Science.gov

Sample records for accessibility nchs home

  1. Accessibility of Special Education Program Home Pages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Claudia P.; Bray, Marty; Algozzine, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    Eighty-nine special education Web sites were evaluated for accessibility errors. Most (73 percent) special education home pages had accessibility problems, and the majority of these errors severely limited access for individuals with disabilities. The majority of the errors can be easily corrected. Recommendations and methods for improving…

  2. Development of an integrated staircase lift for home access

    PubMed Central

    Mattie, Johanne L.; Borisoff, Jaimie F.; Leland, Danny; Miller, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stairways into buildings present a significant environmental barrier for those with mobility impairments, including older adults. A number of home access solutions that allow users to safely enter and exit the home exist, however these all have some limitations. The purpose of this work was to develop a novel, inclusive home access solution that integrates a staircase and a lift into one device. Method The development of an integrated staircase lift followed a structured protocol with stakeholders providing feedback at various stages in the design process, consistent with rehabilitation engineering design methods. Results A novel home access device was developed. The integrated staircase-lift has the following features: inclusivity, by a universal design that provides an option for either use of stairs or a lift; constant availability, with a lift platform always ready for use on either level; and potential aesthetic advantages when integrating the device into an existing home. The potential also exists for emergency descent during a power outage, and self-powered versions. Conclusions By engaging stakeholders in a user centred design process, insight on the limitations of existing home access solutions and specific feedback on our design guided development of a novel home access device. PMID:26793318

  3. High speed infrared optical wireless for home access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Dominic C.

    2013-12-01

    The availability of high-bandwidth internet connections to home gateways will place increasing demands on the home access network that provides connections to computers and other devices. In this paper the use of infrared optical wireless to provide connections to user appliances and terminals is discussed. The design and implementation of two demonstration systems operating at hundreds of Mbit/s and above are detailed. Future challenges are also discussed.

  4. Technology and Learning at Home: Findings from the Evaluation of the Home Access Programme Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewitt, C.; Parashar, U.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of a UK government initiative, introduced in late 2008 and closed in 2011, to provide a computer and 1 year of Internet connectivity to low-income households with children aged 5-19 years. This paper presents and discusses the findings from the evaluation of the initiative, the Home Access Programme (HAP) pilot study…

  5. Adolescents’ Access to Their Own Prescription Medications in the Home

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Durow, Paula Lynn; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Boyd, Carol J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this descriptive study was to determine adolescents’ access to their own medications at home, specifically prescription pain, stimulant, anti-anxiety, and sedative medications. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a cohort of 501 adolescents from two southeastern Michigan school districts. Participants were asked what medications had been prescribed to them during the previous six months; if they had received prescription medications, they were asked in-depth questions about them, including how medications were stored and supervised at home. Results The sample was comprised of adolescents in the 8th and 9th grades, and 50.9% were male. Participants were primarily White (72.9%, n = 365) or African American (21.6%, n = 108). Slightly less than half of the adolescents (45.9%, n=230) reported having been prescribed medications in the previous six months. Of this group, 14.3% (n = 33) had been prescribed pain medications, 9.6% (n = 22) stimulants, 1.7% (n = 4) anti-anxiety medications, and 0.9% (n = 2) sedatives. In total, 57 adolescents were prescribed medications in the pain, stimulant, anti-anxiety, or sedative categories (including controlled medications), and the majority (73.7%, n=42) reported that they had unsupervised access to medications with abuse potential. Conclusions The majority of adolescents who were prescribed medications in the pain, stimulant, anti-anxiety or sedative categories during the previous six months had unsupervised access to them at home. It is critical that clinicians educate parents and patients about the importance of proper storage and disposal of medications, particularly those with abuse potential. PMID:23683499

  6. Hegira adaptation of the NCHS weight and height charts.

    PubMed

    Osman, M I; Magbool, G; Kaul, K K

    1993-03-01

    The ages of Saudi children are recorded and based on the Hegira calendar. When charted on the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) weight and height charts, children will be at disadvantage since the Hegira year is shorter than the Gregorian year. In this paper, centiles for the NCHS reference population are estimated for age in Hegira years from 2-18 for height and weight for both sexes using mathematical interpolation. Charts are prepared for use in hospitals and health centers for children whose ages have been reported based on the Hegira calendar. PMID:17588024

  7. Hegira adaptation of the NCHS weight and height charts.

    PubMed

    Osman, M I; Magbool, G; Kaul, K K

    1993-03-01

    The ages of Saudi children are recorded and based on the Hegira calendar. When charted on the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) weight and height charts, children will be at disadvantage since the Hegira year is shorter than the Gregorian year. In this paper, centiles for the NCHS reference population are estimated for age in Hegira years from 2-18 for height and weight for both sexes using mathematical interpolation. Charts are prepared for use in hospitals and health centers for children whose ages have been reported based on the Hegira calendar.

  8. Home Delivery Medicament Program: access, inactivity and cardiovascular risk 1

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Roque da Silva; Arcuri, Edna Apparecida Moura; Lopes, Victor Cauê

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to verify causes of inactivity in the Home Delivery Medicament Program, as referred by users from a Primary Health Care Service in São Paulo, comparing them to the causes registered in the program and analyzing them in the theoretical model Concept of Access to Health. Methods: cross-sectional study, interviewing 111 inactive users; and documentary study in the program records. Results: half of the users did not know the condition of inactivity. Discrepancies were found between the user's and the program's information, observing different levels of agreement: Absence of physician and administrative staff member 0%; Transfer to other service 25%; Death 50%; Option to quit 50%; Address change 57% and Change in therapeutic schedule 80%. The users' feeling of accepting the program was observed. In the health access concept, inactivity can be explained in the information dimension, in the degree of asymmetry between the patient's and the health professional's knowledge, identified through the indicators: education, knowledge and information sources. Conclusions: due to the low education level, the user does not assimilate the information on the steps of the program flowchart, does not return for the assessment that guarantees its continuity. Consequently, (s)he stops receiving the medication and spends a long time without treatment, increasing the cardiovascular risk of hypertensive (92% of the sample), diabetic (44%) and dyslipidemic patients (31%). PMID:27737378

  9. Does government oversight improve access to nursing home care? Longitudinal evidence from US counties.

    PubMed

    Howard, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Gains in life expectancy around the world have increasingly placed pressure on governments to ensure that the elderly receive assistance with activities of daily living. This research examines the impact of government oversight of Medicaid payment policies on access to nursing home care services in the United States. Variation in price levels induced by a federal policy shift in 1997 is used to identify the effect of Medicaid reimbursements on the number of nursing homes and beds available. Court rulings prior to the policy change are used to categorically define a range of oversight treatments at the state level. Difference-in-differences estimates indicate a significant decline in access to nursing home care services for individuals living in states in which courts consistently ruled that Medicaid reimbursements did not meet the minimum standard implied by federal law. The findings suggest that nursing home care services were made more accessible through a combination of legislative and judicial oversight of Medicaid payment policies.

  10. Accessibility of Schools and Colleges of Education Home Pages for Individuals with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Marty

    Colleges of Education (COEs) use the World Wide Web to disseminate and gather information. Online barriers limit the accessibility of the Web for individuals with disabilities. This study evaluated the accessibility of COE home pages. Two hundred and fifty Web sites were randomly selected for evaluation. A software program was used to quantify the…

  11. FastStats: Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Home Health Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Data Alzheimer’s disease Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over [ ...

  12. A remote data access architecture for home-monitoring health-care applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Hung; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Kuo, Te-Son

    2007-03-01

    With the aging of the population and the increasing patient preference for receiving care in their own homes, remote home care is one of the fastest growing areas of health care in Taiwan and many other countries. Many remote home-monitoring applications have been developed and implemented to enable both formal and informal caregivers to have remote access to patient data so that they can respond instantly to any abnormalities of in-home patients. The aim of this technology is to give both patients and relatives better control of the health care, reduce the burden on informal caregivers and reduce visits to hospitals and thus result in a better quality of life for both the patient and his/her family. To facilitate their widespread adoption, remote home-monitoring systems take advantage of the low-cost features and popularity of the Internet and PCs, but are inherently exposed to several security risks, such as virus and denial-of-service (DoS) attacks. These security threats exist as long as the in-home PC is directly accessible by remote-monitoring users over the Internet. The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to improve the security of such systems, with the proposed architecture aimed at increasing the system availability and confidentiality of patient information. A broker server is introduced between the remote-monitoring devices and the in-home PCs. This topology removes direct access to the in-home PC, and a firewall can be configured to deny all inbound connections while the remote home-monitoring application is operating. This architecture helps to transfer the security risks from the in-home PC to the managed broker server, on which more advanced security measures can be implemented. The pros and cons of this novel architecture design are also discussed and summarized. PMID:16621655

  13. Medicare home health payment reform may jeopardize access for clinically complex and socially vulnerable patients.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Robert J; Russell, David; Peng, Timothy; Brickner, Carlin; Kurowski, Daniel; Christopher, Mary Ann; Sheehan, Kathleen M

    2014-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act directed Medicare to update its home health prospective payment system to reflect more recent data on costs and use of services-an exercise known as rebasing. As a result, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will reduce home health payments 3.5 percent per year in the period 2014-17. To determine the impact that these reductions could have on beneficiaries using home health care, we examined the Medicare reimbursement margins and the use of services in a national sample of 96,621 episodes of care provided by twenty-six not-for-profit home health agencies in 2011. We found that patients with clinically complex conditions and social vulnerability factors, such as living alone, had substantially higher service delivery costs than other home health patients. Thus, the socially vulnerable patients with complex conditions represent less profit-lower-to-negative Medicare margins-for home health agencies. This financial disincentive could reduce such patients' access to care as Medicare payments decline. Policy makers should consider the unique characteristics of these patients and ensure their continued access to Medicare's home health services when planning rebasing and future adjustments to the prospective payment system.

  14. Home Infotainment Platform - A Ubiquitous Access Device for Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Arpan; Prashant, M.; Ghose, Avik; Bhaumik, Chirabrata

    There is tremendous need for a low-cost Internet-Enabled Platform for developing countries like India that uses TV as the display medium and can connect to Internet using various available connectivity solutions. The paper presents how a generic framework middleware can be used to create a Home Infotainment Platform that can support variety of value-added applications. It also talks about the innovative designs employed to bring about the low-cost solution keeping in mind both the limitations of TV as a display and non-availability of high quality-of-service networks. Finally the social, economic and environmental implications of wide-spread deployment of the proposed solution are outlined.

  15. A universal data access and protocol integration mechanism for smart home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Pengfei; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Xuan

    2013-03-01

    With the lack of standardized or completely missing communication interfaces in home electronics, there is no perfect solution to address every aspect in smart homes based on existing protocols and technologies. In addition, the central control unit (CCU) of smart home system working point-to-point between the multiple application interfaces and the underlying hardware interfaces leads to its complicated architecture and unpleasant performance. A flexible data access and protocol integration mechanism is required. The current paper offers a universal, comprehensive data access and protocol integration mechanism for a smart home. The universal mechanism works as a middleware adapter with unified agreements of the communication interfaces and protocols, offers an abstraction of the application level from the hardware specific and decoupling the hardware interface modules from the application level. Further abstraction for the application interfaces and the underlying hardware interfaces are executed based on adaption layer to provide unified interfaces for more flexible user applications and hardware protocol integration. This new universal mechanism fundamentally changes the architecture of the smart home and in some way meets the practical requirement of smart homes more flexible and desirable.

  16. The Impact of the Medical Home on Access to Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheak-Zamora, Nancy C.; Farmer, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience difficulty accessing health care services. Using parent-reported data from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, we examined whether having a medical home reduces unmet need for specialty care services for children with ASD (n = 3,055). Descriptive…

  17. 47 CFR 76.806 - Pre-termination access to cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-termination access to cable home wiring. 76.806 Section 76.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.806...

  18. 47 CFR 76.806 - Pre-termination access to cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-termination access to cable home wiring. 76.806 Section 76.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.806...

  19. 47 CFR 76.806 - Pre-termination access to cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-termination access to cable home wiring. 76.806 Section 76.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.806...

  20. 47 CFR 76.806 - Pre-termination access to cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-termination access to cable home wiring. 76.806 Section 76.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.806...

  1. 47 CFR 76.806 - Pre-termination access to cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-termination access to cable home wiring. 76.806 Section 76.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.806...

  2. Perceptions of Personal Well-Being among Youth Accessing Residential or Intensive Home-Based Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preyde, Michele; Watkins, Hanna; Ashbourne, Graham; Lazure, Kelly; Carter, Jeff; Penney, Randy; White, Sara; Frensch, Karen; Cameron, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The outcomes of youth accessing residential treatment or intensive home-based treatment are varied. Understanding youth's perceptions of their well-being may inform service. The purpose of this report was to explore perceptions of youth's mental health, life satisfaction, and outlook for the future. Youth reported ongoing struggles with mental…

  3. Accessibility of U.S. Federal Government Home Pages: Section 508 Compliance and Site Accessibility Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olalere, Abiodun; Lazar, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    U.S. federal websites are required to be accessible for people with impairments. However, despite the existing regulations and guidelines, many federal websites continue to be inaccessible, and accessibility policy statements available on federal websites often do not provide any useful information. This paper provides three contributions to the…

  4. 75 FR 56549 - National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Classifications and Public Health Data Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS... topics: Contrast Dye Removal Endovascular partial occlusion of abdominal aorta Endovascular Intracranial... Pulmonary Artery Pressure Monitoring Addenda (procedures) September 16, 2010 Corticobasal...

  5. Accessible Home Environments for People with Functional Limitations: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hea Young; MacLachlan, Malcolm; Clarke, Michael; Mannan, Hasheem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the health and social effects of accessible home environments for people with functional limitations, in order to provide evidence to promote well-informed decision making for policy guideline development and choices about public health interventions. MEDLINE and nine other electronic databases were searched between December 2014 and January 2015, for articles published since 2004. All study types were included in this review. Two reviewers independently screened 12,544 record titles or titles and abstracts based on our pre-defined eligibility criteria. We identified 94 articles as potentially eligible; and assessed their full text. Included studies were critically appraised using the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool, version 2011. Fourteen studies were included in the review. We did not identify any meta-analysis or systematic review directly relevant to the question for this systematic review. A narrative approach was used to synthesise the findings of the included studies due to methodological and statistical heterogeneity. Results suggest that certain interventions to enhance the accessibility of homes can have positive health and social effects. Home environments that lack accessibility modifications appropriate to the needs of their users are likely to result in people with physical impairments becoming disabled at home. PMID:27548194

  6. Accessible Home Environments for People with Functional Limitations: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hea Young; MacLachlan, Malcolm; Clarke, Michael; Mannan, Hasheem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the health and social effects of accessible home environments for people with functional limitations, in order to provide evidence to promote well-informed decision making for policy guideline development and choices about public health interventions. MEDLINE and nine other electronic databases were searched between December 2014 and January 2015, for articles published since 2004. All study types were included in this review. Two reviewers independently screened 12,544 record titles or titles and abstracts based on our pre-defined eligibility criteria. We identified 94 articles as potentially eligible; and assessed their full text. Included studies were critically appraised using the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool, version 2011. Fourteen studies were included in the review. We did not identify any meta-analysis or systematic review directly relevant to the question for this systematic review. A narrative approach was used to synthesise the findings of the included studies due to methodological and statistical heterogeneity. Results suggest that certain interventions to enhance the accessibility of homes can have positive health and social effects. Home environments that lack accessibility modifications appropriate to the needs of their users are likely to result in people with physical impairments becoming disabled at home. PMID:27548194

  7. Does government oversight improve access to nursing home care? Longitudinal evidence from US counties.

    PubMed

    Howard, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Gains in life expectancy around the world have increasingly placed pressure on governments to ensure that the elderly receive assistance with activities of daily living. This research examines the impact of government oversight of Medicaid payment policies on access to nursing home care services in the United States. Variation in price levels induced by a federal policy shift in 1997 is used to identify the effect of Medicaid reimbursements on the number of nursing homes and beds available. Court rulings prior to the policy change are used to categorically define a range of oversight treatments at the state level. Difference-in-differences estimates indicate a significant decline in access to nursing home care services for individuals living in states in which courts consistently ruled that Medicaid reimbursements did not meet the minimum standard implied by federal law. The findings suggest that nursing home care services were made more accessible through a combination of legislative and judicial oversight of Medicaid payment policies. PMID:25526725

  8. Physical growth in schoolchildren from Argentina: comparison with Argentinean and CDC/NCHs growth references.

    PubMed

    Orden, Alicia B; Torres, María F; Castro, Luis; Cesani, María F; Luis, María A; Quintero, Fabián A; Oyhenart, Evelia E

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the physical growth of schoolchildren from Argentina by comparison with the CDC/NCHS and Argentinean growth references (AGR), to contribute to the discussion about the use of local or international references for the assessment of growth in developing countries. Weight and height were measured in 3,411 schoolchildren aged 5-14 years. Data were log-transformed and compared with both references by paired samples t-test (CI = 0.95; alpha = 0.005). The boys' weights were greater than CDC/NCHS (up to 10, and at 14 years old) and the national reference at all ages (P < 0.005). The girls also were heavier than CDC/NCHS (at 7 and 12 years old, P < 0.005) and AGR, except at age 11 and 14 years. In boys, height was lower than CDC/NCHS at 9 and 14 years of age, and higher than AGR at all ages (P < 0.005). The girls were also shorter than CDC/NCHS at 7, 13, and 14 years old (P < 0.005), and-except at age 14-taller than AGR. The weight was higher than both of the references. Height showed a clear dissociation from the national reference and minor differences from CDC/NCHS. Nevertheless, around puberty, the children's height fell short of CDC/NCHS, especially the girls, whose values approached those of their Argentinean peers. This divergence could be associated with cohort effects or population variations in adolescent growth spurt. The use of a single growth reference for preadolescent may be appropriate. The height decrease in adolescents suggests the usefulness of local standards at this period.

  9. Nutritional status of urban Nigerian school children relative to the NCHS reference population.

    PubMed

    Ukoli, F A; Adams-Campbell, L L; Ononu, J; Nwankwo, M U; Chanetsa, F

    1993-07-01

    The present study assessed the growth problems in an indigenous African population of Nigerian urban public school children. The study population consisted of 1390 Nigerian children (predominantly Igbo), 718 boys and 672 girls, ages 4-10 years. Compared to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) reference population, the Nigerian children had an excess prevalence of both short stature and underweight. The prevalence of short stature was 14.2% for the boys and 17.4% for the girls. Approximately 20% of the children were underweight whereas less than 1% were considered overweight. These data demonstrate an excess of both acute and chronic malnutrition relative to the NCHS reference population.

  10. Medicaid home and community-based services: how consumer access is restricted by state policies.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terence; Stone, Julie; Harrington, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    State Medicaid programs have expanded home and community-based services (HCBS). This article compares trends and variations in state policies for Medicaid HCBS programs in 2005 and 2010. State limitations on financial eligibility criteria and service benefits have remained stable. Although the use of consumer direction, independent providers, and family care providers has increased, some states do not have these options. The increased adoption of state cost control policies have led to large increases in persons on waiver wait lists. Access could be improved by standardizing and liberalizing state HCBS policies, but state fiscal concerns are barriers to rebalancing between HCBS and institutional services. PMID:25299976

  11. Color coded multiple access scheme for bidirectional multiuser visible light communications in smart home technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Samrat Vikramaditya; Sewaiwar, Atul; Chung, Yeon-Ho

    2015-10-01

    In optical wireless communications, multiple channel transmission is an attractive solution to enhancing capacity and system performance. A new modulation scheme called color coded multiple access (CCMA) for bidirectional multiuser visible light communications (VLC) is presented for smart home applications. The proposed scheme uses red, green and blue (RGB) light emitting diodes (LED) for downlink and phosphor based white LED (P-LED) for uplink to establish a bidirectional VLC and also employs orthogonal codes to support multiple users and devices. The downlink transmission for data user devices and smart home devices is provided using red and green colors from the RGB LEDs, respectively, while uplink transmission from both types of devices is performed using the blue color from P-LEDs. Simulations are conducted to verify the performance of the proposed scheme. It is found that the proposed bidirectional multiuser scheme is efficient in terms of data rate and performance. In addition, since the proposed scheme uses RGB signals for downlink data transmission, it provides flicker-free illumination that would lend itself to multiuser VLC system for smart home applications.

  12. Survey of home hemodialysis patients and nursing staff regarding vascular access use and care

    PubMed Central

    Spry, Leslie A; Burkart, John M; Holcroft, Christina; Mortier, Leigh; Glickman, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Vascular access infections are of concern to hemodialysis patients and nurses. Best demonstrated practices (BDPs) have not been developed for home hemodialysis (HHD) access use, but there have been generally accepted practices (GAPs) endorsed by dialysis professionals. We developed a survey to gather information about training provided and actual practices of HHD patients using the NxStage System One HHD machine. We used GAP to assess training used by nurses to teach HHD access care and then assess actual practice (adherence) by HHD patients. We also assessed training and adherence where GAPs do not exist. We received a 43% response rate from patients and 76% response from nurses representing 19 randomly selected HHD training centers. We found that nurses were not uniformly instructing HHD patients according to GAP, patients were not performing access cannulation according to GAP, nor were they adherent to their training procedures. Identification of signs and symptoms of infection was commonly trained appropriately, but we observed a reluctance to report some signs and symptoms of infection by patients. Of particular concern, when aggregating all steps surveyed, not a single nurse or patient reported training or performing all steps in accordance with GAP. We also identified practices for which there are no GAPs that require further study and may or may not impact outcomes such as infection. Further research is needed to develop strategies to implement and expand GAP, measure outcomes, and ultimately develop BDP for HHD to improve infectious complications. PMID:25154423

  13. Better access, quality, and cost for clinically complex veterans with home-based primary care.

    PubMed

    Edes, Thomas; Kinosian, Bruce; Vuckovic, Nancy H; Nichols, Linda Olivia; Becker, Margaret Mary; Hossain, Monir

    2014-10-01

    In successfully reducing healthcare expenditures, patient goals must be met and savings differentiated from cost shifting. Although the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) program for chronically ill individuals has resulted in cost reduction for the VA, it is unknown whether cost reduction results from restricting services or shifting costs to Medicare and whether HBPC meets patient goals. Cost projection using a hierarchical condition category (HCC) model adapted to the VA was used to determine VA plus Medicare projected costs for 9,425 newly enrolled HBPC recipients. Projected annual costs were compared with observed annualized costs before and during HBPC. To assess patient perspectives of care, 31 veterans and caregivers were interviewed from three representative programs. During HBPC, Medicare costs were 10.8% lower than projected, VA plus Medicare costs were 11.7% lower than projected, and combined hospitalizations were 25.5% lower than during the period without HBPC. Patients reported high satisfaction with HBPC team access, education, and continuity of care, which they felt contributed to fewer exacerbations, emergency visits, and hospitalizations. HBPC improves access while reducing hospitalizations and total cost. Medicare is currently testing the HBPC approach through the Independence at Home demonstration. PMID:25333529

  14. 75 FR 82030 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  15. 75 FR 17754 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  16. 75 FR 55333 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  17. 76 FR 53137 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  18. 77 FR 31359 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS) Notice of Cancellation: This notice was published in the...

  19. 76 FR 9019 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register...

  20. 77 FR 22326 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  1. Relationships, Expertise, Incentives, and Governance: Supporting Care Home Residents' Access to Health Care. An Interview Study From England

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L.; Gordon, Adam L.; Meyer, Julienne; Dening, Tom; Gladman, John R.F.; Iliffe, Steve; Zubair, Maria; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Martin, Finbarr C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what commissioners of care, regulators, providers, and care home residents in England identify as the key mechanisms or components of different service delivery models that support the provision of National Health Service (NHS) provision to independent care homes. Methods Qualitative, semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of people with direct experience of commissioning, providing, and regulating health care provision in care homes and care home residents. Data from interviews were augmented by a secondary analysis of previous interviews with care home residents on their personal experience of and priorities for access to health care. Analysis was framed by the assumptions of realist evaluation and drew on the constant comparative method to identify key themes about what is required to achieve quality health care provision to care homes and resident health. Results Participants identified 3 overlapping approaches to the provision of NHS that they believed supported access to health care for older people in care homes: (1) Investment in relational working that fostered continuity and shared learning between visiting NHS staff and care home staff, (2) the provision of age-appropriate clinical services, and (3) governance arrangements that used contractual and financial incentives to specify a minimum service that care homes should receive. Conclusion The 3 approaches, and how they were typified as working, provide a rich picture of the stakeholder perspectives and the underlying assumptions about how service delivery models should work with care homes. The findings inform how evidence on effective working in care homes will be interrogated to identify how different approaches, or specifically key elements of those approaches, achieve different health-related outcomes in different situations for residents and associated health and social care organizations. PMID:25687930

  2. Can the HIV Home Test Promote Access to Care? Lessons Learned from the In-home Pregnancy Test

    PubMed Central

    Schnall, Rebecca; Carballo-Dieguez, Alex; Larson, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults are the fastest growing age group of HIV+ individuals in the US and many who are infected do not know their HIV status. The HIV home test has the potential to help curb the HIV epidemic by improving detection of persons living with HIV and enabling them to seek follow-up care, but, it has not yet been evaluated in adolescents. Analogous to the home pregnancy test, which was met with much resistance and only successfully marketed during a time of social change, the HIV home test has been met with resistance since its FDA approval. This commentary summarizes the need to systematically evaluate positive and untoward/unanticipated effects of HIV home testing, particularly in young adults. PMID:24849622

  3. [Classification of Colombian children with malnutrition according to NCHS reference or WHO standard].

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Claudia; Bermúdez, Juliana; Echeverri, Claudia; Estrada, Alejandro

    2011-12-01

    A descriptive study was conducted to evaluate the concordance of National Center for Health Statistics reference (NCHS) used to classify undernourished children from Colombia with the WHO Child Growth Standards. We used data from children aged 6 to 59 months with acute malnutrition (Z <-2) and severe (Z <-3) who were admitted to the "Unidad Vida Infantil" nutrition program in Colombia. Indicators height-for-age, weight for-height were analyzed when they were admitted to the hospital and weight for-height leaving the hospital. A statistical method used to compare means was T-student. Correlation coefficient intraclass (CCI) and Kappa index evaluated the concordance between NCHS and OMS; McNemar method evaluated the changes on the nutritional classification for children according to growth devices used. Of the total number of children classified as normal by NCHS, 10.4% were classified as stunted by WHO. 64% of the children admitted to the hospital presented acute malnutrition according to NCHS, of these 44,8% presented severe emaciation according to OMS, indeed severe emaciation increased of 36,0% to 63,3% using OMS. 5% of children leaving the hospital could need to stay more days if they had been evaluated with OMS. Growth devices shown high concordance in height-for-age (CCI = 0,988; k= 0,866) and weight for-height (CCI = 0,901; k = 0,578). Concluded that OMS growth standards classified more malnourished children and more severe states, in addition more malnourished children could be hospitalized and they could stay more days.

  4. Home Schooling and the Request for Access to Public School Extracurricular Activities: A Legal and Policy Study of Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lett, David R.

    This paper reports on a study that examines legal and policy issues surrounding access to public-school extracurricular activities for home-school students. Chapter 1, "The Problem and Its Background," reviews such relevant issues as the history of choice in America and Illinois, legal foundations, regulatory disparities, research questions,…

  5. Inequality in access to health care in Cambodia: socioeconomically disadvantaged women giving birth at home assisted by unskilled birth attendants.

    PubMed

    Hong, Rathavuth; Them, Rathnita

    2015-03-01

    Cambodia faces major challenges in its effort to provide access to health care for all. Although there is a sharp improvement in health and health care in Cambodia, 6 in 10 women still deliver at home assisted by unskilled birth attendants. This practice is associated with higher maternal and infant deaths. This article analyzes the 2005 Cambodia Demographic and Health Survey data to examine the relationship between socioeconomic inequality and deliveries at home assisted by unskilled birth attendants. It is evident that babies in poorer households are significantly more likely to be delivered at home by an unskilled birth attendant than those in wealthier households. Moreover, delivery at home by an unskilled attendant is associated with mothers who have no education, live in a rural residence, and are farmers, and with higher birth order children. Results from this analysis demonstrate that socioeconomic inequality is still a major factor contributing to ill health in Cambodia.

  6. [Access of French-speaking elderly to nursing homes among minorities, a linguistic challenge for health and greater welfare].

    PubMed

    Forgues, Eric; Doucet, Michel; Guignard Noël, Josée

    2011-12-01

    Access to long-term nursing homes by French-speaking seniors in minority situations is a very real problem. However, few studies have been conducted on this subject. We wanted to better understand this issue in New Brunswick while taking into account the language aspect. In this article, we will present the problem based on different issues encountered by Francophones in minority situations and by giving an overview of the studies conducted on French-speaking seniors in minority situations. We will then address the issue related to the rights of French-speaking senior to receive services in French in nursing homes by analyzing briefly the province's legal requirements. Furthermore, we will present the regulatory framework of nursing homes in New Brunswick. Finally, we will provide a geographic analysis of existing New Brunswick nursing homes while taking into account the language aspect, the levels of service and the distribution of French-speaking seniors within the territory.

  7. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers.

    PubMed

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-09-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted. First, interviews were performed with nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 9) and rheumatologists (n = 13). Subsequently, collected responses were quantified, using a questionnaire among the interviewees. The following advantages of patient home access to the EMR were reported: (1) enhancement of patient participation in treatment, (2) increased knowledge and self-management, (3) improved patient-provider interaction, (4) increased patient safety, and (5) better communication with others. Foreseen disadvantages of the service included: (1) problems with interpretation of data, (2) extra workload, (3) a change in consultation content, and (4) disturbing the patient-provider interaction. Also, the following preconditions emerged from the data: (1) optimal security, (2) no extra record, but a patient-accessible section, (3) no access to clinical notes, and (4) a lag time on the release of lab data. Most respondents reported that data on diagnosis, medication, treatment plan and consultations could be released to patients. On releasing more complex data, such as bodily examinations, lab results and radiological images the opinions differed considerably. Providing patients home access to their medical record might be a valuable next step into patient empowerment and in service towards the patient, provided that security is optimal and content and presentation of data are carefully considered. PMID:22453527

  8. Can the HIV home test promote access to care? Lessons learned from the in-home pregnancy test.

    PubMed

    Schnall, Rebecca; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Larson, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    Adolescents and young adults are the fastest growing age group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive individuals in the US, and many who are infected do not know their HIV status. The HIV home test has the potential to help curb the HIV epidemic by improving detection of persons living with HIV and enabling them to seek follow-up care but it has not yet been evaluated in adolescents. Analogous to the home pregnancy test, which was met with much resistance and only successfully marketed during a time of social change, the HIV home test has been met with resistance since its FDA approval. This commentary summarizes the need to systematically evaluate positive and untoward/unanticipated effects of HIV home testing, particularly in young adults. The overall incidence of HIV has been declining in the US, yet it continues to grow at alarming rates for adolescents and young adults [1]. Almost 40 % of new HIV infections in the US are in this age group [2]. Further, many HIV infected adolescents and young adults are unaware of their infection. Nationwide, only 22.6 % of sexually active high school students have ever been tested for HIV [3]. While advances in drug regimens have transformed HIV into a chronic disease, infected individuals need to be identified and subsequently engaged in care [4].

  9. Accessibility attributes of blood glucose meter and home blood pressure monitor displays for visually impaired persons.

    PubMed

    Blubaugh, Morgan V; Uslan, Mark M

    2012-03-01

    The vast majority of diabetes-related self-management technology utilizes small visual displays (SVDs) that often produce a low level of contrast and suffer from high levels of reflection (glare). This is a major accessibility issue for the 3.5 million Americans with diabetes who have reduced vision. The purpose of this article is to gather comparative data on the key display attributes of the SVDs used in blood glucose meters (BGMs) and home blood pressure monitors (HBPMs) on the market today and determine which displays offer the best prospect for being accessible to people with reduced vision. Nine BGMs and eight HBPMs were identified for this study on the basis of amount of devices sold, fullfunctionality speech output, and advanced display technologies. An optical instrumentation system obtained contrast, reflection (glare), and font height measurements for all 17 displays. The contrast, reflection, and font-height values for the BGMs and HBPMs varied greatly between models. The Michelson contrast values for the BGMs ranged from 11% to 98% and font heights ranged 0.39-1.00 in. for the measurement results. The HBPMs had Michelson contrast values ranging 55-96% and font height ranging 0.28-0.94 in. for the measurement results. Due largely to the lack of display design standards for the technical requirements of SVDs, there is tremendous variability in the quality and readability of BGM and HBPM displays. There were two BGMs and one HBPM that exhibited high-contrast values and large font heights, but most of the devices exhibited either poor contrast or exceptionally high reflection.

  10. Housing Quality and Access to Material and Learning Resources within the Home Environment in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Robert H.; Putnick, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined home environment conditions (housing quality, material resources, formal and informal learning materials) and their relations with the Human Development Index (HDI) in 28 developing countries. Home environment conditions in these countries varied widely. The quality of housing and availability of material resources at home were…

  11. Installing computers in older adults' homes and teaching them to access a patient education web site: a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Dauz, Emily; Moore, Jan; Smith, Carol E; Puno, Florence; Schaag, Helen

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of nurses who, as part of a large clinical trial, brought the Internet into older adults' homes by installing a computer, if needed, and connecting to a patient education Web site. Most of these patients had not previously used the Internet and were taught even basic computer skills when necessary. Because of increasing use of the Internet in patient education, assessment, and home monitoring, nurses in various roles currently connect with patients to monitor their progress, teach about medications, and answer questions about appointments and treatments. Thus, nurses find themselves playing the role of technology managers for patients with home-based Internet connections. This article provides step-by-step procedures for computer installation and training in the form of protocols, checklists, and patient user guides. By following these procedures, nurses can install computers, arrange Internet access, teach and connect to their patients, and prepare themselves to install future generations of technological devices.

  12. Correlates of availability and accessibility of fruits and vegetables in homes of low-income Hispanic families.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jayna M; Evans, Alexandra E; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Watkins, Ken W; Saunders, Ruth P

    2010-02-01

    Availability and accessibility (AA) has been consistently shown across studies as the most important correlate of fruits and vegetables (FV) intake. However, there is little data on factors that influence AA of FV, especially in Hispanic families. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between parental factors, child's preferences for FV and AA of FV in homes of low-income Hispanic families with children 5-12 years old. A convenience sample of 184 parents of low socioeconomic status recruited through public elementary schools completed a self-administered questionnaire about demographics, language spoken at home and food insecurity (FI). Parental factors and child's preferences were measured using a 16-item questionnaire, which was developed specifically for the study. AA of FV was measured using a validated nine-item index. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that language spoken at home, parental practices that promote consumption of FV, parental role modeling and perceived benefits of fast food had significant and independent associations with AA of FV at home. Intervention programs should take into consideration the language spoken at home and target at improving parental factors in order to improve AA of FV.

  13. Correlates of availability and accessibility of fruits and vegetables in homes of low-income Hispanic families.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jayna M; Evans, Alexandra E; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Watkins, Ken W; Saunders, Ruth P

    2010-02-01

    Availability and accessibility (AA) has been consistently shown across studies as the most important correlate of fruits and vegetables (FV) intake. However, there is little data on factors that influence AA of FV, especially in Hispanic families. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between parental factors, child's preferences for FV and AA of FV in homes of low-income Hispanic families with children 5-12 years old. A convenience sample of 184 parents of low socioeconomic status recruited through public elementary schools completed a self-administered questionnaire about demographics, language spoken at home and food insecurity (FI). Parental factors and child's preferences were measured using a 16-item questionnaire, which was developed specifically for the study. AA of FV was measured using a validated nine-item index. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that language spoken at home, parental practices that promote consumption of FV, parental role modeling and perceived benefits of fast food had significant and independent associations with AA of FV at home. Intervention programs should take into consideration the language spoken at home and target at improving parental factors in order to improve AA of FV. PMID:19654221

  14. Housing Quality and Access to Material and Learning Resources within the Home Environment in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert H.; Putnick, Diane L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined home environment conditions (housing quality, material resources, formal and informal learning materials) and their relations with the Human Development Index (HDI) in 28 developing countries. Home environment conditions in these countries varied widely. The quality of housing and availability of material resources at home were consistently tied to HDI; the availability of formal and informal learning materials little less so. Gross domestic product (GDP) tended to show a stronger independent relation with housing quality and material resources than life expectancy and education. Formal learning resources were independently related to the GDP and education indices, and informal learning resources were not independently related to any constituent indices of the overall HDI. PMID:22277008

  15. Young Children's Access to Computers in the Home and at School in 1999 and 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathbun, Amy H.; West, Jerry; Hausken, Elvira Germino

    As computers become more prevalent and computer skills more necessary, there continues to be a "digital divide" between those with computer access and skills and those without. These differences are less pronounced in skills where children's access to computers and the Internet are more prevalent. Noting that few studies have focused exclusively…

  16. CHOICES: promoting early access to end-of-life care through home-based transition management.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Brad; D'Onofrio, Carol N; Boatman, Susanne; Feigelman, Glen

    2003-08-01

    CHOICES is a comprehensive home-based care coordination program designed to bridge the gap between home health and hospice for Medicare + Choice enrollees with advanced chronic illness in San Francisco's East Bay region. Key elements of the program include physician education, enrollment of patients with high disease burden who may not be terminally ill, co-management of care with the primary physician, and an advanced practice clinical team that provides comprehensive in-home assessments, a flexible mix of life-prolonging and palliative care that evolves with disease progression, focused education and advance planning, and caregiver support. During a 42-month demonstration, 208 patients were enrolled in the program. Eighty percent had a non-cancer diagnosis; 40% were people of color. After an 8-month follow-up, 44% of the study cohort had died in the program or after transfer to hospice, 51% had been discharged, and 5% remained active. Median length of stay for decedents was 260 days. Preliminary evidence supports the program's feasibility and acceptability to patients, families, physicians, and agency partners. However, the uncertain future of Medicare + Choice and of managed care may jeopardize the program's sustainability. Policymakers and taxpayers will need to determine how to care for the growing number of chronically ill elderly who wish to remain at home as illness advances. The care needs of these patients and their families may overwhelm a health system organized around hospital treatment of acute illness.

  17. Effects of body size and home range on access to mates and paternity in male bridled nailtail wallabies.

    PubMed

    Fisher; Lara

    1999-07-01

    The bridled nailtail wallaby, Onychogalea fraenata, is a relatively small, solitary and sexually size dimorphic macropod. We studied the mating system of free-ranging wallabies over 3 years, using microsatellite analysis of paternity, radiotelemetry and behavioural observations. Both sexes were promiscuous, and general reproductive behaviour was similar to that of larger, better-known macropods. Home range size influenced the number of associations with oestrous females, and was a significant component of male reproductive success. Female population density varied within the site, but males with home ranges that overlapped more females did not sire more offspring. Aggression between males occurred only around oestrous females and males did not establish a predetermined dominance hierarchy. Male body weight strongly influenced priority of access to oestrous females, and was related to age. The number of times that males were seen closest to an oestrous female when other males were present (priority of access) was the most important predictor of variation in the number of offspring sired. Females mated with several males within and between oestrous cycles, and may have influenced male-male competition by prolonging advertisement of approaching oestrus, expanding their home ranges at oestrus and engaging in mate chases that attracted groups of up to six males. Despite overall similarities in the mating system of this species and that of other macropods, male mating success may be less skewed in bridled nailtail wallabies than in other species, although paternity analysis of free-ranging populations of other species is required to confirm this conclusion. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:10413548

  18. Remote access to medical specialists: home care interactive patient management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter J.; Draghic, Nicole; Wiesmann, William P.

    1999-07-01

    Diabetes management involves constant care and rigorous compliance. Glucose control is often difficult to maintain and onset of complications further compound health care needs. Status can be further hampered by geographic isolation from immediate medical infrastructures. The Home Care Interactive Patient Management System is an experimental telemedicine program that could improve chronic illness management through Internet-based applications. The goal of the system is to provide a customized, integrated approach to diabetes management to supplement and coordinate physician protocol while supporting routine patient activity, by supplying a set of customized automated services including health data collection, transmission, analysis and decision support.

  19. Optimising Health Literacy and Access of Service Provision to Community Dwelling Older People with Diabetes Receiving Home Nursing Support

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Sue; Norman, Ralph; Morley, Jo; Weerasuriya, Rona; Osborne, Richard H.; Beauchamp, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Background. Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, and use information and services for good health. Among people with chronic conditions, health literacy requirements for effective self-management are high. The Optimising Health Literacy and Access (Ophelia) study engaged diverse organisations in the codesign of interventions involving the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) needs assessment, followed by development and evaluation of interventions addressing identified needs. This study reports the process and outcomes of one of the nine organisations, the Royal District Nursing Service (RDNS). Methods. Participants were home nursing clients with diabetes. The intervention included tailored diabetes self-management education according to preferred learning style, a standardised diabetes education tool, resources, and teach-back method. Results. Needs analysis of 113 quota-sampled clients showed difficulties managing health and finding and appraising health information. The service-wide diabetes education intervention was applied to 24 clients. The intervention was well received by clients and nurses. Positive impacts on clients' diabetes knowledge and behaviour were seen and nurses reported clear benefits to their practice. Conclusion. A structured method that supports healthcare services to codesign interventions that respond to the health literacy needs of their clients can lead to evidence-informed, sustainable practice changes that support clients to better understand effective diabetes self-management. PMID:27668261

  20. Optimising Health Literacy and Access of Service Provision to Community Dwelling Older People with Diabetes Receiving Home Nursing Support

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Sue; Norman, Ralph; Morley, Jo; Weerasuriya, Rona; Osborne, Richard H.; Beauchamp, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Background. Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, and use information and services for good health. Among people with chronic conditions, health literacy requirements for effective self-management are high. The Optimising Health Literacy and Access (Ophelia) study engaged diverse organisations in the codesign of interventions involving the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) needs assessment, followed by development and evaluation of interventions addressing identified needs. This study reports the process and outcomes of one of the nine organisations, the Royal District Nursing Service (RDNS). Methods. Participants were home nursing clients with diabetes. The intervention included tailored diabetes self-management education according to preferred learning style, a standardised diabetes education tool, resources, and teach-back method. Results. Needs analysis of 113 quota-sampled clients showed difficulties managing health and finding and appraising health information. The service-wide diabetes education intervention was applied to 24 clients. The intervention was well received by clients and nurses. Positive impacts on clients' diabetes knowledge and behaviour were seen and nurses reported clear benefits to their practice. Conclusion. A structured method that supports healthcare services to codesign interventions that respond to the health literacy needs of their clients can lead to evidence-informed, sustainable practice changes that support clients to better understand effective diabetes self-management.

  1. Home care for terminally ill Turks and Moroccans and their families in the Netherlands: carers' experiences and factors influencing ease of access and use of services.

    PubMed

    de Graaff, F M; Francke, A L

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of relatives of elderly terminally ill Turks and Moroccans regarding Dutch professional home care and the barriers to the use this care. Nine Turkish and ten Moroccan family members, who recently looked after dying members of their families, were interviewed using a semi-structured topic list. The data was analyzed using the method described by Glaser and Strauss. The results of this study make it clear that there is no uniform pattern in the use of home care. However, family members who did use home care facilities were all satisfied. Furthermore, on the basis of this study, several factors influencing access to and use of home care were discerned, e.g., illness, family structure, decision making, pressure from the community, information and formal referrals. In addition, the authors found that 'preferences regarding family care' influenced all former factors.

  2. HIV/AIDS and access to water: A case study of home-based care in Ngamiland, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwenya, B. N.; Kgathi, D. L.

    This case study investigates access to potable water in HIV/AIDS related home-based care households in five rural communities in Ngamiland, Botswana. Primary data collected from five villages consisted of two parts. The first survey collected household data on demographic and rural livelihood features and impacts of HIV/AIDS. A total of 129 households were selected using a two-stage stratified random sampling method. In the second survey, a total of 39 family primary and community care givers of continuously ill, bed-ridden or non-bed-ridden HIV/AIDS patients were interviewed. A detailed questionnaire, with closed and open-ended questions, was used to collect household data. In addition to using the questionnaire, data were also collected through participant observation, informal interviews and secondary sources. The study revealed that there are several sources of water for communities in Ngamiland such as off-plot, outdoor (communal) and on-plot outdoor and/or indoor (private) water connections, as well as other sources such as bowsed water, well-points, boreholes and open perennial/ephemeral water from river channels and pans. There was a serious problem of unreliable water supply caused by, among other things, the breakdown of diesel-powered water pumps, high frequency of HIV/AIDS related absenteeism, and the failure of timely delivery of diesel fuel. Some villages experienced chronic supply disruptions while others experienced seasonal or occasional water shortages. Strategies for coping with unreliability of water supply included economizing on water, reserve storage, buying water, and collection from river/dug wells or other alternative sources such as rain harvesting tanks in government institutions. The unreliability of water supply resulted in an increase in the use of water of poor quality and other practices of poor hygiene as well as a high opportunity cost of water collection. In such instances, bathing of patients was cut from twice daily to once or

  3. Enhancing nutritional environments through access to fruit and vegetables in schools and homes among children and youth: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption is one of the top 10 global risk factors for mortality, and is related to increased risk for cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Many environmental, sociodemographic and personal factors affect FV consumption. The purpose of this review is to examine the effects of interventions delivered in the home, school and other nutritional environments designed to increase FV availability for five to 18-year olds. Methods The search included: 19 electronic bibliographic databases; grey literature databases; reference lists of key articles; targeted Internet searching of key organization websites; hand searching of key journals and conference proceedings; and consultation with experts for additional references. Articles were included if: in English, French and Spanish; from high-, middle-, and low-income countries; delivered to anyone who could bring about change in FV environment for 5 to 18 year olds; with randomized and non-randomized study designs that provided before-after comparisons, with or without a control group. Primary outcomes of interest were measures of FV availability. Results The search strategy retrieved nearly 23,000 citations and resulted in 23 unique studies. Interventions were primarily policy interventions at the regional or state level, a number of curriculum type interventions in schools and community groups and a garden intervention. The majority of studies were done in high-income countries. The diversity of interventions, populations, outcomes and outcome measurements precluded meta-analysis. The most promising strategies for improving the FV environment for children are through local school food service policies. Access to FV was successfully improved in four of the six studies that evaluated school-based policies, with the other two studies finding no effect. Broader state or federally mandated policies or educational programs for food service providers and decision makers had mixed or

  4. Elements of the patient-centered medical home associated with health outcomes among veterans: the role of primary care continuity, expanded access, and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Karin; Sun, Haili; Dolan, Emily; Maynard, Charles; Beste, Laruen; Bryson, Christopher; Schectman, Gordon; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-01-01

    Care continuity, access, and coordination are important features of the patient-centered medical home model and have been emphasized in the Veterans Health Administration patient-centered medical home implementation, called the Patient Aligned Care Team. Data from more than 4.3 million Veterans were used to assess the relationship between these attributes of Patient Aligned Care Team and Veterans Health Administration hospitalization and mortality. Controlling for demographics and comorbidity, we found that continuity with a primary care provider was associated with a lower likelihood of hospitalization and mortality among a large population of Veterans receiving VA primary care.

  5. Elements of the patient-centered medical home associated with health outcomes among veterans: the role of primary care continuity, expanded access, and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Karin; Sun, Haili; Dolan, Emily; Maynard, Charles; Beste, Laruen; Bryson, Christopher; Schectman, Gordon; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-01-01

    Care continuity, access, and coordination are important features of the patient-centered medical home model and have been emphasized in the Veterans Health Administration patient-centered medical home implementation, called the Patient Aligned Care Team. Data from more than 4.3 million Veterans were used to assess the relationship between these attributes of Patient Aligned Care Team and Veterans Health Administration hospitalization and mortality. Controlling for demographics and comorbidity, we found that continuity with a primary care provider was associated with a lower likelihood of hospitalization and mortality among a large population of Veterans receiving VA primary care. PMID:25180648

  6. Accessing History from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pember, Mary Annette

    2012-01-01

    Partnering with museums and Indiana University, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) has helped create e-Humanity, an online cultural portal. Launched in June 2011, E-Humanity represents the beginning of a new form of cultural institution, one that will blur the lines between traditional museum authority and collections of…

  7. The effects of home computer access and social capital on mathematics and science achievement among Asian-American high school students in the NELS:88 data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, Mark Declan

    The purpose of this researcher was to examine specific environmental, educational, and demographic factors and their influence on mathematics and science achievement. In particular, the researcher ascertained the interconnections of home computer access and social capital, with Asian American students and the effect on mathematics and science achievement. Coleman's theory on social capital and parental influence was used as a basis for the analysis of data. Subjects for this study were the base year students from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88) and the subsequent follow-up survey data in 1990, 1992, and 1994. The approximate sample size for this study is 640 ethnic Asians from the NELS:88 database. The analysis was a longitudinal study based on the Student and Parent Base Year responses and the Second Follow-up survey of 1992, when the subjects were in 12th grade. Achievement test results from the NELS:88 data were used to measure achievement in mathematics and science. The NELS:88 test battery was developed to measure both individual status and a student's growth in a number of achievement areas. The subject's responses were analyzed by principal components factor analysis, weights, effect sizes, hierarchial regression analysis, and PLSPath Analysis. The results of this study were that prior ability in mathematics and science is a major influence in the student's educational achievement. Findings from the study support the view that home computer access has a negative direct effect on mathematics and science achievement for both Asian American males and females. None of the social capital factors in the study had either a negative or positive direct effect on mathematics and science achievement although some indirect effects were found. Suggestions were made toward increasing parental involvement in their children's academic endeavors. Computer access in the home should be considered related to television viewing and should be closely

  8. 76 FR 9018 - National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Classifications and Public Health Data Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Left atrial appendage exclusion femoral/epicardial access Neuroflow endovascular dual balloon catheter.../icd9cm_maintenance.htm . Contact Persons for Additional Information: Donna Pickett, Medical...

  9. Long-Term Outcomes of Children and Youth Accessing Residential or Intensive Home-Based Treatment: Three Year Follow up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preyde, M.; Frensch, K.; Cameron, G.; White, S.; Penny, R.; Lazure, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this study the long-terms outcomes of children and youth with severe mental health problems receiving residential treatment (RT) or an intensive home-based treatment (IHT) were reported. RT is 24-hour mental health intervention in a highly supervised and structured group living setting where individualized and related therapies are provided.…

  10. Correlates of Availability and Accessibility of Fruits and Vegetables in Homes of Low-Income Hispanic Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Jayna M.; Evans, Alexandra E.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Watkins, Ken W.; Saunders, Ruth P.

    2010-01-01

    Availability and accessibility (AA) has been consistently shown across studies as the most important correlate of fruits and vegetables (FV) intake. However, there is little data on factors that influence AA of FV, especially in Hispanic families. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between parental factors,…

  11. The Neurorehabilitation Training Toolkit (NTT): A Novel Worldwide Accessible Motor Training Approach for At-Home Rehabilitation after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez i Badia, Sergi; Cameirão, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    After stroke, enduring rehabilitation is required for maximum recovery, and ideally throughout life to prevent functional deterioration. Hence we developed a new concept for at-home low-cost motor rehabilitation, the NTT, an Internet-based interactive system for upper-limb rehabilitation. In this paper we present the NTT design concepts, its implementation and a proof of concept study with 10 healthy participants. The NTT brings together concepts of optimal learning, engagement, and storytelling to deliver a personalized training to its users. In this study we evaluate the feasibility of NTT as a tool capable of automatically assessing and adapting to its user. This is achieved by means of a psychometric study where we show that the NTT is able to assess movement kinematics—movement smoothness, range of motion, arm displacement and arm coordination—in healthy users. Subsequently, a modeling approach is presented to understand how the measured movement kinematics relate to training parameters, and how these can be modified to adapt the training to meet the needs of patients. Finally, an adaptive algorithm for the personalization of training considering motivational and performance aspects is proposed. In the next phase we will deploy and evaluate the NTT with stroke patients at their homes. PMID:22619741

  12. Eldercare at Home: Choosing a Nursing Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... at home. Problems such as frequent incontinence, dangerous wandering, inability to sleep at night (a disrupted sleep - ... a security system to prevent confused residents from wandering out of the building? Are there accessible outdoor ...

  13. Patterns in Home Care Use in Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Lori; Roos, Noralou, P.; Shapiro, Evelyn

    2005-01-01

    Administrative home care data from the Manitoba Support Services Payroll (MSSP) system for fiscal years 1995/1996 to 1998/1999 were utilized to study home care client characteristics and changes in home care use over time. Patterns in home care access and use after hospitalization, before admission to a nursing home, and before death were…

  14. Home safety (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... socket protectors block a child's access to dangerous electricity. Many accidents can be avoided by closely supervising children and by simply practicing these and other preventative measures in the home.

  15. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in Moratoria-Designated Geographic Locations. Implementation of the waiver demonstration.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This notice announces the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in 6 states. The demonstration is being implemented in accordance with section 402 of the Social Security Amendments of 1967 and gives CMS the authority to grant waivers to the statewide enrollment moratoria on a case-by-case basis in response to access to care issues, and to subject providers and suppliers enrolling via such waivers to heightened screening, oversight, and investigations. PMID:27487580

  16. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in Moratoria-Designated Geographic Locations. Implementation of the waiver demonstration.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This notice announces the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in 6 states. The demonstration is being implemented in accordance with section 402 of the Social Security Amendments of 1967 and gives CMS the authority to grant waivers to the statewide enrollment moratoria on a case-by-case basis in response to access to care issues, and to subject providers and suppliers enrolling via such waivers to heightened screening, oversight, and investigations.

  17. [Home Treatment].

    PubMed

    Widmann, F; Bachhuber, G; Riedelsheimer, A; Schiele, A; Ullrich, S; Kilian, R; Becker, T; Frasch, K

    2016-01-01

    Home Treatment (HT) means acute psychiatric treatment in the patient's usual environment. Conceptually, HT is to be differentiated from other home-based services: It is limited with regard to duration and multiprofessional (e. g. psychiatrist plus psychiatric nursing staff plus social worker); the "24/7"-accessibility is frequently provided by the corresponding background hospital infrastructure. Target group are acutely mentally ill persons with an indication to inpatient treatment, who are willing to cooperate, and absence of endangerment to self and others. In contrast to the Scandinavian and many Anglophone countries where nationwide HT services are delivered, there are not many HT sites in Germany so far. Consequently, empirical data concerning HT in Germany is scarce. In summary, international studies show equivalent effects on psychopathological measures compared to inpatient treatment, reductions with regard to inpatient days, higher patient satisfaction and a trend towards cost-effectivity. PMID:26878432

  18. [Home enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Virgili, N; Vilarasau, M C

    1999-04-01

    Enteral nutrition in the home is applied to stabilized patients who do not require hospitalization or to chronically ill patients who can stay in their homes. However, ensuring the correct administration of this treatment requires a coordinated, expert multidisciplinary team. This article reviews the conditions for use of enteral nutrition in the home, the means of access, the nutritional formulas, the administrative technique, and the complications enteral nutrition in the home may present. Furthermore, the composition and characteristics of the multidisciplinary team which will be in charge of carrying out this treatment is discussed.

  19. Over-the-horizon, connected home/office (OCHO): situation management of environmental, medical, and security conditions at remote premises via broadband wireless access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2010-04-01

    Broadband wireless access standards, together with advances in the development of commercial sensing and actuator devices, enable the feasibility of a consumer service for a multi-sensor system that monitors the conditions within a residence or office: the environment/infrastructure, patient-occupant health, and physical security. The proposed service is a broadband reimplementation and combination of existing services to allow on-demand reports on and management of the conditions by remote subscribers. The flow of on-demand reports to subscribers and to specialists contracted to mitigate out-of-tolerance conditions is the foreground process. Service subscribers for an over-the-horizon connected home/office (OCHO) monitoring system are the occupant of the premises and agencies, contracted by the service provider, to mitigate or resolve any observed out-of-tolerance condition(s) at the premises. Collectively, these parties are the foreground users of the OCHO system; the implemented wireless standards allow the foreground users to be mobile as they request situation reports on demand from the subsystems on remote conditions that comprise OCHO via wireless devices. An OCHO subscriber, i.e., a foreground user, may select the level of detail found in on-demand reports, i.e., the amount of information displayed in the report of monitored conditions at the premises. This is one context of system operations. While foreground reports are sent only periodically to subscribers, the information generated by the monitored conditions at the premises is continuous and is transferred to a background configuration of servers on which databases reside. These databases are each used, generally, in non-real time, for the assessment and management of situations defined by attributes like those being monitored in the foreground by OCHO. This is the second context of system operations. Context awareness and management of conditions at the premises by a second group of analysts and

  20. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  1. Home Care: The Agony of Indifference. The Role of the Older Americans Act in Assuring Access to Quality Home Care. Hearing before the Special Committee on Aging. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Special Committee on Aging.

    This document presents witnesses' testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the problems of Americans, mostly elderly persons, who need home health care. Opening statements are included by Senators John Melcher, John Heinz, Bill Bradley, John Chafee, Harry Reid, John Glenn, Dave Durenberger, and Quentin…

  2. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  3. Research on the model of home networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Xiang; Feng, Xiancheng

    2007-11-01

    It is the research hotspot of current broadband network to combine voice service, data service and broadband audio-video service by IP protocol to transport various real time and mutual services to terminal users (home). Home Networking is a new kind of network and application technology which can provide various services. Home networking is called as Digital Home Network. It means that PC, home entertainment equipment, home appliances, Home wirings, security, illumination system were communicated with each other by some composing network technology, constitute a networking internal home, and connect with WAN by home gateway. It is a new network technology and application technology, and can provide many kinds of services inside home or between homes. Currently, home networking can be divided into three kinds: Information equipment, Home appliances, Communication equipment. Equipment inside home networking can exchange information with outer networking by home gateway, this information communication is bidirectional, user can get information and service which provided by public networking by using home networking internal equipment through home gateway connecting public network, meantime, also can get information and resource to control the internal equipment which provided by home networking internal equipment. Based on the general network model of home networking, there are four functional entities inside home networking: HA, HB, HC, and HD. (1) HA (Home Access) - home networking connects function entity; (2) HB (Home Bridge) Home networking bridge connects function entity; (3) HC (Home Client) - Home networking client function entity; (4) HD (Home Device) - decoder function entity. There are many physical ways to implement four function entities. Based on theses four functional entities, there are reference model of physical layer, reference model of link layer, reference model of IP layer and application reference model of high layer. In the future home network

  4. Home sweet medical home.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2014-11-01

    Starting with a solid primary care foundation, the patient-centered medical home has become a hot commodity for making health care more efficient and effective and less fragmented and costly. Whether the enhanced primary care model lives up to its promise is still up for debate, based on the available research. Still, policymakers, payers, and physician practices are increasingly taking the bet.

  5. Increasing Access to Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage Interventions for Births in Health Facilities and at Home in Four Districts of Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Dao, Blami; Ngabo, Fidele; Zoungrana, Jeremie; Rawlins, Barbara; Mukarugwiro, Beata; Musoni, Pascal; Favero, Rachel; MacDowell, Juliet; Eugene, Kanyamanza

    2015-12-01

    To assess coverage, acceptability, and feasibility of a program to prevent postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) at community and facility levels, a study was conducted in 60 health facilities and their catchment areas in four districts in Rwanda. A total of 220 skilled birth attendants at these facilities were trained to provide active management of the third stage of labor and 1994 community health workers (ASMs) were trained to distribute misoprostol at home births. A total of 4,074 pregnant women were enrolled in the program (20.5% of estimated deliveries). Overall uterotonic coverage was 82.5%: 85% of women who delivered at a facility received a uterotonic to prevent PPH; 76% of women reached at home at the time of birth by an ASM ingested misoprostol--a 44.3% coverage rate. Administration of misoprostol at the time of birth for home births achieved moderate uterotonic coverage. Advancing the distribution of misoprostol through antenatal care services could further increase coverage. PMID:27337854

  6. Editorial: Next Generation Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, Marco; Cincotti, Gabriella; Pizzinat, Anna; Vetter, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade we have seen an increasing number of operators deploying Fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) solutions in access networks, in order to provide home users with a much needed network access upgrade, to support higher peak rates, higher sustained rates and a better and more uniform broadband coverage of the territory.

  7. Catalog of electronic data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The catalog lists and describes the public-use data files produced by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). More than 500 public-use data files, representing most of the NCHS data collection programs, are available for purchase and use. Public-use data files are prepared and disseminated to speed and enhance access to the full scope of data. NCHS data systems include a national vital registration program; household interview and health examination surveys; surveys of hospitals, nursing homes, physicians, and other health care providers; and other periodic or occasional data collection activities to produce a wide spectrum of health and health-related data. NCHS data users encompass all levels of government, the academic and research communities, and business. The majority of the data files released by NCHS contain microdata to allow researchers to aggregate findings in whatever format appropriate for their analyses.

  8. Solar home show: Homes designed for the solar homebuilders program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-07-01

    Ten passive solar homes are presented that resulted from a program to demonstrate that passive solar homes can be attractive, affordable, functional, and therefore, marketable. For each home is given: the designer and builder, floor plans, perspective of the outside, passive solar and conservation features, and a comparison of the estimated heating bill for the house and a conventional house the same size. A brief discussion is included on the basics of passive solar design, ventilation and cooling, and solar access.

  9. Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Related Topics Assisted Living Community-Based Care Nursing Homes Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Home Care Basic Facts & Information Role of Health Care Professionals in Home Care Your physician is the leader ...

  10. Patterns in home care use in Manitoba.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lori; Roos, Noralou P; Shapiro, Evelyn

    2005-01-01

    Administrative home care data from the Manitoba Support Services Payroll (MSSP) system for fiscal years 1995/1996 to 1998/1999 were utilized to study home care client characteristics and changes in home care use over time. Patterns in home care access and use after hospitalization, before admission to a nursing home, and before death were examined. The study found that the majority of home care clients were female, aged 65 and over, and not married. The proportion of Manitobans using home care increased slowly, but significantly, over the 4 years. The greatest increases were found among the older age groups. The average number of days that clients received home care before death or before admission to a nursing home was stable over time, while a significant increase over time in home care use after hospitalization was experienced. These findings can be useful to regional health authorities for planning and budgeting. PMID:16080138

  11. Rationale, design and methods for a randomised and controlled trial to investigate whether home access to electronic games decreases children's physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Straker, Leon M; Abbott, Rebecca A; Piek, Jan P; Pollock, Clare M; Davies, Peter S; Smith, Anne J

    2009-01-01

    Background Many children are reported to have insufficient physical activity (PA) placing them at greater risk of poor health outcomes. Participating in sedentary activities such as playing electronic games is widely believed to contribute to less PA. However there is no experimental evidence that playing electronic games reduces PA. There is also no evidence regarding the effect of different types of electronic games (traditional sedentary electronic games versus new active input electronic games) on PA. Further, there is a poor understanding about how characteristics of children may moderate the impact of electronic game access on PA and about what leisure activities are displaced when children play electronic games. Given that many children play electronic games, a better understanding of the effect of electronic game use on PA is critical to inform child health policy and intervention. Methods This randomised and controlled trial will examine whether PA is decreased by access to electronic games and whether any effect is dependent on the type of game input or the child's characteristics. Children aged 10–12 years (N = 72, 36 females) will be recruited and randomised to a balanced ordering of 'no electronic games', 'traditional' electronic games and 'active' electronic games. Each child will participate in each condition for 8 weeks, and be assessed prior to participation and at the end of each condition. The primary outcome is PA, assessed by Actical accelerometers worn for 7 days on the wrist and hip. Energy expenditure will be assessed by the doubly labelled water technique and motor coordination, adiposity, self-confidence, attitudes to technology and PA and leisure activities will also be assessed. A sample of 72 will provide a power of > 0.9 for detecting a 15 mins difference in PA (sd = 30 mins). Discussion This is the first such trial and will provide critical information to understand whether access to electronic games affects children's PA. Given the

  12. New American Home 2008: Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-12-01

    Each year, The New American home demonstrates innovative building materials, cutting-edge design, and the latest construction techniques. It provides production homebuilders with an example for producing more energy-efficient, durable homes without sacrificing style. This year, The New American Home celebrates its 25th anniversary. The New American Home is the official showcase house of the annual International Builders' Show, and is a for-sale product. Most features and innovations in the home are accessible to builders and consumers for integration into their own home.

  13. The Effects of Home Computers on School Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairlie, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 9 out of 10 high school students who have access to a home computer use that computer to complete school assignments. Do these home computers, however, improve educational outcomes? Using the Computer and Internet Use Supplement to the 2001 Current Population Survey, I explore whether access to home computers increases the likelihood…

  14. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  15. Home Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, William M.; And Others

    Cases that address the issue of home schooling are summarized in this report. Organized chronologically, each case description includes quoted material from the court ruling. Issues involve parent actions regarding compulsory student enrollment, parent qualifications for home teaching, student certification, church-state separation, constitutional…

  16. Latest Trends in Home Networking Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Akihiro

    Broadband access service, including FTTH, is now in widespread use in Japan. More than half of the households that have broadband Internet access construct local area networks (home networks) in their homes. In addition, information appliances such as personal computers, networked audio, and visual devices and game machines are connected to home networks, and many novel service applications are provided via the Internet. However, it is still difficult to install and incorporate these devices and services because networked devices have been developed in different communities. I briefly explain the current status of information appliances and home networking technologies and services and discuss some of the problems in this and their solutions.

  17. 41 CFR 51-10.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  18. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  19. 43 CFR 17.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible locations, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...) of this section, alternative, methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  20. 45 CFR 2301.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  1. 43 CFR 17.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible locations, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...) of this section, alternative, methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  2. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  3. 43 CFR 17.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible locations, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...) of this section, alternative, methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  4. 5 CFR 1636.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  5. 22 CFR 711.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  6. 5 CFR 1636.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  7. 5 CFR 1636.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  8. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  9. 22 CFR 711.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  10. 22 CFR 711.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  11. 5 CFR 1636.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  12. 29 CFR 2205.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  13. 45 CFR 2301.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  14. 41 CFR 51-10.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  15. 22 CFR 711.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  16. 41 CFR 51-10.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  17. 34 CFR 1200.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  18. The New American Home 2007, Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-12-01

    Each year, The New American Home (R) demonstrates use of innovative building materials, cutting-edge design, and the latest construction techniques, providing production homebuilders with a model for producing more energy efficient, durable homes without sacrificing style. Cosponsored by The National Council of the Housing Industry and BUILDER Magazine, The New American Home (R) is not only the official showcase house of the annual International Builders' Show, but is also a for-sale product. The majority of features and innovations in the home are accessible to both builders and consumers for integration into their own homes.

  19. Home Modification

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is important to consider certain safety modifications. Adaptations such as those in the following list can ... The importance of a Consumer Perspective in Home Adaptation of Alzheimer’s Households” (Chapter 6 pp 91-112) ...

  20. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... up like a hospital. The staff provides medical care, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapy. ... relationships with residents. Some nursing homes have special care units for people with serious memory problems such ...

  1. Home Hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... more flexible schedule and better health. More Flexible Schedule A person can choose the schedule for home ... treat. When prepared, this content included the most current information available. For updates or for questions about ...

  2. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skilled nursing - home care; Physical therapy - at home; Occupational therapy - at home; Discharge - home health care ... medicines that you may be taking. Physical and occupational therapists can make sure your home is set ...

  3. The Medical Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy The Medical Home KidsHealth > For Parents > The Medical Home Print ... home" for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a ...

  4. Home Away from Home: A Toolkit for Planning Home Visiting Partnerships with Family, Friend, and Neighbor Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Staub, Christine; Schmit, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Home visiting is one tool used to prevent child abuse and improve child well-being by providing education and services in families' homes through parent education and connection to community resources. This toolkit provides state policymakers and advocates with strategies for extending and expanding access to state- or federally-funded home…

  5. Transforming home health nursing with telehealth technology.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Francisca Cisneros

    2015-06-01

    Telehealth technology is an evidence-based delivery model tool that can be integrated into the plan of care for mental health patients. Telehealth technology empowers access to health care, can help decrease or prevent hospital readmissions, assist home health nurses provide shared decision making, and focuses on collaborative care. Telehealth and the recovery model have transformed the role of the home health nurse. Nurses need to be proactive and respond to rapidly emerging technologies that are transforming their role in home care.

  6. Snails home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstan, D. J.; Hodgson, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    Many gardeners and horticulturalists seek non-chemical methods to control populations of snails. It has frequently been reported that snails that are marked and removed from a garden are later found in the garden again. This phenomenon is often cited as evidence for a homing instinct. We report a systematic study of the snail population in a small suburban garden, in which large numbers of snails were marked and removed over a period of about 6 months. While many returned, inferring a homing instinct from this evidence requires statistical modelling. Monte Carlo techniques demonstrate that movements of snails are better explained by drift under the influence of a homing instinct than by random diffusion. Maximum likelihood techniques infer the existence of two groups of snails in the garden: members of a larger population that show little affinity to the garden itself, and core members of a local garden population that regularly return to their home if removed. The data are strongly suggestive of a homing instinct, but also reveal that snail-throwing can work as a pest management strategy.

  7. Home Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Under the Guaranteed Watt Savers (GWS) system, plans for a new home are computer analyzed for anticipated heat loss and gain. Specifications are specifically designed for each structure and a Smart- House Radiant Barrier is installed. Designed to reflect away 95% of the Sun's radiant energy, the radiant barrier is an adaptation of an aluminum shield used on Apollo spacecraft. On completion of a home, technicians using a machine, check for air tightness, by creating a vacuum in the house and computer calculations that measure the amount of air exchanged. A guarantee that only the specified number kilowatt hours will be used is then provided.

  8. The Other Technological Divide: K-12 Web Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krach, S. Kathleen; Jelenic, Milan

    2009-01-01

    This study examined individual school home pages and their corresponding district-wide home pages for Web accessibility. As of 1999, the U.S. government established that all public and private school Web sites were to be made "Web accessible," meaning accessible to students with disabilities. Although higher education sites have been subjected to…

  9. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  10. Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This presentation of suggested layouts and specifications for home economics facilities has been prepared to be of service to school boards, architects, teachers, and administrators who are planning new schools or making renovations to existing structures. Room layouts are shown for a foods and nutrition room, or the foods and nutrition area of a…

  11. Home Modifications

    MedlinePlus

    ... use, and flexible enough to be adapted for special needs. Back to top Evaluating Your Needs Before any changes are made to the home, evaluate your current and future needs room by room. Once you have explored all areas, make a list of potential problems and solutions. ...

  12. 47 CFR 76.802 - Disposition of cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... alternative video programming service provider connects its wiring to the home wiring before the incumbent... ensure that an alternative service provider has access to the home wiring at the demarcation point. Cable... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disposition of cable home wiring....

  13. 47 CFR 76.802 - Disposition of cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... alternative video programming service provider connects its wiring to the home wiring before the incumbent... ensure that an alternative service provider has access to the home wiring at the demarcation point. Cable... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disposition of cable home wiring....

  14. 29 CFR 32.27 - Accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... available at an alternative accessible site or sites. Accessibility requires nonpersonal aids to make the... significant alteration in its existing facilities or facility the recipient may, as an alternative, refer...

  15. 29 CFR 32.27 - Accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... available at an alternative accessible site or sites. Accessibility requires nonpersonal aids to make the... significant alteration in its existing facilities or facility the recipient may, as an alternative, refer...

  16. 29 CFR 32.27 - Accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... available at an alternative accessible site or sites. Accessibility requires nonpersonal aids to make the... significant alteration in its existing facilities or facility the recipient may, as an alternative, refer...

  17. 29 CFR 32.27 - Accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reassignment of classes or other services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... available at an alternative accessible site or sites. Accessibility requires nonpersonal aids to make the... significant alteration in its existing facilities or facility the recipient may, as an alternative, refer...

  18. [The visit prior to returning home].

    PubMed

    Blond, Héléne

    2015-01-01

    Towards the end of a hospital stay, the question of the elderly person's future is raised. Depending on the situation, a return home, follow-up and rehabilitation care or admission to a nursing home may be envisaged. When a return home is considered, the preparatory home visit is important, both for the nursing team as well as for the patient and their family, as it enables the feasibility and suitability of the project to be assessed. Often coming down to an assessment regarding accessibility, it also makes the patient and their family think about the capacities of the hospitalised person and their future day-to-day reality.

  19. Home Seismometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Nakmaura, H.; Wu, C.; Rydelek, P.; Kachi, M.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed an automated system for analyzing Hi-net seismograms for earthquake early warning (EEW) in Japan. Because of limitations imposed by station spacing, our system generally cannot issue an EEW to areas within about 30 km distance of the earthquake's hypocenter. We estimate that about 10 times the number of stations would be needed to issue an EEW in these areas, but the overhead would be cost prohibitive for governmental agencies. The practical deployment of EEW in Japan has started in October, 2007 and millions of people are expected to purchase and install the receiving/alarm unit of EEW. Since most of these units are connected to internet and equipped with a CPU and memory, we realized that the addition of an inexpensive seismometer and digitizer would transform the receiver into a real-time seismic observatory, which we are calling a home seismometer; these modifications only cost about $20. The home seismometer can help to generate alerts at the time of the occurrence of a large local earthquake by using locally observed data. Also, home seismograms can be used to estimate the amplification factor in sedimentary layers, which will be used to determine the site correction for shaking intensity by comparing the waveform data from the home seismometer against those from nearby Hi-net or K-NET stations. This amplification factor, which is essentially the basis of a shake-map with very-high spatial resolution, will help to establish a safety index of houses/buildings for large earthquakes, since a structure located at a site with large seismic amplification can be damaged more seriously than those with small amplification factors. The installation of home seismometers will create an extremely dense seismic network that is without precedence. We are developing an automatic system that collects waveform data from all home seismometer installations, calculates earthquake parameters in real-time, and then sends back alarms signals based on computed

  20. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  1. Rehabilitation in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Joseph, C L; Wanlass, W

    1993-11-01

    Despite the considerable challenges to providing high-quality rehabilitation in a long-term care facility, growing demographic and fiscal pressures are likely to push the nursing home into the forefront of rehabilitation for the frail elderly. Model programs have been implemented in recent years that present alternative ways to increase access to skilled services and improve quality of care in nursing homes without a drastic increase in costs. The teaching nursing home program has supported projects to make longterm care facilities centers for education, innovative clinical care, and research, thus bringing nursing homes into the mainstream of the medical establishment. A majority of US medical schools have recognized the need for training in long-term care and have formed affiliations with nursing homes. The Department of Veterans Affairs has a large national system of nursing homes, which has made a significant contribution to the training of health professionals in many fields. Demonstration projects such as the Social Health Maintenance Organization and On Lok have sought to decrease the fragmentation of health care services for the elderly and bring nursing homes into a continuum of care. The adoption of the OBRA regulations is building a base for comprehensive assessment and improved provision of care in nursing homes nationwide. Nursing home rehabilitation has the potential to decrease institutionalization in the short-term resident, whereas maintenance therapy can improve quality of life and decrease the cost of caring for patients who must be institutionalized. But to achieve this potential, significant barriers must be overcome. Negative attitudes about aging and nursing homes percolate through all levels of health care from lack of reimbursement at the federal and state levels to the professional priorities that continue to favor "high-tech" medicine and stigmatize nursing homes and those who work in them, to low expectations of caregivers and the

  2. Home Energy Score

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-16

    The Home Energy Score allows a homeowner to compare her or his home's energy consumption to that of other homes, similar to a vehicle's mile-per-gallon rating. A home energy assessor will collect energy information during a brief home walk-through and then score that home on a scale of 1 to 10.

  3. Simple Remodeling for Tomorrow's Needs: Cost-Effective Green Solutions for Your Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purpora, Megan

    2009-01-01

    People normally do not think about the future of their home in terms of accessibility. But, since Americans spend approximately 90 percent of their time indoors, shouldn't their home be as accessible as possible? By doing a few simple home upgrades on overlooked items, it will lessen the burden later. To live safer and healthier use natural…

  4. Accessibility Videos.

    PubMed

    Kurppa, Ari; Nordlund, Marika

    2016-01-01

    It can be difficult to understand accessibility, if you do not have the personal experience. The Accessibility Centre ESKE produced short videos which demonstrate the meaning of accessibility in different situations. Videos will raise accessibility awareness of architects, other planners and professionals in the construction field and maintenance. PMID:27534282

  5. 36 CFR 909.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  6. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  7. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  8. 36 CFR 812.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  9. 36 CFR 909.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  10. 36 CFR 812.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  11. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  12. 36 CFR 812.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  13. 36 CFR 909.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  14. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  15. 36 CFR 909.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  16. 36 CFR 812.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  17. Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

  18. VNA of Boston addresses cultural barriers in home-based care.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert-Allman, C; Conti, P A

    1995-12-01

    Home care professionals know that communication is the key to successful treatment. But what if the patient speaks a different language? One home care agency addresses this problem with a culturally diverse staff and access to interpretation services. PMID:10153855

  19. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  20. Staying safe at home

    MedlinePlus

    Carbon monoxide safety; Electrical safety; Furnace safety; Gas appliance safety; Water heater safety ... inside the home and outside the home: Put gas and charcoal grills well away from your home, ...

  1. Home Care Services

    MedlinePlus

    Home care is care that allows a person with special needs stay in their home. It might be for people who are getting ... chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help with ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Genetics Home Reference Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The Genetics Home Reference (GHR) Web site — ghr.nlm.nih. ...

  3. Exercise at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Divisions Home Health Insights Exercise Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  4. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  5. Home-test support grows as more questions arise.

    PubMed

    1995-07-01

    As approval of the first home-access HIV test kit appears inevitable, various health care agencies are anticipating how the kit would change HIV testing methods. One survey indicates that home testing would be favored by minority groups, would decrease the burden on public testing sites, and would lessen the use of blood donation as a means of HIV testing. Three companies have home-access kits awaiting Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval: Johnson & Johnson of New Brunswick, NJ; Chem Trak of Sunnyvale, CA; and Home Access Health Corp. in Chicago. The Johnson & Johnson kit provides a lance for pricking the finger, filter paper on which to place a drop of blood, and a sealed envelope for mailing to a laboratory, which provides results by telephone within several weeks. Opposition to the concept of home-access testing has dwindled as the need for more accessible HIV testing takes on added urgency now that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended routine, voluntary HIV testing for all pregnant women. The CDC reversed its earlier position and now supports the concept of home-access HIV testing and feels that it has the potential to expand access to testing. Of concern is the adequacy of telephone counseling. In addition, health officials are concerned about the impact on public testing sites and the possible threat to HIV prevention funding for HIV clinics.

  6. Childproofing Your Home: 12 Safety Devices to Protect Your Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... are relatively inexpensive. You can buy them at hardware stores, baby equipment shops, supermarkets, drug stores, home ... but are accessible and become entangled in the loops. If you have window blinds from 2000 or ...

  7. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  8. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  9. Access to postacute rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Buntin, Melinda Beeuwkes

    2007-11-01

    Each year, more than 10 million Medicare beneficiaries are discharged from acute care hospitals into postacute care (PAC) settings, including inpatient rehabilitation facilities, skilled nursing facilities, and homes with services from home health agencies. These beneficiaries include very frail and vulnerable elders, many of whom have suffered from an acute event such as a stroke or a fall resulting in hip fracture, all of whom are judged unable to return to their homes without further care. Whether beneficiaries receive PAC and the type and intensity of care they receive is influenced not only by clinical factors, but by nonclinical factors including provider supply and financing, especially Medicare's methods of payment. This article provides a definition of PAC and discusses the wide cross-sectional variation in the use of postacute rehabilitation. It then discusses recent changes to PAC provider payment that have raised concerns about access to postacute rehabilitation, trends in the use of PAC, and what these trends imply about the appropriateness of PAC as it is now delivered. It concludes by identifying issues about the policy and research implications of recent developments and the PAC literature reviewed.

  10. The National Home Visiting Coalition: A History of Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Jane; Gavaghan, Bridget; Howard, Karen; Kelley, Melissa L.; Schwartz, Marvin; Walzer, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The Home Visiting Coalition represents more than 75 organizations working together to articulate the effectiveness of home visiting to a range of policymakers and stakeholders in the early childhood field. Despite varying program goals and service delivery strategies, the Coalition participants share a commitment to expanding access to…

  11. Marketing home health care to health maintenance organizations.

    PubMed

    Shalowitz, J

    1987-01-01

    Home health care is a rapidly growing industry whose continued success depends upon expansion into new markets. One target market a successful company will need to reach is health maintenance organizations. The following article summarizes basic marketing strategies a home care company needs to follow in order to access such contracts.

  12. Financing of pediatric home health care. Committee on Child Health Financing, Section on Home Care, American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    2006-08-01

    In certain situations, home health care has been shown to be a cost-effective alternative to inpatient hospital care. National health expenditures reveal that pediatric home health costs totaled $5.3 billion in 2000. Medicaid is the major payer for pediatric home health care (77%), followed by other public sources (22%). Private health insurance and families each paid less than 1% of pediatric home health expenses. The most important factors affecting access to home health care are the inadequate supply of clinicians and ancillary personnel, shortages of home health nurses with pediatric expertise, inadequate payment, and restrictive insurance and managed care policies. Many children must stay in the NICU, PICU, and other pediatric wards and intermediate care areas at a much higher cost because of inadequate pediatric home health care services. The main financing problem pertaining to Medicaid is low payment to home health agencies at rates that are insufficient to provide beneficiaries access to home health services. Although home care services may be a covered benefit under private health plans, most do not cover private-duty nursing (83%), home health aides (45%), or home physical, occupational, or speech therapy (33%) and/or impose visit or monetary limits or caps. To advocate for improvements in financing of pediatric home health care, the American Academy of Pediatrics has developed several recommendations for public policy makers, federal and state Medicaid offices, private insurers, managed care plans, Title V officials, and home health care professionals. These recommendations will improve licensing, payment, coverage, and research related to pediatric home health services.

  13. The Technological Revolution in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Philip A.

    This exploration of possible information and communications developments in the future focuses on the picture of the family or individual depending on access to information as a key to their status in society. The scenario involves the home as the center for conducting business, banking, shopping, and receiving lifelong education, and this paper…

  14. Simulation of Smart Home Activity Datasets.

    PubMed

    Synnott, Jonathan; Nugent, Chris; Jeffers, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A globally ageing population is resulting in an increased prevalence of chronic conditions which affect older adults. Such conditions require long-term care and management to maximize quality of life, placing an increasing strain on healthcare resources. Intelligent environments such as smart homes facilitate long-term monitoring of activities in the home through the use of sensor technology. Access to sensor datasets is necessary for the development of novel activity monitoring and recognition approaches. Access to such datasets is limited due to issues such as sensor cost, availability and deployment time. The use of simulated environments and sensors may address these issues and facilitate the generation of comprehensive datasets. This paper provides a review of existing approaches for the generation of simulated smart home activity datasets, including model-based approaches and interactive approaches which implement virtual sensors, environments and avatars. The paper also provides recommendation for future work in intelligent environment simulation.

  15. Simulation of Smart Home Activity Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Synnott, Jonathan; Nugent, Chris; Jeffers, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A globally ageing population is resulting in an increased prevalence of chronic conditions which affect older adults. Such conditions require long-term care and management to maximize quality of life, placing an increasing strain on healthcare resources. Intelligent environments such as smart homes facilitate long-term monitoring of activities in the home through the use of sensor technology. Access to sensor datasets is necessary for the development of novel activity monitoring and recognition approaches. Access to such datasets is limited due to issues such as sensor cost, availability and deployment time. The use of simulated environments and sensors may address these issues and facilitate the generation of comprehensive datasets. This paper provides a review of existing approaches for the generation of simulated smart home activity datasets, including model-based approaches and interactive approaches which implement virtual sensors, environments and avatars. The paper also provides recommendation for future work in intelligent environment simulation. PMID:26087371

  16. Disability and dignity-enabling home environments.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Barbara E; Secker, Barbara; Rolfe, Debbie; Wagner, Frank; Parke, Bob; Mistry, Bhavnita

    2012-01-01

    In Canada where long-term care is primarily oriented to elderly persons and affordable accessible housing is limited, younger disabled adults may be living in circumstances that do not meet their health needs and contribute to their social exclusion. The purpose of this study was to undertake an ethical analysis of what constitute an 'adequate' home environment for adults with significant mobility disabilities. An integrated design was used that combined qualitative interviews with normative ethical analysis in an iterative process. Twenty interviews with 19 participants were conducted in Ontario, Canada with two groups: younger adults (ages 18-55) with mobility disabilities and 'decision-makers' who consisted of policy makers, program administrators and discharge planners. Data were analyzed using a critical disability ethics approach and processes of reflective equilibrium. Drawing on Nora Jacobson's (Jacobson, 2009) taxonomy of dignity and pluralistic approaches to social justice, the concept of 'social dignity' provides a lens for exploring the adequacy of home environments for disabled people. Analyses suggested seven threshold conditions necessary for a dignity-enabling home: the ability to form and sustain meaningful relationships; access to community and civic life; access to control and flexibility of daily activities; access to opportunities for self-expression and identity affirmation; access to respectful relationships with attendants; access to opportunities to participate in school, work or leisure; access to physical, psychological and ontological security. The results have implications for housing, health and social care policies, and political reform. Social dignity provides a normative ethical grounding for assessing the adequacy of home environments. The threshold elements outline specific dignity-enabling conditions that are open to further specification or elaboration in different contexts.

  17. Home Energy Assessments

    ScienceCinema

    Dispenza, Jason

    2016-07-12

    A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time. This video shows some of the ways that a contractor may test your home during an assessment, and helps you understand how an assessment can help you move toward energy savings. Find out more at: http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/energy_audits/index.cfm/mytopic=11160

  18. Home Energy Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Dispenza, Jason

    2010-01-01

    A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time. This video shows some of the ways that a contractor may test your home during an assessment, and helps you understand how an assessment can help you move toward energy savings. Find out more at: http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/energy_audits/index.cfm/mytopic=11160

  19. Gaining Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses issues schools and universities have encountered in complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and making their facilities more accessible to the disabled. The ADA's vagueness and the architect's need for understanding the regulations is highlighted. (GR)

  20. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  1. Capital access.

    PubMed

    Towne, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    To maintain their viability, hospitals are being compelled to invest in big capital projects such as information technology and renovation and construction. This gatefold examines the trends in credit and capital, and how they affect hospitals' access to money.

  2. Semantic home video categorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Hyun-Seok; Lee, Young Bok; De Neve, Wesley; Ro, Yong Man

    2009-02-01

    Nowadays, a strong need exists for the efficient organization of an increasing amount of home video content. To create an efficient system for the management of home video content, it is required to categorize home video content in a semantic way. So far, a significant amount of research has already been dedicated to semantic video categorization. However, conventional categorization approaches often rely on unnecessary concepts and complicated algorithms that are not suited in the context of home video categorization. To overcome the aforementioned problem, this paper proposes a novel home video categorization method that adopts semantic home photo categorization. To use home photo categorization in the context of home video, we segment video content into shots and extract key frames that represent each shot. To extract the semantics from key frames, we divide each key frame into ten local regions and extract lowlevel features. Based on the low level features extracted for each local region, we can predict the semantics of a particular key frame. To verify the usefulness of the proposed home video categorization method, experiments were performed with home video sequences, labeled by concepts part of the MPEG-7 VCE2 dataset. To verify the usefulness of the proposed home video categorization method, experiments were performed with 70 home video sequences. For the home video sequences used, the proposed system produced a recall of 77% and an accuracy of 78%.

  3. 44 CFR 16.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  4. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers...

  5. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers...

  6. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers...

  7. 10 CFR 4.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 4.550(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility...

  8. 10 CFR 4.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 4.550(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility...

  9. 44 CFR 16.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  10. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers...

  11. 45 CFR 1153.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  12. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers...

  13. 44 CFR 16.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  14. 45 CFR 1153.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  15. 45 CFR 1153.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  16. Practical principles of home artificial nutrition.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Hernández, Julia

    2008-10-01

    Due to its multiple advantages, patient care at home is an expanding therapeutic modality. This therapeutic option benefits patients and their families by reducing the probability of complications related to length of hospital stay, such as nosocomial infections, as well as by offering the possibility of allowing patients to remain in the home environment, which is more comfortable. Furthermore, this treatment improves resource utilization by increasing hospital bed turnover. One of the modalities that is receiving increasing interest is home artificial nutrition. This treatment consists of administering nutrients and another therapeutic agents into a tube feeding (home enteral nutrition [HEN]) or through venous access (home parenteral nutrition [HPN]) to improve or to maintain the patient's nutritional status in the home environment. The present article aims to review some of the most interesting features of HAN related to the prevalence, legal framework, special situations in Spain and particular features of HEN and HPN (patient selection, diets, monitoring, complications). Lastly, this article analyzes the importance of education programs for patients and their families and of integration between the primary care and the specialist care teams for the success of this therapeutic modality, the aim of which is to improve quality of care. Home artificial nutrition is a necessary but underused modality in Spain compared with other, similar countries. However, the continual search for efficiency and quality in patient care will help to improve the provision of this therapeutic option in the near future.

  17. Alternatives to Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this website may not be available. Alternatives to nursing homes Before you make any decisions about long ... live and what help you may need. A nursing home may not be your only choice. Discharge ...

  18. National Nursing Home Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  19. Falls in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for health care providers. Learn More Falls in Nursing Homes Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... 5 Why do falls occur more often in nursing homes? Falling can be a sign of other ...

  20. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  1. Home Schooling Goes Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaither, Milton

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that while home schooling may have particular appeal to celebrities, over the last decade families of all kinds have embraced the practice for widely varying reasons: no longer is home schooling exclusive to Christian fundamentalism and the countercultural Left. Along with growing acceptance of home schooling nationally has…

  2. Home Economics Unlimited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopkin, Doris

    This publication advocates the teaching of home economics to both boys and girls, and describes some home economics programs that provide meaningful learning experiences for students of both sexes. The philosophy and legal considerations behind teaching home economics to boys are examined. Changing life styles and social pressures are considered.…

  3. Healthy Homes Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Gina; Lyon, Melinda; Russ, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Extension is focusing on healthy homes programming. Extension educators are not qualified to diagnose consumers' medical problems as they relate to housing. We cannot give medical advice. Instead, we can help educate consumers about home conditions that may affect their well-being. Extension educators need appropriate healthy homes tools to…

  4. The Effects of Home Computers on School Enrollment. JCPR Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairlie, Robert W.

    Approximately 9 out of 10 high school students who have access to a home computer use that computer to complete school assignments. Using the Computer and Internet Use Supplements to the 2001 Current Population Survey, this study explores whether access to home computers increases the likelihood of school enrollment among teenagers who have not…

  5. Home Care Nursing via Computer Networks: Justification and Design Specifications

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    1988-01-01

    High-tech home care includes the use of information technologies, such as computer networks, to provide direct care to patients in the home. This paper presents the justification and design of a project using a free, public access computer network to deliver home care nursing. The intervention attempts to reduce isolation and improve problem solving among home care patients and their informal caregivers. Three modules comprise the intervention: a decision module, a communications module, and an information data base. This paper describes the experimental evaluation of the project, and discusses issues in the delivery of nursing care via computers.

  6. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  7. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  8. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  9. Fruits and Vegetables at Home: Child and Parent Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Robinson-O'Brien, Ramona; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Hannan, Peter J.; Burgess-Champoux, Teri; Haines, Jess

    2009-01-01

    Objective Examine child and parent perceptions of home food environment factors and associations with child fruit and vegetable (FV) intake Design Research staff administered surveys to children during after-school sessions and parents completed surveys by mail or over the phone Setting Four urban elementary schools in St. Paul, Minnesota, serving primarily low-income populations Participants 73 children (55 girls, 18 boys) participating in a theater-based intervention aimed at obesity prevention and one parent/guardian per child Main Outcome Measures Perceptions of home food environment factors (home FV availability, home FV accessibility; parental encouragement to eat FV; family meal frequency). Analysis Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests Results On average, child and parent perceptions of the home food environment were similar. When comparing child-parent dyad perceptions of home food environment, moderate to high level of agreement (56%-86%) was found. Child report of home FV availability, home FV accessibility, parental encouragement to eat FV, and family meal frequency explained 26.7% of the variance in child FV intake; whereas, parent report of these factors explained 4.9% of the variance. Conclusions and Implications It is important to understand both child and parent perceptions of the home food environment when developing interventions aimed at increasing child FV intake. PMID:19717120

  10. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  11. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  12. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  13. 49 CFR 28.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... achieving compliance with this section. The Department, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall... made until the planned restructuring takes place. However, alternative means for participation...

  14. Home range and travels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  15. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the “Domus”1 smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%). PMID:27616986

  16. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment.

    PubMed

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the "Domus" smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%).

  17. Ethical challenges in home mechanical ventilation: A secondary analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dybwik, Knut; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the ethical challenges in home mechanical ventilation based on a secondary analysis of qualitative empirical data. The data included perceptions of healthcare professionals in hospitals and community health services and family members of children and adults using home mechanical ventilation. The findings show that a number of ethical challenges, or dilemmas, arise at all levels in the course of treatment: deciding who should be offered home mechanical ventilation, respect for patient and family wishes, quality of life, dignity and equal access to home mechanical ventilation. Other challenges were the impacts home mechanical ventilation had on the patient, the family, the healthcare services and the allocation of resources. A better and broader understanding of these issues is crucial in order to improve the quality of care for both patient and family and assist healthcare professionals involved in home mechanical ventilation to make decisions for the good of the patient and his or her family. PMID:22183963

  18. Return to nursing home investment: Issues for public policy

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Carliss Y.; Bishop, Christine E.

    1984-01-01

    Because Government policy does much to determine the return available to nursing home investment, the profitability of the nursing home industry has been a subject of controversy since Government agencies began paying a large portion of the Nation's nursing home bill. Controversy appears at several levels. First is the rather narrow concern, often conceived in accounting terms, of the appropriate reimbursement of capital-related expense under Medicaid and Medicare. Second is the concern about how return to capital affects the flow of investment into nursing homes, leading either to inadequate access to care or to over-capacity. Third is the concern about how-sources of return to nursing home investment affect the pattern of nursing home ownership and the amount of equity held by owners since the pattern of ownership and amount of equity have been linked to quality of care. PMID:10310945

  19. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the “Domus”1 smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%).

  20. Home-ownership in Europe: How did it happen?

    PubMed

    Angelini, Viola; Laferrère, Anne; Weber, Guglielmo

    2013-03-01

    We use data from the third wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARELIFE)(1) to document the different ways individuals first became home-owners across countries and over cohorts over the second half of the 20th century. Focusing on first-time home owners we find that younger cohorts became home-owners earlier and were more likely to do it through credit, less likely to inherit their home directly. Having higher human capital, being employed, married, having children and living in an urban area, all make it more likely to purchase a home with a mortgage. The persistence of family help in accessing home-ownership in many countries demonstrates the interrelation between family, market and the state in most of continental Europe. PMID:24797468

  1. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment.

    PubMed

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the "Domus" smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%). PMID:27616986

  2. Hospital information technology in home care

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of hospital information technology (HIT) as a tool for home care is a recent trend in health science. Subjects gaining benefits from this new endeavor include middle-aged individuals with serious chronic illness living at home. Published data on the utilization of health care information technology especially for home care in chronic illness patients have increased enormously in recent past. The common chronic illnesses reported in these studies were primarily on heart and lung diseases. Furthermore, health professionals have confirmed in these studies that HIT was beneficial in gaining better access to information regarding their patients and they were also able to save that information easily for future use. On the other hand, some health professional also observed that the use of HIT in home care is not suitable for everyone and that individuals cannot be replaced by HIT. On the whole it is clear that the use of HIT could complement communication in home care. The present review aims to shed light on these latest aspects of the health care information technology in home care. PMID:27698741

  3. Hospital information technology in home care

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of hospital information technology (HIT) as a tool for home care is a recent trend in health science. Subjects gaining benefits from this new endeavor include middle-aged individuals with serious chronic illness living at home. Published data on the utilization of health care information technology especially for home care in chronic illness patients have increased enormously in recent past. The common chronic illnesses reported in these studies were primarily on heart and lung diseases. Furthermore, health professionals have confirmed in these studies that HIT was beneficial in gaining better access to information regarding their patients and they were also able to save that information easily for future use. On the other hand, some health professional also observed that the use of HIT in home care is not suitable for everyone and that individuals cannot be replaced by HIT. On the whole it is clear that the use of HIT could complement communication in home care. The present review aims to shed light on these latest aspects of the health care information technology in home care.

  4. Picture Your Nursing Home: Exploring the Sense of Home of Older Residents through Photography

    PubMed Central

    van Hoof, J.; Verhagen, M. M.; Wouters, E. J. M.; Marston, H. R.; Rijnaard, M. D.; Janssen, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    The quality of the built environment can impact the quality of life and the sense of home of nursing home residents. This study investigated (1) which factors in the physical and social environment correlate with the sense of home of the residents and (2) which environmental factors are most meaningful. Twelve participants engaged in a qualitative study, in which photography was as a supportive tool for subsequent interviews. The data were analysed based on the six phases by Braun and Clarke. The four themes identified are (1) the physical view; (2) mobility and accessibility; (3) space, place, and personal belongings; and (4) the social environment and activities. A holistic understanding of which features of the built environment are appreciated by the residents can lead to the design and retrofitting of nursing homes that are more in line with personal wishes. PMID:26346975

  5. Home is Private…Do Not Enter! Introversion and Sensitivity to Work-Home Conflict.

    PubMed

    Baer, Stacy M; Jenkins, Jade S; Barber, Larissa K

    2014-12-01

    This study examined extraversion as a moderator of the relationship between negative work-home conflict and stress-related outcomes among US employees using conservation of resources theory and privacy regulation theory. Introverts only experienced stronger negative effects of negative work-home conflict on work-related resource depletion (job burnout, low engagement, low satisfaction with balance) rather than general resource depletion (personal burnout) and strain (physical and psychological). This finding suggests that introverts selectively withdraw from the work domain to conserve resources when privacy at home is threatened. Employers may want to consider ways to help introverts increase work-home segmentation, such as reducing workplace norms that encourage employees to be continuously accessible. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25470248

  6. Personal resources supporting living at home as described by older home care clients.

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Sini; Routasalo, Pirkko; Arve, Seija

    2008-08-01

    This study describes the personal resources of older (> or = 75 years) home care clients in Finland and their perceptions of factors that enhance and constrain their ability to live independently at home. The data were collected by unstructured interviews with 21 older home care clients. Inductive content analysis were used to analyse the data. The resources of older people consisted of a sense of control over one's life and a determination to remain active. Factors enhancing older people's resources were their involvement in leisure activities and social networks, factors undermining their resources were conditions on living imposed by outsiders, declining health and loneliness. The results show that home care professionals do not yet have sufficient skills and abilities to identify and support older people's existing resources. As well as having access to necessary resources, it is also crucial that older people know how to use them.

  7. Facilitating home birth.

    PubMed

    Finigan, Valerie; Chadderton, Diane

    2015-06-01

    The birth of a baby is a family experience. However, in the United Kingdom birth often occurs outside the family environment, in hospital. Both home and hospital births have risks and benefits, but research shows that, for most women, it is as safe to give birth at home as it is in hospital. Women report home-birth to be satisfying with lowered risks of intervention and less likelihood of being separated from their family. It is also more cost effective for the National Health Service. Yet, whilst midwives are working hard to promote home birth as an option, it remains controversial. The aim of this paper is to raise awareness of the safety of home birth and the needs of women and midwives when a home birth is chosen. It provides an overview of care required and the role of the midwife in the ensuring care is woman-centred and personalised. PMID:26320334

  8. Home hemodialysis needs you!

    PubMed

    Agar, John W M; Schatell, Dori; Walker, Rachael

    2015-04-01

    This special supplement of Hemodialysis International focuses on home hemodialysis (HD). It has been compiled by a group of international experts in home HD who were brought together throughout 2013-2014 to construct a home HD "manual." Drawing upon both the literature and their own extensive expertise, these experts have helped develop this supplement that now stands as an A-to-Z guide for any who may be unfamiliar or uncertain about how to establish and maintain a successful home HD program. PMID:25925822

  9. Ozark Mountain solar home

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.

    1998-03-01

    If seeing is believing, Kyle and Christine Sarratt are believers. The couple has been living in their passive solar custom home for almost two years, long enough to see a steady stream of eye-opening utility bills and to experience the quality and comfort of energy-efficient design. Skeptical of solar homes at first, the Sarratts found an energy-conscious designer that showed them how they could realize their home-building dreams and live in greater comfort while spending less money. As Kyle says, {open_quotes}We knew almost nothing about solar design and weren`t looking for it, but when we realized we could get everything we wanted in a home and more, we were sold.{close_quotes} Now the couple is enjoying the great feeling of solar and wood heat in the winter, natural cooling in the summer and heating/cooling bills that average less than $20/month. The Sarratts` home overlooks a large lake near the town of Rogers, tucked up in the northwest corner of Arkansas. It is one of three completed homes out of 29 planned for the South Sun Estates subdivision, where homes are required by covenant to incorporate passive solar design principles. Orlo Stitt, owner of Stitt Energy Systems and developer of the subdivision, has been designing passive solar, energy-efficient homes for twenty years. His passive solar custom home development is the first in Arkansas.

  10. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-dialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-dialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency-dialysis access; Chronic kidney failure-dialysis access; Chronic renal failure-dialysis access

  11. Food Away from Home and Childhood Obesity.

    PubMed

    Mancino, Lisa; Todd, Jessica E; Guthrie, Joanne; Lin, Biing-Hwan

    2014-12-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with a number of serious health risks that can persist into adulthood. While trends in food away from home and fast-food consumption have paralleled trends in childhood obesity, it is important to identify whether this is a causal relationship. This paper reviews recent literature in this area to summarize if there is a consensus in research findings. We group the literature into two areas - consumption of and access to food away from home (FAFH). While no consensus findings have been reached in either area, the evidence of an association between FAFH consumption and childhood obesity has gained strength. Further, there is evidence that FAFH meals add calories to children's diets. The literature on the role of FAFH access and childhood obesity has continued producing mixed results. PMID:26626922

  12. Making the Computer Laboratory Accessible to Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert

    Research literature shows that current uses of computers in public school education are not reaching minority populations, and that females and ethnic minority students are less likely to have access to a computer at home. In addition, a study of computer use in the Learning Skills Center (LSC) at the University of Alabama supported the research…

  13. Committee Opinion No. 669: Planned Home Birth.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    In the United States, approximately 35,000 births (0.9%) per year occur in the home. Approximately one fourth of these births are unplanned or unattended. Although the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists believes that hospitals and accredited birth centers are the safest settings for birth, each woman has the right to make a medically informed decision about delivery. Importantly, women should be informed that several factors are critical to reducing perinatal mortality rates and achieving favorable home birth outcomes. These factors include the appropriate selection of candidates for home birth; the availability of a certified nurse-midwife, certified midwife or midwife whose education and licensure meet International Confederation of Midwives' Global Standards for Midwifery Education, or physician practicing obstetrics within an integrated and regulated health system; ready access to consultation; and access to safe and timely transport to nearby hospitals. The Committee on Obstetric Practice considers fetal malpresentation, multiple gestation, or prior cesarean delivery to be an absolute contraindication to planned home birth. PMID:27454733

  14. Easy Access to Firearms: Juveniles' Risks for Violent Offending and Violent Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruback, R. Barry; Shaffer, Jennifer N.; Clark, Valerie A.

    2011-01-01

    Keeping firearms at home may increase personal safety but it may also increase the risk of injury. This study uses data from three waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to assess the extent to which adolescents' easy access to firearms at home increases the risk of violent offending and violent victimization. Access to…

  15. AP@home: The Artificial Pancreas Is Now at Home.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Benesch, Carsten; DeVries, J Hans

    2016-07-01

    In the past years the development of an artificial pancreas (AP) has made great progress and many activities are ongoing in this area of research. The major step forward made in the last years was moving the evaluation of AP systems from highly controlled experimental conditions to daily life conditions at the home of patients with diabetes; this was also the aim of the European Union-funded AP@home project. Over a time period of 5 years a series of clinical studies were performed that culminated in 2 "final studies" during which an AP system was used by patients in their home environment for 2 or 3 months without supervision by a physician, living their normal lives. Two different versions of the AP system developed within this project were evaluated. A significant improvement in glycated hemoglobin was observed during closed-loop conditions despite the fact that during the control period the patients used the best currently available therapeutic option. In addition, a "single-port AP system" was developed within the project that combines continuous glucose monitoring and insulin infusion at a single tissue site. By using such a combined device the patients not only have to carry one less device around, the number of access points through the skin is also reduced from 2 to 1. In summary, close cooperation of 12 European partners, both academic centers and industry, enabled the development and evaluation of AP systems under daily life conditions. The next step is to develop these into products in cooperation with commercial partners. PMID:26888971

  16. Home Schooling: The Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menendez, Albert J.

    Home schooling, practiced as an alternative to both public and private schooling, is on the increase. This booklet provides an overview of the home schooling movement's statistical and demographic background. It also describes the legal context in states across the United States; the advocacy groups that are involved; the reasons why parents home…

  17. Home Education in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staroverova, T. I.

    2011-01-01

    From the eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries, home education (home schooling) by tutors and governesses in Russia was a customary form of schooling for an overwhelming majority of members of the nobility. Social and political transformations of the twentieth century led to substantial changes as the state got actively involved with…

  18. The Home Microbiome Project

    ScienceCinema

    Gilbert, Jack

    2016-07-12

    The Home Microbiome Project is an initiative aimed at uncovering the dynamic co-associations between people's bacteria and the bacteria found in their homes.The hope is that the data and project will show that routine monitoring of the microbial diversity of your body and of the environment in which you live is possible.

  19. Home Health in Chinatown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services Administration (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Community Health Services.

    The document reports on the successful efforts of the San Francisco Home Health Service, which brings much needed homemaker/home health aide services to hundreds of elderly people in the San Francisco Chinatown area. Providing historical and cultural background information about the area, its residents, and its particular health problems, the…

  20. Sex Away from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Harold

    1971-01-01

    The reasons why people who are normally truthful to their spouses engage in sex away from home are discussed. These reasons can include loneliness, ego building or the opportunity to have homosexual relations. Sex away from home is likely to increase since the number of people traveling is increasing. (Author/CG)

  1. Home Maintenance Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Jim; And Others

    This manual, written especially for the Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission, is a simply worded, step-by-step guide to home maintenance for new homeowners. It can be used for self-study or it can serve as instructional material for a training class on home ownership. The manual is organized in nine sections that cover the following…

  2. Home Study Advertising Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Michael P., Ed.; Welch, Sally R., Ed.

    This handbook contains a collections of nine articles on the subject of direct-response advertising. The handbook gives advice on how to create effective advertisements for home study courses. The nine articles are the following: "Overview of Home Study Advertising in the 1990s" (Michael P. Lambert); "Ad Features that Sell" (Nancie E. Robertson);…

  3. Home Activities for Fours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson-Florissant School District, Ferguson, MO.

    These home learning activity guides have been developed for parents to use with their 4-year-old children. Most of the activities require only household items that are often thrown away and can be recycled for learning activities. Some require no materials at all. The guides frequently begin with a discussion of home activities; progress through…

  4. The Home Microbiome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Jack

    2014-08-25

    The Home Microbiome Project is an initiative aimed at uncovering the dynamic co-associations between people's bacteria and the bacteria found in their homes.The hope is that the data and project will show that routine monitoring of the microbial diversity of your body and of the environment in which you live is possible.

  5. No Place Like Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    To fight rampant consumerism (Martha Stewart Inc.), reduce the divorce rate, prevent cancer and heart disease, and ensure domestic tranquility, educators should bring back home economics. Workers must put more energy into the home front, and we must begin teaching our children how to live well on less. (MLH)

  6. Asbestos in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The United States Government is concerned about asbestos-containing products in the home because sometimes asbestos fibers can be released from these produces. If asbestos fibers are inhaled, certain types of cancer may later develop. Asbestos in homes poses several problems. Household members have little or no protection from exposure to asbestos…

  7. Competition, information, and quality: Evidence from nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Economic theory suggests that competition and information can both be important for product quality, and yet evidence on how they may interact to affect quality is sparse. This paper estimates the impact of competition between nursing homes on their quality, and how this impact varies when consumers have better access to information. The effect of competition is identified using exogenous variation in the geographical proximity of nursing homes to their potential consumers. The change in information transparency is captured by the launch of the Five-Star Quality Rating System in 2009, which improved access to the quality information of nursing homes. We find that while the effect of competition on nursing home quality is generally rather limited, this effect becomes significantly stronger with increased information transparency. The results suggest that regulations on public quality reporting and on market structure are policy complements, and should be considered jointly to best improve quality.

  8. Comprehensive Home Economics. Vocational Home Economics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This curriculum guide is one of a number of curriculum guides developed for use in vocational home economics education in Texas. The guide is correlated closely with the essential elements prescribed by the State Board of Education. The competencies in the guide are the essential elements, and the subcompetencies are the subelements prescribed in…

  9. Moving Parkinson care to the home.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, E Ray; Vlaanderen, Floris P; Engelen, Lucien Jlpg; Kieburtz, Karl; Zhu, William; Biglan, Kevin M; Faber, Marjan J; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-09-01

    In many ways, the care of individuals with Parkinson disease does not meet their needs. Despite the documented benefits of receiving care from clinicians with Parkinson disease expertise, many patients (if not most) do not. Moreover, current care models frequently require older individuals with impaired mobility, cognition, and driving ability to be driven by overburdened caregivers to large, complex urban medical centers. Moving care to the patient's home would make Parkinson disease care more patient-centered. Demographic factors, including aging populations, and social factors, such as the splintering of the extended family, will increase the need for home-based care. Technological advances, especially the ability to assess and deliver care remotely, will enable the transition of care back to the home. However, despite its promise, this next generation of home-based care will have to overcome barriers, including outdated insurance models and a technological divide. Once these barriers are addressed, home-based care will increase access to high quality care for the growing number of individuals with Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27501323

  10. Moving Parkinson care to the home.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, E Ray; Vlaanderen, Floris P; Engelen, Lucien Jlpg; Kieburtz, Karl; Zhu, William; Biglan, Kevin M; Faber, Marjan J; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-09-01

    In many ways, the care of individuals with Parkinson disease does not meet their needs. Despite the documented benefits of receiving care from clinicians with Parkinson disease expertise, many patients (if not most) do not. Moreover, current care models frequently require older individuals with impaired mobility, cognition, and driving ability to be driven by overburdened caregivers to large, complex urban medical centers. Moving care to the patient's home would make Parkinson disease care more patient-centered. Demographic factors, including aging populations, and social factors, such as the splintering of the extended family, will increase the need for home-based care. Technological advances, especially the ability to assess and deliver care remotely, will enable the transition of care back to the home. However, despite its promise, this next generation of home-based care will have to overcome barriers, including outdated insurance models and a technological divide. Once these barriers are addressed, home-based care will increase access to high quality care for the growing number of individuals with Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  11. Old Buildings Broadband Home Networks: Technologies and Services Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantacci, Romano; Pecorella, Tommaso; Micciullo, Luigia; Viti, Roberto; Pasquini, Vincenzo; Calì, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Internet broadband access is becoming a reality in many countries. To fully exploit the benefits from high-speed connection, both suitable home network connectivity and advanced services support have to be made available to the user. In this article, issues relative to the upgrade of existing home networks, particularly in old buildings, together with networking and security requirements are addressed, and possible solutions are proposed.

  12. [Travel and cultural activities in care homes for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Andriot, Hervé; Roumilhac, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Travel and cultural activities are still accessible for elderly people, in particular those living in care homes. With some precautions and adequate professional supervision, it is possible to carry out such activities, elderly people's limits being psychological rather than physical. Elderly people can thereby open up to the adventure of travelling whether it is an actual, physical trip or a virtual journey, through cultural activities. A report on the Residence Orpea des Noues care home's experience of such initiatives.

  13. Technical aspects of home hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Alhomayeed, B; Lindsay, R M

    2009-03-01

    Home hemodialysis (HHD) has proved to be a useful form of renal replacement therapy. The economic advantage of HHD is well established and interest in it is renewed. Once it has been decided to establish a HHD program, a well developed strategic plan is required. This should address financial and logistical issues and establish policies that will address responsi-bilities of both patients and HD centers. The recruitment of patients is facilitated by ensuring that all incident patients have early access to an education program describing all forms of renal replacement therapy that the regional renal program provides. Patients and members of the pre-dialysis education program should understand the selection process criteria in advance. Once the assessment is completed and the patient agrees to the proceedings, a plan of action should be esta-blished for enrolling the patient into the program and initiating training. Patients' education pro-gram should take into consideration principles of adult learning. When choosing dialysis equip-ment for home use, the needs and preferences of the patients should be respected. As a rule of thumb, the equipment should be simple to use, yet still provide adequate and reliable therapy. De-ciding where to set up and position the HHD equipment is important. Installation of HHD ma-chine at home requires a continuous supply of accessories. Before establishing a HHD program, commitment of the dialysis center to provide and maintain the infrastructure of the program is mandatory. The estimated patients suitable for HHD are less than 15% of all prospective dialysis patients. Generally, those who are have greatly improved quality of life and by using modalities such as nocturnal and daily dialysis can have improved physical well-being with considerable potential cost savings.

  14. Home Computers and Child Outcomes: Short-Term Impacts from a Randomized Experiment in Peru. NBER Working Paper No. 18818

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beuermann, Diether W.; Cristia, Julian P.; Cruz-Aguayo, Yyannu; Cueto, Santiago; Malamud, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results from a randomized control trial in which approximately 1,000 OLPC XO laptops were provided for home use to children attending primary schools in Lima, Peru. The intervention increased access and use of home computers, with some substitution away from computer use outside the home. Beneficiaries were more likely to…

  15. Benefits and implementation of home hemodialysis: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Karkar, Ayman; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Strippoli, Giovanni F M

    2015-11-01

    Home hemodialysis (HD) is a modality of renal replacement therapy that can be safely and independently performed at home by end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Home HD can be performed at the convenience of the patients on a daily basis, every other day and overnight (nocturnal). Despite the great and many perceived benefits of home HD, including the significant improvements in health outcomes and resource utilization, the adoption of home HD has been limited; lack or inadequate pre-dialysis education and training constitute a major barrier. The lack of self-confidence and/or self-efficacy to manage own therapy, lack of family and/or social support, fear of machine and cannulation of blood access and worries of possible catastrophic events represent other barriers for the implementation of home HD besides inadequate competence and/or expertise in caring for home HD patients among renal care providers (nephrologists, dialysis nurses, educators). A well-studied, planned and prepared and carefully implemented central country program supported by adequate budget can play a positive role in overcoming the challenges to home HD. Healthcare authorities, with the increasingly financial and logistic demands and the relatively higher mortality and morbidity rates of the conventional in-center HD, should tackle home HD as an attractive and cost-effective modality with more freedom, quality of life and improvement of clinical outcomes for the ESRD patients. PMID:26586045

  16. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 2416.150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  17. 49 CFR 1014.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1014.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  18. 34 CFR 105.32 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignments of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... with this section. (iii) The Department, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... because of § 105.32 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include—...

  19. 22 CFR 144.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 144.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  20. 22 CFR 1510.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  1. 5 CFR 1850.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  2. 22 CFR 1510.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  3. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services.... The Board, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the... historic property is not required because of § 530.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of...

  4. 29 CFR 100.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  5. 45 CFR 2490.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... property is not required because of § 2490.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving...

  6. 12 CFR 794.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 794.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  7. 12 CFR 794.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 794.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  8. 3 CFR 102.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  9. 25 CFR 720.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 720.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  10. 3 CFR 102.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  11. 22 CFR 144.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 144.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  12. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 1207.150(a)(2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  13. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... physical alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1208.150(a)(2) or (3),...

  14. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services.... The Board, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the... historic property is not required because of § 530.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of...

  15. 5 CFR 1850.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  16. 34 CFR 105.32 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignments of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... with this section. (iii) The Department, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... because of § 105.32 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include—...

  17. 45 CFR 2104.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 2104.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  18. 7 CFR 15e.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  19. 1 CFR 457.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 457.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  20. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 2416.150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  1. 5 CFR 1850.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  2. 46 CFR 507.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 507.150 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  3. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 1207.150(a)(2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  4. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services.... The Board, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the... historic property is not required because of § 530.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of...

  5. 1 CFR 500.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 500.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  6. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 4907.150 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  7. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 2416.150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  8. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... physical alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1208.150(a)(2) or (3),...

  9. 17 CFR 200.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  10. 22 CFR 1005.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 1005.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  11. 22 CFR 1005.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 1005.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  12. 17 CFR 149.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 149.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  13. 22 CFR 1701.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  14. 22 CFR 1701.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  15. 22 CFR 1510.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  16. 45 CFR 2490.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... property is not required because of § 2490.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving...

  17. 17 CFR 149.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 149.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  18. 49 CFR 1014.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1014.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  19. 5 CFR 723.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... physical alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 723.150(a) (2) or (3),...

  20. 22 CFR 1701.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  1. 12 CFR 794.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 794.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  2. 34 CFR 105.32 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignments of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... with this section. (iii) The Department, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... because of § 105.32 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include—...

  3. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 1207.150(a)(2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  4. 25 CFR 720.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 720.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  5. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... physical alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1208.150(a)(2) or (3),...

  6. 25 CFR 720.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 720.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  7. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 2416.150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  8. 46 CFR 507.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 507.150 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  9. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 4907.150 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  10. 22 CFR 1005.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 1005.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  11. 34 CFR 1200.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  12. 7 CFR 15e.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  13. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 4907.150 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  14. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 2416.150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  15. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 1207.150(a)(2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  16. 5 CFR 1850.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  17. 22 CFR 144.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 144.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  18. 45 CFR 2104.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 2104.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  19. 22 CFR 1510.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  20. 49 CFR 1014.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1014.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  1. 22 CFR 1701.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  2. 22 CFR 1005.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 1005.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  3. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 1207.150(a)(2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  4. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services.... The Board, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the... historic property is not required because of § 530.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of...

  5. Kids Not Getting the Web Access They Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minkel, Walter

    2004-01-01

    A new study shows that students aged 6 to 17 who have access to the Interact at home are growing afore and more dissatisfied with the access to the Net available to them at school. Grunwald Associates, a California market research firm, released the results of their survey, "Children, Families and the Internet," on December 4. Seventy-six percent…

  6. 12 CFR 606.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... decision that compliance would result in such alteration or burdens must be made by the agency head or his..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... facilities, or any other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible to...

  7. 16 CFR 6.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... such alteration or burdens. The decision that compliance would result in such alteration or burdens... to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at... accessible rolling stock, or any methods that result in making its programs or activities readily...

  8. 43 CFR 17.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... proving that compliance with § 17.550(a) would result in such an alteration or burdens. The decision that..., reassignment of services to accessible locations, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs...

  9. Home Telehealth Video Conferencing: Perceptions and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Greg; Pech, Joanne; Rechter, Stuart; Carati, Colin; Kidd, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Background The Flinders Telehealth in the Home trial (FTH trial), conducted in South Australia, was an action research initiative to test and evaluate the inclusion of telehealth services and broadband access technologies for palliative care patients living in the community and home-based rehabilitation services for the elderly at home. Telehealth services at home were supported by video conferencing between a therapist, nurse or doctor, and a patient using the iPad tablet. Objective The aims of this study are to identify which technical factors influence the quality of video conferencing in the home setting and to assess the impact of these factors on the clinical perceptions and acceptance of video conferencing for health care delivery into the home. Finally, we aim to identify any relationships between technical factors and clinical acceptance of this technology. Methods An action research process developed several quantitative and qualitative procedures during the FTH trial to investigate technology performance and users perceptions of the technology including measurements of signal power, data transmission throughput, objective assessment of user perceptions of videoconference quality, and questionnaires administered to clinical users. Results The effectiveness of telehealth was judged by clinicians as equivalent to or better than a home visit on 192 (71.6%, 192/268) occasions, and clinicians rated the experience of conducting a telehealth session compared with a home visit as equivalent or better in 90.3% (489/540) of the sessions. It was found that the quality of video conferencing when using a third generation mobile data service (3G) in comparison to broadband fiber-based services was concerning as 23.5% (220/936) of the calls failed during the telehealth sessions. The experimental field tests indicated that video conferencing audio and video quality was worse when using mobile data services compared with fiber to the home services. As well, statistically

  10. West Virginia nursing homes: are they up to the standard?

    PubMed

    Madero, Guillermo; Neitch, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Quality measurement and performance monitoring are under continuous assessment in Nursing Homes (NH). Through this research project we assess the quality of care provided in the NH in the state of West Virginia by publicly accessible quality measurements. The methodology for this research study was through the retrieval of data from the Nursing Home Compare website in which a total of 80 NH were located and analyzed. The results demonstrate that more than 50% of NH in West Virginia are at or above the national average when compared using the Five Star Rating System by CMS, in overall rating (59%), health inspections (57%), nursing home staffing (63%) and quality measures (55%). Contrary to the prevailing reputation, the nursing homes of West Virginia are at or above the nation's average in overall rating, health inspections, nursing home staffing and quality measures.

  11. Home Versus Nonhome Neighborhood

    PubMed Central

    Hurvitz, Philip M.; Moudon, Anne Vernez

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Built environment and health research have focused on characteristics of home neighborhoods, whereas overall environmental exposures occur over larger spatial ranges. Purpose Differences in built environment characteristics were analyzed for home and nonhome locations using GPS data. Methods GPS data collected in 2007–2008 were analyzed for 41 subjects in the Seattle area in 2010. Environmental characteristics for 3.8 million locations were measured using novel GIS data sets called SmartMaps, representing spatially continuous values of local built environment variables in the domains of neighborhood composition, utilitarian destinations, transportation infrastructure, and traffic conditions. Using bootstrap sampling, CIs were estimated for differences in built environment values for home (<833 m of home address) and nonhome (>1666 m) GPS locations. Results Home and nonhome built environment values were significantly different for over 90% of variables across subjects (p<0.001). Only 51% of subjects had higher counts of supermarkets near than away from home. Different measures of neighborhood parks yielded varying results. Conclusions SmartMaps helped measure local built environment characteristics for a large set of GPS locations. Most subjects had significantly different home and nonhome built environment exposures. Considering the full range of individuals’ environmental exposures may improve understanding of effects of the built environment on behavior and health outcomes. PMID:22424255

  12. Defenders against Threats or Enablers of Opportunities: The Screening Role Played by Gatekeepers in Researching Older People in Care Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scourfield, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper emerges from a case study of the system of statutory reviews in older people's care homes in the UK. Informed by a review of selected literature on gaining access, this paper provides a critical account of the process of negotiating access with gatekeepers (chiefly, care home managers). The negotiations were time-consuming and largely…

  13. Reflections: Volunteering at Home.

    PubMed

    Hu, Amanda

    2016-08-01

    Many young people look forward to volunteering abroad and overlook the ample volunteer opportunities at home. There are several advantages to volunteering at home: you help people in your own community; you can make a long-term commitment; and you have continuity of care for your patients. There are >1200 free clinics in the United States whose main goal is to provide care to the indigent population. These free clinics are always looking for volunteers with specialized medical training. This article reviews the medically related and unrelated volunteer opportunities available in the United States. Volunteering at home is a worthwhile experience, and I encourage the otolaryngology community to explore these opportunities.

  14. Bringing Your Baby Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid suffocation. Chances are much better that you'll bring home a calm, contented baby if you ... by the manufacturer before the second birthday, you'll need to use a convertible seat designed for ...

  15. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: neuroblastoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions neuroblastoma neuroblastoma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Neuroblastoma is a type of cancer that most often ...

  17. Twelve Home Cleaning Recipes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Safe and Effective Disinfection Twelve Home Cleaning Recipes Safer alternatives to hazardous cleaning products exist for ... 24 hours at room temperature. All Purpose Cleaner recipes for use on counters, floors and other hard ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: anencephaly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions anencephaly anencephaly Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Anencephaly is a condition that prevents the normal development ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: adermatoglyphia

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adermatoglyphia adermatoglyphia Enable Javascript to ...

  20. School in Model Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lander, Kathleen

    1973-01-01

    A model home complex solved a critical housing shortage for the San Joaquin school district in Orange County, California, last fall and will be in use again this year as a school for primary grades. (Author)

  1. Webcasting in home and hospice care services: virtual communication in home care.

    PubMed

    Smith-Stoner, Marilyn

    2011-06-01

    The access to free live webcasting over home computers was much more available in 2007, when three military leaders from West Point, with the purpose of helping military personnel stay connected with their families when deployed, developed Ustream.tv. There are many types of Web-based video streaming applications. This article describes Ustream, a free and effective communication tool to virtually connect staff. There are many features in Ustream, but the most useful for home care and hospice service providers is its ability to broadcast sound and video to anyone with a broadband Internet connection, a chat room for users to interact during a presentation, and the ability to have a "co-host" or second person also broadcast simultaneously. Agencies that provide community-based services in the home will benefit from integration of Web-based video streaming into their communication strategy.

  2. Home Schoolers: A Forgotten Clientele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avner, Jane A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of home schooling, including reasons that parents choose home schooling, two major schools of thought on home education, historical perspectives, and legal issues. The role of the public library is examined and some services offered to home schoolers are described. A bibliography of books for parents is provided. (10…

  3. Protect Your Home from Wildfire!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Homes in wooded areas or in the wildland/urban interface are at special risk for wildfire. The article provides a checklist of what to keep on hand to make homes safer from wildfire, focusing on vegetation around the home and maintenance of the yard and home. (SM)

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes — Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder was honored for Most DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes Built in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards. By July 2014, Palo Duro had completed 152 homes since the program began in 2013 (under the original program title DOE Challenge Home), all of them certified to the stringent efficiency requirements of DOE’s Zero Energy Ready Home program.

  5. Keep Illicit Drugs, Booze Out of the Home to Lower Teens' Addiction Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asians generally had easier access to alcohol and drugs in the home as teens, according to the study. It was published online recently in the Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse . "While there have been many studies linking alcohol ...

  6. Nursing homes in China.

    PubMed

    Chu, Leung-Wing; Chi, Iris

    2008-05-01

    China will face a dramatic transition from a young to an aged society in the coming 30 to 40 years. In 2000, there were 88,110,000 persons aged 65 years and older, which represented 7% of the population. This percentage is projected to increase to 23% in 2050. Regarding health and long-term care for older adults, the current challenge is to build a comprehensive system of care for older adults. Nursing home care is an inevitable care model for frail older adults in China, which is largely sponsored by the government of China with contributions from some nongovernment organizations and private investors. China is a large country. Within the country, long-term care varies greatly between rural and urban areas, and among the different economic developing areas. In urban and better-developed areas, the range of services exists; however, in rural and less-developed areas, the range of services is limited. The "Star Light Program" and "Beloved Care Engineering" were recent government initiatives to improve aged care. They were launched in 2001 and have dramatically increased the number of both senior centers and nursing homes for older adults. While the quantity of nursing homes is still inadequate with an additional mismatch problem between the supply and demand, the quality of care in most nursing homes is suboptimal. At present, most administrative and frontline workers in nursing homes have received little training in elder care. There is a need for good-quality structured training in long-term care for all types of staff. Moreover, quality standard for care, including standard setting, assessment, and monitoring, is an important issue and needs substantial improvement for nursing homes in China. Currently, 1.5% of older people live in nursing homes and apartments for older people. Because of the peculiar 4-2-1 family structure in China, we expect the prevalence of nursing home placement of older adults will increase in the coming years. The government of China has

  7. Haemodialysis: hospital or home?

    PubMed

    Power, Albert; Ashby, Damien

    2014-02-01

    Healthcare costs associated with the provision of dialysis therapy are escalating globally as the number of patients developing end-stage renal disease increases. In this setting, there has been heightened interest in the application and potential benefit of home haemodialysis therapies compared with the conventional approach of thrice weekly, incentre treatments. Increasingly, national healthcare systems are financially incentivising the expansion of home haemodialysis programmes with observational studies demonstrating better patient survival, superior control of circulating volume and blood pressure, greater patient satisfaction and lower running costs compared with incentre dialysis. Nonetheless, increasing the prevalence of home haemodialysis is challenged by the technological complexity of conventional dialysis systems, the need for significant adaptations to the home as well as suboptimal clinician and patient education about the feasibility and availability of this modality. In addition, enthusiasm about frequent as well as nocturnal (extended-hours) haemodialysis has been tempered by results from the recent Frequent Haemodialysis Network randomised controlled trials comparing these schedules with a conventional incentre regime. An increasing emphasis on empowering patient choice and promoting self-management of chronic illness is a powerful driver for the expansion of home haemodialysis programmes in the UK and internationally.

  8. Home Computer Use and Academic Performance of Nine-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Alice; Layte, Richard; Lyons, Sean; Silles, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A recent rise in home computer ownership has seen a growing number of children using computers and accessing the internet from a younger age. This paper examines the link between children's home computing and their academic performance in the areas of reading and mathematics. Data from the nine-year-old cohort of the Growing Up in Ireland survey…

  9. Starting a Second Chance Home: A Guide for Policymakers and Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Kathy; Kelly, Lisa M.

    This guide outlines 10 basic steps for policymakers and practitioners interested in creating Second Chance Homes in their areas. Second Chance Homes provide stable, nurturing environments for teen families with access to child care, education, job training, counseling, and advice on parenting and life skills. The guide is based on interviews with…

  10. 45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes... direct primary care medical homes. A QHP issuer may provide coverage through a direct primary...

  11. The Impact of Home Computer Use on Children's Activities and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Kraut, Robert E.; Greenfield, Patricia M.; Gross, Elisheva F.

    2000-01-01

    Research on the effects of home computer use on children's development indicates that: computer access increases total time spent with the television or computer rather than other activities; computer games can build computer literacy; home computer use slightly increases academic performance; increased Internet use may increase loneliness and…

  12. Pilot Evaluation of a Home Visit Parent Training Program in Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study reported the pilot evaluation of the Healthy Start Home Visit Program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, delivered by trained parent assistants. Home visiting was used to make services more accessible to disadvantaged families. Method: The participants included 21 parent-child dyads. Outcome measures…

  13. The Whole World at Our Door and in Their Hands: Library Media Specialists, Internet Access, and PDAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2003-01-01

    Considers the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) report on Internet access and the rapidly growing importance of Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) in education. Highlights include school access to the Internet; classroom access; types of connections; home access; special hardware and software for students with disabilities; and…

  14. Residential accessibility to information technology retailers and self reported computer use among patients attending community clinics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul; Shaheen, Madga; Smith, James; Ryan, Daniel; Baker, Richard

    2009-11-14

    The actual mechanisms that maintain the individual disparities in home computer use and internet access that are collectively termed "the digital divide" remain unclear. We hypothesized that geographic accessibility to IT retailers would independently influence community clinic patients self reported use of computers at home thus limiting their ability to access health related information via the internet. To test this we obtained information on the locations of IT retailers in Los Angeles County, California and generated accessibility scores for the patient's home residence. Geographic measures of accessibility to IT retailers independently predicted clinic patient's self reported use of computers at home, and this effect was driven by low income individuals. Our results indicate that the causes of the digital divide are influenced by less commonly considered factors such as local IT retailer availability.

  15. Teaching Science in the Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ream, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    How to effectively teach science in a classroom setting has long been a topic of discussion. Teachers are given specific guidelines on what to teach in the school curriculum and outreach programs are commonly used to help teach science in classrooms through demonstrations and other activities. However, a growing number of people are taking their children out of traditional schools and choosing instead to teach them in their own homes. Statistics show that between 1999 and 2007, the number of homeschoolers rose from 850,000 to 1.5 million [National Center for Education Statistics July 2004, Dec 2008]. For many of these families, math and science are difficult subjects to teach because the parents do not know how to convey the ideas to their children in an engaging way. This is made more difficult because the parents themselves are not engaged. Classroom demonstrations and hands-on activities are a very effective ways to teach science concepts while showing that science itself can be fun and exciting but demonstrations do not typically include homeschooling families and in many cases doing the experiments on their own is not an option due to availability and cost of the materials. In this presentation we will discuss some ways to make demonstrations and hands-on activities more accessible to homeschooling families as well as looking at various ways of overcoming difficulties when teaching science in the home. References Princiotta, D., Bielick, S., and Chapman, C. (2004). 1.1 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2003 (NCES 2004-115). National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Washington, D.C. Bielick S. (2008) 1.5 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2007 (NCES 2009-030). National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Washington, D.C.

  16. 42 CFR 494.100 - Condition: Care at home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... complications, including water treatment problems. (iv) Availability of support resources and how to access and... treatment modality selected, including effective use of dialysis supplies and equipment in achieving and... needed. (v) Monitoring of the quality of water and dialysate used by home hemodialysis patients...

  17. 42 CFR 494.100 - Condition: Care at home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... complications, including water treatment problems. (iv) Availability of support resources and how to access and... treatment modality selected, including effective use of dialysis supplies and equipment in achieving and... needed. (v) Monitoring of the quality of water and dialysate used by home hemodialysis patients...

  18. 42 CFR 494.100 - Condition: Care at home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... complications, including water treatment problems. (iv) Availability of support resources and how to access and... treatment modality selected, including effective use of dialysis supplies and equipment in achieving and... needed. (v) Monitoring of the quality of water and dialysate used by home hemodialysis patients...

  19. 42 CFR 494.100 - Condition: Care at home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... complications, including water treatment problems. (iv) Availability of support resources and how to access and... treatment modality selected, including effective use of dialysis supplies and equipment in achieving and... needed. (v) Monitoring of the quality of water and dialysate used by home hemodialysis patients...

  20. [Palliative care at home, transferring information to emergency medical teams].

    PubMed

    Ribeaucoup, Luc; Roche, Blandine

    2015-11-01

    Many people wish to die at home. However, the end-of-life period can be marked by the occurrence of numerous symptoms causing situations of crisis. Emergency medical teams are therefore frequently called upon. In order to be able to make the right decisions in a short space of time, they must have quick access to all the relevant information. PMID:26567076

  1. Mining the Home Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Diane J.; Krishnan, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals spend a majority of their time in their home or workplace and for many, these places are our sanctuaries. As society and technology advance there is a growing interest in improving the intelligence of the environments in which we live and work. By filling home environments with sensors and collecting data during daily routines, researchers can gain insights on human daily behavior and the impact of behavior on the residents and their environments. In this article we provide an overview of the data mining opportunities and challenges that smart environments provide for researchers and offer some suggestions for future work in this area. PMID:25506128

  2. Mountain Home Well - Photos

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shervais, John

    2012-01-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  3. House calls: a practical guide to seeing the patient at home.

    PubMed

    Scanameo, A M; Fillit, H

    1995-03-01

    The physician and/or healthcare team is responsible for the planning, design, implementation, and authorization of home care services. Home visits are appropriate for elderly homebound patients and for those who are having problems at home, such as recent falls or suspected abuse. The home visit can provide valuable information that is not readily accessible in the office setting. At the home, the comprehensive geriatric assessment should include history and physical exam, plus a medication review, environmental evaluation, and assessment of functional status. Discussion with the family is also important, as caregiver burnout can adversely affect the well-being of the frail older patient living at home. Environmental modifications can improve home safety and reduce the risk for falls.

  4. Making a "Web" for Students: From the Classroom to Their Homes and to the Instructor's Home Page.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Will

    Community college students are often described as less motivated, or "turned-off," compared to other college students. This stereotype has prevented many writing instructors from trying new ways of reaching these students at a Midwest community college, the majority of whom have access to the Internet either at home or in the local library. Using…

  5. But Does It Work in Homes Away From Home?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Phyllis

    1972-01-01

    The experimental Mother-Child Home Program, aimed at the prevention of educational disadvantaged," was shown to be effective in repeated studies away from the home base of the Verbal Interaction Project. (Author/SP)

  6. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communications & IT Access to information and communication technology (ICT) is addressed by Board standards and guidelines issued ... Engineer (November 3) Access Board Approves Rules on ICT Refresh and Medical Diagnostic Equipment (September 14) Access ...

  7. Differences in home food and activity environments between obese and healthy weight families of preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Boles, Richard E.; Scharf, Cynthia; Filigno, Stephanie S.; Saelens, Brian E.; Stark, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a home food and activity instrument to discriminate between the home environments of obese and healthy weight preschool children. Design A modified questionnaire about home environments was tested as an observation tool. Setting Family homes. Participants Thirty-five obese children with at least one obese caregiver were compared to forty-seven healthy weight children with no obese caregivers. Main Outcome Measures Home observation assessments were conducted to evaluate the availability of devices supporting activity behaviors and foods based on availability, accessibility, and readiness to be eaten. Analysis Agreement statistics were conducted to analyze psychometrics and MANOVAs were conducted to assess group differences, significance, P < .05. Results Home observations showed acceptable agreement statistics between independent coders across food and activity items. Families of obese preschoolers were significantly less likely to have fresh vegetables available or accessible in the home, were more likely to have a TV in the obese child’s bedroom and had fewer physical activity devices compared to healthy weight preschoolers. Conclusions and Implications Families of young children live in home environments that were discriminatively characterized based on home observations. Future tool refinement will further clarify the impact of the home environment on early growth. PMID:23380192

  8. Home Weatherization Visit

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  9. School Music Goes Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Susan Hobson

    2012-01-01

    This article explores ways for music teachers to influence music making in the home. Often preschool music programs include parents in the music education process, but when children enter school, the parent connection is not usually continued with the same intensity. This article will serve as a catalyst for further conversations on ways to…

  10. Solar Electricity for Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Every day, the sun showers the Earth with millions of times more energy than its people use. The only problem is that energy is spread out over the entire Earth's surface and must be harvested. Engineers are learning to capture and use some of this energy to make electricity for homes. Solar panels make up the heart of a solar system. They can be…

  11. Preceptorship in home care.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Kelly

    2008-10-01

    Central to the orientation process is the role of the preceptor. The following is a methodological survey of clinical and administrative nursing staffs' current perceptions concerning the preceptorship process existing within a small New England home health agency. Recommendations are made for improvement using evidenced-based strategies found in the current literature.

  12. Home care goes corporate.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H

    1997-05-01

    Some 18,000 home health agencies dot today's landscape--one of health care's last cottage industries. But the spread of managed care, plus long-promised Medicare payment reform, will change all that. Waves of consolidation and cost-cutting won't be far behind.

  13. Home Furnishing Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The secondary level curriculum guide in home furnishings was designed for coordinated vocational-academic education (CVAE) students, in-school youth possessing academic, socioeconomic, or other handicaps which prevent them from succeeding in traditional educational endeavors. The first of two parts of the guide is the overview which describes the…

  14. Eldercare at Home: Caregiving

    MedlinePlus

    ... fill up all your time. This will then increase your stress and reduce your ability to give good care. Pay attention to positive ... If you do, caregiving can wear you out, increase your stress, and interfere with your ability to give good care at home. Support groups ...

  15. Home, Hearth and Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seelig, Anita

    1982-01-01

    Advantages of having children use microcomputers at school and home include learning about sophisticated concepts early in life without a great deal of prodding, playing games that expand knowledge, and becoming literate in computer knowledge needed later in life. Includes comments from parents on their experiences with microcomputers and…

  16. The Computer Goes Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirone, Bill

    2001-01-01

    A partnership between local community, business, and education leaders and the Santa Barbara County Education Office spawned Computers for Families--a program putting computers in needy families' homes. Adjudicated youth at a residential boys' camp gain vocational skills when refurbishing donated computers for families' use. (MLH)

  17. Home Energy Conservation Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, V. William; And Others

    This guide was prepared to support a program of training for community specialists in contemporary and practical techniques of home energy conservation. It is designed to assist professionals in efficient operation of energy conservation programs and to provide ideas for expanding education operations. Eight major sections are presented: (1)…

  18. Solar Energy: Home Heating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on home heating is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  19. Home Weatherization Visit

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2016-07-12

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  20. Composting Begins at Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreckman, George P.

    1994-01-01

    Reports the results of a year-long home composting pilot program run by the city of Madison, Wisconsin. The study was designed to gather data on the amount and type of materials composted by 300 volunteer households and to determine the feasibility of a full-scale program. (LZ)

  1. Home Education Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Alberta parents enjoy a range of choices for their children's education, including the option of home education. Alberta's "School Act" and its funding guidelines for education recognize the central role of parents in the education of their children. No matter what your decision about educational programming, your ongoing involvement and…

  2. Home Improvement Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolansky, William D.; Ogwezi, Benedict

    A study was conducted to determine what alterations, additions, and improvements in older homes make them more desirable to the consumer. After a revlew of the literature, a questionnaire was developed and sent to fifty-five homeowners in Ames, Iowa, who had had major additions or renovations done by contractors during the previous five years.…

  3. Close to Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    In 1954, when the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision in "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka," the South Lawndale neighborhood on Chicago's southwest side was home primarily to Polish and Czech immigrants. In the decades since, South Lawndale has undergone dramatic change. Eastern Europeans moved out, and people of Mexican descent…

  4. Group Home Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide seeks improvement in group home management, especially community-based residential facilities for juvenile offenders. Primary organizational considerations include structure, communication lines and decision making. The role of the Board of Directors is explored from initial selection through definition of the program directors role.…

  5. At Home with Montessori.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oriti, Patricia; Kahn, David, Ed.

    Based on Montessori's ideas about children's innate capabilities and potential, this book encourages restructuring the home environment to provide children, especially preschool children, with opportunities for self-directed activities and personal autonomy. In each of the chapters, a different room is examined as to how it could be redesigned to…

  6. At Home with History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biemiller, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Charles Carroll Jr. would be long forgotten but for a single notable accomplishment: he built an exceedingly handsome house. Begun in 1801 with money from his wealthy father-- Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence-- the Federal-style home has near-perfect proportions and airy rooms. The…

  7. TARCOG Home Start Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Top of Alabama Regional Council of Governments, Huntsville. Human Resources Program.

    This report describes the Top of Alabama Regional Council of Governments (TARCOG) Home Start Program. Five aspects of the program are presented. (1) The nutrition component is aimed at helping parents make the best use of food resources through good planning, buying, and cooking. (2) The health program involves provision of medical and dental…

  8. Quality of Life in Group Homes and Older Persons' Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Laura; Mansell, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Older people with intellectual disabilities sometimes live in older people's homes rather than homes for people with intellectual disabilities. Little is known about their quality of life in these homes. A non-equivalent comparison group design was used to compare the quality of life of 59 people in three groups; older people without an…

  9. Freedom and Confinement: Patients' Experiences of Life with Home Haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Vestman, C.; Hasselroth, M.; Berglund, M.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic end stage renal disease need dialysis to survive; however, they also need a treatment that suits their life situation. It is important that healthcare providers provide reliable, up-to-date information about different dialysis treatment options. Since home haemodialysis is a relatively new treatment, it is necessary to gather more knowledge about what the treatment entails from the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to describe patients' experiences of having home haemodialysis. To gain access to the patients' experiences, they were asked to write narratives, which describe both their good and bad experiences of life with the treatment. The narratives were analysed with a qualitative method. The results of this analysis are subdivided into five themes: freedom to be at home and control their own treatment, feeling of being alone with the responsibility, changes in the home environment, need for support, and security and well-being with home haemodialysis. The conclusion is that home haemodialysis provides a certain level of freedom, but the freedom is limited as the treatment itself is restrictive. In order to improve patients' experiences with home haemodialysis, more research based on patients' experiences is needed and it is necessary to involve the patients in the development of the care. PMID:25587441

  10. Contextual determinants of US nursing home racial/ethnic diversity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jullet A; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Lapane, Kate L; Laberge, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We hypothesized that for-profit/chain affiliated nursing homes, those in states with higher Medicaid reimbursement, and those in more competitive markets would have greater resident racial/ethnic diversity than nursing homes not meeting these criteria. Using 2004 Online Survey, Certification and Reporting data, Minimum Data Set, Lewis Mumford Center for Comparative Urban and Regional Research data, and the Area Resource File, we included U.S. Medicare/Medicaid certified nursing homes (N = 8950) located in 310 Metropolitan Statistical Areas. The dependent variable quantified facility-level multiracial diversity. Ordinary least squares regression showed support for the hypothesized relationships: for-profit/chain affiliated nursing homes were more diverse than nursing homes in all other ownership/chain member categories, while higher Medicaid per-diem rates, greater residential diversity, and stronger market competition were also positively associated with nursing home racial/ethnic composition. Results suggest there is room for policy changes to achieve equitable access to all levels of nursing home services for minority elders. PMID:24581072

  11. Contextual determinants of US nursing home racial/ethnic diversity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jullet A; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Lapane, Kate L; Laberge, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We hypothesized that for-profit/chain affiliated nursing homes, those in states with higher Medicaid reimbursement, and those in more competitive markets would have greater resident racial/ethnic diversity than nursing homes not meeting these criteria. Using 2004 Online Survey, Certification and Reporting data, Minimum Data Set, Lewis Mumford Center for Comparative Urban and Regional Research data, and the Area Resource File, we included U.S. Medicare/Medicaid certified nursing homes (N = 8950) located in 310 Metropolitan Statistical Areas. The dependent variable quantified facility-level multiracial diversity. Ordinary least squares regression showed support for the hypothesized relationships: for-profit/chain affiliated nursing homes were more diverse than nursing homes in all other ownership/chain member categories, while higher Medicaid per-diem rates, greater residential diversity, and stronger market competition were also positively associated with nursing home racial/ethnic composition. Results suggest there is room for policy changes to achieve equitable access to all levels of nursing home services for minority elders.

  12. Removing Mold from Your Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mitigation Planning Hazus High Water Mark Initiative Home Hurricane Katrina Incident Management Assistance Teams Independent Study Program ... Flood-Damaged Home After natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods, excess moisture and standing water ...

  13. Connecting to the Internet Securely; Protecting Home Networks CIAC-2324

    SciTech Connect

    Orvis, W J; Krystosek, P; Smith, J

    2002-11-27

    With more and more people working at home and connecting to company networks via the Internet, the risk to company networks to intrusion and theft of sensitive information is growing. Working from home has many positive advantages for both the home worker and the company they work for. However, as companies encourage people to work from home, they need to start considering the interaction of the employee's home network and the company network he connects to. This paper discusses problems and solutions related to protection of home computers from attacks on those computers via the network connection. It does not consider protection of those systems from people who have physical access to the computers nor does it consider company laptops taken on-the-road. Home networks are often targeted by intruders because they are plentiful and they are usually not well secured. While companies have departments of professionals to maintain and secure their networks, home networks are maintained by the employee who may be less knowledgeable about network security matters. The biggest problems with home networks are that: Home networks are not designed to be secure and may use technologies (wireless) that are not secure; The operating systems are not secured when they are installed; The operating systems and applications are not maintained (for security considerations) after they are installed; and The networks are often used for other activities that put them at risk for being compromised. Home networks that are going to be connected to company networks need to be cooperatively secured by the employee and the company so they do not open up the company network to intruders. Securing home networks involves many of the same operations as securing a company network: Patch and maintain systems; Securely configure systems; Eliminate unneeded services; Protect remote logins; Use good passwords; Use current antivirus software; and Moderate your Internet usage habits. Most of these items

  14. Home Making Around the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This book is designed to aid American home economists sent to other countries on technical assistance programs and home economists of other countries responsible for beginning such programs focused on the home and family. The information describes the pioneering experience of trained people in many countries and some ways in which basic principles…

  15. Racial Inequalities in Home Ownership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Mary R.; Jackman, Robert W.

    1980-01-01

    Throughout the United States, the probability of home ownership is considerably lower for Blacks than for Whites who are comparable in terms of socioeconomic characteristics, family composition, and location. Outside the South, Black owner-occupied homes are worth considerably less than the homes of comparable Whites. (Author/GC)

  16. Home Education: A Human Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The right of parents to home educate is sometimes described as a "human right." Underlying this "rights claim" is the perception that attempts to restrict home education are both unnecessary and dangerous. "Unnecessary," because home education does not harm children or deprive them of the right to education and "dangerous," because parental…

  17. The New American Home 2011

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-01

    The New American Home® is built annually as a showcase home for the International Builders’ Show® to demonstrate innovative technologies, construction techniques, products, and design trends for the homebuilding industry to use in any new or remodeled home.

  18. Guide to Home Energy Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    A proper home energy assessment (also called a home energy audit) will tell you how much energy you use in your house, the most cost-effective measures you can take to improve the energy efficiency of your home, and how to save money on energy bills.

  19. Integrated working between residential care homes and primary care: a survey of care homes in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Older people living in care homes in England have complex health needs due to a range of medical conditions, mental health needs and frailty. Despite an increasing policy expectation that professionals should operate in an integrated way across organisational boundaries, there is a lack of understanding between care homes and the National Health Service (NHS) about how the two sectors should work together, meaning that residents can experience a poor "fit" between their needs, and services they can access. This paper describes a survey to establish the current extent of integrated working that exists between care homes and primary and community health and social services. Methods A self-completion, online questionnaire was designed by the research team. Items on the different dimensions of integration (funding, administrative, organisational, service delivery, clinical care) were included. The survey was sent to a random sample of residential care homes with more than 25 beds (n = 621) in England in 2009. Responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results The survey achieved an overall response rate of 15.8%. Most care homes (78.7%) worked with more than one general practice. Respondents indicated that a mean of 14.1 professionals/ services (other than GPs) had visited the care homes in the last six months (SD 5.11, median 14); a mean of .39 (SD.163) professionals/services per bed. The most frequent services visiting were district nursing, chiropody and community psychiatric nurses. Many (60%) managers considered that they worked with the NHS in an integrated way, including sharing documents, engaging in integrated care planning and joint learning and training. However, some care home managers cited working practices dictated by NHS methods of service delivery and priorities for care, rather than those of the care home or residents, a lack of willingness by NHS professionals to share information, and low levels of respect for

  20. Why Hospitals and Payers are Recommending Home Care Upon Discharge Instead of SNF or Traditional Home Health Services--Alternative Payment Model Hospital Incentives Aligning with Patient Choice.

    PubMed

    Luke, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Seniors and other hospital patients in the United States have traditionally had the option of being discharged to a skilled nursing facility (convalescent home) for post-acute services, or home with nursing and therapy services provided in the home setting. Traditionally, these home based services have been referred to as "home health." As more Americans have retired, home health services have expanded and are readily accessible. This growth put tremendous stress on the Medicare fund which pays for senior care services. However, "Home Care," which traditionally has been viewed as non-medical home based services, has also become a booming industry for the cost conscious in recent years as more Americans reach retirement age. With the passing of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, providers and payers are now finding themselves responsible for post-acute care and continuous patient health, so cost efficient solutions for post-acute care are thriving. For the first time in history, American hospitals and Insurers are recognizing Home Care as an effective model that achieves the Triple Aim of Health Care reform. Home Care, which is no longer completely non-medical services, has proven to be an integral part of the care continuum for seniors in recent years and is now becoming a viable solution for keeping patients well, while still honoring their desire to age and heal at home. This paper analyzes the benefits and risks of home care and provides a clear understanding as to why American hospitals are emphasizing SNF Avoidance and skipping home health, opting instead to refer patients directly to home care as the preferred discharge solution in a value based model. PMID:27180473

  1. Why Hospitals and Payers are Recommending Home Care Upon Discharge Instead of SNF or Traditional Home Health Services--Alternative Payment Model Hospital Incentives Aligning with Patient Choice.

    PubMed

    Luke, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Seniors and other hospital patients in the United States have traditionally had the option of being discharged to a skilled nursing facility (convalescent home) for post-acute services, or home with nursing and therapy services provided in the home setting. Traditionally, these home based services have been referred to as "home health." As more Americans have retired, home health services have expanded and are readily accessible. This growth put tremendous stress on the Medicare fund which pays for senior care services. However, "Home Care," which traditionally has been viewed as non-medical home based services, has also become a booming industry for the cost conscious in recent years as more Americans reach retirement age. With the passing of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, providers and payers are now finding themselves responsible for post-acute care and continuous patient health, so cost efficient solutions for post-acute care are thriving. For the first time in history, American hospitals and Insurers are recognizing Home Care as an effective model that achieves the Triple Aim of Health Care reform. Home Care, which is no longer completely non-medical services, has proven to be an integral part of the care continuum for seniors in recent years and is now becoming a viable solution for keeping patients well, while still honoring their desire to age and heal at home. This paper analyzes the benefits and risks of home care and provides a clear understanding as to why American hospitals are emphasizing SNF Avoidance and skipping home health, opting instead to refer patients directly to home care as the preferred discharge solution in a value based model.

  2. HomeBank: An Online Repository of Daylong Child-Centered Audio Recordings.

    PubMed

    VanDam, Mark; Warlaumont, Anne S; Bergelson, Elika; Cristia, Alejandrina; Soderstrom, Melanie; De Palma, Paul; MacWhinney, Brian

    2016-05-01

    HomeBank is introduced here. It is a public, permanent, extensible, online database of daylong audio recorded in naturalistic environments. HomeBank serves two primary purposes. First, it is a repository for raw audio and associated files: one database requires special permissions, and another redacted database allows unrestricted public access. Associated files include metadata such as participant demographics and clinical diagnostics, automated annotations, and human-generated transcriptions and annotations. Many recordings use the child-perspective LENA recorders (LENA Research Foundation, Boulder, Colorado, United States), but various recordings and metadata can be accommodated. The HomeBank database can have both vetted and unvetted recordings, with different levels of accessibility. Additionally, HomeBank is an open repository for processing and analysis tools for HomeBank or similar data sets. HomeBank is flexible for users and contributors, making primary data available to researchers, especially those in child development, linguistics, and audio engineering. HomeBank facilitates researchers' access to large-scale data and tools, linking the acoustic, auditory, and linguistic characteristics of children's environments with a variety of variables including socioeconomic status, family characteristics, language trajectories, and disorders. Automated processing applied to daylong home audio recordings is now becoming widely used in early intervention initiatives, helping parents to provide richer speech input to at-risk children. PMID:27111272

  3. HomeBank: An Online Repository of Daylong Child-Centered Audio Recordings.

    PubMed

    VanDam, Mark; Warlaumont, Anne S; Bergelson, Elika; Cristia, Alejandrina; Soderstrom, Melanie; De Palma, Paul; MacWhinney, Brian

    2016-05-01

    HomeBank is introduced here. It is a public, permanent, extensible, online database of daylong audio recorded in naturalistic environments. HomeBank serves two primary purposes. First, it is a repository for raw audio and associated files: one database requires special permissions, and another redacted database allows unrestricted public access. Associated files include metadata such as participant demographics and clinical diagnostics, automated annotations, and human-generated transcriptions and annotations. Many recordings use the child-perspective LENA recorders (LENA Research Foundation, Boulder, Colorado, United States), but various recordings and metadata can be accommodated. The HomeBank database can have both vetted and unvetted recordings, with different levels of accessibility. Additionally, HomeBank is an open repository for processing and analysis tools for HomeBank or similar data sets. HomeBank is flexible for users and contributors, making primary data available to researchers, especially those in child development, linguistics, and audio engineering. HomeBank facilitates researchers' access to large-scale data and tools, linking the acoustic, auditory, and linguistic characteristics of children's environments with a variety of variables including socioeconomic status, family characteristics, language trajectories, and disorders. Automated processing applied to daylong home audio recordings is now becoming widely used in early intervention initiatives, helping parents to provide richer speech input to at-risk children.

  4. American Academy of Home Care Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletter Certification/Training Donate Featured Members Home Care Medicine in America The American Academy of Home Care ... Resources with the American Academy of Home Care Medicine. The American Academy of Home Care Medicine understands ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: aceruloplasminemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Miyajima H. Cys-881 is essential for the trafficking and secretion of truncated mutant ceruloplasmin in aceruloplasminemia. ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  7. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  8. Home-Based School Teachers in Afghanistan: Teaching for Tarbia and Student Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Jackie; Winthrop, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    Teachers in community-based or home-based schools in Afghanistan play a critical role in extending access to education to children who are unable to access the government schools, especially girls. These teachers--men and women--are nominated by the community to teach, without necessarily having teaching experience or even completing their own…

  9. Hydropathy at Home:

    PubMed Central

    Marland, Hilary; Adams, Jane

    2009-01-01

    This article explores domestic practices of hydropathy in Britain, suggesting that these formed a major contribution to the popularity of the system in the mid-nineteenth century. Domestic hydropathy was encouraged by hydropathic practitioners in their manuals and in the training they provided at their establishments. We argue that hydropathy can be seen as belonging to two interacting spheres, the hydro and the home, and was associated with a mission to encourage self-healing practices as well as commercial interests. Home treatments were advocated as a follow-up to attendance at hydros and encouraged as a low-cost option for those unable to afford such visits. Domestic hydropathy emphasized the high profile of the patient and was depicted as being especially appropriate for women, though in many households it appears to have been a common concern between husbands and wives. PMID:19801794

  10. Home versus hospital confinement

    PubMed Central

    Barry, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    The case for hospital rather than home delivery has been powerfully argued, especially in and since the Report of the Peel Committee. Nevertheless, evidence of comparison with other countries, notably the Netherlands, suggests the choice is not necessarily simple. Some general practitioner units are now reporting perinatal mortality rates which are consistently lower than those of specialist units, and recent statistical analyses suggest that the presence of more high risk cases in consultant units does not explain this. The only big controlled home-versus-hospital trial did not lead to a significantly lower perinatal mortality rate in the hospital group. The onus of proof now seems to lie with those who advocate 100 per cent hospital confinement. PMID:7373581

  11. Rolling Back Medicare Home Health

    PubMed Central

    Komisar, Harriet L.

    2002-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 included major changes to Medicare's home health benefit designed to control spending and promote efficient delivery of services. Using national data from Medicare home health claims, this study finds the initial effect of the BBA was to steeply reduce use of the home health benefit and intensify its focus on post-acute skilled nursing and therapy services. The striking responsiveness of home health agencies (HHAs) to altered financial incentives suggests that we may again see large shifts in patterns of care under the new incentives of Medicare's prospective payment system (PPS) for home health. PMID:12690694

  12. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance. PMID:26154352

  13. AGIO gets new home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Association of Geoscientists for International Development (AGID), in February, opened new global headquarters at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) in Bangkok, Thailand. Prinya Nutalaya is AGID's president.Housed in AIT's geotechnical division, AGID leaves its old home in Caracas, Venezuela. The former secretariat, under the direction of Alirio Bellizzia, now operates as a regional office for Latin America and the Caribbean. A new regional office for Africa also has been established at Ahmadu Bello University in Nigeria.

  14. Homing pigeons develop local route stereotypy.

    PubMed

    Meade, Jessica; Biro, Dora; Guilford, Tim

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms used by homing pigeons (Columba livia) to navigate homeward from distant sites have been well studied, yet the mechanisms underlying navigation within, and mapping of, the local familiar area have been largely neglected. In the local area pigeons pote ntially have access to a powerful navigational aid--a memorized landscape map. Current opinion suggests that landmarks are used only to recognize a familiar start position and that the goalward route is then achieved solely using compass orientation. We used high-resolution global positioning system (GPS) loggers to track homing pigeons as they became progressively familiar with a local homing task. Here, we demonstrate that birds develop highly stereotyped yet individually distinctive routes over the landscape, which remain substantially inefficient. Precise aerial route recapitulation implies close control by localized geocentric cues. Magnetic cues are unlikely to have been used, since recapitulation remains despite magnetic disruption treatment, and olfactory cues would have been positionally unstable under the variable wind conditions, making visual landmarks the most likely cues used. PMID:15875565

  15. [Update of enteral nutrition at the patient's home].

    PubMed

    García-Luna, P P; Parejo Campos, J; Fenoy Macías, J L

    1999-05-01

    Home enteral nutrition is the administration of enteral formulae into the digestive tract using a tube, with the objective of preventing or correcting malnutrition patients who are seen at home. Home enteral nutrition is a type of nutritional support that is growing, that improves the nutritional status of the patient with a lower cost and with a greater quality of life of the family unit than enteral nutrition in the hospital. The prevalence is clearly increasing although the data of the national registers of patients with at home enteral nutrition are under estimated. Patients who are candidates for home enteral nutrition can be all those with an indication for enteral nutrition and whose underlying disease is stabilized or does not require all the technical means of the hospital in a permanent and essential manner. Neoplasias and neurological diseases are those that benefit most from at home enteral nutrition and in all registries each group varies between 30 and 40%. All access routes and all enteral nutrition formulae can be used in patients with home enteral nutrition. The use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomies is ever more recommended in patients who need at home enteral nutrition for a period longer than 4 weeks. Since the publication of the Ministerial Order of June 2nd 1998, home enteral nutrition is considered a health care service that can be covered by the Social Security. This order lists a series of disease that are likely to be treated with at home enteral nutrition (in our opinion the list is not complete but it is likely to be changed in the future by an Assessing Committee), and it presents some basic norms that all patients must comply with, regardless of the autonomous community in which they live. Before beginning at home enteral nutrition the training of the patient and/or the family with regard to the management of at home enteral nutrition is essential. The existence of qualified personnel with experience in this nutritional support

  16. Hepatitis C therapy at home: a hospital and home care partnership.

    PubMed

    Jack, Kate; Barnett, Jenn; Holiday, Amanda; Heard, Greeba; Thomson, Brian

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant public health threat in the UK, and is both underdiagnosed and undertreated. The treatment episode takes between 12 and 48 weeks. In the UK, HCV management is undertaken in secondary and tertiary centres. This does not meet the needs of all patients; they may have to travel long distances, incur travel costs, wait a long time to be seen and negotiate time off work while not divulging their illness. Providing care at home can increase patients' access to and acceptability of treatment, especially in areas remote from specialist centres. This paper describes the feasibility, safety and efficacy of treating HCV infected patients at home by a partnership between secondary care and an clinical home care company. The home care model had a significantly higher attendance rate than the clinic model. It allowed the trust to improve care at no extra cost. This model can optimise specialist nurses' time, allowing them to focus on patients with more complex needs. PMID:23752623

  17. Manufactured Homes Tool

    2005-03-09

    The MH Tool software is designed to evaluate existing and new manufactured homes for structural adequacy in high winds. Users define design elements of a manufactured home and then select the hazard(s) for analysis. MH Tool then calculates and reports structural analysis results for the specified design and hazard Method of Solution: Design engineers input information (geometries, materials, etc.) describing the structure of a manufactured home, from which the software automatically creates a mathematical model.more » Windows, doors, and interior walls can be added to the initial design. HUD Code loads (wind, snow loads, interior live loads, etc.) are automatically applied. A finite element analysis is automatically performed using a third party solver to find forces and stresses throughout the structure. The designer may then employ components of strength (and cost) most appropriate for the loads that must be carried at each location, and then re-run the analysis for verification. If forces and stresses are still within tolerable limits (such as the HUD requirements), construction costs would be reduced without sacrificing quality.« less

  18. Home advantage in professional tennis.

    PubMed

    Koning, Ruud H

    2011-01-01

    Home advantage is a pervasive phenomenon in sport. It has been established in team sports such as basketball, baseball, American football, and European soccer. Attention to home advantage in individual sports has so far been limited. The aim of this study was to examine home advantage in professional tennis. Match-level data are used to measure home advantage. The test used is based on logit models, and consistent specification is addressed explicitly. Depending on the interpretation of home advantage, restrictions on the specification of the model need to be imposed. We find that although significant home advantage exists for men, the performance of women tennis players appears to be unaffected by home advantage.

  19. Chemists, Access, Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2000-06-01

    New JCE Internet Feature at JCE Online Biographical Snapshots of Famous Chemists is a new JCE Internet feature on JCE Online. Edited by Barbara Burke, this feature provides biographical information on leading chemists, especially women and minority chemists, fostering the attitude that the practitioners of chemistry are as human as those who endeavor to learn about it. Currently, the column features biographical "snapshots" of 30 chemists. Each snapshot includes keywords and bibliography and several contain links to additional online information about the chemist. More biographical snapshots will appear in future installments. In addition, a database listing over 140 women and minority chemists is being compiled and will be made available online with the snapshots in the near future. The database includes the years of birth and death, gender and ethnicity, major and minor discipline, keywords to facilitate searching, and references to additional biographical information. We welcome your input into what we think is a very worthwhile resource. If you would like to provide additional biographical snapshots, see additional chemists added to the database, or know of additional references for those that are already in the database, please contact JCE Online or the feature editor. Your feedback is welcome and appreciated. You can find Biographical Snapshots of Famous Chemists starting from the JCE Online home page-- click the Features item under JCE Internet and then the Chemist Bios item. Access JCE Online without Name and Password We have recently been swamped by libraries requesting IP-number access to JCE Online. With the great benefit IP-number authentication gives to librarians (no user names and passwords to administer) and to their patrons (no need to remember and enter valid names and passwords) this is not surprising. If you would like access to JCE Online without the need to remember and enter a user name and password, you should tell your librarian about our

  20. Pediatric Home Sleep Apnea Testing: Slowly Getting There!

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui-Leng; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric OSA can result in significant neurocognitive, behavioral, cardiovascular, and metabolic morbidities. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are, therefore, of paramount importance. The current gold standard for diagnosis of OSA in children is in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG). Home sleep apnea testing has been considered as an alternative as it is potentially more cost effective, convenient, and accessible. This review concentrates mainly on the use of type 2 and 3 portable monitoring devices. The current evidence on the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of home testing in the diagnosis of pediatric OSA was examined. Overall, the evidence in children is limited. Feasibility studies that have been performed have on the whole shown good results, with several reporting > 90% of their home recordings as meeting predetermined quality criteria regarding signal artifact and minimum recording time. The limited data comparing type 2 studies with in-laboratory PSG have shown no significant differences in respiratory parameters. The results pertaining to diagnostic accuracy of type 3 home sleep apnea testing devices are conflicting. Although more research is needed, home testing with at least a type 3 portable monitor offers a viable alternative in the diagnosis of otherwise healthy children with moderate to severe OSA, particularly in settings where access to polysomnography is scarce or unavailable. Of note, since most studies have been performed in habitually snoring healthy children, home sleep apnea testing may not be applicable to children with other comorbid conditions. In particular, CO2 monitoring is important in children in whom there is concern regarding nocturnal hypoventilation, such as children with neuromuscular disease, underlying lung disease, or obesity hypoventilation, and most home testing devices do not include a transcutaneous or end-tidal CO2 channel.

  1. Investigating the Perceptions and Behaviors of Elementary Students and Teachers when Internet Access is Universal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinson, Janice M

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a preliminary investigation into changes in the perceptions and behaviors of teachers and students when all have universal Internet access at home and school using Internet-on-TV technology. Four hundred fourth-grade students and their teachers from seven schools participated in the WISH TV (WorldGate Internet School to Home)…

  2. Survey-based Indices for Nursing Home Quality Incentive Reimbursement

    PubMed Central

    Willemain, Thomas R.

    1983-01-01

    Incentive payments are a theoretically appealing complement to nursing home quality assurance systems that rely on regulatory enforcement. However, the practical aspects of incentive program design are not yet well understood. After reviewing the rationale for incentive approaches and recent State and. Federal initiatives, the article considers a basic program design issue: creating an index of nursing home quality. It focuses on indices constructed from routine licensure and certification survey results because State initiatives have relied heavily on these readily accessible data. It also suggests a procedure for creating a survey-based index and discusses a sampling of Implementation issues. PMID:10309858

  3. Nursing home bed capacity in the States, 1978-86

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Charlene; Swan, James H.; Grant, Leslie A.

    1988-01-01

    Trends in nursing home bed supply in the States show large variations in beds per population and a gradual decline in supply per aged population. A cross-sectional time-series regression analysis was used to examine some factors associated with nursing home bed supply. Variation was accounted for by economic factors, supply of alternative services, and climate. State Medicaid reimbursement rates had negative coefficients, with supply suggesting States may be increasing rates to improve access where supply is limited. Medicaid waiver policy was not found to be significant. PMID:10312634

  4. Medicaid payment policies for nursing home care: A national survey

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Robert J.; Madel, R. Peter; Persons, Dan

    1991-01-01

    This research gives a comprehensive overview of the nursing home payment methodologies used by each State Medicaid program. To present this comprehensive overview, 1988 data were collected by survey from 49 States and the District of Columbia. The literature was reviewed and integrated into the study to provide a theoretical framework to analyze the collected data. The data are organized and presented as follows: payment levels, payment methods, payment of capital-related costs, and incentives in nursing home payment. We conclude with a discussion of the impact these different methodologies have on program cost containment, quality, and recipient access. PMID:10114935

  5. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  6. The Data Rescue @ Home Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickler, A.; Allan, R.; Valente, M. A.; Tinz, B.; Brönnimann, S.

    2012-04-01

    Climate science as a whole as well as reanalyses as a special case can significantly profit from the recovery, imaging and digitisation of historical observations. The importance of this fact is reflected in large, global data rescue projects and initiatives such as the Atmospheric Circulation Reconstructions over the Earth (ACRE, www.met-acre.org) or the EU FP7 ERA-CLIM project (www.era-clim.eu). From the time before 1957, there are still large amounts of surface data e.g. from former colonies and from overseas territories of European countries )e.g. Portugal, France and Germany) that need to be rescued. Also in case of the very early upper-air observations before the 1930s, even Europe and North America still hold an important quantity of data to be recovered in digital form. Here, we present the web platform "Data Rescue @ Home" (www.data-rescue-at-home.org), which has been developed at ETH Zurich and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, and which has been designed to take advantage of the voluntary assistance of the thousands of people on the web who are interested in climate or old weather data. On the website, these volunteers can enter meteorological data shown on digital images into entry masks that resemble the original. By registering, the users get access to their personal digitisation statistics and help optimising the project. At the moment, 4 digitisation projects are online: One project is dealing with German upper-air data from the Second World War period. In a second project, station data from Tulagi (Solomon Islands) is being digitised. Finally, two collaborative projects have been included: One in cooperation with the Instituto Dom Luiz (Univ. Lisbon, Portugal), where Portuguese station data from Angra (Azores) is digitised, and a further one in cooperation with the German Meteorological Service (DWD), in which precipitation data from former German colonies is being digitised. On our poster, we will report on the status of the projects

  7. On Using Home Networks and Cloud Computing for a Future Internet of Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayer, Heiko; Holz, Ralph; Pahl, Marc-Oliver; Carle, Georg

    In this position paper we state four requirements for a Future Internet and sketch our initial concept. The requirements: (1) more comfort, (2) integration of home networks, (3) resources like service clouds in the network, and (4) access anywhere on any machine. Future Internet needs future quality and future comfort. There need to be new possiblities for everyone. Our focus is on higher layers and related to the many overlay proposals. We consider them to run on top of a basic Future Internet core. A new user experience means to include all user devices. Home networks and services should be a fundamental part of the Future Internet. Home networks extend access and allow interaction with the environment. Cloud Computing can provide reliable resources beyond local boundaries. For access anywhere, we also need secure storage for data and profiles in the network, in particular for access with non-personal devices (Internet terminal, ticket machine, ...).

  8. Patients' experiences of telerehabilitation at home after shoulder joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Lisbeth; Lindström, Britta; Ekenberg, Lilly

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the experience of ten patients who received video-based physiotherapy at home for two months after a shoulder joint replacement. Videoconferencing took place via the patient's home broadband connection at a bandwidth of 256-768 kbit/s. Qualitative interviews were carried out, transcribed and analysed. Through qualitative content analysis six categories were identified: (1) a different reinforced communication; (2) pain-free exercising as an effective routine; (3) from a dependent patient to a strengthened person at home; (4) closeness at a distance; (5) facilitated daily living; and (6) continuous physiotherapy chain. The access to bodily knowledge, continuity, collaboration and being at home were all aspects that contributed to the patients' recovery. The patients described experiences of safety, and strengthening during their daily exercise routine at home. The frequent interplay with the patient during telerehabilitation made it possible for the physiotherapist to make an individual judgement about each patient; this could be one reason for the positive findings. Home video-based physiotherapy may be useful in other kinds of physiotherapy. PMID:21075802

  9. Vascular access hemorrhages contribute to deaths among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Katherine D; Palekar, Rakhee S; Lucero, Cynthia A; Kurkjian, Katherine M; Chai, Shua J; Schlossberg, Dana S; Vincenti, Donna M; Fink, Jeffrey C; Davies-Cole, John O; Magri, Julie M; Arduino, Matthew J; Patel, Priti R

    2012-09-01

    In 2007 the Maryland Medical Examiner noted a potential cluster of fatal vascular access hemorrhages among hemodialysis patients, many of whom died outside of a health-care setting. To examine the epidemiology of fatal vascular access hemorrhages, we conducted a retrospective case review in District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia from January 2000 to July 2007 and a case-control study. Records from the Medical Examiner and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services were reviewed, from which 88 patients were identified as fatal vascular access hemorrhage cases. To assess risk factors, a subset of 20 cases from Maryland was compared to 38 controls randomly selected among hemodialysis patients who died from non-vascular access hemorrhage causes at the same Maryland facilities. Of the 88 confirmed cases, 55% hemorrhaged from arteriovenous grafts, 24% from arteriovenous fistulas, and 21% from central venous catheters. Of 82 case-patients with known location of hemorrhage, 78% occurred at home or in a nursing home. In the case-control analysis, statistically significant risk factors included the presence of an arteriovenous graft, access-related complications within 6 months of death, and hypertension; presence of a central venous catheter was significantly protective. Psychosocial factors and anticoagulant medications were not significant risk factors. Effective strategies to control vascular access hemorrhage in the home and further delineation of warning signs are needed.

  10. Alert management for home healthcare based on home automation analysis.

    PubMed

    Truong, T T; de Lamotte, F; Diguet, J-Ph; Said-Hocine, F

    2010-01-01

    Rising healthcare for elder and disabled people can be controlled by offering people autonomy at home by means of information technology. In this paper, we present an original and sensorless alert management solution which performs multimedia and home automation service discrimination and extracts highly regular home activities as sensors for alert management. The results of simulation data, based on real context, allow us to evaluate our approach before application to real data.

  11. Energy access and sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Alstone, Peter; Gershenson, Dimitry

    2015-03-01

    With 1.4 billion people lacking electricity to light their homes and provide other basic services, or to conduct business, and all of humanity (and particularly the poor) are in need of a decarbonized energy system can close the energy access gap and protect the global climate system. With particular focus on addressing the energy needs of the underserved, we present an analytical framework informed by historical trends and contemporary technological, social, and institutional conditions that clarifies the heterogeneous continuum of centralized on-grid electricity, autonomous mini- or community grids, and distributed, individual energy services. We find that the current day is a unique moment of innovation in decentralized energy networks based on super-efficient end-use technology and low-cost photovoltaics, supported by rapidly spreading information technology, particularly mobile phones. Collectively these disruptive technology systems could rapidly increase energy access, contributing to meeting the Millennium Development Goals for quality of life, while simultaneously driving action towards low-carbon, Earth-sustaining, energy systems.

  12. Easy access to firearms: juveniles' risks for violent offending and violent victimization.

    PubMed

    Ruback, R Barry; Shaffer, Jennifer N; Clark, Valerie A

    2011-07-01

    Keeping firearms at home may increase personal safety but it may also increase the risk of injury. This study uses data from three waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to assess the extent to which adolescents' easy access to firearms at home increases the risk of violent offending and violent victimization. Access to firearms was higher for males, Whites, and adolescents having two parents, especially fathers. Current access to firearms at home significantly increased the odds of both violent offending and violent victimization, even after controlling for prior access, prior offending, and prior victimization. This relationship persisted into early adulthood; access to firearms still significantly increased the odds of violent offending and violent victimization.

  13. Convents as homes.

    PubMed

    Arias, Enrique Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The present article discusses convents as homes. Resulting from the study of a Gregorian source presently housed at DePaul University's Richardson library, this article probes the complexities and restrictions of convent life in 17th century Spain. The Sanctoral de Visperas (1653) functions as a backdrop for a consideration of how singing chant and attendant rituals enriched the lives of nuns. Also included are references to nuns from this period who were outstanding musicians and poets and whose works have recently received enthusiastic attention. PMID:16556588

  14. Convents as homes.

    PubMed

    Arias, Enrique Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The present article discusses convents as homes. Resulting from the study of a Gregorian source presently housed at DePaul University's Richardson library, this article probes the complexities and restrictions of convent life in 17th century Spain. The Sanctoral de Visperas (1653) functions as a backdrop for a consideration of how singing chant and attendant rituals enriched the lives of nuns. Also included are references to nuns from this period who were outstanding musicians and poets and whose works have recently received enthusiastic attention.

  15. Lighting Options for Homes.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, W.S.

    1991-04-01

    This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

  16. Factor substitution in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Cawley, John; Grabowski, David C; Hirth, Richard A

    2006-03-01

    This paper studies factor substitution in one important sector: the nursing home industry. Specifically, we measure the extent to which nursing homes substitute materials for labor when labor becomes relatively more expensive. From a policy perspective, factor substitution in this market is important because materials-intensive methods of care are associated with greater risks of morbidity and mortality among nursing home residents. Studying longitudinal data from 1991 to 2000 on nearly every nursing home in the United States, we use the method of instrumental variables (IV) to address measurement error in nursing home wages. The results from the IV models yield evidence of factor substitution: higher nursing home wages are associated with greater use of psychoactive drugs and lower quality.

  17. Data sharing between home care professionals: a feasibility study using the RAI Home Care instrument

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Across Ontario, home care professionals collect standardized information on each client using the Resident Assessment for Home Care (RAI-HC). However, this information is not consistently shared with those professionals who provide services in the client’s home. In this pilot study, we examined the feasibility of sharing data, from the RAI-HC, between care coordinators and service providers. Methods All participants were involved in a one-day training session on the RAI-HC. The care coordinators shared specific outputs from the RAI-HC, including the embedded health index scales, with their contracted physiotherapy and occupational therapy service providers. Two focus groups were held, one with care coordinators (n = 4) and one with contracted service providers (n = 6). They were asked for their opinions on the positive aspects of the project and areas for improvement. Results The focus groups revealed a number of positive outcomes related to the project including the use of a falls prevention brochure and an increased level of communication between professionals. The participants also cited multiple areas for improvement related to data sharing (e.g., time constraints, data being sent in a timely fashion) and to their standard practices in the community (e.g., busy workloads, difficulties in data sharing, duplication of assessments between professionals). Conclusions Home care professionals were able to share select pieces of information generated from the RAI-HC system and this project enhanced the level of communication between the two groups of professionals. However, a single information session was not adequate training for the rehabilitation professionals, who do not use the RAI-HC as part of normal practice. Better education, ongoing support and timely access to the RAI-HC data are some ways to improve the usefulness of this information for busy home care providers. PMID:24975375

  18. University Access for Disadvantaged Children: A Comparison across Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrim, John; Vignoles, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider whether certain countries are particularly adept (or particularly poor) at getting children from disadvantaged homes to study for a bachelor's degree. A series of university access models are estimated for four English-speaking countries (England, Canada, Australia and the USA), which include controls for comparable…

  19. 24 CFR 9.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, also shall meet... alternative method to meet the needs of that current or prospective tenant. Nothing in this section shall...

  20. Middle School Students' Perceived Access to Cigarettes in Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speizer, Ilene S.; Bean, Melanie K.; Obando, Patricia; Fries, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine correlates of perceived access to cigarettes at home, school, and the store among youth. Methods: Virginia middle school youth were surveyed before beginning tobacco prevention programs. Multivariate analyses examined household smoking, peer smoking, and perceived community tobacco use for their relationship to perceived…

  1. Access to Books: A Scaffolded Program Creates Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTague, Becky; Abrams, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    A summer reading program for disadvantaged, urban elementary school students provided scaffolded access to books by constructing a book-rich environment, as well as giving supportive strategy instruction for choosing and using reading materials. The program culminated in a book-buying experience in which students chose books for home libraries.…

  2. Home-Based Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... do when I don't have access to physical therapy? While VEDA does not recommend doing vestibular exercises ... already existing ringing Fluid discharge from your ears Pain and ... try a general low-impact and balance-strengthening fitness program. The more ...

  3. Energy 101: Home Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    A home energy checkup helps owners determine where their house is losing energy and money - and how such problems can be corrected to make the home more energy efficient. A professional technician - often called an energy auditor - can give your home a checkup. You can also do some of the steps yourself. Items shown here include checking for leaks, examining insulation, inspecting the furnace and ductwork, performing a blower door test and using an infrared camera.

  4. Energy 101: Home Energy Assessment

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A home energy checkup helps owners determine where their house is losing energy and money - and how such problems can be corrected to make the home more energy efficient. A professional technician - often called an energy auditor - can give your home a checkup. You can also do some of the steps yourself. Items shown here include checking for leaks, examining insulation, inspecting the furnace and ductwork, performing a blower door test and using an infrared camera.

  5. Studying "exposure" to firearms: household ownership v access

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, R; Dahlberg, L; Kresnow, M; Sacks, J; Mercy, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: Firearm ownership has often been used to measure access to weapons. However, persons who own a firearm may not have access to it and conversely, persons who do not own a firearm may be able to access one quickly. Objectives: To examine whether using firearm ownership is a reasonable proxy for access by describing the demographic characteristics associated with ownership and access. Methods: Data are from the 1994 Injury Control and Risk Survey, a national, random digit dial survey. Information about household firearm ownership and ready access to a loaded firearm were collected and weighted to provide national estimates. Adjusted odds ratios for three separate models were calculated using logistic regression. Results: A total of 1353 (27.9%) respondents reported both having a firearm in the household and ready access to one. An additional 313 respondents (8.1%) reported having a firearm, but were not able to access these weapons. Another 421 respondents (7.2%) did not have a firearm in or around their home, yet reported being able to retrieve and fire one within 10 minutes. Based on the logistic regression findings, the demographic characteristics of this latter group are quite different from those who report ownership. Those who do not have a firearm, but report ready access to one, are more likely to be ethnic minorities, single, and living in attached homes. Conclusions: Asking only about the presence of a firearm in a household may miss some respondents with ready access to a loaded firearm. More importantly, those who do not own a firearm, but report ready access to one, appear to be qualitatively different from those who report ownership. Caution should be exercised when using measures of ownership as a proxy for access. PMID:12642560

  6. The possible function of positive reinforcement in home-bound agoraphobia: a case study.

    PubMed

    O'Donohue, W; Plaud, J J; Hecker, J E

    1992-12-01

    We conducted an uncontrolled case study (ABA design) based upon the hypothesis that the behavior of a home-bound agoraphobic is at least partially maintained by positive reinforcement in the home and that a disruption of access to home-based reinforcement would lead to an increased frequency of out-of-the-home behavior. Data concerning the types and amounts of behavior engaged in by the subject within the confines of her home and yard were gathered during a 30-day base line period. In addition, potential reinforcers in the home were identified by a survey schedule and by self-report of time allocation. During an 18-day intervention period the subject agreed only to engage in certain reinforcing activities outside her home (e.g., only watching television at a neighbor's house). Postintervention results indicated that for the first time in over 7 years the subject began engaging in out-of-home activities, including walking to other parts of the street, visiting several neighbors' homes, and attending parties at neighbors' homes. Moreover, data suggested a positive trend in time spent outside the yard during both 2 and 18 month follow-up periods. However, significant restrictions in the range of mobility were still observed.

  7. Medical Conditions and Healthcare Utilization among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Group Homes in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Joel M.; Botuck, Shelly; Damiani, Marco R.; Levy, Philip H.; Dern, Thomas A.; Freeman, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    The shift in living situations for adults with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (IDDD) from family homes to group homes has raised questions about their healthcare needs and access to appropriate healthcare services. This study was undertaken to describe the disability characteristics and medical conditions in a sample of adults…

  8. Home Literacy Environments and Foundational Literacy Skills for Struggling and Nonstruggling Readers in Rural Early Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tichnor-Wagner, Ariel; Garwood, Justin D.; Bratsch-Hines, Mary; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Factors such as weak early literacy skills and living in poverty may put young students at risk for reading disabilities. While home literacy activities and access to literacy materials have been associated with positive reading outcomes for urban and suburban students, little is known about home literacy environments of rural early elementary…

  9. Home Assessment and Remediation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Charles S; Horner, W Elliott; Kennedy, Kevin; Grimes, Carl; Miller, J David

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the relationship of fungi to asthma in indoor air is very old and well documented. There is substantial evidence that mold and dampness exacerbate asthma in sensitized individuals. Many governmental and nongovernmental organizations around the world have issued guidelines to the effect that the elimination of moisture intrusion and the removal of moldy items from living space can improve respiratory health. The process of home assessment for moisture and mold presence is discussed along with factors that can be used to guide fungal exposure reduction efforts. An approach to the assessment process itself is outlined, and common causes of moisture and mold damage are described. Points that should be included in a report resulting from a home assessment and rudimentary elements of report interpretation are discussed. Emphasis is that interpretation of sampling for moisture and fungal presence should be provided by the person performing the assessment. We conclude that multifaceted remediation contributes to fungal allergen avoidance. The use of an indoor environmental professional to generate evaluation reports and remediation activities can be a valuable contribution to an overall allergen avoidance strategy.

  10. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  11. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  12. Open Access and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shawn; Schmidt, Christian; Das, Chhaya; Tucker, Philip W

    2006-01-01

    Uncensored exchange of scientific results hastens progress. Open Access does not stop at the removal of price and permission barriers; still, censorship and reading disabilities, to name a few, hamper access to information. Here, we invite the scientific community and the public to discuss new methods to distribute, store and manage literature in order to achieve unfettered access to literature. PMID:16956402

  13. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  14. Home advantage in Greek football.

    PubMed

    Armatas, Vasilis; Pollard, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Home advantage as it relates to team performance at football was examined in Superleague Greece using nine seasons of game-by-game performance data, a total of 2160 matches. After adjusting for team ability and annual fluctuations in home advantage, there were significant differences between teams. Previous findings regarding the role of territorial protection were strengthened by the fact that home advantage was above average for the team from Xanthi (P =0.015), while lower for teams from the capital city Athens (P =0.008). There were differences between home and away teams in the incidence of most of the 13 within-game match variables, but associated effect sizes were only moderate. In contrast, outcome ratios derived from these variables, and measuring shot success, had negligible effect sizes. This supported a previous finding that home and away teams differed in the incidence of on-the-ball behaviours, but not in their outcomes. By far the most important predictor of home advantage, as measured by goal difference, was the difference between home and away teams in terms of kicked shots from inside the penalty area. Other types of shots had little effect on the final score. The absence of a running track between spectators and the playing field was also a significant predictor of goal difference, worth an average of 0.102 goals per game to the home team. Travel distance did not affect home advantage.

  15. Home advantage in Greek football.

    PubMed

    Armatas, Vasilis; Pollard, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Home advantage as it relates to team performance at football was examined in Superleague Greece using nine seasons of game-by-game performance data, a total of 2160 matches. After adjusting for team ability and annual fluctuations in home advantage, there were significant differences between teams. Previous findings regarding the role of territorial protection were strengthened by the fact that home advantage was above average for the team from Xanthi (P =0.015), while lower for teams from the capital city Athens (P =0.008). There were differences between home and away teams in the incidence of most of the 13 within-game match variables, but associated effect sizes were only moderate. In contrast, outcome ratios derived from these variables, and measuring shot success, had negligible effect sizes. This supported a previous finding that home and away teams differed in the incidence of on-the-ball behaviours, but not in their outcomes. By far the most important predictor of home advantage, as measured by goal difference, was the difference between home and away teams in terms of kicked shots from inside the penalty area. Other types of shots had little effect on the final score. The absence of a running track between spectators and the playing field was also a significant predictor of goal difference, worth an average of 0.102 goals per game to the home team. Travel distance did not affect home advantage. PMID:24533517

  16. [eLearning service for home palliative care].

    PubMed

    Sakuyama, Toshikazu; Komatsu, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Daisuke; Fukushima, Osamu

    2008-12-01

    In order to support the home palliative care learning, we made the eLearning service for home palliative care (beta version) and tried to teach the palliative care to the medical staffs in the community. The various learners (such as nurses, pharmacists and the like) accessed to the online learning and used this eLearning service. After the learners finished eLearning for home palliative care, some questionnaires were distributed to the learners and analyzed by us. The analysis of questionnaires revealed that almost all were satisfied with our eLearning services. Especially the learners were not only interested in using the skills of opioids and the management of pain control, but they had a good cognition for the usage of opioids. PMID:20443298

  17. Residents' choice of and control over food in care homes.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Susan

    2009-04-01

    This study aimed to map food pathways in care homes to identify how residents exercised choice and control over their food intake and any associated or influencing factors. Four homes were visited, interviews were conducted with chefs and nursing staff and the dining facilities were noted. It was found that residents were dependent on the care home for the provision of food. There was almost no direct contact between residents and external food retailers. A food map was constructed, which identified three routes for potential improvements in practice: supply and delivery of food; serving of food; and consumption of food. Residents' choice and control over food could be improved through the design of new products for serving and consumption of food and eating aids, access to local food retailers and nutritional training. PMID:19363950

  18. Home Monitoring: what can we expect in the future?

    PubMed

    Deharo, J-C; Djiane, P

    2006-01-01

    The Home Monitoring of implanted cardiac rhythm management devices developed by Biotronik (Berlin, Germany) is a new useful tool for monitoring patients. Home Monitoring provides access to technical and clinical data, allowing almost continuous patient surveillance. The implanted defibrillators and pacemakers transmit encrypted messages, which are automatically analyzed in the Home Monitoring Service Center and sent to the physician. The expected benefit of this kind of data transmission is an improvement in patient follow-up and early detection of changes in the rhythmologic state of the patient. However, these new tools raise several questions, which will require an answer in the nearest future. These questions focus on safety and economic aspects, and on the liability of the physician and the manufacturer. Technological improvement is also expected.

  19. HoCaMA: Home Care Hybrid Multiagent Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile, Juan A.; Bajo, Javier; Abraham, Ajith; Corchado, Juan M.

    Home Care is one of the main objectives of Ambient Intelligence. Nowadays, the disabled and elderly population, which represents a significant part of our society, requires novel solutions for providing home care in an effective way. In this chapter, we present HoCaMA, a hybrid multiagent architecture that facilitates remote monitoring and care services for disabled patients at their homes. HoCaMA combines multiagent systems and Web services to facilitate the communication and integration with multiple health care systems. In addition, HoCaMA focuses on the design of reactive agents capable of interacting with different sensors present in the environment, and incorporates a system of alerts through SMS and MMS mobile technologies. Finally, it uses Radio Frequency IDentification and JavaCard technologies to provide advanced location and identification systems, as well as automatic access control facilities. HoCaMA has been implemented in a real environment and the results obtained are presented within this chapter.

  20. Reliability and validity of the Healthy Home Survey: A tool to measure factors within homes hypothesized to relate to overweight in children

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Maria J; Ward, Dianne S; Hales, Derek; Vaughn, Amber; Tabak, Rachel G; Stevens, June

    2008-01-01

    Background The contribution of the environment to the obesity epidemic is well recognized. Parents have control over their home environment and can, therefore, support healthy dietary and activity habits in their children by manipulating factors such as access to energy-dense foods, availability of physical activity equipment, and restricting screen time. This paper describes the development of the Healthy Home Survey and its reliability and validity. The Healthy Home Survey was designed to assess characteristics of the home environment that are hypothesized to influence healthy weight behaviors in children including diet and physical activity. Methods We recruited 85 families with at least one child between 3–8 years. The Healthy Home Survey was administered to parents via telephone and repeated in a random sample of 45 families after 7 days. In-home observations were performed within 14 days of the first Healthy Home Survey interview. Percent agreement, Kappa statistics, Intra-class correlation coefficients and sensitivity analyses were used to evaluate reliability and validity evidence. Results Reliability and validity estimates for the Healthy Home Survey were varied, but generally high (0.22–1.00 and 0.07–0.96 respectively), with lower scores noted for perishable foods and policy items. Lower scores were likely related to actual change in the perishable foods present and the subjective nature or clarity of policy questions and response categories. Conclusion Initial testing demonstrated that the Healthy Home Survey is a feasible, reliable, and valid assessment of the home environment; however, it has also highlighted areas that need improvement. The Healthy Home Survey will be useful in future research exploring the relationship between the home environment and child weight. PMID:18442392

  1. Family and home characteristics correlate with mold in homes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously, we demonstrated that infants exposed to higher Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value homes were more likely to develop asthma by age seven. The purpose of this analysis was to determine what family and home characteristics were associated with higher ER...

  2. Healthcare professionals' experiences with EHR-system access control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Faxvaag, Arild; Johansen, Trond S; Heimly, Vigdis; Melby, Line; Grimsmo, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Access control mechanisms might influence on the information seeking and documentation behavior of clinicians. In this study, we have surveyed healthcare professionals in nursing homes and hospitals on their attitudes to, and experiences with using access control mechanisms. In some situations, the access control mechanisms of the EHR system made clinicians postpone documentation work. Their practice of reading what others have documented was also influenced. Not all clinicians logged out of the system when they left a workstation, and some clinicians reported to do some of their documentation work in the name of others. The reported practices might have implications for the safety of the patient.

  3. Telecommuting (Work-At-Home) at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinidhi, Saragur M.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents a study in evaluating the viability of providing a work-at-home (telecommuting) program for Lewis Research Center's corporate employees using Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN). Case studies have been presented for a range of applications from casual data access to interactive access. The network performance of telemedia applications were studied against future requirements for such level of remote connectivity. Many of the popular ISDN devices were characterized for network and service functionality. A set of recommendations to develop a telecommuting policy have been proposed.

  4. Seven theses on pigeon homing deduced from empirical findings

    PubMed

    Wallraff

    1996-01-01

    Experimental findings obtained in recent years make it possible to recognize and distinguish the most relevant components determining homing flights of displaced pigeons. Conclusions deduced from these experiments, more or less compelling or tentative, are presented in the form of seven theses, supplemented by several subtheses along with reference to empirical data. The principal theses are as follows. (1) Passively displaced pigeons find the way home by using location-dependent signals and not by path integration based on recording of motion. Pigeons are able to home, even from unfamiliar areas, without access to potentially useful information during transport to the release site. (2) Home-related orientation of pigeons in unfamiliar areas requires positional information acquired olfactorily from atmospheric trace gases. Empirically deduced details of olfactory navigation are enumerated (connection with winds and the sun, inaccuracy, spatial range, time course of sampling and memorizing spatial information, etc.). The critical gap in our knowledge, i.e. the nature and spatio-temporal distribution of the substances involved, is provisionally filled by speculation. (3) In familiar areas, known from previous flights, the visual landscape is used additionally to find the way home. (4) Initial orientation of pigeons does not exclusively reflect home-related navigation but includes components independent of the position with respect to home. Observed bearings are co-determined by a general preference for a certain compass direction and by distracting features of the nearby landscape. (5) Proportions among components controlling initial orientation according to theses 2-4 are highly variable depending on local, temporal and experimental conditions and on the life histories of the pigeons. This complexity greatly restricts recognition of the navigationally relevant components of behaviour at a given release site. (6) Sensory inputs, being neither olfactory nor visual, do

  5. Manufactured Home Testing in Simulated and Naturally Occurring High Winds

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson

    2006-08-01

    A typical double-wide manufactured home was tested in simulated and naturally occurring high winds to understand structural behavior and improve performance during severe windstorms. Seven (7) lateral load tests were conducted on a double-wide manufactured home at a remote field test site in Wyoming. An extensive instrumentation package monitored the overall behavior of the home and collected data vital to validating computational software for the manufactured housing industry. The tests were designed to approach the design load of the home without causing structural damage, thus allowing the behavior of the home to be accessed when the home was later exposed to high winds (to 80-mph). The data generally show near-linear initial system response with significant non-linear behavior as the applied loads increase. Load transfer across the marriage line is primarily compression. Racking, while present, is very small. Interface slip and shear displacement along the marriage line are nearly insignificant. Horizontal global displacements reached 0.6 inch. These tests were designed primarily to collect data necessary to calibrate a desktop analysis and design software tool, MHTool, under development at the Idaho National Laboratory specifically for manufactured housing. Currently available analysis tools are, for the most part, based on methods developed for “stick built” structures and are inappropriate for manufactured homes. The special materials utilized in manufactured homes, such as rigid adhesives used in the connection of the sheathing materials to the studs, significantly alter the behavior of manufactured homes under lateral loads. Previous full scale tests of laterally loaded manufactured homes confirm the contention that conventional analysis methods are not applicable. System behavior dominates the structural action of manufactured homes and its prediction requires a three dimensional analysis of the complete unit, including tiedowns. This project was

  6. Committee Opinion No. 669 Summary: Planned Home Birth.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    In the United States, approximately 35,000 births (0.9%) per year occur in the home. Approximately one fourth of these births are unplanned or unattended. Although the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists believes that hospitals and accredited birth centers are the safest settings for birth, each woman has the right to make a medically informed decision about delivery. Importantly, women should be informed that several factors are critical to reducing perinatal mortality rates and achieving favorable home birth outcomes. These factors include the appropriate selection of candidates for home birth; the availability of a certified nurse-midwife, certified midwife or midwife whose education and licensure meet International Confederation of Midwives' Global Standards for Midwifery Education, or physician practicing obstetrics within an integrated and regulated health system; ready access to consultation; and access to safe and timely transport to nearby hospitals. The Committee on Obstetric Practice considers fetal malpresentation, multiple gestation, or prior cesarean delivery to be an absolute contraindication to planned home birth. PMID:27454729

  7. Designing of smart home automation system based on Raspberry Pi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Ravi Prakash; Singh, Bhanu Pratap; Sharma, Mahesh Kumar; Wattanawisuth, Nattapol; Leeprechanon, Nopbhorn

    2016-03-01

    Locally networked or remotely controlled home automation system becomes a popular paradigm because of the numerous advantages and is suitable for academic research. This paper proposes a method for an implementation of Raspberry Pi based home automation system presented with an android phone access interface. The power consumption profile across the connected load is measured accurately through programming. Users can access the graph of total power consumption with respect to time worldwide using their Dropbox account. An android application has been developed to channelize the monitoring and controlling operation of home appliances remotely. This application facilitates controlling of operating pins of Raspberry Pi by pressing the corresponding key for turning "on" and "off" of any desired appliance. Systems can range from the simple room lighting control to smart microcontroller based hybrid systems incorporating several other additional features. Smart home automation systems are being adopted to achieve flexibility, scalability, security in the sense of data protection through the cloud-based data storage protocol, reliability, energy efficiency, etc.

  8. Does quality influence consumer choice of nursing homes? Evidence from nursing home to nursing home transfers.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Richard A; Banaszak-Holl, Jane C; Fries, Brant E; Turenne, Marc N

    2003-01-01

    We estimated Cox proportional hazards models using assessment data from the Minimum Data Set to test whether nursing home residents and their proxies respond to quality of care by changing providers. Various indicators of poor quality increased the likelihood of transfer. Residents of for-profit homes or homes with excess capacity also were more likely to transfer. Inability to participate in care decisions and factors indicating frailty limited residents' ability to transfer. The apparent responsiveness to quality is encouraging. Nonetheless, because the absolute transfer rate is low, significant barriers to movement among nursing homes still may exist. PMID:15055834

  9. Nursing Home Nomads: A Study of Transfers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retsinas, Joan

    Researchers have divided nursing home residents into long-stayers and short-stayers. While long-stayers rarely return home, they do not necessarily stay long in one institution. Instead, they may transfer from nursing home to nursing home. Although many studies have examined the impact of relocation on nursing home residents, few studies have…

  10. The Patient-Centered Medical Home: How Is It Related to Quality and Equity Among the General Adult Population?

    PubMed

    Reibling, Nadine

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates whether patient-reported characteristics of the medical home are associated with improved quality and equity of preventive care, advice on health habits, and emergency department use. We used adjusted risk ratios to examine the association between medical home characteristics and care measures based on the 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Medical home characteristics are associated with 6 of the 11 outcome measures, including flu shots, smoking advice, exercise advice, nutrition advice, all advice, and emergency department visits. Educational and income groups benefit relatively equally from medical home characteristics. However, compared with insurance and access to a provider, medical home characteristics have little influence on overall disparities in care. In sum, our findings support that medical home characteristics can improve quality and reduce emergency visits but we find no evidence that medical home characteristics alleviate disparities in care.

  11. The virtual dental home: implications for policy and strategy.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Paul; Harrington, Maureen; Mertz, Elizabeth; Namakian, Maysa

    2012-07-01

    Widely recognized problems with the U.S. health care system, including rapidly increasing costs and disparities in access and outcomes also exist in oral health. If oral health systems are to meet the "Triple Aim" of improving the experience of care, improving the health of populations, and reducing per capita costs of health care, new and innovative strategies will be needed including new regulatory, delivery, and financing systems. The virtual dental home is one such system.

  12. Transferring PACE Assessments Upon Home Sale

    SciTech Connect

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Coughlin, Jason; Fuller, Merrian; Zimring, Mark

    2010-04-12

    A significant barrier to investing in renewable energy and comprehensive energy efficiency improvements to homes across the country is the initial capital cost. Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing this upfront cost issue. Recently, the White House cited PACE programs as an important element of its 'Recovery through Retrofit' plan. The residential PACE model involves the creation of a special clean energy financing district that homeowners elect to opt into. Once opted in, the local government (usually at the city or county level) finances the upfront investment of the renewable energy installation and/or energy efficiency improvements. A special lien is attached to the property and the assessment is paid back as a line item on the property tax bill. As of April 2010, 17 states have passed legislation to allow their local governments to create PACE programs, two already have the authority to set up PACE programs, and over 10 additional states are actively developing enabling legislation. This policy brief analyzes one of the advantages of PACE, which is the transferability of the special assessment from one homeowner to the next when the home is sold. This analysis focuses on the potential for the outstanding lien to impact the sales negotiation process, rather than the legal nature of the lien transfer itself. The goal of this paper is to consider what implications a PACE lien may have on the home sales negotiation process so that it can be addressed upfront rather than risk a future backlash to PACE programs. If PACE programs do expand at a rapid rate, the chances are high that there will be other cases where prospective buyers uses PACE liens to negotiate lower home prices or require repayment of the lien as a condition of sale. As a result, PACE programs should highlight this issue as a potential risk factor for the sake of full disclosure. A good example of this

  13. Home Schooling in Rural Nebraska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robert L.; Cruzeiro, Patricia; Holz, Jan

    1999-01-01

    A 1996-97 survey of 40 home schooling families in rural Nebraska examined family characteristics, parents' social and political attitudes, the rationale for home schooling, curriculum and supplementary materials, children's opportunities for social experiences, rural characteristics, parents' educational attitudes, and support from extended…

  14. School Plus Home = Student Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Nancy; Santos, Ricardo Sotelo

    This handbook was developed to serve as a point of reference in identifying potential dropout problems. Included are several crucial recommendations for establishing an effective partnership between home and school that will help children succeed in school. Recommendations focus on preventive action in the classroom and at home. Artwork and…

  15. Reading Practices in Singapore Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mee, Cheah Yin; Gan, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Conducted a pilot questionnaire study on Singaporean family reading practices. Found that in the majority of homes, the mother initiated reading of mostly fictional material borrowed from public libraries. Reading aloud to children occurred in about one-third of homes, with direct reading instruction occurring in over two-thirds of families. Found…

  16. Coordinated Home Care Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. Home Care Training Center.

    This manual is intended as a source of information and assistance in the planning, organization, implementation, and evaluation of home care programs. There are ten major sections: (1) Introduction (review of the history of home care and definition of pertinent terms), (2) Program Planning, (3) Organizational Structure, (4) Coordination and…

  17. Legal Aspects of Home Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrere, Thomas A.

    The nationwide phenomenon of home instruction is meeting resistance from state compulsory school attendance laws, resulting in many court cases in recent years. Parents who choose to teach their children at home may do so on moral or religious grounds, or because they consider public schools too conservative or traditional. State compulsory…

  18. Home Education: Constructions of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Families who choose to home educate generally do so due to dissatisfaction with school-based education. Common perceptions of home educators oscillate between images of the "tree-hugging hippy" and the "religious fanatic". Whilst attempting to go beyond such stereotypical dichotomies, this paper will examine three very…

  19. Home Economics Career Preparation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCuiston, Wendy; Stevens, Sarah; Mathieson, Mary

    This handbook is designed to help secondary education teachers in Texas to conduct courses in a broad range of occupationally-specific training options in home economics. These programs usually include general related instruction, specific related instruction, and work-based instruction for careers in home economics areas. The handbook is divided…

  20. Families, Homes and Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Phillip G.

    2005-01-01

    The findings from a study of how Green families construct and practise versions of an environmental ethic and ecopolitic in the home are suggestive of how environmental education in schools might be revised. In this study, the green home proved to be a very different form of environmental education and practice of sustainability. Children's…

  1. Home Education: The Social Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Christian W.

    2010-01-01

    Data from a Norwegian survey show correlation between a student's socially related problems at school and the parent's social motivation for home education. I argue that more time spent at school by a student could result in more socially related problems at school, which can explain an increase in social motivation for home education.

  2. Precision zero-home locator

    DOEpatents

    Stone, William J.

    1986-01-01

    A zero-home locator includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home location is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.

  3. The Effectiveness of Home Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Charles B.

    Home study as an effective method of adult education is discussed. Results of several major university research studies are cited and examples of the use of home study by labor unions, professional and trade groups, the federal government, and the armed services are presented. Support for the method by legislative and regulatory bodies (such as…

  4. Home Education: Practising without Prejudice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothermel, Paula Jane

    2010-01-01

    In this article has been extracted from a longer paper by the same name that came about in response to the Badman Review of Elective Home Education (Badman 2009). The first part briefly discusses the Badman Review. The next looks at the misunderstandings that can occur once concerns are raised in home education. Finally there are case studies…

  5. Housing and Home Furnishings Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    These sixty-seven modules provide student materials for a home economics course in housing and home furnishings. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately--see note.) Each module contains an objective, student information, learning activities (and activity sheets as needed), student self-checks, student self-check answers, check-out…

  6. The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodkin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) is a collaboration of public and private organizations which work to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of home visiting services throughout the state. The HVC identified service needs and gaps and has focused on increasing the interagency state and local partnerships so that resources are…

  7. Home Study Course Development Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Michael P., Ed.; Welch, Sally R., Ed.

    Intended for independent study directors, course authors, and directors of home based or distance learning projects, this collection of current, practical guides on correspondence course development contains fourteen chapters authored by practicing home study educators and experts in their field. From Theory to Practice lists steps in course…

  8. Early Childhood Education at Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Mary JoAnn

    Outlined is a Title III early childhood at home project which involves a team approach to the education of 40 handicapped and 75 nonhandicapped rural, disadvantaged children, their parents, and/or babysitters in West Virginia. It is noted that four teams consisting of a teacher and paraprofessionals visit homes to instruct baby sitters or parents…

  9. Home Education: Then and Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Elective Home Education is a legal, minority approach to the compulsory education of children. I review the potential contribution of the historical analysis of "domestic pedagogies", presented in this Special Issue, for home education practice in the UK. By drawing on narratives of a period at the cusp of the perceived normalcy of…

  10. Compulsory Attendance vs. Home Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Jerry C.

    Most states require compulsory attendance of students through age 16. Challenges to the compulsory attendance laws often derive from disputes between parents and school officials over home instruction. This paper reviews prominent court cases that address legal issues pertaining to home schooling. The landmark case of "Pierce v. Society of…

  11. Human factors and ergonomics in home care: Current concerns and future considerations for health information technology

    PubMed Central

    Or, Calvin K.L.; Valdez, Rupa S.; Casper, Gail R.; Carayon, Pascale; Burke, Laura J.; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2010-01-01

    Sicker patients with greater care needs are being discharged to their homes to assume responsibility for their own care with fewer nurses available to aid them. This situation brings with it a host of human factors and ergonomic (HFE) concerns, both for the home care nurse and the home dwelling patient, that can affect quality of care and patient safety. Many of these concerns are related to the critical home care tasks of information access, communication, and patient self-monitoring and self-management. Currently, a variety of health information technologies (HITs) are being promoted as possible solutions to those problems, but those same technologies bring with them a new set of HFE concerns. This paper reviews the HFE considerations for information access, communication, and patients self-monitoring and self-management, discusses how HIT can potentially mitigate current problems, and explains how the design and implementation of HIT itself requires careful HFE attention. PMID:19713630

  12. Chapter 6: Children's Environmental Access in Relation to Motor Competence, Physical Activity, and Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Heather E.; Woods, Amelia Mays; Woods, Martha K.; Castelli, Darla M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine levels of physical activity engagement, motor competence, and physical fitness as related to child access to physical activity facilities in the home and school environments. The present investigation attempts to further efforts to examine the relationship between physical activity levels and access.…

  13. Gambling and the Multidimensionality of Accessibility: More than Just Proximity to Venues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Anna Christina; Bates, Glen; Moore, Susan; Kyrios, Michael; Meredyth, Denise; Jessop, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Accessibility to gambling has been linked to gambling behaviour but remains poorly understood. This study used data from semi-structured focus groups and interviews with 38 participants (Median age 42 years) to explore wider aspects of accessibility. People preferred venues which were open long hours and located close to home, work or regular…

  14. Language in Epistemic Access: Mobilising Multilingualism and Literacy Development for More Equitable Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerfoot, Caroline; Simon-Vandenbergen, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article is the guest editors' introduction to the special issue "Language in Epistemic Access: Mobilising Multilingualism and Literacy Development for More Equitable Education in South Africa". The issue offers complementary perspectives on improving epistemic access for all learners but especially those whose home language…

  15. Phenotype and seed production among hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus L. Sweet) accessions rescued using hydroponic techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyacinth bean, Lablab purpureus L. (Sweet) is a legume used as a vegetable, forage, and in home gardens as an ornamental plant. Many accessions do not flower during their juvenile period in Byron, GA. Other hyacinth bean accessions produce few seed when regenerated in the field. This study was condu...

  16. Child injury: Does home matter?

    PubMed

    Osborne, Jodie M; Davey, Tamzyn M; Spinks, Anneliese B; McClure, Roderick J; Sipe, Neil; Cameron, Cate M

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between home risk and hospital treated injury in Australian children up to five years old. Women with children between two and four years of age enrolled in the Environments for Healthy Living (EFHL): Griffith Birth Cohort Study were invited to complete a Home Injury Prevention Survey from March 2013 to June 2014. A total home risk score (HRS) was calculated and linked to the child's injury related state-wide hospital emergency and admissions data and EFHL baseline demographic surveys. Data from 562 households relating to 566 child participants were included. We found an inverse relationship between home risk and child injury, with children living in homes with the least injury risk (based on the absence of hazardous structural features of the home and safe practices reported) having 1.90 times the injury rate of children living in high risk homes (95% CI 1.15-3.14). Whilst this appears counter-intuitive, families in the lowest risk homes were more likely to be socio-economically disadvantaged than families in the highest risk homes (more sole parents, lower maternal education levels, younger maternal age and lower income). After adjusting for demographic and socio-economic factors, the relationship between home risk and injury was no longer significant (p > 0.05). Our findings suggest that children in socio-economically deprived families have higher rates of injury, despite living in a physical environment that contains substantially fewer injury risks than their less deprived counterparts. Although measures to reduce child injury risk through the modification of the physical environment remain an important part of the injury prevention approach, our study findings support continued efforts to implement societal-wide, long term policy and practice changes to address the socioeconomic differentials in child health outcomes. PMID:26928586

  17. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  18. Relationships between energy balance knowledge and the home environment.

    PubMed

    Slater, Megan E; Sirard, John R; Laska, Melissa N; Pereira, Mark A; Lytle, Leslie A

    2011-04-01

    Certain aspects of the home environment as well as individuals' knowledge of energy balance are believed to be important correlates of various dietary and physical activity behaviors, but no known studies have examined potential relationships between these correlates. This study evaluated cross-sectional associations between characteristics of the home environment and energy balance knowledge among 349 youth/parent pairs recruited from the Minneapolis/St Paul, MN, metropolitan area from September 2006 to June 2007. Linear regression models adjusted for student grade and highest level of parental education were used to compare data from home food, physical activity, and media inventories (parent-reported) with energy balance knowledge scores from youth and parent questionnaires. Paired energy balance knowledge (average of youth and parent knowledge scores) was associated with all home food availability variables. Paired knowledge was also significantly associated with a media equipment availability and accessibility summary score (β=-1.40, P=0.005), as well as an activity-to-media ratio score (β=0.72, P=0.003). Youth and/or parent knowledge alone was not significantly associated with most characteristics of the home environment, supporting the importance of developing intervention strategies that target the family as a whole.

  19. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) Methodology: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.

    2011-11-01

    The test suite represents a set of cases applying the new Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) Methodology developed by NREL. (Judkoff et al. 2010a). The NREL team developed the test cases in consultation with the home retrofit industry (BESTEST-EX Working Group 2009), and adjusted the test specifications in accordance with information supplied by a participant with access to large utility bill datasets (Blasnik 2009).

  20. Home Energy Displays. Consumer Adoption and Response

    SciTech Connect

    LaMarche, Janelle; Cheney, K.; Akers, C.; Roth, K.; Sachs, O.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of this project was to investigate the factors influencing consumer adoption of Home Energy Displays (HEDs) and to evaluate electricity consumption in households with basic HEDs versus enhanced feedback methods - web portals or alerts. The team hypothesized that providing flexible and relatable information to users, in addition to a basic HED, would make feedback more effective and achieve persistent energy savings. In Phase I, Fraunhofer conducted three user research studies and found preferences for aesthetically pleasing, easy to understand feedback that is accessible through multiple media and offered free of charge. The deployment of HEDs in 150 households planned for Phase II encountered major recruitment and HED field deployment problems. In light of these challenges, the team is pursuing a modified study investigating the energy savings of a web portal versus alert-based energy feedback instead of a physical HED.