines that doing so would...

  2. 31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR AT MEZZANINE AND LOWER LEVELS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106352. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. 17 CFR 149.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY...) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  4. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND PROCEDURES ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES...) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in... result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial...

  5. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AUTHORITY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY... agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  6. 29 CFR 2205.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY... operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  7. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY.... The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its... fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative...

  8. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE FEDERAL... shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is... fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative...

  9. 29 CFR 2205.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY... operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  10. 45 CFR 1706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE §...

  11. 44 CFR 16.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP... the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151...

  12. 44 CFR 16.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP... the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151...

  13. 45 CFR 2490.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION § 2490.150 Program...

  14. 12 CFR 410.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151 through 4157), and..., but in any event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural... October 7, 1986, a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such changes. The...

  15. 16 CFR 1034.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and any... event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to..., a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such changes. The agency...

  16. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and... September 14, 1990, but in any event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that... develop, by March 14, 1988, a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such...

  17. 5 CFR 723.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and... September 6, 1991, but in any event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that... develop, by March 6, 1989, a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such...

  18. 14 CFR 1251.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and... September 6, 1991, but in any event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that... develop, by March 6, 1989, a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such...

  19. 49 CFR 1014.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and... event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to..., 1987, a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such changes. The agency...

  20. 22 CFR 144.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and... event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to..., 1987, a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such changes. The agency...

  1. 25 CFR 720.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and... event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to..., 1987 a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such changes. The agency...

  2. 45 CFR 1706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE § 1706.150... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate...

  3. 45 CFR 1706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE §...

  4. 45 CFR 1706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE §...

  5. Evaluation of existing United States` facilities for use as a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Chidester, K.; Eaton, S.L.; Motley, F.E.; Siebe, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    A number of existing US facilities were evaluated for use as a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition. These facilities include the Fuels Material Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford, the Washington Power Supply Unit 1 (WNP-1) facility at Hanford, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) at Barnwell, SC, the Fuel Processing Facility (FPF) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the P-reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The study consisted of evaluating each facility in terms of available process space, available building support systems (i.e., HVAC, security systems, existing process equipment, etc.), available regional infrastructure (i.e., emergency response teams, protective force teams, available transportation routes, etc.), and ability to integrate the MOX fabrication process into the facility in an operationally-sound manner that requires a minimum amount of structural modifications.

  6. Personnel Access Control System Evaluation for National Ignition Facility Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Altenbach, T; Brereton, S.; Hermes, G.; Singh, M.

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the baseline Access Control System for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and to assess its effectiveness at controlling access to hazardous locations during full NIF operations. It reviews the various hazards present during a NIF shot sequence, and evaluates the effectiveness of the applicable set of controls at preventing access while the hazards are present. It considers only those hazards that could potentially be lethal. In addition, various types of technologies that might be applicable at NIF are reviewed, as are systems currently in use at other facilities requiring access control for safety reasons. Recommendations on how this system might be modified to reduce risk are made.

  7. Americans with Disabilities Act: Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities, Transportation Facilities, Transportation Vehicles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, Washington, DC.

    Guidelines are presented regarding accessibility to buildings and facilities, transportation facilities, and transportation vehicles by individuals with disabilities, under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. These guidelines are to be applied during building design, construction, and alteration. Part 1 offers detailed facility…

  8. 30 CFR 250.153 - Do I have to rename an existing facility or well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General... existing facility or well? You do not have to rename facilities installed and wells drilled before...

  9. 30 CFR 250.153 - Do I have to rename an existing facility or well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General... existing facility or well? You do not have to rename facilities installed and wells drilled before...

  10. 30 CFR 250.153 - Do I have to rename an existing facility or well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General... existing facility or well? You do not have to rename facilities installed and wells drilled before...

  11. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed...

  12. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed...

  13. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed...

  14. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed...

  15. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed...

  16. 50 CFR 80.24 - Recreational boating access facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.24... the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act for recreational boating access facilities. However,...

  17. 78 FR 13695 - Information Collection: Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Information Collection: Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing... requirements in the regulations under ``Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...: 1010-0176. Title: 30 CFR 585, Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the...

  18. User perceptions of existing home access solutions and a novel home access device

    PubMed Central

    Mattie, Johanne L.; Borisoff, Jaimie F.; Wong, Angie S.; Miller, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate end user perspectives of four existing home access solutions (HAS) and a newly designed experimental device (the ARISE). Method A cross-sectional design was used to evaluate the ARISE prototype against other HAS. Specifically, participants trialed stairs, a ramp, a platform lift (PL), a stair glide and the ARISE, after which they completed questionnaires aimed at soliciting their perspectives of these solutions. The time taken by participants to use each HAS was also collected. Results Five HAS design features were deemed as important by 90% of participants: ease of use, ability to use independently, reliability, safety and security. Time taken to use each HAS from fastest to slowest was: stairs, the ARISE, ramp, PL and stair glide. The ARISE prototype was rated as the first or second most preferred device by the most number of participants, followed by the PL, then the ramp. Conclusions Results from this study provide greater understanding of user perspectives of HAS. End user feedback on a novel prototype device has provided valuable insight into its usability and function, which should not only guide future development of this device, but also provide direction for other innovations around home access. PMID:25815678

  19. Facilities Management of Existing School Buildings: Two Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Technology, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    While all school districts are responsible for the management of their existing buildings, they often approach the task in different ways. This document presents two models that offer ways a school district administration, regardless of size, may introduce activities into its ongoing management process that will lead to improvements in earthquake…

  20. Facility wide benefits of radiology vascular access teams, part 2.

    PubMed

    Burns, Tim; Lamberth, Becky

    2010-01-01

    A vascular access team (VAT) can provide a full scope of PICC services, including pre-placement evaluation, placement of the PICC, educational resources to bedside nursing staff, management and monitoring of the insertion sites, discontinuation of the line, and documentation for quality control purposes. Two hospitals that have developed VAT programs outline key factors in forming a successful team, which include identifying the resources and associated costs,developing policies and procedures, establishing quality assurance, and enabling employee satisfaction. Facilities will need to consider the cost associated with the implementation of the team; however, benefits the team provides to the facility far outweigh the financial commitment required.

  1. Facility wide benefits of radiology vascular access teams.

    PubMed

    Burns, Tim; Lamberth, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Many PICC lines are inserted in the radiology department and, at the rate they are inserted, can have serious financial implications for a facility. These costs combined with the increase in the number of line placements performed annually have imaging leadership evaluating alternatives for catheter placements in their departments. Several benefits to forming an in-house vascular access team include increased patient satisfaction, improved care, decreased length of stay, optimizing DRG reimbursement, and increased revenue. Considerations prior to initiating a vascular access team include: staff members involved, location of insertions, and up front funds available.

  2. Adaptation of existing facilities to isentropic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, Douglas G; Mielke, Charles H; Rodriguez, George; Rickel, Dwight G

    2011-01-07

    We demonstrate that the established pulsed power infrastructure at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Pulsed Field Facility (NHMFL-PFF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory can be adapted to obtain high quality isentropic compression experiment (ICE) data on materials in extreme conditions of dynamic high pressure. Experiments utilized a single-turn magnet pulsed power system at the NHMFL-PFF that was originally designed to measure actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla). A simple modification to the single-turn magnet has converted it to a fast turnaround dynamic high pressure measurement system. This paper details the work done including important background details that indicate that much more can be accomplished with optimization of the load characteristics in terms of ultimate peak pressures. To match the rise time of the NHMFL capacitor bank ({approx}2 {mu}s versus {approx}0.5 {mu}s for the Sandia Z-machine) the sample dimensions can be relatively large, i.e., up to 5 mm thickness. The maximum stresses are {approx}50GPa (0.5 Mbar) at the maximum bank voltage (60 kV) and higher pressures may be possible if the sample is tamped. For the design and predictions of performance of the NHMFL-ICE experiment it is important to have good predictive models. A SPICE code simulation was chosen to model all aspects of the experiment, electrical and physical. To this end, accurate dynamic load models were developed to simulate the compression and expansion of the dynamic load at high pressures using shock physics principles. A series experiments have been performed which demonstrated the feasibility of the NHMFL-ICE technique. The results will be shown and discussed. The NHMFL-ICE technique is an excellent method for measuring equations of state (EOS) at megabar pressures. Because a complete EOS can be obtained in one experiment from zero to the peak pressure, and because many shots can be fired in one day, the technique promises to

  3. BIOPACK: the ground controlled late access biological research facility.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Jack J W A

    2004-03-01

    Future Space Shuttle flights shall be characterized by activities necessary to further build the International Space Station, ISS. During these missions limited resources are available to conduct biological experiments in space. The Shuttles' Middeck is a very suitable place to conduct science during the ISS assembly missions or dedicated science missions. The BIOPACK, which flew its first mission during the STS-107, provides a versatile Middeck Locker based research tool for gravitational biology studies. The core facility occupies the space of only two Middeck Lockers. Experiment temperatures are controlled for bacteria, plant, invertebrate and mammalian cultures. Gravity levels and profiles can be set ranging from 0 to 2.0 x g on three independent centrifuges. This provides the experimenter with a 1.0 x g on-board reference and intermediate hypogravity and hypergravity data points to investigate e.g. threshold levels in biological responses. Temperature sensitive items can be stored in the facilities' -10 degrees C and +4 degrees C stowage areas. During STS-107 the facility also included a small glovebox (GBX) and passive temperature controlled units (PTCU). The GBX provides the experimenter with two extra levels of containment for safe sample handling. This biological research facility is a late access (L-10 hrs) laboratory, which, when reaching orbit, could automatically be starting up reducing important experiment lag-time and valuable crew time. The system is completely telecommanded when needed. During flight system parameters like temperatures, centrifuge speeds, experiment commanding or sensor readouts can be monitored and changed when needed. Although ISS provides a wide range of research facilities there is still need for an STS-based late access facility such as the BIOPACK providing experimenters with a very versatile research cabinet for biological experiments under microgravity and in-flight control conditions.

  4. 48 CFR 3052.222-71 - Strikes or picketing affecting access to a DHS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... affecting access to a DHS facility. 3052.222-71 Section 3052.222-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... affecting access to a DHS facility. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3022.101-71(b), insert the following clause: Strikes or Picketing Affecting Access to a DHS Facility (DEC 2003) If the Contracting...

  5. 45 CFR 1386.22 - Access to records, facilities and individuals with developmental disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to records, facilities and individuals with... Access to records, facilities and individuals with developmental disabilities. (a) Access to records—A... the staff of a facility that is providing care or treatment; (2) Reports prepared by an agency...

  6. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  7. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  8. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  9. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  10. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  11. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  12. 75 FR 81643 - Hydropower Resource Assessment at Existing Reclamation Facilities-Draft Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Hydropower Resource Assessment at Existing Reclamation Facilities--Draft Report AGENCIES: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Reopening of comment period for review of the Hydropower... committed to increasing the generation of environmentally sustainable, affordable hydropower for...

  13. Limited electricity access in health facilities of sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of data on electricity access, sources, and reliability

    PubMed Central

    Adair-Rohani, Heather; Zukor, Karen; Bonjour, Sophie; Wilburn, Susan; Kuesel, Annette C; Hebert, Ryan; Fletcher, Elaine R

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Access to electricity is critical to health care delivery and to the overarching goal of universal health coverage. Data on electricity access in health care facilities are rarely collected and have never been reported systematically in a multi-country study. We conducted a systematic review of available national data on electricity access in health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We identified publicly-available data from nationally representative facility surveys through a systematic review of articles in PubMed, as well as through websites of development agencies, ministries of health, and national statistics bureaus. To be included in our analysis, data sets had to be collected in or after 2000, be nationally representative of a sub-Saharan African country, cover both public and private health facilities, and include a clear definition of electricity access. Results: We identified 13 health facility surveys from 11 sub-Saharan African countries that met our inclusion criteria. On average, 26% of health facilities in the surveyed countries reported no access to electricity. Only 28% of health care facilities, on average, had reliable electricity among the 8 countries reporting data. Among 9 countries, an average of 7% of facilities relied solely on a generator. Electricity access in health care facilities increased by 1.5% annually in Kenya between 2004 and 2010, and by 4% annually in Rwanda between 2001 and 2007. Conclusions: Energy access for health care facilities in sub-Saharan African countries varies considerably. An urgent need exists to improve the geographic coverage, quality, and frequency of data collection on energy access in health care facilities. Standardized tools should be used to collect data on all sources of power and supply reliability. The United Nations Secretary-General's “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative provides an opportunity to comprehensively monitor energy access in health care

  14. 10 CFR 70.64 - Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... safety or does not require adherence to the specified criteria. (1) Quality standards and records. The... throughout the life of the facility. (2) Natural phenomena hazards. The design must provide for adequate... design must provide for inclusion of instrumentation and control systems to monitor and control...

  15. 10 CFR 70.64 - Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... throughout the life of the facility. (2) Natural phenomena hazards. The design must provide for adequate protection against natural phenomena with consideration of the most severe documented historical events for... selection of engineered controls over administrative controls to increase overall system reliability; and...

  16. 10 CFR 70.64 - Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... material. (6) Emergency capability. The design must provide for emergency capability to maintain control of... LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Additional Requirements for Certain Licensees Authorized To Possess a Critical Mass of Special Nuclear Material § 70.64 Requirements for new facilities or new processes...

  17. Construction Guidelines and Specifications. Modifying the Existing Campus Building for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotler, Stephen Richard

    To address problems that the campus faces when attempting to make facility modifications that meet federal handicap accessibility requirements, this guidebook gives guidance on requirements and methods of "retrofitting" that meet the mobility needs of the disabled. Seven chapters discuss modifications to site, entrance, doors, interior…

  18. Review Of Existing Facilities: Shock Tunnels, Part of AIAA Short Course On Aerothermodynamic Facilities and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This review is divided into two main sections. The first section described the various types of shock tunnel facilities - reflected shock tunnels, non-reflected shock tunnels and expansion tubes/tunnels. Driver technology is then described, followed by a discussion of the performance obtainable from various driver-driven combinations. A survey of a number of facilities is then presented. The second part of the review deals with details of the operation of the facilities. Operation of combustion drivers, electrically heated drivers and piston compression drivers is discussed in some detail. Main diaphragm break techniques are discussed, with particular attention being paid to maintaining the integrity of the diaphragm petals. Secondary diaphragm techniques are discussed. Phenomena which limit test time are discussed and a number of techniques to increase test time are presented. Contamination of the flow with material ablated from the wall is discussed along with the relative suitability of various materials for lining the tubes and nozzle. Finally, boundary layer effects in shock tunnels and expansion tubes are discussed.

  19. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When can access to IRR transportation facilities be... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.813 When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted? IRR transportation facilities must be open and available for public...

  20. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When can access to IRR transportation facilities be... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.813 When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted? IRR transportation facilities must be open and available for public...

  1. 50 CFR 85.45 - Public access to facilities and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public access to facilities and... GRANT PROGRAM Conditions on Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.45 Public access to facilities and maintenance. All recreational vessels must have access to pumpout and dump stations funded under this grant...

  2. ADA Compliance and the Accessibility of Physical Activity Facilities in Western Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Spaziani, Marc D.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated how compliant physical activity facilities in western Oregon were with regard to the Americans with Disabilities Act's mandate regarding accessibility of public facilities for all people. Data from direct observations and physical measurements at 50 physical activity facilities indicated that no facility was 100-percent compliant. The…

  3. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  4. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  5. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  6. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  7. 78 FR 67303 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1191 RIN 3014-AA22 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities; Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility...

  8. 76 FR 4244 - Regulation and Enforcement; Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Regulation and Enforcement; Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf--Acquire a Lease... renewable energy regulatory provisions that pertain to noncompetitive acquisition of leases, published...

  9. 75 FR 67993 - Hydropower Resource Assessment at Existing Reclamation Facilities-Draft Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-27908] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Hydropower Resource... public review and comment the ``Hydropower Resource Assessment at Existing Reclamation Facilities'' (HRA) Draft Report. The HRA is an assessment of the economic and technical potential for...

  10. 42 CFR 52b.11 - What are the requirements for acquisition and modernization of existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What are the requirements for acquisition and modernization of existing facilities? 52b.11 Section 52b.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.11 What are...

  11. 42 CFR 52b.11 - What are the requirements for acquisition and modernization of existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What are the requirements for acquisition and modernization of existing facilities? 52b.11 Section 52b.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.11 What are...

  12. 42 CFR 52b.11 - What are the requirements for acquisition and modernization of existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What are the requirements for acquisition and modernization of existing facilities? 52b.11 Section 52b.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.11 What are...

  13. 42 CFR 52b.11 - What are the requirements for acquisition and modernization of existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What are the requirements for acquisition and modernization of existing facilities? 52b.11 Section 52b.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.11 What are...

  14. 42 CFR 52b.11 - What are the requirements for acquisition and modernization of existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the requirements for acquisition and modernization of existing facilities? 52b.11 Section 52b.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.11 What are...

  15. Restructuring an Existing Token Economy in a Psychiatric Facility for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James W.; Tingstrom, Daniel H.; Doggett, R. Anthony; Carlyon, William D.

    2001-01-01

    Restructuring an existing token economy (TE) in a psychiatric facility for children led to increased point-earning and decreased daily trips to seclusion. Restructuring occurred through operationalization of target behaviors and reduction of time between receipt of reinforcers and opportunity to exchange tokens. Results suggest changes in basic…

  16. 39 CFR 254.1 - Adoption of U.S. Access Board Standards as Postal Service Standards of Facility Accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Barriers Act (ABA) “Standards for Facility Accessibility,” the following sections of 36 CFR part 1191... Barriers Act, Scoping (which contains ABA Chapter 1, Application and Administration, and ABA Chapter...

  17. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  18. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Within Industry 3004.470 Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities,...

  19. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Accessibility of Airport Facilities § 382.51 What requirements...

  20. A Review of Avian Monitoring and Mitigation Information at Existing Utility-Scale Solar Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, Leroy J.; Rollins, Katherine E.; Smith, Karen P.; LaGory, Kirk E.; Sinclair, Karin; Turchi, Craig; Wendelin, Tim; Souder, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    There are two basic types of solar energy technology: photovoltaic and concentrating solar power. As the number of utility-scale solar energy facilities using these technologies is expected to increase in the United States, so are the potential impacts on wildlife and their habitats. Recent attention is on the risk of fatality to birds. Understanding the current rates of avian mortality and existing monitoring requirements is an important first step in developing science-based mitigation and minimization protocols. The resulting information also allows a comparison of the avian mortality rates of utility-scale solar energy facilities with those from other technologies and sources, as well as the identification of data gaps and research needs. This report will present and discuss the current state of knowledge regarding avian issues at utility-scale solar energy facilities.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico existing environmental analyses bounding environmental test facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Rodney A.; Bailey-White, Brenda E.; Cantwell, Amber

    2009-06-01

    This report identifies current environmental operating parameters for the various test and support facilities at SNL/NM. The intent of this report is solely to provide the limits which bound the facilities' operations. Understanding environmental limits is important to maximizing the capabilities and working within the existing constraints of each facility, and supports the decision-making process in meeting customer requests, cost and schedule planning, modifications to processes, future commitments, and use of resources. Working within environmental limits ensures that mission objectives will be met in a manner that protects human health and the environment. It should be noted that, in addition to adhering to the established limits, other approvals and permits may be required for specific projects.

  2. Existence and accessibility of igniting states in a tokamak inferred from its performance in tritiumless discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Carretta, U.R.; Minardi, E.

    1988-09-01

    The conditions for the existence and accessibility of ignited or subignited deuterium-tritium states are discussed in terms of the performance of the thermonuclear device in tritiumless discharges. The discussion includes the effects of the thermal instability of both the marginally igniting states and the nonstationary states in the start-up phase. These effects are an integral part of the problem of the accessibility to ignition under reliable conditions. Typical examples taken from the next generation of igniting tokamaks are discussed. The necessity of allowing sufficient excursion of the plasma column for a stable drive to ignition by feedback on the vertical field is underlined.

  3. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs.

    PubMed

    Pomp, S; Bartlett, D T; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Röttger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-10-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe.

  4. Survey of existing underground openings for in-situ experimental facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, H.; Graf, A.; Strisower, B.; Korbin, G.

    1981-07-01

    In an earlier project, a literature search identified 60 underground openings in crystalline rock capable of providing access for an in-situ experimental facility to develop geochemical and hydrological techniques for evaluating sites for radioactive waste isolation. As part of the current project, discussions with state geologists, owners, and operators narrowed the original group to 14. Three additional sites in volcanic rock and one site in granite were also identified. Site visits and application of technical criteria, including the geologic and hydrologic settings and depth, extent of the rock unit, condition, and accessibility of underground workings, determined four primary candidate sites: the Helms Pumped Storage Project in grandiodorite of the Sierra Nevada, California; the Tungsten Queen Mine in Precambrian granodiorite of the North Carolina Piedmont; the Mount Hope Mine in Precambrian granite and gneiss of northern New Jersey; and the Minnamax Project in the Duluth gabbro complex of northern Minnesota.

  5. 39 CFR 255.8 - Access to postal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES TO POSTAL SERVICE PROGRAMS, ACTIVITIES, FACILITIES, AND ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY... meet ABA design standards is not required, a discretionary alteration may be made on a...

  6. The accessibility of substance abuse treatment facilities in the United States for persons with disabilities.

    PubMed

    West, Steven L

    2007-07-01

    This study assessed the accessibility of a nationally representative sample of substance abuse treatment facilities in the United States for persons with disabilities (PWDs). A stratified random sample of 159 substance abuse treatment facilities in 40 states completed a survey regarding physical accessibility and the provision of services that could enhance the ability to serve individuals with disabilities. Most responding facilities self-reported a variety of barriers to physical accessibility, as well as the lack of services and physical accommodations for persons with sensory limitations. Such widespread inaccessibility may be a factor that promotes the low representation of PWDs in the treatment population.

  7. Access to Mammography Facilities and Detection of Breast Cancer by Screening Mammography: A GIS Approach.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Selina; Price, James H; Dignan, Mark; Rahman, Saleh; Lindquist, Peter S; Jordan, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to examine the association between access to mammography facilities and utilization of screening mammography in an urban population. METHODS: Data on female breast cancer cases were obtained from an extensive mammography surveillance project. Distance to mammography facilities was measured by using GIS, which was followed by measuring geographical access to mammography facilities using Floating Catchment Area (FCA) method (considering all available facilities within an arbitrary radius from the woman's residence by using Arc GIS 9.0 software). RESULTS: Of 2,024 women, 91.4% were Caucasian; age ranged from 25 to 98 years; most (95%) were non-Hispanic in origin. Logistic regression found age, family history, hormone replacement therapy, physician recommendation, and breast cancer stage at diagnosis to be significant predictors of having had a previous mammogram. Women having higher access to mammography facilities were less likely to have had a previous mammogram compared to women who had low access, considering all the facilities within 10 miles (OR=0.41, CI=0.22-0.76), 30 miles (OR=0.52, CI=0.29-0.91) and 40 miles (OR=0.51, CI=0.28-0.92) radiuses. CONCLUSIONS: Physical distance to mammography facilities does not necessarily predict utilization of mammogram and greater access does not assure greater utilizations, due to constraints imposed by socio economic and cultural barriers. Future studies should focus on measuring access to mammography facilities capturing a broader dimension of access considering qualitative aspect of facilities, as well as other travel impedances.

  8. Spatial accessibility to specific sport facilities and corresponding sport practice: the RECORD Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity is considered as a major component of a healthy lifestyle. However, few studies have examined the relationships between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and sport practice with a sufficient degree of specificity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the spatial accessibility to specific types of sports facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports after carefully controlling for various individual socio-demographic characteristics and neighborhood socioeconomic variables. Methods Data from the RECORD Study involving 7290 participants recruited in 2007–2008, aged 30–79 years, and residing in the Paris metropolitan area were analyzed. Four categories of sports were studied: team sports, racket sports, swimming and related activities, and fitness. Spatial accessibility to sport facilities was measured with two complementary approaches that both take into account the street network (distance to the nearest facility and count of facilities around the dwelling). Associations between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports were assessed using multilevel logistic regression after adjusting for individual and contextual characteristics. Results High individual education and high household income were associated with the practice of racket sports, swimming or related activities, and fitness over the previous 7 days. The spatial accessibility to swimming pools was associated with swimming and related sports, even after adjustment for individual/contextual factors. The spatial accessibility to facilities was not related to the practice of other sports. High neighborhood income was associated with the practice of a racket sport and fitness. Conclusions Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that integrates educational, financial, and geographical aspects. Our work supports the evidence that strategies to increase participation in sport

  9. 43 CFR 2.65 - Requests for notification of existence of records and for access to records: Appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests for notification of existence of records and for access to records: Appeals. 2.65 Section 2.65 Public Lands: Interior Office of the... notification of existence of records and for access to records: Appeals. (a) Right of appeal. Except...

  10. 25 CFR 700.281 - Requests for notification of existence of records and for access to records: Appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requests for notification of existence of records and for access to records: Appeals. 700.281 Section 700.281 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN... existence of records and for access to records: Appeals. (a) Right of appeal. If an individual has...

  11. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or ANSI A117.1(1980) (American National Standards Specification for... covering those elements or spaces are contained in UFAS or ANSI A117.1, as applicable. (c) (1)...

  12. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or ANSI A117.1(1980) (American National Standards Specification for... covering those elements or spaces are contained in UFAS or ANSI A117.1, as applicable. (c) (1)...

  13. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or ANSI A117.1(1980) (American National Standards Specification for... covering those elements or spaces are contained in UFAS or ANSI A117.1, as applicable. (c) (1)...

  14. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or ANSI A117.1(1980) (American National Standards Specification for... covering those elements or spaces are contained in UFAS or ANSI A117.1, as applicable. (c) (1)...

  15. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or ANSI A117.1(1980) (American National Standards Specification for... covering those elements or spaces are contained in UFAS or ANSI A117.1, as applicable. (c) (1)...

  16. Charter Schools: Limited Access to Facility Financing. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaul, Marnie S.

    This report determines the degree to which charter schools have access to traditional public school facility financing, and whether alternative sources of facility financing are available to charter schools. Further discussed are potential options generally available to the federal government if it were to assume a larger role in charter school…

  17. 10 CFR 1016.8 - Approval for processing access permittees for security facility approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 1016.8 Approval for processing access permittees for security facility... Restricted Data at any location in connection with its permit shall promptly request a DOE security facility... proposed security procedures and controls for the protection of Restricted Data, including a floor plan...

  18. Existing FDA pathways have potential to ensure early access to, and appropriate use of, specialty drugs.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Tan, Yongtian Tina; Darrow, Jonathan J; Avorn, Jerry

    2014-10-01

    Specialty drugs are notable among prescription drugs in that they offer the possibility of substantial clinical improvement, come with important risks of adverse events and mortality, can be complex to manufacture or administer, and are usually extremely costly. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) plays a critical role in ensuring that patients who could benefit from specialty drugs have access to them in a timely fashion. In this article we review the different strategies that the FDA can use to approve and influence the post-approval prescribing of specialty drugs. When specialty drugs show promise in early clinical trials, the FDA can expedite the drugs' availability to patients through expanded access programs and expedited approval pathways that speed regulatory authorization. After approval, to ensure that specialty drugs are directed to the patients who are most likely to benefit from them, the FDA can limit the scope of the drugs' indications, encourage the development of companion diagnostic tests to indicate which patients should receive the drugs, or require that manufacturers subject them to Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies to ensure that their use is appropriately limited to a restricted population that is aware of the drugs' risks and benefits. Implementing these existing regulatory approaches can promote timely patient access to specialty drugs while preventing expensive and potentially inappropriate overuse.

  19. Self-Access English Learning Facility: A Report of Student Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gromik, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study research conducted at a Self-Access Learning Center (SALC) from 2009 to 2012. Over these four years data was collected through a survey from over 6000 participants regarding their access and use of the self facility and resources. The article reports on various on-site learning environments and the influence this…

  20. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  1. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  2. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  3. Building collaboration tools and access to on-line facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.; Sachs, S.

    1996-11-01

    Network-based facilities will allow researchers at different locations to collaborate on experiments as if they all were together in the same laboratory. The expected value of these geographically distributed environments includes substantially increased effectiveness in doing science, and an enabling capability for analytical and high-value production use by industry. The Distributed, Collaboratory Experiment Environments (DCEE) Program consists of four projects that were established to build prototype remote experiment and collaborative environments. The work undertaken in this project represents some of the research and development of the mechanisms and infrastructure required to make collaboratories a reality. Some of these mechanisms have already been developed. Several other mechanisms, such as data dissemination, resource management for the sharing of experiment control, safety and security, electronic notebooks, elements of telepresence, and integrated user interfaces need further research and development. The pilot application for these collaborative tools is the Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamline 7.0 at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The ALS is a particle accelerator and is a source of very high brilliance soft X-ray beams. One experimental facility is the Spectro-Microscopy Facility Beamline 7.0. Through this project, the Spectro-Microscopy Facility will be opened up to users from a wide range of organizations. The goal is to build software that will not only put the ALS Beamline 7.0 on-line, but will also serve as building blocks for future collaboratory development.

  4. Regulatory experience in applying a radiological environmental protection framework for existing and planned nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Mihok, S; Thompson, P

    2012-01-01

    Frameworks and methods for the radiological protection of non-human biota have been evolving rapidly at the International Commission on Radiological Protection and through various European initiatives. The International Atomic Energy Agency has incorporated a requirement for environmental protection in the latest revision of its Basic Safety Standards. In Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission has been legally obligated to prevent unreasonable risk to the environment since 2000. Licensees have therefore been meeting generic legal requirements to demonstrate adequate control of releases of radioactive substances for the protection of both people and biota for many years. In the USA, in addition to the generic requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Energy facilities have also had to comply with specific dose limits after a standard assessment methodology was finalised in 2002. Canadian regulators developed a similar framework for biota dose assessment through a regulatory assessment under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act in the late 1990s. Since then, this framework has been applied extensively to satisfy legal requirements under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and the Nuclear Safety and Control Act. After approximately a decade of experience in applying these methods, it is clear that simple methods are fit for purpose, and can be used for making regulatory decisions for existing and planned nuclear facilities.

  5. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Boat Manufacturing Facilities 1 Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. VVVV, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities As specified in § 63.5695, you must comply...

  6. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required...

  7. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in §§ 63.5800...

  8. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required...

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in §§ 63.5800...

  10. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required...

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Boat Manufacturing Facilities 1 Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. VVVV, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities As specified in § 63.5695, you must comply by the dates in...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Boat Manufacturing Facilities 1 Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. VVVV, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities As specified in § 63.5695, you must comply by the dates in...

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Boat Manufacturing Facilities 1 Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. VVVV, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities As specified in § 63.5695, you must comply...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Boat Manufacturing Facilities 1 Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. VVVV, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities As specified in § 63.5695, you must comply...

  15. Evolution of area access safety training required for gaining access to Space Shuttle launch and landing facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willams, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Assuring personnel and equipment are fully protected during the Space Shuttle launch and landing operations has been a primary concern of NASA and its associated contractors since the inception of the program. A key factor in support of this policy has been the area access safety training requirements for badging of employees assigned to work on Space Shuttle Launch and Facilities. This requirement was targeted for possible cost savings and the transition of physical on-site walkdowns to the use of television tapes has realized program cost savings while continuing to fully satisfy the area access safety training requirements.

  16. A public aid clinic prototype: utilizing a dental hygiene educational facility to increase access to care.

    PubMed

    Maurizio, Sandra J; DeMattei, Ronda; Meyer, Jennifer; Cotner, Danna

    2003-01-01

    Few dentists in a rural Midwestern community participate in providing oral health care to public aid recipients. In response, faculty at a baccalaureate degree dental hygiene program located at Southern illinois University, Carbondale (SIUC) proposed, developed, and implemented the Heartland Dental Clinic to serve Medicaid participants. The unique program utilizes existing facilities, staff, and students to provide comprehensive oral health care to underserved populations. The state awarded a small grant to cover start-up costs. Two dental units were upgraded with fiber optics to allow restorative procedures. Dental hygiene students provide intake examinations and preventive care, while a staff dentist provides restorative care, dentures, and examinations. Dental technology students and faculty fabricate prostheses. A part-time clinic manager facilitates communication, patient scheduling, and billing. Two local Rotary Club members volunteer as receptionists for the clinic on the one evening per week that the clinic operates. The Rotary Club purchased educational pamphlets, a television/VCR, videotapes, and two signs for the clinic. By locating the clinic in the existing SIUC facility and utilizing dental hygiene students, a staff dentist, volunteer receptionists and dentists, student workers, and health care management interns, the clinic overhead costs have been kept to a minimum. The clinic provides a unique opportunity for dental hygiene students to experience firsthand scheduling, billing, and treating public aid patients while providing patients with an additional source for oral health care. The Heartland Dental Clinic model represents a cost effective method for increasing oral health access to underserved populations while also benefiting students in an educational program.

  17. 40 CFR 63.11601 - What are the standards for new and existing paints and allied products manufacturing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... existing paints and allied products manufacturing facilities? 63.11601 Section 63.11601 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Area Sources: Paints and Allied Products Manufacturing Standards, Monitoring, and Compliance Requirements § 63.11601 What are the standards for new and existing paints and...

  18. 40 CFR 63.11601 - What are the standards for new and existing paints and allied products manufacturing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... existing paints and allied products manufacturing facilities? 63.11601 Section 63.11601 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Area Sources: Paints and Allied Products Manufacturing Standards, Monitoring, and Compliance Requirements § 63.11601 What are the standards for new and existing paints and...

  19. Mach Stability Improvements Using an Existing Second Throat Capability at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Balakrishna, Sundareswara; Walker, Eric L.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent data quality improvements at the National Transonic Facility have an intended goal of reducing the Mach number variation in a data point to within plus or minus 0.0005, with the ultimate goal of reducing the data repeatability of the drag coefficient for full-span subsonic transport models at transonic speeds to within half a drag count. This paper will discuss the Mach stability improvements achieved through the use of an existing second throat capability at the NTF to create a minimum area at the end of the test section. These improvements were demonstrated using both the NASA Common Research Model and the NTF Pathfinder-I model in recent experiments. Sonic conditions at the throat were verified using sidewall static pressure data. The Mach variation levels from both experiments in the baseline tunnel configuration and the choked tunnel configuration will be presented and the correlation between Mach number and drag will also be examined. Finally, a brief discussion is given on the consequences of using the second throat in its location at the end of the test section.

  20. Mach Stability Improvements Using an Existing Second Throat Capability at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent data quality improvements at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) have an intended goal of reducing the Mach number variation in a data point to within unit vector A plus or minus 0.0005, with the ultimate goal of reducing the data repeatability of the drag coefficient for full-span subsonic transport models at transonic speeds to within half of a drag count. This paper will discuss the Mach stability improvements achieved through the use of an existing second throat capability at the NTF to create a minimum area at the end of the test section. These improvements were demonstrated using both the NASA Common Research Model and the NTF Pathfinder-I model in recent experiments. Sonic conditions at the throat were verified using sidewall static pressure data. The Mach variation levels from both experiments in the baseline tunnel configuration and the choked tunnel configuration will be presented. Finally, a brief discussion is given on the consequences of using the second throat in its location at the end of the test section.

  1. The EcoData Retriever: Improving Access to Existing Ecological Data

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Benjamin D.; White, Ethan P.

    2013-01-01

    Ecological research relies increasingly on the use of previously collected data. Use of existing datasets allows questions to be addressed more quickly, more generally, and at larger scales than would otherwise be possible. As a result of large-scale data collection efforts, and an increasing emphasis on data publication by journals and funding agencies, a large and ever-increasing amount of ecological data is now publicly available via the internet. Most ecological datasets do not adhere to any agreed-upon standards in format, data structure or method of access. Some may be broken up across multiple files, stored in compressed archives, and violate basic principles of data structure. As a result acquiring and utilizing available datasets can be a time consuming and error prone process. The EcoData Retriever is an extensible software framework which automates the tasks of discovering, downloading, and reformatting ecological data files for storage in a local data file or relational database. The automation of these tasks saves significant time for researchers and substantially reduces the likelihood of errors resulting from manual data manipulation and unfamiliarity with the complexities of individual datasets. PMID:23785456

  2. 36 CFR 1008.16 - Requests for notification of existence of records and for access to records: Appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requests for notification of existence of records and for access to records: Appeals. 1008.16 Section 1008.16 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST REQUESTS UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT § 1008.16 Requests for notification of existence...

  3. 12 CFR 792.56 - Notice of existence of records, access decisions and disclosure of requested information; time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of existence of records, access decisions and disclosure of requested information; time limits. 792.56 Section 792.56 Banks and Banking...; SECURITY PROCEDURES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION The Privacy Act § 792.56 Notice of existence of...

  4. Energy Conservation in School Facilities. Energy Conservation in Existing School Facilities: An Overview. Energy Conservation Materials Package Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Interstate Energy Conservation Leadership.

    School energy-saving strategies can be developed and implemented at three levels: (1) programmatic--the educational program and schedule of activities taking place at the school, (2) operational--how the facility and its supporting systems are run to house and support these educational activities, and (3) physical plant and its operating system.…

  5. Maryland Public Library Services for the Handicapped. A Survey for Handicapped Accessibility to Public Library Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Library Development and Services.

    Prepared as a part of an ongoing effort to make Maryland public libraries readily accessible to the handicapped, this directory identifies equipment, services, and facilities available to library users who are confined to wheel chairs and others who have difficulty with steps or stairs. Supplied by the administrators of Maryland's 24 public…

  6. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations §...

  7. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations §...

  8. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  9. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  10. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  11. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  12. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-11-13

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas.

  13. 33 CFR 6.04-5 - Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preventing access of persons..., AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES General Provisions § 6.04-5 Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities. The Captain of the Port may prevent any person, article,...

  14. 33 CFR 6.04-5 - Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Preventing access of persons..., AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES General Provisions § 6.04-5 Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities. The Captain of the Port may prevent any person, article,...

  15. 33 CFR 6.04-5 - Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Preventing access of persons..., AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES General Provisions § 6.04-5 Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities. The Captain of the Port may prevent any person, article,...

  16. 30 CFR 250.153 - Do I have to rename an existing facility or well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General Naming and Identifying... do not have to rename facilities installed and wells drilled before January 27, 2000, unless...

  17. Assessment of automated access to existing federal marine pollution data and information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    The objective of the Ocean Pollution Data and Information Network (OPDIN) under Section 8 of Public Law 95-273 is to improve the dissemination of information concerning Federal marine pollution-related projects. One means of improving dissemination is developing direct access and establishing a working knowledge with those systems that have automated data and information files. The Central Coordination and Referral Office (CCRO) maintains a description of the systems and services with pollution interests that are available from eleven Federal organizations. These systems and services range from completely automated, user-accessible systems of national interest, to non-automated services for retrieval of hard-copy materials and products of regional interest. This report focuses on the present CCRO access capabilities to those systems and identifies additional systems with potential access by the CCRO and its Network participants.

  18. RADIATION ACCESS ZONE AND VENTILATION CONFINEMENT ZONE CRITERIA FOR THE MGR SURFACE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Padula

    2000-09-13

    The objectives of this technical report are to: (1) Establish the criteria for Radiation Access Zone (RAZ) designation. (2) Establish the criteria for the Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) designation. The scope will be to formulate the RAZ and VCZ zoning designation for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface facilities and to apply the zoning designations to the current Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB) configurations.

  19. Pre-Existing Venous Calcification Prior to Dialysis Vascular Access Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timmy; Safdar, Nida; Mistry, Meenakshi J; Wang, Yang; Chauhan, Vibha; Campos, Begoña; Munda, Rino; Cornea, Virgilius; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification is present in arterial vessels used for dialysis vascular access creation prior to surgical creation. Calcification in the veins used to create a new vascular access has not previously been documented. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of venous calcification in samples collected at the time of vascular access creation. 67 vein samples were studied. A von Kossa stain was performed to quantify calcification. A semi-quantitative scoring system from 0–4+ was used to quantify the percentage positive area for calcification as a fraction of total area (0=0; 1+ = 1–10%; 2+ =11–25%; 3+ = 26–50%; 4+ >50% positive). 22/67(33%) samples showed evidence of venous calcification. Histologic examination showed varying degrees of calcification within each cell layer. Among the subset of patients with calcification, 4/22 (18%), 19/22 (86%), 22/22 (100%), and 7/22 (32%) had calcification present within the endothelium, intima, media, and adventitia, respectively. The mean semi-quantitative scores of the 22 samples with calcification were 0.18±0.08, 1.2±0.14, 1.6±0.13, and 0.36±0.12 for the endothelium, intima, media, and adventitia, respectively. Our results demonstrate that vascular calcification is present within veins used to create new dialysis vascular access, and located predominately within the neointimal and medial layers. PMID:22452638

  20. Design of a limited-access facility and safety program for a genetic toxicology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Inmon, J; Vaughan, T; Morris, J

    1985-06-01

    A limited-access facility has been designed as a result of the need for laboratories for testing hazardous materials found in the environment. The facility design features include room air flow and filtration, hood types, sink design and placement, design of countertops, type of flooring and wall sealant, and traffic flow within the laboratories. These laboratories required the diversity to handle weighing of stock hazardous materials, preparation and handling of aliquots, maintenance of dosed animals as well as sterile conditions required for tissue culture and continuous cell culture methods. A safety and health program was also developed which included specific dress (e.g., scrub suit, TYVEK jumpsuit, gloves, safety glasses and safety shoes), safety advisory group, safety response group, medical monitoring program and training of current and new staff members. The design and use of the facility are continuously reevaluated and changes are made as necessitated by either research needs or improved safety methods.

  1. An Energy Conservation Retrofit Process for Existing Public and Institutional Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiedeman, Thomas V.

    This manual was developed to provide assistance to public officials first considering energy conservation in existing public buildings. The manual focuses on management decisions which must be made in implementing energy conservation programs for existing buildings. It provides assistance in developing a plan of attack, establishing schedules,…

  2. Evaluating Alternative Methodologies for Capturing As-Built Building Information Models (BIM) For Existing Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Scale Definitions (NASA TLX 2003). Title Endpoints Descriptions Mental demand Low/High How much mental and perceptual activity was required (e.g...for realistic, scaled models. • Limitations o Full facility model/photos requires scanning each room o COBIE data capturing to be accomplished...Ultra-Mobile PC Panasonic Toughbook U1 Fully Rugged UMPC $2,499 Each X Panasonic U1 (http://catalog2. panas onic.com) Additional

  3. The integration of microgravity science experiments into shared or previously existing experiment facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer-Peckham, M. S.; Mccarley, K. S.

    1991-01-01

    The overall flow for integrating a sample into an experiment facility, specifically materials science is discussed using the Crystal Growth Furnace as an example. A typical preflight timeline for an experiment is discussed, including identification of all documentation and hardware deliveries. Each of the items presented is discussed in detail including the experiment requirements document, the announcement opportunity response, the experiment specific equipment, safety reviews, mission plan, and hardware integration plan. These items are addressed both individualy and with respect to their relevance to the program as a whole.

  4. Overview of existing regulations for ventilation requirements of enclosed vehicular parking facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Krarti, M.; Ayari, A.M.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current standards and regulations regarding the ventilation in enclosed parking facilities in the US and other countries. First, the paper discusses the emission rates of motor vehicle pollutants and their health effects. In particular, typical emission rates for different vehicle and fuel types are presented to highlight the effect of various parameters on the ventilation rate requirements for parking garages. In addition, the paper provides a brief description of some of the common ventilation problems reported in the literature for enclosed parking garages.

  5. 29 CFR 4902.3 - Procedures for determining existence of and requesting access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PERTAINING TO INDIVIDUALS UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT § 4902.3 Procedures for determining existence of and... mailing address and location, can be obtained on PBGC's Web site, http://www.pbgc.gov. (b) Each request... prominently state the words, “Privacy Act Request.” If this information is insufficient to enable the PBGC...

  6. 29 CFR 4902.3 - Procedures for determining existence of and requesting access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PERTAINING TO INDIVIDUALS UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT § 4902.3 Procedures for determining existence of and... mailing address and location, can be obtained on PBGC's Web site, http://www.pbgc.gov. (b) Each request... prominently state the words, “Privacy Act Request.” If this information is insufficient to enable the PBGC...

  7. 29 CFR 4902.3 - Procedures for determining existence of and requesting access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PERTAINING TO INDIVIDUALS UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT § 4902.3 Procedures for determining existence of and... mailing address and location, can be obtained on PBGC's Web site, http://www.pbgc.gov. (b) Each request... prominently state the words, “Privacy Act Request.” If this information is insufficient to enable the PBGC...

  8. 9 CFR 320.4 - Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling. 320.4 Section 320.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY...) of this chapter) also must be afforded any necessary facilities (other than reproduction...

  9. 9 CFR 381.178 - Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling. 381.178 Section 381.178 Animals and Animal Products FOOD... necessary facilities (other than reproduction equipment) for the examination and copying of records and...

  10. 45 CFR 707.8 - Physical access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... facilities, directing users to a location at which they can obtain information about accessible facilities... § 707.8 Physical access. (a) Discrimination prohibited. Except as otherwise provided in this section, no... facilities-program access—(1) Existing facilities defined. For the purpose of this section,...

  11. Estimating spatial accessibility to facilities on the regional scale: an extended commuting-based interaction potential model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the study of the relationships between individual health-related behaviours (e.g. food intake and physical activity) and measurements of spatial accessibility to the associated facilities (e.g. food outlets and sport facilities). The aim of this study is to propose measurements of spatial accessibility to facilities on the regional scale, using aggregated data. We first used a potential accessibility model that partly makes it possible to overcome the limitations of the most frequently used indices such as the count of opportunities within a given neighbourhood. We then propose an extended model in order to take into account both home and work-based accessibility for a commuting population. Results Potential accessibility estimation provides a very different picture of the accessibility levels experienced by the population than the more classical "number of opportunities per census tract" index. The extended model for commuters increases the overall accessibility levels but this increase differs according to the urbanisation level. Strongest increases are observed in some rural municipalities with initial low accessibility levels. Distance to major urban poles seems to play an essential role. Conclusions Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that should integrate some aspects of travel behaviour. Our work supports the evidence that the choice of appropriate accessibility indices including both residential and non-residential environmental features is necessary. Such models have potential implications for providing relevant information to policy-makers in the field of public health. PMID:21219597

  12. 40 CFR 125.97 - As an owner or operator of a Phase II existing facility, what records must I keep and what...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in accordance with § 125.98(b)(5). Effective Date Note: At 72 FR 37109, July 9, 2007, § 125.97 was... existing facility, what records must I keep and what information must I report? 125.97 Section 125.97... Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the Act § 125.97 As an...

  13. 36 CFR 1250.8 - Does NARA provide access to all the executive branch records housed at NARA facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does NARA provide access to... AVAILABILITY AND USE OF FEDERAL RECORDS General Information About Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Requests § 1250.8 Does NARA provide access to all the executive branch records housed at NARA facilities? (a)...

  14. Reconsidering access: park facilities and neighborhood disamenities in New York City.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Christopher C; Purciel, Marnie; Bader, Michael; Quinn, James W; Lovasi, Gina; Neckerman, Kathryn M; Rundle, Andrew G

    2011-04-01

    With increasing concern about rising rates of obesity, public health researchers have begun to examine the availability of parks and other spaces for physical activity, particularly in cities, to assess whether access to parks reduces the risk of obesity. Much of the research in this field has shown that proximity to parks may support increased physical activity in urban environments; however, as yet, there has been limited consideration of environmental impediments or disamenities that might influence individuals' perceptions or usage of public recreation opportunities. Prior research suggests that neighborhood disamenities, for instance crime, pedestrian safety, and noxious land uses, might dissuade people from using parks or recreational facilities and vary by neighborhood composition. Motivated by such research, this study estimates the relationship between neighborhood compositional characteristics and measures of park facilities, controlling for variation in neighborhood disamenities, using geographic information systems (GIS) data for New York City parks and employing both kernel density estimation and distance measures. The central finding is that attention to neighborhood disamenities can appreciably alter the relationship between neighborhood composition and spatial access to parks. Policy efforts to enhance the recreational opportunities in urban areas should expand beyond a focus on availability to consider also the hazards and disincentives that may influence park usage.

  15. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-01-01

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas. PMID:26580637

  16. An observational program to search for radio signals from extraterrestrial intelligence through the use of existing facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    It is argued that a substantial portion of the capability for detecting microwave signals from extraterrestrial civilizations lies not in the application of ever larger antenna collecting areas but rather in the application of millions or billions of simultaneous frequency-channel observations combined with rapid and powerful data processing techniques. The application of these methods to existing facilities is discussed in terms of a program of modest expense and duration which will seek to discover certain classes of extraterrestrial signals of intelligent origin while defining boundaries to the search problem throughout the range of interest. This program will investigate radio-astronomical phenomena of interest and simultaneously define the background of environmental radiation in order to determine physical limitations on both the search strategies and the potential for deep-space communications. Signal parameters that must be determined are examined along with the potential of existing radio-astronomical facilities for detecting narrow-band signals. A seven-year program is described which will carry out a search for extraterrestrial intelligence over 80% of the sky and over the entire frequency range from 1 to 25 GHz with a sensitivity limit varying from 10 to the -21st power W/sq cm at the lowest frequencies to 10 to the -19th power W/sq cm at the higher frequencies.

  17. A Unique, Optically Accessible Flame Tube Facility for Lean Combustor Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Locke, Randy J.; Wey, Chowen C.; Bianco, Jean

    1995-01-01

    A facility that allows interrogation of combusting flows by advanced diagnostic methods and instrumentation has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. An optically accessible flame tube combustor is described which has high temperature, pressure, and air flow capabilities. The windows in the combustor measure 3.8 cm axially by 5.1 cm radially, providing 67% optical access to the 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm cross section flow chamber. Advanced gas analysis instrumentation is available through a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer system (GC/MS), which has on-line capability for heavy hydrocarbon measurement with resolution to the parts per billion level. The instrumentation allows one to study combusting flows and combustor subcomponents, such as fuel injectors and air swirlers. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) can measure unstable combustion species, which cannot be obtained with traditional gas sampling. This type of data is especially useful to combustion modellers. The optical access allows measurements to have high spatial and temporal resolution. GC/MS data and PLIF images of OH- are presented from experiments using a lean direct injection (LDI) combustor burning Jet-A fuel at inlet temperatures ranging from 810 K to 866 K, combustor pressures up to 1380 kPa, and equivalence ratios from 0.41 to 0.59.

  18. 40 CFR 63.5692 - How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new source or an existing source?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I know if my boat manufacturing... Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing What the Subpart Covers § 63.5692 How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new source or an existing source? (a) A boat manufacturing facility is a new source if...

  19. 40 CFR 63.5692 - How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new source or an existing source?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I know if my boat manufacturing... Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing What the Subpart Covers § 63.5692 How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new source or an existing source? (a) A boat manufacturing facility is a new source if...

  20. 40 CFR 63.5692 - How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new source or an existing source?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I know if my boat manufacturing... Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing What the Subpart Covers § 63.5692 How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new source or an existing source? (a) A boat manufacturing facility is a new source if...

  1. Reproductive rights denied: the Hyde Amendment and access to abortion for Native American women using Indian health service facilities.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Shaye Beverly

    2014-10-01

    Restrictions on the use of federal funds to provide abortions have limited the access to abortion services for Native American women receiving care at Indian Health Service facilities. Current data suggest that the vast majority of Indian Health Service facilities are unequipped to provide abortions under any circumstances. Native American women experience disproportionately high rates of sexual assault and unintended pregnancy. Hyde Amendment restrictions systematically infringe on the reproductive rights of Native American women and present a pressing public health policy concern.

  2. Assessing the population-level impact of vouchers on access to health facility delivery for women in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Obare, Francis; Warren, Charlotte; Abuya, Timothy; Askew, Ian; Bellows, Ben

    2014-02-01

    Although available evidence indicates that vouchers improve service utilization among the target populations, we do not know whether increased utilization results from improved access (new clients who would not have used services without the voucher) or from shifting clients from non-accredited to contracted service providers. This paper examines whether the safe motherhood voucher program in Kenya is associated with improved access to health facility delivery using information on births within two years preceding the survey in voucher and comparison sites. Data were collected in 2010-2011 and in 2012 among 2933 and 3094 women aged 15-49 years reporting 962 and 1494 births within two years before the respective surveys. Analysis entails cross-tabulations and estimation of multilevel random-intercept logit models. The results show that the proportion of births occurring at home declined by more than 10 percentage points while the proportion of births delivered in health facilities increased by a similar margin over time in voucher sites. The increase in facility-based births occurred in both public and private health facilities. There was also a significant increase in the likelihood of facility-based delivery (odds ratios [OR]: 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.40-2.98 in the 2006 voucher arm; OR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.22-2.43 in the 2010-2011 voucher arm) in voucher sites over time. In contrast, there were no significant changes in the likelihood of facility-based delivery in the comparison arm over time. These findings suggest that the voucher program contributed to improved access to institutional delivery by shifting births from home to health facilities. However, available evidence from qualitative data shows that some women who purchased the vouchers did not use them because of high transportation costs to accredited facilities. The implication is that substantial improvements in service uptake could be achieved if the program subsidized transportation costs as

  3. Investigating disparities in spatial accessibility to and characteristics of sport facilities: direction, strength, and spatial scale of associations with area income.

    PubMed

    Billaudeau, Nathalie; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Simon, Chantal; Charreire, Hélène; Casey, Romain; Salze, Paul; Badariotti, Dominique; Banos, Arnaud; Weber, Christiane; Chaix, Basile

    2011-01-01

    We conducted an environmental justice study of the spatial distribution of sport facilities, a major resource for physical activity, in the Paris Region in France. Comprehensive data of the French Census of Sport Facilities allowed us to investigate disparities not only in the spatial accessibility to facilities, but also in the characteristics of these facilities. We found that the associations between area income and the presence of facilities or favorable characteristics of these facilities varied from positive to negative depending on the facilities and on the characteristics examined. Sensitivity analyses defining area income in circular areas of different radii permitted a refined identification of areas underserved in sport facilities.

  4. Access to Treatment for Diabetes and Hypertension in Rural Cambodia: Performance of Existing Social Health Protection Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli, Maryam; Jacobs, Bart; Men, Chean Rithy; Nilsen, Kristine; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases (NCD) pose challenges to Cambodia’s health system. Medicines for NCD are on the National Essential Medicines List but no clinical guidelines support their utilization. Two social health protection schemes aimed at the informal sector population exist (Health Equity Funds and Insurance) together with two disease-specific interventions (a Peer Educator Network and Chronic Diseases Clinics) targeted at NCD patients. This study examines performance of these various schemes in relation to NCD. Methods Cross-sectional household survey among 709 individuals self-reporting diabetes and/or hypertension in three geographical locations in rural Cambodia using a structured questionnaire investigating diagnostic and treatment pathways, health seeking behaviour, health expenditures, and financial coping mechanisms. Results Two third of respondents with NCD were female and 55% did not belong to any scheme. The majority (59%) were diagnosed in the private sector and only 56% were on allopathic treatment that was mainly sought in the private sector (49%). Outpatient treatment cost was higher in the private sector and when using multiple providers of care. The majority were indebted, 11% due to health-related expenses. Contrary to social health protection schemes, disease-specific interventions offered better access to allopathic treatment and provided medicines in accordance with NEML. Conclusion The benefit packages of existing social health protection schemes and services in the public health sector should be adjusted to cater for the needs of people living with NCD in rural Cambodia. Initiatives that offer active disease management strategies and promote patients and community participation appear more successful in increasing treatment adherence and decreasing the risk of financial hardship. PMID:26815916

  5. Is Accessibility to Dental Care Facilities in Rural Areas Associated with Number of Teeth in Elderly Residents?

    PubMed Central

    Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Miwako; Tominaga, Kazumichi; Sundquist, Kristina; Nabika, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Given that public transportation networks are less developed in rural than in urban areas, a lack of accessibility to dental care facilities could be a barrier to routine dental checkups. Thus, we hypothesized that the distance to the dental care facilities is a risk factor for tooth loss. The aim of this study was to test whether there is an association between the distance to dental care facilities, estimated by geographic information systems, and number of teeth, assessed by an oral examination, among elderly residents of a rural area in Japan. Data were collected in 2016 from a cross-sectional study conducted in Shimane prefecture, Japan. After excluding participants with missing data (n = 21), we analyzed data from 710 participants. Of them, 40.6% were male and the mean (standard deviation) age was 67.4 (7.4) years. Further, 68.0% (n = 483) had at least 20 teeth. We found that the distance to dental care facilities was significantly associated with the number of teeth (less than 20) (odds ratio = 1.07, 95% confidence interval = 1.01–1.12) after adjustment for potential confounders. This result suggested that individuals without easy access to dental care facilities may be important targets for dental care. PMID:28335583

  6. Systematic Assessment of Linkage to Care for Persons with HIV Released from Corrections Facilities Using Existing Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Brian T.; Rosen, David L.; Sammartino, Cara; Costa, Michael; Gutman, Roee; Solomon, Liza; Rich, Josiah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Populations in corrections continue to have high prevalence of HIV. Expanded testing and treatment programs allow persons to be identified and stabilized on treatment while incarcerated. However, these gains and frequently lost on reentry. Systemic frameworks are needed to monitor linkage to care to guide programs supporting linkage to care. To assess the adequacy of linkage to care on reentry, incarceration data from the National Corrections Reporting Program and data from the Ryan White Services Report from 2010 to 2012 were linked using an encrypted client identification (eUCI). Time from release to the first visit and presence of detectable HIV RNA at linkage were assessed. Multivariate survival analyses were performed to identify associations between patient characteristics and time to linkage. Among those linking, only 43% in Rhode Island and 49% in North Carolina linked within 90 days, and 33% in both states had detectable viremia at the first visit. Those not previously in care and with shorter incarceration experiences longer linkage times. Persons identified as black, had median times greater than 1 year. Using existing datasets, significant gaps in linkage to care for persons with HIV on release from corrections were demonstrated in Rhode Island and North Carolina. Systemically implementing this monitoring to evaluate changes over time would provide important information to support interventions to improve linkage in high-risk populations. Using national datasets for both corrections and clinical data, this framework equally could be used to evaluate experiences of persons with HIV linking to care on release from corrections facilities nationwide. PMID:26836237

  7. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Construction of an Entomology Facility and Demolition of the Existing Entomology Facility at Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Pest Management Program, the entomology facility needs to be updated to more efficiently process, distribute, store, recycle, and reuse pesticides. Additionally, land uses adjacent to the current facility are shifting from industrial to commercial/retail and residential. This change in land use, suggests that the facility should be relocated to an industrial area that centralizes all civil engineering functions into one area of the installation. Alternatives considered for this proposed action include (1) the no action alternative and (2) the construction of an annex to

  8. Reproductive Rights Denied: The Hyde Amendment and Access to Abortion for Native American Women Using Indian Health Service Facilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Restrictions on the use of federal funds to provide abortions have limited the access to abortion services for Native American women receiving care at Indian Health Service facilities. Current data suggest that the vast majority of Indian Health Service facilities are unequipped to provide abortions under any circumstances. Native American women experience disproportionately high rates of sexual assault and unintended pregnancy. Hyde Amendment restrictions systematically infringe on the reproductive rights of Native American women and present a pressing public health policy concern. PMID:25122025

  9. 75 FR 13457 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Accessibility Guidelines; Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility Standards AGENCY: Architectural... Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) to begin the process of updating its standards for electronic and... (voice); 202- 272-0082 (TTY). Electronic mail address: board.gov ">creagan@access-...

  10. Library Media Facilities Access: Do You Really Want Your Library Media Center Used?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Thomas L.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses and provides some examples on how students and teachers should use library media centers. He also discusses the common problems with facilities design as it changes along with other aspects of society. He states that flexibility in design ensures that the physical facility will meet future program needs.…

  11. Making Facilities Accessible for the Physically Handicapped. Act. No. 1 of the Public Acts of 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Legislature, Lansing.

    A physical handicap is defined as an impairment which affects an individual to the extent that special facilities are needed to provide for his safety. Facilities include--(1) the special design of parking lots, building approaches and entrances, (2) stairs, ramps, doors, and multilevel floors, (3) corridors, and (4) rooms with sloping floors,…

  12. Facilities Planning Guide for Special Education Programs: Planning Accessibility for the Handicapped in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Kenneth W.

    The guide details characteristics to provide architecturally accessible special education programs for handicapped students. Impetus for the accessibility movement is traced to legislation, including the Architectural Barriers Act and Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Planning features considered are the development of a…

  13. 18 CFR 131.80 - FERC Form No. 556, Certification of qualifying facility status for an existing or a proposed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (Section 292.202(k)), solar, geothermal, wind, waste, biomass (Section 292.202(a)), or other). For a waste...)). For any oil or natural gas fuel, use lower heating value (Section 292.202(m)): Natural gas: Oil: Coal... public. 8. If the facility reported herein is not an eligible solar, wind, waste or geothermal...

  14. Federal Facilities Inspections: A Guide to EPA's Access and Inspection Authorities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This brochure outlines the legal authority for EPA, or one of its authorized representatives, to inspect a federal facility for compliance with environmental laws. It also identifies the federal, state, or tribal inspectors who may conduct inspections.

  15. Massive Access Control Aided by Knowledge-Extraction for Co-Existing Periodic and Random Services over Wireless Clinical Networks.

    PubMed

    Du, Qinghe; Zhao, Weidong; Li, Weimin; Zhang, Xuelin; Sun, Bo; Song, Houbing; Ren, Pinyi; Sun, Li; Wang, Yichen

    2016-07-01

    The prosperity of e-health is boosted by fast development of medical devices with wireless communications capability such as wearable devices, tiny sensors, monitoring equipments, etc., which are randomly distributed in clinic environments. The drastically-increasing population of such devices imposes new challenges on the limited wireless resources. To relieve this problem, key knowledge needs to be extracted from massive connection attempts dispersed in the air towards efficient access control. In this paper, a hybrid periodic-random massive access (HPRMA) scheme for wireless clinical networks employing ultra-narrow band (UNB) techniques is proposed. In particular, the proposed scheme towards accommodating a large population of devices include the following new features. On one hand, it can dynamically adjust the resource allocated for coexisting periodic and random services based on the traffic load learned from signal collision status. On the other hand, the resource allocation within periodic services is thoroughly designed to simultaneously align with the timing requests of differentiated services. Abundant simulation results are also presented to demonstrate the superiority of the proposed HPRMA scheme over baseline schemes including time-division multiple access (TDMA) and random access approach, in terms of channel utilization efficiency, packet drop ratio, etc., for the support of massive devices' services.

  16. Using geographical information systems for defining the accessibility to health care facilities in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Murad, Abdulkader A

    2014-12-01

    Spatial data play an important role in the planning of health care facilities and their allocation. Today, geographical information systems (GIS) provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analysing health care spatial data; indeed health geoinformatics is an emerging discipline that uses innovative geospatial technology to investigate health issues. The purpose of this paper is to define how GIS can be used for assessing the level of accessibility to health care. The paper identifies the advantages of using GIS in health care planning and covers GIS-based international accessibility with a focus on GIS applications for health care facilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A geodatabase that includes location of health services, road networks, health care demand and population districts was created using ArcGIS software. The geodatabase produced is based on collected data and covers issues, such as defining the spatial distribution of health care facilities, evaluating health demand types and modelling health service areas based on analysis of driving-time and straight-line distances.

  17. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  18. Physical access to health facilities and contraceptive use in Kenya: evidence from the 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Ettarh, Remare R; Kyobutungi, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the spatial variation in modern contraceptive use and unmet need for family planning across the counties of Kenya and to examine whether the spatial patterns were associated with inequalities in physical access to health facilities. Data were obtained from the 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey and linked to the location of health facilities in the country. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the influence of distance to the nearest health facility and health facility density, in addition to other covariates, on modern contraceptive use and unmet need. Overall, the prevalence of modern contraceptive use and unmet need among women aged 15-49 in Kenya was 42.1% and 19.7% respectively. Among the respondents who lived more than 5 km from the nearest health facility modern contraceptive use was significantly less likely compared to women resident 5 km or less from the nearest health facility. Women from counties with higher health facility density were 53% more likely to use modern contraceptives compared to women in counties with low health facility density. Distance and health facility density in the county were not significantly associated with unmet need. Physical access to health facilities is an important determinant of modern contraceptive use and unmet need in Kenya. Strategies should be developed in underserved counties to mitigate the challenge of distance to health facilities, such as delivering services by outreach and mobile facilities.

  19. Overcoming Access Barriers for Facility-based Delivery in Low-income Settings: Insights from Bangladesh and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Azizur; Ssengooba, Freddie

    2006-01-01

    Women in both Bangladesh and Uganda face a number of barriers to delivery in professional health facilities, including costs, transportation problems, and sociocultural norms to deliver at home. Some women in both the countries manage to overcome these barriers. This paper reports on a comparative qualitative study investigating how some women and their families were able to use professional delivery services. The study provides insights into the decision-making processes and overcoming access barriers. Husbands were found to be particularly important in Uganda, while, in Bangladesh, a number of individuals could influence care-seeking, including unqualified local healers or traditional birth attendants. In both the settings, cost and transport barriers were often overcome through social networks. Social prohibitions on birth in the health facility did not feature strongly in women's accounts, with several Ugandan women explaining that friends or peers also used facilities, while, in Bangladesh, perceived complications apparently justified the use of professional medical care. Investigating the ways in which some women can overcome common barriers can help inform policy and planning to increase the use of health facilities for child delivery. PMID:17591340

  20. Household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in Vietnam and associated factors: findings from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Tuyet-Hanh, Tran Thi; Lee, Jong-Koo; Oh, Juhwan; Van Minh, Hoang; Ou Lee, Chul; Hoan, Le Thi; Nam, You-Seon; Long, Tran Khanh

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite progress made by the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) number 7.C, Vietnam still faces challenges with regard to the provision of access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Objective This paper describes household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities separately, and analyses factors associated with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in combination. Design Secondary data from the Vietnam Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey in 2000, 2006, and 2011 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and tests of significance describe trends over time in access to water and sanitation by location, demographic and socio-economic factors. Binary logistic regressions (2000, 2006, and 2011) describe associations between access to water and sanitation, and geographic, demographic, and socio-economic factors. Results There have been some outstanding developments in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities from 2000 to 2011. In 2011, the proportion of households with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities reached 90% and 77%, respectively, meeting the 2015 MDG targets for safe drinking water and basic sanitation set at 88% and 75%, respectively. However, despite these achievements, in 2011, only 74% of households overall had access to combined improved drinking water and sanitation facilities. There were also stark differences between regions. In 2011, only 47% of households had access to both improved water and sanitation facilities in the Mekong River Delta compared with 94% in the Red River Delta. In 2011, households in urban compared to rural areas were more than twice as likely (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9-2.5) to have access to improved water and sanitation facilities in combination, and households in the highest compared with the lowest wealth quintile were over 40 times more likely (OR: 42.3; 95% CI: 29.8-60.0). Conclusions More efforts

  1. The Post-Embargo Open Access Citation Advantage: It Exists (Probably), It’s Modest (Usually), and the Rich Get Richer (of Course)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many studies show that open access (OA) articles—articles from scholarly journals made freely available to readers without requiring subscription fees—are downloaded, and presumably read, more often than closed access/subscription-only articles. Assertions that OA articles are also cited more often generate more controversy. Confounding factors (authors may self-select only the best articles to make OA; absence of an appropriate control group of non-OA articles with which to compare citation figures; conflation of pre-publication vs. published/publisher versions of articles, etc.) make demonstrating a real citation difference difficult. This study addresses those factors and shows that an open access citation advantage as high as 19% exists, even when articles are embargoed during some or all of their prime citation years. Not surprisingly, better (defined as above median) articles gain more when made OA. PMID:27548723

  2. The Post-Embargo Open Access Citation Advantage: It Exists (Probably), Its Modest (Usually), and the Rich Get Richer (of Course).

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Many studies show that open access (OA) articles-articles from scholarly journals made freely available to readers without requiring subscription fees-are downloaded, and presumably read, more often than closed access/subscription-only articles. Assertions that OA articles are also cited more often generate more controversy. Confounding factors (authors may self-select only the best articles to make OA; absence of an appropriate control group of non-OA articles with which to compare citation figures; conflation of pre-publication vs. published/publisher versions of articles, etc.) make demonstrating a real citation difference difficult. This study addresses those factors and shows that an open access citation advantage as high as 19% exists, even when articles are embargoed during some or all of their prime citation years. Not surprisingly, better (defined as above median) articles gain more when made OA.

  3. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Transportation Facilities A Appendix A to Part 37 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Pt. 37, App. A Appendix A to Part 37... also be found via a hyperlink on the Internet at the following address:...

  4. U.S. EPA High-Field NMR Facility with Remote Accessibility

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s High-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Research Facility housed in Athens, GA has two Varian 600 MHz NMR spectrometers used for conducting sophisticated experiments in environmental science. Off-site users can ship their samples and perform their NMR experiments remotely fr...

  5. 78 FR 7334 - Port Authority Access to Facility Vulnerability Assessments and the Integration of Security Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... ] systems operated or maintained by certain law enforcement agencies and the Coast Guard. DATES: Comments... the maximum extent practical,'' the facility's security systems ``with compatible systems operated or... systems operated or maintained by the appropriate State and local law enforcement agencies and the...

  6. Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Richard F.; Evans, Lisa J.; Cruise, Keith R.; Feinstein, Ronald A.; Kendrick, Rhonda F.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care…

  7. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... restricted? 170.813 Section 170.813 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND... protection; (4) To prevent traffic from causing damage to the facility; and (5) For reasons deemed to be in the public interest such as fire prevention or suppression as approved by the Secretary....

  8. Accessibility and Use of Recreational Sports Facilities at Florida's Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Michele, Douglas

    In an effort to determine the percent of use of sports facilities on Florida community college campuses, a survey was sent to community college presidents and campus recreation directors throughout the Florida Community College System (FCCS). The survey, distributed to all 25 branch campuses and 28 primary campuses in the system, was designed to…

  9. AMERICAN STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS FOR MAKING BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES ACCESSIBLE TO, AND USABLE BY, THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Chicago, IL.

    THIS STANDARD IS INTENDED TO PROVIDE MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS TO BE USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALL BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES AND FOR ADOPTION AND ENFORCEMENT BY ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITIES IN ORDER TO ALLOW INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT PHYSICAL DISABILITIES TO PURSUE THEIR INTERESTS AND ASPIRATIONS, DEVELOP THEIR TALENTS, AND EXERCISE THEIR SKILLS.…

  10. 75 FR 18781 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Parts 1191, 1193, and 1194 RIN 3014-AA37 Americans With... and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of hearing. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) will hold a public hearing on its...

  11. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... also be found via a hyperlink on the Internet at the following address: http://www.access-board.gov/ada... Department has modified the language of the ADAAG as it applies to entities subject to 49 CFR part 37. These entities must comply with the modified language in this Appendix rather than the language of Appendices...

  12. Facility Consideration for Handicapped Intramural Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAvaddy, Jim

    The author discusses the specifics of planning new facilities and restructuring existing ones for intramural and recreational use by handicapped and normal individuals. Detailed are suggestions for general accessibility (including parking, ramps and door hardware aspects), toilet facilities, swimming pools, and such miscellaneous facilities as…

  13. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 5, Structural/seismic investigation. Section A report, existing conditions calculations/supporting information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. Based upon US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations (DOE/Al) Office and LANL projections, storage space limitations/restrictions will begin to affect LANL`s ability to meet its missions between 1998 and 2002.

  14. Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Malone; John R. Celesteb; Peter M. Celliers; Brent C. Froggeta; Robert L. Guyton; Morris I. Kaufman; Tony L. Lee; Brian J. MacGowan; Edmund W. Ng; Imants P. Reinbachs; Ronald B. Robinson; Lynn G. Seppala; Tom W. Tunnell; Phillip W. Watts

    2005-01-01

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1–5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

  15. Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Seppala, L; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P

    2005-07-07

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1-5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

  16. Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Robert M.; Celeste, John R.; Celliers, Peter M.; Frogget, Brent C.; Guyton, Robert L.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lee, Tony L.; MacGowan, Brian J.; Ng, Edmund W.; Reinbachs, Imants P.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Seppala, Lynn G.; Tunnell, Thomas W.; Watts, Phillip W.

    2005-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1-5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

  17. Proposed Design and Operation of a Heat Pipe Reactor using the Sandia National Laboratories Annular Core Test Facility and Existing UZrH Fuel Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Pandya, Tara; Peters, Curtis

    2005-02-01

    Heat Pipe Reactors (HPR) for space power conversion systems offer a number of advantages not easily provided by other systems. They require no pumping, their design easily deals with freezing and thawing of the liquid metal, and they can provide substantial levels of redundancy. Nevertheless, no reactor has ever been operated and cooled with heat pipes, and the startup and other operational characteristics of these systems remain largely unknown. Signification deviations from normal reactor heat removal mechanisms exist, because the heat pipes have fundamental heat removal limits due to sonic flow issues at low temperatures. This paper proposes an early prototypic test of a Heat Pipe Reactor (using existing 20% enriched nuclear fuel pins) to determine the operational characteristics of the HPR. The proposed design is similar in design to the HOMER and SAFE-300 HPR designs (Elliot, Lipinski, and Poston, 2003; Houts, et. al, 2003). However, this reactor uses existing UZrH fuel pins that are coupled to potassium heat pipes modules. The prototype reactor would be located in the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor Facility where the fuel pins currently reside. The proposed reactor would use the heat pipes to transport the heat from the UZrH fuel pins to a water pool above the core, and the heat transport to the water pool would be controlled by adjusting the pressure and gas type within a small annulus around each heat pipe. The reactor would operate as a self-critical assembly at power levels up to 200 kWth. Because the nuclear heated HPR test uses existing fuel and because it would be performed in an existing facility with the appropriate safety authorization basis, the test could be performed rapidly and inexpensively. This approach makes it possible to validate the operation of a HPR and also measure the feedback mechanisms for a typical HPR design. A test of this nature would be the world's first operating Heat Pipe Reactor. This reactor is therefore called "HPR-1".

  18. Beam dynamics in an ultra-low energy storage rings (review of existing facilities and feasibility studies for future experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Storage rings operating at ultra-low energies and in particular electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. However, earlier measurements showed strong limitations on beam intensity, fast decay of ion current, reduced life time etc. The nature of these effects was not fully understood. Also a large variety of experiments in future generation ultra-low energy storage and decelerator facilities including in-ring collision studies with a reaction microscope require a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes involved into the operation of such rings. In this paper, we present review of non-linear and long term beam dynamics studies on example of the ELISA, AD Recycler, TSR and USR rings using the computer codes BETACOOL, OPERA-3D and MAD-X. The results from simulations were benchmarked against experimental data of beam losses in the ELISA storage ring. We showed that decay of beam intensity in ultra-low energy rings is mainly caused by ion losses on ring aperture due to multiple scattering on residual gas. Beam is lost on ring aperture due to small ring acceptance. Rate of beam losses increases at high intensities because of the intra-beam scattering effect adds to vacuum losses. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of the effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target have been carried out as well. The life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with this internal gas jet target were estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the TSR ring, where low intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93 keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions have been reproduced. Based on these simulations

  19. Access and utilisation of healthcare services in rural Tanzania: A comparison of public and non-public facilities using quality, equity, and trust dimensions.

    PubMed

    Shayo, Elizabeth H; Senkoro, Kesheni P; Momburi, Romanus; Olsen, Øystein E; Byskov, Jens; Makundi, Emmanuel A; Kamuzora, Peter; Mboera, Leonard E G

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the access and utilisation of health services in public and non-public health facilities in terms of quality, equity and trust in the Mbarali district, Tanzania. Interviews, focus group discussions, and informal discussions were used to generate data. Of the 1836 respondents, 1157 and 679 respondents sought healthcare services on their last visit at public or non-public health facilities, respectively. While 45.5% rated the quality of services to be good in both types of facilities, reported medicine shortages were more pronounced among those who visited public rather than non-public health facilities (OR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.4, 2.1). Respondents who visited public facilities were 4.9 times less likely than those who visited non-public facilities to emphasise the influence of cost in accessing and utilising health care (OR = 4.9, CI 3.9-6.1). A significant difference was also found in the provider-client relationship satisfaction level between non-public (89.1%) and public facilities (74.7%) (OR = 2.8, CI: 1.5-5.0), indicating a level of lower trust in the later. Revised strategies are needed to ensure availability of medicines in public facilities, which are used by the majority of the population, while strengthening private-public partnerships to harmonise healthcare costs.

  20. Improving Healthcare Facility Locations in Bamyan, Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    including: diagnosis and treatment of malaria, diarrhea and acute respiratory infection; distribution of condoms and oral contraceptives ; and...operating cost, and accessibility of the existing and future healthcare facilities. We also look into the ethnicity problem that would affect the...cost, and accessibility of the existing and future healthcare facilities. We also look into the ethnicity problem that would affect the selection of

  1. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Undergraduate Education and Research Programs, Facilities, and Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) GRIDVIEW: Recent Improvements in Research and Education Software for Exploring Mars Topography; 2) Software and Hardware Upgrades for the University of North Dakota Asteroid and Comet Internet Telescope (ACIT); 3) Web-based Program for Calculating Effects of an Earth Impact; 4) On-Line Education, Web- and Virtual-Classes in an Urban University: A Preliminary Overview; 5) Modelling Planetary Material's Structures: From Quasicrystalline Microstructure to Crystallographic Materials by Use of Mathematica; 6) How We Used NASA Lunar Set in Planetary and Material Science Studies: Textural and Cooling Sequences in Sections of Lava Column from a Thin and a Thick Lava-Flow, from the Moon and Mars with Terrestrial Analogue and Chondrule Textural Comparisons; 7) Classroom Teaching of Space Technology and Simulations by the Husar Rover Model; 8) New Experiments (In Meteorology, Aerosols, Soil Moisture and Ice) on the New Hunveyor Educational Planetary Landers of Universities and Colleges in Hungary; 9) Teaching Planetary GIS by Constructing Its Model for the Test Terrain of the Hunveyor and Husar; 10) Undergraduate Students: An Untapped Resource for Planetary Researchers; 11) Analog Sites in Field Work of Petrology: Rock Assembly Delivered to a Plain by Floods on Earth and Mars; 12) RELAB (Reflectance Experiment Laboratory): A NASA Multiuser Spectroscopy Facility; 13) Full Text Searching and Customization in the NASA ADS Abstract Service.

  2. Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.D.; Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

  3. The Delivery of Distance Education and Other Community Services through Multi-Role Public Access Facilities in Rural Communities: Australian Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crellin, Ian; Graham, Jim

    Changes in Australia's rural economy have resulted in reductions in the availability of government services and education and training. One response to these reductions has been the emergence of community-managed multirole facilities that deliver a range of community services, including access to education and training. Although these centers are…

  4. Advancing Long Tail Data Capture and Access Through Trusted, Community-Driven Data Services at the IEDA Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Hsu, L.; Arko, R. A.; Walker, J. D.; O'hara, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    Substantial volumes of data in the Earth Sciences are collected in small- to medium-size projects by individual investigators or small research teams, known as the 'Long Tail' of science. Traditionally, these data have largely stayed 'in the dark', i.e. they have not been properly archived, and have therefore been inaccessible and underutilized. The primary reason has been the lack of appropriate infrastructure, from adequate repositories to resources and support for investigators to properly manage their data, to community standards and best practices. Lack of credit for data management and for the data themselves has contributed to the reluctance of investigators to share their data. IEDA (Integrated Earth Data Applications), a NSF-funded data facility for solid earth geoscience data, has developed a comprehensive suite of data services that are designed to address the concerns and needs of investigators. IEDA's data publication service registers datasets with DOI and ensures their proper citation and attribution. IEDA is working with publishers on advanced linkages between datasets in the IEDA repository and scientific online articles to facilitate access to the data, enhance their visibility, and augment their use and citation. IEDA's investigator support ranges from individual support for data management to tools, tutorials, and virtual or face-to-face workshops that guide and assist investigators with data management planning, data submission, and data documentation. A critical aspect of IEDA's concept has been the disciplinary expertise within the team and its strong liaison with the science community, as well as a community-based governance. These have been fundamental to gain the trust and support of the community that have lead to significantly improved data preservation and access in the communities served by IEDA.

  5. Spatially Modelling the Association Between Access to Recreational Facilities and Exercise: The ‘Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis’

    PubMed Central

    Berchuck, Samuel I.; Warren, Joshua L.; Herring, Amy H.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Moore, Kari A.B.; Ranchod, Yamini K.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Numerous studies have investigated the relationship between the built environment and physical activity. However these studies assume that these relationships are invariant over space. In this study, we introduce a novel method to analyze the association between access to recreational facilities and exercise allowing for spatial heterogeneity. In addition, this association is studied before and after controlling for crime, a variable that could explain spatial heterogeneity of associations. We use data from the Chicago site of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis of 781 adults aged 46 years and over. A spatially varying coefficient Tobit regression model is implemented in the Bayesian setting to allow for the association of interest to vary over space. The relationship is shown to vary over Chicago, being positive in the south but negative or null in the north. Controlling for crime weakens the association in the south with little change observed in northern Chicago. The results of this study indicate that spatial heterogeneity in associations of environmental factors with health may vary over space and deserve further exploration. PMID:26877598

  6. 29 CFR 32.27 - Accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Classroom Training and On-the-Job-Training, when each part is viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible... required to make structural changes in existing facilities where other methods are effective in achieving... the effective date of this part except that where structural changes in facilities are necessary,...

  7. Expanding Access to the Intrauterine Device in Public Health Facilities in Ethiopia: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Tilahun, Yewondwossen; Mehta, Sarah; Zerihun, Habtamu; Lew, Candace; Brooks, Mohamad I; Nigatu, Tariku; Hagos, Kidest Lulu; Asnake, Mengistu; Tasissa, Adeba; Ali, Seid; Desalegn, Ketsela; Adane, Girmay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Ethiopia, modern contraceptive prevalence among currently married women nearly tripled over the last decade, but the method mix remains skewed toward short-acting methods. Since 2011, the Integrated Family Health Program (IFHP+), jointly implemented by Pathfinder International and John Snow Inc., has supported the Federal Ministry of Health to introduce intrauterine devices (IUDs) in more than 800 health centers across 4 regions to improve access to a wider range of methods. Between March and August 2014, Pathfinder conducted a mixed-methods study in 40 purposively selected health centers to assess shifts in the contraceptive method mix following introduction of IUDs using data from family planning registers; determine the characteristics of IUD users through a cross-sectional survey of 2,943 family planning clients who accepted the IUD; explore reasons for method discontinuation among 165 clients seeking IUD removal services; and identify facilitators and barriers to IUD use through focus group discussions (N = 115 clients) and key informant interviews (N = 36 providers, facility heads, and health office heads). Introduction of IUDs into the 40 health centers participating in the study was correlated with a statistically significant increase in the contribution of all long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs)—both IUDs and implants—to the method mix, from 6.9% in 2011 to 20.5% in 2014 (P<.001). Our study found that latent demand for the IUD was more prevalent than anticipated and that the method was acceptable to a broad cross-section of women. Of the 2,943 women who sought IUDs during the 6-month study period, 18.0% were new contraceptive users (i.e., those using a contraceptive method for the first time ever), 44.7% reported no educational attainment, 62.5% were from rural areas, and 59.3% were younger than 30 years old, with almost 3 in 10 (27.7%) under the age of 25. The most commonly cited reason for seeking IUD removal services

  8. Creating a Clinical Video-Conferencing Facility in a Security-Constrained Environment Using Open-Source AccessGrid Software and Consumer Hardware

    PubMed Central

    Terrazas, Enrique; Hamill, Timothy R.; Wang, Ye; Channing Rodgers, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has been split into widely separated facilities, leading to much time being spent traveling between facilities for meetings. We installed an open-source AccessGrid multi-media-conferencing system using (largely) consumer-grade equipment, connecting 6 sites at 5 separate facilities. The system was accepted rapidly and enthusiastically, and was inexpensive compared to alternative approaches. Security was addressed by aspects of the AG software and by local network administrative practices. The chief obstacles to deployment arose from security restrictions imposed by multiple independent network administration regimes, requiring a drastically reduced list of network ports employed by AG components. PMID:18693930

  9. Creating a clinical video-conferencing facility in a security-constrained environment using open-source AccessGrid software and consumer hardware.

    PubMed

    Terrazas, Enrique; Hamill, Timothy R; Wang, Ye; Channing Rodgers, R P

    2007-10-11

    The Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has been split into widely separated facilities, leading to much time being spent traveling between facilities for meetings. We installed an open-source AccessGrid multi-media-conferencing system using (largely) consumer-grade equipment, connecting 6 sites at 5 separate facilities. The system was accepted rapidly and enthusiastically, and was inexpensive compared to alternative approaches. Security was addressed by aspects of the AG software and by local network administrative practices. The chief obstacles to deployment arose from security restrictions imposed by multiple independent network administration regimes, requiring a drastically reduced list of network ports employed by AG components.

  10. 76 FR 75844 - Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way; Reopening of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1190 RIN 3014-AA26 Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian... Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking; reopening of comment period. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) is reopening until February 2,...

  11. Accessibility and assistive products

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Porrero, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Accessibility and assistive products and technologies are needed to ensure the rights of persons with disabilities and older persons. Many developments have been implemented in laws, standards, markets and from the consumers perspective, at international, European and national levels. The real issue is that not all the potential users benefit from the use of assistive products or accessible measures. Discussion Innovative methods are needed to allow all potential users to have real advantage of assistive technologies and accessible and design for all facilities. Best practices will be presented and existing gaps and recommendations will be discussed. Cost-benefits aspects will also be presented. Conclusion In order to get advantages from opportunities of globalization, hard work and responsibilities of all stakeholders are needed, so that assistive products and accessibility reach a whole range of situations and environments and contribute to ensure quality of life in a society for all.

  12. Springfield Processing Plant* (A Hypothetical Facility) SPP, Entry Control Point and Vehicle Gate Access Control Post Order

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Gregory A.

    2014-06-01

    This hypothetical order provides the requirements and instructions for the Springfield Processing Plant (SPP) Vehicle Gate and Entry Control Point (ECP) in the perimeter access building. The purpose of this post is to prevent the theft, sabotage or diversion of nuclear material (NM), control access and exit at the protected area, and to respond to emergencies according the SPP Guard Force (GF) Contingency Plan and as directed by a Guard Force Supervisor.

  13. The Prospect of China’s Access to Naval Facilities in Burma and the Ramifications for Regional Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    www.guardian.co.uk/china/story/0,,1939380,00.html (accessed 2 March 2007). 34 David Zweig and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for Energy.” Foreign Affairs 84...http://www.uscc.gov/annual_report/2006/06_annual_report.php (accessed November 30, 2006). Zweig , David, and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for

  14. Estimating Access to Drinking Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene Facilities in Wolaita Sodo Town, Southern Ethiopia, in Reference to National Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Debebe, Ashenafi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coverage of sanitation and access to safe drinking water in Ethiopia especially in Wolaita Sodo town are not well studied. Therefore, the main objective of this study was estimating access to drinking water supply, sanitation, and hygiene facilities in Wolaita Sodo town, southern Ethiopia, in reference to national coverage. Methods. A community based cross-sectional study design method was employed in the study in 588 households of Wolaita Sodo town inhabitants. Face-to-face interview to household owners, in-depth interview to key informants, reviewing secondary data, and observational check lists were used to collect data. Districts were selected using simple random sampling techniques, while systematic random sampling technique was applied to select households. Data was analyzed using Epi Info version 3.5.4 and SPSS version 16 statistical software. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis were carried out. Results. The community has access to improved water supply which was estimated to be 67.9%. The main water sources of the town were tap water within the yard, which was estimated to be 44.7%, and tap water in the community was 40.0% followed by private protected well which was 14.5%. Ninety-one percent of the households had at least one type of latrine in their homes. The most common type of latrine available to households was pit latrine with superstructure which was estimated to be 75.9% followed by a pit without superstructure, 21.3%, and more than half of the respondents had hand washing facilities in their compound. Occupational status, educational status, and training on water, sanitation, and hygiene related topics were significantly associated with use of improved water source, improved sanitation, and hygiene facilities. Conclusion. In order to address the demand of the town, additional water, sanitation, and hygiene programs are required. PMID:28025598

  15. The technology development studio of the MPI-CBG: an open access cell-based screening facility.

    PubMed

    Bickle, Marc

    2014-05-01

    In the past decade, academic screening centers have been created in many universities worldwide. Most of these screening centers are organized as core facilities that accept projects from both within their organization and from external users in order to maximize staff and instrument usage. The Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany, also created such a screening facility named the Technology Development Studio (TDS). The mission of the facility is to provide cell based screening services focused on high resolution confocal imaging. The acquisition of high resolution images allows the mathematical description of cells with image analysis to a high degree of precision. This precision in turn allows classifying phenotypes accurately and compare different cellular treatments to discover underlying mechanisms.

  16. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  17. Investigations and Recommendations on the Use of Existing Experiments in Criticality Safety Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities for Weapons-Grade Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, B.T.

    2002-05-29

    report is given in Sect. 2. This report pertains to two of the five AOAs identified by the licensee [Duke, Cogema, Stone and Webster (DCS)] for the validation of criticality codes in the design of the Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The five AOAs are as follows: (1) Pu-nitrate aqueous solutions (homogeneous systems), (2) Mixed-oxide (MOX) pellets, fuel rods and fuel assemblies (heterogeneous systems), (3) PuO{sub 2} powders, (4) MOX powders, and (5) Aqueous solutions of Pu compounds (Pu-oxalate solutions). This report addresses a S/U analysis pertaining to AOA 3, PuO{sub 2} powders, and AOA 4, MOX powders. AOA 3 and AOA 4 are the subject of this report since the other AOAs (solutions and heterogeneous systems) appear to be well represented in the documented benchmark experiments used in the criticality safety community. Prior to this work, DCS used traditional criticality validation techniques to identify numerous experimental benchmarks that are applicable to AOAs 3 and 4. Traditional techniques for selection of applicable benchmark experiments essentially consist of evaluating the area of applicability for important design parameters (e.g., Pu content or average neutron energy) and ensuring experiments have similar characteristics that bound or nearly bound the range of conditions requiring design analysis. DCS provided ORNL with compositions and dimensions for critical systems used to establish preliminary mass limits for facility powder and fuel pellet handling areas corresponding to AOAs 3 and 4. ORNL has reviewed existing critical experiments to identify those, which, in addition to those provided by DCS, may be applicable to the criticality code validation for AOAs 3 and 4. A S/U analysis was then performed to calculate the integral parameters used to determine the similarity of each critical experiment to each design system provided by DCS. This report contains a review of the S/U theory, a description of the design systems, a brief description of

  18. 40 CFR 63.5692 - How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new source or an existing source?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I know if my boat manufacturing... AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing What the Subpart Covers § 63.5692 How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new...

  19. 40 CFR 63.5692 - How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new source or an existing source?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true How do I know if my boat manufacturing... AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing What the Subpart Covers § 63.5692 How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new...

  20. Incorporating energy conservation techniques in the operation of existing LeRC R and D facilities. [energy policy/NASA programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieberding, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    A general discussion of various methods which can be used to reduce energy consumption is presented. A very brief description of Lewis Research Center facilities is given and the energy reduction methods are discussed relative to them. Some specific examples (ie; automated equipment and data systems) of the implementation of the energy reduction methods are included.

  1. 78 FR 10110 - Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way; Shared Use Paths

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    .... Regulatory Analyses In this preamble, ``we,'' ``us,'' and ``our'' refer to the Architectural and...-way or on an exclusive right-of-way with minimal cross flow by motor vehicles. The Washington State... surfaces of 5.2.9 Surface Structure pedestrian access routes and Hard, all-weather pavement...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cb of... - Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing Designated Facilities Included in an Emissions Averaging Plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing.... 60, Subpt. Cb, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart Cb of Part 60—Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing... by volume) b On and after April 28, 2009, nitrogen oxides emission limit (parts permillion by...

  3. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cb of... - Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing Designated Facilities Included in an Emissions Averaging Plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing.... 60, Subpt. Cb, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart Cb of Part 60—Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing... by volume) b On and after April 28, 2009, nitrogen oxides emission limit (parts permillion by...

  4. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cb of... - Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing Designated Facilities Included in an Emissions Averaging Plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing.... 60, Subpt. Cb, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart Cb of Part 60—Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing... by volume) b On and after April 28, 2009, nitrogen oxides emission limit (parts permillion by...

  5. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cb of... - Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing Designated Facilities Included in an Emissions Averaging Plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing.... 60, Subpt. Cb, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart Cb of Part 60—Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing... by volume) b On and after April 28, 2009, nitrogen oxides emission limit (parts permillion by...

  6. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cb of... - Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing Designated Facilities Included in an Emissions Averaging Plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing.... 60, Subpt. Cb, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart Cb of Part 60—Nitrogen Oxides Limits for Existing... by volume) b On and after April 28, 2009, nitrogen oxides emission limit (parts permillion by...

  7. The Feasibility of Establishing Operational Water Hyacinth-Based Systems at the Treatment Facilities of Existing Cities. [in Florida and Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The wastewater treatment facilities of three communities in southern Florida and two in southern Texas areas having populations of 20,000 or fewer persons were surveyed to determine: (1) their performance characteristics and the nature of their customers; (2) facility upgrading requirements needed to meet current and future EPA and State standards; (3) their adaptability to water hyacinth utilization and harvested plant disposal; and (4) the level of community support. Guidelines for site selection were established and applied to five cities in Texas and four in Florida. An evaluation of the prospective sites reveals that the Florida locations are generally unsuitable for implementation of water hyacinth based systems because of regulatory philosophy. All five Texas sites have excellent potential.

  8. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (631-24G) - March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit is located in the northeast corner of SRS. In the mid 1980`s, sparse vegetation, dead trees, and small mounds of soil were discovered on a portion of the road leading to Gunsite 113. This area became the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (Gunsite 113). The unit appears to have been used as a spoil dirt and / or road construction debris disposal area. There is no documentation or record of any hazardous substance management, disposal, or any type of waste disposal at this unit. Based upon the available evidence, there are no potential contaminants of concern available for evaluation by a CERCLA baseline risk assessment. Therefore, there is no determinable health risk associated with Gunsite 113. In addition, it is also reasonable to conclude that, since contamination is below risk-based levels, the unit presents no significant ecological risk. It is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  9. A Review of Existing Studies Reporting the Negative Effects of Alcohol Access and Positive Effects of Alcohol Control Policies on Interpersonal Violence

    PubMed Central

    Fitterer, Jessica L.; Nelson, Trisalyn A.; Stockwell, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption often leads to elevated rates of violence yet alcohol access policies continue to relax across the globe. Our review establishes the extent alcohol policy can moderate violent crime through alcohol availability restrictions. Results were informed from comprehensive selection of peer-reviewed journals from 1950 to October 2015. Our search identified 87 relevant studies on alcohol access and violence conducted across 12 countries. Seventeen studies included quasi-control design, and 23 conducted intervention analysis. Seventy-one (82%) reported a significant relationship between alcohol access and violent offenses. Alcohol outlet studies reported the greatest percentage of significant results (93%), with trading hours (63%), and alcohol price following (58%). Results from baseline studies indicated the effectiveness of increasing the price of commonly consumed alcohol, restricting the hours of alcohol trading, and limiting the number of alcohol outlets per region to prevent violent offenses. Unclear are the effects of tax reductions, restriction of on-premises re-entry, and different outlet types on violent crime. Further, the generalization of statistics over broad areas and the low number of control/intervention studies poses some concern for confounding or correlated effects on study results, and amount of information for local-level prevention of interpersonal violence. Future studies should focus on gathering longitudinal data, validating models, limiting crime data to peak drinking days and times, and wherever possible collecting the joint distribution between violent crime, intoxication, and place. A greater uptake of local-level analysis will benefit studies comparing the influence of multiple alcohol establishment types by relating the location of a crime to establishment proximity. Despite, some uncertainties particular studies showed that even modest policy changes, such as 1% increases in alcohol price, 1 h changes to closing times

  10. Indoor Athletic Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, E. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Examines the concept of shared-use facilities to help financially support and meet the demand for athletic facilities. Shared-use considerations are explored including cost sharing of ongoing operations, aesthetics, locker rooms, support facilities, parking and site access, and building access and security. (GR)

  11. A summary of existing and planned experiment hardware for low-gravity fluids research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Myron E.; Omalley, Terence F.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of (1) existing ground-based, low gravity research facilities, with examples of hardware capabilities, and (2) existing and planned space-based research facilities, with examples of current and past flight hardware. Low-gravity, ground-based facilities, such as drop towers and aircraft, provide the experimenter with quick turnaround time, easy access to equipment, gravity levels ranging from 10(exp -2) to 10(exp -6) G, and low-gravity durations ranging from 2 to 30 sec. Currently, the only operational space-based facility is the Space Shuttle. The Shuttle's payload bay and middeck facilities are described. Existing and planned low-gravity fluids research facilities are also described with examples of experiments and hardware capabilities.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations for the design of the treatment rooms and synchrotron access mazes in the CNAO Hadrontherapy facility.

    PubMed

    Porta, Alessandro; Agosteo, Stefano; Campi, Fabrizio

    2005-01-01

    The Italian National Centre for Hadrontherapy is based on a synchrotron capable of accelerating protons and carbon ions up to 250 MeV and 400 MeV u(-1), respectively. The present work describes some Monte Carlo simulations performed to verify the design of the treatment rooms and synchrotron access mazes. The different shielding efficiency and induced activations of the common concrete and the baryte concrete were analysed. In such a radiation field, i.e. with high-energy neutrons, the baryte concrete gains twice the activation than the common concrete without any relevant dose reduction. Moreover, the simulations have stressed, again, the discrepancies between H*(10) and E in such cases where the neutron radiation field is the dominant component and, particularly, in the medium-high energy range.

  13. Open Access Centre at the Nature Research Centre: a facility for enhancement of scientific research, education and public outreach in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šerpenskienė, Silvija; Skridlaitė, Gražina

    2014-05-01

    Open Access Centre (OAC) was established in Vilnius, Lithuania in 2013 as a subdivision of the Nature Research Centre (NRC) operating on the principle of open access for both internal and external users. The OAC consists of 15 units, i.e. 15 NRC laboratories or their branches. Forty four sets of research equipment were purchased. The OAC cooperates with Lithuanian science and studies institutions, business sector and other governmental and public institutions. Investigations can be carried in the Geosciences, Biotaxonomy, Ecology and Molecular Research, and Ecotoxicology fields. Environmental radioactivity, radioecology, nuclear geophysics, microscopic and chemical composition of natural compounds (minerals, rocks etc.), paleomagnetic, magnetic and environmental investigations, as well as ground and water contamination by oil products and other organic environment polluting compounds, identification of fossils, rocks and minerals can be studied in the Georesearch field. Ecosystems and identification of plants, animals and microorganisms are main subjects of the Biotaxonomy, Ecology and Molecular Research field. The Ecotoxicologal Research deals with toxic and genotoxic effects of toxic substances and other sources of pollution on macro- and microorganisms and cell cultures. Open access is guaranteed by: (1) providing scientific research and experimental development services; (2) implementing joint business and science projects; (3) using facilities for the training of specialists of the highest qualifications; (4) providing properly qualified and technically trained users with opportunities to carry out their scientific research and/or experiments in the OAC laboratories by themselves. Services provided in the Open Access Centre can be received by both internal and external users: persons undertaking innovative economic activities, students of other educational institutions, interns, external teams of researchers engaged in scientific research activities, teachers

  14. Positive materials identification of existing equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, H.A.

    1996-07-01

    Considerable engineering effort and expertise are expended for materials selection at refining and petrochemical facilities. However, the benefits of this effort are undermined if there is an inadvertent material substitution during construction. Although procedures have always been in place to reduce the chance of such substitutions, it is known that these errors have occurred. Accordingly, over the years the industry has periodically reviewed and improved quality control in this effort. However, many older facilities that did not benefit from today`s procedures are still in operation. As a consequence, some companies have conducted positive material identification (PMI) verification of existing equipment. This process is further complicated by the fact that the most susceptible components are typically insulated and must be located. Once located, accessibility and operating temperatures are complicating issues. This paper describes prioritization issues and hardware tradeoffs for conducting a PMI verification program.

  15. The EarthScope Array Network Facility: application-driven low-latency web-based tools for accessing high-resolution multi-channel waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, R. L.; Lindquist, K. G.; Clemesha, A.; Vernon, F. L.

    2008-12-01

    Since April 2004 the EarthScope USArray seismic network has grown to over 400 broadband stations that stream multi-channel data in near real-time to the Array Network Facility in San Diego. Providing secure, yet open, access to real-time and archived data for a broad range of audiences is best served by a series of platform agnostic low-latency web-based applications. We present a framework of tools that interface between the world wide web and Boulder Real Time Technologies Antelope Environmental Monitoring System data acquisition and archival software. These tools provide audiences ranging from network operators and geoscience researchers, to funding agencies and the general public, with comprehensive information about the experiment. This ranges from network-wide to station-specific metadata, state-of-health metrics, event detection rates, archival data and dynamic report generation over a stations two year life span. Leveraging open source web-site development frameworks for both the server side (Perl, Python and PHP) and client-side (Flickr, Google Maps/Earth and jQuery) facilitates the development of a robust extensible architecture that can be tailored on a per-user basis, with rapid prototyping and development that adheres to web-standards.

  16. Barrier-Free Design: Access to and Use of Buildings by Physically Disabled People = Amenagement pour Acces Facile: Acces Facile aux Immeubles et Leur Utilisation par les Personnes Handicapees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Works Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The manual describes, for people with physical disabilities, a building standard of accessibility and the policy for its application. Policies address both new construction and renovation work based on principles of building accessibility to a broad range of users, public service accessibility, and equality of access to employment opportunities.…

  17. An Evaluation of Spatial Distribution of Public Parking Facilities in Huizhou Downtown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiasheng; Bai, Yang; Chen, Ying

    2016-11-01

    The survey and evaluation of existing public parking facilities were carried out, which had important practical significance to resolve conflicts over demand and supply of parking facilities. Taking Huizhou downtown as a study area, we surveyed parking facilities mainly by daily observing and recording. Parking facilities supply, characteristics, and demand were analysed by calculating parking utilization and turnover rate. Based on GIS, the distance-based and time-based accessibility of parking facilities were analysed to evaluate spatial distribution. The results indicated that a large spatial difference in supply and characteristics of parking was shown in public parking facilities of Huizhou downtown and that the parking demand was large. Furthermore, there existed imbalance in spatial distribution of parking facilities in Huizhou downtown area. Our study suggested that it was imbalanced and irrational between parking facilities supply and parking demand, that the planning of parking facilities was inadequate and that management system was incomplete.

  18. Modifying the Existing Campus Building for Accessibility: Accessible Products Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotler, Stephen Richard

    This catalog is intended to assist architects and college administrators to select products that help physically handicapped people lead lives free of architectural barriers. The product information, obtained directly from the manufacturers, is listed on comparative matrix sheets, that can be used to achieve the design recommendations. Products of…

  19. North American deep underground laboratories: Soudan Underground Laboratory, SNOLab, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesko, Kevin T.

    2015-08-01

    Over the past several decades, fundamental physics experiments have required access to deep underground laboratories to satisfy the increasingly strict requirements for ultra-low background environments and shielding from cosmic rays. In this presentation, I summarize the existing and anticipated physics programs and laboratory facilities of North America's deep facilities: The Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, SNOLab in Ontario, Canada, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota.

  20. National Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility

    Cancer.gov

    Information about the National Cryo-EM Facility at NCI, created to provide researchers access to the latest cryo-EM technology for high resolution imaging. Includes timeline for installation and how to access the facility.

  1. An evaluation of NCRP report 151--radiation shielding design for radiotherapy facilities, and a feasibility study for 6 MV open-door treatments in an existing high-energy radiation therapy bunker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kildea, John

    This thesis describes a study of shielding design techniques used for radiation therapy facilities that employ megavoltage linear accelerators. Specifically, an evaluation of the shielding design formalism described in NCRP report 151 was undertaken and a feasibility study for open-door 6 MV radiation therapy treatments in existing 6 MV, 18 MV treatment rooms at the Montreal General Hospital (MGH) was conducted. To evaluate the shielding design formalism of NCRP 151, barrier-attenuated equivalent doses were measured for several of the treatment rooms at the MGH and compared with expectations from NCRP 151 calculations. It was found that, while the insight and recommendations of NCRP 151 are very valuable, its dose predictions are not always correct. As such, the NCRP 151 methodology is best used in conjunction with physical measurements. The feasibility study for 6 MV open-door treatments made use of the NCRP 151 formalism, together with physical measurements for realistic 6 MV workloads. The results suggest that, dosimetrically, 6 MV open door treatments are feasible. A conservative estimate for the increased dose at the door arising from such treatments is 0.1 mSv, with a 1/8 occupancy factor, as recommended in NCRP 151, included.

  2. Problems of Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servedio, William; McLeod, William

    1980-01-01

    Increased participation in recreational programing by persons with handicapping conditions is a right that calls for significant changes in accessibility of facilities. Both interior and exterior building modifications must be made. (CJ)

  3. Impact of supervised drug consumption services on access to and engagement with care at a palliative and supportive care facility for people living with HIV/AIDS: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Ryan; Dilley, Laura B; Guirguis-Younger, Manal; Hwang, Stephen W; Small, Will

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Improvements in the availability and effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have prolonged the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, mortality rates have remained high among populations that encounter barriers to accessing and adhering to HAART, notably people who use drugs. This population consequently has a high burden of illness and complex palliative and supportive care needs, but is often unable to access these services due to anti-drug policies and discrimination. In Vancouver, Canada, the Dr. Peter Centre (DPC), which operates a 24-bed residential HIV/AIDS care facility, has sought to improve access to palliative and supportive care services by adopting a comprehensive harm reduction strategy, including supervised injection services. We undertook this study to explore how the integration of comprehensive harm reduction services into this setting shapes access to and engagement with care. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 DPC residents between November 2010 and August 2011. Interviews made use of a semistructured interview guide which facilitated discussion regarding how the DPC Residence's model of care (a) shaped healthcare access, (b) influenced healthcare interactions and (c) impacted drug use practices and overall health. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Results Participant accounts highlight how the harm reduction policy altered the structural-environmental context of healthcare services and thus mediated access to palliative and supportive care services. Furthermore, this approach fostered an atmosphere in which drug use could be discussed without the risk of punitive action, and thus increased openness between residents and staff. Finally, participants reported that the environmental supports provided by the DPC Residence decreased drug-related risks and improved health outcomes, including HAART adherence and survival. Conclusions This study highlights how adopting

  4. AccessMod 3.0: computing geographic coverage and accessibility to health care services using anisotropic movement of patients

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Nicolas; Ebener, Steeve

    2008-01-01

    Background Access to health care can be described along four dimensions: geographic accessibility, availability, financial accessibility and acceptability. Geographic accessibility measures how physically accessible resources are for the population, while availability reflects what resources are available and in what amount. Combining these two types of measure into a single index provides a measure of geographic (or spatial) coverage, which is an important measure for assessing the degree of accessibility of a health care network. Results This paper describes the latest version of AccessMod, an extension to the Geographical Information System ArcView 3.×, and provides an example of application of this tool. AccessMod 3 allows one to compute geographic coverage to health care using terrain information and population distribution. Four major types of analysis are available in AccessMod: (1) modeling the coverage of catchment areas linked to an existing health facility network based on travel time, to provide a measure of physical accessibility to health care; (2) modeling geographic coverage according to the availability of services; (3) projecting the coverage of a scaling-up of an existing network; (4) providing information for cost effectiveness analysis when little information about the existing network is available. In addition to integrating travelling time, population distribution and the population coverage capacity specific to each health facility in the network, AccessMod can incorporate the influence of landscape components (e.g. topography, river and road networks, vegetation) that impact travelling time to and from facilities. Topographical constraints can be taken into account through an anisotropic analysis that considers the direction of movement. We provide an example of the application of AccessMod in the southern part of Malawi that shows the influences of the landscape constraints and of the modes of transportation on geographic coverage

  5. Aeronautical facilities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the free world's aeronautical facilities was undertaken and an evaluation made on where the relative strengths and weaknesses exist. Special emphasis is given to NASA's own capabilities and needs. The types of facilities surveyed are: Wind Tunnels; Airbreathing Propulsion Facilities; and Flight Simulators

  6. Lack of access to treatment as a barrier to HCV screening: a facility-based assessment in the Indian health service.

    PubMed

    Reilley, Brigg; Leston, Jessica; Redd, John T; Geiger, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued new recommendations to screen persons born between 1945 and 1965 for hepatitis C virus. Federal facilities in the US Indian Health Service were surveyed on knowledge and support for the hepatitis C virus recommendations, as well as barriers and concerns.

  7. 77 FR 36231 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... standards for residential facilities are the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS). When HUD... residential facilities covered by the ABA are the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS).\\5\\ HUD...

  8. Nondiscrimination on the basis of disability by public accommodations and in commercial facilities; Americans With Disabilities Act accessibility guidelines for buildings and facilities--Department of Justice. Final rule: technical amendment.

    PubMed

    1993-04-05

    This document contains technical amendments to the regulations on nondiscrimination on the basis of disability by public accommodations and in commercial facilities, which implement title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and to appendix A to those regulations. This final rule makes some technical corrections to the regulations and amends the regulations to reference an Office and Management and Budget control number in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980, as amended.

  9. 33 CFR 125.07 - Waterfront facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waterfront facility. 125.07...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIALS FOR PERSONS REQUIRING ACCESS TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.07 Waterfront facility. The term waterfront facility as used in this subchapter, means...

  10. Socio Economic Position in TB Prevalence and Access to Services: Results from a Population Prevalence Survey and a Facility-Based Survey in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Shahed; Quaiyum, Mohammad Abdul; Zaman, Khalequ; Banu, Sayera; Husain, Mohammad Ashaque; Islam, Mohammad Akramul; Cooreman, Erwin; Borgdorff, Martien; Lönnroth, Knut; Salim, Abdul Hamid; van Leth, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Background In Bangladesh DOTS has been provided free of charge since 1993, yet information on access to TB services by different population group is not well documented. The objective of this study was to assess and compare the socio economic position (SEP) of actively detected cases from the community and the cases being routinely detected under National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTP) in Bangladesh. Methods and Findings SEP was assessed by validated asset item for each of the 21,427 households included in the national tuberculosis prevalence survey 2007–2009. A principal component analysis generated household scores and categorized in quartiles. The distribution of 33 actively identified cases was compared with the 240 NTP cases over the identical SEP quartiles to evaluate access to TB services by different groups of the population. The population prevalence of tuberculosis was 5 times higher in the lowest quartiles of population (95.4, 95% CI: 48.0–189.7) to highest quartile population (19.5, 95% CI: 6.9–55.0). Among the 33 cases detected during survey, 25 (75.8%) were from lower two quartiles, and the rest 8 (24.3%) were from upper two quartiles. Among TB cases detected passively under NTP, more than half of them 137 (57.1%) were from uppermost two quartiles, 98 (41%) from the second quartile, and 5 (2%) in the lowest quartile of the population. This distribution is not affected when adjusted for other factors or interactions among them. Conclusions The findings indicate that despite availability free of charge, DOTS is not equally accessed by the poorer sections of the population. However, these figures should be interpreted with caution since there is a need for additional studies that assess in-depth poverty indicators and its determinants in relation to access of the TB services provided in Bangladesh. PMID:23028718

  11. Facility Focus: Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses design and architectural features of two new science facilities at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida, and a new graduate research tower the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Notes the important convenience associated with interior windows in these facilities, which allow researchers, faculty, and students to see…

  12. 33 CFR 106.260 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.260 Security measures for access control. (a)...

  13. 33 CFR 106.260 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.260 Security measures for access control. (a)...

  14. 33 CFR 106.260 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.260 Security measures for access control. (a)...

  15. Biosecurity measures in 48 isolation facilities managing highly infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Puro, Vincenzo; Fusco, Francesco M; Schilling, Stefan; Thomson, Gail; De Iaco, Giuseppina; Brouqui, Philippe; Maltezou, Helena C; Bannister, Barbara; Gottschalk, René; Brodt, Hans-Rheinhard; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Biosecurity measures are traditionally applied to laboratories, but they may also be usefully applied in highly specialized clinical settings, such as the isolation facilities for the management of patients with highly infectious diseases (eg, viral hemorrhagic fevers, SARS, smallpox, potentially severe pandemic flu, and MDR- and XDR-tuberculosis). In 2009 the European Network for Highly Infectious Diseases conducted a survey in 48 isolation facilities in 16 European countries to determine biosecurity measures for access control to the facility. Security personnel are present in 39 facilities (81%). In 35 facilities (73%), entrance to the isolation area is restricted; control methods include electronic keys, a PIN system, closed-circuit TV, and guards at the doors. In 25 facilities (52%), identification and registration of all staff entering and exiting the isolation area are required. Access control is used in most surveyed centers, but specific lacks exist in some facilities. Further data are needed to assess other biosecurity aspects, such as the security measures during the transportation of potentially contaminated materials and measures to address the risk of an "insider attack."

  16. Biosecurity Measures in 48 Isolation Facilities Managing Highly Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Puro, Vincenzo; Schilling, Stefan; Thomson, Gail; De Iaco, Giuseppina; Brouqui, Philippe; Maltezou, Helena C.; Bannister, Barbara; Gottschalk, René; Brodt, Hans-Rheinhard; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Biosecurity measures are traditionally applied to laboratories, but they may also be usefully applied in highly specialized clinical settings, such as the isolation facilities for the management of patients with highly infectious diseases (eg, viral hemorrhagic fevers, SARS, smallpox, potentially severe pandemic flu, and MDR- and XDR-tuberculosis). In 2009 the European Network for Highly Infectious Diseases conducted a survey in 48 isolation facilities in 16 European countries to determine biosecurity measures for access control to the facility. Security personnel are present in 39 facilities (81%). In 35 facilities (73%), entrance to the isolation area is restricted; control methods include electronic keys, a PIN system, closed-circuit TV, and guards at the doors. In 25 facilities (52%), identification and registration of all staff entering and exiting the isolation area are required. Access control is used in most surveyed centers, but specific lacks exist in some facilities. Further data are needed to assess other biosecurity aspects, such as the security measures during the transportation of potentially contaminated materials and measures to address the risk of an “insider attack.” PMID:22571373

  17. Future User Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, Lee

    2002-10-01

    The southeastern part of the U.S. is blessed with an array of national user facilities that are accessible to scientists in the region. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates 17 officially designated user facilities for the Department of Energy, the Jefferson Lab operates the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and a number of universities have forefront experimental facilities that are widely accessible. The long lead time necessary to originate and construct new user facilities makes it imperative to consider the needs of the physical sciences 10 to 20 years in the future. The construction of the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL positions the southeast to lead in neutron science. Upgrades are desired for CEBAF and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (ORNL). The more future possibilities are less clear, but are becoming a focus of strategic planning among the national laboratories. Possibilities may arise in the U.S. for next-generation light sources, large computational centers, advanced fusion devices, nanotechnology centers, and perhaps facilities that are not yet contemplated. A regional discussion of the needs for large-scale user facilities in the southeast is important.

  18. Digital Scholarship and Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losoff, Barbara; Pence, Harry E.

    2010-01-01

    Open access publications provide scholars with unrestricted access to the "conversation" that is the basis for the advancement of knowledge. The large number of open access journals, archives, and depositories already in existence demonstrates the technical and economic viability of providing unrestricted access to the literature that is the…

  19. Use of the Wilkinson catalyst for the ortho-C-H heteroarylation of aromatic amines: facile access to highly extended π-conjugated heteroacenes for organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yumin; Wu, Di; Huang, Jingsheng; Guo, Qiang; Li, Juan; You, Jingsong

    2014-11-03

    An unprecedented catalytic system composed of the Wilkinson catalyst [Rh(PPh3)3Cl] and CF3COOH enabled the highly regioselective cross-coupling of aromatic amines with a variety of heteroarenes through dual C-H bond cleavage. This protocol provided a facile and rapid route from readily available substrates to (2-aminophenyl)heteroaryl compounds, which may be conveniently transformed into highly extended π-conjugated heteroacenes. The experimental studies and calculations showed that thianaphtheno[3,2-b]indoles have large HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and low-lying HOMO levels, and could therefore potentially be high-performance organic semiconductors. Herein we report the first use of a rhodium(I) catalyst for oxidative C-H/C-H coupling reactions. The current innovative catalyst system is much less expensive than [RhCp*Cl2]2/AgSbF6 and could open the door for the application of this approach to other types of C-H activation processes.

  20. HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSISTANCE RESOURCES: POLLUTION PREVENTION AND COMPLIANCE ASSISTANCE FOR HEALTHCARE FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This CD ROM is a result of several healthcare guidance documents coming into existence around the same time and the need for one tool where healthcare facilities could have access to these documents and other valuable healthcare resources regardless of connection to the internet....

  1. Cogeneration for existing alfalfa processing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This study is designed to look at the application of gas-turbine generator cogeneration to a typical Nebraska alfalfa processing mill. The practicality is examined of installing a combustion turbine generator at a plant site and modifying existing facilities for generating electricity, utilizing the electricity generated, selling excess electricity to the power company and incorporating the turbine exhaust flow as a drying medium for the alfalfa. The results of this study are not conclusive but the findings are summarized.

  2. 20 CFR 655.350 - Public access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Nurses § 655.350 Public access. (a) Public examination at ETA. ETA shall make available for public... petitions (if any) for H-1A nurses, and for each such facility, a copy of the facility's attestation and any... thereafter for so long as the facility uses any H-1 or H-1A nurse under the attestation, the facility...

  3. Implications for informatics given expanding access to care for Veterans and other populations.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian E; Haggstrom, David A; Weiner, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Recent investigations into appointment scheduling within facilities operated by the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) illuminate systemic challenges in meeting its goal of providing timely access to care for all Veterans. In the wake of these investigations, new policies have been enacted to expand access to care at VA facilities as well as non-VA facilities if the VA is unable to provide access within a reasonable timeframe or a Veteran lives more than 40 miles from a VA medical facility. These policies are similar to broader health reform efforts that seek to expand access to care for other vulnerable populations. In this perspective, we discuss the informatics implications of expanded access within the VA and its wider applicability across the US health system. Health systems will require robust health information exchange, to maintain coordination while access to care is expanded. Existing informatics research can guide short-term implementation; furthermore, new research is needed to generate evidence about how best to achieve the long-term aim of expanded access to care.

  4. 30 CFR 57.20008 - Toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toilet facilities. 57.20008 Section 57.20008....20008 Toilet facilities. (a) Toilet facilities shall be provided at locations that are compatible with the mine operations and that are readily accessible to mine personnel. (b) The facilities shall...

  5. 30 CFR 56.20008 - Toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toilet facilities. 56.20008 Section 56.20008... Toilet facilities. (a) Toilet facilities shall be provided at locations that are compatible with the mine operations and that are readily accessible to mine personnel. (b) The facilities shall be kept clean...

  6. Physical Education Facilities for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Larry; Frederick, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    Physical education facilities at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio have been adapted for the recreational needs of handicapped students. Changes include a special exercise room, accessible locker and shower facilities, a pool area, and a wheelchair repair shop. (CJ)

  7. Do poorer people have poorer access to local resources and facilities? The distribution of local resources by area deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne

    2008-09-01

    It has commonly been suggested that in modern cities individual or household deprivation (for example, low income or education) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of jobs or good schools), in ways which damage the health of the poorest and increase health inequalities. The aim of this study was to determine the location of a range of resources and exposures by deprivation in a UK city. We examined the location of 42 resources in Glasgow City, Scotland, in 2005-2006, by quintile of small area deprivation. Measures included number per 1000 population, network distance to nearest resource, and percentage of data zones containing at least one of each type of resource. Twelve resources had higher density in, and/or were closer to or more common in, more deprived neighbourhoods: public nurseries, public primary schools, police stations, pharmacies, credit unions, post offices, bus stops, bingo halls, public swimming pools, public sports centres, outdoor play areas, and vacant and derelict land/buildings. Sixteen had higher density in, and/or were closer to, or more common in, more affluent neighbourhoods: public secondary schools, private schools, banks, building societies, museums/art galleries, railway stations, subway stations, tennis courts, bowling greens, private health clubs, private swimming pools, colleges, A & E hospitals, parks, waste disposal sites, and tourist attractions. Private nurseries, Universities, fire stations, general, dental and ophthalmic practices, pawn brokers, ATMs, supermarkets, fast food chains, cafes, public libraries, golf courses, and cinemas showed no clear pattern by deprivation. Thus it appears that in the early 21st century access to resources does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods in the UK. We conclude that we need to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date and context-specific empirical evidence on the distribution of neighbourhood resources, and to engage in further research on

  8. Do poorer people have poorer access to local resources and facilities? The distribution of local resources by area deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland☆

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne

    2008-01-01

    It has commonly been suggested that in modern cities individual or household deprivation (for example, low income or education) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of jobs or good schools), in ways which damage the health of the poorest and increase health inequalities. The aim of this study was to determine the location of a range of resources and exposures by deprivation in a UK city. We examined the location of 42 resources in Glasgow City, Scotland, in 2005–2006, by quintile of small area deprivation. Measures included number per 1000 population, network distance to nearest resource, and percentage of data zones containing at least one of each type of resource. Twelve resources had higher density in, and/or were closer to or more common in, more deprived neighbourhoods: public nurseries, public primary schools, police stations, pharmacies, credit unions, post offices, bus stops, bingo halls, public swimming pools, public sports centres, outdoor play areas, and vacant and derelict land/buildings. Sixteen had higher density in, and/or were closer to, or more common in, more affluent neighbourhoods: public secondary schools, private schools, banks, building societies, museums/art galleries, railway stations, subway stations, tennis courts, bowling greens, private health clubs, private swimming pools, colleges, A & E hospitals, parks, waste disposal sites, and tourist attractions. Private nurseries, Universities, fire stations, general, dental and ophthalmic practices, pawn brokers, ATMs, supermarkets, fast food chains, cafes, public libraries, golf courses, and cinemas showed no clear pattern by deprivation. Thus it appears that in the early 21st century access to resources does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods in the UK. We conclude that we need to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date and context-specific empirical evidence on the distribution of neighbourhood resources, and to engage in further research

  9. Concept for an advanced exotic beam facility based on ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    The acceleration of beams of unstable nuclei has opened up new research frontiers. Experiments at existing accelerators, and particularly at the first generation of radioactive ion beam facilities, have demonstrated convincingly that unique information becomes accessible. Critical cross sections for astrophysical processes that were impossible to obtain previously, qualitatively new and unexpected nuclear structure effects in nuclei far from stability, completely new approaches to studies of nuclear decays, reactions and structure, all have triggered much excitement for this new dimension in nuclear research. To explore this new dimension, an extension of present technical capabilities and facilities is needed. This need and its scientific basis were discussed in various workshops and symposia and in the Isospin Laboratory (ISL) White Paper. A report by the European community was published recently on prospects of radioactive beam facilities in Europe, and some next-generation projects for such facilities are starting in both Europe and Japan.

  10. National Facilities study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This study provides a set of recommendations for improving the effectiveness of our nation's aeronautics and space facilities. The study plan considers current and future government and commercial needs as well as DOD and NASA mission requirements through the year 2023. It addresses shortfalls in existing capabilities, new facility requirements, upgrades, consolidations, and phase-out of existing facilities. If the recommendations are implemented, they will provide world-class capability where it is vital to our country's needs and make us more efficient in meeting future needs.

  11. Access to Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how modern library systems can protect collections while not impeding disabled persons' access to facilities. Describes the problem with swinging gates and offers some security alternatives, such as high-tech gateless security, video detection, and voice alarms, that do not impede disabled persons' movements. (RJM)

  12. NRL Tropical Exposure Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-04-01

    canal. To the east, on the opposite side of Limon Bay, lies Cristobal , Coco Solo, and Colon . Travel between Fort Sherman and Cristobal is accomplished...precision equipment. I 4 NRL TROPICAL EXPOSURE FACILITIES 5 Accessibility Proximity of the station to the port of Cristobal and to the Naval Air Station

  13. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  14. Evaluation of spatial accessibility to primary healthcare using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtsho, S.; Corner, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    Primary health care is considered to be one of the most important aspects of the health care system in any country, which directly helps in improving the health of the population. Potential spatial accessibility is a very important component of the primary health care system. One technique for studying spatial accessibility is by computing a gravity-based measure within a geographic information system (GIS) framework. In this study, straight-line distances between the associated population clusters and the health facilities and the provider-to-population ratio were used to compute the spatial accessibility of the population clusters for the whole country. Bhutan has been chosen as the case study area because it is quite easy to acquire and process data for the whole country due to its small size and population. The spatial accessibility measure of the 203 sub-districts shows noticeable disparities in health care accessibility in this country with about only 19 sub-districts achieving good health accessibility ranking. This study also examines a number of different health accessibility policy scenarios which can assist in identifying the most effective health policy from amongst many probable planning scenarios. Such a health accessibility measuring system can be incorporated into an existing spatial health system in developing countries to facilitate the proper planning and equitable distribution of health resources.

  15. Arteriovenous Access

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Yilmaz, Serdar; Lok, Charmaine; Leung, Kelvin; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Complications of vascular access lead to morbidity and may reduce quality of life. In this module, we review both infectious and noninfectious arteriovenous access complications including neuropathy, aneurysm, and high-output access. For the challenging patients who have developed many complications and are now nearing their last vascular access, we highlight some potentially novel approaches. PMID:28270919

  16. Rendezvous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

    1988-11-01

    The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

  17. A new polarized neutron interferometry facility at the NCNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, C. B.; Arif, M.; Cory, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Williams, C. J.; Huber, M. G.; Pushin, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new monochromatic beamline and facility has been installed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) devoted to neutron interferometry in the research areas of spin control, spin manipulation, quantum mechanics, quantum information science, spintronics, and material science. This facility is possible in part because of advances in decoherence free subspace interferometer designs that have demonstrated consistent contrast in the presence of vibrational noise; a major environmental constraint that has prevented neutron interferometry from being applied at other neutron facilities. Neutron interferometry measures the phase difference between a neutron wave function propagating along two spatially separated paths. It is a practical example of self interference and due to its modest path separation of a few centimeters allows the insertion of samples and macroscopic neutron spin rotators. Phase shifts can be caused by gravitational, magnetic and nuclear interactions as well as purely quantum mechanical effects making interferometer a robust tool in neutron research. This new facility is located in the guide hall of the NCNR upstream of the existing Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOF) and has several advantages over the NIOF including higher incident flux, better neutron polarization, and increased accessibility. The long term goal for the new facility is to be a user supported beamline and makes neutron interferometer more generally available to the scientific community. This paper addresses both the capabilities and characteristics of the new facility.

  18. Suitport extra-vehicular access facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a system for entering and leaving a space station, a bulkhead divides the module into an antechamber and an airlock. A space suit has a portable life support system (PLSS) interface on its back. The suit is removably attached to the bulkhead by the interface at a hatch in the bulkhead. A PLSS is detachably mounted in the hatch cover, which is pivotally mounted to move away from the hatch to allow an astronaut to enter the suit through the open hatch and the PLSS interface. After entering the suit, the astronaut closes the hatch and attaches the PLSS to the suit by the operating control to which the glove portion of the suit is attached. The astronaut initiates pumpdown of the airlock with the control. When the pumpdown is complete, the astronaut opens the hatch, disconnects the PLSS from the hatch cover, pivots the pressure vessels of the control to one side on their supports, disconnects the glove portions from the pressure vessels and goes EVA.

  19. Making Facilities Accessible to the Physically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. Construction Fund, Albany, NY.

    Guidelines on performance criteria for the State University of New York consider two main types of handicapped: the ambulant and semi-ambulant, including some physically handicapped, the visually and aurally handicapped, and persons with cardiac conditions; and persons confined to wheel chairs. The handicapped and planning for them are discussed.…

  20. 40 CFR 63.1157 - Emission standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1157 Emission standards for existing sources. (a... percent. (b) Hydrochloric acid regeneration plants. (1) No owner or operator of an existing affected...

  1. Greening Existing Tribal Buildings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance about improving sustainability in existing tribal casinos and manufactured homes. Many steps can be taken to make existing buildings greener and healthier. They may also reduce utility and medical costs.

  2. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  3. Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. National facilities study. Volume 4: Space operations facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The principal objectives of the National Facilities Study (NFS) were to: (1) determine where U.S. facilities do not meet national aerospace needs; (2) define new facilities required to make U.S. capabilities 'world class' where such improvements are in the national interest; (3) define where consolidation and phase-out of existing facilities is appropriate; and (4) develop a long-term national plan for world-class facility acquisition and shared usage. The Space Operations Facilities Task Group defined discrete tasks to accomplish the above objectives within the scope of the study. An assessment of national space operations facilities was conducted to determine the nation's capability to meet the requirements of space operations during the next 30 years. The mission model used in the study to define facility requirements is described in Volume 3. Based on this model, the major focus of the Task Group was to identify any substantive overlap or underutilization of space operations facilities and to identify any facility shortfalls that would necessitate facility upgrades or new facilities. The focus of this initial study was directed toward facility recommendations related to consolidations, closures, enhancements, and upgrades considered necessary to efficiently and effectively support the baseline requirements model. Activities related to identifying facility needs or recommendations for enhancing U.S. international competitiveness and achieving world-class capability, where appropriate, were deferred to a subsequent study phase.

  5. Robotic tele-existence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachi, Susumu; Arai, Hirohiko; Maeda, Taro

    1989-01-01

    Tele-existence is an advanced type of teleoperation system that enables a human operator at the controls to perform remote manipulation tasks dexterously with the feeling that he or she exists in the remote anthropomorphic robot in the remote environment. The concept of a tele-existence is presented, the principle of the tele-existence display method is explained, some of the prototype systems are described, and its space application is discussed.

  6. 20 CFR 655.350 - Public access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES Attestations by Facilities Using Nonimmigrant Aliens as Registered Nurses § 655.350 Public access. (a) Public examination at ETA. ETA shall make available for public... petitions (if any) for H-1A nurses, and for each such facility, a copy of the facility's attestation and...

  7. 20 CFR 655.350 - Public access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES Attestations by Facilities Using Nonimmigrant Aliens as Registered Nurses § 655.350 Public access. (a) Public examination at ETA. ETA shall make available for public... petitions (if any) for H-1A nurses, and for each such facility, a copy of the facility's attestation and...

  8. 20 CFR 655.350 - Public access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES Attestations by Facilities Using Nonimmigrant Aliens as Registered Nurses § 655.350 Public access. (a) Public examination at ETA. ETA shall make available for public... petitions (if any) for H-1A nurses, and for each such facility, a copy of the facility's attestation and...

  9. Major Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report presents priorities for new facilities and new capabilities at existing facilities with initial costs of at least $5 million. The new facilities in order of priority are: (1) a 6 GeV synchrotron radiation facility; (2) an advanced steady state neutron facility; (3) a 1 to 2 GeV synchrotron radiation facility; and (4) a high intensity…

  10. 44 CFR 331.5 - Production facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Production facilities. 331.5... AND FACILITIES IN LABOR SURPLUS AREAS § 331.5 Production facilities. All Federal departments and... production facilities, including expansion, to the extent that such selection is consistent with existing...

  11. Health facility committees and facility management - exploring the nature and depth of their roles in Coast Province, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Community participation has been emphasized internationally as a way of enhancing accountability, as well as a means to enhance health goals in terms of coverage, access and effective utilization. In rural health facilities in Kenya, initiatives to increase community accountability have focused on Health Facility Committees (HFCs). In Coast Province the role of HFCs has been expanded with the introduction of direct funding of rural facilities. We explored the nature and depth of managerial engagement of HFCs at the facility level in two rural districts in this Coastal setting, and how this has contributed to community accountability Methods We conducted structured interviews with the health worker in-charge and with patients in 30 health centres and dispensaries. These data were supplemented with in-depth interviews with district managers, and with health workers and HFC members in 12 health centres and dispensaries. In-depth interviews with health workers and HFC members included a participatory exercise to stimulate discussion of the nature and depth of their roles in facility management. Results HFCs were generally functioning well and played an important role in facility operations. The breadth and depth of engagement had reportedly increased after the introduction of direct funding of health facilities which allowed HFCs to manage their own budgets. Although relations with facility staff were generally good, some mistrust was expressed between HFC members and health workers, and between HFC members and the broader community, partially reflecting a lack of clarity in HFC roles. Moreover, over half of exit interviewees were not aware of the HFC's existence. Women and less well-educated respondents were particularly unlikely to know about the HFC. Conclusions There is potential for HFCs to play an active and important role in health facility management, particularly where they have control over some facility level resources. However, to optimise their

  12. Frontier HED Science accessible on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Ho, D D; Ilinskij, A

    2007-09-24

    With the advent of high-energy-density (HED) experimental facilities, such as high-energy lasers and fast Z-pinch pulsed-power facilities, millimeter-scale quantities of matter can be placed in extreme states of density, temperature, and/or velocity. With the commissioning of the NIF laser facility in the very near future, regimes experimentally accessible will be pushed to even higher densities and pressures. This is enabling the emergence of a new class of experimental science, wherein the properties of matter and the processes that occur under the most extreme physical conditions can be examined in the laboratory. Areas particularly suitable to laboratory astrophysics include the study of opacities relevant to stellar interiors, equations of state relevant to planetary interiors, strong shock-driven nonlinear hydrodynamics and radiative dynamics relevant to supernova explosions and subsequent evolution, protostellar jets and high Mach number flows, radiatively driven molecular clouds, nonlinear photoevaporation front dynamics, and photoionized plasmas relevant to accretion disks around compact objects such as black holes and neutron stars. In the area of materials science and condensed matter physics, material properties such as phase, elastic coefficients such as shear modulus, Peierls stress, and transport coefficients such as thermal diffusivity can be accessed at considerably higher densities and pressure than any existing data. In the field of nonlinear optical phenomena, NIF will be an unparalleled setting for studying the nonlinear interactions of a ''statistical ensemble'' of 100 high power beams in large volumes of plasma. In the area of nuclear physics, nuclear reaction rates in dense, highly screened plasmas and on ignition implosions, reactions from excited nuclear states via multi-hit reactions should be possible. A selection from this frontier HED science accessible on NIF will be presented.

  13. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  14. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  15. War No Longer Exists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    population centers is also not a new phenomenon. Constantinople was first sacked by Christians in 1204, then by the Ottomans in 1453. Oliver Cromwell...this-day-in-history/ sack -of-lawrence-kansas (accessed February 7, 2012). 48 82 Lowell Thomas’ multimedia show in 1919-1924 was seen by more

  16. A Materials Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Avery, Don E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Materials Exposure Facility (MEF) is to provide a test bed in space for conducting long-term (greater than one year) materials experiments which require exposure to the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment. The proposed MEF is planned to be an integral part of the agency's Space Environments and Effects Research Program. The facility will provide experiment trays similar to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Each tray location is planned to have a power and data interface and robotic installation and removal provisions. Space environmental monitoring for each side of the MEF will also be provided. Since routine access to MEF for specimen retrieval is extremely important to the materials research, Space Station Freedom has been chosen as the preferred MEF carrier.

  17. MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION ASSESSMENT: COMBUSTION CONTROL AT EXISTING FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides the supporting data and rationale used to establish baseline emission levels for model plants that represent portions of the planned and projected population of municipal waste combustors (MWCs). The baseline emissions represent performance levels that are exp...

  18. Facilities Data System Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acridge, Charles W.; Ford, Tim M.

    The purposes of this manual are to set forth the scope and procedures for the maintenance and operation of the University of California facilities Data System (FDX) and to serve as a reference document for users of the system. FDX is an information system providing planning and management data about the existing physical plant. That is, it…

  19. Modelling study to evaluate two variants for accessing a deep geological repository from the point of view of long-term safety

    SciTech Connect

    Poller, Andreas; Zuidema, Piet; Schneider, Jurg W.; Smith, Paul; Mayer, Gerhard; Hayek, Mohamed

    2013-07-01

    Siting a deep geological repository for radioactive waste essentially involves two interrelated steps: deciding on an appropriate geological environment for the underground facilities and selecting a suitable location for the associated surface facility. An acceptable solution is more easily achieved if some flexibility exists for siting the surface facility, irrespective of the exact position of the underground facilities. Such flexibility is available if a ramp is used as the main access route from the surface facility to the underground facilities. Another option is to use a combination of shafts and (sub)horizontal tunnels as the main access route. Both variants include shafts for ventilation, etc. In this paper, the two variants (i) main access via ramp and (ii) main access via shaft are compared in terms of long-term safety. To this end, the entire network of underground tunnels of a deep geological repository is implemented in an analytical resistor network flow model. Radionuclide release through the tunnel system and the host rock is then calculated with a numerical network transport model, using as input the results from the flow model. The results clearly indicate that, even in case of hypothetically deficient horizontal and sub-horizontal sealing elements, the choice between ramp and shaft as the main access route is irrelevant to long-term safety. (authors)

  20. Regulating access via economic principles

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, P.J.; Zona, J.D.

    1999-09-01

    The right policy to balance the benefits of allowing the distco to fully utilize the efficiency advantage of vertical integration against the risks of anticompetitive conduct, is neither to split up the distco not to compel that it share all its facilities. This article shows that the general policy of compelling access to essential facilities, accompanied by effective monitoring and imputation rules, will strike the right balance: maximizing the benefits of competition, while preventing anticompetitive conduct.

  1. Making Space for Children: A Toolkit for Starting a Child Care Facilities Fund. Starting Points: Meeting the Needs of Our Youngest Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershaw, Amy

    To address the growing demand for high-quality child care, many communities are seeking to develop specialized child care facilities funds to build new, and improve the quality of existing, child care programs. This toolkit is designed for policymakers, nonprofit leaders, child care providers, and others interested in increasing access to…

  2. Facility Planning for Technology Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Tweed W.; Stewart, G. Kent

    1993-01-01

    When planning new school buildings or modifications to existing structures, checking facility planning in relation to technology planning is critical. Areas requiring serious attention include space, electricity, lighting, security, furnishings, shielding, and acoustics. (MLF)

  3. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  4. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan; Jersey Inst Ansari, New; Jersey Inst, New

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  5. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  6. Spatial Access to Emergency Services in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A GIS-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tansley, Gavin; Schuurman, Nadine; Amram, Ofer; Yanchar, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Injury is a leading cause of the global disease burden, accounting for 10 percent of all deaths worldwide. Despite 90 percent of these deaths occurring in low and middle-income countries (LMICs), the majority of trauma research and infrastructure development has taken place in high-income settings. Furthermore, although accessible services are of central importance to a mature trauma system, there remains a paucity of literature describing the spatial accessibility of emergency services in LMICs. Using data from the Service Provision Assessment component of the Demographic and Health Surveys of Namibia and Haiti we defined the capabilities of healthcare facilities in each country in terms of their preparedness to provide emergency services. A Geographic Information System-based network analysis method was used to define 5- 10- and 50-kilometer catchment areas for all facilities capable of providing 24-hour care, higher-level resuscitative services or tertiary care. The proportion of a country’s population with access to each level of service was obtained by amalgamating the catchment areas with a population layer. A significant proportion of the population of both countries had poor spatial access to lower level services with 25% of the population of Haiti and 51% of the population of Namibia living further than 50 kilometers from a facility capable of providing 24-hour care. Spatial access to tertiary care was considerably lower with 51% of Haitians and 72% of Namibians having no access to these higher-level services within 50 kilometers. These results demonstrate a significant disparity in potential spatial access to emergency services in two LMICs compared to analogous estimates from high-income settings, and suggest that strengthening the capabilities of existing facilities may improve the equity of emergency services in these countries. Routine collection of georeferenced patient and facility data in LMICs will be important to understanding how spatial

  7. 76 FR 17064 - Shared Use Path Accessibility Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... pedestrians, bicyclists, skaters, equestrians, and other users. The guidelines will include technical... Urban Development, and United States Postal Service are authorized to issue enforceable accessibility... Facilities'' (July 2004) and the ``Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities'' (1999)....

  8. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  9. 22 CFR 219.149 - Program accessibility: Discrimination prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COOPERATION AGENCY, AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT § 219.149 Program accessibility: Discrimination... agency's facilities are inaccessible to or unusable by handicapped persons, be denied the benefits of,...

  10. 42 CFR 51.43 - Denial or delay of access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Access to Records..., or other legal representative of an individual with mental illness. Access to facilities, records...

  11. 42 CFR 51.43 - Denial or delay of access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Access to Records..., or other legal representative of an individual with mental illness. Access to facilities, records...

  12. 42 CFR 51.43 - Denial or delay of access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Access to Records..., or other legal representative of an individual with mental illness. Access to facilities, records...

  13. 42 CFR 51.43 - Denial or delay of access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Access to Records..., or other legal representative of an individual with mental illness. Access to facilities, records...

  14. 42 CFR 51.43 - Denial or delay of access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Access to Records..., or other legal representative of an individual with mental illness. Access to facilities, records...

  15. Experiments, conceptual design, preliminary cost estimates and schedules for an underground research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Korbin, G.; Wollenberg, H.; Wilson, C.; Strisower, B.; Chan, T.; Wedge, D.

    1981-09-01

    Plans for an underground research facility are presented, incorporating techniques to assess the hydrological and thermomechanical response of a rock mass to the introduction and long-term isolation of radioactive waste, and to assess the effects of excavation on the hydrologic integrity of a repository and its subsequent backfill, plugging, and sealing. The project is designed to utilize existing mine or civil works for access to experimental areas and is estimated to last 8 years at a total cost for contruction and operation of $39.0 million (1981 dollars). Performing the same experiments in an existing underground research facility would reduce the duration to 7-1/2 years and cost $27.7 million as a lower-bound estimate. These preliminary plans and estimates should be revised after specific sites are identified which would accommodate the facility.

  16. Biotechnology Facility: An ISS Microgravity Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will support several facilities dedicated to scientific research. One such facility, the Biotechnology Facility (BTF), is sponsored by the Microgravity Sciences and Applications Division (MSAD) and developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The BTF is scheduled for delivery to the ISS via Space Shuttle in April 2005. The purpose of the BTF is to provide: (1) the support structure and integration capabilities for the individual modules in which biotechnology experiments will be performed, (2) the capability for human-tended, repetitive, long-duration biotechnology experiments, and (3) opportunities to perform repetitive experiments in a short period by allowing continuous access to microgravity. The MSAD has identified cell culture and tissue engineering, protein crystal growth, and fundamentals of biotechnology as areas that contain promising opportunities for significant advancements through low-gravity experiments. The focus of this coordinated ground- and space-based research program is the use of the low-gravity environment of space to conduct fundamental investigations leading to major advances in the understanding of basic and applied biotechnology. Results from planned investigations can be used in applications ranging from rational drug design and testing, cancer diagnosis and treatments and tissue engineering leading to replacement tissues.

  17. Does Unconscious Racism Exist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillian, Lincoln

    2008-01-01

    This essay argues for the existence of a form of unconscious racism. Research on implicit prejudice provides good evidence that most persons have deeply held negative associations with minority groups that can lead to subtle discrimination without conscious awareness. The evidence for implicit attitudes is briefly reviewed. Criticisms of the…

  18. Relativity, Dimensionality, and Existence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, Vesselin

    A 100 years have passed since the advent of special relativity and 2008 will mark another important to all relativists anniversary - 100 years since Minkowski gave his talk "Space and Time" on September 21, 1908 in which he proposed the unifi- cation of space and time into an inseparable entity - space-time. Although special relativity has been an enormously successful physical theory no progress has been made in clarifying the question of existence of the objects represented by two of its basic concepts - space-time and world lines (or worldtubes in the case of extended bodies). The major reason for this failure appears to be the physicists' tradition to call such questions of existence philosophical. This tradition, however, is not quite consistent. In Newtonian mechanics physicists believe that they describe real objects whenever they talk about particles - one of the basic concepts of Newtonian physics. The situation is the same in quantum physics - no one questions the existence of electrons, protons, etc. Then why should the question of existence of worldtubes (representing particles in relativity) be regarded as a philosophical question?

  19. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

  20. 48 CFR 252.217-7011 - Access to vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to vessel. 252.217... Clauses 252.217-7011 Access to vessel. As prescribed at 217.7104(a), use the following clause: Access to... to the Contractor's facilities and access to vessel, on a non-interference basis, as necessary...